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  1. Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolkit No. 23 Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart What can taking aspirin do for me? If you are at high risk for or if you have heart disease, taking a low dose aspirin every day may help. Aspirin can also help ...

  2. Increased platelet expression of glycoprotein IIIa following aspirin treatment in aspirin-resistant but not aspirin-sensitive subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Christopher N; Goodman, Timothy; Becker, Silke; Chen, Nan; Mustafa, Agnesa; Schofield, Emma; Campbell, James; Ward, Malcolm; Sharma, Pankaj; Ferro, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Aims Aspirin is widely used as an anti-platelet agent for cardiovascular prophylaxis. Despite aspirin treatment, many patients experience recurrent thrombotic events, and aspirin resistance may contribute to this. We examined the prevalence of aspirin resistance in a healthy population, and investigated whether the platelet proteome differed in aspirin-resistant subjects. Methods Ninety-three healthy subjects received aspirin 300 mg daily for 28 days. Before and at the end of treatment, urine was taken to determine 11-dehydrothromboxane B2, and blood was taken to measure arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation of platelet-rich plasma and to interrogate the platelet proteome by mass spectrometric analysis with further confirmation of findings using Western blotting. Results In two of the 93 subjects, neither AA-induced aggregation nor urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 was effectively suppressed by aspirin, despite measurable plasma salicylate concentrations, suggesting the presence of true aspirin resistance. Despite no detectable differences in the platelet proteome at baseline, following aspirin a marked increase was seen in platelet glycoprotein IIIa expression in the aspirin-resistant but not aspirin-sensitive subjects. An increase in platelet glycoprotein IIIa expression with aspirin resistance was confirmed in a separate cohort of 17 patients with stable coronary artery disease on long term aspirin treatment, four of whom exhibited aspirin resistance. Conclusions In a healthy population, true aspirin resistance is uncommon but exists. Resistance is associated with an increase in platelet glycoprotein IIIa expression in response to aspirin. These data shed new light on the mechanism of aspirin resistance, and provide the potential to identify aspirin-resistant subjects using a novel biomarker. PMID:25099258

  3. Protective effect of aspirin treatment on mouse behavior in the acute phase of experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvero-Isidre, Arturo; Morínigo-Guayuán, Sergio; Meza-Ojeda, Aaron; Mongelós-Cardozo, Marcelo; Centurión-Wenninger, Claudia; Figueredo-Thiel, Susy; Sanchez, Diego F; Acosta, Nidia

    2018-01-01

    Chagas disease is a potentially fatal disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which can in some cases affect the central nervous system. The objective was to evaluate the effect of aspirin (ASA) in the behavior of mice infected with T. cruzi during the acute phase. This was an experimental study with random assignation. Twenty four BALB/c mice were divided into four groups of six animals each as follows: only ASA (OA), ASA before infection (BI), ASA after infection (AI) and only infection (OI). The strain used for infection was M/HOM/Bra/53/Y. An ASA dose of 100 mg/kg per day was administered 72 h before infection to BI group and the same dose 48 h after infection to AI group. Mice behavior in the open field test, mortality, and brain histopathology was evaluated. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, chi square test, and Kaplan-Meier with long-rank for survival analysis. In the open field test, the OA group has similar results with the BI group, in the variables of immobility and escape. Also, the OA group displayed significantly higher rates of micturition (p < 0.001) and defecation (p < 0.001) compared to infected groups. Mortality was higher in BI group (p = 0.02). The presence of T. cruzi amastigotes were higher in brain tissues of the AI and OI groups (p = 0.008). In conclusion, the administration of ASA before infection seemed to prevent behavioral changes induced by the acute infection, but it led to accelerated mortality. The study highlighted the potential importance of the pathways inhibited by ASA in the early hours of acute infection with T. cruzi.

  4. Apple polyphenol extracts protect against aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats.

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    Paturi, Gunaranjan; Butts, Christine A; Bentley-Hewitt, Kerry L; McGhie, Tony K; Saleh, Zaid S; McLeod, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    The protective role of two apple polyphenol extracts, Douglas-FB (FB) and Douglas-EF (EF), on gastric mucosal damage following aspirin ingestion was investigated in healthy rats. Polyphenol content of the apple extracts varied, with the EF extract having 20% w/w polyphenols and a high proportion of flavanols as epicatechin and procyanidin, whereas the FB extract comprised 12% w/w polyphenols, which were mostly flavonols as quercetin glycosides. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to control, FB and EF groups and fed the experimental diet during the 10-day trial. Control treatment rats received 1 mL of deionised water, whereas apple polyphenol treatment group rats, FB and EF received a concentration of 10(-2)  m polyphenols in 1 mL deionised water daily via oral gavage. At the end of 10-day feeding period, rats were fasted overnight, and the following morning, aspirin (200 mg/kg) was given by oral gavage. Four hours after aspirin administration, the animals were euthanised, and samples taken for analysis. Both apple polyphenol extracts significantly reduced the ulcer area, ulcer lesion index and gastric injury score. The glutathione in gastric mucosa was increased significantly in rats given FB apple extract. Despite their different polyphenol compositions, FB and EF apple extracts assisted in protecting the gastric mucosa following acute aspirin administration in rats. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. State of the Art: Medical treatment of aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD).

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    Ta, Von; Simon, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is characterized as adult onset asthma, nasal polyps, chronic rhinosinusitis, and hypersensitivity to a cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitor, viz aspirin or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The method for diagnosing AERD is with aspirin challenge, and treatment includes aspirin desensitization followed by continued daily aspirin. Although oral challenge has been the mainstay in the United States, lysyl-aspirin has been validated as a diagnostic tool for aspirin-sensitive asthma and will be discussed further in this article. The challenges with aspirin therapy surrounding endoscopy and perioperative aspirin therapy will be discussed. Additionally, daily aspirin therapy is not for everyone. Aspirin is relatively contraindicated in those with a history of gastrointestinal bleed and an absolute contraindication in pregnancy. Aspirin desensitization and subsequent treatment has been shown to be highly effective for AERD.

  6. The Protective Effect of Field Mint Leaves in Reducing Stomach Ulcer in Rats Induced by Aspirin

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    Vanitha Ratha Krisnan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stomach mucosal wall erosion is caused by the imbalance of the aggressive factors and mucosal defensive factors due to the common causes such as the side effect of consuming non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Field mint (Menthaarvensis leaves have been used as an alternative option to cure and prevent the gastric problems. The aim of this study was to analyze the protective effect of Field mint leaves infusion in reducing stomach ulcer in rats induced by Aspirin. Methods: The experimental study was conducted at Histology Laboratory of Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung. Sixteen rats were divided into 4 groups randomly: group I (control negative group, group II (control positive group, given 90mg/day Aspirin, group III (the treatment group, given 5cc of Field mint leaves infusion and 90 mg Aspirin and group IV (the treatment group, given 5.6µg of Misoprostol and 90 mg Aspirin. Mucosal wall erosions were determined by using microscope. Data were analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test (CI 95% and p-value<0.05 Results: Group II had high score of mucosal wall erosions after given only aspirin. In group III and IV, the score of mucosal wall erosions were low. However there was no difference in score of mucosal wall erosions between group III-IV (p<0.05 Conclusions: Field mint (Menthaarvensis leaves infusion is able to prevent stomach mucosal wall erosions induced by Aspirin as misoprostol does.

  7. Rivaroxaban or Aspirin for Extended Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitz, Jeffrey I; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Prins, Martin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although many patients with venous thromboembolism require extended treatment, it is uncertain whether it is better to use full- or lower-intensity anticoagulation therapy or aspirin. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study, we assigned 3396 patients with venous...... thromboembolism to receive either once-daily rivaroxaban (at doses of 20 mg or 10 mg) or 100 mg of aspirin. All the study patients had completed 6 to 12 months of anticoagulation therapy and were in equipoise regarding the need for continued anticoagulation. Study drugs were administered for up to 12 months...... in 17 of 1107 patients (1.5%) receiving 20 mg of rivaroxaban and in 13 of 1127 patients (1.2%) receiving 10 mg of rivaroxaban, as compared with 50 of 1131 patients (4.4%) receiving aspirin (hazard ratio for 20 mg of rivaroxaban vs. aspirin, 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20 to 0.59; hazard ratio...

  8. Aspirin treatment reduces platelet resistance to deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, S M; Smith, C M; Rao, G H; White, J G

    1987-01-01

    The present investigation has evaluated the influence of aspirin, its constituents, and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on the resistance of human platelets to aspiration into micropipettes. Aspirin increased the length of platelet extensions into the micropipette over the entire negative tension range of 0.04 to 0.40 dynes/cm after exposure to the drug in vitro or after ingestion of the agent. Other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, ibuprofen and indomethacin, did not increase platelet deformability. The influence of aspirin was mimicked to some degree by high concentrations of salicylic acid, but acetylation of platelets with acetic anhydride had little influence on platelet deformability. Incubation of platelets with both salicylic acid and acetic anhydride had no more effect than salicylic acid alone. Benzoic acid, chemically similar to salicylic acid, had a minimal effect. The studies demonstrate that aspirin makes platelets more deformable, while components of the drug or other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents and cyclooxygenase inhibitors do not have the same influence on resistance to deformation.

  9. Contemporary Reflections on the Safety of Long-Term Aspirin Treatment for the Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

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    Fanaroff, Alexander C.; Roe, Matthew T.

    2018-01-01

    Aspirin has been the cornerstone of therapy for the secondary prevention treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease since landmark trials were completed in the late 1970s and early 1980s that demonstrated the efficacy of aspirin for reducing the risk of ischemic events. Notwithstanding the consistent benefits demonstrated with apirin for both acute and chronic cardiovascular disease, there are a number of toxicities associated with aspirin that have been showcased by recent long-term clinical trials that have included an aspirin monotherapy arm. As an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, aspirin impairs gastric mucosal protective mechanisms. Prior trials have shown that up to 15–20% of patients developed gastrointestinal symptoms with aspirin monotherapy and roughly 1% of patients per year had a clinically significant bleeding event, including 1 in 1000 patients who suffered an intracranial or fatal bleed. These risks have been shown to be compounded for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), who are also treated with other anti-thrombotic agents during the acute care/procedural period, as well as for an extended time period afterwards. Given observations of substantial increases in bleeding rates from many prior long-term clinical trials that have evaluated aspirin together with other oral platelet inhibitors or oral anti-coagulants, the focus of contemporary research has pivoted towards tailored anti-thrombotic regimens that attempt to either shorten the duration of exposure to aspirin or replace aspirin with an alternative anti-thrombotic agent. While these shifts are occurring, the safety profile of aspirin when used for the secondary prevention treatment of patients with established cardiovascular disease deserves further consideration. PMID:27028617

  10. Rivaroxaban or Aspirin for Extended Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Prins, Martin H.; Bauersachs, Rupert; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Davidson, Bruce L.; Decousus, Hervé; Freitas, Maria C. S.; Holberg, Gerlind; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Haskell, Lloyd; van Bellen, Bonno; Pap, Akos F.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S.; Prandoni, Paolo; Bianchi, Alessandra; Brighton, Tim; Carroll, Patrick; Chong, Beng; Chunilal, Sanjeev; Coughlin, Paul; Curnow, Jennifer; Jackson, David; Tran, Huyen; Ward, Chris; Brodmann, Marianne; Kyrle, Paul; Marschang, Peter; Petkov, Ventzislav; Hainaut, Philippe; Jordens, Paul; Vandekerkhof, Jos; Wautrecht, Jean-Claude; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce; Correa, Joao; Cukier, Alberto; Freire, Antonio; Pereira, Adamastor; Porto, Carmen; Sacilotto, Roberto; Vasconcelos Costa, Agenor; Della Siega, Anthony; Dolan, Sean; Le Gal, Gré goire; Gross, Peter; Kahn, Susan; Kassis, Jeannine; Kovacs, Michael; Pesant, Yves; Ritchie, Bruce; Schulman, Sam; Shivakumar, Sudeep; Solymoss, Susan; Chang, Shu; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Zhong; Chen, Hong; Dai, Xiangchen; Fang, Baoming; Fu, Weiguo; Gao, Xinglin; Huang, Jinhua; Lai, Yanping; Li, Li; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Yiqing; Liu, Jinming; Liu, Shuang; Ma, Wenjiang; Ni, Songshi; Qin, Zhiqiang; Shi, Guochao; Tian, Hongyan; Wang, Shenming; Wang, Lie; Xiao, Wei; Ying, Kejing; Yu, Guanfeng; Yuan, Yadong; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Xinri; Zhang, Liyan; Zhu, Lei; Chlumský , Jaromir; Chochola, Jiri; Dunaj, Milna; Kovarova, Katerina; Lang, Pavel; Matoš ka, Petr; Podpera, Ivo; Spacek, Rudolf; Stehlikova, Olga; Brø nnum-Schou, Jens; Egstrup, Kenneth; Gislason, Gunnar; Jeppesen, Jorgen; May, Ole; Nielsen, Henrik; Wiggers, Henrik; Achkar, Antoine; Aquilanti, Sandro; Benhamou, Ygal; Brisot, Dominique; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Castella, Nadine; Elias, Antoine; Falvo, Nicolas; Ferrari, Emile; Lacroix, Philippe; Mahe, Isabelle; Meneveau, Nicolas; Messas, Emmanuel; Mismetti, Patrick; Montaclair, Karine; Mottier, Dominique; Moumneh, Thomas; Paleiron, Nicolas; Parent, Florence; Pernod, Gilles; Sanchez, Olivier; Schmidt, Jeannot; Simoneau, Guy; Stephan, Dominique; Amann, Berthold; Blessing, Erwin; Czihal, Michael; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Kahrmann, Gerd; Licka, Manuela; Neumeister, Axel; Schellong, Sebastian; Boda, Zoltan; Farkas, Katalin; Gurzo, Mihaly; Katona, Andras; Riba, Maria; Sipos, Gyula; Tó th, Kalman; Braester, Andrei; Elias, Mazen; Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Gavish, Dov; Hussein, Osamah; Lishner, Michael; Schiff, Elad; Spectre, Galia; Tzoran-Rozenthal, Inna; Zimlichman, Reuven; Ageno, Walter; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bova, Carlo; Garbelotto, Raffaella; Ghirarduzzi, Angelo; Imberti, Davide; Pesavento, Raffaele; Porreca, Ettore; Visonà , Adriana; Flota Cervera, Luis; Llamas Esperó n, Guillermo; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Daniel; Solis Morales, Lucas; Boersma, Willem; ten Cate, Hugo; Erdkamp, Franciscus; Grifioen-Keijzer, Anita; Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Meijer, Karina; Middeldorp, Saskia; Swart-Heikens, Janneke; ten Wolde, Marije; Westerweel, Peter; Braithwaite, Irene; Harper, Paul; Merriman, Eileen; Ockelford, Paul; Royle, Gordon; Smith, Mark; Ghanima, Waleed; Sandset, Per Morten; Abola, Maria; Chę ciń ski, Pawel; Grzelakowski, Pawel; Lewczuk, Jerzy; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Tomkowski, Witold; Abramov, Igor; Chechulov, Pavel; Karpenko, Andrey; Katelnitskiy, Ivan; Kazakov, Andrey; Makarova, Olga; Panchenko, Elizaveta; Sergeeva, Elena; Subbotin, Yuriy; Suchkov, Igor; Zeltser, Mikhail; Adler, David; Breedt, Johannes; Fourie, Nyda; Isaacs, Rashid; Jacobson, Barry; Siebert, Heidi; van Zyl, Louis; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kang, Seok-Min; Kim, Kye-Hun; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Kim, Dong-Ik; Min, Seung-Kee; Park, Ki Hyuk; Garcí a-Bragado Dalmau, Fernando; Gó mez Cerezo, Jorge; Mirete, Jose Carlos Ferrer; Riera, Antonio; del Toro, Jorge; Eriksson, Henry; Torstensson, Ingemar; Banyai, Martin; Baumgartner, Iris; Mazzolai, Lucia; Periard, Daniel; Righini, Marc; Staub, Daniel; Chiang, Chern-En; Chiu, Kuan-Ming; Pai, Pei-Ying; Angchaisuksiri, Pantep; Chansung, Kanchana; Ö ngen, Gul; Tuncay, Esin; Alikhan, Raza; Chetter, Ian; Kesteven, Patrick; Nokes, Tim; Bauer, Kenneth; Comerota, Anthony; Elias, Darlene; Garcia, David; Gibson, Kathleen; Ginsberg, Daniel; Jenkins, Jeffrey; Kingsley, Edwin; Lambert, Richard; Lyons, Roger; Pullman, John; Shah, Vinay; Smith, S. Wayne; Stein, Robert; Tapson, Victor; Walsh, John; Wang, Tzu-Fei; Do Loi, Doan; Do Quang, Huan; Pham, Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although many patients with venous thromboembolism require extended treatment, it is uncertain whether it is better to use full- or lower-intensity anticoagulation therapy or aspirin. METHODS In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study, we assigned 3396 patients with venous

  11. 'Aspirin resistance' or treatment non-compliance: Which is to blame for cardiovascular complications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantsila Eduard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aspirin is one of the 'cornerstone' drugs in our current management of cardiovascular disorders. However, despite the prescription of aspirin recurrent vascular events still occur in 10–20% of patients. These, data together with the observations of diminished antiaggregatory response to aspirin in some subjects have provided the basis of the current debate on the existence of so-called "aspirin resistance". Unfortunately, many of the tests employed to define 'aspirin resistance' lack sufficient sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility. The prevalence of 'aspirin resistance' as defined by each test varies widely, and furthermore, the value of a single point estimate measure of aspirin resistance is questionable. The rate of 'aspirin resistance' is law if patients observed to ingest aspirin, with large proportion of patients to be pseudo-'aspirin resistant', due to non-compliance. What are the implications for clinical practice? Possible non-adherence to aspirin prescription should also be carefully considered before changing to higher aspirin doses, other antiplatelet drugs (e.g. clopidogrel or even combination antiplatelet drug therapy. Given the multifactorial nature of atherothrombotic disease, it is not surprising that only about 25% of all cardiovascular complications can usually be prevented by any single medication. We would advocate against routine testing of platelet sensitivity to aspirin (as an attempt to look for 'aspirin resistance' but rather, to highlight the importance of clinicians and public attention to the problem of treatment non-compliance.

  12. [Aspirin and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancher, Adrien; Michel, Pierre; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Sefrioui, David

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a worldwide public health problem. Aspirin has been identified as a protective factor against the apparition of colorectal cancer. There are several mechanisms about the actions by aspirin on colorectal tumorogenesis. These are not perfectly known nowadays. On one hand, there are direct mechanisms on colorectal mucosa, on the other hand there are indirect mechanisms through platelet functions. Aspirin also plays a role by its anti-inflammatory action and the stimulation of antitumor immunity. Several studies show that long-term treatment with low-doses of aspirin decreases the incidence of adenomas and colorectal cancers. In the United States, aspirin is currently recommended for primary prevention of the risk of colorectal cancer in all patients aged 50 to 59, with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular event greater than 10 %. However, primary prevention with aspirin should not be a substitute for screening in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, aspirin seems to be beneficial when used in post-diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It could actually decrease the risk of metastasis in case of a localized colorectal cancer, and increase the survival in particular, concerning PIK3CA mutated tumors. The association of aspirin with neoadjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer by radiochimiotherapy seems to have beneficial effects. French prospective randomized study is currently being conducted to investigate postoperative aspirin in colorectal cancers with a PIK3CA mutation. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Biological properties of citral and its potential protective effects against cytotoxicity caused by aspirin in the IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzenna, Hafsia; Hfaiedh, Najla; Giroux-Metges, Marie-Agnès; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Talarmin, Hélène

    2017-03-01

    Citral, 3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienal, is a key component of several essential oils extracted from lemon-scented herbal plants. The present study was designed to investigate the antioxidant activities of citral and assess its possible protective effects against aspirin-induced toxicity in vitro. We used IEC-6 cells (rat small intestine epithelial cells). The antioxidant activities were determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), β-carotene/linoleic acid and Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). Cytotoxicity was evaluated by cell viability, anti-oxidant enzyme activities, malondialdehyde (MDA) production and by the expression of MAPKs (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases) pathways. According to results, citral showed an important antioxidant activity. It inhibited the oxidation of linoleic acid, a moderate DPPH was found and it showed a Ferric reducing antioxidant potential with an EC50 value of 125±28.86μg/mL. Then, the co-treatment of aspirin with citral significantly decreased the aspirin-induced cell death, and the MDA level. It modulated the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) activities. Also, the activation of MAPKs was attenuated by citral. These findings suggest that citral can protect IEC-6 cells against aspirin-induced oxidative stress that may help to discover new chemicals out of natural antioxidant substances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Once- versus twice-daily aspirin treatment in patients with essential thrombocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mads Lamm; Pedersen, Oliver Heidmann; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2018-01-01

    Insufficient platelet inhibition has been reported in up to 40% of aspirin-treated patients, including patients with essential thrombocytosis. To maintain sufficient platelet inhibition, a shorter dosing interval with aspirin has been suggested. We aimed to investigate the antiplatelet effect...... of low-dose aspirin given twice-daily compared to standard once-daily dosing in patients with essential thrombocytosis. We included 22 patients, who were treated for 7 days with standard once-daily aspirin (75 mg once-daily) followed by 7 days treatment of twice-daily aspirin (37.5 mg twice......-daily). The two regimens were separated by 14 days aspirin washout. Blood samples were obtained 1h and 24h/12h after the last pill intake in each regimen. The effect of aspirin was evaluated by: (1) platelet aggregation measured by whole blood impedance aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyser) using arachidonic acid...

  15. The postulated mechanism of the protective effect of ginger on the aspirin induced gastric ulcer: Histological and immunohistochemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah Khalil, Mahmoud

    2015-07-01

    There are many available drugs for treating gastric ulcer, but they have various side effects. Ginger is a folk, herbal medicine, which is used for treatment of various diseases including gastric ulcer. This study investigates the possible mechanism of the protective effect of ginger on aspirin induced gastric ulcer. Forty adult male albino rats were randomized into four groups (10 animal per each group) and orally received the followings once daily for 5 days: Group I: 3 ml of 1% carboxymethyl cellulose; Group II: ginger powder (200 mg/kg body weight) suspended in 3 mL of 1% carboxymethylcellulose; Group III: aspirin (400 mg/kg body weight) suspended in 3 ml of 1% carboxymethylcellulose in water. Group IV: ginger and 30 minutes later, received aspirin suspended in 1% carboxymethylcellulose, in similar doses as received in groups II and III. On day 6, rats were sacrificed. The animals were anesthetized and the stomach was removed for the macroscopic, histological (Haematoxylin & Eosin and Periodic Acid Shiff) and immunohistochemical investigations (Bax, inducible nitric oxide synthase and heat shock protein 70). Aspirin induced a significant increase of the macroscopic ulcer score, shed and disrupted epithelium, mucosal hemorrhage, submucosal edema and leukocyte infiltration, loss of the mucus of the mucosal surface significantly increased expression of apoptosis regulator Bax, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Ginger ameliorated the histological changes by reducing Bax and iNOS and increasing HSP70 expressions.

  16. Low dose aspirin as adjuvant treatment for venous leg ulceration: pragmatic, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial (Aspirin4VLU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, Andrew; Wadham, Angela; Bullen, Chris; Parag, Varsha; Kerse, Ngaire; Waters, Jill

    2017-11-24

    Objective  To determine the effect of low dose aspirin on ulcer healing in patients with venous leg ulcers. Design  Pragmatic, community based, parallel group, double blind, randomised controlled trial. Setting  Five community nursing centres in New Zealand. Participants  251 adults with venous leg ulcers who could safely be treated with aspirin or placebo: 125 were randomised to aspirin and 126 to placebo. Interventions  150 mg oral aspirin daily or matching placebo for up to 24 weeks treatment, with compression therapy as standard background treatment. Main outcome measures  The primary outcome was time to complete healing of the reference ulcer (largest ulcer if more than one ulcer was present). Secondary outcomes included proportion of participants healed, change in ulcer area, change in health related quality of life, and adverse events. Analysis was by intention to treat. Results  The median number of days to healing of the reference ulcer was 77 in the aspirin group and 69 in the placebo group (hazard ratio 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 1.13, P=0.25). The number of participants healed at the endpoint was 88 (70%) in the aspirin group and 101 (80%) in the placebo group (risk difference -9.8%, 95% confidence interval -20.4% to 0.9%, P=0.07). Estimated change in ulcer area was 4.1 cm 2 in the aspirin group and 4.8 cm 2 in the placebo group (mean difference -0.7 cm 2 , 95% confidence interval -1.9 to 0.5 cm 2 , P=0.25). 40 adverse events occurred among 29 participants in the aspirin group and 37 adverse events among 27 participants in the placebo group (incidence rate ratio 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.7 to 1.7, P=0.71). Conclusion  Our findings do not support the use of low dose aspirin as adjuvant treatment for venous leg ulcers. Trial registration  ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02158806. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Prevention and treatment of cancer with aspirin: where do we stand?

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    Pasche, Boris; Wang, Minghui; Pennison, Michael; Jimenez, Hugo

    2014-06-01

    Aspirin is arguably the synthesized drug that has been used most commonly in human history. Aspirin was originally developed and marketed for the treatment of inflammatory disorders at the end of the 19th century, but its mechanism of action remained unknown until the second half of the 20th century. Since the latter part of the 20th century aspirin also has been used for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases given its anti-thrombotic properties. An association between intake of aspirin and decreased cancer risk was identified in the past decades. Whether aspirin can be used as an anticancer agent in patients with a diagnosis of cancer was unknown until recently. Recent studies suggest that aspirin might provide therapeutic benefit in the adjuvant treatment of certain forms of cancer. This review provides a critical update on this topic, which has potential implications for oncologists and their patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The protective effect of Citrus limon essential oil on hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity induced by aspirin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzenna, Hafsia; Dhibi, Sabah; Samout, Noura; Rjeibi, Ilhem; Talarmin, Hélène; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2016-10-01

    Citrus limon is a member of the large Rutaceae family characterized by its therapeutic proprieties and has been widely used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases. This study investigates the protective effect of Citrus limon essential oil against a high dose of aspirin-induced acute liver and kidney damage in female Wistar albino rats. Twenty-eight adult female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups of 7 each: (1) a control group; (2) a group of rats which was kept untreated for 56days then treated with aspirin (A) (600mg/kg) for 4 days; (3) a group fed with essential oil of Citrus limon for 56days then (A) for 4 days; and (4) a group of rats receiving essential oil of Citrus limon for 56 days, then given NaCl for 4 days. Estimations of biochemical parameters in blood were determined. Lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidas (GPx) activities in liver and kidney was determined. A histopathological study was done. Under our experimental conditions, aspirin induced an increase of serum biochemical parameters and it resulted in an oxidative stress in both liver and kidney. This was evidenced by significant increase in TBARS in liver and kidney by 108% and 55%, respectively, compared to control. On the other hand, a decrease in the activities of SOD by 78% and 53%, CAT by 53% and 78%, and GPx by 78% and 51% in liver and kidney, respectively. Administration of EOC to rats attenuated the induced an effect of the high dose of aspirin induced in the afore mentioned serum biochemical parameters. In conclusion, our data suggest that treatment with essential oil of Citrus limon prevented the liver and kidney damage induced by aspirin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The administration of a loading dose of aspirin to patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction while receiving chronic aspirin treatment reduces thromboxane A2-dependent platelet reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Teresa; Madrid, Isabel; Moscardo, Antonio; Latorre, Ana M; Bonastre, Juan; Ruano, Miguel; Valles, Juana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The optimal dose of aspirin for patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) while receiving chronic aspirin therapy has not been clearly established. We evaluated whether continued treatment with 100 mg of aspirin or a loading dose (200-500 mg) influences thromboxane A2 (TX) suppression or platelet reactivity. Sixty-four consecutive patients with AMI and 98 healthy subjects (82 aspirin-free and 16 receiving 100 mg daily for a week) were evaluated. Treatment was at the discretion of the attending physician. Collagen (1 µg/ml)-induced TX synthesis, (14)C-serotonin-release, platelet aggregation, and the PFA-100 assay were evaluated. The platelet TX synthesis of patients receiving a loading dose of aspirin was sixfold lower than that of patients receiving 100 mg of aspirin (psynthesis (aspirin-free subjects) revealed that 8% of the patients treated with loading doses had a poor response (aspirin to patients with AMI during existing chronic aspirin treatment induced greater reductions in platelet TX synthesis and TX-dependent platelet reactivity than the continued treatment alone.

  20. Aspirin protects human coronary artery endothelial cells against atherogenic electronegative LDL via an epigenetic mechanism: a novel cytoprotective role of aspirin in acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Po-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Jie; Chang, Fu-Hsiung; Lu, Jonathan; Huang, Wen-Huei; Yang, Tzu-Ching; Lee, Yuan-Teh; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Lu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Chu-Huang

    2013-07-01

    L5 is the most negatively charged subfraction of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and is the only subfraction of LDL capable of inducing apoptosis in cultured vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by inhibiting fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) transcription. We examined whether plasma L5 levels are elevated in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and whether aspirin provides epigenetic protection of human coronary artery ECs (HCAECs) exposed to L5. Plasma L5 levels were compared between patients with STEMI (n = 10) and control subjects with chest pain syndrome but a normal coronary arteriogram (n = 5). L5 was isolated from the plasma of STEMI patients and control subjects, and apoptosis, FGF2 expression, and FGF2 promoter methylation were examined in HCAECs treated with L5 and aspirin. Plasma L5 levels were significantly higher in STEMI patients than in control subjects (P aspirin (0.2 mM) attenuated the adverse effects of L5 on HCAEC survival, FGF2 expression, and FGF2 promoter methylation. In contrast, high concentrations of aspirin (≥1.0 mM) accentuated the effects of L5. Our results show that L5 levels are significantly increased in STEMI patients. Furthermore, L5 impairs HCAEC function through CpG methylation of the FGF2 promoter, which is suppressed in the presence of low-concentration aspirin. Our results provide evidence of a novel mechanism of aspirin in the prevention of MI.

  1. Aspirin Has a Protective Effect Against Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbeh, Antonios; Tamim, Hani M; Abu Daya, Hussein; Abou Mrad, Rachel; Badreddine, Rami J; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A; Rockey, Don C; Barada, Kassem

    2015-07-01

    To determine the effect of aspirin and anticoagulants on clinical outcomes and cause of in-hospital death in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB). Patients were identified from a tertiary center database that included all patients with UGIB. Clinical outcomes including (1) in-hospital mortality, (2) severe bleeding, (3) rebleeding, (4) in-hospital complications, and (5) length of hospital stay were examined in patients taking (a) aspirin only, (b) anticoagulants only, and (c) no antithrombotics. Of 717 patients with NVUGIB, 56 % (402) were taking at least one antithrombotic agent. Seventy-eight (11 %) patients died in hospital, and 310 (43 %) had severe bleeding (BP 120 b/min, Hb 3 units). On multivariate analysis, being on aspirin was protective against in-hospital mortality [OR 0.26 (0.13-0.53)], rebleeding [OR 0.31 (0.17-0.59)], and predictive of a shorter hospital stay (coefficient = -4.2 days; 95 % CI -8.7, 0.3). Similarly, being on nonaspirin antiplatelets was protective against in-hospital mortality (P = 0.03). However, being on anticoagulants was predictive of in-hospital complications [OR 2.0 (1.20-3.35)] and severe bleeding [OR 1.69 (1.02-2.82)]. Compared to those not taking any antithrombotics, patients who bled on aspirin were less likely to die in hospital of uncontrolled gastrointestinal bleeding (3.6 vs 0 %, P ≤ 0.01) and systemic cancer (4.9 vs 0 %, P ≤ 0.002), but equally likely to die of cardiovascular/thromboembolic disease, sepsis, and multiorgan failure. Patients who present with NVUGIB on aspirin had reduced in-hospital mortality and fewer adverse outcomes, while those on anticoagulants had increased in-hospital complications.

  2. Aspirin Versus Aspirin Plus Clopidogrel as Antithrombotic Treatment Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With a Balloon-Expandable Valve: The ARTE (Aspirin Versus Aspirin + Clopidogrel Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation) Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Masson, Jean-Bernard; Welsh, Robert C; Garcia Del Blanco, Bruno; Pelletier, Marc; Webb, John G; Al-Qoofi, Faisal; Généreux, Philippe; Maluenda, Gabriel; Thoenes, Martin; Paradis, Jean-Michel; Chamandi, Chekrallah; Serra, Vicenç; Dumont, Eric; Côté, Mélanie

    2017-07-10

    The aim of this study was to compare aspirin plus clopidogrel with aspirin alone as antithrombotic treatment following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for the prevention of ischemic events, bleeding events, and death. Few data exist on the optimal antithrombotic therapy following TAVR. This was a randomized controlled trial comparing aspirin (80 to 100 mg/day) plus clopidogrel (75 mg/day) (dual antiplatelet therapy [DAPT]) versus aspirin alone (single-antiplatelet therapy [SAPT]) in patients undergoing TAVR with a balloon-expandable valve. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke or transient ischemic attack, or major or life-threatening bleeding (according to Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definitions) within the 3 months following the procedure. The trial was prematurely stopped after the inclusion of 74% of the planned study population. A total of 222 patients were included, 111 allocated to DAPT and 111 to SAPT. The composite of death, MI, stroke or transient ischemic attack, or major or life-threatening bleeding tended to occur more frequently in the DAPT group (15.3% vs. 7.2%, p = 0.065). There were no differences between groups in the occurrence of death (DAPT, 6.3%; SAPT, 3.6%; p = 0.37), MI (DAPT, 3.6%; SAT, 0.9%; p = 0.18), or stroke or transient ischemic attack (DAPT, 2.7%; SAPT, 0.9%; p = 0.31) at 3 months. DAPT was associated with a higher rate of major or life-threatening bleeding events (10.8% vs. 3.6% in the SAPT group, p = 0.038). There were no differences between groups in valve hemodynamic status post-TAVR. This small trial showed that SAPT (vs. DAPT) tended to reduce the occurrence of major adverse events following TAVR. SAPT reduced the risk for major or life-threatening events while not increasing the risk for MI or stroke. Larger studies are needed to confirm these results. (Aspirin Versus Aspirin + Clopidogrel Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: The ARTE

  3. Safety of low-dose aspirin in endovascular treatment for intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ma

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety of low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel versus high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel in prevention of vascular risk within 90 days of duration of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients treated with intracranial endovascular treatment. METHODS: From January 2012 to December 2013, this prospective and observational study enrolled 370 patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis of ≥70% with poor collateral undergoing intracranial endovascular treatment. Antiplatelet therapy consists of aspirin, at a low-dose of 100 mg or high-dose of 300 mg daily; clopidogrel, at a dose of 75 mg daily for 5 days before endovascular treatment. The dual antiplatelet therapy continued for 90 days after intervention. The study endpoints include acute thrombosis, subacute thrombosis, stroke or death within 90 days after intervention. RESULTS: Two hundred and seventy three patients received low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel and 97 patients received high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel before intracranial endovascular treatment. Within 90 days after intervention, there were 4 patients (1.5% with acute thrombosis, 5 patients (1.8% with subacute thrombosis, 17 patients (6.2% with stroke, and 2 death (0.7% in low-dose aspirin group, compared with no patient (0% with acute thrombosis, 2 patient (2.1% with subacute thrombosis, 6 patients (6.2% with stroke, and 2 death (2.1% in high-dose aspirin group, and there were no significant difference in all study endpoints between two groups. CONCLUSION: Low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel is comparative in safety with high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel within 90 days of duration of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients treated with intracranial endovascular treatment.

  4. [Protective effects and mechanism of action of aspirin on focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Li-ying; Yu, Juan; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Chong-hong

    2003-08-01

    To investigate the protective effects and mechanism of action of aspirin on focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion rats. The right middle cerebral artery of the rat was occluded by inserting a thread through internal carotid artery for 2 h, and then reperfused for 24 h. Different doses of aspirin were intragastricly administrated at reperfusion 0 h and 6 h. The injured area of the brain and cerebral edema were estimated. The contents of prostacyclin (PGI2), thromboxane (TXA2), and endothelin (ET) in plasma were measured by 125I radioimmunoassay method. The content of nitric oxide (NO) in plasma was measured by the nitrate reductase method. The malondialdehyde (MDA) content in brain tissue was determined by the thiobarbituric acid method. The superoxide dismutase content (SOD) in brain tissue was assayed by the xanthine oxidase method. The content of adenosin 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in brain tissue was separated by capillary electrophoresis. The injured area of the brain and the cerebral edema of occluded side were dramatically reduced after 6 and 60 mg.kg-1 doses of aspirin were administrated intragastricaly. The ratio of PGI2/TXA2 in plasma was increased by aspirin in a dose-dependent manner. In brain tissue of the occluded side, the MDA content was reduced from 9.0 +/- 0.75 to 6.48 +/- 0.74, and the ATP level was increased from 10.26 +/- 1.02 to 25.65 +/- 3.45 by the 60 mg.kg-1 dose of aspirin. No significant effect on SOD content was observed. In plasma, the NO content was significantly decreased from 24.76 +/- 1.88 to 8.17 +/- 0.79, and the ET level was increased from 254.85 +/- 21.14 to 278.43 +/- 16.79 by 6 mg.kg-1 dose of aspirin. The neuroprotective effects of aspirin on focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion rats might be attributed to its effects by increasing the ratio of PGI2 and TXA2, reducing lipid peroxides and improving the energy metabolism.

  5. The Effect of Combined Aspirin and Clopidogrel Treatment on Cancer Incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Avi; Zelikson-Saporta, Ravit; Pereg, David; Spectre, Galia; Rozovski, Uri; Raanani, Pia; Hermoni, Doron; Lishner, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Multiple studies have shown an association between aspirin treatment and a reduction in newly diagnosed cancer. Conversely, there are conflicting clinical and laboratory data on the effect of combined clopidogrel and aspirin therapy on cancer incidence, including analyses suggesting an increased cancer risk. No large-scale cohort study has been performed to address this issue in a heterogeneous real-world scenario. We investigated the effect of clopidogrel and aspirin on cancer incidence compared with aspirin alone and no antiplatelet therapy. A population-based historical cohort study of subjects aged ≥50 years covered by Clalit Health Services, an Israeli health maintenance organization, was performed. Patients treated with the newer antiplatelet drugs, prasugrel or ticagrelor, which, like clopidogrel, inhibit adenosine diphosphate receptors, and those with prior cancer were excluded. Prescription records of antiplatelet medication were retrieved. The cohort included 183,912 subjects diagnosed with 21,974 cancer cases based upon the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision. Dual aspirin and clopidogrel was prescribed in 9.6%, while 49% received aspirin alone and 41% used neither. Compared with nonusers, there was a lower risk of cancer in subjects exposed to aspirin with (hazard ratio [HR] 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.44-0.49) or without clopidogrel (HR 0.54; 95% CI, 0.52-0.56), on long-term follow-up. Combined treatment was associated with a lower cancer risk than the aspirin-only group (HR 0.92; 95% CI, 0.86-0.97). Dual clopidogrel and aspirin treatment is safe regarding the cancer risk. This study generates the hypothesis that clopidogrel may reduce cancer incidence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Effect of aspirin administration for the treatment of osteoporosis in ovariectomized rat model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-wen; Wu, Zi-xiang; Sang, Hong-xun; Qin, Guo-liang; Wang, Li-song; Feng, Jing; Wang, Jun; Li, Xiao-juan; Wang, Jian-chao; Zhang, Da

    2011-04-05

    To explore the therapeutic effects of aspirin on postmenopausal osteoporosis and understand its action mechanism. Forty three-month-old female SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 8 each): sham group, OVX group and aspirin groups (A1, A2 & A3). The OVX and aspirin groups were ovariectomized (OVX). All rats underwent BMD (bone mineral density) scan at the time of OVX and 3 months after OVX. After the animal model of osteoporosis was established, aspirin groups were intragastrically administered at a dose of 8.93 mg×kg(-1)×d(-1) (A1), 26.79 mg×kg(-1)×d(-1) (A2) and 80.36 mg×kg(-1)×d(-1) (A3) daily in OVX rats. Three months later, the BMD and micro-architecture of vertebrae were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and microtomography. Alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin were measured in peripheral blood. The trabecular architecture changes were observed by histomorphology. Axial compression tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of vertebral specimens and three-point bending tests used for femur shaft. Three months after ovariectomy, BMD was significantly lower than preoperative. BMD in aspirin treated groups was significantly higher than that in OVX group. Alkaline phosphatase in peripheral blood decreased significantly in aspirin groups than those in OVX, but osteocalcin had no significant difference between aspirin and OVX groups. The microtomography reconstruction analysis also showed that the trabecular thickness, trabecular number and BMD increased significantly in aspirin groups than those in OVX. And there was no significant difference between A3 and sham groups. The results of biomechanical test showed that the maximum compression load of lumbar spine and three-point bending load of femur shaft were significantly higher in aspirin groups than those in OVX group. Aspirin can promote trabecular bone remodeling, improve three-dimensional structure of trabecular bone and increase bone density of cancellous in

  7. Vascular protective actions of a nitric oxide aspirin analog in both in vitro and in vivo models of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Galen M; Siebeneich, Wolfgang; Olds, Cara L; Felix, Christopher C; Del Soldato, Piero

    2002-06-01

    but not by mannitol, the parent compound (aspirin) or by NCX2216. In addition, chronic treatment with NCX4016 prevented the development of defective endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine. This protection did not occur as a result to any changes in blood glucose concentration or hemoglobin glycation. Treatment with NCX4016 did decrease the elevation in plasma isoprostanes and normalized the diabetes-induced increase in NF-kappaB binding activity in nuclear fractions derived from aortic tissue. Collectively, these studies suggest that antioxidant interventions using NO-donating NSAIDs may provide an important novel therapeutic strategy to protect the diabetic endothelium.

  8. Enhanced platelet MRP4 expression and correlation with platelet function in patients under chronic aspirin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Isabella; Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria; Temperilli, Flavia; Mancone, Massimo; Sardella, Gennaro; Calcagno, Simone; Turriziani, Ombretta; Frati, Luigi; Pulcinelli, Fabio M

    2016-11-30

    Platelet multidrug resistance protein4 (MRP4)-overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action. Aspirin in vivo treatment enhances platelet MRP4 expression and MRP4 mediated transport inhibition reduces platelet function and delays thrombus formation. The aim of our work was to verify whether MRP4 expression is enhanced in platelets obtained from patients under chronic aspirin treatment and whether it correlates with residual platelet reactivity. We evaluated changes on mRNA and protein-MRP4 expression and platelet aggregation in four populations: healthy volunteers (HV), aspirin-free control population (CTR), patients who started the treatment less than one month ago (ASAaspirinated patients who started the treatment more than two months ago (ASA>2 months patients). In platelets obtained from ASA>2 months patients, it was found a statistically significant MRP4 enhancement of both mRNA and protein expression compared to HV, CTR and ASA2 months patients that present high levels of platelet MRP4, have higher serum TxB2 levels and collagen-induced platelet aggregation compared to patient with low levels of MRP4 in platelets. In addition collagen induced platelet aggregation is higher in in vitro aspirinated platelets obtained from patients with high levels of MRP4 patients compared to those obtained from patients with low MRP4 levels. We can assert that, in patients under chronic aspirin treatment, platelets that present high MRP4 levels have an increase of residual platelet reactivity, which is due in part to incomplete COX-1 inhibition, and in part to COX-1-independent mechanism.

  9. Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: Prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and considerations for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Ashley N.; Borish, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is a late onset condition characterized by the Samter triad (aspirin sensitivity [as well as sensitivity to any nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitor], nasal polyps, asthma) and additional features, including eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis, hypereosinophilia, anosmia, frequent absence of atopy, and, intolerance to ingestion of red wine and other alcoholic beverages. The diagnosis is rare, and, because of this, it is also often missed by physicians. However, it is highly overexpressed in patients with severe asthma (and severe chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps), which makes its recognition essential. For this review, we considered mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this disease and discussed the clinical symptoms of AERD. We also discussed the role of aspirin desensitization in the treatment of AERD. Also, we considered medications (e.g, leukotriene modifiers) and surgical interventions that have a role in the treatment of AERD. PMID:28124651

  10. Aspirin and clopidogrel high on-treatment platelet reactivity and genetic predictors in peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Khung-Keong; Armstrong, Ehrin J; López, Javier E; Chen, Debbie C; Westin, Gregory G; Li, Chin-Shang; Anderson, David; Hua, Amy; Singapuri, Anil; Amsterdam, Ezra A; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Laird, John R

    2018-02-07

    Our aims were to examine the prevalence and genetic predictors of aspirin and clopidogrel high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HoTPR), and associated adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The association of aspirin and clopidogrel HoTPR with outcomes in PAD remains unclear. This is a prospective cohort study of patients with angiographically documented PAD involving carotid and lower extremity arteries. Aspirin and clopidogrel HoTPR (using the VerifyNow Assay) and associated genetic predictors were compared to clinical outcomes. The primary end-point was a composite of major adverse cardiovascular events: all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, target vessel revascularization (TVR) and limb-loss in patients who underwent extremity intervention. The study was stopped prematurely due to slow patient enrolment. Of 195 patients enrolled, the primary analysis was performed in 154 patients taking both drugs. Aspirin HoTPR was present in 31 (20%) and clopidogrel HoTPR in 76 (49%) patients. There was a trend toward more primary composite outcome events with PRU ≥ 235 (52% freedom-from-event rate vs. 70% for PRU < 235; P = 0.09). TVR was higher in those with PRU ≥ 235 (20 vs. 6%, unadjusted P = 0.02). There was no association between aspirin HoTPR and combined outcomes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON1) gene was associated with aspirin HoTPR (P = 0.005) while SNP in phospholipase A2, group III (PLA2G3) gene was associated with clopidogrel HoTPR (P = 0.002). Clopidogrel HoTPR was significantly associated with TVR, while aspirin HoTPR was not associated with adverse clinical outcomes in patients with PAD. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Thromboxane Formation Assay to Identify High On-Treatment Platelet Reactivity to Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohring, Annemarie; Piayda, Kerstin; Dannenberg, Lisa; Zako, Saif; Schneider, Theresa; Bartkowski, Kirsten; Levkau, Bodo; Zeus, Tobias; Kelm, Malte; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Polzin, Amin

    2017-01-01

    Platelet inhibition by aspirin is indispensable in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Nevertheless, impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects (high on-treatment platelet reactivity [HTPR]) are frequent. This is associated with an enhanced risk of cardiovascular events. The current gold standard to evaluate platelet hyper-reactivity despite aspirin intake is the light-transmittance aggregometry (LTA). However, pharmacologically, the most specific test is the measurement of arachidonic acid (AA)-induced thromboxane (TX) B2 formation. Currently, the optimal cut-off to define HTPR to aspirin by inhibition of TX formation is not known. Therefore, in this pilot study, we aimed to calculate a TX formation cut-off value to detect HTPR defined by the current gold standard LTA. We measured platelet function in 2,507 samples. AA-induced TX formation by ELISA and AA-induced LTA were used to measure aspirin antiplatelet effects. TX formation correlated nonlinearly with the maximum of aggregation in the AA-induced LTA (Spearman's rho R = 0.7396; 95% CI 0.7208-0.7573, p < 0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis and Youden's J statistics revealed 209.8 ng/mL as the optimal cut-off value to detect HTPR to aspirin with the TX ELISA (area under the curve: 0.92, p < 0.0001, sensitivity of 82.7%, specificity of 90.3%). In summary, TX formation ELISA is reliable in detecting HTPR to aspirin. The calculated cut-off level needs to be tested in trials with clinical end points. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Update on aspirin in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennekens, Charles H

    2002-12-01

    Antiplatelet therapy, most notably aspirin, has been well documented to reduce risks of subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in secondary prevention, acute myocardial infarction (MI), acute occlusive stroke, as well as in primary prevention. In secondary prevention, the most recent Antithrombotic Trialists' Collaboration reviewed 194 published randomized trials of antiplatelet therapy, mostly aspirin, involving more than 212 000 patients (ie, 135 000 using antiplatelet therapy or control and 77 000 using different antiplatelet regimens). In a very wide range of patients who have survived a prior occlusive vascular event-including MI, transient ischemic attacks, occlusive stroke, unstable and stable angina, percutaneous coronary interventions, and coronary artery bypass graft-aspirin prevents about 25% of serious vascular events. Among patients suffering acute Ml or acute occlusive stroke, aspirin begun promptly and continued long-term reduces risks of subsequent MI, stroke, and vascular death. In acute coronary syndromes, clopidogrel added to aspirin further reduces the risk of important vascular events, but not mortality, and causes more side effects, especially bleeding. For patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions, the addition of a short-term infusion of a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist to aspirin prevents additional vascular events during the early in-hospital period but also increases the risk of major bleeding. Ongoing research is investigating other combinations of different antiplatelet drugs. In all these high-risk patients, there is a small excess of major bleeding among those assigned at random to aspirin, which is far outweighed by the magnitude of benefits on CVD. During an acute MI, after a loading dose of 160 mg to 325 mg aspirin, daily doses ranging from 75 to 150 mg daily are as effective as higher doses. For long-term treatment, the effects of doses 325 mg daily, no antiplatelet regimen is more effective than aspirin

  13. Protective effects of essential oil of Citrus limon against aspirin-induced toxicity in IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzenna, Hafsia; Hfaiedh, Najla; Giroux-Metges, Marie-Agnès; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Talarmin, Hélène

    2017-05-01

    Aspirin, one of the widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, is the most highly consumed pharmaceutical product in the world. However, it has several side effects in cells. This study was designed to investigate the antioxidative activity and cytoprotective effects of essential oil of Citrus limon (EOC) extracted from leaves against aspirin-induced damages in the rat small intestine epithelial cells (IEC-6). Biochemical indicators were used to assess cytotoxicity and oxidative damages caused by aspirin treatment on IEC-6. Our results showed that the chemical characterization of EOC identified 25 compounds representing 98.19% of the total oil. The major compounds from this oil were z-citral (53.21%), neryl acetate (13.06%), geranyl acetate (10.33%), and limonene (4.23%). Aspirin induced a decrease in cell viability as well as an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. Contrariwise, the co-exposure of cells to aspirin and EOC alleviated every above syndrome by an increase in cell survival and decrease in SOD and CAT activities. In conclusion, the essential oil of C. limon has a potent cytoprotective effect against aspirin-induced toxicity in IEC-6 cells.

  14. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 down-regulates inflammatory responses and protects against endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiao [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shetty, Sreerama [Center for Biomedical Research, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, TX 75708 (United States); Zhang, Ping [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Gao, Rong; Hu, Yuxin [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang, Shuxia [Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li, Zhenyu [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Fu, Jian, E-mail: jian.fu@uky.edu [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The presence of endotoxin in blood can lead to acute kidney injury (AKI) and septic shock. Resolvins, the endogenous lipid mediators derived from docosahexaenoic acid, have been reported to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory action. Using a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI, we investigated the effects of aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) on inflammatory kidney injury. Administration of AT-RvD1 1 h after LPS challenge protected the mice from kidney injury as indicated by the measurements of blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and morphological alterations associated with tubular damage. The protective effects were evidenced by decreased neutrophil infiltration in the kidney indicating reduction in inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment restored kidney cell junction protein claudin-4 expression, which was otherwise reduced after LPS challenge. AT-RvD1 treatment inhibited endotoxin-induced NF-κB activation and suppressed LPS-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in the kidney. Moreover, AT-RvD1 treatment markedly decreased LPS-induced IL-6 level in the kidney and blocked IL-6-mediated signaling including STAT3 and ERK phosphorylation. Our findings demonstrate that AT-RvD1 is a potent anti-inflammatory mediator in LPS-induced kidney injury, and AT-RvD1 has therapeutic potential against AKI during endotoxemia.

  15. [Protective effect of compound bismuth and magnesium granules on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, F H; Hu, F L; Wei, H; Zhang, Y Y; Yang, G B; Lei, X Y; Yang, Y P; Sun, W N; Cui, M H

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the protective effect of compound bismuth and magnesium granules on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats and its possible mechanism. Acute gastric mucosal injury model was developed with intraperitoneal injection of aspirin in Wistar rats. The rats were divided into normal control group, injury group, sucralfate protection group, compound bismuth and magnesium granules protection group and its herbal components protection group(each group 12 rats). In the protection groups, drugs as mentioned above were administered by gavage before treated with intraperitoneal injection of aspirin. To evaluate the extent of gastric mucosal injury and the protective effect of drugs, gastric mucosal lesion index, gastric mucosal blood flow, content of gastric mucosal hexosamine, prostaglandins (PG), nitric oxide(NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin (IL) -1, 2, 8 were measured in each group, and histological changes were observed by gross as well as under microscope and electron microscope. Contents of hexosamine, NO, and PG in all the protection groups were significantly higher than those in the injury group (all Pbismuth and magnesium granules group was significantly higher than that in the sucralfate group ((11.29±0.51) vs(10.80±0.36)nmol/ml, Pbismuth and magnesium granules group were significantly lower than those in the sucralfate group ((328.17±6.56) vs(340.23±8.05)pg/ml, Pbismuth and magnesium granules and its herbal components may have significant protective effect on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury.

  16. The safety and efficacy of aspirin intake in photoselective vaporization laser treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao IH

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available I-Hung Shao,1,* Chen-Pang Hou,1,* Shao-Ming Chen,3 Chien-Lun Chen,1,2 Yu-Hsiang Lin,1 Phei-Lang Chang,1,2 Ke-Hung Tsui1,2 1Department of Urology, 2Bioinformation Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linko and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 3Department of Urology, Taipei City Hospital, Heping Campus, Taipei, Taiwan, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Endoscopic surgical treatment has become an option to treat benign prostate hyperplasia. We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP in patients. We evaluated preoperative and perioperative parameters, functional outcomes, and adverse events up to 12 months postoperatively of patients on oral anticoagulation therapy undergoing PVP, and compared the results with patients who did not take anticoagulation therapy. A total of 89 patients who received photoselective vaporization laser for benign prostate hyperplasia from May 2006 to February 2011 in our hospital were enrolled in our study. The patients were divided into two groups based on whether or not they were taking oral aspirin; 23 (25.8% patients were taking aspirin derivatives (aspirin group, and 66 (74.2% were not taking aspirin derivatives (control group. The mean prostate volume (58.8 mL vs 51 mL; P = 0.16 and mean energy consumption (235,268 J vs 289,793 J; P = 0.097 were comparable between the aspirin group and control group. The average postoperative results of hemoglobin were 13.4 mg/dL for the aspirin group versus 13.9 mg/dL for the control group (P = 0.327. A significantly higher maximum flow rates and 80% improved post-void residual urine were noted during the followup. Postoperatively all variable showed significant improvement starting at month 1 of followup and remained improved for the 12 month followup. Postoperative complications were low and comparable between groups. PVP was characterized by excellent hemostatic

  17. Effect of aspirin treatment on TNFalpha production by women with a history of preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Morgan R; Faux, David S; Hamblin, Steven D; Cooper, Corrina; Silver, Robert M; Esplin, M Sean

    2009-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated TNFalpha production is reported to be greater for whole blood (WB) cultures prepared from patients with a history of preterm birth than cultures obtained from women with a history of term birth. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine if there is a similar differential responsiveness for peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML) and (2) to determine if treatment with aspirin influences LPS-stimulated TNFalpha production in these patients. WB and PBML were obtained from women with a history of preterm delivery before 32 weeks (cases; n=5) and age- and race-matched controls (n=5) with a history of uncomplicated term delivery. WB and PBML were cultured and stimulated with LPS. All participants then took aspirin daily for 1 week and responsiveness of PBML and WB cultures to LPS was retested. The history of preterm labor was found to have no effect on LPS-stimulated TNFalpha production in cultures of WB or PBML. Aspirin treatment enhanced LPS-stimulated TNFalpha production by PBML from controls but not cases. We conclude that endotoxin responsiveness of women with a history of preterm birth is similar to that of women with a history of term birth in terms of in vitro TNFalpha production. Aspirin increases TNFalpha production by PBML in control women but not in women with a history of preterm birth. The divergent responses to aspirin treatment in patients with and without prior preterm labor may reflect differential regulation of cytokine production by prostaglandins in women with preterm labor associated with infection or inflammation.

  18. Fibrin clot structure and platelet aggregation in patients with aspirin treatment failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søs Neergaard-Petersen

    Full Text Available Aspirin is a cornerstone in prevention of cardiovascular events and modulates both platelet aggregation and fibrin clot formation. Some patients experience cardiovascular events whilst on aspirin, often termed aspirin treatment failure (ATF. This study evaluated both platelet aggregation and fibrin clot structure in patients with ATF.We included 177 stable coronary artery disease patients on aspirin monotherapy. Among these, 116 (66% had ATF defined as myocardial infarction (MI whilst on aspirin. Platelet aggregation was assessed by Multiplate® aggregometry and VerifyNow®, whereas turbidimetric assays and scanning electron microscopy were employed to study fibrin clot characteristics.Enhanced platelet aggregation was observed in patients with ATF compared with non-MI patients following stimulation with arachidonic acid 1.0 mM (median 161 (IQR 95; 222 vs. 97 (60; 1776 AU*min, p = 0.005 and collagen 1.0 µg/mL (293 (198; 427 vs. 220 (165; 370 AU*min, p = 0.03. Similarly, clot maximum absorbance, a measure of fibrin network density, was increased in patients with ATF (0.48 (0.41; 0.52 vs. 0.42 (0.38; 0.50, p = 0.02, and this was associated with thinner fibres (mean ± SD: 119.7±27.5 vs. 127.8±31.1 nm, p = 0.003 and prolonged lysis time (552 (498; 756 vs. 519 (468; 633 seconds; p = 0.02. Patients with ATF also had increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP (1.34 (0.48; 2.94 and 0.88 (0.32; 1.77 mg/L, p = 0.01 compared with the non-MI group. Clot maximum absorbance correlated with platelet aggregation (r = 0.31-0.35, p-values<0.001 and CRP levels (r = 0.60, p<0.001.Patients with aspirin treatment failure showed increased platelet aggregation and altered clot structure with impaired fibrinolysis compared with stable CAD patients without previous MI. These findings suggest that an increased risk of aspirin treatment failure may be identified by measuring both platelet function and fibrin clot structure.

  19. Observation on the therapeutic effect of aspirin in combined with acupuncture in the treatment of TIA

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    Jing Gao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of aspirin in combined with acupuncture in the treatment of transient ischemic attack (TIA. Methods: A total of 90 patients with TIA who were admitted in our hospital were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group with 45 cases in each group. The patients in the two groups were given aspirin and routine symptomatic treatments. On this basis, the patients in the observation group were given acupuncture. Two-week treatment was regarded as one course. The fasting venous blood before treatment and one course after treatment was collected to detect the serum lipid level. TCD was used to detect the average peak flow velocity of MCA, VA, and BA. A follow-up visit was paid to TIA attack times within 3 months. Results: TC, TG, and LDL levels after treatment in the two groups were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment, while HDL was significantly elevated when compared with before treatment. The comparison of TC, TG, LDL, and HDL after treatment between the two groups was not statistically significant. The comparison of the average peak flow velocity of MCA, VA, and BA before treatment between the two groups was not statistically significant. The average peak flow velocity of MCA and BA after treatment were significantly slowing down when compared with before treatment, while the average peak flow velocity of VA was not significantly different from that before treatment. The average peak flow velocity of MCA and BA after treatment in the treatment group was significantly lower than that in the control group. The average attack time of TIA every week after treatment in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group. Conclusions: Aspirin in combined with acupuncture in the treatment of TIA can effectively improve the cerebral hemodynamic indicators, and reduce TIA attack time; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended in the

  20. Potentiation of LPS-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells by Aspirin via ROS and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Protection by N-Acetyl Cysteine.

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    Haider Raza

    Full Text Available Cytotoxicity and inflammation-associated toxic responses have been observed to be induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS in vitro and in vivo respectively. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as aspirin, has been reported to be beneficial in inflammation-associated diseases like cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Their precise molecular mechanisms, however, are not clearly understood. Our previous studies on aspirin treated HepG2 cells strongly suggest cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study, we have further demonstrated that HepG2 cells treated with LPS alone or in combination with aspirin induces subcellular toxic responses which are accompanied by increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS production, oxidative stress, mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and apoptosis. The LPS/Aspirin induced toxicity was attenuated by pre-treatment of cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC. Alterations in oxidative stress and glutathione-dependent redox-homeostasis were more pronounced in mitochondria compared to extra- mitochondrial cellular compartments. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with NAC exhibited a selective protection in redox homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that the altered redox metabolism, oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in HepG2 cells play a critical role in LPS/aspirin-induced cytotoxicity. These results may help in better understanding the pharmacological, toxicological and therapeutic properties of NSAIDs in cancer cells exposed to bacterial endotoxins.

  1. The outcome of short-term low-dose aspirin treatment in Kawasaki disease based on inflammatory markers

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Jae Won; Kim, Ji Mok; Kil, Hong Ryang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Previously, Kawasaki disease (KD) treatment with low-dose aspirin was administered for 6?8 weeks after the acute phase. However, inflammatory marker levels normalize before 6?8 weeks. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical outcome of short-term low-dose aspirin treatment based on inflammatory and thrombotic marker levels. Methods We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of patients with KD who were hospitalized at Chungnam National University Hospital be...

  2. Fibrin clot structure and platelet aggregation in patients with aspirin treatment failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neergaard-Petersen, Søs; Ajjan, Ramzi; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Hess, Katharina; Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2013-01-01

    Aspirin is a cornerstone in prevention of cardiovascular events and modulates both platelet aggregation and fibrin clot formation. Some patients experience cardiovascular events whilst on aspirin, often termed aspirin treatment failure (ATF). This study evaluated both platelet aggregation and fibrin clot structure in patients with ATF. We included 177 stable coronary artery disease patients on aspirin monotherapy. Among these, 116 (66%) had ATF defined as myocardial infarction (MI) whilst on aspirin. Platelet aggregation was assessed by Multiplate® aggregometry and VerifyNow®, whereas turbidimetric assays and scanning electron microscopy were employed to study fibrin clot characteristics. Enhanced platelet aggregation was observed in patients with ATF compared with non-MI patients following stimulation with arachidonic acid 1.0 mM (median 161 (IQR 95; 222) vs. 97 (60; 1776) AU*min, p = 0.005) and collagen 1.0 µg/mL (293 (198; 427) vs. 220 (165; 370) AU*min, p = 0.03). Similarly, clot maximum absorbance, a measure of fibrin network density, was increased in patients with ATF (0.48 (0.41; 0.52) vs. 0.42 (0.38; 0.50), p = 0.02), and this was associated with thinner fibres (mean ± SD: 119.7±27.5 vs. 127.8±31.1 nm, p = 0.003) and prolonged lysis time (552 (498; 756) vs. 519 (468; 633) seconds; p = 0.02). Patients with ATF also had increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (1.34 (0.48; 2.94) and 0.88 (0.32; 1.77) mg/L, p = 0.01) compared with the non-MI group. Clot maximum absorbance correlated with platelet aggregation (r = 0.31-0.35, p-valuesaspirin treatment failure showed increased platelet aggregation and altered clot structure with impaired fibrinolysis compared with stable CAD patients without previous MI. These findings suggest that an increased risk of aspirin treatment failure may be identified by measuring both platelet function and fibrin clot structure.

  3. Astragaloside IV protects rat gastric mucosa against aspirin-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dan-Dan; Lin, Shan; Song, Yan-Ping; Wang, Ze-Yu; Liu, Bo; Gao, Sai-Nan; Fan, Yu-Hua; Zhu, Shan; Li, Sen; Jiang, Lei

    2016-12-01

    Aspirin (Asp) is commonly used as an anti-inflammatory drug, but the long-term usage of Asp can lead to severe gastrointestinal damage. Thus the co-administering of Asp with another drug that can suppress its side effect while having no impact on its anti-inflammatory activity would be ideal. Astragaloside IV (AST-IV) is a natural anti-inflammatory compound that has been shown to protect rat gastric mucosa from anhydrous ethanol-inflicted damage. In this study, we investigated whether AST-IV could protect rat gastric mucosa against Asp-induced gastric mucosal damage. Wistar rats administered 150mg/kg Asp showed significant damage to the gastric mucosa, as revealed by gastric damage score and histological evaluation. However, this was largely abolished by co-administering Asp and 25mg/kg or 50mg/kg AST-IV. The protective mechanism of AST-IV involved the suppression of Asp-induced inhibition of cycloxygenase-1 (COX-1) expression, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and nitric oxide (NO) production. AST-IV blocked Asp-induced inhibition of SOD activity through preventing Asp from inhibiting the expression of SOD-1, both at the mRNA and protein levels. AST-IV did not appear to interfere with the anti-inflammatory activity of Asp since COX-2 level in model gastritis rats treated with Asp plus AST-IV was equally suppressed as in model gastritis rats treated with Asp alone. The results clearly showed that AST-IV could neutralize the toxicity of Asp while having no impact on its anti-inflammatory activity. AST-IV could therefore be considered as a potential drug for relieving the side effect associated with the long-term usage of Asp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Markers of hypercoagulability in CAD patients. Effects of single aspirin and clopidogrel treatment

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    Bratseth Vibeke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease with disturbances in the haemostatic system, might lead to thrombotic complications with clinical manifestations like acute myocardial infarction (AMI and stroke. Activation of the coagulation cascade with subsequent increased thrombin generation, characterizes a prothrombotic phenotype. In the present study we investigated whether prothrombotic markers were associated with risk factors and clinical subgroups in a cohort of patients with angiographically verified coronary artery disease (CAD. The patients were randomized to long-term treatment with the antiplatelet drugs aspirin or clopidogrel, and we further investigated the effect on hypercoagulability of such treatment for 1 year, of which limited data exists. Methods Venous blood samples were collected in fasting condition between 08:00 and 10:30 am, at baseline when all patients were on aspirin therapy (n = 1001 and in 276 patients after 1 year follow-up on aspirin or clopidogrel. In vivo thrombin generation was assessed by prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1+2 and D-dimer, and the endogenous thrombin potentiale (ETP in the calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT assay, representing ex vivo thrombin generation. In addition soluble tissue factor (sTF and free- and total tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI were measured. Results We found age to be significantly associated with F1+2 and D-dimer (β = 0.229 and β =0.417 respectively, p Conclusions In the present population of stable CAD, we could demonstrate a more hypercoagulable profile among women, smokers and patients on RAS medication, assessed by the prothrombotic markers F1+2, D-dimer and ETP. Long-term antiplatelet treatment with aspirin alone seems to attenuate thrombin generation to a greater extent than with clopidogrel alone. The study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00222261.

  5. Treatment with aspirin, NSAID, corticosteroids, and colchicine in acute and recurrent pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazio, Massimo; Adler, Yehuda

    2013-05-01

    Empiric anti-inflammatory therapy for acute and recurrent pericarditis is warranted for viral and idiopathic cases that represent most cases of pericarditis in developed countries. For specific uncomplicated etiologies, such as systemic autoimmune diseases and postpericardiotomy syndromes, the same drugs are also indicated. Aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) are mainstay of therapy with the possible adjunct of colchicine, especially for recurrences. Corticosteroids are a second choice for difficult cases requiring multi-drug therapies and specific medical conditions (i.e., specific cases with systemic autoimmune diseases, postpericardiotomy syndrome, and pregnancy). Medical therapy of pericarditis should be individualized as much as possible providing the attack dose every 8 h to ensure full daily control of symptoms and till remission and C-reactive protein normalization, and then tapering should be considered. The present paper will review current evidence for the treatment of acute and recurrent pericarditis with aspirin, NSAID, corticosteroids, and colchicine.

  6. An alkyne-aspirin chemical reporter for the detection of aspirin-dependent protein modification in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Leslie A; Zaro, Balyn W; Miller, Stephanie M; Pratt, Matthew R

    2013-10-02

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is widely used for the acute treatment of inflammation and the management of cardiovascular disease. More recently, it has also been shown to reduce the risk of a variety of cancers. The anti-inflammatory properties of aspirin in pain-relief, cardio-protection, and chemoprevention are well-known to result from the covalent inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes through nonenzymatic acetylation of key serine residues. However, any additional molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the beneficial effects of aspirin remain poorly defined. Interestingly, studies over the past 50 years using radiolabeled aspirin demonstrated that other proteins are acetylated by aspirin and enrichment with antiacetyl-lysine antibodies identified 33 potential targets of aspirin-dependent acetylation. Herein we describe the development of an alkyne-modified aspirin analogue (AspAlk) as a chemical reporters of aspirin-dependent acetylation in living cells. When combined with the Cu(I)-catalyzed [3 + 2] azide-alkyne cycloaddition, this chemical reporter allowed for the robust in-gel fluorescent detection of acetylation and the subsequent enrichment and identification of 120 proteins, 112 of which have not been previously reported to be acetylated by aspirin in cellular or in vivo contexts. Finally, AspAlk was shown to modify the core histone proteins, implicating aspirin as a potential chemical-regulator of transcription.

  7. Aspirin overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002542.htm Aspirin overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An overdose of aspirin means you have too much aspirin in your ...

  8. Aspirin Desensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nerve Decompression Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Aspirin Desensitization Kevin C. Welch, MD Zara Patel, MD Introduction The term "aspirin-sensitive asthma" (also known as "aspirin triad" or " ...

  9. Increased expression of tight junction protein occludin is associated with the protective effect of mosapride against aspirin-induced gastric injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenchen; Duan, Zhaotao; Guan, Yue; Wu, Hailu; Hu, Kewei; Gao, Xin; Yuan, Fangcen; Jiang, Zongdan; Fan, Ye; He, Bangshun; Wang, Shukui; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2018-02-01

    Mosapride is known to affect gastric motility, however whether mosapride has anti-ulcergenic effects in gastric mucosal injury is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of mosapride on aspirin-induced gastric injuries. GES-1 cells were cultured and divided into 5 groups: Control group, aspirin injury group (treated with 18.2 mmol/l aspirin) and mosapride pretreatment groups (treated with 0.4, 0.5, or 0.6 µmol/l mosapride). Cell proliferation was evaluated via MTT assay and cell apoptosis was investigated via flow cytometry. The expression of occludin was determined by western blot analysis. A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into five groups: Control group, aspirin injury group (150 mg/kg) and mosapride pretreatment groups (0.25, 0.50 or 0.75 mg/kg). Gastric mucosal lesions were induced by administering 200 mg/kg aspirin daily for 4 days. Rats in the mosapride groups were pretreated with mosapride 1 h prior to aspirin administration. Histological changes were evaluated under a light microscope and gastric epithelial TJs were observed via transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed that cell apoptosis was significantly increased in the aspirin injury group compared with the control (P<0.05), whereas apoptosis was significantly decreased in the mosapride pretreatment groups compared with the aspirin group (P<0.05). Cell viability was significantly increased in the mosapride pretreatment groups compared with the aspirin injury group (P<0.05), and that of the aspirin injury group was significantly decreased compared with the control group (P<0.05). Compared with the aspirin injury group, occludin expression was significantly increased in the three mosapride pre-treatment groups (all P<0.05). It was also demonstrated that gastric damage was significantly attenuated in the mosapride pretreatment groups compared with the aspirin injury group (P<0.05). Impaired TJ integrity was observed in aspirin injury group

  10. The outcome of short-term low-dose aspirin treatment in Kawasaki disease based on inflammatory markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Won; Kim, Ji Mok; Kil, Hong Ryang

    2017-01-01

    Previously, Kawasaki disease (KD) treatment with low-dose aspirin was administered for 6-8 weeks after the acute phase. However, inflammatory marker levels normalize before 6-8 weeks. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical outcome of short-term low-dose aspirin treatment based on inflammatory and thrombotic marker levels. We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of patients with KD who were hospitalized at Chungnam National University Hospital between September 2012 and May 2014. When fever subsided, low-dose aspirin treatment was started. Inflammatory (white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein) and thrombotic markers (D-dimer) were monitored at follow-ups conducted in 1- to 2-week intervals. The low-dose aspirin administration was terminated when both markers were normalized and no cardiovascular complications were observed. Eighty-four patients with KD (complete KD, n=49; incomplete KD, n=35) were enrolled. The inflammatory and thrombotic marker levels were normalized within 3-4 weeks on average. At the beginning the low-dose aspirin treatment, 9 patients had coronary artery lesions but 75 did not. When the low-dose aspirin administration was terminated at the time the inflammatory marker levels were normalized, no new CALs developed during the follow-up at 6-8 weeks. Most of the inflammatory marker levels were normalized within 3-4 weeks after the acute phase of KD. New cardiovascular complications did not develop during the course of the short-term aspirin treatment based on the inflammatory marker levels, clinical findings, and echocardiography.

  11. [Effects of intravenous immunoglobulin and aspirin treatment on the functions of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in children with Kawasaki disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming-Guo; Men, Li-Na; Zu, Ying; Zhao, Chun-Yu; Meng, Xiang-Chun

    2011-12-01

    To study the effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and aspirin treatment on the functions of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in children with Kawasaki disease (KD) and possible mechanisms. Blood samples were obtained in 10 children with KD before and 7 days after the treatment by IVIG and aspirin. MTT method, modified Boyden chamber method and cell culture plate adhesion method were used to assess the functions of EPCs, including proliferation, adhension and migration activities. The plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP) were also measured. The functions of circulating EPCs 7 days after IVIG and aspirin treatment were significantly improved. IVIG and aspirin treatment significantly reduced plasma TNF-α and hs-CRP concentrations. There was a significant linear regression relationship between the reduced plasma TNF-α and hs-CRP levels and the increased functions of circulating EPCs. IVIG and aspirin treatment can improve the functions of circulating EPCs, possibly through reducing plasma concentrations of TNF-α and hs-CRP.

  12. Paradoxical Effect of Aspirin

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    Christian Doutremepuich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-dose aspirin is an important therapeutic option in the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI and ischemic stroke, basedon its unique cost-effectiveness and widespread availability. In addition, based on the results of a number of large studies, aspirin is also widely used in the primary prevention of MI. This paper provides an update of the available data to offer greater clarity regarding the risks of aspirin with respect to hemorrhagic stroke. In the secondary prevention of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and ischemic events, the evidence supports that the benefits of aspirin treatment significantly outweigh the risk of a major hemorrhage. When considering whether aspirin is appropriate, the absolute therapeutic cardiovascular benefits of aspirin must be balanced with the possible risks associated with its use, being hemorrhagic stroke. Regarding these clinical facts, normal, COX 1 −/−, and COX 2 −/− mice were treated with a wide range of doses of aspirin and studied by induced hemorrhagic time. The results outlined three major conclusions: high doses of aspirin induce hemorrhage, while low doses of aspirin do not. In the absence of COX 1, ultra low doses of aspirin produce an antihemorrhagic effect not observed with intermediate doses. The absence of COX 2 induced a hemorrhagic effect that needs further research, probably originated in compensatory phenomena.

  13. Aspirin-Exacerbated Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese, Mathew; Lockey, Richard F

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on aspirin-exacerbated asthma (AEA). The review includes historical perspective of aspirin, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of AEA. The pathogenesis of AEA involves the cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. Aspirin affects both of these pathways by inhibiting the enzyme cycooxygenase-1 (COX-1). Inhibition of COX-1 leads to a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The decrease in PGE2 results in an increase in cysteinyl leukotrienes by the lipoo...

  14. Protective effect of heparin and aspirin against vascular thrombosis in pediatric kidney transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiar, Nasrin; Otukesh, Hasan; Sharifian, Mostafa; Hoseini, Rozita

    2012-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate preventive effect of a combination of heparin and aspirin on vascular thrombosis and kidney transplant outcomes of pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Twenty-four pediatric kidney transplant recipients received heparin, 50 U/kg, every 8 hours for 7 postoperative days, and aspirin, 5 mg/kg, thrice a week from day 3 of transplantation for 3 months. These patients were compared with a matched group of pediatric kidney allograft recipients in terms of development of thrombosis and serum creatinine level at 1 year postoperation. The mean age of patients was 9.4 ± 3.2 years. No vascular thrombosis was developed among the 24 patients with anticoagulant therapy, while in the control group, 5 grafts (7.9%) developed thrombosis (P = .19). Serum creatinine levels at 1 year were lower in the children with anticoagulant therapy as compared with the controls (P = .02). Our study revealed a reduction in kidney allograft thrombosis incidence in children who received heparin and aspirin after transplantation, which was clinically important although the difference was not statistically significant. Lower serum creatinine levels as compared with a historical cohort group were seen 1 year after transplant surgery. These findings are required to be confirmed by further studies.

  15. Repurposing of metformin and aspirin by targeting AMPK-mTOR and inflammation for pancreatic cancer prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wen; Yang, Chung S; DiPaola, Robert S; Tan, Xiang-Lin

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer, as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths, carries a poor prognosis with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3% to 5%. These statistics highlight an urgent need for novel chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies for this malignancy. Metformin and aspirin have been explored as two emerging cancer chemoprevention agents for different types of cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Here, we review the effects of both metformin and aspirin on pancreatic tumorigenesis and their potential actions in pancreatic cancer. Special attention is paid to their effects on the important signaling pathways of pancreatic cancer development as well as possible mechanisms for synergy between these two agents. For metformin, the most important mechanism may involve the inhibition of mTOR signaling via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent and -independent pathways. For aspirin, the major mechanism is the anti-inflammatory action through the inhibition of COX-1/COX-2 and modulation of the NFκB or STAT3 pathway. In addition, aspirin may activate AMPK, and both agents may affect Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, and other signaling pathways. The combination of metformin and aspirin will provide additive and possibly synergistic effects for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Treatment with low doses of aspirin during chronic phase of experimental Chagas' disease increases oesophageal nitrergic neuronal subpopulation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massocatto, Cristina Lorena; Martins Moreira, Neide; Muniz, Eliane; Marques de Araújo, Silvana; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Rossi, Robson Marcelo; de Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; de Mello Gonçales Sant'ana, Débora

    2018-01-19

    Patients with Chagas' disease may develop dysfunctions of oesophageal and colonic motility resulting from the degeneration or loss of the myenteric neurons of the enteric nervous system. Studies have shown that the use of aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), influences the pathogenesis of the disease. However, this remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of treatment with low doses of aspirin during the chronic phase of Chagas' disease on oesophageal function. Twenty male Swiss mice, 60 days of age, were used. The animals were infected with Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, injected intraperitoneally. Aspirin was given at a dose of 50 mg/kg to some of the infected animals, from the 55th to 63rd day after inoculation on consecutive days, and from the 65th to 75th day on alternate days. We investigated food passage of time, wall structure and nitrergic neuronal population of the distal oesophagus. Our data revealed that the use of low doses of aspirin in chronic Chagas' disease caused an increase in the number of nitrergic neurons and partially prevented hypertrophy of the oesophagus. In addition, the aspirin administration impeded Chagas' diseases associated changes in intestinal transit time. Thus treatment with aspirin in the chronic phase of Chagas' disease changes the natural history of the disease and raises the possibility of using it as a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of this aspect of Chagas' disease pathology. © 2018 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2018 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  17. ASPIRIN VERSUS INDOMETHACIN TREATMENT OF PATENT DUCTUS-ARTERIOSUS IN PRETERM INFANTS WITH RESPIRATORY-DISTRESS SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANOVERMEIRE, B; BRUS, F; VANACKER, KJ; VANDERAUWERA, JC; SCHASFOORT, M; ELZENGA, NJ; OKKEN, A

    1995-01-01

    Indomethacin (Indo) is commonly used for treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) but has renal failure as a main side effect. Aspirin (ASA) is an alternative, but there are no controlled trials on its efficacy. We randomly assigned 75 premature infants suffering from respiratory distress

  18. Role of aspirin for prevention and treatment of perioperative cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceppe, E; Mrkobrada, M; Thomas, S; Devereaux, P J

    2015-06-01

    Among adults undergoing non-cardiac surgery who are at risk of a myocardial infarction, a long-standing question has been whether these patients should receive aspirin throughout the perioperative period. A large (n = 10,010 patients) international trial (POISE-2) demonstrated that perioperative aspirin did not prevent myocardial infarction, and the result was consistent both for patients who had been taking aspirin before the trial (continuation stratum, 4382 patients) and for patients who had not been taking aspirin before the trial (initiation stratum, 5628 patients). Aspirin did, however, increase the risk of major bleeding. Therefore, the best evidence does not support the use of aspirin for the prevention of myocardial infarction in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. In patients who have an indication for long-term aspirin usage and have their aspirin held during the perioperative period, it is important to ensure aspirin is restarted after the high-risk period for bleeding has passed (i.e., 8-10 days after surgery). © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. A natural flavonoid present in unripe plantain banana pulp (Musa sapientum L. var. paradisiaca) protects the gastric mucosa from aspirin-induced erosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, D A; Fields, W N; Shaw, G P

    1999-06-01

    The active anti-ulcerogenic ingredient was extracted from unripe plantain banana by solvent fractionation and identified by chromatography, spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography as the flavonoid leucocyanidin. Dried unripe plantain banana powder, the extracted leucocyanidin and a purified synthetic leucocyanidin demonstrated a significant (P < 0.05) protective effect against aspirin-induced erosions.

  20. Aspirin revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, D.; Hu, X. K.; Loboda, A. V.; Mosey, N. J.; Lipson, R. H.

    2007-03-01

    Experiments are described where the experimental conditions have been optimized to detect aspirin by MALDI mass spectrometry. Although protonated aspirin was not observed by MALDI, sodium and potassium aspirin adducts could be found. Significantly better signals could be obtained by using Rb and Cs salts as cationization sources. Quantum calculations were carried out to determine the structure and energetics of the Li, K, Rb, and Cs alkali--aspirin adducts.

  1. Gastro-protective effect of methanol extract of Vernonia amygdalina (del. leaf on aspirin-induced gastric ulcer in Wistar rats

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    Modinat A. Adefisayo

    Full Text Available This study investigated the protective effects of methanol extract of Vernonia amygdalina leaf (MEVA on aspirin induced gastric ulcer in rats. Thirty Wistar rats, 150–200 g were divided into six groups as follows: Group 1 (control rats received 2 mL/kg of propylene glycol for 28 consecutive days. Group 2 (Ulcer Control received 150 mg/kg/day of aspirin suspended in 3 mL of 1% carboxymethylcellulose in water orally for 3 consecutive days during which the rats were fasted for the induction of ulcer. Group 3 received cimetidine at 100 mg/kg/day orally for 28 consecutive days and thereafter treated as group 2. Groups 4, 5 and 6 received MEVA orally at 200, 300 and 400 mg/kg/day respectively for 28 consecutive days and thereafter were treated with aspirin as group 2. All the animals were sacrifice at the end of the study to determine the gastric pH, gastric acidity, gastric ulcer score, haematological indices, superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, reduced glutathione (GSH and Lipid peroxidation (LPO levels. The result showed that aspirin significantly (p < 0.05 increased gastric ulcer score and index, decreased gastric pH, gastric acidity, SOD activity, GSH level as well as increased LPO level. It induced significant necrosis of the stomach tissue. Administration of MEVA significantly (p < 0.05 increased gastric pH, but decreased gastric acid secretion and reversed alteration of haematological parameters. It also significantly (p < 0.05 increased SOD activity, GSH level and decreased LPO level. The results suggest that Vernonia amygdalina possesses gastro-protective properties against aspirin-induced gastric ulcer. Keywords: Vernonia amygdalina, Aspirin, Gastric ulcer, Antioxidant, Rat

  2. Dissimilar effects of chronic treatment with aspirin, flubiprofen and indomethacin on renal prostaglandins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quilley, C.P.; McGiff, J.C.; Quilley, J.

    1986-03-01

    Inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) excretion is not sustained during long-term aspirin administration. The authors compared the effects of 9d treatment of SHR rats with aspirin (A), 200 mg/kg/d s.c., flubiprofen (F), 2.5 mg/kg/12h s.c., and indomethacin (I), 2.5 mg/kg/12 s.c. on excretion of radioimmunoassayable PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../. Conversion of 1-(/sup 14/C) arachidonic acid (AA) by renal papillae was also examined. In vehicle-treated control rats (C) PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ excretion varied from 32.2 +/- 6.2 (mean +/- SEM) to 41.6 +.- 7.3 ng/6h, 3-fold higher than that of PGE/sub 2/. Within 6h of administration all 3 drugs reduced excretion of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 2/ to less than 20% and 35% of C rats. Although urinary concentrations of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 2/ in A-treated rats remained depressed, a 2-fold increase in urine volume resulted in excretion rates similar to C rats. In contrast, urine volume in I- and F-treated rats was unaffected while PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 2/ excretion rates in I-treated rats were 50''% of C rats and were also lower than control in F-treated rats. Paradoxically, metabolism of AA to PGs by by renal papillae dissected on day 10, 2-4h after the last drug dose, was markedly inhibited by A (PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ by 62% and PGE/sub 2/ by 82%), but unaffected by I and F. As the effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors differ on in vivo and indices of PG production, their intended action should be verified by measuring PG levels in biological fluids.

  3. Lower Mortality Rate in Elderly Patients With Community‐Onset Pneumonia on Treatment With Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marco; Russo, Alessandro; Cangemi, Roberto; Farcomeni, Alessio; Calvieri, Camilla; Barillà, Francesco; Scarpellini, Maria Gabriella; Bertazzoni, Giuliano; Palange, Paolo; Taliani, Gloria; Venditti, Mario; Violi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is complicated by high rate of mortality and cardiovascular events (CVEs). The potential benefit of aspirin, which lowers platelet aggregation by inhibition of thromboxane A2 production, is still unclear. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of aspirin on mortality in patients with pneumonia. Methods and Results Consecutive patients admitted to the University‐Hospital Policlinico Umberto I (Rome, Italy) with community‐onset pneumonia were recruited and prospectively followed up until discharge or death. The primary end point was the occurrence of death up to 30 days after admission; the secondary end point was the intrahospital incidence of nonfatal myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. One thousand and five patients (age, 74.7±15.1 years) were included in the study: 390 were receiving aspirin (100 mg/day) at the time of hospitalization, whereas 615 patients were aspirin free. During the follow‐up, 16.2% of patients died; among these, 19 (4.9%) were aspirin users and 144 (23.4%; Paspirin nonusers. Overall, nonfatal CVEs occurred in 7% of patients, 8.3% in nonaspirin users, and 4.9% in aspirin users (odds ratio, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 3.04; P=0.040). The Cox regression analysis showed that pneumonia severity index (PSI), severe sepsis, pleural effusion, and PaO2/FiO2 ratio aspirin therapy was associated with improved survival. Compared to patients receiving aspirin, the propensity score adjusted analysis confirmed that patients not taking aspirin had a hazard ratio of 2.07 (1.08 to 3.98; P=0.029) for total mortality. Conclusions This study shows that chronic aspirin use is associated with lower mortality rate within 30 days after hospital admission in a large cohort of patients with pneumonia. PMID:25564372

  4. Aspirin and blood pressure: Effects when used alone or in combination with antihypertensive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana Catarina; Reina-Couto, Marta; Albino-Teixeira, António; Sousa, Teresa

    Arterial hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and renal events. Lowering blood pressure is thus an important strategy for reducing morbidity and mortality. Since low-dose aspirin is a cornerstone in the prevention of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, combined treatment with aspirin and antihypertensive drugs is very common. However, the impact of aspirin therapy on blood pressure control remains a subject of intense debate. Recent data suggest that the cardioprotective action of aspirin extends beyond its well-known antithrombotic effect. Aspirin has been shown to trigger the synthesis of specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators from arachidonic acid and omega-3 fatty acids. These novel anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving mediators actively stimulate the resolution of inflammation and tissue regeneration. Additionally, they may contribute to other protective effects on redox status and vascular reactivity that have also been attributed to aspirin. Of note, aspirin has been shown to improve vasodilation through cyclooxygenase-independent mechanisms. On the other hand, higher aspirin doses have been reported to exert a negative impact on blood pressure due to inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 activity, which reduces renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate and sodium and water excretion. This review aims to provide an overview of the effects of aspirin on blood pressure and the underlying mechanisms, focusing on the interaction between aspirin and antihypertensive drugs. Studies in both experimental and human hypertension are presented. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. The functions of endothelial progenitor cells were significantly improved after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and aspirin in children with Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming Guo; Men, Li Na; Zu, Ying; Zhao, Chun Yu; Meng, Xiang Chun; Wang, Tao

    2011-04-01

    We sought to determine the effects of treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and aspirin on the functions of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in patients with Kawasaki disease (KD) as well as its relationship with concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Ten KD patients in the acute phase of their disease were recruited. We investigated EPC functions in children with KD before and after treatment with IVIG and aspirin. In vitro assays were used to measure the functions, including proliferation, adhesion, and migration activities, of EPCs. Plasma levels of TNF-α and hs-CRP were also assessed. All of the data were assessed before and at 7 days after treatment initiation. EPC functions after 7 days of treatment with IVIG and aspirin were significantly improved than they were before treatment with IVIG and aspirin. Treatment with IVIG and aspirin significantly decreased TNF-α and hs-CRP concentrations. There was a significant linear regression relationship between decreased plasma TNF-α levels, hs-CRP levels, and increased functions of circulating EPCs. The results of our study indicate that the functions of circulating EPCs improved after treatment with IVIG and aspirin, which may be related to decreased concentrations of TNF-α and hs-CRP.

  6. Spinal cholinergic involvement after treatment with aspirin and paracetamol in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Kommalage, Mahinda; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-01-01

    Aspirin and paracetamol have been shown to suppress non-inflammatory pain conditions like thermal, visceral and mechanical pain in mice and rats. The non-inflammatory antinociception appears to be mediated by central receptor mechanisms, such as the cholinergic system. In this study, we tested...... the hypothesis that the non-inflammatory antinociception of aspirin and paracetamol could be mediated by an increase of intraspinal acetylcholine release. Microdialysis probes were placed intraspinally in anesthetized rats for acetylcholine sampling. Subcutaneously administered aspirin 100 and 300 mg....../kg increased, while paracetamol 300 mg/kg decreased intraspinal acetylcholine release. Intraspinal drug administration did not affect acetylcholine release. Our results suggest that an increased intraspinal acetylcholine release could be involved in part of the non-inflammatory pain suppression by aspirin...

  7. The Protective Effect of Low-Dose Aspirin against Colorectal Cancer Is Unlikely Explained by Selection Bias: Results from Three Different Study Designs in Clinical Practice.

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    Lucía Cea Soriano

    Full Text Available We conducted three differently designed nested case-control studies to evaluate whether the protective effect of low-dose aspirin against colorectal cancer (CRC is explained by selection bias.Using a large validated UK primary care database, we followed different cohorts of patients, who varied in their demographic and clinical characteristics, to identify first ever cases of CRC. In Studies 1 and 2, two cohorts were followed, i new users of low-dose aspirin at start of follow-up (N = 170,336 in Study 1, N = 171,527 in Study 2 and either ii non-users of low-dose aspirin (Study 1, N = 170,336 or new users of paracetamol (Study 2, N = 149,597 at start of follow-up. In Study 3 a single cohort of individuals näive to low-dose aspirin at the start of observation was followed. Controls were selected using incidence sampling and logistic regression used to obtain an unbiased estimate of the incidence rate ratio (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Low-dose aspirin exposure was analyzed 'as-treated' before the index date (CRC date for cases, random date for controls.In the three studies, median (maximum follow-up was 5.1 (12, 5.8 (12 and 7.5 (13 years, respectively. 3033 incident CRC cases were identified in Study 1, 3174 in Study 2, and 12,333 in Study 3. Current use of low-dose aspirin was associated with a significantly reduced risk of 34%, 29% and 31% in the three studies, respectively; corresponding RRs (95% CIs were 0.66 (0.60-0.73, 0.71 (0.63-0.80 and 0.69 (0.64-0.74. In each study, significantly reduced risks of CRC were seen when low-dose aspirin was used for primary or secondary cardiovascular disease prevention, in both sexes, and across all age groups evaluated.Low-dose aspirin is associated with a significantly reduced risk of CRC. The consistency of our findings across different studies makes selection bias an unlikely explanation.

  8. The Protective Effect of Low-Dose Aspirin against Colorectal Cancer Is Unlikely Explained by Selection Bias: Results from Three Different Study Designs in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse; García Rodríguez, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    We conducted three differently designed nested case-control studies to evaluate whether the protective effect of low-dose aspirin against colorectal cancer (CRC) is explained by selection bias. Using a large validated UK primary care database, we followed different cohorts of patients, who varied in their demographic and clinical characteristics, to identify first ever cases of CRC. In Studies 1 and 2, two cohorts were followed, i) new users of low-dose aspirin at start of follow-up (N = 170,336 in Study 1, N = 171,527 in Study 2) and either ii) non-users of low-dose aspirin (Study 1, N = 170,336) or new users of paracetamol (Study 2, N = 149,597) at start of follow-up. In Study 3 a single cohort of individuals näive to low-dose aspirin at the start of observation was followed. Controls were selected using incidence sampling and logistic regression used to obtain an unbiased estimate of the incidence rate ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Low-dose aspirin exposure was analyzed 'as-treated' before the index date (CRC date for cases, random date for controls). In the three studies, median (maximum) follow-up was 5.1 (12), 5.8 (12) and 7.5 (13) years, respectively. 3033 incident CRC cases were identified in Study 1, 3174 in Study 2, and 12,333 in Study 3. Current use of low-dose aspirin was associated with a significantly reduced risk of 34%, 29% and 31% in the three studies, respectively; corresponding RRs (95% CIs) were 0.66 (0.60-0.73), 0.71 (0.63-0.80) and 0.69 (0.64-0.74). In each study, significantly reduced risks of CRC were seen when low-dose aspirin was used for primary or secondary cardiovascular disease prevention, in both sexes, and across all age groups evaluated. Low-dose aspirin is associated with a significantly reduced risk of CRC. The consistency of our findings across different studies makes selection bias an unlikely explanation.

  9. Aspirin treatment of mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and implications for the pathogenesis of Chagas disease.

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    Shankar Mukherjee

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiovascular disease. It is increasingly clear that parasite-derived prostaglandins potently modulate host response and disease progression. Here, we report that treatment of experimental T. cruzi infection (Brazil strain beginning 5 days post infection (dpi with aspirin (ASA increased mortality (2-fold and parasitemia (12-fold. However, there were no differences regarding histopathology or cardiac structure or function. Delayed treatment with ASA (20 mg/kg beginning 60 dpi did not increase parasitemia or mortality but improved ejection fraction. ASA treatment diminished the profile of parasite- and host-derived circulating prostaglandins in infected mice. To distinguish the effects of ASA on the parasite and host bio-synthetic pathways we infected cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1 null mice with the Brazil-strain of T. cruzi. Infected COX-1 null mice displayed a reduction in circulating levels of thromboxane (TXA(2 and prostaglandin (PGF(2α. Parasitemia was increased in COX-1 null mice compared with parasitemia and mortality in ASA-treated infected mice indicating the effects of ASA on mortality potentially had little to do with inhibition of prostaglandin metabolism. Expression of SOCS-2 was enhanced, and TRAF6 and TNFα reduced, in the spleens of infected ASA-treated mice. Ablation of the initial innate response to infection may cause the increased mortality in ASA-treated mice as the host likely succumbs more quickly without the initiation of the "cytokine storm" during acute infection. We conclude that ASA, through both COX inhibition and other "off-target" effects, modulates the progression of acute and chronic Chagas disease. Thus, eicosanoids present during acute infection may act as immunomodulators aiding the transition to and maintenance of the chronic phase of the disease. A deeper understanding of the mechanism of ASA action may provide clues to the

  10. Aspirin treatment of mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and implications for the pathogenesis of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Shankar; Machado, Fabiana S; Huang, Huang; Oz, Helieh S; Jelicks, Linda A; Prado, Cibele M; Koba, Wade; Fine, Eugene J; Zhao, Dazhi; Factor, Stephen M; Collado, J Elias; Weiss, Louis M; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Ashton, Anthony W

    2011-02-15

    Chagas disease, caused by infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiovascular disease. It is increasingly clear that parasite-derived prostaglandins potently modulate host response and disease progression. Here, we report that treatment of experimental T. cruzi infection (Brazil strain) beginning 5 days post infection (dpi) with aspirin (ASA) increased mortality (2-fold) and parasitemia (12-fold). However, there were no differences regarding histopathology or cardiac structure or function. Delayed treatment with ASA (20 mg/kg) beginning 60 dpi did not increase parasitemia or mortality but improved ejection fraction. ASA treatment diminished the profile of parasite- and host-derived circulating prostaglandins in infected mice. To distinguish the effects of ASA on the parasite and host bio-synthetic pathways we infected cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) null mice with the Brazil-strain of T. cruzi. Infected COX-1 null mice displayed a reduction in circulating levels of thromboxane (TX)A(2) and prostaglandin (PG)F(2α). Parasitemia was increased in COX-1 null mice compared with parasitemia and mortality in ASA-treated infected mice indicating the effects of ASA on mortality potentially had little to do with inhibition of prostaglandin metabolism. Expression of SOCS-2 was enhanced, and TRAF6 and TNFα reduced, in the spleens of infected ASA-treated mice. Ablation of the initial innate response to infection may cause the increased mortality in ASA-treated mice as the host likely succumbs more quickly without the initiation of the "cytokine storm" during acute infection. We conclude that ASA, through both COX inhibition and other "off-target" effects, modulates the progression of acute and chronic Chagas disease. Thus, eicosanoids present during acute infection may act as immunomodulators aiding the transition to and maintenance of the chronic phase of the disease. A deeper understanding of the mechanism of ASA action may provide clues to the differences

  11. Aspirin or heparin or both in the treatment of recurrent spontaneous abortion in women with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chang; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Hai-Li

    2018-01-10

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of aspirin or heparin or both in the treatment for recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) in women with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). Systematic searches for randomized clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating on live birth and preterm delivery, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, gestational diabetes, bleeding of RSA with APS patients receiving aspirin, and heparin therapy were carried out, from PubMed, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, and CNKI. Related data were extracted from eligible studies and then subjected to Reviewer Manage 5.3 for analysis. Relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval were calculated. Nineteen publications with randomized controlled trials were selected for this study, which included a total of 1251 pregnant patients with diagnosis of RSA with APS. With respect to live birth, it was remarkably improved in aspirin plus heparin or heparin alone group [RR =1.23, 95% CI (1.12-1.36), p < .0001; RR = 1.18, 95% CI (1.03-1.35), p = .02]; aspirin alone group, however, there was no statistically significant difference compare to placebo [RR = 0.97, 95% CI (0.80-1.16), p = .71]. Meanwhile, aspirin plus heparin therapy did not significantly reduce the risk of recurrent placenta-mediated pregnancy complications including preterm birth, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), gestational diabetes, and minor bleeding. A beneficial therapeutic effect of heparin alone therapy was found on preventing preterm birth and low-dose aspirin plus heparin therapy was significant reduce the risk of preeclampsia. An improvement of pregnancy outcomes in women with RSA and APS can be achieved by treatment strategies combining low-dose aspirin plus heparin or heparin alone. Aspirin alone, by contrast, seemed inferior to other treatments in achieving more live birth.

  12. Nitric oxide, afferent sensory nerves, and antioxidative enzymes in the mechanism of protection mediated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium(II) dimer and sodium hydrosulfide against aspirin-induced gastric damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magierowski, Marcin; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Magierowska, Katarzyna; Wojcik, Dagmara; Sliwowski, Zbigniew; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    Aspirin exerts side effects within the gastrointestinal tract. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon monoxide (CO) have been implicated in gastroprotection but the mechanism of beneficial action of these gaseous mediators against aspirin-induced damage has not been fully studied. We determined the involvement of afferent sensory neurons, calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP), lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide (NO) biosynthesis in gastroprotection of H2S-releasing NaHS and CO-releasing tricarbonyldichlororuthenium(II) dimer (CORM-2) against aspirin-induced injury. Wistar rats with or without capsaicin-induced denervation of sensory neurons were pretreated with vehicle, CORM-2 (5 mg/kg intragastrically), or NaHS (5 mg/kg intragastrically) with or without capsazepine (5 mg/kg intragastrically) or N G-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 20 mg/kg intraperitoneally). The areas of aspirin-induced lesions and gastric blood flow (GBF) were assessed by planimetry and laser flowmetry respectively. Gastric mucosal messenger RNA and/or protein expression of CGRP, heme oxygenase 1, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, interleukin-1β, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1), and superoxide dismutase was determined by real-time PCR or Western blot. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) content was determined by colorimetric assay. Aspirin caused gastric lesions, decreased GBF, and raised MDA content, but pretreatment with NaHS and CORM-2 reduced these effects. Capsaicin-induced denervation or co-treatment with capsazepine reversed the gastroprotective and vasodilatory effects of NaHS but not those of CORM-2. L-NNA reversed NaHS-induced gastroprotection and partly reduced CORM-2-induced gastroprotection. NaHS and CORM-2 decreased MDA and 4-HNE content, restoring GPx-1 protein expression. We conclude that H2S- but not CO-mediated gastroprotection against aspirin-induced injury involves afferent sensory nerves and partly NO activity. NaHS and CORM-2 prevented

  13. GPIIb/IIIa Receptor Antagonism Using Small Molecules Provides no Additive Long-Term Protection after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention as Compared to Clopidogrel Plus Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiariti, Michele; Saladini, Angela; Papalia, Francesco; Grillo, Placido; Nesta, Cristina; Cuturello, Domenico; Missiroli, Bindo; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is some controversy as to whether tirofiban or eptifibatide, two small anti-aggregating drugs (AAD), may reduce the incidence of composite ischemic events within one year in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the real clinical world. Methods: We compared consecutive patients on oral double AAD (with clopidogrel and aspirin) who underwent PCI (n=207) and patients who were on single AAD and received a second AAD, just prior to PCI, and either high-dose tirofiban or double-bolus eptifibatide (double AAD plus small molecules group, n=666). The primary end point (incidence of composite ischemic events within one year) included death, acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, stent thrombosis or repeat PCI or coronary bypass surgery (related to the target vessel PCI failure) and was modelled by Cox’s regression. Results: There were 89 composite ischemic events: 24 (11.6%) in double AAD alone and 65 (9.8%) in double AAD plus small molecules groups (log-rank test: p=0.36). Incidences by type of ischemic events were similar between the 2 groups. Based on 21 potential covariates fitted simultaneously, adjusted hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals) showed that age (HR 1.03, 1.01-1.06, p=0.01), diabetes (HR 1.68, 1.01-2.79, p=0.05) and intra aortic balloon pump (HR 5.12, 2.36-11.10, p=0.0001) were significant risk factors whereas thrombolysis by tenecteplase (HR 0.35, 0.13-0.98, p=0.05) and having had hypertension or anti-hypertensive treatment (HR 0.58, 0.36-0.93, p=0.03) were significant protectors for events. Whether small molecules were present provided a non significant additional benefit as compared to double AAD alone (HR 0.83, 0.51-1.36, p=0.46). Pre-PCI CK-MB were not useful to predict events (HR 1.01, 0.99-1.01, p=0.17). Conclusions: In clinical world patients undergoing PCI (rescue plus primary <13%) while on double AAD, based on clopidogrel plus aspirin, small molecules (tirofiban or eptifibatide

  14. Aspirin resistant patients with recent ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Navas-Alcántara, M S; Fernández-Moreno, M C

    2014-04-01

    Some patients with a recent ischemic stroke who are being treated with aspirin as an antiaggregant suffer a new ischemic stroke. These patients (15-25%) have been called unresponsive to aspirin or aspirin resistant. The aspirin-resistant patients have a four-time greater risk of suffering a stroke. Furthermore, these strokes are generally more severe, with increased infarct volume and greater risk of recurrence. There is currently no ideal laboratory test to detect the resistance to the antiaggregant effect of aspirin. The study of resistance to aspirin would only be indicated in selected cases. In these patients, one should first rule out any "pseudo-resistance" to aspirin (lack of compliance, concomitant treatments that interfere with the action of the aspirin). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Aspirin-Exacerbated Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Mathew

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on aspirin-exacerbated asthma (AEA. The review includes historical perspective of aspirin, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of AEA. The pathogenesis of AEA involves the cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. Aspirin affects both of these pathways by inhibiting the enzyme cycooxygenase-1 (COX-1. Inhibition of COX-1 leads to a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. The decrease in PGE2 results in an increase in cysteinyl leukotrienes by the lipooxygenase pathway involving the enzyme 5-lipooxygenase (5-LO. Leukotriene C4 (LTC4 synthase is the enzyme responsible for the production of leukotriene C4, the chief cysteinyl leukotriene responsible for AEA. There have been familial occurences of AEA. An allele of the LTC4 synthase gene in AEA is known as allele C. Allele C has a higher frequency in AEA. Clinical presentation includes a history of asthma after ingestion of aspirin, nasal congestion, watery rhinorrhea and nasal polyposis. Treatment includes leukotriene receptor antagonists, leukotriene inhibitors, aspirin desinsitaztion and surgery. AEA is the most well-defined phenotype of asthma. Although AEA affects adults and children with physician-diagnosed asthma, in some cases there is no history of asthma and AEA often goes unrecognized and underdiagnosed.

  16. A combination treatment of folic acid, aspirin, doxycycline and progesterone for women with recurrent early pregnancy loss; hospital based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal M. Zahran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study aims to state the effectiveness of a new combination treatment composed of folic acid, doxycycline, low dose aspirin and natural progesterone in cases of recurrent early pregnancy loss. Study design: A clinical comparative hospital-based study. Setting: Women Health Hospital – Assiut University – Egypt. Materials and methods: All patients with recurrent early pregnancy loss at 10 weeks or less attending our antenatal care unit were included. The patients were recruited over a period of 16 months and allocated into two groups. The study group received a regimen of folic acid, doxycycline, aspirin, and progesterone. The control group did not receive the previous regimen in the proposed way. The main outcome measures the live birth rate and complications of pregnancy in both groups. Results: Three hundred patients were recruited, with 150 women in each group. A high rate of live births was found in the study group (76.0% more than the control group (59.3%. Women in the Control Group reported more complications (76.0% vs. 51.3%. These were mainly abortion (40.0% vs. 23.3%, pre-eclampsia (16.0% vs. 10.7% and oligohydramnios (10.0% vs. 6.7%. Conclusion: The implementation of combination treatment of folic acid, doxycycline, low dose aspirin and natural progesterone resulted in a significant increase in the live birth rate, a significant reduction in miscarriages, and lower incidence of complications in patients with recurrent early pregnancy loss.

  17. Amelioration of Aspirin Induced Oxidative Impairment and Apoptotic Cell Death by a Novel Antioxidant Protein Molecule Isolated from the Herb Phyllanthus niruri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Ghosh, Shatadal; Sil, Parames C.

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin has been used for a long time as an analgesic and anti-pyretic drug. Limitations of its use, however, remain for the gastro-intestinal side effects and erosions. Although the role of aspirin on gastro-intestinal injury has been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms underlying aspirin-induced liver and spleen pathophysiology are poorly defined. The present study has been conducted to investigate whether phyllanthus niruri protein (PNP) possesses any protective role against aspirin mediated liver and spleen tissue toxicity, and if so, what signaling pathways it utilizes to convey its protective action. Aspirin administration in mice enhanced serum marker (ALP) levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, reduced antioxidant power and altered oxidative stress related biochemical parameters in liver and spleen tissues. Moreover, we observed that aspirin intoxication activated both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, as well as down regulated NF-κB activation and the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK MAPKs. Histological assessments and TUNEL assay also supported that aspirin induced tissue damages are apoptotic in nature. PNP treatment after aspirin exposure effectively neutralizes all these abnormalities via the activation of survival PI3k/Akt pathways. Combining all results suggest that PNP could be a potential protective agent to protect liver and spleen from the detrimental effects of aspirin. PMID:24586486

  18. Protective Effects of Aspirin from Cardiac Hypertrophy and Oxidative Stress in Cardiomyopathic Hamsters

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    Rong Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the capacity of chronic ASA therapy to prevent cardiac alterations and increased oxidative stress in cardiomyopathic hamsters. Methods and Results. Male Syrian cardiomyopathic and age-matched inbred control hamsters received ASA orally from the age of 60 days. Animals were sacrificed at the age of 150, 250, and 350 days to evaluate the time course of cardiac hypertrophy and cardiovascular tissue superoxide anion (O2- production. At the age of 150 days, the ventricular weight over body weight ratio, resting heart rate, and cardiovascular O2- production were much higher in cardiomyopathic hamsters than those in control. At the age of 250 days, in addition to the continual deterioration of these parameters with age, the blood pressure started to fall and the signs of heart failure appeared. In these cardiomyopathic hamsters, chronic ASA treatment (a completely prevented elevated O2- production and the NAD(PH oxidase activity, (b significantly slowed down the development of the cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Conclusions. Chronic ASA treatment significantly prevents the deterioration of cardiac function and structure as well as the increased oxidative stress in the cardiomyopathic hamster. Our findings suggest that ASA presents a therapeutic potential to prevent cardiac dysfunction.

  19. Protective effects of aspirin from cardiac hypertrophy and oxidative stress in cardiomyopathic hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rong; Yin, David; Sadekova, Nataliya; Deschepper, Christian F; de Champlain, Jacques; Girouard, Helene

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the capacity of chronic ASA therapy to prevent cardiac alterations and increased oxidative stress in cardiomyopathic hamsters. Male Syrian cardiomyopathic and age-matched inbred control hamsters received ASA orally from the age of 60 days. Animals were sacrificed at the age of 150, 250, and 350 days to evaluate the time course of cardiac hypertrophy and cardiovascular tissue superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) production. At the age of 150 days, the ventricular weight over body weight ratio, resting heart rate, and cardiovascular O(2)(-) production were much higher in cardiomyopathic hamsters than those in control. At the age of 250 days, in addition to the continual deterioration of these parameters with age, the blood pressure started to fall and the signs of heart failure appeared. In these cardiomyopathic hamsters, chronic ASA treatment (a) completely prevented elevated O(2)(-) production and the NAD(P)H oxidase activity, (b) significantly slowed down the development of the cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Chronic ASA treatment significantly prevents the deterioration of cardiac function and structure as well as the increased oxidative stress in the cardiomyopathic hamster. Our findings suggest that ASA presents a therapeutic potential to prevent cardiac dysfunction.

  20. Aspirin and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrignani, Paola; Patrono, Carlo

    2016-08-30

    The place of aspirin in primary prevention remains controversial, with North American and European organizations issuing contradictory treatment guidelines. More recently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended "initiating low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and colorectal cancer in adults aged 50 to 59 years who have a 10% or greater 10-year CVD risk, are not at increased risk for bleeding, have a life expectancy of at least 10 years, and are willing to take low-dose aspirin daily for at least 10 years." This recommendation reflects increasing evidence for a chemopreventive effect of low-dose aspirin against colorectal (and other) cancer. The intent of this paper is to review the evidence supporting a chemopreventive effect of aspirin, discuss its potential mechanism(s) of action, and provide a conceptual framework for assessing current guidelines in the light of ongoing studies. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protective Effects of Pinus halepensis L. Essential Oil on Aspirin-induced Acute Liver and Kidney Damage in Female Wistar Albino Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzenna, Hafsia; Samout, Noura; Amani, Etaya; Mbarki, Sakhria; Tlili, Zied; Rjeibi, Ilhem; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Talarmin, Hélène; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2016-08-01

    Aromatic and medicinal plants are sources of natural antioxidants thanks to their secondary metabolites. Administration of Pinus halepensis L. (Pinaceae family) in previous studies was found to alleviate deleterious effects of aspirin-induced damage on liver and kidney. The present study, carried out on female rats, evaluates the effects of P. halepensis L. essential oil (EOP) on aspirin (A)-induced damage to liver and kidney. The animals used in this study were rats (n=28) divided into 4 groups of 7 each: (1) a control group (C); (2) a group given NaCl for 56 days then treated with (A) (600 mg/kg) for 4 days (A); (3) a group fed with (EOP) for 56 days then (A) for 4 days; and a group fed with only (EOP) for 56 days and given NaCl for 4 days. Estimations of biochemical parameters in blood were determined using kit methods (Spinreact). Lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were determined. Histopathological study was done by immersing pieces of both organs in a fixative solution followed by paraffin embeddeding and hematoxylin-eosin staining. Under our experimental conditions, Aspirin at dose 600 mg/kg body weight induced an increase of serum biochemical parameters as well as an oxidative stress in both organs. An increase occurred in TBARS by 108% and 55%, a decrease in SOD by 78% and 53%, CAT by 53% and 78%, and GPx by 78% and 51% in liver and kidney, respectively, compared to control. Administration of EOP given to rats enabled correction in these parameters. It could be concluded that the treatment with P. halepensis L. essential oil inhibited aspirin-induced liver and kidney damage.

  2. TRUE RESISTANCE AND PSEUDORESISTANCE TO ASPIRIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Martynov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low dose aspirin reduces the secondary incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke. Drug resistance to aspirin might result in treatment failure. Despite this concern, no clear definition of aspirin resistance has emerged, and estimates of its incidence have varied remarkably. Researchers from university of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, the USA, led by Dr. Tilo Grosser, aimed to determine the specific phenotype of true pharmacological resistance to aspirin — such as might be explained by genetic causes. However the study failed to identify a single case of true drug resistance. Pseudoresistance, reflecting delayed and reduced drug absorption, complicates enteric coated but not immediate release aspirin administration.

  3. Aspirin in the Treatment of Cancer: Reductions in Metastatic Spread and in Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of Published Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C Elwood

    Full Text Available Low-dose aspirin has been shown to reduce the incidence of cancer, but its role in the treatment of cancer is uncertain.We conducted a systematic search of the scientific literature on aspirin taken by patients following a diagnosis of cancer, together with appropriate meta-analyses.Searches were completed in Medline and Embase in December 2015 using a pre-defined search strategy. References and abstracts of all the selected papers were scanned and expert colleagues were contacted for additional studies. Two reviewers applied pre-determined eligibility criteria (cross-sectional, cohort and controlled studies, and aspirin taken after a diagnosis of cancer, assessed study quality and extracted data on cancer cause-specific deaths, overall mortality and incidence of metastases. Random effects meta-analyses and planned sub-group analyses were completed separately for observational and experimental studies. Heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed in sensitivity analyses and appropriate omissions made. Papers were examined for any reference to bleeding and authors of the papers were contacted and questioned.Five reports of randomised trials were identified, together with forty two observational studies: sixteen on colorectal cancer, ten on breast and ten on prostate cancer mortality. Pooling of eleven observational reports of the effect of aspirin on cause-specific mortality from colon cancer, after the omission of one report identified on the basis of sensitivity analyses, gave a hazard ratio (HR of 0.76 (95% CI 0.66, 0.88 with reduced heterogeneity (P = 0.04. The cause specific mortality in five reports of patients with breast cancer showed significant heterogeneity (P<0.0005 but the omission of one outlying study reduced heterogeneity (P = 0.19 and led to an HR = 0.87 (95% CI 0.69, 1.09. Heterogeneity between nine studies of prostate cancer was significant, but again, the omission of one study led to acceptable homogeneity (P = 0.26 and an

  4. Design and evaluation of famotidine mucoadhesive nanoparticles for aspirin induced ulcer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Dhaval J., E-mail: dhaval6668@gmail.com [Department of Pharmaceutics, Saraswati Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gujarat (India); Patel, Jayvadan K. [Department of Pharmaceutics, Nootan Pharmacy College, Visnagar (India)

    2013-03-15

    The present study was performed to design and evaluate the famotidine loaded mucoadhesive nanosuspension for aspirin induced ulcer. A 3-factor, 3-level Box-Behnken design was applied to study the effects of amount of the beads (X{sub 1}), PVPK-30(X{sub 2}) and Tween-80 (X{sub 3}) on the particle size (Y{sub 1}), and cumulative percentage drug released after 1h (Y{sub 2}). The optimization was performed using the desirability function and contour plots. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the nanoparticles as spherical in shape. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis indicated that there was substantial crystallinity change in the nanoparticle compared with the pure drug. Ex-vivo mucoadhesion study showed that famotidine mucoadhesive nanoparticles possessed higher mucoadhesion than the famotidine nanoparticles. The in vivo studies on aspirin-induced rats indicated the lowering in ulcer index for famotidine mucoadhesive nanoparticles was 0.46 {+-}0.011, which was significantly better than the effect of traditional famotidine suspension (0.66{+-}0.035). Famotidine mucoadhesive nanosuspension could be prepared using the media milling technique and allowing significant reduction in ulcer index compared to famotidine suspension. (author)

  5. Aspirin in the Treatment of Cancer: Reductions in Metastatic Spread and in Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of Published Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has been shown to reduce the incidence of cancer, but its role in the treatment of cancer is uncertain. Objectives We conducted a systematic search of the scientific literature on aspirin taken by patients following a diagnosis of cancer, together with appropriate meta-analyses. Methods Searches were completed in Medline and Embase in December 2015 using a pre-defined search strategy. References and abstracts of all the selected papers were scanned and expert colleagues were contacted for additional studies. Two reviewers applied pre-determined eligibility criteria (cross-sectional, cohort and controlled studies, and aspirin taken after a diagnosis of cancer), assessed study quality and extracted data on cancer cause-specific deaths, overall mortality and incidence of metastases. Random effects meta-analyses and planned sub-group analyses were completed separately for observational and experimental studies. Heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed in sensitivity analyses and appropriate omissions made. Papers were examined for any reference to bleeding and authors of the papers were contacted and questioned. Results Five reports of randomised trials were identified, together with forty two observational studies: sixteen on colorectal cancer, ten on breast and ten on prostate cancer mortality. Pooling of eleven observational reports of the effect of aspirin on cause-specific mortality from colon cancer, after the omission of one report identified on the basis of sensitivity analyses, gave a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.76 (95% CI 0.66, 0.88) with reduced heterogeneity (P = 0.04). The cause specific mortality in five reports of patients with breast cancer showed significant heterogeneity (Paspirin, and in five the effect is statistically significant. There were no significant differences between the pooled HRs for the three main cancers and after the omission of three reports already identified in sensitivity analyses heterogeneity was

  6. High on treatment platelet reactivity against aspirin by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs--pharmacological mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohlfeld, T; Saxena, A; Schrör, K

    2013-05-01

    Inhibition of platelet function by aspirin results from irreversible inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1. While sufficient inhibition is obtained at antiplatelet doses (75-325 mg/day) in most (≥95%) treated patients, the antiplatelet effect of aspirin and subsequent cardiovascular risk reduction is much less in clinical settings and disease-dependent. Several reasons for this "high on treatment platelet reactivity" are known. This paper reviews the evidence for an interaction between aspirin and other COX inhibitors, namely non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Numerous experimental studies demonstrated a pharmacodynamic interaction between aspirin and NSAIDs. This likely occurs within the hydrophobic substrate channel of platelet COX-1 and might be explained by molecular competition between inhibitor drugs and substrate (arachidonic acid) at overlapping binding sites. This interaction is found with some compounds, notably ibuprofen and dipyrone (metamizole), but not with others, such as diclofenac and acetaminophen (paracetamol). Hence, this interaction is not a class effect of NSAIDs and/or non-steroidal analgesics but rather due to specific structural requirements which still remain to be defined. In vivo studies on healthy subjects and patients tend to confirm this type of interaction as well as large differences between NSAIDs and non-steroidal analgesics, respectively. These interactions may be clinically relevant and may increase the cardiovascular risk in long-term treatment for primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention in patients with chronic inflammation, such as rheumatoid arthritis. These patients have an elevated risk for myocardial infarctions and may require chronic antiplatelet treatment by aspirin in addition to treatment of inflammatory pain.

  7. Aspirin and Omeprazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of aspirin and omeprazole is used to reduce the risk of stroke or heart attack in patients who have had or ... risk of developing a stomach ulcer when taking aspirin. Aspirin is in a class of medications called ...

  8. Aspirin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled Mansour; Ali T. Taher; Khaled M. Musallam; Samir Alam

    2009-01-01

    The development of adverse cardiovascular events despite aspirin use has established an interest in a possible resistance to the drug. Several definitions have been set and various laboratory testing modalities are available. This has led to a wide range of prevalence reports in different clinical entities. The etiologic mechanism has been related to clinical, genetic, and other miscellaneous factors. The clinical implications of this phenomenon are significant and warrant concern. Management...

  9. Treatment of bipolar depression with minocycline and/or aspirin: an adaptive, 2×2 double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase IIA clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, Jonathan B; Teague, T Kent; Misaki, Masaya; Macaluso, Matt; Wurfel, Brent E; Meyer, Matt; Drevets, Douglas; Yates, William; Gleason, Ondria; Drevets, Wayne C; Preskorn, Sheldon H

    2018-01-24

    Given evidence of chronic inflammation in bipolar disorder (BD), we tested the efficacy of aspirin and minocycline as augmentation therapy for bipolar depression. Ninety-nine depressed outpatients with BD were enrolled in a 6 week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, and randomized to one of four groups: active minocycline (100 mg b.i.d.) + active aspirin (81 mg b.i.d.) (M + A); active minocycline + placebo aspirin (M + P); placebo-minocycline + active aspirin (A + P); and placebo-minocycline + placebo aspirin (P + P). A blinded interim analysis mid-way through the study led to the dropping of the M + P and A + P arms from further enrollment giving numbers per group who were included in the final analysis of: 30 (M + A), 18 (M + P), 19 (A + P), and 28 (P + P). When the study started, there were three primary outcome measures. Based on the results of the interim analysis, the primary outcome variable, response to treatment as defined by >50% decrease in Montgomery-Äsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score was maintained. The other two (i.e., the change in mean MADRS score from baseline to end of study and the remission rate, with remission being defined as a score of <11 on the MADRS) were reduced to exploratory outcome measures because the interim analysis indicated that the study was adequately powered to test differences in response rate but not the mean change in MADRS scores or remission rates. CRP and IL-6 were assayed to measure inflammation. Urinary thromboxane B2 (11-D-TXB2) concentrations, which were significantly increased at baseline in the combined BD sample (n = 90) vs. a healthy control group (n = 27), served as an indirect marker of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity. In a two-group analysis, the M + A group showed a greater response rate than the P + P group (p(one-tailed) = 0.034, OR = 2.93, NNT = 4.7). When all four arms were included in the analysis, there

  10. The role of aspirin in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Michael J; Jacobs, Eric J; Patrono, Carlo

    2012-04-03

    Clinical guidelines for prophylactic aspirin use currently only consider the cardiovascular benefits of aspirin, weighed against the potential harm from aspirin-induced bleeding. Daily aspirin use has been convincingly shown to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and recurrence of adenomatous polyps, but in average-risk populations, these benefits alone do not outweigh harms from aspirin-induced bleeding. Recently published secondary analyses of cardiovascular trials provide the first randomized evidence that daily aspirin use may also reduce the incidence of all cancers combined, even at low doses (75-100 mg daily). This Review considers the general mechanism of action that defines aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a class, the specific advantages of aspirin over other NSAIDs for prophylactic use, the current evidence concerning the main health outcomes affected by aspirin use, and the hypothesis that inhibition of platelet activation may mediate both the cardioprotective and cancer-preventive effects of low-dose aspirin. It also considers how even a 10% reduction in overall cancer incidence beginning during the first 10 years of treatment could tip the balance of benefits and risks favourably in average-risk populations.

  11. Effect of aspirin in "aspirin sensitive" patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Asad, S I; Kemeny, D M; Youlten, L J; Frankland, A W; Lessof, M H

    1984-01-01

    Eighteen patients with a history of urticaria or asthma, or both, induced by aspirin were studied before and after provocation of symptoms with aspirin. The plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha concentration, which was characteristically raised before challenge, fell significantly at the time of adverse reactions. Repeated administration of aspirin up to a dose of 650 mg daily induced tolerance in most of the patients, and several developed bronchodilator responses to aspirin. Although median total ...

  12. Aspirin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Mansour

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of adverse cardiovascular events despite aspirin use has established an interest in a possible resistance to the drug. Several definitions have been set and various laboratory testing modalities are available. This has led to a wide range of prevalence reports in different clinical entities. The etiologic mechanism has been related to clinical, genetic, and other miscellaneous factors. The clinical implications of this phenomenon are significant and warrant concern. Management strategies are currently limited to dosing alteration and introduction of other anitplatelet agents. However, these measures have not met the expected efficacy or safety.

  13. Chronic aspirin treatment affects collagen deposition in non-infarcted myocardium during remodeling after coronary artery ligation in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.J. Kalkman (Ed); R-J. van Suylen (Robert-Jan); J.P.M. van Dijk (J. P M); P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan); R.G. Schoemaker (Regien)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractLow-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA), inhibiting platelet thromboxane production in favor of endothelium formation of prostaglandins, is successfully used as primary or secondary prophylaxis against myocardial infarction. Although prognosis may be improved, effects of long-term

  14. The infrared spectra and structure of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and its oxyanion: an ab initio force field treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binev, I. G.; Stamboliyska, B. A.; Binev, Y. I.

    1996-05-01

    The structures of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) (I) and its oxyanion (II) have been studied by means of infrared spectra and ab initio 3-21 G force field calculations. The 3100-1100 cm -1 region bands of both the aspirin molecule and its oxyanion have been assigned. The theoretical infrared data for the free aspirin anion are in good agreement with the experimental data for aspirin alkali-metal salts in dimethyl sulfoxide- d6. The theoretical geometrical parameters for the isolated aspirin molecule are close to the literature X-ray diffraction data for its dimer in the solid state, except for those of the carboxy group, which participates directly in hydrogen bond formation. The changes in both the spectral and geometrical parameters, caused by the conversion of the aspirin molecule into the anion, are essential, but they are localized mainly within the carboxy group and the adjacent C-Ph bond. This is also true for the changes in the corresponding bond indices and electronic charges.

  15. Association of Discharge Aspirin Dose With Outcomes After Acute Myocardial Infarction: Insights From the Treatment with ADP Receptor Inhibitors: Longitudinal Assessment of Treatment Patterns and Events after Acute Coronary Syndrome (TRANSLATE-ACS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Ying; Wang, Tracy Y; McCoy, Lisa A; Effron, Mark B; Henry, Timothy D; Bach, Richard G; Zettler, Marjorie E; Baker, Brian A; Fonarow, Gregg C; Peterson, Eric D

    2015-07-21

    Aspirin is the most widely used antiplatelet drug postmyocardial infarction, yet its optimal maintenance dose after percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting remains uncertain. We compared outcomes of 10 213 patients with myocardial infarction who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention and were discharged on dual-antiplatelet therapy at 228 US hospitals in the Treatment with ADP Receptor Inhibitors: Longitudinal Assessment of Treatment Patterns and Events after Acute Coronary Syndrome (TRANSLATE-ACS) study from 2010 to 2012. Major adverse cardiovascular events and bleeding within 6 months postdischarge were compared between high-dose (325 mg) and low-dose aspirin (81 mg) by using regression models with inverse probability-weighted propensity adjustment. Overall, 6387 patients (63%) received high-dose aspirin at discharge. Major adverse cardiovascular events risk was not significantly different between groups (high versus low: unadjusted 8.2% versus 9.2%; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.85-1.17). High-dose aspirin use was associated with greater risk of any Bleeding Academic Research Consortium-defined bleeding events (unadjusted 24.2% versus 22.7%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.33), driven mostly by minor Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type 1 or 2 bleeding events not requiring hospitalization (unadjusted 21.4% versus 19.5%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.34). Bleeding events requiring hospitalization were similar by aspirin dosing groups (unadjusted 2.8% versus 3.2%, adjusted odds ratio, 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 0.87-1.70). Similar associations were observed in landmark analyses accounting for aspirin dosing change over time, and across subgroup analyses by age, sex, baseline aspirin use, and type of ADP receptor inhibitor (clopidogrel versus prasugrel/ticagrelor). Among percutaneous coronary intervention-treated patients with myocardial infarction, high

  16. A critical appraisal of the phenomenon of aspirin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup Poulsen, Tina; Risom Kristensen, Søren; Atar, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay antiplatelet treatment in patients with high risk of cardiovascular atherothrombotic events, and its beneficial effect is documented in several clinical trials. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of aspirin has been questioned by the emergence of the concept of 'aspirin...

  17. PIXE analysis of trace metals in aspirin-treated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rinsvelt, H.A.; Sater, R.; Hurd, R.W.; Andres, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Aspirin is known to complex metals, yet its effect on trace metals of the body remains poorly characterized. Chronic aspirin treatment of rats for one week produced significant alterations of serum iron, zinc, and selenium, and liver selenium and copper. Implications of metal complexation on the mechanism of action of aspirin and the association with Reye's Syndrome are discussed.

  18. PIXE analysis of trace metals in aspirin-treated rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rinsvelt, H. A.; Sater, R.; Hurd, R. W.; Andres, J. M.

    1985-05-01

    Aspirin is known to complex metals, yet its effect on trace metals of the body remains poorly characterized. Chronic aspirin treatment of rats for one week produced significant alterations of serum iron, zinc, and selenium, and liver selenium and copper. Implications of metal complexation on the mechanism of action of aspirin and the association with Reye's Syndrome are discussed.

  19. Aspirin treatment improved mesenchymal stem cell immunomodulatory properties via the 15d-PGJ2/PPARγ/TGF-β1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianxia; Xiong, Jimin; Wu, Tingting; Tang, Zhangui; Ding, Gang; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Songlin; Liu, Yi

    2014-09-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) have been used to treat a variety of autoimmune diseases in clinics. However, the therapeutic effects are largely dependent on the immunomodulatory capacity of culture-expanded BMMSCs. In the present study, we show that aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA)-treated BMMSCs have significantly improved immunomodulatory function, as indicated by upregulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and downregulation of Th17 cells via the 15d-PGJ2/PPARγ/TGF-β1 pathway. Furthermore, the therapeutic effect of ASA-pretreated BMMSCs was confirmed in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced experimental colitis mouse model, in which systemic infusion of ASA-pretreated BMMSCs significantly ameliorated disease activity index and colonic inflammation, along with an increased number of Tregs and decreased number of Th17 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that aspirin treatment is a feasible strategy to promote BMMSC-based immunomodulation.

  20. Antiplatelet and invasive treatment in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and acute coronary syndrome. The safety of aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafkas, N V; Liakos, C I; Mouzarou, A G

    2015-06-01

    Aspirin is an important drug in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). However, its use is contraindicated in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (risk for haemolytic anaemia). We report the management of 2 patients with class II G6PD deficiency and non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS). The two patients were safely and efficiently treated with dual antiplatelet treatment (DAPT, aspirin plus ticagrelor) and PCI using new-generation drug-eluting stent (DES) despite G6PD deficiency. NSTE-ACS management with DAPT and DES is probably safe and effective in class II G6PD-deficient patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Aspirin and colorectal cancer: the promise of precision chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, David A; Cao, Yin; Chan, Andrew T

    2016-03-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has become one of the most commonly used drugs, given its role as an analgesic, antipyretic and agent for cardiovascular prophylaxis. Several decades of research have provided considerable evidence demonstrating its potential for the prevention of cancer, particularly colorectal cancer. Broader clinical recommendations for aspirin-based chemoprevention strategies have recently been established; however, given the known hazards of long-term aspirin use, larger-scale adoption of an aspirin chemoprevention strategy is likely to require improved identification of individuals for whom the protective benefits outweigh the harms. Such a precision medicine approach may emerge through further clarification of aspirin's mechanism of action.

  2. COAST (Cisplatin ototoxicity attenuated by aspirin trial): A phase II double-blind, randomised controlled trial to establish if aspirin reduces cisplatin induced hearing-loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, Simon J; Martin, Karen; Abab, Julia; Ratcliffe, Ian; Thornton, Roger; Lineton, Ben; Ellis, Mary; Moody, Ronald; Stanton, Louise; Galanopoulou, Angeliki; Maishman, Tom; Geldart, Thomas; Bayne, Mike; Davies, Joe; Lamb, Carolynn; Popat, Sanjay; Joffe, Johnathan K; Nutting, Chris; Chester, John; Hartley, Andrew; Thomas, Gareth; Ottensmeier, Christian; Huddart, Robert; King, Emma

    2017-12-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most ototoxic chemotherapy drugs, resulting in a permanent and irreversible hearing loss in up to 50% of patients. Cisplatin and gentamicin are thought to damage hearing through a common mechanism, involving reactive oxygen species in the inner ear. Aspirin has been shown to minimise gentamicin-induced ototoxicity. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that aspirin could also reduce ototoxicity from cisplatin-based chemotherapy. A total of 94 patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy for multiple cancer types were recruited into a phase II, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and randomised in a ratio of 1:1 to receive aspirin 975 mg tid and omeprazole 20 mg od, or matched placebos from the day before, to 2 days after, their cisplatin dose(s), for each treatment cycle. Patients underwent pure tone audiometry before and at 7 and 90 days after their final cisplatin dose. The primary end-point was combined hearing loss (cHL), the summed hearing loss at 6 kHz and 8 kHz, in both ears. Although aspirin was well tolerated, it did not protect hearing in patients receiving cisplatin (p-value = 0.233, 20% one-sided level of significance). In the aspirin arm, patients demonstrated mean cHL of 49 dB (standard deviation [SD] 61.41) following cisplatin compared with placebo patients who demonstrated mean cHL of 36 dB (SD 50.85). Women had greater average hearing loss than men, and patients treated for head and neck malignancy experienced the greatest cHL. Aspirin did not protect from cisplatin-related ototoxicity. Cisplatin and gentamicin may therefore have distinct ototoxic mechanisms, or cisplatin-induced ototoxicity may be refractory to the aspirin regimen used here. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. The Aspirin Foundation Scientific Conference: the history, the present state and the future of aspirin prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Tom; Elwood, Peter; Keating, Conrad; Rothwell, Peter; Detering, Elmar; Freedman, Andrew; Langley, Ruth; Logan, Richard; Phillips, Ceri; DeCensi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Aspirin Foundation Conference covered a range of topics from clinical and medical history, epidemiology, health economics, and the current uses of aspirin in general practice and in the treatment and prevention of cancer. The use of aspirin as primary prevention in people at risk of atherosclerotic events is now well known, but its use as a preventative agent in some cancer types is still under discussion, and data on colorectal and lung cancer were presented at this meeting. The pot...

  4. The evolution of antiplatelet therapy in the treatment of acute coronary syndromes: from aspirin to the present day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2012-11-12

    Our knowledge of the mechanisms of platelet-mediated thrombosis has increased dramatically over the last 40 years. This increased understanding has identified treatment strategies for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) by targeting key mediators of platelet activation and aggregation processes. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) monotherapy improves patient outcomes by irreversibly inhibiting the cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 enzyme in the arachidonic acid pathway. The later-developed thienopyridines, prodrugs that irreversibly inhibit the P2Y(12) receptor, and therefore adenosine diphosphate (ADP) binding, further enhance platelet inhibition and patient outcomes. The thienopyridine clopidogrel has been the standard of care, but it is limited by variable response and treatment failure. A more potent thienopyridine, prasugrel, requires fewer hepatic metabolic steps for activation, and elicits significantly improved outcomes for patients with ACS. The increased potency of prasugrel is associated with an increase in Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI)-defined major bleeding compared with clopidogrel. Ticagrelor represents a new chemical class of agents called the cyclopentyltriazolopyrimidines. It interacts reversibly with the platelet P2Y(12) receptor, and does not require metabolic bioactivation for activity. Data show a significant improvement in ischaemic outcomes, including mortality, for ticagrelor compared with clopidogrel, without an increase in overall major bleeding, although non-coronary artery bypass graft bleeding is increased. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa targeted agents (abciximab, tirofiban and eptifibatide) are also used in ACS patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. These inhibitors utilize a different mechanism of action by preventing fibrinogen-mediated platelet aggregation. Other therapeutic strategies for platelet inhibition are being evaluated, including the investigative protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and thromboxane A(2) antagonists

  5. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Aspirin Therapy for the Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Idiopathic Pericarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwier, Nicholas; Tran, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a mainstay of therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pericarditis (IP). A comprehensive review consisting of pertinent clinical literature, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic considerations, has not been released in recent years. This review will facilitate the clinician’s understanding of pharmacotherapeutic considerations for using ASA/NSAIDs to treat IP. Data were compiled using clinical literature consisting of case reports, cohort data, retrospective and prospective studies, and manufacturer package inserts. ASA, ibuprofen, indometacin, and ketorolac relatively have the most evidence in the treatment of IP, provide symptomatic relief of IP, and should be tapered accordingly. ASA is the drug of choice in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), or renal disease, but should be avoided in patients with asthma and nasal polyps, who are naïve to ASA therapy. Ibuprofen is an inexpensive and relatively accessible option in patients who do not have concomitant CAD, HF, or renal disease. Indometacin is not available over-the-counter in the USA, and has a relatively higher incidence of central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects. Ketorolac is an intravenous option; however, clinicians must be mindful of the maximum dose that can be administered. While ASA/NSAIDs do not ameliorate the disease process of IP, they are part of first-line therapy (along with colchicine), for preventing recurrence of IP. ASA/NSAID choice should be dictated by comorbid conditions, tolerability, and adverse effects. Additionally, the clinician should be mindful of considerations such as tapering, high-sensitivity CRP monitoring, bleeding risk, and contraindications to ASA/NSAID therapy. PMID:27023565

  6. Comparison of increased aspirin dose versus combined aspirin plus clopidogrel therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease and impaired antiplatelet response to low-dose aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzenli, Mehmet Akif; Ozdemir, Kurtulus; Aygul, Nazif; Soylu, Ahmet; Tokac, Mehmet

    2008-08-15

    The effects of therapy with aspirin 300 mg/day and with combined aspirin 100 mg/day plus clopidogrel 75 mg/day on platelet function were compared in patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease and impaired antiplatelet responses to aspirin 100 mg/day. The study population consisted of 151 outpatients with type II diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease who were taking aspirin 100 mg/day. Of the 151 patients, a subgroup of subjects with impaired aspirin response were selected on the basis of the results of platelet aggregometry. Nonresponsiveness to aspirin was defined as mean aggregation > or =69% with 3 micromol/L adenosine diphosphate and mean aggregation > or =70% with 2 micromol/L collagen. Aspirin semiresponders were defined as meeting 1 but not both of these criteria. Nonresponders and semiresponders were randomized equally to aspirin 300 mg/day and aspirin 100 mg/day plus clopidogrel 75 mg/day, and aggregation tests were repeated after 2 weeks. Sixty of the 151 patients with diabetes (40%) were found to respond to aspirin inadequately. Platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate and collagen decreased significantly after aspirin 300 mg/day or combined therapy. Combined treatment was found to have a stronger inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate than aspirin 300 mg/day (p = 0.002). Impaired aspirin response was resolved by increasing the aspirin dose or adding clopidogrel to aspirin (p <0.0001 for each). However, desired platelet inhibition was achieved in significantly more patients by combined treatment than by aspirin 300 mg/day (p <0.05). In conclusion, aspirin 100 mg/day does not inhibit platelet function adequately in a significant number of patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease. Increasing the aspirin dose to 300 mg/day or adding clopidogrel to aspirin can provide adequate platelet inhibition in a significant number of those patients with impaired responses to

  7. Efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with aspirin in patients who previously tried but failed treatment with vitamin K antagonists: results from the AVERROES trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppens, Michiel; Synhorst, David; Eikelboom, John W; Yusuf, Salim; Shestakovska, Olga; Connolly, Stuart J

    2014-07-21

    The AVERROES double-blinded, randomized trial demonstrated that apixaban reduces the risk of stroke or systemic embolism (SSE) by 55% compared with aspirin without an increase in major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation either who previously tried but failed vitamin K antagonists (VKA) therapy or who were expected to be unsuitable for VKA therapy. In this pre-specified analysis, we explored the consistency of the results in the subgroup of patients who tried but failed VKA therapy. Of 5599 patients, 2216 (40%) had previously failed VKA treatment [main reasons: poor international normalized ratio (INR) control 42%, refusal 37%, bleeding on VKA 8%]. Compared with those expected to be unsuitable for VKA therapy, those who had previously failed were older, more often male, had higher body mass index, more likely to have moderate renal impairment and a history of stroke and less likely to have heart failure or to be medically undertreated. The effects of apixaban compared with aspirin were consistent in those who previously failed and those who were expected to be unsuitable, for both SSE (P interaction 0.13) and major bleeding (P interaction 0.74) and were also consistent among different subgroups of patients who had previously failed VKA therapy defined by reasons for unsuitability, age, sex, renal function, CHADS2 score, aspirin dose, duration, indication, and quality of INR control of prior VKA use. The efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with aspirin is consistent in subgroups of patients who have previously attempted but failed VKA therapy, irrespective of the reason for discontinuation. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Aspirin, Butalbital, and Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of aspirin, butalbital, and caffeine comes as a capsule and tablet to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 4 ... explain any part you do not understand. Take aspirin, butalbital, and caffeine exactly as directed. Do not ...

  9. Aspirin in Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Yolanda Aburto-Murrieta; Dulce Bonifacio-Delgadillo; Juan Marquez

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin is widely used for the prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with transient ischaemic attack (TIA) of arterial origin, because it is effective and inexpensive. Clopidogrel and the combination of aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole are more effective than aspirin, but are also much more expensive. No other antithrombotic regimens provide significant advantages over aspirin, although cilostazol and the novel platelet protease-activated receptor-1 antagonist, SCH 530348, are c...

  10. Experiments with Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Londa L.; Barry, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Presents a series of experiments that can be used to demonstrate how aspirin can be synthesized and characterized, how the hydrolysis of aspirin can be used as an introduction to kinetics, and how coordination chemistry (chelation) can be introduced by preparing and characterizing the copper complexes of aspirin and salicylic acid. (Contains over…

  11. Unmet needs in the treatment of autoimmunity: from aspirin to stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    As rheumatologic diseases became understood to be autoimmune in nature, the drugs used to treat this group of conditions has evolved from herbal or plant derived anti-inflammatory agents, such as salicylates, quinine and colchicine to the many recently approved biological response modifiers. These new drugs, especially the anti-tumor necrosis factor agents, have shown remarkable efficacy in autoimmune diseases, and there are new agents under investigation that will provide additional treatment options. In between, the world was introduced to cortisone and all of its derivatives, as chemical synthesis led to better, more efficacious drugs with lesser side effects. Disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents have actually been around since the first half of the 20th century, but only began to be used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases in the 1970s and 1980s. One advantage is that they have been invaluable in their ability to offer "steroid sparing" to decrease the adverse effects of steroids. Research over the past decade has resulted in a new class of drugs that influence cytokine regulatory pathways such as the Janus associated kinase inhibitors. The promise of personalized medicine now permeates current research into new pharmacological agents for the treatment of autoimmune disease. The new appreciation for the gene-environment interaction in the pathogenesis of most diseases especially those as heterogeneous as autoimmune diseases, has led to our focus on targeted therapies. Add to that the new knowledge of epigenetics and how changes in DNA and histone structure affect expression of genes that can play a role in immune signaling, and we now have a new exciting frontier for cutting edge drug development. The history of treatment of autoimmune diseases is really only a little over a century, but so much has changed, leading to increasing lifespans and improved quality of life of those who suffer from these ailments. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. High dose aspirin and left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction: aspirin and myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, Anna; Hu, Kai; Bayer, Barbara; Wagner, Helga; Ertl, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann; Frantz, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    Proinflammatory proteins like inflammatory cytokines are implicated in myocardial depression and left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction. High-dose aspirin inhibits cytokine activation. Therefore, we tested the influence of high-dose aspirin treatment on left ventricular remodeling in mice after myocardial infarction. Mice were treated for 4 weeks with placebo or aspirin (120 mg/kg per day) by Alzet mini-osmotic pumps after ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Serial transthoracic echocardiography was performed at days 1, 7, and 28. Over the 4 weeks, mortality was not different between the groups (placebo 30.8%, aspirin 30.8%). On echocardiography, animals after myocardial infarction exhibited left ventricular dilatation (week 4, end-systolic area, placebo sham 8.9 +/- 1.7 vs. placebo MI 15.9 +/- 2.5 mm(2)), which was not changed by aspirin treatment (week 4, end-systolic area, aspirin MI 14.5 +/- 1.3 mm(2), p= ns vs. placebo MI). The expression of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-1beta were markedly upregulated in mice with myocardial infarction on placebo. Cytokine expression was significantly reduced by aspirin treatment while collagen deposition was not influenced. Continuous aspirin treatment (120 mg/kg/d) reduces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines after myocardial infarction, but does not affect post-infarct cardiac remodeling and cardiac function.

  13. Cyclooxygenase-independent neuroprotective effects of aspirin against dopamine quinone-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Masato; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Kikkawa, Yuri; Kimoto, Naotaka; Takeshima, Mika; Murakami, Shinki; Miyoshi, Ko

    2012-09-01

    Prostaglandin H synthase exerts not only cyclooxygenase activity but also peroxidase activity. The latter activity of the enzyme is thought to couple with oxidation of dopamine to dopamine quinone. Therefore, it has been proposed that cyclooxygenase inhibitors could suppress dopamine quinone formation. In the present study, we examined effects of various cyclooxygenase inhibitors against excess methyl L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced quinoprotein (protein-bound quinone) formation and neurotoxicity using dopaminergic CATH.a cells. The treatment with aspirin inhibited excess methyl L-DOPA-induced quinoprotein formation and cell death. However, acetaminophen did not show protective effects, and indomethacin and meloxicam rather aggravated these methyl L-DOPA-induced changes. Aspirin and indomethacin did not affect the level of glutathione that exerts quenching dopamine quinone in dopaminergic cells. In contrast with inhibiting effects of higher dose in the previous reports, relatively lower dose of aspirin that affected methyl L-DOPA-induced quinoprotein formation and cell death failed to prevent cyclooxygenase-induced dopamine chrome generation in cell-free system. Furthermore, aspirin but not acetaminophen or meloxicam showed direct dopamine quinone-scavenging effects in dopamine-semiquinone generating systems. The present results suggest that cyclooxygenase shows little contribution to dopamine oxidation in dopaminergic cells and that protective effects of aspirin against methyl L-DOPA-induced dopamine quinone neurotoxicity are based on its cyclooxygenase-independent property.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of aspirin treatment in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease events in subgroups based on age, gender, and varying cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greving, J.P.; Buskens, E.; Koffijberg, H.; Algra, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background-Aspirin is effective for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but it remains unclear for which subgroups of individuals aspirin is beneficial. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of aspirin separately for men and women of different ages with various levels of cardiovascular

  15. Aspirin Metabolomics in Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Substantial evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for cancer chemoprevention in addition to its well-established role in cardiovascular protection. In recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in humans, daily aspirin use reduced incidence, metastasis and mortality from several common types of cancer, especially colorectal cancer. The mechanism(s) by which aspirin exerts an anticancer benefit is uncertain; numerous effects have been described involving both cyclooxygenase-dependent and -independent pathways. |

  16. Aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage: prevention by enteric-coating and relation to prostaglandin synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hawthorne, A B; Mahida, Y R; Cole, A T; Hawkey, C J

    1991-01-01

    1. Gastric damage induced by low-dose aspirin and the protective effect of enteric-coating was assessed in healthy volunteers in a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial using Latin square design. Each was administered placebo, plain aspirin 300 mg daily, plain aspirin 600 mg four times daily, enteric-coated aspirin 300 mg daily, or enteric-coated aspirin 600 mg four times daily for 5 days. Gastric damage was assessed endoscopically, and gastric mucosal bleeding measured. 2. Aspirin...

  17. Iododerma occurring during thyroid protection treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkin, J.K.; Strobel, D.

    1985-10-01

    A patient with rheumatoid arthritis developed nodules and ulcers shortly after treatment with supersaturated potassium iodide (SSKI) drops. The SSKI was administered for thyroid protection during an iodide fibrinogen uptake test to detect phlebothrombosis of the legs. Discontinuation of SSKI was accompanied by regression of all lesions. Previous case reports include other patients who experienced iododerma after receiving low doses of iodides. This should be borne in mind if ever a mass iodide prophylaxis program is undertaken following a nuclear event.

  18. Assessment of platelet function in acute ischemic stroke patients previously treated with aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Aida; Parkhutik, Vera; Tembl, Jose Ignacio; Vallés, Juana; Santos, Maria Teresa; Moscardó, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Platelet inhibition measured by platelet function tests could be critical to understand the reasons for early recurrence and to guide therapeutic recommendations. We assess the platelet function during the acute phase of ischemic stroke in patients pretreated with aspirin who continue their treatment with aspirin only, are started on clopidogrel only, or add clopidogrel to aspirin. Sixty-four patients were taking aspirin before the stroke. Depending on the administered antiplatelet, 3 groups were defined: ASA: patients who continued on aspirin orally or intravenous acetylsalicylate of lysine, n = 30; CLO: patients who discontinued aspirin and were started on clopidogrel, n = 16; and ASA + CLO: patients who were prescribed both aspirin and clopidogrel, n = 10. Collagen-induced thromboxane A2 (TXA2) synthesis, ADP (adenosine diphosphate)-induced aggregation, and occlusion time (PF-100) were measured. CLO group only had a marked elevation of TXA2 (17.44 ± 15.62 ng/mL, P = .000) and a shortening of the platelet function analyzer (PFA)-100 closure time (157.13 ± 88 seconds, P = .047) compared with the other 2 groups (ASA: TXA2, .62 ± 1.59 ng/mL; ASA + CLO: TXA2 1.79 ± 4.59 ng/mL). They achieved a small (13%) but significant reduction of ADP-induced aggregation (87.00 ± 23.06 mm, P = .008) compared with the ASA group (102.82 ± 22.38 seconds). Stopping aspirin intake within the first 72 hours of the acute stroke drastically increases TXA2 synthesis. During the same time window, the freshly prescribed clopidogrel manages to reduce the ADP-induced aggregation only slightly (13%). This study offers analytic proof that the common practice of replacing aspirin with clopidogrel does not leave stroke patients fully protected during the first days after an ischemic stroke. Possible solutions could be to preserve aspirin during a few days or to use loading doses of clopidogrel at hospital admission. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc

  19. Duration of increased bleeding tendency after cessation of aspirin therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin has a significant effect on hemostasis, so it is often recommended that patients taking aspirin discontinue treatment before elective surgery. While off aspirin, these patients may be at risk of thrombosis. The optimum period of time that aspirin should be withheld is controversial. The aim of this study was to establish the duration of the antihemostatic effect of prolonged aspirin therapy. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective study, 51 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into 3 groups, each receiving an identical tablet for 14 days. One group received a placebo tablet; individuals in the other two groups received either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin once a day. Template bleeding times and specific platelet function testing (using the PFA-100; Dade Behring) were carried out on subjects before therapy and again after its completion until they returned to baseline. RESULTS: Thirty-eight volunteers complied sufficiently with the protocol to provide useful results. All bleeding times normalized within 96 hours and all platelet function tests within 144 hours after stopping aspirin. There was no demonstrable hemostatic defect in any volunteer persisting by or beyond the sixth day after treatment cessation. There was no apparent difference in duration of effect between those taking either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin. CONCLUSIONS: This study uses sensitive measures of platelet function to demonstrate the duration of increased bleeding tendency after withdrawal of aspirin therapy. It supports discontinuation of aspirin therapy 5 days before elective surgery (with the operation being performed on the sixth day).

  20. The role of aspirin, heparin, and other interventions in the prevention and treatment of fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Katie M; David, Anna L

    2018-02-01

    Fetal growth restriction and related placental pathologies such as preeclampsia, stillbirth, and placental abruption are believed to arise in early pregnancy when inadequate remodeling of the maternal spiral arteries leads to persistent high-resistance and low-flow uteroplacental circulation. The consequent placental ischaemia, reperfusion injury, and oxidative stress are associated with an imbalance in angiogenic/antiangiogenic factors. Many interventions have centered on the prevention and/or treatment of preeclampsia with results pertaining to fetal growth restriction and small-for-gestational-age pregnancy often included as secondary outcomes because of the common pathophysiology. This renders the study findings less reliable for determining clinical significance. For the prevention of fetal growth restriction, a recent large-study level meta-analysis and individual patient data meta-analysis confirm that aspirin modestly reduces small-for-gestational-age pregnancy in women at high risk (relative risk, 0.90, 95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.00) and that a dose of ≥100 mg should be recommended and to start at or before 16 weeks of gestation. These findings support national clinical practice guidelines. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that low-molecular-weight heparin may prevent fetal growth restriction; however, evidence from randomized control trials is inconsistent. A meta-analysis of multicenter trial data does not demonstrate any positive preventative effect of low-molecular-weight heparin on a primary composite outcome of placenta-mediated complications including fetal growth restriction (18% vs 18%; absolute risk difference, 0.6%; 95% confidence interval, 10.4-9.2); use of low-molecular-weight heparin for the prevention of fetal growth restriction should remain in the research setting. There are even fewer treatment options once fetal growth restriction is diagnosed. At present the only management option if the risk of hypoxia, acidosis, and

  1. Platelet hyperfunction is decreased by additional aspirin loading in patients presenting with myocardial infarction on daily aspirin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Ingrid; Spiel, Alexander O; Frossard, Martin; Derhaschnig, Ulla; Riedmüller, Eva; Jilma, Bernd

    2010-06-01

    Currently 162-325 mg aspirin is recommended for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome. We tested the effect of an additional loading dose of 250 mg aspirin at the onset of acute coronary syndrome in patients who were already on chronic therapy with 100 mg aspirin. This was a prospective trial in patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome that included a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial subgroup. An emergency department in a tertiary care center. Consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome were enrolled, including a cohort already on chronic aspirin therapy. Patients received an intravenous infusion of 250 mg aspirin. Platelet function was measured with a platelet function analyzer in 234 patients before and after aspirin infusion. Aspirin infusion prolonged collagen epinephrine closure times in almost all patients. Aspirin infusion further lowered thromboxane B(2) levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome who were on chronic aspirin therapy before admission. Concomitantly, collagen epinephrine closure times increased by 22% from 223 secs (95% confidence interval, 192-255 secs) before to 273 secs (95% confidence interval, 252-294 secs) after aspirin infusion (p myocardial infarction on daily aspirin therapy (53%) displayed platelet hyperfunction (collagen epinephrine closure times aspirin infusion further decreased platelet function in these patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (30% prolongation of collagen epinephrine closure times; p myocardial infarction still displayed platelet hyperfunction (p = .02). Aspirin loading in the emergency room further reduced thromboxane B(2) levels and further inhibited platelet function in many patients with acute coronary syndrome already on 100 mg aspirin.

  2. Aspirin plus dipyridamole versus aspirin alone after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin (ESPRIT): randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkes, P H A; van Gijn, J; Kappelle, L J; Koudstaal, P J; Algra, A

    2006-05-20

    Results of trials of aspirin and dipyridamole combined versus aspirin alone for the secondary prevention of vascular events after ischaemic stroke of presumed arterial origin are inconsistent. Our aim was to resolve this uncertainty. We did a randomised controlled trial in which we assigned patients to aspirin (30-325 mg daily) with (n=1363) or without (n=1376) dipyridamole (200 mg twice daily) within 6 months of a transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke of presumed arterial origin. Our primary outcome event was the composite of death from all vascular causes, non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or major bleeding complication, whichever happened first. Treatment was open, but auditing of outcome events was blinded. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial (number ISRCTN73824458) and with (NCT00161070). Mean follow-up was 3.5 years (SD 2.0). Median aspirin dose was 75 mg in both treatment groups (range 30-325); extended-release dipyridamole was used by 83% (n=1131) of patients on the combination regimen. Primary outcome events arose in 173 (13%) patients on aspirin and dipyridamole and in 216 (16%) on aspirin alone (hazard ratio 0.80, 95% CI 0.66-0.98; absolute risk reduction 1.0% per year, 95% CI 0.1-1.8). Addition of the ESPRIT data to the meta-analysis of previous trials resulted in an overall risk ratio for the composite of vascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction of 0.82 (95% CI 0.74-0.91). Patients on aspirin and dipyridamole discontinued trial medication more often than those on aspirin alone (470 vs 184), mainly because of headache. The ESPRIT results, combined with the results of previous trials, provide sufficient evidence to prefer the combination regimen of aspirin plus dipyridamole over aspirin alone as antithrombotic therapy after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin.

  3. Minocycline and aspirin in the treatment of bipolar depression: a protocol for a proof-of-concept, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2x2 clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, Jonathan; Preskorn, Sheldon; Teague, T Kent; Drevets, Douglas; Yates, William; Drevets, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    New medication classes are needed to improve treatment effectiveness in the depressed phase of bipolar disorder (BD). Extant evidence suggests that BD is characterised by neural changes such as dendritic remodelling and glial and neuronal cell loss. These changes have been hypothesised to result from chronic inflammation. The principal aims of the proposed research is to evaluate the antidepressant efficacy in bipolar depression of minocycline, a drug with neuroprotective and immune-modulating properties, and of aspirin, at doses expected to selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1). 120 outpatients between 18 and 55 years of age, who meet DSM-IV-TR criteria for BD (type I or II) and for a current major depressive episode will be recruited to take part in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, proof-of-concept clinical trial following a 2×2 design. As adjuncts to existing treatment, subjects will be randomised to receive one of the four treatment combinations: placebo-minocycline plus placebo-aspirin, active-minocycline plus placebo-aspirin, placebo-minocycline plus active-aspirin or active-minocycline plus active-aspirin. The dose of minocycline and aspirin is 100 mg twice daily and 81 mg twice daily, respectively. Antidepressant response will be evaluated by assessing changes in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores between baseline and the end of the 6-week trial. As secondary outcome measures, the anti-inflammatory effects of minocycline and aspirin will be tested by measuring pre-treatment and post-treatment levels of C reactive protein and inflammatory cytokines. Minocycline has been widely used as an antibiotic in doses up to 400 mg/day. Low-dose aspirin has been safely used on a worldwide scale for its role as an antithrombotic and thrombolytic. The study progress will be overseen by a Data, Safety and Monitoring Board, which will meet once every 6 months. Results of the study will be published in peer

  4. Aspirin for Primary Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Ilana B; Owens, Douglas K

    2017-07-01

    Aspirin reduces the risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke, and the risk of colorectal cancer. Aspirin increases the risk of gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding. The best available evidence supports initiating aspirin in select populations. In 2016, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended initiating aspirin for the primary prevention of both cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer among adults ages 50 to 59 who are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Adults 60 to 69 who are at increased cardiovascular disease risk may also benefit. There remains considerable uncertainty about whether younger and older patients may benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Aspirin and ibuprofen, in bulk and nanoforms: Effects on DNA damage in peripheral lymphocytes from breast cancer patients and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandah, Osama; Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Isreb, Mohammed; Linforth, Richard; Tait, Catherine; Baumgartner, Adi; Anderson, Diana

    2018-02-01

    Regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be protective against tumours, including breast cancer. We have studied the effects of ibuprofen and aspirin on DNA damage in lymphocytes obtained from breast cancer patients and healthy female controls. Both nanoparticle (NPs) and bulk formulations were used in the comet and micronucleus (MN) assays. Non-toxic doses (250 ng/ml ibuprofen; 500 ng/ml aspirin) were tested. Aspirin, both bulk and nano formulations, significantly reduced DNA damage measured with the comet and micronucleus assays; the nano formulation was more effective. Ibuprofen was not effective in the comet assay but showed a significant reduction in MN frequency, with the nano formulation being more effective. NPs may have better penetration through the nuclear membrane relative to the bulk formulation. NSAIDs such as aspirin and ibuprofen may have a promising role in cancer prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Aspirin, but not clopidogrel, reduces collateral conductance in a rabbit model of femoral artery occlusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefer, Imo E.; Grundmann, Sebastian; Schirmer, Stephan; van Royen, Niels; Meder, Benjamin; Bode, Christoph; Piek, Jan J.; Buschmann, Ivo R.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to test the potential of aspirin and clopidogrel to influence collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis). BACKGROUND Aspirin and clopidogrel are antiplatelet agents commonly used in the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular disease. Both inhibit platelet

  7. The role of aspirin in childhood tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, Johan F; Janse van Rensburg, Anita; Laubscher, Jacoba A; Springer, Priscilla

    2011-08-01

    Arterial stroke is the main cause of poor outcome in childhood tuberculous meningitis. Aspirin has an antithrombotic action at low dose and anti-ischemic and anti-inflammatory properties, which are dose-related. The aim of the study was to explore the possible benefits of aspirin in children with tuberculous meningitis. A total of 146 consecutive children with a diagnosis of probable tuberculous meningitis were studied. Patients were randomized into 3 groups: (1) placebo group, (2) low-dose aspirin group, and (3) high-dose aspirin group. Twenty-nine additional patients who received aspirin before admission were excluded from the randomized study, but continued on low-dose aspirin. Aspirin, irrespective of dose, did not show any significant benefit regarding morbidity (hemiparesis and developmental outcome) and mortality. Aspirin was well tolerated, but 1 death was probably related to aspirin. The fact that the outcome of the high-dose aspirin group compared favorably with the other treatment groups despite younger age and more severe neurological involvement at baseline needs further investigation.

  8. Aspirin resistance: Prevalence and clinical outcome in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Salah; Mohammed El-Desuky; Amal Rizk; Amr El-Hadidy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The antiplatelet drug aspirin is considered as a cornerstone in medical treatment of patients with CV or cerebrovascular diseases. Despite its use, a significant number of patients had recurrent adverse ischemic events. Inter-individual variability of platelet aggregation in response to aspirin may be an explanation for some of these events. Multiple trials have linked aspirin resistance to these adverse events. Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence...

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Aspirin on Cholangiocarcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boueroy, Parichart; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Boonmars, Thidarut; Sriraj, Pranee; Ratanasuwan, Panaratana; Juasook, Amornrat; Wonkchalee, Nadchanan; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Wongkham, Sopit

    2017-11-26

    Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs reduce the risk of cancer due to their anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects, which are the important mechanisms for their anti-tumor activity. Here, the effect of aspirin on human cholangiocarcinoma cells (KKU-214) and the underlying mechanisms of its action were explored. Cell proliferation was measured by sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay, while cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. Western blotting was used to explore protein expression underlying molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer treatment of aspirin. Aspirin reduced cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and altered the cell cycle phase distribution of KKU-214 cells by increasing the proportion of cells in the G0/G1 phase and reducing the proportion in the S and G2/M phases. Consistent with its effect on the cell cycle, aspirin also reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin‑dependent kinase 4 (Cdk-4), which are important for G0/G1 cell cycle progression. Treatment with aspirin led to increased induction of apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis of the mechanism underlying the effect of this drug showed that aspirin induced the expression of the tumor-suppressor protein p53 while inhibiting the anti-apoptotic protein B‑cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2). Correspondingly, the activation of caspase-9 and -3 was also increased. These findings suggest that aspirin causes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, both of which could contribute to its anti-proliferative effect. Creative Commons Attribution License

  10. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack . Your provider may recommend to take daily aspirin if: You do not have a history of heart disease or stroke, but you are at high risk for a heart attack or stroke. You have been diagnosed ... already. Aspirin helps get more blood flowing to your legs. ...

  11. Drug Resistance and Pseudoresistance: An Unintended Consequence of Enteric Coating Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosser, Tilo; Fries, Susanne; Lawson, John A.; Kapoor, Shiv C.; Grant, Gregory R.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low dose aspirin reduces the secondary incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke. Drug resistance to aspirin might result in treatment failure. Despite this concern, no clear definition of “aspirin resistance” has emerged and estimates of its incidence have varied remarkably. We aimed to determine the commonality of a mechanistically consistent, stable and specific phenotype of true pharmacological resistance to aspirin – such as might be explained by genetic causes. Methods and Results Healthy volunteers (n=400) were screened for their response to a single oral dose of 325 mg immediate release or enteric coated aspirin. Response parameters reflected the activity of aspirin's molecular target, cyclooxygenase-1. Individuals who appeared “aspirin resistant” on one occasion underwent repeat testing and if still “resistant” were exposed to low dose enteric coated aspirin (81 mg) and clopidogrel (75 mg) for one week each. Variable absorption caused a high frequency of apparent resistance to a single dose of 325 mg enteric coated aspirin (up to 49%) but not to immediate release aspirin (0%). All individuals responded to aspirin upon repeated exposure, extension of the post dosing interval or addition of aspirin to their platelets ex vivo. Conclusions Pharmacological resistance to aspirin is rare; this study failed to identify a single case of true drug resistance. Pseudoresistance, reflecting delayed and reduced drug absorption, complicates enteric coated but not immediate release aspirin administration. Clinical Trial Registration Information clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00948987. PMID:23212718

  12. Clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for preventing cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Bellesini, Marta; Takeda, Andrea; Middeldorp, Saskia; Donadini, Marco Paolo

    2017-12-14

    Aspirin is the prophylactic antiplatelet drug of choice for people with cardiovascular disease. Adding a second antiplatelet drug to aspirin may produce additional benefit for people at high risk and people with established cardiovascular disease. This is an update to a previously published review from 2011. To review the benefit and harm of adding clopidogrel to aspirin therapy for preventing cardiovascular events in people who have coronary disease, ischaemic cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, or were at high risk of atherothrombotic disease, but did not have a coronary stent. We updated the searches of CENTRAL (2017, Issue 6), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 4 July 2017) and Embase (Ovid, 1947 to 3 July 2017) on 4 July 2017. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP portal, and handsearched reference lists. We applied no language restrictions. We included all randomised controlled trials comparing over 30 days use of aspirin plus clopidogrel with aspirin plus placebo or aspirin alone in people with coronary disease, ischaemic cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, or at high risk of atherothrombotic disease. We excluded studies including only people with coronary drug-eluting stent (DES) or non-DES, or both. We collected data on mortality from cardiovascular causes, all-cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction, fatal and non-fatal ischaemic stroke, major and minor bleeding. The overall treatment effect was estimated by the pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI), using a fixed-effect model (Mantel-Haenszel); we used a random-effects model in cases of moderate or severe heterogeneity (I 2 ≥ 30%). We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We used GRADE profiler (GRADE Pro) to import data from Review Manager to create a 'Summary of findings' table. The search identified 13 studies in addition to the two studies in the previous version of our systematic review. Overall

  13. Comparison of antiplatelet activity of garlic tablets with cardio-protective dose of aspirin in healthy volunteers: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Shafiekhani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Some of the adverse effects of aspirin including peptic ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding and aspirin resistance compelled researchers to find a suitable alternative with fewer adverse effects. In this clinical trial, we aimed to find the effective antiplatelet dose of garlic. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT was conducted on 62 healthy volunteers of 20-50 years old. All volunteers used 80 mg aspirin per day for 1 week and at the end of this time, platelet aggregation (PA induced by 4 agonists acting in aggregation pathway including adenosinediphosphate (20 μmol/l, epinephrine (20 μmol/l, collagen(0.19 mg/ ml and arachidonic acid (0.5mg/ ml was measured by Light Transmittance Aggregometry (LTA in all participants. After one month washout period, volunteers were randomized into 3 groups and each received 1, 2 or 3 garlic tablets (1250 mg a day for 1 month. After one month, PA was examined in all groups. Results: The mean ±SD of the age of all volunteers was 28.60 ± 9.00 years. In addition, 52.00 % of our volunteers were male and 48.00% of them were female. Garlic tablet didnot have significant effect on PA at any dose. However, 30% of volunteers in the group that used 3 garlic tablets/day reported adverse effect (i.e. bleeding. No significant association between sex, age and PA was observed. Conclusion:  In this study, we were unable to determine the effective anti-platelet dose of garlic which that could be equal to that of aspirin anti-platelet activity, as assessed LTA method.

  14. Medium intensity oral anticoagulants versus aspirin after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin (ESPRIT): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkes, P H A; van Gijn, J; Kappelle, L J; Koudstaal, P J; Algra, A

    2007-02-01

    Oral anticoagulants are better than aspirin for secondary prevention after myocardial infarction and after cerebral ischaemia in combination with non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation. The European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischaemia Trial (ESPRIT) aimed to determine whether oral anticoagulation with medium intensity is more effective than aspirin in preventing future vascular events in patients with transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke of presumed arterial origin. In this international, multicentre trial, patients were randomly assigned within 6 months after a transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke of presumed arterial origin either anticoagulants (target INR range 2.0-3.0; n=536) or aspirin (30-325 mg daily; n=532). The primary outcome was the composite of death from all vascular causes, non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or major bleeding complication, whichever occurred first. In a post hoc analysis anticoagulants were compared with the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole (200 mg twice daily). Treatment was open, but auditing of outcome events was blinded. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial (number ISRCTN73824458) and with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00161070). The anticoagulants versus aspirin comparison of ESPRIT was prematurely ended because ESPRIT reported previously that the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole was more effective than aspirin alone. Mean follow-up was 4.6 years (SD 2.2). The mean achieved INR was 2.57 (SD 0.86). A primary outcome event occurred in 99 (19%) patients on anticoagulants and in 98 (18%) patients on aspirin (hazard ratio [HR] 1.02, 95% CI 0.77-1.35). The HR for ischaemic events was 0.73 (0.52-1.01) and for major bleeding complications 2.56 (1.48-4.43). The HR for the primary outcome event comparing anticoagulants with the combination treatment of aspirin and dipyridamole was 1.31 (0.98-1.75). Oral

  15. Outcomes after complete endoscopic sinus surgery and aspirin desensitization in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adappa, Nithin D; Ranasinghe, Viran J; Trope, Michal; Brooks, Steven G; Glicksman, Jordan T; Parasher, Arjun K; Palmer, James N; Bosso, John V

    2018-01-01

    In this study we assessed patient outcomes after complete endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) and aspirin desensitization for patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients with aspirin challenge-proven AERD who underwent complete ESS followed by aspirin desensitization. Outcomes assessed included need for revision surgery and quality-of-life measures using the 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcomes Test (SNOT-22). Data were collected preoperatively, postoperatively prior to desensitization, and then at intervals post-desensitization through 30 months after aspirin desensitization. A longitudinal linear mixed-effects model was used for data analysis. Thirty-four patients met the inclusion criteria for this study. Thirty-two patients successfully completed aspirin desensitization and were subsequently followed for 30 months after desensitization. Two patients were unable to complete desensitization. Five patients discontinued aspirin maintenance therapy due to gastrointestinal and respiratory side effects. Within the follow-up period, there were only 3 (9.4%) revision sinus surgeries. Notably, 1 of these revision cases occurred in a patient who had discontinued aspirin maintenance therapy. After surgical treatment and prior to desensitization patients had significant reductions in SNOT-22 scores. Our results demonstrate that total SNOT-22 scores remained statistically unchanged from immediate post-desensitization throughout the 30-month follow-up period. Complete sinus surgery followed by timely aspirin desensitization and maintenance therapy is an effective combination in the long-term management of sinus disease in patients with AERD. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  16. Immunomodulatory activity of fucoidan against aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendran, Hanumantha Rao Balaji; Srinivasan, Periasamy; Rekha, Sathyanath

    2011-02-01

    Gastric ulcers and related complications associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin, represent a major global health problem. In the present study, we investigate the immunological activity of fucoidan against aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats. Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into the following, normal (Carboxy methyl cellulose 0.05 %), aspirin (Asp-400mg/kg) treated, fucoidan alone (Fu-0.02 g/kg, daily for 14 days) and Fu+Asp. Cytokines, total nitrite and nitrate (NOx) analysis and tissue localization of Cyclooxygenase 1, 2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were done using Elisa and immunohistochemistry respectively. Histopathology of gastric tissue, collagen deposition was performed using Hematoxylin and Eosin and Masson's trichrome were performed. Treatment of rats with a single dose of aspirin (400mg/kg, orally) led to significant alterations in the levels of total nitrite and nitrate (NOx), interleukins (IL-4, 6, 10, 12), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), and interferon gamma (IFN-γ). Notably, collagen deposition in glandular tissue and localization of cyclooxygenase 1, 2, and epidermal growth factor were considerably affected in aspirin-treated rats. These severities were prevented to a significant extent in rats pretreated with fucoidan (0.02 g/kg/day for two weeks orally). Our findings collectively indicate that the gastro-protective effect of fucoidan against aspirin-induced ulceration in rats is mediated through its immunomodulatory properties. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Monitoring aspirin therapy with the Platelet Function Analyzer-100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jette; Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2008-01-01

    . The Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PFA-100) is a commonly used platelet function test. We aimed to assess the reproducibility of the PFA-100 and the agreement with optical platelet aggregometry (OPA) in healthy volunteers and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) treated with low-dose aspirin....... MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 43 patients with CAD took part in the study. During treatment with aspirin 75 mg daily, all participants had platelet function assessed in duplicate with the PFA-100 and OPA on 4 consecutive days. Additionally, platelet function was assessed before...... aspirin treatment in healthy subjects. Serum-thromboxane B(2) (S-TxB(2)) was measured to assess compliance. RESULTS: In healthy volunteers not receiving aspirin, duplicate measurements resulted in coefficients of variation (CV) of 7.9 % for the PFA-100 and 5.2 % for OPA. During aspirin treatment, CVs were...

  18. Aspirin use and endometrial cancer risk and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiuchi, Tsuyoshi; Blake, Erin A; Matsuo, Koji; Sood, Anil K; Brasky, Theodore M

    2018-01-01

    The role of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) as a chemo-preventive and adjuvant therapeutic agent for cancers is generating attention. Mounting evidence indicates that aspirin reduces the incidence and mortality of certain obesity-related cancers, particularly colorectal cancer. In endometrial cancer, previous studies examining the effect of aspirin remain inconsistent as to the reduction in the risk of endometrial cancer. While some evidence indicates protective effects in obese women, other studies have showed a potential deleterious effect of these medications on endometrial cancer outcomes. However, exposure measurement across studies has been inconsistent in recording dose, duration, and frequency of use; thus making comparisons difficult. In this article, we review the evidence for the association between endometrial cancer and obesity, the pharmacological differences between regular- and low-dose aspirin, as well as the potential anti-tumor mechanism of aspirin, supporting a possible therapeutic effect on endometrial cancer. A proposed mechanism behind decreased cancer mortality in endometrial cancer may be a result of inhibition of metastasis via platelet inactivation and possible prostaglandin E 2 suppression by aspirin. Additionally, aspirin use in particular may have a secondary benefit for obesity-related comorbidities including cardiovascular disease in women with endometrial cancer. Although aspirin-related bleeding needs to be considered as a possible adverse effect, the benefits of aspirin therapy may exceed the potential risk in women with endometrial cancer. The current evidence reviewed herein has resulted in conflicting findings regarding the potential effect on endometrial cancer outcomes, thus indicating that future studies in this area are needed to resolve the effects of aspirin on endometrial cancer survival, particularly to identify specific populations that might benefit from aspirin use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aspirin: History and Applications; Cross-Curricular Instructional Strategies, Ideas, and Applications for Teaching about Aspirin in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hademenos, George

    2005-01-01

    Of the thousands of drugs and medicines available for the prevention, treatment, and control of human disease and discomfort, the most widely used is aspirin. The primary reason for aspirin's popularity is its capabilities as a pain reliever, fever reducer, and anti-inflammatory agent. This article explores the historical development of aspirin…

  20. The mechanism of action of aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, J R; Botting, R M

    2003-06-15

    The therapy of rheumatism began thousands of years ago with the use of decoctions or extracts of herbs or plants such as willow bark or leaves, most of which turned out to contain salicylates. Following the advent of synthetic salicylate, Felix Hoffman, working at the Bayer company in Germany, made the acetylated form of salicylic acid in 1897. This drug was named "Aspirin" and became the most widely used medicine of all time. In 1971, Vane discovered the mechanism by which aspirin exerts its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic actions. He proved that aspirin and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit the activity of the enzyme now called cyclooxygenase (COX) which leads to the formation of prostaglandins (PGs) that cause inflammation, swelling, pain and fever. However, by inhibiting this key enzyme in PG synthesis, the aspirin-like drugs also prevented the production of physiologically important PGs which protect the stomach mucosa from damage by hydrochloric acid, maintain kidney function and aggregate platelets when required. This conclusion provided a unifying explanation for the therapeutic actions and shared side effects of the aspirin-like drugs. Twenty years later, with the discovery of a second COX gene, it became clear that there are two isoforms of the COX enzyme. The constitutive isoform, COX-1, supports the beneficial homeostatic functions, whereas the inducible isoform, COX-2, becomes upregulated by inflammatory mediators and its products cause many of the symptoms of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid and osteoarthritis.

  1. Purine Pathway Implicated in Mechanism of Resistance to Aspirin Therapy: Pharmacometabolomics-Informed-Pharmacogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Ellero-Simatos, Sandrine; Georgiades, Anastasia; Zhu, Hongjie; Lewis, Joshua; Horenstein, Richard B.; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Dane, Adrie; Reijmers, Theo; Hankemeier, Thomas; Fiehn, Oliver; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima

    2014-01-01

    Though aspirin is a well-established antiplatelet agent, the mechanisms of aspirin resistance remain poorly understood. Metabolomics allows for measurement of hundreds of small molecules in biological samples enabling detailed mapping of pathways involved in drug response. We defined the metabolic signature of aspirin exposure in subjects from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention (HAPI) Heart Study. Many metabolites, including known aspirin catabolites, changed upon exposure to aspirin and pathway enrichment analysis identified purine metabolism as significantly affected by drug exposure. Further, purines were associated with aspirin response and poor responders had higher post-aspirin adenosine and inosine than good responders (N=76;paspirin response. Combining metabolomics and genomics allowed for more comprehensive interrogation of mechanisms of variation in aspirin response - an important step toward personalized treatment approaches for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23839601

  2. Aspirin as a Chemopreventive Agent for Cancer: a New Hope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isnatin Miladiyah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: inflammation has been shown to play a major role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Inflammatory process activates the immune system through pro-inflammatory mediators and subsequent triggers transformation into malignant cells. Some tumors or cancers has been associated with chronic infections, such as hepatitis B and C viruses (hepatocellular carcinoma, human papilloma virus (cervical cancer, Helicobacter pylori (gastric cancer and lymphoma, and prostatitis (prostate cancer. A considerable study have investigated the benefits of aspirin for the prevention and treatment of cancer or tumors. Objectives: This paper aims to describe the relationship between inflammation and cancer incidence, so that use of aspirin as an anti-inflammatory agent is a rational choice in the treatment and prevention of cancer. Conclusion: Aspirin potential for chemoprevention of various types of cancer. Considering the high risk of side effects of aspirin, aspirin is not intended as a routine therapy to prevent the occurrence of cancer.

  3. Effect of aspirin on acute changes in peripheral arterial stiffness and endothelial function following exertional heat stress in firefighters: The factorial group results of the Enhanced Firefighter Rehab Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Hostler, David; Winger, Daniel G; Wang, Li; Reis, Steven E

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral arterial stiffness and endothelial function, which are independent predictors of cardiac events, are abnormal in firefighters. We examined the effects of aspirin on peripheral arterial stiffness and endothelial function in firefighters. Fifty-two firefighters were randomized to receive daily 81 mg aspirin or placebo for 14 days before treadmill exercise in thermal protection clothing, and a single dose of 325 mg aspirin or placebo immediately following exertion. Peripheral arterial augmentation index adjusted for a heart rate of 75 (AI75) and reactive hyperemia index (RHI) were determined immediately before, and 30, 60, and 90 minutes after exertion. Low-dose aspirin was associated with lower AI75 (-15.25±9.25 vs -8.08±10.70, p=0.014) but not RHI. On repeated measures analysis, treatment with low-dose aspirin before, but not single-dose aspirin after exertion, was associated with lower AI75 following exertional heat stress (p=0.018). Low-dose aspirin improved peripheral arterial stiffness and wave reflection but not endothelial function in firefighters. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Medications Containing Aspirin (Acetylsalicylate) and Aspirin-Like Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    updated 3/10/08 Medications Containing Aspirin (Acetylsalicylate) and Aspirin-Like Products © National Reye's Syndrome Foundation Inc. 2008 Epidemiologic research has shown an association between the development of Reye's ...

  5. Synthesis and gastroprotective activities of some zinc (II complexes derived from (E-2-(1-(2-(piperazin-1-ylethyliminoethylphenol and (E-4-(1-(2-(piperazin-1-ylethyliminoethylbenzene-1,3-diol Schiff bases against aspirin induced ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saleh Salga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the protective effects of piperazine derived compounds against aspirin induced gastric injuries and evaluated the role of nitric oxide, inflammatory cytokines and serum level of aspartate aminotransaminases (AST, alanine aminotransaminases (ALT, high density lipoprotein (HDL and malondialdehyde (MDA. The oral administration of the compounds at doses 30 and 60 mg/kg protected the gastric against the nectrotizing effects of aspirin. The level of nitric oxide (NO was elevated in the group pretreated with the compounds. The results also showed that pre-treatment with piperazine compounds has led to the decrease in the amount of MDA and increased the activity of AST, ALT and HDL. In conclusion, pre-treatment with piperazine derived compounds; (E-2-(1-(2-(piperazin-1-ylethyliminoethylphenol (2HP, (E-4-(1-(2-(piperazin-1-ylethyliminoethyl benzene-1,3-diol (DHP and their zinc complexes has provided a significant protection to the gastric from damaging effects of aspirin.

  6. Aspirin: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Nikołajewna Dołżenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical utility of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA is one of the more important issues in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. The present paper provides analysis of aspirin history, mechanisms of its antiplatelet activity, and expediency of the use of low- and high-dose aspirin in the groups including patients after myocardial revascularization, and requiring secondary prevention of stroke. Also gender-specific aspirin properties were mentioned, highlighting the especially important role of aspirin in women at the age of >65 years, and its utility in all women, irrespectively of age, and those who are at high risk of cardiovascular disease, including atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease. Moreover, the mechanisms of aspirin resistance, characterized by inability of aspirin to prevent thromboembolic complications or inadequate platelet inhibition showed in laboratory results, were mentioned. Prevalence of resistance in aspirin-treated patients is estimated to be between 1 and 68%. Stress was also put on the aspirin safety, associated with prophylaxis of peptic ulcer disease, which can be achieved i.e. by the use of the enteric-coated aspirin. This form of aspirin is associated with lower risk of gastrointestinal mucosae damage and bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract. At the end of the article, the importance of the adherence to therapeutic guidelines of aspirin use, including assessment of variation in aspirin bioavailability associated with improper dosing and altered absorption in the gastrointestinal tract, was stressed.

  7. Low dose aspirin and pregnancy: how important is aspirin resistance?

    OpenAIRE

    Navaratnam, K; Alfirevic, A; Alfirevic, Z

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet agents are pivotal for prevention of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease worldwide. Individual patient data meta?analysis indicates that low?dose aspirin causes a 10% risk reduction in pre?eclampsia for women at high individual risk. However, in the last 15 years it has emerged that a significant proportion of aspirin?treated individuals exhibit suboptimal platelet response, determined biochemically and clinically, termed ?aspirin non?responsiveness?, ?aspirin res...

  8. Effect of aspirin desensitization on T-cell cytokines and plasma lipoxins in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Kurtuluş; Kurt, Emel; Alatas, Özkan; Gülbas, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is thought to be based on, mainly, overproduction of eicosanoid lipid mediators and on defective anti-inflammatory regulators. Aspirin desensitization treatment, the mainstay of controlling asthma and rhinitis in AERD patients, however, is the least understood aspect of the disease. The study was designed to determine the effect of aspirin desensitization on T-lymphocyte cytokine expression and on plasma lipoxin levels in AERD. Spirometry, skin-prick test and asthma control test were documented and intracellular cytokine expression in T lymphocytes and plasma lipoxin levels were measured in 23 AERD patients, 17 aspirin-tolerant asthmatic (ATA) patients, and 16 healthy controls. In the AERD group nasal symptom and smell scores were assessed. Of the 23 AERD patients 15 accepted to undergo aspirin desensitization protocol and 14 of them were desensitized successfully. In the desensitized AERD group, cytokine and lipoxin measurements were repeated after 1-month aspirin treatment. CD4(+) IL-10 levels were higher in AERD patients than in healthy controls and CD4(+) interferon (IFN) gamma levels were higher in AERD and ATA patients than in controls. Plasma lipoxin-A4 and 15-epi-lipoxin-A4 levels were similar among the three study groups. In the AERD group, subjects underwent aspirin desensitization followed by a 1-month aspirin treatment. Clinical parameters improved and CD4(+) IFN-gamma levels decreased significantly. No significant change in lipoxin levels was recorded. CD4(+) IFN-gamma and CD4(+) IL-10 levels in AERD patients after 1-month aspirin desensitization treatment were similar to the healthy controls. The study confirms aspirin desensitization is effective clinically in AERD patients and suggests that IFN gamma and IL-10 expression in CD4(+) T lymphocytes may be related to the mechanism of action.

  9. Reverse effect of aspirin: is the prothrombotic effect after aspirin discontinuation mediated by cyclooxygenase 2 inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutremepuich, Christian; Aguejouf, Omar; Eizayaga, Francisco X; Desplat, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    While aspirin is the drug most often used to prevent cardiovascular complications, its discontinuation induces an increased risk of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic stroke in some patients. We hypothesized that infinitesimal concentrations of aspirin could persist in plasma after its discontinuation, thereby inducing a prothrombotic effect that could be due to a modification in the mechanism of action of aspirin via the cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) and COX-2 pathways. We studied the effects of ultra-low-dose aspirin (ULDA) as well as those of sc-560 and ns-398, specific COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors, on induced hemorrhagic time and in a model of laser-induced thrombosis in rats. In the laser-induced thrombosis model, ULDA treatment increased the number of emboli and the duration of embolization, thereby confirming its prothrombotic effect described in previous publications. This effect was also observed in rats pretreated with sc-560 but not in those pretreated with ns-398. We demonstrated that ULDA induced a prothrombotic effect in the rats studied. This strongly suggests that a very small amount of aspirin could remain in the patient's blood after aspirin therapy, leading to cardiovascular complications. This effect may be mediated by the COX-2 pathway. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Clinical effects of early angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment for acute myocardial infarction are similar in the presence and absence of aspirin: systematic overview of individual data from 96,712 randomized patients. Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitor Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latini, R; Tognoni, G; Maggioni, A P

    2000-01-01

    after MI. Aspirin inhibits the synthesis of vasodilating prostaglandins, and, in principle, this inhibition might antagonize some of the effects of ACEi. But it is uncertain whether, in practice, this influences the effects of ACEi on mortality and major morbidity after MI. METHODS: This overview sought......OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine whether the clinical effects of early angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (ACEi) treatment for acute myocardial infarction (MI) are influenced by the concomitant use of aspirin (ASA). BACKGROUND: Aspirin and ACEi both reduce mortality when given early...

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and aspirin interact synergistically to induce cell death in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Hüls, Isabel; Sigler, Michael; Palani, Chithra D; Hong, Le Thi Thu; Völker, Uwe; Kroemer, Heyo K; Beck, James F

    2008-07-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) as well as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin show promise as antineoplastic agents. The treatment with both HDIs and aspirin can result in hyperacetylation of proteins. In this study, we investigated whether HDIs and aspirin interacted in inducing anticancer activity and histone acetylation. We found that the HDIs, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and sodium butyrate, and aspirin cooperated to induce cell death in the ovarian cancer cell line, A2780. The effect was synergistic, as evidenced by CI-isobologram analysis. However, aspirin had no effect on histone acetylation, neither in the absence nor presence of HDIs. To gain insight into the mechanism underlying the synergistic action of HDIs and aspirin, we employed the deacetylated metabolite of aspirin, salicylic acid, and the cyclooxygenase-1- and -2-selective inhibitors, SC-560 and NS-398, respectively. We found that HDIs and salicylic acid interacted synergistically, albeit less efficiently than HDIs and aspirin, to induce cancer cell death, suggesting that the acetyl and the salicyl moiety contributed to the cooperative interaction of aspirin with HDIs. SC-560 and NS-398 had little effect both when applied alone or in conjunction with HDIs, indicating that the combinatorial effect of HDIs and aspirin was not the result of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that HDIs and aspirin synergize to induce cancer cell death and, thus, provides a rationale for a more in-depth exploration into the potential of combining HDIs and aspirin as a strategy for anticancer therapy.

  12. Aspirin: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Nikołajewna Dołżenko

    2014-01-01

    Clinical utility of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is one of the more important issues in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. The present paper provides analysis of aspirin history, mechanisms of its antiplatelet activity, and expediency of the use of low- and high-dose aspirin in the groups including patients after myocardial revascularization, and requiring secondary prevention of stroke. Also gender-specific aspirin properties were mentioned, hi...

  13. Up-regulation of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor in Astrocytes by Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Khushbu K.; Sendtner, Michael; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a promyelinating trophic factor, and the mechanisms by which CNTF expression could be increased in the brain are poorly understood. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is one of the most widely used analgesics. Interestingly, aspirin increased mRNA and protein expression of CNTF in primary mouse and human astrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Aspirin induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) but not protein kinase C (PKC). H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated aspirin-induced expression of CNTF. The activation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), but not NF-κB, by aspirin, the abrogation of aspirin-induced expression of CNTF by siRNA knockdown of CREB, the presence of a consensus cAMP-response element in the promoter of CNTF, and the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the CNTF promoter by aspirin suggest that aspirin increases the expression of the Cntf gene via the activation of CREB. Furthermore, we demonstrate that aspirin-induced astroglial CNTF was also functionally active and that supernatants of aspirin-treated astrocytes of wild type, but not Cntf null, mice increased myelin-associated proteins in oligodendrocytes and protected oligodendrocytes from TNF-α insult. These results highlight a new and novel myelinogenic property of aspirin, which may be of benefit for multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating disorders. PMID:23653362

  14. Twisted aspirin crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Rohl, Andrew L; Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2013-03-06

    Banded spherulites of aspirin have been crystallized from the melt in the presence of salicylic acid either generated from aspirin decomposition or added deliberately (2.6-35.9 mol %). Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and optical polarimetry show that the spherulites are composed of helicoidal crystallites twisted along the growth directions. Mueller matrix imaging reveals radial oscillations in not only linear birefringence, but also circular birefringence, whose origin is explained through slight (∼1.3°) but systematic splaying of individual lamellae in the film. Strain associated with the replacement of aspirin molecules by salicylic acid molecules in the crystal structure is computed to be large enough to work as the driving force for the twisting of crystallites.

  15. Circulating Myeloid‐Related Protein–8/14 is Related to Thromboxane‐Dependent Platelet Activation in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome, With and Without Ongoing Low‐Dose Aspirin Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilli, Francesca; Paloscia, Leonardo; Liani, Rossella; Di Nicola, Marta; Di Marco, Massimo; Lattanzio, Stefano; La Barba, Sara; Pascale, Silvia; Mascellanti, Marco; Davì, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet activation is involved in acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Incomplete suppression by low‐dose aspirin treatment of thromboxane (TX) metabolite excretion (urinary 11‐dehydro‐TXB2) is predictive of vascular events in high‐risk patients. Myeloid‐related protein (MRP)‐8/14 is a heterodimer secreted on activation of platelets, monocytes, and neutrophils, regulating inflammation and predicting cardiovascular events. Among platelet transcripts, MRP‐14 has emerged as a powerful predictor of ACS. Methods and Results We enrolled 68 stable ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 63 ACS patients, undergoing coronary angiography, to evaluate whether MRP‐8/14 release in the circulation is related to TX‐dependent platelet activation in ACS and IHD patients and to residual TX biosynthesis in low‐dose aspirin–treated ACS patients. In ACS patients, plasma MRP‐8/14 and urinary 11‐dehydro‐TXB2 levels were linearly correlated (r=0.651, Paspirin. In aspirin‐treated ACS patients, MRP‐8/14 and 11‐dehydro‐TXB2 were lower versus those not receiving aspirin (Paspirin (Paspirin, TX biosynthesis in ACS (adjusted R2=0.384). Conclusions Circulating MRP‐8/14 is associated with TX‐dependent platelet activation in ACS, even during low‐dose aspirin treatment, suggesting a contribution of residual TX to MRP‐8/14 shedding, which may further amplify platelet activation. Circulating MRP‐8/14 may be a target to test different antiplatelet strategies in ACS. PMID:25037196

  16. Mechanisms of aspirin-sensitive asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Ying

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now widely accepted that aspirin, along with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, may precipitate asthma attacks in a minority of susceptible individuals. The syndrome is part of a mucosal inflammatory disease that typically affects the nasal, as well as the bronchial, mucosa and sometimes the gut and skin also. Although the mucosal cellular infiltrate in aspirin-sensitive asthma and rhinitis resembles that of asthma and rhinitis in general, there is evidence of increased expression of asthma-relevant cytokines, such as interleukin-5 and granulocyte–macrophage colony stimulating factor, and a more intense infiltrate of mast cells and eosinophils. One key feature of aspirin-sensitive asthma is thought to be the overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes, principally by these local mast cells and eosinophils, but whether this represents a fundamental abnormality or is simply a consequence of greater numbers and activation of inflammatory cells is unclear. Genetic polymorphisms of the leukotriene C4 synthase gene, which result in elevated expression of this enzyme, may also play a role. In addition, overexpression of cysteinyl leukotriene receptors, particularly CysLT1, may contribute to an enhanced response of local inflammatory and structural cells to cysteinyl leukotrienes. Aspirin challenge in these patients is accompanied by acute further elevation of the already elevated baseline cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis, a phenomenon that is most closely related to the ability of aspirin and related NSAIDs to inhibit the cyclooxygenase enzyme COX-1. The reason for this is unknown, although it has been suggested that the COX-1 product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 serves as a ‘brake’ to leukotriene synthesis and that somehow this mechanism is deficient in aspirin-sensitive asthmatics. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of aspirin-sensitive asthma will undoubtedly lead to better approaches to treatment. Aside from the use of

  17. Aspirin in the Chemoprevention of Colorectal Neoplasia: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andrew T.; Arber, Nadir; Burn, John; Chia, John Whay-Kuang; Elwood, Peter; Hull, Mark A.; Logan, Richard F.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Schrör, Karsten; Baron, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) in addition to its well-established benefits in the prevention of vascular disease. Epidemiologic studies have consistently observed an inverse association between aspirin use and risk of CRC. A recent pooled analysis of a long-term post-trial follow-up of nearly 14,000 patients from 4 randomized, cardiovascular disease prevention trials showed that daily aspirin treatment for about 5 years was associated with a 34% reduction in 20-year CRC mortality. A separate meta-analysis of nearly 3,000 patients with a history of colorectal adenoma or cancer in 4 randomized adenoma prevention trials demonstrated that aspirin reduced the occurrence of advanced adenomas by 28% and any adenoma by 17%. Aspirin has also been shown to be beneficial in a clinical trial of patients with Lynch syndrome, a hereditary CRC syndrome; in those treated with aspirin for at least 2 years, there was a ≥ 50% reduction in the risk of CRC commencing 5 years after randomization and after aspirin had been discontinued. A few observational studies have shown an increase in survival among patients with CRC who use aspirin. Taken together, these findings strengthen the case for consideration of long-term aspirin use in CRC prevention. Despite these compelling data, there is a lack of consensus about the balance of risks and benefits associated with long-term aspirin use, particularly in low-risk populations. The optimal dose to use for cancer prevention and the precise mechanism underlying aspirin’s anticancer effect require further investigation. PMID:22084361

  18. Platelet-rich fibrin/aspirin complex promotes alveolar bone regeneration in periodontal defect in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J; Mei, S; Guo, L; Su, Y; Wang, H; Liu, Y; Zhao, Z; Wang, S; Liu, Y

    2018-02-01

    The efficacy and outcomes of aspirin in local defects and the use of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) in periodontal defects were investigated. Whether the PRF/aspirin complex is a suitable scaffold and delivery system to carry sustained-release aspirin/salicylic acid to promote periodontal bone regeneration was determined. PRF and PRF/aspirin complex were prepared. The concentrations of aspirin/salicylic acid released from the PRF/aspirin complex were calculated at 37°C. Periodontal ligament mesenchymal cells were cultured on six-well plates with PRF or PRF/aspirin complex gel to analyze proliferation and migration. The alveolar bone between the inferior buccal mesial root and anterior buccal distal root of the first maxillary molar was removed in 15 rats randomly divided into three groups: no treatment, PRF or PRF/aspirin complex. Twelve weeks post-transplantation, 2D/3D micro-computed tomography and histomorphometric technique were used for quantitative analyses. The PRF/aspirin complex provided a sustained-release aspirin/salicylic acid. Peak concentrations occurred 4 hours after transplantation and were sustained to 48 hours at 37°C; the total concentration of released aspirin/salicylic acid was 83.5 mg/mL, respectively. The sustained-release promoted the proliferation and migration of periodontal ligament mesenchymal cells. Micro-computed tomography and histological data showed that both the PRF and PRF/aspirin complex enhanced periodontal bone formation (P<.05). Moreover, the new bone formation was two times greater in the PRF/aspirin complex group than the PRF group. Aspirin/salicylic acid could be sustained-released from PRF/aspirin complex, which could inhibit inflammation and improve the function of mesenchymal cells. The data might provide a new safe and easy clinical therapeutic strategy to promote periodontal bone reparation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Aspirin desensitization for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessner, Katharine M

    2015-08-01

    The use of aspirin in coronary artery disease and address the unmet need of aspirin therapy in patients with history of hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) or other nonsteroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Aspirin hypersensitivity is reported in 1.5% of patients with cardiovascular disease. However, many of those labeled as allergic to aspirin had experienced side-effects and could be safely treated with aspirin. Those with true hypersensitivity reactions were often not placed on appropriate antiplatelet therapy. A number of protocols of varying complexity exist in the literature for aspirin desensitization. The focus of this review is to identify the types of aspirin reactions that can occur and provide a rational approach to oral aspirin challenge and desensitization. In summary, with rare exceptions, patients with a history of 'aspirin/NSAID allergy' who need ASA for cardiovascular issues will be able to safely take aspirin either after a graded challenge or desensitization providing a central role of the allergist in the management of these patients.

  20. Effect of Aspirin on Fractalkine in Rats with Pulmonary Embolism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The serum levels of FKN, IL-8, TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly decreased by treatment with aspirin compared with the PE group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, mRNA expressions of lung FKN, TNF- α and IL-1β in PE group were markedly decreased by treatment with aspirin compared with that in PE group. PE-induced ...

  1. Intracellular Erythrocyte Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase I Inactivates Aspirin in Blood*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K.; Willard, Belinda; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) prophylaxis suppresses major adverse cardiovascular events, but its rapid turnover limits inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity and thrombosis. Despite its importance, the identity of the enzyme(s) that hydrolyzes the acetyl residue of circulating aspirin, which must be an existing enzyme, remains unknown. We find that circulating aspirin was extensively hydrolyzed within erythrocytes, and chromatography indicated these cells contained a single hydrolytic activity. Purification by over 1400-fold and sequencing identified the PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of type I platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase, a phospholipase A2 with selectivity for acetyl residues of PAF, as a candidate for aspirin acetylhydrolase. Western blotting showed that catalytic PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of the type I enzyme co-migrated with purified erythrocyte aspirin hydrolytic activity. Recombinant PAFAH1B2, but not its family member plasma PAF acetylhydrolase, hydrolyzed aspirin, and PAF competitively inhibited aspirin hydrolysis by purified or recombinant erythrocyte enzymes. Aspirin was hydrolyzed by HEK cells transfected with PAFAH1B2 or PAFAH1B3, and the competitive type I PAF acetylhydrolase inhibitor NaF reduced erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin. Exposing aspirin to erythrocytes blocked its ability to inhibit thromboxane A2 synthesis and platelet aggregation. Not all individuals or populations are equally protected by aspirin prophylaxis, the phenomenon of aspirin resistance, and erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin varied 3-fold among individuals, which correlated with PAFAH1B2 and not PAFAH1B3. We conclude that intracellular type I PAF acetylhydrolase is the major aspirin hydrolase of human blood. PMID:21844189

  2. Effects of long-term treatment with angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors in the presence or absence of aspirin: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teo, Koon K; Yusuf, Salim; Pfeffer, Marc

    2002-01-01

    -Yusuf method to undertake a systematic overview of data for 22060 patients from six long-term randomised trials of ACE inhibitors to assess whether aspirin altered the effects of ACE inhibitor therapy on major clinical outcomes (composite of death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospital admission...... between the proportional reductions in risk with ACE inhibitor therapy in the presence or absence of aspirin for the major clinical outcomes (p=0.15), or in any of its individual components, except myocardial infarction (interaction p=0.01). Overall, ACE inhibitor therapy significantly reduced the risk......BACKGROUND: Results from a retrospective analysis of the Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) study suggest that angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may be less effective in patients receiving aspirin. We aimed to confirm or refute this theory. METHODS: We used the Peto...

  3. Reye Syndrome and Aspirin

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-six cases of Reye syndrome occurring between 1973 and 1982 have been reviewed in relation to aspirin ingestion at the Children’s Hospital, Camperdown, Australia (formerly the Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children in Sydney), where Reye first described his syndrome of encephalopathy and fatty degeneration of the viscera in 1963.

  4. Inappropriate combination of warfarin and aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Burak; Demir, Hakan; Mutlu, Ayhan; Daşlı, Tolga; Erkol, Ayhan; Erden, İsmail

    2016-03-01

    A combination of warfarin and aspirin is associated with increased bleeding compared with warfarin monotherapy. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence and appropriateness of the combination of warfarin and aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or mechanical heart valve (MHV). This cross-sectional study included consecutive patients with AF or MHV on chronic warfarin therapy (>3 months) without acute coronary syndrome or have not undergone a revascularization procedure in the preceding year. Medical history, concomitant diseases, and treatment data were acquired through patient interviews and from hospital records. Three hundred and sixty patients (213 with AF, 147 with MHV) were included. In those with AF, a significantly higher warfarin-aspirin combination was observed with concomitant vascular disease (38.8% vs. 14.6%), diabetes (36.6% vs. 16.3%), statin therapy (40% vs. 16.9%), left ventricular systolic dysfunction (33.3% vs. 17.5%) (paspirin combination were concomitant vascular disease, diabetes, and (younger) age in patients with AF and were concomitant AF and male sex in patients with MHV. Interestingly, the incidence of combination therapy was found to increase with a higher HAS-BLED score in both patients with AF and MHV (paspirin was found to be prescribed to patients with AF mainly for the prevention of cardiovascular events, for which warfarin monotherapy usually suffices. On the other hand, co-treatment with aspirin appeared to be underused in patients with MHV.

  5. Multidrug Resistance Protein-4 Influences Aspirin Toxicity in Human Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Massimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of efflux transporters, in human cells, is a mechanism of resistance to drug and also to chemotherapy. We found that multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4 overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action in patients after bypass surgery and, very recently, we found that aspirin enhances platelet MRP4 levels through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα. In the present paper, we verified whether exposure of human embryonic kidney-293 cells (Hek-293 to aspirin modifies MRP4 gene expression and its correlation with drug elimination and cell toxicity. We first investigated the effect of high-dose aspirin in Hek-293 and we showed that aspirin is able to increase cell toxicity dose-dependently. Furthermore, aspirin effects, induced at low dose, already enhance MRP4 gene expression. Based on these findings, we compared cell viability in Hek-293, after high-dose aspirin treatment, in MRP4 overexpressing cells, either after aspirin pretreatment or in MRP4 transfected cells; in both cases, a decrease of selective aspirin cell growth inhibition was observed, in comparison with the control cultures. Altogether, these data suggest that exposing cells to low nontoxic aspirin dosages can induce gene expression alterations that may lead to the efflux transporter protein overexpression, thus increasing cellular detoxification of aspirin.

  6. Multidrug Resistance Protein-4 Influences Aspirin Toxicity in Human Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Isabella; Ciuffetta, Ambra; Temperilli, Flavia; Ferrandino, Francesca; Zicari, Alessandra; Pulcinelli, Fabio M; Felli, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of efflux transporters, in human cells, is a mechanism of resistance to drug and also to chemotherapy. We found that multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action in patients after bypass surgery and, very recently, we found that aspirin enhances platelet MRP4 levels through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα). In the present paper, we verified whether exposure of human embryonic kidney-293 cells (Hek-293) to aspirin modifies MRP4 gene expression and its correlation with drug elimination and cell toxicity. We first investigated the effect of high-dose aspirin in Hek-293 and we showed that aspirin is able to increase cell toxicity dose-dependently. Furthermore, aspirin effects, induced at low dose, already enhance MRP4 gene expression. Based on these findings, we compared cell viability in Hek-293, after high-dose aspirin treatment, in MRP4 overexpressing cells, either after aspirin pretreatment or in MRP4 transfected cells; in both cases, a decrease of selective aspirin cell growth inhibition was observed, in comparison with the control cultures. Altogether, these data suggest that exposing cells to low nontoxic aspirin dosages can induce gene expression alterations that may lead to the efflux transporter protein overexpression, thus increasing cellular detoxification of aspirin.

  7. Aspirin Prophylaxis for the Prevention of Thrombosis: Expectations and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gundu H. R. Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets play a very important role in the pathogenesis of acute vascular events leading to thrombosis of the coronary and cerebral arteries. Blockage of these arteries leading to regional ischemia of heart and brain tissues precipitate heart attacks and stroke. Acetyl salicylic acid (Aspirin has been the drug of choice for over half a century for the primary and secondary prophylaxis of thrombotic events. In spite of its extensive use as an antiplatelet drug for the prevention of vascular thrombosis, there is considerable concern about the degree of protection it offers, to patients under aspirin therapy. In this paper, we explain the phenomenon of aspirin resistance, discuss the limitations of aspirin therapy, and suggest methods to monitor “at-risk” individuals. Ability to monitor and determine at risk patients will provide opportunities for the clinicians to customize antiplatelet therapies.

  8. Oral aspirin for treating venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Carvalho, Paulo Eduardo; Magolbo, Natiara G; De Aquino, Rebeca F; Weller, Carolina D

    2016-02-18

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) or varicose ulcers are the final stage of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), and are the most common type of leg ulcer. The development of VLUs on ankles and lower legs can occur spontaneously or after minor trauma. The ulcers are often painful and exudative, healing is often protracted and recurrence is common. This cycle of healing and recurrence has a considerable impact on the health and quality of life of individuals, and healthcare and socioeconomic costs. VLUs are a common and costly problem worldwide; prevalence is estimated to be between 1.65% to 1.74% in the western world and is more common in adults aged 65 years and older. The main treatment for a VLU is a firm compression bandage. Compression assists by reducing venous hypertension, enhancing venous return and reducing peripheral oedema. However, studies show that it only has moderate effects on healing, with up to 50% of VLUs unhealed after two years of compression. Non-adherence may be the principal cause of these poor results, but presence of inflammation in people with CVI may be another factor, so a treatment that suppresses inflammation (healing ulcers more quickly) and reduces the frequency of ulcer recurrence (thereby prolonging time between recurrent episodes) would be an invaluable intervention to complement compression treatments. Oral aspirin may have a significant impact on VLU clinical practice worldwide. Evidence for the effectiveness of aspirin on ulcer healing and recurrence in high quality RCTs is currently lacking. To assess the benefits and harms of oral aspirin on the healing and recurrence of venous leg ulcers. In May 2015 we searched: The Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. Additional searches were made in trial registers and reference lists of relevant publications for

  9. Safety and outcomes of aspirin desensitization for aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: A single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldram, Jeremy; Walters, Kristen; Simon, Ronald; Woessner, Katherine; Waalen, Jill; White, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Aspirin desensitization is an effective treatment option for aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease. Aspirin desensitization protocol modifications have improved the safety and efficiency of this procedure, yet some providers remain reluctant to perform it. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and outcomes of outpatient aspirin desensitization procedures. A secondary objective was to assess clinical characteristics that might predict reaction severity during aspirin desensitization. Two hundred seventy-five patients underwent aspirin desensitization at Scripps Clinic between January 2009 and August 2015. Baseline patient characteristics and reaction results were analyzed in the 167 patients who reacted during desensitization. All of the 167 reactors, including 23 who were classified as severe reactors, were successfully desensitized in the outpatient setting. The average desensitization duration among reactors was 1.67 days, and the average duration for gastrointestinal reactors was 2.29 days. The mean baseline Sino-Nasal Outcome Test score was higher in severe reactors compared with nonsevere reactors (P = .05). Overall, patients receiving omalizumab had a similar reaction profile to those not receiving omalizumab. Most patients undergoing aspirin desensitization will have symptoms. It remains difficult to predict the severity of these symptoms. However, desensitization can be done safely and efficiently in an appropriately equipped outpatient setting. This treatment option should be made available to all patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease. The Sino-Nasal Outcome Test score might be able to predict more severe reactions and merits further study. Eight of the 9 patients receiving omalizumab reacted during desensitization, suggesting that it does not block reactions during aspirin desensitization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with aspirin in patients who previously tried but failed treatment with vitamin K antagonists: results from the AVERROES trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppens, Michiel; Synhorst, David; Eikelboom, John W.; Yusuf, Salim; Shestakovska, Olga; Connolly, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    The AVERROES double-blinded, randomized trial demonstrated that apixaban reduces the risk of stroke or systemic embolism (SSE) by 55% compared with aspirin without an increase in major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation either who previously tried but failed vitamin K antagonists (VKA)

  11. ESPRIT: is aspirin plus dipyridamole superior to aspirin alone in TIA or minor stroke patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhl, R P W; Lodder, J

    2008-11-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) or a (minor) ischemic stroke increases the risk of a recurrent stroke or death. Antiplatelet therapy with aspirin or clopidogrel is, in the absence of a potential cardiac embolic source, common practice to lower this risk. Until recently, adjuvant dipyridamole or low intensity oral anticoagulation were not generally prescribed in secondary prevention. In this article, we will summarize and discuss the published results of the European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischemia Trial (ESPRIT). In this trial, treatments with anticoagulants, aspirin alone and the combination of aspirin plus dipyridamole were compared, in a multicenter, three-armed, randomized, open-label study in patients with TIA or minor stroke.

  12. Antiplatelet (aspirin) therapy as a new option in the treatment of vasculogenic erectile dysfunction: a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Zeki; Albayrak, Selami

    2018-01-17

    To investigate the efficiency of antiplatelet (aspirin) therapy in vasculogenic erectile dysfunction (VED) patients with a high mean platelet volume. A total of 184 patients diagnosed with VED between the ages of 18 and 76 were randomly divided into two groups and treated for 6 weeks [group 1: 120 patients (mean age 48.3), aspirin 100 mg/day; group 2: 64 patients (mean age 47.7), placebo 100 mg/day]. The changes from baseline to end point in erectile function scores on the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-EF) and the number of patients who answered "yes" to questions 2 and 3 of the sexual encounter profile (SEP) were compared statistically. The mean baseline IIEF-EF scores in groups 1 and 2 were 14.1 ± 4.9 and 14.3 ± 5.2, respectively (p = 0.7966), the number of patients who answered "yes" to SEP-2 was 62 (51.6%) in group 1 and 32 (50%) in group 2 (p = 0.8366), and the number of patients who answered "yes" to SEP-3 was 38 (31.6%) in group 1 and 20 (31.2%) in group 2 (p = 0.9557). In the aspirin group, the changes from baseline to end point in the IIEF-EF, SEP-2, and SEP-3 scores were 7.2, 36.6, and 46.6%, respectively. In the placebo group, these changes were 2.0, 9.4, and 12.5%, respectively. When compared with the placebo group, aspirin-treated subjects showed a significant improvement in all three efficacy measures (p < 0.0001). 100 mg of aspirin administered once a day significantly improved EF in men with VED.

  13. Aspirin, 110 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrono, C; Rocca, B

    2009-07-01

    Although conceived at the end of the 19th century as a synthetic analgesic agent with improved gastric tolerability vs. naturally occurring salicylates, acetylsalicylic acid (marketed as aspirin in 1899) turned out to be an ideal antiplatelet agent about 90 years later, following the understanding of its mechanism of action, the development of a mechanism-based biomarker for dose-finding studies, and the initiation of a series of appropriately sized, randomized clinical trials to test its efficacy and safety at low doses given once daily. At the turn of its 110th anniversary, aspirin continues to attract heated debates on a number of issues including (i) the optimal dose to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity; (ii) the possibility that some patients may be 'resistant' to its antiplatelet effects; and (iii) the balance of benefits and risks in primary vs. secondary prevention.

  14. Acetylsalicylic acid provides cerebrovascular protection from oxidant damage in salt-loaded stroke-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Niwa, Atsuko; Tabuchi, Masaki; Ooshima, Kana; Higashino, Hideaki

    2008-03-26

    Inflammatory processes may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of cerebrovascular injury in salt-loaded stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Recent reports revealed that acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) has anti-oxidative properties and elicits nitric oxide release by a direct activation of the endothelial NO synthase. The present study was designed to determine whether low-dose aspirin might prevent cerebrovascular injury in salt-loaded SHRSP by protecting oxidative damage. Nine-week-old SHRSP were fed a 0.4% NaCl or a 4% NaCl diet with or without treatment by naproxen (20 mg/kg/day), salicylic acid (5 mg/kg/day), or aspirin (5 mg/kg/day) for 5 weeks. Blood pressure, blood brain barrier impairment, mortality, and the parameters of cerebrovascular inflammation and damage were compared among them. High salt intake in SHRSP significantly increased blood brain barrier impairment and early mortality, which were suppressed by treatment with aspirin independent of changes in blood pressure. Salt loading significantly increased superoxide production in basilar arteries of SHRSP, which were significantly suppressed by treatment with aspirin. Salt loading also significantly decreased NOS activity in the basilar arteries of SHRSP, which were significantly improved by treatment with aspirin. At 5 weeks after salt loading, macrophage accumulation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity at the stroke-negative area in cerebral cortex of SHRSP were significantly reduced by treatment with aspirin. These results suggest that low-dose aspirin may exert protective effects against cerebrovascular inflammation and damage by salt loading through down-regulation of superoxide production and induction of nitric oxide synthesis.

  15. Corrosion protection of reinforcement by hydrophobic treatment of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Vries, H. de

    1999-01-01

    Penetration of de-icing salts into concrete bridge decks may cause corrosion of reinforcement. Hydrophobic treatment of concrete was studied as additional protection. It was shown that hydrophobic treatment strongly reduces chloride ingress, during semi-permanent contact and in wetting/drying

  16. Aspirin Use and Mortality in Two Contemporary US Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Yi; Daugherty, Sarah E; Shiels, Meredith S; Purdue, Mark P; Freedman, Neal D; Abnet, Christian C; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Hayes, Richard B; Silverman, Debra T; Berndt, Sonja I

    2018-01-01

    Daily aspirin use has been recommended for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, but its use for primary prevention remains controversial. We followed 440,277 men and women from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study (ages 50-71) and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (ages 55-74) for mortality for 13 years on average. Frequency of aspirin use was ascertained through self-report, and cause of death by death certificates. We calculated multivariate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for mortality using Cox proportional hazards models for each cohort and combined by meta-analysis. We found a consistent U-shaped relationship between aspirin use and mortality in both studies, with differential risk patterns for cardiovascular mortality by disease history. Among individuals with a history of cardiovascular disease, daily aspirin use was associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality [HR = 0.78 (95% CI, 0.74, 0.82)]. However, among those without a previous history, we observed no protection for daily aspirin users [HR = 1.06 (1.02, 1.11)], and elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality for those taking aspirin twice daily or more [HR = 1.29 (1.19, 1.39)]. Elevated risk persisted even among participants who lived beyond 5 years of follow-up and used aspirin without other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs [HR = 1.31 (1.17, 1.47)]. Results from these 2 large population-based US cohorts confirm the utility of daily aspirin use for secondary prevention of cardiovascular mortality; however, our data suggest that caution should be exercised in more frequent use, particularly among individuals without a history of cardiovascular disease.

  17. Clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for preventing cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Bellesini, Marta; Takeda, Andrea; Middeldorp, Saskia; Donadini, Marco Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin is the prophylactic antiplatelet drug of choice for people with cardiovascular disease. Adding a second antiplatelet drug to aspirin may produce additional benefit for people at high risk and people with established cardiovascular disease. This is an update to a previously published review

  18. Clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for preventing cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Keller, Tymen; Romualdi, Erica; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin is the prophylactic antiplatelet drug of choice for people with cardiovascular disease. Adding a second antiplatelet drug to aspirin may produce additional benefit for those at high risk and those with established cardiovascular disease. To quantify the benefit and harm of adding clopidogrel

  19. Aspirin in the 21st century-common mechanisms of disease and their modulation by aspirin: a report from the 2015 scientific conference of the international aspirin foundation, 28 August, London, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tom; Hutchison, Pippa; Schrör, Karsten; Clària, Joan; Lanas, Angel; Patrignani, Paola; Chan, Andrew T; Din, Farhat; Langley, Ruth; Elwood, Peter; Freedman, Andrew; Eccles, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Professor Peter Rothwell of Oxford University chaired the annual Scientific Conference of the International Aspirin Foundation in London on 28 August 2015. It took the form of four sessions. Aspirin has more than one action in its effects on disease. Its acetylation of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in platelets leads to the blockade of pro-inflammatory chemicals and generation of anti-inflammatory mediators and increase in nitrous oxide (NO) production, which helps to preserve arterial endothelium. But platelets are not its only target. There is now evidence that aspirin has a direct antitumour effect on intestinal mucosal cells that block their potential transformation into cancer cells. Randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) in people with histories of colorectal neoplasia have shown that aspirin reduces the risk of recurrent adenomas and reduces long-term cancer incidence in patients with Lynch syndrome. Among women given aspirin for cardiovascular disease, there were fewer cancers than in those given placebo. Epidemiological evidence has suggested that aspirin treatment after cancer is diagnosed reduces the incidence of metastases and prolongs survival, and long-term studies of anticancer treatment with aspirin are under way to confirm this. Apart from cancer studies, aspirin use is now firmly established as treatment for antiphospholipid syndrome (Hughes syndrome) and is being used to prevent and treat the heightened risk of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus and in patients with HIV.

  20. Aspirin in the 21st century—common mechanisms of disease and their modulation by aspirin: a report from the 2015 scientific conference of the international aspirin foundation, 28 August, London, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tom; Hutchison, Pippa; Schrör, Karsten; Clària, Joan; Lanas, Angel; Patrignani, Paola; Chan, Andrew T; Din, Farhat; Langley, Ruth; Elwood, Peter; Freedman, Andrew; Eccles, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Professor Peter Rothwell of Oxford University chaired the annual Scientific Conference of the International Aspirin Foundation in London on 28 August 2015. It took the form of four sessions. Aspirin has more than one action in its effects on disease. Its acetylation of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in platelets leads to the blockade of pro-inflammatory chemicals and generation of anti-inflammatory mediators and increase in nitrous oxide (NO) production, which helps to preserve arterial endothelium. But platelets are not its only target. There is now evidence that aspirin has a direct antitumour effect on intestinal mucosal cells that block their potential transformation into cancer cells. Randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) in people with histories of colorectal neoplasia have shown that aspirin reduces the risk of recurrent adenomas and reduces long-term cancer incidence in patients with Lynch syndrome. Among women given aspirin for cardiovascular disease, there were fewer cancers than in those given placebo. Epidemiological evidence has suggested that aspirin treatment after cancer is diagnosed reduces the incidence of metastases and prolongs survival, and long-term studies of anticancer treatment with aspirin are under way to confirm this. Apart from cancer studies, aspirin use is now firmly established as treatment for antiphospholipid syndrome (Hughes syndrome) and is being used to prevent and treat the heightened risk of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus and in patients with HIV. PMID:26557879

  1. Effect of Aspirin and Indomethacin on Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis in C6 Glioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiuh-Lin Hwang

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 plays an important role in immunosuppression and tumor growth. PGE2 inhibitors such as aspirin and indomethacin suppress experimental tumor growth. Little is known of the relationship between PGE2 synthesis in brain tumors and the dose of aspirin or indomethacin. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of different doses of aspirin and indomethacin on PGE2 synthesis in C6 glioma cells. C6 glioma cells were incubated with different concentrations (2, 4, and 8 μM of aspirin and indomethacin for 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hours. Intracellular PGE2 concentration was measured by enzyme immunoassay. Each concentration of aspirin and indomethacin effectively inhibited PGE2 synthesis. Concentrations of 2, 4, and 8 μM of aspirin significantly inhibited PGE2 production at 6, 4, and 1 hours, respectively, and the inhibition persisted for more than 24 hours (p 0.05. Indomethacin 8 μM was effective at 1 hour and the inhibition persisted beyond 24 hours (p < 0.05. Our study demonstrates that aspirin and indomethacin inhibit PGE2 synthesis in C6 glioma cells and that low-dose aspirin is as effective as high-dose aspirin. This study may encourage future clinical use of low-dose aspirin in the prevention or treatment of brain tumors.

  2. of aspirin The use of renal enzymes indication of renal toxicity dose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-30

    Apr 30, 1983 ... Ten volunteers participated in a study comparing the effects on renal enzymes of multiple oral doses of aspirin relative to no treatment. The total urinary output was collected daily for 21 days from all sub- jects. The first 7 days were treatment-free. During the second 7-day period the subjects received aspirin ...

  3. Greener Methods for Aspirin Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Barilone, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    In this semester long study, I used microwave irradiation to synthesize aspirin. I compared this method to a traditional method that utilizes a strong acid. I compared the percent yield and the purity of the methods to pure aspirin

  4. MACULAR DEGENERATION AND ASPIRIN USE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Kent W; Garabetian, Christine A; Shaya, Fadi S

    2017-09-01

    To review current literature of the benefits that aspirin provides for patients' cardiovascular health compared with the risk of AMD worsening. We performed a review and critically analyzed six cardiovascular and four ophthalmological trials regarding risks and benefits of aspirin use. The prospective randomized cardiovascular trials had a cumulative 167,580 while the 3 smaller ophthalmological data sets had a cumulative 12,015 subjects. The reviewed meta-analysis literature demonstrated a statistically significant 32% reduction in the risk of nonfatal stroke with regular aspirin users. The study also documented that aspirin users decreased the risk of fatal vascular deaths by 15%. Of the three ophthalmological studies highlighting the adverse affects of aspirin association with AMD, all suggested an exacerbation of AMD without statistical significance and broad confidence bands. Overall, the number, size, and quality of the cardiovascular studies recommending aspirin use are far superior to the fewer, smaller and conflicting studies suggesting a possible adverse effect of aspirin use in relation to AMD. The benefits of aspirin usage include preserving the duration and quality of life by decreasing stroke and heart attack risk. These benefits seem to far outweigh the theoretical risks of possibly exacerbating wet AMD, which can be reasonably controlled with anti-VEGF therapy.

  5. Up-regulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor in astrocytes by aspirin: implications for remyelination in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Khushbu K; Sendtner, Michael; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-06-21

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a promyelinating trophic factor, and the mechanisms by which CNTF expression could be increased in the brain are poorly understood. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is one of the most widely used analgesics. Interestingly, aspirin increased mRNA and protein expression of CNTF in primary mouse and human astrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Aspirin induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) but not protein kinase C (PKC). H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated aspirin-induced expression of CNTF. The activation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), but not NF-κB, by aspirin, the abrogation of aspirin-induced expression of CNTF by siRNA knockdown of CREB, the presence of a consensus cAMP-response element in the promoter of CNTF, and the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the CNTF promoter by aspirin suggest that aspirin increases the expression of the Cntf gene via the activation of CREB. Furthermore, we demonstrate that aspirin-induced astroglial CNTF was also functionally active and that supernatants of aspirin-treated astrocytes of wild type, but not Cntf null, mice increased myelin-associated proteins in oligodendrocytes and protected oligodendrocytes from TNF-α insult. These results highlight a new and novel myelinogenic property of aspirin, which may be of benefit for multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating disorders.

  6. Aspirin prevents diabetic oxidative changes in rat lacrimal gland structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Angélica Gobbi; Módulo, Carolina Maria; Dias, Ana Carolina; Braz, Alexandre Martins; Filho, Rubens Bertazolli; Jordão, Alceu A; de Paula, Jayter Silva; Rocha, Eduardo Melani

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate whether aspirin reduces Diabetis Mellitus (DM) oxidative damage in the lacrimal gland (LG), and ocular surface (OS). Ten weeks after streptozotocin induced DM and aspirin treatment, LG and OS of rats were compared for tear secretion, hidtology, peroxidase activity, and expression of uncoupling proteins (UCPs). DM reduction of tear secretion was prevented by aspirin (P aspirin-treated diabetic rats. Peroxidase activity levels were higher and UCP-2 was reduced in DM LG but not in aspirin treated (P = 0.0025 and P aspirin indicate a direct inhibitory effect on oxidative pathways in LG and their inflammatory consequences, preserving the LG structure and function against hyperglycemia and/or insulin deficiency damage.

  7. 24-hour antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with previous definite stent thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Morten; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Lisette O

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Once-daily aspirin is standard treatment, but recent studies point towards increased platelet function at the end of the dosing interval. Stent thrombosis (ST) has been linked with reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin, so we investigated if platelet inhibition by aspirin declines...... with 100 patients with stable coronary artery disease and 50 healthy volunteers. All participants were on aspirin 75 mg/day mono antiplatelet therapy. Platelet aggregation was measured 1 and 24 h after aspirin intake using platelet aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyzer). Cyclooxygenase-1 activity, platelet...... activation, immature platelets, and thrombopoietin were measured. RESULTS: Platelet aggregation increased by 109±150 (arachidonic acid) and 47±155 (collagen) aggregation units per minute from 1 to 24 h after aspirin intake (p-values

  8. Modulating the inflammatory properties of activated microglia with Docosahexaenoic acid and Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Microglia are considered the “resident macrophages” of the brain. When in their resting state, microglia perform routine maintenance and immune surveillance. Once activated, either by injury or an immune stimulus, microglia secrete a variety of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as Nitric Oxide, superoxide, and inflammatory cytokines. Up-regulation of pro-inflammatory molecules is transient, and does not cause neurodegeneration. However, if up-regulation lasts for an extended period of time, neurodegeneration ensues. Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation due to microglial activation. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) have been proposed as possible preventative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, due to their anti-inflammatory properties. Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) is an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that has potent anti-inflammatory properties.This research work sought to elucidate whether microglial activation can be modulated by combining Aspirin, a classical NSAID, with Docosahexaenoic Acid, a natural anti-inflammatory agent. The combined ability of Aspirin and DHA to modulate microglial activation was determined in the context of pro-inflammatory cytokines, Nitric Oxide levels, as well as total Glutathione levels. Results Docosahexaenoic Acid increased total Glutathione levels in microglia cells and enhanced their anti-oxidative capacity. It reduced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 induced through TLR-3 and TLR-4 activation. Furthermore, it reduced production of Nitric Oxide. Aspirin showed similar anti-inflammatory effects with respect to TNF-α during TLR-3 and TLR-7 stimulation. Aspirin did not show any redection in terms of Nitric Oxide production. Combination of Aspirin and Docosahexaenoic Acid showed augmentation in total Glutathione production during TLR-7 stimulation as well as a reduction in IL-6, TNF-α and Nitric Oxide. Conclusions

  9. Aspirin inhibition of platelet deposition at angioplasty sites: demonstration by platelet scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuningham, D.A.; Kumar, B.; Siegel, B.A.; Gilula, L.A.; Totty, W.G.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-05-01

    In-111 platelet scintigraphy was used to evaluate the effects of prior aspirin administration on the accumulation of In-111-labeled autologous platelets at sites of arterial injury resulting from iliac, femoral, or popliteal transluminal angioplasty in a nonrandomized study of 17 men. The degree of platelet localization at angioplasty sites was significantly less in nine men who had received aspirin in varying doses within the 4 days before angioplasty than in eight men who had not received aspirin for at least two weeks. The results suggest that aspirin treatment before angioplasty limits the early platelet deposition at the angioplasty site in men.

  10. Comparative bioequivalence assessment of aspirin tablets marketed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: In the last few years, aspirin has become a life saver against cardiovascular accidents. This investigation was carried out to determine possible bioequivalence between regular aspirin and soluble aspirin tablets marketed in Nigeria. Methods: The in vivo bioavailability profiles of three commercial brands of aspirin ...

  11. Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szakaly, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low ( i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

  12. TRIAL OF ASPIRIN AND CALCIUM ON PREVENTION OF PREECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALI AKBA TAHERIAN

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction. Preelampsia is a common and serious complication of pregnancy that affects both mother and newborn. This study designed to determine whether low-dose aspirin or calcium supplements taken throughout pregnancy reduce the incidence of preeclampsia. Methods. The present study was a randomized controlled clinical trial. 990 healthy nulliparous women, who were pregnant for 13 to 20 weeks were chosen to receive daily treatment with low dose of aspirin 75 mg (330 patients, aspirin group, calcium D 500 mg (330 Patients, calcium group and no medication (330 patients, control group for remainder of theirs pregnancies. Data included demographic, obstetric, prenatal care, hospital records and final diagnosis were collected. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-Squre, ANOVA and Duncan test at significance level of 0.05. Results. Preeclampsia occurred in 15 of 330 women in the aspirin group (4.6%, 13 of 330 women in the calcium group (4% and in 33 of 330 women in control group (10.1%. There were significant differences between aspirin and control groups (4.6% vs. 10.1% P < 0.05 also between calcium and control group (4% vs. 10.1% P < 0.05. Discussion. These results suggest that low dose of aspirin or calcium D during pregnancy in healthy nulliparous women is effective to reduce the prevalence of preeclampsia.

  13. Antiplatelet effects of aspirin in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, A; Dannenberg, L; Sansone, R; Levkau, B; Kelm, M; Hohlfeld, T; Zeus, T

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have a high risk of cardiovascular events. A pharmacodynamic evaluation of the effects of aspirin in 116 patients was carried out. The antiplatelet effects of aspirin are associated with impaired renal function. The optimal antithrombotic regimen in CKD patients must be investigated on a larger scale. The pharmacodynamic response to aspirin varies significantly between individuals. Insufficient antiplatelet effects of aspirin are associated with increased risk of ischemic events. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is suggested to affect the pharmacodynamic response to antiplatelet medication. High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) to clopidogrel has been reported to partially account for the enhanced risk of death and cardiovascular events in CKD patients. Objective To investigate the antiplatelet effects of aspirin in patients with CKD. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 116 patients on permanent aspirin medication. The pharmacodynamic response to aspirin was determined by arachidonic acid-induced thromboxane formation. HTPR to aspirin was more frequent in patients with impaired renal function (47% vs. 22%; odds ratio, 3.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-7.41; P = 0.008). The pharmacodynamic response to aspirin was impaired in patients with moderate/severe CKD (92; interquartile range [IQR], 282 ng mL(-1) ) as compared to patients with normal/mildly reduced renal function (36; IQR, 100 ng mL(-1) ; difference in medians, 57; CI, 5-110 ng mL(-1) ; P = 0.013). Bivariate Pearson analysis showed residual thromboxane formation to be correlated with glomerular filtration rate (R = -0.303; R(2) = 0.092; P = 0.001). Patients with CKD were older and more frequently female. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that the correlation was independent of age (R = -0.314; R(2) = 0.082; P = 0.002) and gender (R = -0.305; R(2) = 0.077; P = 0.006). Renal function is correlated with pharmacodynamic response to

  14. The role of aspirin desensitization in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Jonas Willian; Valera, Fabiana Cardoso Pereira; Cordeiro, Daniel Loiola; de Mendonça, Taís Nociti; Leite, Marcelo Gonçalves Junqueira; Tamashiro, Edwin; Arruda, Luiza Karla; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) consists of a classic tetrad: moderate/severe asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and intolerance to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Clinical control with drugs, surgery, and desensitization are treatment options. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of aspirin desensitization in patients with AERD. Periodic symptom assessment and endoscopy in patients with AERD undergoing surgery who were desensitized. Seventeen patients were desensitized. Eight patients completed the desensitization and were followed for a minimum of a one-year period (mean 3.1 years). These patients showed improvement in all symptoms. Moreover, surgical reassessment was not indicated in any of these patients and there was a decrease in costs with medication and procedures. Eight patients did not complete desensitization, mainly due to procedure intolerance and uncontrolled asthma, whereas another patient was lost to follow-up. Aspirin desensitization, when tolerated, was effective in patients with AERD and with poor clinical/surgical response. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Aspirin and the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases: An Approach Based on Individualized, Integrated Estimation of Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Massimo; Battistoni, Allegra; Gallo, Giovanna; Coluccia, Roberta; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2017-09-01

    While the use of aspirin in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular (CVD) is well established, aspirin in primary prevention is not systematically recommended because the absolute CV event reduction is similar to the absolute excess in major bleedings. Recently, emerging evidence suggests the possibility that the assumption of aspirin, may also be effective in the prevention of cancer. By adding to the CV prevention benefits the potential beneficial effect of aspirin in reducing the incidence of mortality and cancer could tip the balance between risks and benefits of aspirin therapy in the primary prevention in favour of the latter and broaden the indication for treatment with in populations at average risk. While prospective and randomized study are currently investigating the effect of aspirin in prevention of both cancer and CVD, clinical efforts at the individual level to promote the use of aspirin in global (or total) primary prevention could be already based on a balanced evaluation of the benefit/risk ratio.

  16. Aspirin-Induced Acute Liver Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Laster, Janese; Satoskar, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin is thought to be a relatively safe drug in adults. The association of aspirin and Reye syndrome in children is well documented. We report a 41-year-old female with pericarditis who was treated with high-dose aspirin and developed subsequent acute liver injury. After discontinuation of aspirin, liver enzyme elevation and right upper quadrant pain both resolved. We conclude that high-dose aspirin should be considered as a potentially hepatotoxic agent.

  17. Could Aspirin and Diets High in Fiber Act Synergistically to Reduce the Risk of Colon Cancer in Humans?

    OpenAIRE

    Pan Pan; Yi-Wen Huang; Kiyoko Oshima; Martha Yearsley; Jianying Zhang; Jianhua Yu; Mark Arnold; Li-Shu Wang

    2018-01-01

    Early inhibition of inflammation suppresses the carcinogenic process. Aspirin is the most commonly used non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and it irreversibly inhibits cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX1, COX2). Multiple randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that aspirin offers substantial protection from colon cancer mortality. The lower aspirin doses causing only minimal gastrointestinal disturbance, ideal for long-term use, can achieve only partial and transitory inhibition of ...

  18. Platelets, aspirin, and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, P C; Hughes, C; O'Brien, J R

    1998-10-01

    Aspirin was first synthesised 100 years ago and its preparation and marketing is generally reckoned to have been the foundation of the pharmaceutical industry. For most of the time since then it has been used for the relief of pain and fever. The modern phase of aspirin use commenced with the reporting in 1974 of a randomised controlled trial in the secondary prevention of death by low-dose aspirin given to patients who had suffered a myocardial infarct. Reports of other trials followed and an overview of the first six trials was presented to the inaugural meeting of the Society for Clinical Trials in Philadelphia in 1980. There have been two further major overviews and the most recent, based on 145 trials, established that low-dose aspirin reduces vascular events by around one third. It has been estimated that, used appropriately, aspirin could prevent 100,000 premature deaths each year worldwide, at a cost of about 250 Pounds ($400) per life saved, and about 80 Pounds ($130) per cardiovascular event prevented. The evidence indicates that it is seriously underused at present. The aspirin story continues and trials are in progress to test other possible uses of aspirin, in vascular dementia, colorectal cancer, and cataract.

  19. Gastrointestinal symptoms in low-dose aspirin users: a comparison between plain and buffered aspirin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers Focks, J.; Tielemans, M.M.; Rossum, L.G.M. van; Eikendal, T.; Brouwer, M.A.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Oijen, M.G.H. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin is associated with gastrointestinal side effects such as gastric ulcers, gastric bleeding and dyspepsia. High-dose effervescent calcium carbasalate (ECC), a buffered formulation of aspirin, is associated with reduced gastric toxicity compared with plain aspirin in healthy

  20. Study protocol for the randomised controlled trial: combined multimarker screening and randomised patient treatment with ASpirin for evidence-based PREeclampsia prevention (ASPRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Neil; Wright, David; Rolnik, Daniel L; Nicolaides, Kypros H; Poon, Liona C

    2016-06-28

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) affects 2-3% of all pregnancies and is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Prophylactic use of low-dose aspirin in women at risk for PE may substantially reduce the prevalence of the disease. Effective screening for PE requiring delivery before 37 weeks (preterm PE) can be provided by a combination of maternal factors, uterine artery Doppler, mean arterial pressure, maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein A and placental growth factor at 11-13 weeks' gestation, with a detection rate of 75% at a false-positive rate of 10%. We present a protocol (V.6, date 25 January 2016) for the ASpirin for evidence-based PREeclampsia prevention (ASPRE) trial, which is a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomised controlled trial (RCT) that uses an effective PE screening programme to determine whether low-dose aspirin given to women from 11 to 13 weeks' gestation will reduce the incidence of preterm PE. All eligible women attending for their first trimester scan will be invited to participate in the screening study for preterm PE. Those found to be at high risk of developing preterm PE will be invited to participate in the RCT. Further scans will be conducted for assessment of fetal growth and biomarkers. Pregnancy and neonatal outcomes will be collected and analysed. The first enrolment for the pilot study was in April 2014. As of April 2016, 26 670 women have been screened and 1760 recruited to the RCT. The study is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) registry. ISRCTN13633058. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Platelets, aspirin, and cardiovascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Elwood, P. C.; Hughes, C.; O'Brien, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    Aspirin was first synthesised 100 years ago and its preparation and marketing is generally reckoned to have been the foundation of the pharmaceutical industry. For most of the time since then it has been used for the relief of pain and fever. The modern phase of aspirin use commenced with the reporting in 1974 of a randomised controlled trial in the secondary prevention of death by low-dose aspirin given to patients who had suffered a myocardial infarct. Reports of other trials followed and a...

  2. Aspirin and coumadin after acute coronary syndromes (the ASPECT-2 study) : a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, RF; Jonker, JJC; Verheugt, FWA; Deckers, JW; Grobbee, DE

    2002-01-01

    Background Antiplatelet treatment with aspirin and oral anticoagulants reduces reocurrence of ischaemic events after myocardial infarction. We aimed to investigate which of these drugs is more effective in the long term after acute coronary events, and whether the combination of aspirin and oral

  3. UP-REGULATION OF ANTITHROMBOTIC ECTONUCLEOTIDASES BY ASPIRIN IN HUMAN ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS IN-VITRO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHEUNG, PK; VISSER, J; BAKKER, WW

    1994-01-01

    Ecto ATP-diphosphohydrolase (apyrase) activity of human endothelial cells following aspirin treatment has been studied in-vitro. It was shown by HPLC analysis of supernatant samples that pre-incubation of the cultures with aspirin resulted in a significantly increased turnover of supplemented ATP

  4. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yanshuang [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); He, Huabin [Department of Orthopedics, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); Lou, Lianqing; Ye, Weiwei; Chen, Yongxin [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); Wang, Jinghe, E-mail: Xiaofeili2000@163.com [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis.

  5. Aspirin and incident depressive symptoms: A longitudinal cohort study over 8 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Nicola; Koyanagi, Ai; Stubbs, Brendon; Solmi, Marco; Fornaro, Michele; Fernandes, Brisa S; Muller, Christoph; Thompson, Trevor; Carvalho, André F; Maggi, Stefania

    2018-02-01

    Aspirin exhibits anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory properties-two potential risk factors for depression. The relationship between aspirin use and depression, however, remains unclear. We investigated whether the aspirin use is associated with a decreased incidence of depressive symptoms in a large North American cohort. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative dataset, a multicenter, longitudinal study on community-dwelling adults was analyzed. Aspirin use was defined through self-report in the past 30 days and confirmed by a trained interviewer. Incident depressive symptoms were defined as a score of ≥16 in the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale. A total of 137 participants (mean age 65 y, 55.5% female) were using aspirin at baseline. Compared with 4003 participants not taking aspirin, no differences in Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression at baseline were evident (P = .65). After a median follow-up time of 8 years, the incidence of depressive symptoms was similar in those taking aspirin at baseline (43; 95% CI, 3-60) and in aspirin nonusers (38; 95% CI, 36-41) per 1000 y; log-rank test = 0.63). Based on Cox's regression analysis adjusted for 11 potential confounders, aspirin use was not significantly associated with the development of depressive symptoms (hazard ratio = 1.12; 95% CI, 0.78-1.62; P = .54). Adjustment for propensity scores or the use of propensity score matching did not alter the results. Our study found that prescription of aspirin offered no significant protection against incident depressive symptoms. Whether aspirin is beneficial in a subgroup of depression with high levels of inflammation remains to be investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and prostate cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Charlotte; Dehlendorff, Christian; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Increasing evidence suggests that aspirin use may protect against prostate cancer. In a nationwide case–control study, using Danish high-quality registry data, we evaluated the association between the use of low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs......) and the risk of prostate cancer. Methods We identified 35,600 patients (cases) with histologically verified prostate cancer during 2000–2012. Cases were matched to 177,992 population controls on age and residence by risk-set sampling. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID exposure was defined by type, estimated dose......, duration, and consistency of use. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs), with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs), for prostate cancer associated with low-dose aspirin (75–150 mg) or nonaspirin NSAID use, adjusted for potential confounders. Results Use of low-dose aspirin...

  7. Contemporary patterns of discharge aspirin dosing after acute myocardial infarction in the United States: results from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Hurst M; de Lemos, James A; Enriquez, Jonathan R; McGuire, Darren K; Peng, S Andrew; Alexander, Karen P; Roe, Matthew T; Desai, Nihar; Wiviott, Stephen D; Das, Sandeep R

    2014-09-01

    Accumulated data suggest that low-dose aspirin after myocardial infarction (MI) may offer similar efficacy to higher dose aspirin with reduced risk of bleeding. Few data are available on contemporary aspirin dosing patterns after MI in the United States Aspirin dosing from 221 199 patients with MI (40.2% ST-segment-elevation MI) from 525 US hospitals enrolled in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's (NCDR's) Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network Registry-Get with the Guidelines were described, overall and in clinically relevant subgroups. High-dose aspirin was defined as 325 mg and low dose as 81 mg. Between January 2007 and March 2011, 60.9% of patients with acute MI were discharged on high-dose aspirin, 35.6% on low-dose aspirin, and 3.5% on other doses. High-dose aspirin was prescribed at discharge to 73.0% of patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention and 44.6% of patients managed medically. Among 9075 patients discharged on aspirin, thienopyridine, and warfarin, 44.0% were prescribed high-dose aspirin. Patients with an in-hospital major bleeding event were also frequently discharged on high-dose aspirin (56.7%). A 25-fold variation in the proportion prescribed high-dose aspirin at discharge was observed across participating centers. Most US patients with MI continue to be discharged on high-dose aspirin. Although aspirin dosing after percutaneous coronary intervention largely reflected prevailing guidelines before 2012, high-dose aspirin was prescribed with similar frequency in medically managed patients and to those in categories expected to be at high risk for bleeding. Wide variability in the proportional use of high-dose aspirin across centers suggests significant influence from local practice habits and uncertainty about appropriate aspirin dosing. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Aspirin inhibits the SHH/GLI1 signaling pathway and sensitizes malignant glioma cells to temozolomide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Jianguang; Sun, Bo; Li, Ziwei; Lin, Lin; Meng, Xiangqi; Han, Bo; Wang, Ruijia; Wu, Pengfei; Li, Jianlong; Cai, Jinquan; Jiang, Chuanlu

    2017-04-01

    Aberrant activation of sonic hedgehog (SHH)/glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1) pathway plays an important role in the tumorigenicity of malignant glioma cells and resistance to temozolomide (TMZ). Here we investigated the aspirin's antineoplastic molecular route by targeting SHH/GLI1 pathway and examined the feasibility of aspirin combined with TMZ therapy. Western blot and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that the activity of the SHH/GLI1 pathway was strongly inhibited by aspirin. Aspirin acted as the glioma growth-inhibitory and pro-apoptosis roles by inhibiting the SHH/GLI1 pathway and reprogramming the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). The immunofluorescence assay showed aspirin could prevent the nuclear translocation of GLI1 to inhibit its transcriptional regulation. The stable lentiviral overexpression of GLI1 reversed the DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) caused by the GANT61 and TMZ. Furthermore, aspirin combined with TMZ enhanced chemosensitivity and GLI1-induced chemoprotection was partly blocked by aspirin in vitro and in vivo . Collectively, aspirin has a therapeutic potential for SHH/GLI1 targeted therapy against glioma cells. Acquired activation of GLI1 protects glioma cells against TMZ therapy. Impairment of DNA DSBs repair activity might be involved in the route of aspirin-induced chemosensitivity. Combined aspirin with TMZ may be a promising strategy against malignant glioma.

  9. Daily Aspirin Therapy: Understand the Benefits and Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily aspirin therapy: Understand the benefits and risks Daily aspirin therapy can be a lifesaving option, but it's not ... everyone. Get the facts before considering a daily aspirin. By Mayo Clinic Staff Daily aspirin therapy may ...

  10. Impact of aspirin and statins on long-term survival in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction complicated by heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewinter, Christian; Bland, John M; Crouch, Simon

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Aspirin and statins are established therapies for acute myocardial infarction (MI), but their benefits in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) remain elusive. We investigated the impact of aspirin and statins on long-term survival in patients hospitalized with acute MI complicated by HF....... METHODS AND RESULTS: Of 4251 patients in the Evaluation of Methods and Management of Acute Coronary Events (EMMACE)-1 and -2 observational studies, 1706 patients had HF. A propensity score-matching method estimated the average treatment effects (ATEs) of aspirin and statins on survival over 90 months....... ATEs were calculated as relative risk differences in all-cause mortality comparing patients receiving aspirin and statins with controls, respectively. Moreover, combined aspirin and statins vs. none (ATE I), aspirin or statins vs. none (ATE II), and aspirin and statins vs. aspirin or statins (ATE III...

  11. By inhibiting PFKFB3, aspirin overcomes sorafenib resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sainan; Dai, Weiqi; Mo, Wenhui; Li, Jingjing; Feng, Jiao; Wu, Liwei; Liu, Tong; Yu, Qiang; Xu, Shizan; Wang, Wenwen; Lu, Xiya; Zhang, Qinghui; Chen, Kan; Xia, Yujing; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Fan, Xiaoming; Xu, Ling; Guo, Chuanyong

    2017-12-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the few cancers with a continuous increase in incidence and mortality. Drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of HCC. In this study, two sorafenib-resistant HCC cell lines and a nude mouse subcutaneously tumor model were used to explore the possible mechanisms leading to sorafenib resistance, and to investigate whether aspirin could increase the sensitivity of hepatoma cells to sorafenib. The combination of aspirin and sorafenib resulted in a synergistic antitumor effect against liver tumors both in vitro and in vivo. High glycolysis and PFKFB3 overexpression occupied a dominant position in sorafenib resistance, and can be targeted and overcome by aspirin. Aspirin plus sorafenib induced apoptosis in tumors without inducing weight loss, hepatotoxicity or inflammation. Our results suggest that aspirin overcomes sorafenib resistance and their combination may be an effective treatment approach for HCC. © 2017 UICC.

  12. High-dose aspirin is required to influence plasma fibrin network structure in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Sara; Antovic, Aleksandra; Mobarrez, Fariborz; Mageed, Koteiba; Lins, Per-Eric; Adamson, Ulf; Wallén, Håkan N; Jörneskog, Gun

    2012-02-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes form a less permeable fibrin network, which could contribute to their increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Low-dose aspirin treatment is the standard in the management of CVD; however, the effect seems reduced in patients with diabetes. We investigated the effects of low- and high-dose aspirin treatment on fibrin network formation in patients with type 1 diabetes (primary aim) and the possible interaction between the treatment effects of aspirin on fibrin network permeability and glycemic control in these patients (secondary aim). Forty-eight patients (24 subjects with good [HbA(1c) 8.4%] glycemic control) were randomly assigned to treatment with 75 or 320 mg/day aspirin during 4 weeks in a crossover fashion. A 4-week washout period separated the treatment periods. The plasma fibrin network was assessed by determination of the permeability coefficient (K(s)). Treatment with 75 mg aspirin did not influence fibrin network permeability (K(s)). However, K(s) increased significantly during treatment with 320 mg aspirin (P = 0.004), and a significant treatment effect was seen compared with treatment with 75 mg aspirin (P = 0.009). The increase in K(s) during high-dose aspirin treatment was significant in patients with poor glycemic control (P = 0.02), whereas K(s) only tended to increase in patients with good glycemic control (P = 0.06). A high dose of aspirin is required to influence fibrin network permeability in patients with type 1 diabetes. The observed lack of effect with low-dose aspirin may contribute to aspirin treatment failure in diabetes.

  13. Antiplatelet therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel, and dipyridamole versus clopidogrel alone or aspirin and dipyridamole in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia (TARDIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bath, Philip M; Woodhouse, Lisa J; Appleton, Jason P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intensive antiplatelet therapy with three agents might be more effective than guideline treatment for preventing recurrent events in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia. We aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of intensive antiplatelet therapy (combined aspirin, clopidogrel...

  14. Measurement of platelet function to determine the prevalence of aspirin non-responsiveness among Saudi type II diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Alahmari

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The relationship between the levels of glucose in the blood and aspirin resistance relates the importance of controlling blood glucose in diabetic patients to guarantee better aspirin action. Regular examining of type II diabetic patients to determine the sensitivity of platelet to the antiplatelet therapy is necessary to protect them from the risks of cardiovascular complications.

  15. High platelet reactivity on aspirin in patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillinger, Jean-Guillaume; Saeed, Alaa; Spagnoli, Vincent; Sollier, Claire Bal Dit; Sideris, Georgios; Silberman, Stephane Manzo; Voicu, Sebastian; Drouet, Ludovic; Henry, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Despite dual antiplatelet treatment, major ischemic events are common following ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We aimed to assess high platelet reactivity on aspirin (HPR-aspirin) and its association with P2Y12i (HPR-P2Y12i) during the acute phase of STEMI. We included all consecutive patients admitted for STEMI treated by primary angioplasty in our center for 1year. All patients received a loading dose followed by a maintenance dose of aspirin (75mg/day) and prasugrel (ticagrelor or clopidogrel if contraindicated). Platelet reactivity was assessed 4±1days and 75±15days after admission using light transmission aggregometry with arachidonic acid (LTA-AA-HPR-aspirin) and VASP (HPR-P2Y12i) to define HPR as well as serum Thromboxane-B2 and LTA-ADP. Major cardiac and cerebrovascular events were recorded for 1year. We included 106 patients - mean age was 61y.o., 76% were male and 20% had diabetes. STEMI was anterior in 52% and LV ejection fraction at discharge was 51±9%. 50% of patients were treated with prasugrel and 34% with ticagrelor. At day 4 after STEMI, HPR-aspirin was found in 26% patients and HPR-P2Y12i in 7%. HPR- both aspirin and P2Y12i was found in 4%. Diabetes and age were predictors of HPR-aspirin. HPR-aspirin was persistent 75days later in 36% patients. At 1year, 7.9% patients had experienced major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE). HPR-aspirin and HPR on both aspirin and P2Y12i were significantly associated with MACCE. HPR-aspirin is frequent just after STEMI and associated with MACCE especially when associated with HPR-P2Y12i. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Aspirin and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Bradley A; Rosalind Lai, Pui Man; Frerichs, Kai U; Du, Rose

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence has suggested a potential beneficial effect of aspirin on the risk of aneurysm rupture. This benefit must be weighed against its potential adverse effects as an antiplatelet agent in the setting of acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A total of 747 consecutive patients with cerebral aneurysms were reviewed, comparing demographics, aneurysm features, presenting clinical and radiographic grades, vasospasm, and outcome at 1 year between patients with aneurysmal SAH taking aspirin on presentation and those who were not. The rate of hemorrhagic presentation was significantly greater in patients not taking aspirin (40% vs. 28%; P = 0.016). Among 274 patients presenting with aneurysmal SAH, there was no significant difference in presenting clinical (Hunt and Hess) and radiographic (Fisher) grade between patients taking aspirin and those who were not. There was also no significant difference in the rate of subsequent angiographic and delayed cerebral ischemia. Multivariate analysis of outcome at 1 year found only increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.12), Hunt and Hess grade (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.81-5.03), and associated hypertension (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.39-7.81) to be statistically significant risk factors for poor outcome (death or dependence), whereas aspirin use was not associated with poor outcome (OR 1.19, 95% CI 0.35-4.09; P = 0.78). In the present study, patients taking aspirin had a lower rate of hemorrhagic presentation. In addition, taking aspirin did not adversely impact presenting clinical grade or radiographic grade, vasospasm, and outcome in the setting of aneurysmal SAH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Is there an ideal way to initiate antiplatelet therapy with aspirin? A crossover study on healthy volunteers evaluating different dosing schemes with whole blood aggregometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overbeck Ursula

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines recommend an early initiation of aspirin treatment in patients with acute cerebral ischemia. Comparative studies on the best starting dose for initiating aspirin therapy to achieve a rapid antiplatelet effect do not exist. This study evaluated the platelet inhibitory effect in healthy volunteers by using three different aspirin loading doses to gain a model for initiating antiplatelet treatment in acute strokes patients. Methods Using whole blood aggregometry, this study with a prospective, uncontrolled, open, crossover design examined 12 healthy volunteers treated with three different aspirin loading doses: intravenous 500 mg aspirin, oral 500 mg aspirin, and a course of 200 mg aspirin on two subsequent days followed by a five-day course of 100 mg aspirin. Aspirin low response was defined as change of impedance exceeding 0 Ω after stimulation with arachidonic acid. Results Sufficient antiplatelet effectiveness was gained within 30 seconds when intravenous 500 mg aspirin was used. The mean time until antiplatelet effect was 74 minutes for 500 mg aspirin taken orally and 662 minutes (11.2 hours for the dose scheme with 200 mg aspirin with a high inter- and intraindividual variability in those two regimes. Platelet aggregation returned to the baseline range during the wash-out phase within 4 days. Conclusion Our study reveals that the antiplatelet effect differs significantly between the three different aspirin starting dosages with a high inter- and intraindividual variability of antiplatelet response in our healthy volunteers. To ensure an early platelet inhibitory effect in acute stroke patients, it could be advantageous to initiate the therapy with an intravenous loading dose of 500 mg aspirin. However, clinical outcome studies must still define the best way to initiate antiplatelet treatment with aspirin.

  18. Novel Proresolving Aspirin-Triggered DHA Pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Serhan, Charles N; Fredman, Gabrielle; Yang, Rong; Karamnov, Sergey; Belayev, Ludmila S; Bazan, Nicolas G; Zhu, Min; Winkler, Jeremy W; Petasis, Nicos A

    2011-01-01

    .... We report an aspirin-triggered DHA metabolome that biosynthesizes a potent product in inflammatory exudates and human leukocytes, namely aspirin-triggered Neuroprotectin D1/Protectin D1 [AT-(NPD1/PD1...

  19. Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work By Emily Carlson ... biology of how cancer cells grow. Antihistamines, Antidepressants, Aspirin Adrenergic receptor with carazolol, a beta-blocker. View ...

  20. Aspirin during Pregnancy: Is It Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week Is it safe to take aspirin during pregnancy? Answers from Yvonne Butler Tobah, M. ... 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/aspirin-during-pregnancy/ ...

  1. Regular use of aspirin and pancreatic cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney Martin C

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs has been consistently associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer and adenoma, and there is some evidence for a protective effect for other types of cancer. As experimental studies reveal a possible role for NSAIDs is reducing the risk of pancreatic cancer, epidemiological studies examining similar associations in human populations become more important. Methods In this hospital-based case-control study, 194 patients with pancreatic cancer were compared to 582 age and sex-matched patients with non-neoplastic conditions to examine the association between aspirin use and risk of pancreatic cancer. All participants received medical services at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY and completed a comprehensive epidemiologic questionnaire that included information on demographics, lifestyle factors and medical history as well as frequency and duration of aspirin use. Patients using at least one tablet per week for at least six months were classified as regular aspirin users. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results Pancreatic cancer risk in aspirin users was not changed relative to non-users (adjusted OR = 1.00; 95% CI 0.72–1.39. No significant change in risk was found in relation to greater frequency or prolonged duration of use, in the total sample or in either gender. Conclusions These data suggest that regular aspirin use may not be associated with lower risk of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Combined effects of aspirin and vitamin D3 on two OSCC cell lines: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ting-Ting; Li, Xian; Feng, Jia-Li; Li, Yong

    2018-01-18

    We evaluated the potential effects of aspirin combined with vitamin D3 on cell proliferation and apoptosis in oral cancer cells. Compared to the untreated control or individual drug, the combinations of aspirin and vitamin D3 significantly decreased the rates of cell proliferation by CCK-8 assay, and caused higher rates of cell apoptosis in both CAL-27 and SCC-15 cells by Annexin V-FITC apoptosis assay and flow cytometry. Remarkably, the combined treatment with aspirin and vitamin D3 significantly suppressed the expression of Bcl-2 protein and p-Erk1/2 protein, examined by western blot analysis. Our study demonstrates that aspirin and vitamin D3 have biological activity against two human OSCC cell lines and their activity is synergistic or additive when two drugs used in combination with therapeutic concentrations. The combination of aspirin and vitamin D3 may be an effective approach for inducing cell death in OSCC.

  3. Current Knowledge and Management of Hypersensitivity to Aspirin and NSAIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Tanya M; Cahill, Katherine N

    Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are some of the most common culprits of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions, and can lead to a wide array of adverse effects. The accurate and timely diagnosis of aspirin and NSAID-induced hypersensitivity reactions is important for both patient safety and for the initiation of appropriate disease-specific management and treatment. Because there are no reliably validated in vitro tests available, aspirin and NSAID challenges are considered to be the criterion standard for the diagnosis of these hypersensitivity reactions, though in some patients the diagnosis can be made on the basis of a clear clinical history. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epidural Hematoma Following Interlaminar Epidural Injection in Patient Taking Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Rebecca A; Bendel, Markus A; Moeschler, Susan M; Mauck, William D

    2018-01-09

    We present a case report of a patient who developed an epidural hematoma following an interlaminar epidural steroid injection with no risk factors aside from old age and aspirin use for secondary prevention. A 79-year-old man developed an epidural hematoma requiring surgical treatment following an uncomplicated interlaminar epidural steroid injection performed for neurogenic claudication. In the periprocedural period, he continued aspirin for secondary prophylaxis following a myocardial infarction. For patients taking aspirin for primary or secondary prophylaxis, the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine antiplatelet and anticoagulation guidelines for spine and pain procedures recommend a shared assessment and risk stratification when deciding to hold the medication for intermediate-risk neuraxial procedures. Cases such as this serve to highlight the importance of giving careful consideration to medical optimization of a patient even when a low- or intermediate-risk procedure is planned.

  5. Optimizing the use of aspirin for cardiovascular prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Arroyo, Rubén; Sostres, Carlos; Lanas, Angel

    2013-06-01

    This article describes the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of aspirin at doses used for cardiovascular prevention and provides specific management recommendations for optimal use in clinical practice. The paper highlights practical aspects related to antiplatelet therapy, including the optimal dose of aspirin, concomitant treatment with other NSAIDs, and strategies for the prevention of gastrointestinal toxicity. Specifically, we revise the benefits and hazards in different clinical settings to help the clinician in the decision-making process for individuals who have different risks for cardiovascular and gastrointestinal bleeding events.

  6. The influence of BRAF and KRAS mutation status on the association between aspirin use and survival after colon cancer diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Frouws (Martine); B. Reimers (Bernhard); M. Swets (Marloes); E. Bastiaannet (Esther); Prinse, B. (Bianca); R. van Eijk (Ronald); V.E.P.P. Lemmens (Valery); M.P.P. van Herk-Sukel (Myrthe); T. van Wezel (Tom); P.J.K. Kuppen (P. J K); H. Morreau (Hans); C.J.H. van de Velde (Cornelis); G.-J. Liefers (Gerrit-Jan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Use of aspirin after diagnosis of colon cancer has been associated with improved survival. Identification of cancer subtypes that respond to aspirin treatment may help develop personalized treatment regimens. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of BRAF and

  7. Variability in the Responsiveness to Low-Dose Aspirin: Pharmacological and Disease-Related Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Rocca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main pharmacological aspects of pharmacodynamics (PD and pharmacokinetics (PK of aspirin as antiplatelet agent were unravelled between the late sixties and the eighties, and low-dose aspirin given once daily has been shown to be a mainstay in the current treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disorders. Nevertheless, several PD and PK aspects of aspirin in selected clinical conditions have recently emerged and deserve future clinical attention. In 1994, the term “aspirin resistance” was used for the first time, but, until now, no consensus exists on definition, standardized assay, underlying mechanisms, clinical impact, and possible efficacy of alternative therapeutic interventions. At variance with an undefined aspirin-resistant status, in the last 5 years, the concept of variability in response to aspirin due to specific pathophysiological mechanisms and based on PK and/or PD of the drug has emerged. This growing evidence highlights the existence and possible clinical relevance of an interindividual variability of pharmacological aspirin response and calls for new, large studies to test new low-dose aspirin-based regimens which may ameliorate platelet acetylation, reduce variability in drug responsiveness, and improve clinical efficacy on selected populations.

  8. Aspirin induces Beclin-1-dependent autophagy of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhenjun; Fang, Weilun; Liu, Weihua; Wang, Li; Liu, Bin; Liu, Shiming; Liu, Shaojun

    2018-01-31

    Aspirin not only reduces the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but also plays a synergistic role with chemotherapy for HCC treatment. However, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely elucidated. Given that autophagy triggers cancer cell death, the present study examined the autophagic effect of aspirin on HCC cells. Results showed that aspirin increased LC3II/LC3I ratio, decreased p62 expression, and enhanced autophagic flux (autophagosome and autolysosome puncta) in Hep3B, HepG2, or SMMC-7721 cells, reflecting the autophagy of HCC cells. The autophagic effects of aspirin depended on Beclin-1 expression. Aspirin disrupted the interaction between Bcl-2 and Beclin-1. In addition to activating the AMP-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and Glycogen synthase kinase-3 pathways, aspirin inhibited the mammalian-target-of rapamycin-S6K1/4E-BP1 signaling. Aspirin induced autophagy of HCC cell. This study contributes to understanding the chemoprotective and inhibitory effects of aspirin on HCC development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Monitoring aspirin therapy in children after interventional cardiac catheterization: laboratory measures, dose response, and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, Markus; Speer, Oliver; Kroiss, Sabine; Knirsch, Walter; Kretschmar, Oliver; Rand, Margaret L; Albisetti, Manuela

    2015-07-01

    Very few studies have investigated dose response of aspirin and agreement of different platelet function assays in children. One hundred five children were studied at baseline and after interventional cardiac catheterization during aspirin treatment and, in cases of aspirin resistance (AR), after dose increase. Results from arachidonate-induced aggregation (AA) were compared with aggregation induced by ADP, PFA-100 closure times (CTs), urinary 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 (urinary 11-dhTxB2) levels, and Impact-R % surface coverage. Aspirin at 2-5 mg/kg/day inhibited platelet function in a large majority. While 19 % showed bruising and mild epistaxis, no thrombotic complications were recorded. AR was detected by AA in seven children (6.7 %). After dose increase, the majority showed inhibition by aspirin. Infants had higher urinary 11-dhTxB2 baseline levels; this assay showed some correlation with AA. Both assays manifested high sensitivity and specificity for aspirin while inferior results were found for the other assays. With the PFA-100, 15.2 % of patients were found to have AR, but this corresponded to AR by AA in only one of seven children. While there was poor agreement among assays, AA and urinary 11-dhTxB2 show good specificity for the monitoring of aspirin therapy in children. Aspirin at 2-5 mg/kg inhibits platelet function; AR in children is rare and can be overcome by dose increase.

  10. Aspirin increases metabolism through germline signalling to extend the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Bing; Mu, Xiao-Hui; Wan, Qin-Li; He, Xiao-Ming; Wu, Gui-Sheng; Luo, Huai-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin is a prototypic cyclooxygenase inhibitor with a variety of beneficial effects on human health. It prevents age-related diseases and delays the aging process. Previous research has shown that aspirin might act through a dietary restriction-like mechanism to extend lifespan. To explore the mechanism of action of aspirin on aging, we determined the whole-genome expression profile of Caenorhabditis elegans treated with aspirin. Transcriptome analysis revealed the RNA levels of genes involved in metabolism were primarily increased. Reproduction has been reported to be associated with metabolism. We found that aspirin did not extend the lifespan or improve the heat stress resistance of germline mutants of glp-1. Furthermore, Oil Red O staining showed that aspirin treatment decreased lipid deposition and increased expression of lipid hydrolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes. The effect of germline ablation on lifespan was mainly mediated by DAF-12 and DAF-16. Next, we performed genetic analysis with a series of worm mutants and found that aspirin did not further extend the lifespans of daf-12 and daf-16 single mutants, glp-1;daf-12 and glp-1;daf-16 double mutants, or glp-1;daf-12;daf-16 triple mutants. The results suggest that aspirin increase metabolism and regulate germline signalling to activate downstream DAF-12 and DAF-16 to extend lifespan.

  11. Aspirin: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, P C

    2001-01-01

    Many folk remedies used since pre-historic times have depended upon salicylates for their effect. One hundred years ago aspirin was formulated from salicylic and acetic acids. It was the first drug to be synthesised and its formulation is regarded as the foundation of the modern pharmaceutical industry. The benefit of low-dose aspirin as a prophylactic after a thrombotic event was first reported 25 years ago. Its use after coronary or cerebral thrombosis is virtually mandatory, unless there are signs of intolerance. A 'loading dose' of soluble aspirin should be given on first contact with a patient who may be suffering from myocardial infarction. Patients considered to be at increased risk of a vascular event should also be advised to carry their own aspirin and, if they experience sudden severe chest pain, to chew and swallow a 300 mg tablet or a soluble preparation immediately. The current phase of the aspirin story is, however, not over, and its possible value in a variety of conditions, including dementia and certain cancers, seems likely to ensure that it will long continue to play a remarkable part in clinical practice.

  12. Preoperative aspirin use and acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery: A propensity-score matched observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hur

    administration in both entire and matched cohort.Preoperative low dose aspirin administration without discontinuation was protective against postoperative AKI defined by KDIGO criteria independently in both entire and matched cohort. Preoperative aspirin was also associated with decreased hemodialysis requirements and decreased postoperative hospital stay without increasing bleeding. However, differences in AKI and hospital stay were not associated with in-hospital mortality.

  13. The role of aspirin in women's health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.; Bolte, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this review is to discuss the role of aspirin for various conditions in women. METHODS: A nonsystematic review of articles published on PubMed((R)) that examines the role of aspirin in women. RESULTS: Aspirin is associated with a significant reduction of stroke risk in women,

  14. Aspirin counteracts cancer stem cell features, desmoplasia and gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyao; Liu, Li; Fan, Pei; Bauer, Nathalie; Gladkich, Jury; Ryschich, Eduard; Bazhin, Alexandr V.; Giese, Nathalia A.; Strobel, Oliver; Hackert, Thilo; Hinz, Ulf; Gross, Wolfgang; Fortunato, Franco; Herr, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is characterized by an extremely poor prognosis. An inflammatory microenvironment triggers the pronounced desmoplasia, the selection of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and therapy resistance. The anti-inflammatory drug aspirin is suggested to lower the risk for PDA and to improve the treatment, although available results are conflicting and the effect of aspirin to CSC characteristics and desmoplasia in PDA has not yet been investigated. We characterized the influence of aspirin on CSC features, stromal reactions and gemcitabine resistance. Four established and 3 primary PDA cell lines, non-malignant cells, 3 patient tumor-derived CSC-enriched spheroidal cultures and tissues from patients who did or did not receive aspirin before surgery were analyzed using MTT assays, flow cytometry, colony and spheroid formation assays, Western blot analysis, antibody protein arrays, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), immunohistochemistry and in vivo xenotransplantation. Aspirin significantly induced apoptosis and reduced the viability, self-renewal potential, and expression of proteins involved in inflammation and stem cell signaling. Aspirin also reduced the growth and invasion of tumors in vivo, and it significantly prolonged the survival of mice with orthotopic pancreatic xenografts in combination with gemcitabine. This was associated with a decreased expression of markers for progression, inflammation and desmoplasia. These findings were confirmed in tissue samples obtained from patients who had or had not taken aspirin before surgery. Importantly, aspirin sensitized cells that were resistant to gemcitabine and thereby enhanced the therapeutic efficacy. Aspirin showed no obvious toxic effects on normal cells, chick embryos or mice. These results highlight aspirin as an effective, inexpensive and well-tolerated co-treatment to target inflammation, desmoplasia and CSC features PDA. PMID:25846752

  15. Antiplatelet effect of aspirin during 24h in patients with type 2 diabetes without cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernstrøm, Liv; Funck, Kristian Løkke; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Laugesen, Esben; Baier, Jonathan Mathias; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup

    2018-01-01

    The antiplatelet effect of low-dose aspirin in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) without cardiovascular disease (CVD) has not been thoroughly explored. We investigated if platelet aggregation increased during the standard 24-hour aspirin dosing interval in patients with T2DM compared to non-diabetic controls. Furthermore, we evaluated baseline platelet aggregation, the acute effects of aspirin on platelet aggregation and platelet turnover. We included 21 patients with T2DM and 21 age and sex-matched controls. Platelet aggregation was measured by impedance aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyzer) and markers of platelet turnover by flow cytometry (Sysmex® XE-5000). Blood samples were obtained at baseline and 1h after administration of 75mg of aspirin. Participants were then treated for 6days with once-daily aspirin, and blood sampling was repeated 1h and 24h after aspirin intake. After 6days of treatment, platelet aggregation levels increased during the 24-hour aspirin dosing interval in both patients and controls (p<0.001) with no difference between patients and controls. At baseline, patients with diabetes had increased platelet aggregation compared to controls (p=0.03). Platelet aggregation was reduced after the first dose of aspirin and significantly further reduced after six days of treatment (p<0.001). Patients with T2DM had numerically higher immature platelet count compared to controls (p=0.09), indicating an increased platelet turnover. Patients with T2DM without a history of CVD and controls had increased platelet aggregation at the end of the standard 24-hour dosing interval of aspirin. Further, aspirin-naïve T2DM patients had increased platelet aggregation compared to controls. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death globally, and atherothrombosis is the underlying cause of most cardiovascular events. Several studies have shown that antiplatelet therapy, including aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), reduces the risk of cardiovascular events and death. However, it is well-known that many patients experience cardiovascular events despite treatment with aspirin, often termed "aspirin low-responsiveness". This fact has caused considerable debate: does biochemical aspirin low-responsiveness have prognostic value? Can low-responders be reliably identified? And if so, should antithrombotic treatment be changed? Is the whole discussion of antiplatelet drug response merely a result of low compliance? Compliance should be carefully optimised, before evaluating the pharmacological effect of a drug. It is well-known that cardiovascular disease is multifactorial, and, therefore, total risk reduction is not feasible. Aetiological factors to the variable platelet inhibition by aspirin seem to include genetic factors, pharmacological interactions, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and increased platelet turnover. It is a captivating thought that antiplatelet therapy may be improved by individually tailored therapy based on platelet function testing. Ongoing studies are challenging the current one-size-fits-all dosing strategy, but the preceding evaluation of platelet function assays has not been adequate. The overall objective of this thesis was to evaluate the reproducibility of and aggreement between a number of widely used platelet function tests and to explore the importance of platelet turnover for the antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease. In the intervention studies (studies 1, 3, and 4), optimal compliance was confirmed by measurements of serum thromboxane, which is the most sensitive assay to confirm compliance with aspirin. In study 1, platelet function tests widely used to measure the antiplatelet effect

  17. Treatment with spermidine protects chrysanthemum seedlings against salinity stress damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Naiyuan; Shi, Xiaomeng; Guan, Zhiyong; Zhao, Shuang; Zhang, Fei; Chen, Sumei; Fang, Weiming; Chen, Fadi

    2016-08-01

    Salinity-stressed plants of salinity sensitive ('Qx096') and tolerant ('Qx097') chrysanthemum cultivar were treated with a range of concentrations of spermidine (Spd). Plant performance, as indicated by various parameters associated with growth, was improved by the treatment, as was the tissue content of soluble protein and proline. The extent of both Na(+) accumulation and K(+) loss was reduced. Activity levels of the stress-related enzymes SOD, POD, APX and CAT were significantly increased and the production of malondialdehyde (MDA) decreased. The suggestion was that treatment with 1.5 mM Spd would be an effective means alleviating salinity-stress induced injury through its positive effect on photosynthetic efficiency, reactive oxygen species scavenging ability and the control of ionic balance and osmotic potential. Its protective capacity was more apparent in 'Qx096' than in 'Qx097'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Aspirin on Fractalkine in Rats with Pulmonary Embolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cai B, Sun C, Wang LC, and Qian H: Curcumin improves the outcomes of acute pulmonary embolism in rats. Zhejiang Med J 2011; 33: 457-459. 8. Widmer BJ, Bassora R, Warrender WJ, Abboud JA: Thromboembolic events are uncommon after open treatment of proximal humerus fractures using aspirin and compression ...

  19. New Perspectives on Aspirin and the Endogenous Control of Acute Inflammatory Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea Morris

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin is unique among the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in that it has both anti-inflammatory as well as cardio-protective properties. The cardio-protective properties arise form its judicious inhibition of platelet-derived thromboxane A2 over prostacyclin, while its anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin stem from its well-established inhibition of prostaglandin (PG synthesis within inflamed tissues. Thus aspirin and the other NSAIDs have popularised the notion of inhibiting PG biosynthesis as a common anti-inflammatory strategy based on the erroneous premise that all eicosanoids are generally detrimental to inflammation. However, our fascination with aspirin has shown a more affable side to lipid mediators based on our increasing interest in the endogenous control of acute inflammation and in factors that mediate its resolution. Epi-lipoxins (epi-LXs, for instance, are produced from aspirin’s acetylation of inducible cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 and together with Resolvins represent an increasingly important family of immuno-regulatory and potentially cardio-protective lipid mediators. Aspirin is beginning to teach us what nature knew all along – that not all lipid mediators are bad. It seems that while some eicosanoids are pathogenic in a variety of diseases, others are unarguable protective. In this review we will re-count aspirin’s colorful history, discuss its traditional mode of action and the controversies associated therewith, as well as highlight some of the new pathways in inflammation and the cardiovascular systems that aspirin has recently revealed.

  20. Systems Pharmacogenomics Finds RUNX1 Is an Aspirin-Responsive Transcription Factor Linked to Cardiovascular Disease and Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Voora, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin prevents cardiovascular disease and colon cancer; however aspirin's inhibition of platelet COX-1 only partially explains its diverse effects. We previously identified an aspirin response signature (ARS in blood consisting of 62 co-expressed transcripts that correlated with aspirin's effects on platelets and myocardial infarction (MI. Here we report that 60% of ARS transcripts are regulated by RUNX1 – a hematopoietic transcription factor - and 48% of ARS gene promoters contain a RUNX1 binding site. Megakaryocytic cells exposed to aspirin and its metabolite (salicylic acid, a weak COX-1 inhibitor showed up regulation in the RUNX1 P1 isoform and MYL9, which is transcriptionally regulated by RUNX1. In human subjects, RUNX1 P1 expression in blood and RUNX1-regulated platelet proteins, including MYL9, were aspirin-responsive and associated with platelet function. In cardiovascular disease patients RUNX1 P1 expression was associated with death or MI. RUNX1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene in gastrointestinal malignancies. We show that RUNX1 P1 expression is associated with colon cancer free survival suggesting a role for RUNX1 in aspirin's protective effect in colon cancer. Our studies reveal an effect of aspirin on RUNX1 and gene expression that may additionally explain aspirin's effects in cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  1. Aspirin: Pharmacology and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enma V. Paez Espinosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiplatelet therapy has been documented to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease after acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft, and in chronic atrial fibrillation patients, amongst other risk factors. Conventional management of thrombosis-based disorders includes the use of heparin, oral anticoagulants, and the preferred antiplatelet agent aspirin. Interestingly, aspirin was not intended to be used as an antiplatelet agent; rather, after being repurposed, it has become one of the most widely prescribed antithrombotic drugs. To this end, there have been several milestones in the development of antiplatelet agents in the last few decades, such as adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitors, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors. However, given some of the limitations of these therapies, aspirin continues to play a major role in the management of thrombotic and cardiovascular disorders and is expected to do so for years to come.

  2. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M. (Assiut Univ. (Egypt))

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author).

  3. Effect of atorvastatin on platelet thromboxane A(2) synthesis in aspirin-treated patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M Teresa; Fuset, M Paz; Ruano, Miguel; Moscardó, Antonio; Valles, Juana

    2009-12-15

    Inhibition of platelet thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)) by aspirin is critical in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but some patients have persistent platelet TXA(2) production within 48 hours of the onset of AMI. Statins are known to reduce TXA(2) in aspirin-free patients with hypercholesterolemia. We hypothesized that treatment with aspirin plus atorvastatin could reduce persistent TXA(2) synthesis and aspirin resistance in patients with AMI. We evaluated platelet function in 184 aspirin-treated patients within 48 hours of the onset of AMI. Patients were divided into group A (treated with aspirin alone, n = 139) and group B (treated with aspirin plus atorvastatin, n = 45). We studied collagen-induced platelet TXA(2) synthesis, serotonin ((14)C-5HT) release and recruitment, and adenosine diphosphate-, arachidonic acid-, and collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Persistent TXA(2) synthesis was detected in 25% and 9% of groups A and B, respectively (p = 0.03). TXA(2), arachidonic acid-aggregation, and collagen-induced responses were significantly reduced in patients receiving dual treatment compared to those receiving aspirin monotherapy. Atorvastatin did not modify platelet reactivity in patients with efficiently blocked TXA(2) synthesis. These results strongly suggest a direct effect of the statin on platelet eicosanoid synthesis. This was confirmed in vitro by incubating washed aspirin-free and aspirin (1 muM)-treated platelets from normal subjects with 1 to 20 microM atorvastatin. Atorvastatin in vitro significantly reduced platelet TXA(2) synthesis and collagen-induced aggregation. In conclusion, atorvastatin combined with aspirin early in the onset of the acute event significantly reduced persistent TXA(2) and TXA(2)-dependent aspirin resistance. This could contribute to the clinical benefit of atorvastatin in patients with AMI.

  4. Compound list: aspirin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aspirin ASA 00014 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/aspirin....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/aspirin....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/aspirin....Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/aspirin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  5. Antecedent Aspirin Use Is Associated with Less Severe Symptoms on Admission for Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sarah; Cloonan, Lisa; Kanakis, Allison S; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin M; Shideler, Kelsey I; Perilla, Adriana S; Furie, Karen L; Rost, Natalia S

    2016-10-01

    Aspirin is known to reduce stroke risk; however, its role in reducing severity of ischemic syndrome is not clear. We sought to investigate the relationship between antecedent aspirin use and stroke severity in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We retrospectively analyzed a prospectively collected database of consecutive AIS patients presenting to our center. Clinical characteristics (including antecedent aspirin use), imaging findings, and laboratory data were assessed in association with presenting stroke severity, as measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Logistic regression models were used to determine univariate and multivariate predictors of baseline NIHSS. Of the 610 AIS patients with admission brain magnetic resonance imaging available for volumetric analysis of acute infarct size, 241 (39.5%) used aspirin prior to stroke onset. Antecedent aspirin use (P = .0005), history of atrial fibrillation (P stroke subtype (P stroke severity in univariate analysis. Antecedent aspirin use (P stroke severity, even after accounting for acute infarct volume. While the underlying biology of this apparent protective relationship requires further study, patients at high risk of stroke may benefit from routine aspirin use. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effectiveness of aspirin for migraine prophylaxis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena, Cristina Pellegrino; D'Amico, Raíssa Campos; Slongo, Helena; Brunoni, André Russowsky; Goulart, Alessandra Carvalho; Benseñor, Isabela

    2017-01-01

    Many researchers have suggested that aspirin prevents migraines. However, the evidence is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the available evidence on the effect of aspirin as a migraine prophylactic. Systematic review, conducted at the Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Brazil, and at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. We performed electronic searches in the databases of MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, WEB OF SCIENCE, the World Health Organization, CENTRAL and OpenGrey, and we also searched manually for interventional studies published before April 2016 that compared the effects of aspirin with a control, in adults. Two authors independently extracted data on the publication, population recruited, intervention (aspirin dosage, follow-up and combined treatment) and main outcomes (frequency, severity and duration of migraine). We evaluated the quality of the studies using the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. Our search retrieved 1,098 references, of which 8 met the selection criteria for this systematic review. The total population was 28,326 participants (18-64 years old); most (96%) were men. The dosage varied from 50 to 650 mg/day across the studies. The risk of bias was generally low or unclear. The only outcome for which most of the studies included (6/8) reported a significant reduction was frequency of migraine, which was reduced at an aspirin dosage of at least 325 mg/day. Aspirin can reduce the frequency of migraines. However, the optimal dosage is unclear.

  7. The effectiveness of aspirin for migraine prophylaxis: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Pellegrino Baena

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Many researchers have suggested that aspirin prevents migraines. However, the evidence is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the available evidence on the effect of aspirin as a migraine prophylactic. DESIGN AND SETTING: Systematic review, conducted at the Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Brazil, and at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: We performed electronic searches in the databases of MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, WEB OF SCIENCE, the World Health Organization, CENTRAL and OpenGrey, and we also searched manually for interventional studies published before April 2016 that compared the effects of aspirin with a control, in adults. Two authors independently extracted data on the publication, population recruited, intervention (aspirin dosage, follow-up and combined treatment and main outcomes (frequency, severity and duration of migraine. We evaluated the quality of the studies using the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. RESULTS: Our search retrieved 1,098 references, of which 8 met the selection criteria for this systematic review. The total population was 28,326 participants (18-64 years old; most (96% were men. The dosage varied from 50 to 650 mg/day across the studies. The risk of bias was generally low or unclear. The only outcome for which most of the studies included (6/8 reported a significant reduction was frequency of migraine, which was reduced at an aspirin dosage of at least 325 mg/day. CONCLUSION: Aspirin can reduce the frequency of migraines. However, the optimal dosage is unclear.

  8. [Aspirin in primary and secondary prevention of colorectal carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard

    2013-11-01

    Observational but also some randomized trials suggest that regular long-term use of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) might reduce the risk of colorectal carcinomas by 15-40%. The efficacy appears to be increased with longer duration of treatment, i.e. beyond 5-10 years, but not with increasing doses. Aspirin at 75-100 mg daily appears to be sufficient in both primary as well as secondary prevention of recurrent tumors in sensitive persons, including prevention of distant metastases. The pharmacological mode of aspirin action is unclear as is the question whether only one or more sites of action exist. In any case, the mechanism(s) in charge should work at aspirin plasma levels of 10 microM or less which is the maximum concentration to be expected after antiplatelet doses. Inhibition of COX-1 and/or COX-2 is most likely involved. Follow-up reactions, such as inhibition of platelet-dependent thromboxane formation and action, release of storage products such as VEGF or sphingosine-1-phosphate and acetylation of COX-2 with subsequent generation of antioncogenic lipid mediators, such as lipoxins, are also possible. There is not much likelihood for "direct" actions of aspirin, shown in vitro at concentrations of 5 mM and more, which uncouple oxidative phosphorylation and paralyse the cell energy metabolism. benefit/risk profile, specifically regarding severe or fatal bleedings (GI-tract, cerebral). Accordingly, the actual German guideline "colorectal carcinoma" does not recommend aspirin use for prophylactic purposes. What is strongly needed are definitions of risk patients in terms of biomarkers or genetic profiling as well as data from long-term prospective randomized trials--both are underway.

  9. Aspirin in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devereaux, P J; Mrkobrada, Marko; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial variability in the perioperative administration of aspirin in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, both among patients who are already on an aspirin regimen and among those who are not. METHODS: Using a 2-by-2 factorial trial design, we randomly assigned 10......,010 patients who were preparing to undergo noncardiac surgery and were at risk for vascular complications to receive aspirin or placebo and clonidine or placebo. The results of the aspirin trial are reported here. The patients were stratified according to whether they had not been taking aspirin before...... the study (initiation stratum, with 5628 patients) or they were already on an aspirin regimen (continuation stratum, with 4382 patients). Patients started taking aspirin (at a dose of 200 mg) or placebo just before surgery and continued it daily (at a dose of 100 mg) for 30 days in the initiation stratum...

  10. Inorganic treatments for the consolidation and protection of stone artefacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Matteini

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Consolidation and protection are two of the principal kinds of treatments through which the decay of old statues, stone facades, plasters and mural paintings caused by both natural atmospheric agents and, above all in the last five decades, by atmospheric pollution, is faced. The most traditional approach has been and is mainly based on the use of organic polymeric materials. They offer the advantage of easy application procedures and the possibility to obtain, at short times, very satisfying results. Different is their behaviour at long times. Some drawbacks come out over time both under the esthetical point of view as well as to the durability, compatibility and efficacy. Particularly critical is the situation when porous materials and soluble salts - gypsum above all - are simultaneously present. In such a situation inorganic treatments demonstrate to be much more appropriate. They assure durable and compatible results. In the present paper two of the most efficient and appropriate inorganic methods are reviewed in detail: the barium hydroxide method, both as desulfating and consolidating agent, and the ammonium oxalate method as passivating agent, consolidant and as a treatment capable of improving the natural colour contrast of the stone, when it is lost due to decay processes.

  11. The Influence of BRAF and KRAS Mutation Status on the Association between Aspirin Use and Survival after Colon Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouws, Martine A; Reimers, Marlies S; Swets, Marloes; Bastiaannet, Esther; Prinse, Bianca; van Eijk, Ronald; Lemmens, Valery E P P; van Herk-Sukel, Myrthe P P; van Wezel, Tom; Kuppen, Peter J K; Morreau, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Use of aspirin after diagnosis of colon cancer has been associated with improved survival. Identification of cancer subtypes that respond to aspirin treatment may help develop personalized treatment regimens. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of BRAF and KRAS mutation status on the association between aspirin use and overall survival after colon cancer diagnosis. A random selection of 599 patients with colon cancer were analyzed, selected from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry, and BRAF and KRAS mutation status was determined. Data on aspirin use (80 mg) were obtained from the PHARMO Database Network. Parametric survival models with exponential (Poisson) distribution were used. Aspirin use after colon cancer diagnosis was associated with improved overall survival in wild-type BRAF tumors, adjusted rate ratio (RR) of 0.60 (95% CI 0.44-0.83). In contrast, aspirin use in BRAF mutated tumors was not associated with an improved survival (RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.57-2.16). P-value for interaction was non-significant. KRAS mutational status did not differentiate in the association between aspirin use and survival. Low-dose aspirin use after colon cancer diagnosis was associated with improved survival in BRAF wild-type tumors only. However, the large confidence interval of the rate ratio for the use of aspirin in patients with BRAF mutation does not rule out a possible benefit. These results preclude BRAF and KRAS mutation status to be used as a marker for individualized treatment with aspirin, if aspirin becomes regular adjuvant treatment for colon cancer patients in the future.

  12. Protective effect of chitosan treatment against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Ozcelik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acetaminophen (APAP is the most commonly reported toxic ingestion in the world. Severe liver injury resulting from overdose or chronic use of APAP remains a significant clinical problem. In recent years, the mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by APAP have become much better understood. We have studied the protective effect of chitosan supplementation against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity with respect to changes in the levels of total and lipid-bound sialic acid in the serum and in the liver tissue and changes in the activity of diagnostic marker enzymes, lipid peroxidation, and ceruloplasmin oxidase enzyme in normal and experimental groups of rats. During the experimental period, chitosan (200 mg/kg body weight per day was administered to APAP + chitosan-treated rats by oral gavage. Results showed that treatment with APAP induced a significant increase in the serum alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities, in total and lipid-bound sialic acids levels, and in the liver lipid peroxide content. The administration of chitosan significantly prevented APAP-induced alterations in the levels of diagnostic marker enzymes, total sialic acid, lipid-bound sialic acid, and malondialdehyde in the experimental groups of rats. Furthermore, chitosan administration increased the activity of ceruloplasmin oxidase. In conclusion, our results suggest that chitosan has a protective effect on APAP-induced hepatic injury in rats. The study sheds light on the therapeutic potential of chitosan in an APAP-induced hepatotoxicity model.

  13. Rivaroxaban with or without aspirin in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Stuart J; Eikelboom, John W; Bosch, Jackie

    2018-01-01

    with aspirin alone (411 [5%] of 8250 vs 460 [6%] of 8261; HR 0·89, 95% CI 0·78-1·02, p=0·094). Combined rivaroxaban plus aspirin treatment resulted in more major bleeds than treatment with aspirin alone (263 [3%] of 8313 vs 158 [2%] of 8261; HR 1·66, 95% CI 1·37-2·03, pbleeds were...... seen in the rivaroxaban alone group than in the aspirin alone group (236 [3%] of 8250 vs 158 [2%] of 8261; HR 1·51, 95% CI 1·23-1·84, pbleeding was gastrointestinal, occurring in 130 [2%] patients who received combined rivaroxaban plus aspirin, in 84 [1...... disease, addition of rivaroxaban to aspirin lowered major vascular events, but increased major bleeding. There was no significant increase in intracranial bleeding or other critical organ bleeding. There was also a significant net benefit in favour of rivaroxaban plus aspirin and deaths were reduced by 23...

  14. Rapid Aspirin Challenge in Patients with Aspirin Allergy and Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kevin A; White, Andrew A

    2016-02-01

    Aspirin allergy in a patient with acute coronary syndrome represents one of the more urgent challenges an allergist may face. Adverse reactions to aspirin are reported in 1.5% of patients with coronary artery disease. A history of adverse reaction to aspirin often leads to unnecessary withholding of this medication or use of alternative antiplatelet therapy which may be inferior or more costly. Aspirin therapy has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary artery disease. Rapid aspirin challenge/desensitization in the aspirin allergic patient has been consistently shown to be both safe and successful in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

  15. Aspirin for Prevention of Preeclampsia in Lupus Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie M. Schramm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia, the onset of hypertension and proteinuria during pregnancy, is a common medical disorder with high maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. The underlying pathology remains poorly understood and includes inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and an unbalanced thromboxane A2/prostacyclin ratio. For women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, particularly those with preexisting renal disease or with active lupus, the risk of developing preeclampsia is up to 14% higher than it is among healthy individuals. The mechanism is still unknown and the data for preventing preeclampsia in lupus pregnancies are rare. Modulating the impaired thromboxane A2/prostacyclin ratio by administration of low-dose aspirin appears to be the current best option for the prevention of preeclampsia. After providing an overview of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia, preeclampsia in lupus pregnancies, and previous trials for prevention of preeclampsia with aspirin treatment, we recommend low-dose aspirin administration for all lupus patients starting prior to 16 weeks of gestation. Patients with SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome should receive treatment with heparin and low-dose aspirin during pregnancy.

  16. The Interplay between Stroke Severity, Antiplatelet Use, and Aspirin Resistance in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agayeva, Nergiz; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Arsava, Ethem Murat

    2016-02-01

    The issue of whether prior antiplatelet use favorably affects stroke severity is currently unresolved. In this study, we evaluated the effect of antiplatelet use on clinical stroke severity and ischemic lesion volume, and assessed the confounding effect of laboratory-defined aspirin resistance on this relationship. Admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, ischemic lesion volumes on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and in vitro aspirin resistance, in addition to other pertinent stroke features, were determined in a series of ischemic stroke patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to compare clinical and imaging markers of stroke severity among patients with and without prior antiplatelet use, taking into consideration the presence or absence of aspirin resistance. Antiplatelet users experienced more severe strokes, per NIHSS score, in comparison to antiplatelet-naive patients (P = .007). No significant difference was observed with respect to admission DWI lesion volume. When analyses were repeated after adjustment for stroke subtype and other confounders, no association was observed between antiplatelet use and stroke severity. On the other hand, NIHSS scores were significantly higher in aspirin-unresponsive patients than in both aspirin responders (P = .049) and aspirin nonusers (P = .005). We were unable to demonstrate a substantial positive influence of prestroke antiplatelet usage on stroke severity. Although the presence of more severe strokes among patients with laboratory resistance suggests a protective influence of aspirin sensitivity on stroke severity, the hypothesis could not be validated as no difference was observed among aspirin-naive and aspirin-sensitive patients with respect to admission NIHSS score or DWI lesion volume. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Synergistic interaction between choline and aspirin against acute inflammation induced by carrageenan and lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Hai

    2014-05-01

    The simultaneous use of drugs with different mechanisms of anti-inflammatory action is a strategy for achieving effective control of inflammation while minimizing dose-related side effects. Choline was described to potentiate the antinociceptive action of aspirin at small doses in several inflammatory pain models. However, these findings are only limited to alleviating pain, more associated data are required to confirm the effectiveness of the combined choline and aspirin therapy against inflammatory disorders. Moreover, no report is available regarding the mechanism responsible for their synergism. Here, we first investigated the anti-inflammatory activity and pharmacological mechanisms of co-administration of choline and aspirin in 2 commonly studied inflammation models, carrageenan-induced paw edema and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis in mice. Isobolographic analysis revealed that combined choline and aspirin administration exhibited a strong synergistic interaction in reducing carrageenan-mediated edema, and the estimated combination index values at 50%, 75%, and 90% effective dose (ED50, ED75, and ED90) were 0.25, 0.32, and 0.44. Drug co-administration also afforded synergistic protection against LPS-induced sepsis and mortality, since aspirin or choline alone was inadequate to improve survival. The effects of choline-aspirin co-administration were blocked by methyllycaconitine, suggesting that activation of alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor participates in the interaction between choline and aspirin. Furthermore, co-administration of choline and aspirin was more likely to inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory mediators induced by LPS. Our results indicated that combined choline and aspirin therapy represented a significant synergistic interaction in attenuating acute inflammatory response. This preclinical relevant evidence provides a promising approach to treat inflammation-based diseases such as arthritis and sepsis. Copyright © 2014

  18. Suboptimal inhibition of platelet cyclo-oxygenase-1 (COX-1) by aspirin in lupus erythematosus: Association with metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Vivian K.; Avalos, Ingrid; Oeser, Annette; Oates, John A.; Milne, Ginger L.; Solus, Joseph F.; Chung, Cecilia P.; Stein, C. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Low-dose aspirin prevents platelet aggregation by suppressing thromboxane A2 synthesis. However, in some individuals thromboxane A2 suppression by aspirin is impaired, indicating suboptimal inhibition of platelet COX-1 by aspirin. Because patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have increased risk of thrombotic events, many receive aspirin; however, the efficacy of aspirin in SLE has not been determined. We examined the hypothesis that aspirin response is impaired in SLE. Methods We assessed the effect of aspirin by measuring concentrations of the stable metabolite of thromboxane A2 - serum thromboxane B2 (sTxB2), before and after treatment with 81 mg daily aspirin for 7 days in 34 patients with SLE and 36 control subjects. The inability to suppress sTxB2 synthesis to aspirin. Results Aspirin almost completely suppressed sTXB2 in control subjects to 1.5, [0.8–2.7] ng/ml (median and interquartile ranges [IQR]), but had less effect in patients with SLE (3.1, [2.2–5.3] ng/ml) (P=0.002). A suboptimal effect of aspirin was present in 15% (5/34) of the patients with SLE but not in control subjects (0/36) (P=0.023). Incomplete responders were more likely to have metabolic syndrome (P=0.048), obesity (P=0.048) and higher concentrations of CRP (P=0.018). Conclusion The pharmacologic effect of aspirin is suboptimal in 15% of patients with SLE but in none of the control subjects, and the suboptimal response was associated with metabolic syndrome, obesity, and higher CRP concentrations. PMID:24022862

  19. FREQUENCY OF ASPIRIN RESISTANCE IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 1 AND 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND ITS ASSOCIATION WITH METABOLIC PARAMETERS

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    Deniz Gokalp

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In the present study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of aspirin resistance in patients with Type 1 and 2 diabetes and to study its association with metabolic parameters. Methods: Aspirin resistance of patients (n=158 with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM who presented to the center after 7 days of regular aspirin use were compared to age-mathced (55±19 healthy controls (n=164. Similarly, aspirin resistance of patients (n=30 diagnosed with Type 1 DM were compared to age-matched (27±7 healthy subjects (n=41 as the control group. Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA-100 was used to evaluate the efficacy of aspirin. Results: Aspirin resistance was identified in 72 of 158 patients with Type 2 DM (45.6% and in 47 of 164 healthy controls (28.6% (p=0.001. Aspirin resistance had a prevalence of 50% in patients with Type 1 DM and was significantly higher compared to the control group of 41 healthy subjects (12.2% (p=0.001. No correlations were noted between aspirin resistance and sex, smoking, HbA1c, hypertension and aspirin dose. There was a significant relation between aspirin resistance and LDL-cholesterol in patients with Type 2 DM (p=0.020. Conclusion: Patients with Type 1 and Type 2 DM had a higher frequency of aspirin resistance than the control group. Therefore, treatment choices including administering higher doses of aspirin or using other antiplatelet agents such as clopidogrel should be considered to prevent thrombocytic events in diabetes mellitus.

  20. Combined clopidogrel and aspirin treatment up to surgery increases the risk of postoperative myocardial infarction, blood loss and reoperation for bleeding in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Antonio; Duggan, Simon M J; Aresu, Giuseppe; de Siena, Paolo M; Romeo, Francesco; Glauber, Mattia; Caputo, Massimo; Angelini, Gianni D

    2013-04-01

    Recent guidelines suggest that patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) should discontinue clopidogrel and aspirin (ASA) 5 and 2-10 days, respectively, before surgery to reduce postoperative bleeding and its complications. The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between the timing of discontinuing clopidogrel + ASA and early clinical outcomes in patients undergoing CABG. Four thousand three hundred and thirty consecutive patients underwent isolated CABG from April 2004 to February 2009. Of these, 926 patients received double antiplatelet therapy in the 14 days prior to surgery. Patients were stratified into three groups: clopidogrel + ASA within 5 and 2 days, respectively, before surgery (Group A, n = 287); clopidogrel within 5 days + ASA stopped 2-10 days before surgery or clopidogrel stopped 5 days + ASA within 2 days of surgery (Group B, n = 308) and clopidogrel + ASA discontinued >5 and 10 days, respectively, before surgery (control group, n = 331). Overall mortality was 0.8%. The incidence of postoperative myocardial infarction (MI) was 5.2, 1 and 1.8% in Groups A, B and control, respectively (P = 0.004). Reoperation for bleeding occurred in 4.5, 2.9 and 1.2% (P = 0.04) and total chest drainage was 761 ± 473, 720 ± 421 and 687 ± 302 ml in Groups A, B and control, respectively (P = 0.06). Multivariable analysis revealed that Group A was an independent predictor of postoperative MI (P = 0.02), reoperation for bleeding (P = 0.02), blood transfusions (P = 0.003) and blood losses (P = 0.015). Clopidogrel in combination with ASA up to the time of surgery is associated with an increased risk of postoperative MI, blood loss and reoperation for bleeding in patients undergoing CABG.

  1. A novel co-drug of aspirin and ursolic acid interrupts adhesion, invasion and migration of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via regulating EMT and EGFR-mediated signaling pathways: multiple targets for cancer metastasis prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiao; Liu, Yajun; Li, Tao; Yang, Xiang; Zheng, Guirong; Chen, Hongning; Jia, Lee; Shao, Jingwei

    2016-11-08

    Metastasis currently remains the predominant cause of breast carcinoma treatment failure. The effective targeting of metastasis-related-pathways in cancer holds promise for a new generation of therapeutics. In this study, we developed an novel Asp-UA conjugate, which was composed of classical "old drug" aspirin and low toxicity natural product ursolic acid for targeting breast cancer metastasis. Our results showed that Asp-UA could attenuate the adhesion, migration and invasion of breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in a more safe and effective manner in vitro. Molecular and cellular study demonstrated that Asp-UA significantly down-regulated the expression of cell adhesion and invasion molecules including integrin α6β1, CD44 ,MMP-2, MMP-9, COX-2, EGFR and ERK proteins, and up-regulated the epithelial markers "E-cadherin" and "β-catenin", and PTEN proteins. Furthermore, Asp-UA (80 mg/kg) reduced lung metastasis in a 4T1 murine breast cancer metastasis model more efficiently, which was associated with a decrease in the expression of CD44. More importantly, we did not detect side effects with Asp-UA in mice such as weight loss and main viscera tissues toxicity. Overall, our research suggested that co-drug Asp-UA possessed potential metastasis chemoprevention abilities via influencing EMT and EGFR-mediated pathways and could be a more promising drug candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer metastasis.

  2. [Resistance to aspirin: prevalence, mechanisms of action and association with thromboembolic events. A narrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañivano Petreñas, L; García Yubero, C

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the prevalence of aspirin resistance in patients with a high risk of cardiovascular events, and secondly, to investigate its epidemiology and mechanism of action, and the clinical consequences it can provoke. A search was run on PubMed, EMBASE and Reviews Database for English or Spanish articles on aspirin resistance published up to November 2008. Additional studies were obtained by searching the reference lists in the selected articles for articles relevant to our secondary objectives. Aspirin resistance is described as affecting 0 to 57% of the population, and is related to a decreased protective effect against strokes and cardiovascular events. Many modifiable and unmodifiable factors can affect the efficacy of antiplatelet drugs. Possible strategies for overcoming this decreased antiaggregant effect include increasing the aspirin dosage or dual therapy with another antiplatelet agent. Lack of response to aspirin decreases its protective effects. However, lack of a standard definition for aspirin resistance, the absence of diagnostic reference methods to identify resistant patients, and the different mechanisms of action involved in platelet aggregation call the clinical importance of this fact into question. Additional well-designed studies are needed to detect patients with real resistance in order to have more effective prevention of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Copyright (c) 2009 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic determinants of on-aspirin platelet reactivity: focus on the influence of PEAR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Würtz

    Full Text Available Platelet aggregation during aspirin treatment displays considerable inter-individual variability. A genetic etiology likely exists, but it remains unclear to what extent genetic polymorphisms determine platelet aggregation in aspirin-treated individuals.To identify platelet-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs influencing platelet aggregation during aspirin treatment. Furthermore, we explored to what extent changes in cyclooxygenase-1 activity and platelet activation may explain such influence.We included 985 Danish patients with stable coronary artery disease treated with aspirin 75 mg/day mono antiplatelet therapy. Patients were genotyped for 16 common SNPs in platelet-related genes using standard PCR-based methods (TaqMan. Platelet aggregation was evaluated by whole blood platelet aggregometry employing Multiplate Analyzer (agonists: arachidonic acid and collagen and VerifyNow Aspirin. Serum thromboxane B2 was measured to confirm aspirin adherence and was used as a marker of cyclooxygenase-1 activity. Soluble P-selectin was used as marker of platelet activation. Platelet aggregation, cyclooxygenase-1 activity, and platelet activation were compared across genotypes in adjusted analyses.The A-allele of the rs12041331 SNP in the platelet endothelial aggregation receptor-1 (PEAR1 gene was associated with reduced platelet aggregation and increased platelet activation, but not with cyclooxygenase-1 activity. Platelet aggregation was unaffected by the other SNPs analyzed.A common genetic variant in PEAR1 (rs12041331 reproducibly influenced platelet aggregation in aspirin-treated patients with coronary artery disease. The exact biological mechanism remains elusive, but the effect of this polymorphism may be related to changes in platelet activation. Furthermore, 14 SNPs previously suggested to influence aspirin efficacy were not associated with on-aspirin platelet aggregation.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01383304.

  4. Aspirin resistance following pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholette, Jill M; Mamikonian, Lara; Alfieris, George M; Blumberg, Neil; Lerner, Norma B

    2010-09-01

    Aspirin is often used to prevent thrombosis in pediatric cardiac surgery. The primary study aim was to assess aspirin resistance in this context. Secondary aims were to evaluate (1) the relationship between elevated inflammatory markers and thrombosis and (2) aspirin's effect on these levels. This was a prospective observational study of children undergoing cardiac surgery managed with and without aspirin. Aspirin response was assessed using the VerifyNow system and urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 (uTxB2) measurements. Laboratory studies of inflammation were also obtained. 101 subjects were studied; 50 received aspirin. Six subjects (5.9%), 5 aspirin-treated, experienced symptomatic thrombosis. When measured by VerifyNow resistance was 43% after aspirin suppositories and 14% after additional days of oral aspirin. There was no correlation with thrombosis. Upper quartile post-operative day (POD) #5 uTxB2 was correlated with thrombosis in aspirin treated subjects (paspirin-treated subjects who experienced thrombosis had higher POD#5 uTxB2. This finding did not reach statistical significance (p=0.07). Elevated pre-operative C-reactive protein (CRP) was independently associated with thrombosis (paspirin. Aspirin inhibited ex-vivo platelet function with a low incidence of resistance. Elevated POD#5 uTxB2 and pre-operative CRP were correlated with thrombosis in aspirin treated subjects. Further studies are needed to determine whether children with high levels of uTxB2 despite aspirin therapy and/or those with elevated preoperative CRP are at increased risk for thrombosis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Pathogenesis and prevention tactics of aspirin resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ren-gang; Zhang, Jun-ping

    2007-05-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Despite its wide uses for more than 100 years, knowledge about mechanism of action and therapeutic issues of aspirin are still under discussion. The use of aspirin has been changed from an analgesic, anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory agent to an anti-thrombotic agent, especially in secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Aspirin has reduced the risk of cardiovascular events by 25%. However, the phenomenon of "aspirin resistance" has been described that in 5%-60% of patients aspirin may not achieve adequate efficacy of suppressing platelet activity. The convinced causes of this phenomenon are still unknown. It is probably due to drugs interaction, inadequate dosage and so on. By far the existing studies of aspirin are insufficient to explain all phenomena of aspirin resistance. And the results are not always uniform about the same research. Therefore, the characteristics in different population with aspirin resistance may account for the complexity. It is unrealistic to elucidate all aspirin resistance by only one pathway. More studies are required to investigate the mechanisms in different population respectively. According to the theory of traditional Chinese medicine and the trait of cardiovascular disease, which often relapses and has a long history, aspirin resistance should be considered as collaterals disease. It can be treated with aspirin and traditional Chinese drugs which have the power to strengthen body resistance, reduce phlegm, remove blood stasis and toxic materials from meridians. The problem of aspirin resistance might be solved by this way, because the traditional Chinese medicine has the superiority of selecting appropriate therapeutic methods based on syndrome differentiation for different population and regulating the whole body's function. Subsequently, cardiovascular disease might be effectively prevented.

  6. 24-hour antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with previous definite stent thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würtz, Morten; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Lisette O; Kaltoft, Anne K; Tilsted, Hans H; Kristensen, Steen D; Grove, Erik L

    2014-08-01

    Once-daily aspirin is standard treatment, but recent studies point towards increased platelet function at the end of the dosing interval. Stent thrombosis (ST) has been linked with reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin, so we investigated if platelet inhibition by aspirin declines through 24 h in patients with previous definite ST. Furthermore, we explored whether increased levels of immature platelets and thrombopoietin are associated with a particularly rapid recovery of platelet function. This case-control study included 50 patients with previous definite ST matched with 100 patients with stable coronary artery disease and 50 healthy volunteers. All participants were on aspirin 75 mg/day mono antiplatelet therapy. Platelet aggregation was measured 1 and 24 h after aspirin intake using platelet aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyzer). Cyclooxygenase-1 activity, platelet activation, immature platelets, and thrombopoietin were measured. Platelet aggregation increased by 109±150 (arachidonic acid) and 47±155 (collagen) aggregation units per minute from 1 to 24 h after aspirin intake (p-values aspirin-treated patients with previous definite ST or stable coronary artery disease and in healthy individuals. Increased levels of immature platelets and thrombopoietin were observed in patients with previous definite ST. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptomic analysis of pancreatic cancer cells in response to metformin and aspirin: an implication of synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wen; Wang, Tao; Zachariah, Emmanuel; Lin, Yong; Yang, Chung S.; Xu, Qing; DiPaola, Robert S.; Tan, Xiang-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Metformin and aspirin have been studied extensively as cancer preventative and therapeutic agents. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for the inhibitory effects of pancreatic cancer development remain undefined. To gain further insight into their biological function in pancreatic cancer, we conducted a transcriptomic analysis using RNA sequencing to assess the differential gene expression induced by metformin (5 mM) and aspirin (2 mM), alone or in combination, after treatment of PANC-1 cells for 48 hours. Compared to an untreated control, metformin down-regulated 58 genes and up-regulated 91 genes, aspirin down-regulated 12 genes only, while metformin plus aspirin down-regulated 656 genes and up-regulated 449 genes (fold-change > 2, P  10, P aspirin, PCDH18, CCL2, RASL11A, FAM111B and BMP5 were down-regulated ≥ 20-fold, while NGFR, NPTX1, C7orf57, MRPL23AS1 and UNC5B were up-regulated ≥ 10-fold. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) revealed that the pathways, “cholesterol biosynthesis”, “cell cycle: G1/S checkpoint regulation”, and “axonal guidance signaling” were the most statistically significant pathways modulated by metformin plus aspirin. Although the results need further functional validation, these data provide the first evidence for the synergistic action between metformin and aspirin in modulating the transcriptional profile of pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:26294325

  8. Evaluación económica del tratamiento con ácido acetilsalicílico más esomeprazol comparado con clopidogrel en la prevención de la hemorragia gastrointestinal Economic evaluation of the treatment of aspirin plus esomeprazole compared to clopidogrel in gastrointestinal bleeding prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carme Piñol

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar la eficiencia del ácido acetilsalicílico (AAS más esomeprazol frente a clopidogrel en la prevención de la hemorragia gastrointestinal. Métodos: Análisis coste-efectividad (árbol de decisión de 2 ramas: AAS más esomeprazol y clopidogrel respecto a la evitación de casos de hemorragia gastrointestinal en 2 años, y análisis de sensibilidad. Resultados: El coste total del tratamiento con AAS más esomeprazol (2.865 S por paciente libre de hemorragia fue inferior al clopidogrel (2.965 S. El tratamiento con AAS resultó dominante. En todos los análisis de sensibilidad la combinación siguió siendo dominante. Al sustituir esomeprazol 40 mg por omeprazol 40 mg, el coste del tratamiento combinado descendió hasta 1.934S/por episodio evitado. Conclusiones: La asociación de esomeprazol y AAS es más coste-efectiva que clopidogrel en la prevención de la hemorragia gastrointestinal. La combinación con omeprazol resulta aún más coste-efectiva.Objective: To evaluate the use of aspirin plus esomeprazole vs. clopidogrel in the prevention of gastrointestinal bleeding. Methods: We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis (two-branch decision tree: aspirin plus esomeprazole or clopidogrel of prevention of gastrointestinal bleeding over a 2-year period, as well as sensitivity analyses. Results: The total cost of aspirin plus esomeprazole treatment (2,865S/patient free of hemorrhage was lower than that of clopidogrel (2,965S. Aspirin treatment was dominant. The combination continued to be dominant in all sensitivity analyses. When esomeprazole 40 mg was substituted by omeprazole 40 mg, the cost of combination therapy decreased to 1,934 S/prevented hemorrhage. Conclusions: The association of esomeprazole and aspirin is more cost-effective than clopidogrel in preventing gastrointestinal bleeding. Aspirin plus omeprazole was even more cost-effective.

  9. Integrative medicine on optimizing clopidogrel and aspirin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui

    2018-01-15

    This article reviews the available published data on optimizing clopidogrel and aspirin therapy using translational and integrative medicine. Translational and evidence-based medical studies show that the CYP2C19 gene mutation (CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3) could affect > 50% of the Chinese population, and that this mutation is closely associated with clopidogrel resistance and an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events, particularly stent thrombosis in patients following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Adjusted-dose warfarin and aspirin reduce stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), and warfarin is substantially more efficacious than aspirin. However, a poor compliance is a big problem in warfarin use especially in China. The genetic variants of vitamin K expoxide reductase might account for the universally lower warfarin dosage used in Chinese population. The available evidence indicates that the integrating mainstream treatments (e.g., clopidogrel, CYP2C19 genotyping) and non-mainstream medicines [e.g., Chinese medicines, Naoxintong Capsule (, NXT)] to treat CYP2C19 gene mutation patients following PCI can be effective. Aspirin combined NXT and the adjusted-dose warfarin was equally effective in elderly patients with non-valvular AF in prevention of ischemic stroke.

  10. Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En español Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin to Prevent Disease Browse Sections The Basics Overview ... and Risks What are the benefits of taking aspirin regularly? Low-dose aspirin can reduce your risk ...

  11. Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke Also known as aspirin primary prevention. ... if I’m taking aspirin to prevent another heart attack or stroke? The information discussed in Who may ...

  12. Antithrombotic properties of aspirin and resistance to aspirin: beyond strictly antiplatelet actions

    OpenAIRE

    Undas, Anetta; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Mann, Kenneth G.

    2007-01-01

    Aspirin is effective in the prevention of cardiovascular events in high-risk patients. The primary established effect of aspirin on hemostasis is to impair platelet aggregation via inhibition of platelet thromboxane A2 synthesis, thus reducing thrombus formation on the surface of the damaged arterial wall. Growing evidence also indicates that aspirin exerts additional antithrombotic effects, which appear to some extent unrelated to platelet thromboxane A2 production. Aspirin can reduce thromb...

  13. Inhibition of Activator Protein 1 Activity and Neoplastic Transformation by Aspirin*

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Zigang; Huang, Chuanshu; Brown, Rhoderick E.; Ma, Wei-Ya

    1997-01-01

    Aspirin, along with its analgesic-antipyretic uses, is now also being considered for prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Although many of aspirin's pharmacological actions are related to its ability to inhibit prostaglandin biosynthesis, some of its beneficial therapeutic effects are not completely understood. Transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1) is critical for the induction of neoplastic transformation and inducti...

  14. Effects of Aspirin on Rheological Properties of Erythrocytes In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Elblbesy, Mohamed A.; Hereba, Abdel Rahman M.; Shawki, Mamdouh M.

    2012-01-01

    Aspirin is of proven value as an antithrombotic drug. In unstable angina it reduces the risk of death and myocardial infarction by half. Most studies on the mechanism of action of aspirin have concentrated on the effect of aspirin on platelets. In the present study we have tried to prove that there is another biophysical mechanism of aspirin, and that is through the effect of aspirin on erythrocytes. In this study ten blood samples were incubated with aspirin at different concentrations. The ...

  15. Genetic Markers for Differentiating Aspirin-Hypersensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Park, Hae-Sim

    2006-01-01

    Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) and aspirin-induced urticaria/angioedema (AIU) are two major aspirin-related allergies. We summarize recent findings related to their molecular genetic mechanisms in order to identify genetic susceptibility markers for differentiating AIU and AIA. The overproduction of cysteinyl leukotriene has been suggested as a mechanism in both AIU and AIA. Increased expression of CYSLTR1 with CYLSTR1 and CYSLTR2 polymorphisms are new findings in AIA, while the ALOX5 promoter ...

  16. [From the willow to aspirin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafont, Olivier

    2007-07-01

    At the beginning was the willow bark, which was considered as a medicine by Hippocrates, Dioscorides and Plinus. During the XVIIIth century, the Reverend Edward Stone re-discovered the willow for the cure of agues. In 1829, the french pharmacist Pierre Joseph Leroux isolated salicin. Raffaelle Piria was the first to synthesize salicylic acid from salicin (salicoside). Hermann Kolbe prepared salicylic acid from sodium phenate and carbon dioxide. And then acetylsalicylic acid was first prepared by Charles Gerhardt in 1853, but he did not succeed in identifying its structure. Felix Hoffmann, Arthur Eichengrun and Heinrich Dresen from Bayer Laboratories were at the origin of the use of Aspirin as a medicine. In 1971, John Vane showed that aspirin-like drugs inhibited prostaglandine synthesis.

  17. Aspirin suppresses neuronal apoptosis, reduces tissue inflammation, and restrains astrocyte activation by activating the Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wang; Shurui, Chen; Zipeng, Zhou; Hongliang, Dai; Hongyu, Wang; Yuanlong, Li; Kang, Zhou; Zhaoliang, Shen; Yue, Guo; Chang, Liu; Mei, Xifan

    2018-01-29

    The nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element signaling pathway plays a substantial role in preventing oxidative stress-related diseases. Aspirin has been shown to exert several pharmacological effects by inducing the expression of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein. However, the effects of aspirin on spinal cord injury (SCI) have rarely been studied. Therefore, we sought to investigate the neuroprotective effects of aspirin after SCI. We employed a spinal cord contusion model in Sprague-Dawley rats, and aspirin was administered intraperitoneally for 7 days. Nissl staining showed that the aspirin treatment significantly reduced the loss of motor neurons after SCI compared with vehicle-treated animals. The expression of Nrf2, quinine oxidoreductase 1, and HO-1 proteins was increased in aspirin-treated animals after SCI compared with the vehicle group. In addition, aspirin simultaneously decreased the expression of inflammation-related proteins, such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 after SCI. Moreover, the ratio of apoptotic neurons in the anterior horn and the levels of the apoptosis-related proteins caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, and Bax were significantly decreased in the aspirin group compared with the vehicle group. Immunofluorescence staining was used to detect the colocalization of NeuN and HO-1, and the results showed that aspirin significantly increased expression of the HO-1 protein in neurons. In addition, western blots and immunofluorescence staining showed aspirin restrained astrocyte activation. In conclusion, aspirin induces neuroprotective effects by inhibiting astrocyte activation and apoptosis after SCI through the activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway.

  18. Aspirin Is Associated with Improved Survival in Severely Thrombocytopenic Cancer Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Attila; Kampaktsis, Polydoros N; Parameswaran, Rekha; Stein, Eytan M; Steingart, Richard; Gupta, Dipti

    2017-02-01

    Patients with hematologic malignancies are at risk for severe thrombocytopenia (sTP). The risk and benefit of aspirin are not known in thrombocytopenic cancer patients experiencing acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Medical records of patients with hematologic malignancies diagnosed with AMI at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center during 2005-2014 were reviewed. sTP was defined as a platelet count aspirin as a treatment for AMI. Compared with patients without sTP with AMI, patients with sTP with AMI were less likely to receive aspirin (83% vs. 43%; p = .0001) and thienopyridine treatment (27% vs. 3%; p = .0005). During median follow-up of 3.7 years after AMI, survival was lower in patients with sTP than in those with no sTP (23% vs. 50% at 1 year; log rank p = .003). Patients with sTP who received aspirin for AMI had improved survival compared with those who did not (92% vs. 70% at 7 days, 72% vs. 33% at 30 days, and 32% vs. 13% at 1 year; log rank p = .008). In multivariate regression models, aspirin use was associated with improved 30-day survival both in the overall patient cohort and in sTP patients. No fatal bleeding events occurred. Major bleeding was not associated with sTP or aspirin use. Treatment of AMI with aspirin in patients with hematologic malignancies and sTP is associated with improved survival without increase in major bleeding. The Oncologist 2017;22:213-221Implications for Practice: In patients with hematologic malignancies and acute myocardial infarction with severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count aspirin therapy was associated with improved survival without an increase in major bleeding in this high-risk patient cohort. © AlphaMed Press 2017.

  19. Cytoprotective effects of essential oil of Pinus halepensis L. against aspirin-induced toxicity in IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzenna, Hafsia; Hfaiedh, Najla; Bouaziz, Mouhamed; Giroux-Metges, Marie-Agnès; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Talarmin, Hélène

    2017-12-01

    Essential oils from Pinus species have been reported to have various therapeutic properties. This study was undertaken to identify the chemical composition and cytoprotective effects of the essential oil of Pinus halepensis L. against aspirin-induced damage in cells in vitro. The cytoprotection of the oil against toxicity of aspirin on the small intestine epithelial cells IEC-6 was tested. The obtained results have shown that 35 different compounds were identified. Aspirin induced a decrease in cell viability, and exhibited significant damage to their morphology and an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. However, the co-treatment of aspirin with the essential oil of Pinus induced a significant increase in cell viability and a decrease in SOD and CAT activities. Overall, these finding suggest that the essential oil of Pinus halepensis L. has potent cytoprotective effect against aspirin-induced toxicity in IEC-6 cells.

  20. Aspirin augments the expression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli protein by suppression of IKKβ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashida, Noboru, E-mail: nashida@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Innovative Medicine, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kishihata, Masako [Department of Clinical Innovative Medicine, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tien, Dat Nguyen [Department of Clinical Innovative Medicine, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Kamei, Kaeko [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Kimura, Takeshi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Yokode, Masayuki [Department of Clinical Innovative Medicine, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Clinical studies revealed aspirin inhibits cancer, but the mechanism is not known. • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a well-known tumor-suppressing gene. • We found aspirin up-regulates the protein of APC. • Aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, an essential kinase in NFκB activation. • The deletion of IKKβ significantly increases the expression of APC protein. - Abstract: Aspirin has been widely used as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory medicine for long. In addition to these traditional effects, clinical studies suggest that aspirin can protect against cancer, but its mechanism has not been explored. To unveil it, we identified the proteins up- or down-regulated after incubation with aspirin by using proteomics analysis with Nano-flow LC/MALDI-TOF system. Interestingly, the analysis identified the protein of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) as one of the most up-regulated protein. APC regulates cell proliferation or angiogenesis, and is widely known as a tumor-suppressing gene which can cause colorectal cancer when it is mutated. Western blots confirmed this result, and real-time PCR indicated it is transcriptionally regulated. We further tried to elucidate the molecular mechanism with focusing on IKKβ. IKKβ is the essential kinase in activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), major transcriptional factors that regulate genes responsible for inflammation or immune response. Previous reports indicated that aspirin specifically inhibits IKKβ activity, and constitutively active form of IKKβ accelerates APC loss. We found that aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, and the deletion of IKKβ by siRNA increases the expression of APC in HEK294 cells. Finally, we observed similar effects of aspirin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results reveal that aspirin up-regulates the expression of APC via the suppression of IKKβ. This can be a mechanism how aspirin prevents cancer at

  1. Immunological mechanisms in aspirin hypersensitivity. Studies on the immunogenicity of free aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cîrstea, M; Suhaciu, G; Cîrje, M; Ciontescu, L

    1976-10-01

    Anti-aspiryl antibodies were produced in rabbits and guinea pigs by inoculation of aspirin incorporated in complete or incomplete Freund's adjuvant. These antibodies were readily detected by passive haemagglutination using rabbit erythrocytes incubated with aspirin at alkaline pH. Aspiryl conjugates with ovalbumin, human gamma-globulin, bovine gamma-globulin and rabbit serum were also prepared by incubating the proteins with aspirin at alkaline pH. Aspiryl conjugates prepared by this technique behaved, immunologically, identically with the conjugates prepared from aspirin chloride. By contrast, the molar absorbance at 305 nm of the conjugates prepared from aspirin was about 25 times lower than the molar absorbance of the conjugates prepared from aspirin chloride. Since the absorbance of salicylic acid is about eight times greater than that of aspirin, the conclusion is drawn that the aspiryl/salicylyl ratio is significantly higher in the conjugates prepared by incubating proteins with aspirin at alkaline pH than in the conjugates prepared from aspirin chloride. In parallel experiments, salicylic acid did not induce formation of specific antibodies capable of reacting with aspirin- or salicylic acid-treated red cells. Sera giving positive passive haemagglutination with aspirin-treated erythrocytes did not react with erythrocytes treated with salicylic acid or acetic anhydride.

  2. Impact of aspirin and clopidogrel interruption on platelet function in patients undergoing major vascular surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Le Manach

    Full Text Available AIMS: To investigate functional platelet recovery after preoperative withdrawal of aspirin and clopidogrel and platelet function 5 days after treatment resumption. METHODS/RESULTS: We conducted an observational study, which prospectively included consecutive patients taking aspirin, taking clopidogrel, and untreated controls (15 patients in each group. The antiplatelet drugs were withdrawn five days before surgery (baseline and were reintroduced two days after surgery. Platelet function was evaluated by optical aggregation in the presence of collagen, arachidonic acid (aspirin and ADP (clopidogrel and by VASP assay (clopidogrel. Platelet-leukocyte complex (PLC level was quantified at each time-point. At baseline, platelet function was efficiently inhibited by aspirin and had recovered fully in most patients 5 days after drug withdrawal. PLC levels five days after aspirin reintroduction were similar to baseline (+4±10%; p = 0.16, in line with an effective platelet inhibition. Chronic clopidogrel treatment was associated with variable platelet inhibition and its withdrawal led to variable functional recovery. PLC levels were significantly increased five days after clopidogrel reintroduction (+10±15%; p = 0.02, compared to baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Aspirin withdrawal 5 days before high-bleeding-risk procedures was associated with functional platelet recovery, and its reintroduction two days after surgery restored antiplaletet efficacy five days later. This was not the case of clopidogrel, and further work is therefore needed to define its optimal perioperative management.

  3. Influence of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use on ovarian and endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdoodt, F.; Kjaer, S. K.; Friis, S.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for aspirin use in reducing the incidence and mortality of several cancer types. This has spurred a new wave of interest in this widely used drug. In this review, we present and evaluate the epidemiologic evidence of the association between the use of aspirin....... Overall, observational studies indicate modest reductions in risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer with aspirin use, whereas the results for non-aspirin NSAID use are equivocal. The strongest inverse associations have been reported for long-term consistent aspirin use, notably among subgroups of users (e.......g., those with high body mass index). Few studies have evaluated the influence of NSAID use on the mortality of ovarian or endometrial cancer, and substantial heterogeneity of study characteristics and results preclude any conclusions. Additional studies of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and ovarian...

  4. Beneficial effects of low-dose aspirin on aortic stiffness in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietri, Panagiota; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Terentes-Printzios, Dimitris; Xaplanteris, Panagiotis; Aznaouridis, Konstantinos; Petrocheilou, Katerina; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2014-12-01

    While treatment with low-dose aspirin has been established as a therapeutic tool for secondary prevention, the role of aspirin on primary prevention remains controversial. Aortic stiffness and wave reflections are independent predictors of cardiovascular events. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of low-dose aspirin on aortic stiffness and wave reflections in hypertensive patients. We studied 30 patients with grade I hypertension. Fifteen patients were treated with 160 mg of aspirin and 15 patients with placebo. Aortic stiffness and wave reflections were assessed by measuring carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and heart rate-adjusted augmentation index (AIx75), respectively. All measurements were conducted at baseline and 2 weeks after treatment. In the aspirin group, there was a significant reduction in PWV compared to the placebo group (from 8.9±1.5 to 8.5±1.6 m/s for the aspirin group vs from 8.6±1.4 to 8.7±1.6 m/s for the placebo group, net change: -0.5 m/s; p=0.02). AIx75 showed a marginal decrease (from 28.0±5.4 to 26.2±5.0% for the aspirin group vs from 31.2±9.7 to 30.6±9.2% for the placebo group, net change: -1.2%; p=0.06). In conclusion, a 2-week course of aspirin administration has a favorable effect on aortic stiffness and, to a lesser extent, on wave reflections in hypertensive patients. Whether the reduction in arterial stiffness is translated to fewer cardiovascular events needs to be confirmed by future prospective studies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. High-Dose Aspirin Is Required to Influence Plasma Fibrin Network Structure in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Tehrani, Sara; Antovic, Aleksandra; Mobarrez, Fariborz; Mageed, Koteiba; Lins, Per-Eric; Adamson, Ulf; Wall?n, H?kan N.; J?rneskog, Gun

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients with type 1 diabetes form a less permeable fibrin network, which could contribute to their increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Low-dose aspirin treatment is the standard in the management of CVD; however, the effect seems reduced in patients with diabetes. We investigated the effects of low- and high-dose aspirin treatment on fibrin network formation in patients with type 1 diabetes (primary aim) and the possible interaction between the treatment effects of aspi...

  6. Antitumor effect of aspirin in glioblastoma cells by modulation of β-catenin/T-cell factor-mediated transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Fengming; Yue, Xiao; Han, Lei; Yuan, Xubo; Shi, Zhendong; Huang, Kai; Yang, Yang; Zou, Jian; Zhang, Junxia; Jiang, Tao; Pu, Peiyu; Kang, Chunsheng

    2011-10-01

    The goal in this study was to investigate the antitumor effect of aspirin in glioblastoma cells and the molecular mechanism involved in its antineoplastic activities. The authors used the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method, flow cytometry, the annexin V method, and Transwell cell invasion test to detect the proliferation and invasive activity of U87 and A172 glioma cells before and after being treated with aspirin. To determine the effects of aspirin on β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) transcription activity, reporter constructs containing 3 repeats of the wild-type (TOPflash) or mutant (FOPflash) TCF-binding sites were used. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses were used to detect the expression of multiple β-catenin/TCF target genes following aspirin treatment. The transcriptional activity of the β-catenin/TCF complex was strongly inhibited by aspirin. Increasing the concentration of aspirin resulted in decreased expression of c-myc, cyclin D1, and fra-1 mRNA and protein in U87 and A172 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Aspirin inhibited glioma cell proliferation and invasive ability, and induced apoptotic cell death. The results suggest that aspirin is a potent antitumor agent, and that it exerts its antineoplastic action by inhibition of the β-catenin/TCF signaling pathway in glioma cells.

  7. Effectiveness of and risk associated with aspirin therapy in hemodialysis patients with a background of antiplatelet factor 4/heparin complex antibody detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Chao; Jin, Liping; Chen, Guanglei; Li, Changchun; Qi, Ka; Kong, Deyang; Wang, Yaping; Song, Minghui; Ma, Lu

    2015-07-01

    The optimal prevention measures against hemodialysis (HD)-associated complications, including all-cause thrombotic events and death, are unclear. This prospective study was designed to assess the effect of aspirin on prevention of HD-associated complications. Patients were divided into four groups according to platelet factor-4/heparin-complex (PF4/H) antibody detection and aspirin prescription: Group 1, antibody(-)/aspirin(+); Group 2, antibody(-)/aspirin(-); Group 3, antibody(+)/aspirin(+); and Group 4, antibody(+)/aspirin(-). Adverse events were compared among all four groups. Cox hazard regression was performed to analyze the effects of anti-PF4/H antibody and aspirin on thrombosis and death. This study included 648 patients undergoing HD; 142 were positive for anti-PF4/H antibodies, and 229 had received aspirin before enrollment. During the 4-year follow-up period, 138 patients developed thrombosis, and 63 of these events were anti-PF4/H antibody-associated. A total of 112 patients died; 75 died of coronary heart disease (CHD). Group 4 had a significantly higher incidence of total and anti-PF4/H antibody-associated thrombosis events as well as total and CHD-associated death than did the other three groups. Aspirin had a preventive effect against all adverse events in anti-PF4/H antibody-positive patients, but not in antibody-negative patients. Group 1 patients with baseline D-dimer levels of Aspirin prevention of thrombosis and death in patients undergoing HD might require consideration of the anti-PF4/H antibody status. In antibody-positive individuals, taking aspirin could improve the prognosis and therefore might be recommended. In antibody-negative individuals, prevention was minimal and the bleeding risk was obviously increased; thus, aspirin should be avoided or at least require careful evaluation prior to aspirin treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Síndrome antifosfolípide e gestação: tratamento com heparina e aspirina em doses baixas Antiphospholipid syndrome and pregnancy: treatment with heparin and low-dose aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Amorim Aquino

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: determinar a eficácia e a segurança do tratamento de gestantes com síndrome antifosfolípide com a heparina associada à aspirina em baixas doses, e determinar possíveis fatores agravantes da síndrome. Métodos: 17 pacientes portadoras da síndrome antifosfolípide foram submetidas a rigoroso acompanhamento pré-natal. A heparina foi utilizada na dose de 10.000 UI/dia e a aspirina na dose de 100 mg/dia. Foram analisados resultados perinatais e maternos, mediante a utilização do teste do chi² e do teste exato de Fischer. Resultados: o índice de recém-nascidos vivos foi de 88,2% nas gestações tratadas dessas pacientes contra 13,3% nas gestações prévias não-tratadas dessas mesmas pacientes. Foi alta a incidência de complicações gestacionais: oligoidrâmnio (40%, sofrimento fetal anteparto (33,3%, crescimento intra-uterino retardado (33,3%, diabetes mellitus gestacional (29,4%, pré-eclâmpsia (23,5% e prematuridade (60%. A presença do lúpus eritematoso sistêmico foi indicação de mau prognóstico. Nenhum efeito colateral significativo foi observado durante o tratamento. Conclusões: o tratamento adotado se mostrou efetivo na obtenção de maior índice de recém-nascidos vivos, seguro, mas incapaz de impedir a alta incidência de complicações maternas e perinatais associadas à síndrome. O lúpus eritematoso sistêmico se mostrou um fator agravante da síndrome antifosfolípide.Purpose: to determine the effectiveness and the safety of treatment with heparin and low-dose aspirin in pregnant women with antiphospholipid syndrome, and to determine possible deteriorating factors for this syndrome. Methods: 17 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome were submitted to a rigorous antenatal care. Patients were treated with a fixed dose of heparin (10,000 IU/day associated with low-dose aspirin (100 mg/day. We analyzed perinatal and maternal results, using chi² test and Fischer's exact test. Results: the overall live

  9. Risks and benefits of clopidogrel-aspirin in minor stroke or TIA: Time course analysis of CHANCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuesong; Jing, Jing; Chen, Weiqi; Meng, Xia; Li, Hao; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Wang, David; Johnston, S Claiborne; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-05-16

    To investigate the short-term time course risks and benefits of clopidogrel with aspirin in minor ischemic stroke or TIA. Data were derived from the Clopidogrel in High-Risk Patients with Acute Nondisabling Cerebrovascular Events (CHANCE) trial. The primary outcome was a new ischemic stroke. Safety outcomes included any bleeding and moderate to severe bleeding. Time course analyses were performed for the outcomes of both stroke and bleeding. A total of 145 (71.1%), 13 (6.4%), and 12 (5.9%) of 204 new ischemic strokes in the clopidogrel-aspirin group vs 223 (75.6%), 19 (6.4%), and 8 (2.7%) of 295 in the aspirin alone group occurred at the first, second, and third week, respectively. A total of 23 (38.3%), 15 (25.0%), and 9 (15.0%) of 60 bleeding cases in the clopidogrel-aspirin group vs 15 (36.6%), 8 (19.5%), and 3 (7.3%) of 41 in the aspirin alone group occurred at the first, second, and third week, respectively. Clopidogrel-aspirin treatment numerically reduced the risk of ischemic stroke within the first 2 weeks. From the 10th day, the number of any bleeding cases caused by dual antiplatelets outweighed that of new stroke reduced by dual antiplatelets. Clopidogrel-aspirin treatment may have a benefit of reducing stroke risk outweighing the potential risk of increased bleeding especially within the first 2 weeks compared with aspirin alone in patients with minor stroke or TIA. NCT00979589. This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with minor stroke or TIA, the reduction of stroke risk from clopidogrel plus aspirin within the first 2 weeks outweighs the risk of bleeding compared with aspirin alone. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. EFFECT OF ACETYLSALICYCLIC ACID (ASPIRIN ) AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIVINGSTON

    Aspirin as such, irreversibly blocks the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase (prostaglandin synthase) which catalyzes the conversion of. Archidonic acid to endoperoxide compounds. In addition to reducing the synthesis of eicosanoid mediators, ASA also interferes with the chemical mediators of the kalikrein system. As a result, aspirin ...

  11. The corrosion protection of aluminum by various anodizing treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1989-01-01

    Corrosion protection to 6061-T6 aluminum, afforded by both teflon-impregnated anodized coats (Polylube and Tufram) and hard-anodized coats (water sealed and dichromate sealed), was studied at both pH 5.5 and pH 9.5, with an exposure period of 28 days in 3.5 percent NaCl solution (25 C) for each specimen. In general, corrosion protection for all specimens was better at pH 9.5 than at pH 5.5. Protection by a Tufram coat proved superior to that afforded by Polylube at each pH, with corrosion protection by the hard-anodized, water-sealed coat at pH 9.5 providing the best protection. Electrochemical work in each case was corroborated by microscopic examination of the coats after exposure. Corrosion protection by Tufram at pH 9.5 was most comparable to that of the hard-anodized samples, although pitting and some cracking of the coat did occur.

  12. Aspirin plus ticlopidine prevented experimental endocarditis due to Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus gallolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, Tiago Rafael; Oechslin, Frank; Que, Yok-Ai; Moreillon, Philippe; Entenza, José Manuel; Mancini, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus gallolyticus cause infective endocarditis (IE), which can originate from the continuous release or translocation of low bacterial numbers into the bloodstream. In this context, IE cannot be prevented with antibiotics. We previously demonstrated that aspirin plus ticlopidine protected rats from IE due to S. gordonii and Staphylococcus aureus. Here we showed that aspirin plus ticlopidine significantly reduced vegetation weight and protected 73 and 64% rats (P faecalis and S. gallolyticus, respectively. These results further support the potential use of aspirin plus ticlopidine for a global prevention of IE in high-risk patients. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. CCN2 reduction mediates protective effects of BMP7 treatment in obstructive nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, Lucas L.; Leeuwis, Jan Willem; Lyons, Karen M.; Mummery, Christine L.; Nguyen, Tri Q.; Goldschmeding, Roel

    2017-01-01

    Treatment with rhBMP7 exerts profound protective effects in a wide variety of experimental models of renal disease. However, little is known about how these protective effects are mediated, and which cells in the kidney are targeted by exogenous rhBMP7 treatment. To determine if rhBMP7 increases

  14. NAC attenuates LPS-induced toxicity in aspirin-sensitized mouse macrophages via suppression of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Raza

    Full Text Available Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces the production of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin is a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug. Our aim was to study the effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant precursor of GSH synthesis, on aspirin-sensitized macrophages treated with LPS. We investigated the effects of LPS alone and in conjunction with a sub-toxic concentration of ASA, on metabolic and oxidative stress, apoptosis, and mitochondrial function using J774.2 mouse macrophage cell line. Protection from LPS-induced toxicity by NAC was also studied. LPS alone markedly induced ROS production and oxidative stress in macrophage cells. When ASA was added to LPS-treated macrophages, the increase in oxidative stress was significantly higher than that with LPS alone. Similarly, alteration in glutathione-dependent redox metabolism was also observed in macrophages after treatment with LPS and ASA. The combination of LPS and ASA selectively altered the CYP 3A4, CYP 2E1 and CYP 1A1 catalytic activities. Mitochondrial respiratory complexes and ATP production were also inhibited by LPS-ASA treatment. Furthermore a higher apoptotic cell death was also observed in LPS-ASA treated macrophages. NAC pre-treatment showed protection against oxidative stress induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. These effects are presumed, at least in part, to be associated with alterations in NF-κB/Nrf-2 mediated cell signaling. These results suggest that macrophages are more sensitive to LPS when challenged with ASA and that NAC pre-treatment protects the macrophages from these deleterious effects.

  15. Pharmacogenetics of the antiplatelet effect of aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würtz, Morten; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2012-01-01

    The concept of "pharmacogenetics" addresses genetically determined variation in how individuals respond to drugs. Accordingly, specific genetic variants have been suggested as contributors to a reduced response to various antiplatelet drugs. Aspirin is a cornerstone in secondary cardiovascular prevention and has been thoroughly investigated. The efficacy of aspirin is well documented, although with considerable interindividual variation. According to meta-analyses, a reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin confers an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The platelet response to aspirin is assessed by in vitro evaluation of thromboxane-dependent platelet function. A reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin can be explained by several mechanisms, which are largely determined by clinical, pharmacodynamic, biological and genetic factors. During the past decade, numerous studies have identified genetic polymorphisms significantly associated with cardiovascular events and modulating the antiplatelet effect of aspirin. However, results have been contradictory allowing only few firm conclusions to be drawn. Polymorphisms in genes encoding glycoproteins (IIb/IIIa, Ia/IIa, VI and Ibα), cyclooxygenases (1 and 2), adenosine diphosphate receptors (P2Y1 and P2Y12) and proteins of importance for haemostasis (thromboxane A2 receptor, coagulation factor XIII, etc.) have been investigated. In particular, a polymorphism in the gene encoding glycoprotein IIb/IIIa has been associated with a reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin. The additive value of an individual's genetic makeup in predicting the antiplatelet effect of aspirin and the risk of cardiovascular events remains controversial. The present review outlines the pharmacology of aspirin and provides an overview of specific genetic variations considered to influence the antiplatelet effect of aspirin.

  16. High-on-Aspirin Residual Platelet Reactivity Evaluated Using the Multiplate® Point-of-Care Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mărginean Alina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of aspirin non-responsiveness using whole blood multiple electrode aggregometry and to investigate the role of different clinical and laboratory variables associated with the lack of response. Methods: The present study included 116 aspirin treated patients presented with acute coronary syndromes or stroke. Response to aspirin was assessed by impedance aggregometry using arachidonic acid as agonist, in a final concentration of 0.5 mM (ASPI test. Results: In our data set 81% (n=94 were responders and 19% (n=22 non-responders showing high-on-aspirin platelet reactivity. Correlation analysis showed that the ward of admittance, low-density lipoproteins (LDL, concomitant antibiotic treatment, beta-adrenergic receptor blockers, history of myocardial infarction as well as PCI performed on Cardiology patients have different degrees of association with aspirin response. Conclusion: Concomitant treatment with beta-adrenergic receptor inhibitors, history of myocardial infarction and Cardiology ward admittance significantly increased the chance of responding to aspirin treatment whereas antibiotic therapy and low-density lipoproteins cholesterol seemed to increase the risk of high-on-aspirin residual platelet reactivity.

  17. The analgesic effect of different antidepressants combined with aspirin on thermally induced pain in Albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla S. Elhwuegi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Combination analgesics provide more effective pain relief for a broader spectrum of pain. This research examines the possible potentiation of the analgesic effect of different classes of antidepressants when combined with aspirin in thermal model of pain using Albino mice.Methods:Different groups of six animals each were injected intraperitoneally by different doses of aspirin (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, imipramine (2.5, 7.5, 15 or 30 mg/kg, fluoxetine (1.25, 2.5, 5 or 7.5 mg/kg, mirtazapine (1.25, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg and a combination of a fixed dose of aspirin (100 mg/kg with the different doses of the three antidepressants. One hour later the analgesic effect of these treatments were evaluated against thermally induced pain. All data were subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired Student's t-test.Results:Aspirin had no analgesic effect in thermally induced pain. The three selected antidepressants produced dose dependent analgesia. The addition of a fixed dose of aspirin to imipramine significantly increased the reaction time (RT of the lowest dose (by 23% and the highest dose (by 20%. The addition of the fixed dose of aspirin to fluoxetine significantly increased RT by 13% of the dose 2.5 mg/Kg. Finally, the addition of the fixed dose of aspirin significantly potentiated the antinociceptive effect of the different doses of mirtazapine (RT was increased by 24, 54 and 38% respectively.Conclusion:Combination of aspirin with an antidepressant might produce better analgesia, increasing the efficacy of pain management and reduces side effects by using smaller doses of each drug.

  18. Aspirin down-regulates tryptophan degradation in stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroecksnadel, K; Winkler, C; Wirleitner, B; Schennach, H; Fuchs, D

    2005-04-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is one of the most widely used drugs worldwide, due mainly to its broad therapeutic spectrum with anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antithrombotic and analgesic effects. However, the exact mechanisms by which aspirin influences inflammation, pain and immune system activation are only partly understood. Within activation of the cellular immune system, Th1-type cytokine interferon (IFN)-gamma induces enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) which converts tryptophan to kynurenine. In parallel, IFN-gamma induces enzyme GTP-cyclohydrolase I, which gives rise to neopterin production by activated human macrophages. Similarly, tryptophan degradation and neopterin formation increase during several disease states involving Th1-type immune activation. Using stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), the effect of aspirin on tryptophan degradation and neopterin production was investigated. Stimulation of PBMC with mitogens concanavalin A, phytohaemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen induced significant tryptophan catabolism as was reflected by a decline in tryptophan levels and a parallel increase in kynurenine concentrations compared with unstimulated cells. In parallel, neopterin production was enhanced. Treatment of stimulated PBMC with increasing doses of 1-5 mM aspirin significantly decreased stimulation-induced tryptophan degradation and neopterin production as well. All the effects of aspirin were dose-dependent. The parallel influence of aspirin on both biochemical pathways implies that there was no direct inhibitory effect of aspirin on IDO; rather, it inhibits production of IFN-gamma in mitogen-treated PBMC. The influence of aspirin on biochemical pathways induced by IFN-gamma may represent an important part of its broad pharmacological effect.

  19. Aspirin prevents bone loss with little mechanical improvement in high-fat-fed ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sien; Lee, Wayne Y W; Huang, Meiling; Fu, Ziwei; Liang, Yanlong; Wu, Haiyou; Xu, Liangliang; Suen, Chun Wai; Huang, Jianping; Wu, Tie; Cui, Liao; Li, Gang

    2016-11-15

    Obesity and osteoporosis are often concurrently happened in the menopausal women. Obesity in menopausal women is not only related to a high risk of cardiovascular disease, but also results in a detrimental effect on bone health. This study aimed to investigate the effects of aspirin, a popular anti-thrombosis drug, on bone quantity and quality in the high-fat-fed animal model. Adult female rats were subjected to either sham operations or ovariectomized operations. The ovariectomized rats were orally administered with deionized water or standardized high fat emulsion with or without aspirin. All rats were injected with calcein before killed for the purpose of double in vivo labeling. Biochemistry, histomorphometry, micro-computed tomography analysis, mechanical test, and component analysis were performed after 12 weeks. In vitro cell culture was also performed to observe the effect of aspirin in osteogenesis. We found that high fat remarkably impaired bone formation and bone biomechanics. Aspirin treatment significantly prevented bone loss by increasing bone formation. In vitro studies also validated the enhancement of osteogenic differentiation. However, aspirin presented no significant improvement in bone mechanical properties. Component analysis shown aspirin could significantly increase the content of mineral, but had limited effect on the content of collagen. In conclusion, aspirin is beneficial for the prevention of bone loss; meanwhile, it may cause an imbalance in the components of bone which may weaken the mechanical properties. The current study provided further evidence that aspirin might not be powerful for the prevention of fracture in osteoporotic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxidative stress-related mechanisms affecting response to aspirin in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilli, Francesca; Lapenna, Domenico; La Barba, Sara; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major cardiovascular risk factor. Persistent platelet activation plays a key role in atherothrombosis in T2DM. However, current antiplatelet treatments appear less effective in T2DM patients vs nondiabetics at similar risk. A large body of evidence supports the contention that oxidative stress, which characterizes DM, may be responsible, at least in part, for less-than-expected response to aspirin, with multiple mechanisms acting at several levels. This review discusses the pathophysiological mechanisms related to oxidative stress and contributing to suboptimal aspirin action or responsiveness. These include: (1) mechanisms counteracting the antiplatelet effect of aspirin, such as reduced platelet sensitivity to the antiaggregating effects of NO, due to high-glucose-mediated oxidative stress; (2) mechanisms interfering with COX acetylation especially at the platelet level, e.g., lipid hydroperoxide-dependent impaired acetylating effects of aspirin; (3) mechanisms favoring platelet priming (lipid hydroperoxides) or activation (F2-isoprostanes, acting as partial agonists of thromboxane receptor), or aldose-reductase pathway-mediated oxidative stress, leading to enhanced platelet thromboxane A2 generation or thromboxane receptor activation; (4) mechanisms favoring platelet recruitment, such as aspirin-induced platelet isoprostane formation; (5) modulation of megakaryocyte generation and thrombopoiesis by oxidative HO-1 inhibition; and (6) aspirin-iron interactions, eventually resulting in impaired pharmacological activity of aspirin, lipoperoxide burden, and enhanced generation of hydroxyl radicals capable of promoting protein kinase C activation and platelet aggregation. Acknowledgment of oxidative stress as a major contributor, not only of vascular complications, but also of suboptimal response to antiplatelet agents in T2DM, may open the way to designing and testing novel antithrombotic strategies, specifically targeting

  1. The inhibitory effect of simvastatin and aspirin on histamine responsiveness in human vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absi, Mais; Bruce, Jason I; Ward, Donald T

    2014-04-01

    Statins and aspirin deliver well-established cardiovascular benefits resulting in their increased use as combined polypills to decrease risk of stroke and heart disease. However, the direct endothelial effect of combined statin/aspirin cotreatment remains unclear. Histamine is an inflammatory mediator that increases vascular permeability, and so we examined the effect of treating human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) for 24 h with 1 μM simvastatin and 100 μM aspirin on histamine responsiveness. Subsequent histamine (1 μM) challenge increased intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)i) concentration, an effect that was significantly inhibited by combined simvastatin/aspirin pretreatment but not when then the compounds were given separately, even at 10-fold higher concentrations. In contrast, the Ca(2+)i mobilization response to ATP challenge (10 μM) was not inhibited by combined simvastatin/aspirin pretreatment. The H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine significantly inhibited both histamine-induced Ca(2+)i mobilization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, whereas ranitidine (H2 receptor antagonist) was without effect. However, combined simvastatin/aspirin pretreatment failed to decrease H1 receptor protein expression ruling out receptor downregulation as the mechanism of action. Histamine-induced ERK activation was also inhibited by atorvastatin pretreatment, while simvastatin further inhibited histamine-induced vascular endothelial cadherin phosphorylation as well as altered HUVEC morphology and inhibited actin polymerization. Therefore, in addition to the known therapeutic benefits of statins and aspirin, here we provide initial cellular evidence that combined statin/aspirin treatment inhibits histamine responsiveness in HUVECs.

  2. Effect of aspirin on nasal resistance to airflow.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, A S; Lancer, J M; Moir, A A; Stevens, J C

    1985-01-01

    The effect of aspirin on nasal resistance to airflow was investigated by rhinomanometry in 25 healthy subjects before and after ingestion of aspirin or vitamin C in a double blind crossover trial. Aspirin caused a significant increase in nasal resistance compared with vitamin C. The effect of aspirin may be due to its inhibition of the synthesis of prostaglandins.

  3. Post-diagnosis aspirin use and overall survival in patients with melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachidi, Saleh; Wallace, Kristin; Li, Hong; Lautenschlaeger, Tim; Li, Zihai

    2018-01-06

    Mouse studies show that tumor-derived prostaglandins and platelets promote melanoma progression and immune-evasion. Determine if aspirin confers longer survival in patients with melanoma. A retrospective cohort study of 1,522 patients at Indiana University Health (IUH) diagnosed with melanoma between 2000 and 2014 and followed up through September, 2016. Aspirin use was associated with longer overall survival in univariate analysis and after controlling for age, sex, stage, and treatment modalities (HR 0.58, 95% CI [0.45-0.75]). Aspirin use was not associated with survival in patients with in situ and stage I melanoma, but was associated with better survival in stages II (HR 0.45, 95% CI [0.24-0.82]) and III (HR 0.57, 95% CI [0.34-0.96]). No statistical significance was observed in stage IV patients (HR 0.55, 95% CI [0.27-1.13]). In turn, patients using aspirin before diagnosis were less likely to be diagnosed in stages III or IV disease. Observational study. Aspirin could provide a survival advantage in melanoma. Clinical trials investigating the therapeutic potential of aspirin are warranted. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial: influence of compliance on beneficial effect of aspirin in prevention of preterm preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David; Poon, Liona C; Rolnik, Daniel L; Syngelaki, Argyro; Delgado, Juan Luis; Vojtassakova, Denisa; de Alvarado, Mercedes; Kapeti, Evgenia; Rehal, Anoop; Pazos, Andrea; Carbone, Ilma Floriana; Dutemeyer, Vivien; Plasencia, Walter; Papantoniou, Nikos; Nicolaides, Kypros H

    2017-12-01

    The Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial was a multicenter study in women with singleton pregnancies. Screening was carried out at 11-13 weeks' gestation with an algorithm that combines maternal factors and biomarkers (mean arterial pressure, uterine artery pulsatility index, and maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein A and placental growth factor). Those with an estimated risk for preterm preeclampsia of >1 in 100 were invited to participate in a double-blind trial of aspirin (150 mg/d) vs placebo from 11-14 until 36 weeks' gestation. Preterm preeclampsia with delivery at preeclampsia in the Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial. This was a secondary analysis of data from the trial. The proportion of prescribed tablets taken was used as an overall measure of compliance. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of aspirin on the incidence of preterm preeclampsia according to compliance of preeclampsia at screening and the participating center. The choice of cut-off of 90% was based on an exploratory analysis of the treatment effect. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate predictors of compliance ≥90% among maternal characteristics and medical history. Preterm preeclampsia occurred in 5/555 (0.9%) participants in the aspirin group with compliance ≥90%, in 8/243 (3.3%) of participants in the aspirin group with compliance preeclampsia was 0.24 (95% confidence interval, 0.09-0.65) for compliance ≥90% and 0.59 (95% confidence interval, 0.23-1.53) for compliance preeclampsia and negatively associated with smoking, maternal age preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy. The beneficial effect of aspirin in the prevention of preterm preeclampsia appears to depend on compliance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Aspirin Inhibits IKK-β-mediated Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion by Targeting Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chongjun; Zhang, Nini; Feng, Yang; Cao, Jiewei; Chen, Xuyi; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin has been demonstrated to possess potent chemopreventive and anticancer effects on prostate cancer. However, the more detailed molecular mechanisms of aspirin to suppress prostate cancer cell invasion have not been clearly elucidated. Transwell assays were performed to evaluate the effects of aspirin on cell invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and serine proteinases activities in cell media were examined by gelatin zymography and ELISA. In addition, inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase-β (IKK-β) phosphorylation and IKK-β kinase activity were measured to assess the effects of aspirin on IKK-β activation. We found that aspirin suppressed the invasion and attachment in human prostate cancer cells. Aspirin treatment significantly resulted in reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and upregulation of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) activity, which are the proteolytic enzymes contributing to the degradation of extracellular matrix and basement membrane in cell invasion and metastasis. Our data further showed that aspirin was able to inhibit both urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in the cells. In addition, aspirin treatment caused a strong decrease in nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation, inhibitor of κB (IκB)-α phosphorylation together with translocation of NF-κB p65 to nucleus and IκB kinase (IKK)- β activation. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of aspirin on cell invasion were reversed by IKK-β overexpression, while the IKK inhibitor sensitizes the anti-invasive effect of aspirin in prostate cancer cells. The present research concluded that aspirin suppressed prostate cancer cell invasion by reducing MMP-9 activity and uPA expression through decreasing of IKK-β-mediated NF-κB activation, indicating that the ability of aspirin to inhibit cell invasion might be useful in the chemoprevention of metastatic prostate cancer. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by

  6. Aspirin Inhibits IKK-β-mediated Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion by Targeting Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongjun Shi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Aspirin has been demonstrated to possess potent chemopreventive and anticancer effects on prostate cancer. However, the more detailed molecular mechanisms of aspirin to suppress prostate cancer cell invasion have not been clearly elucidated. Methods: Transwell assays were performed to evaluate the effects of aspirin on cell invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and serine proteinases activities in cell media were examined by gelatin zymography and ELISA. In addition, inhibitor of κB (IκB kinase-β (IKK-β phosphorylation and IKK-β kinase activity were measured to assess the effects of aspirin on IKK-β activation. Results: We found that aspirin suppressed the invasion and attachment in human prostate cancer cells. Aspirin treatment significantly resulted in reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and upregulation of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 activity, which are the proteolytic enzymes contributing to the degradation of extracellular matrix and basement membrane in cell invasion and metastasis. Our data further showed that aspirin was able to inhibit both urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 expression in the cells. In addition, aspirin treatment caused a strong decrease in nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB activation, inhibitor of κB (IκB-α phosphorylation together with translocation of NF-κB p65 to nucleus and IκB kinase (IKK- β activation. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of aspirin on cell invasion were reversed by IKK-β overexpression, while the IKK inhibitor sensitizes the anti-invasive effect of aspirin in prostate cancer cells. Conclusion: The present research concluded that aspirin suppressed prostate cancer cell invasion by reducing MMP-9 activity and uPA expression through decreasing of IKK-β-mediated NF-κB activation, indicating that the ability of aspirin to inhibit cell invasion might be useful in the chemoprevention of

  7. Preoperative aspirin administration improves oxygenation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrah, Rabin; Elami, Amir; Stamler, Alon; Smirnov, Asya; Stoeger, Zeev

    2005-05-01

    Release of thromboxane (Tx) A(2) by platelets may be one of multiple factors that are responsible for lung injury after cardiopulmonary bypass, leading to pulmonary vasoconstriction and impaired oxygenation. In experimental models, the inhibition of Tx receptor or its production improved lung function. The use of aspirin, which is used widely in the treatment of ischemic heart disease because of its antiplatelet activity, is usually discontinued a week before the patient undergoes the operation to restore normal platelet hemostatic function. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the time of cessation of aspirin before coronary artery bypass surgery, and postoperative oxygenation and bleeding. A prospective clinical study comparing the effect of aspirin on postoperative oxygenation in patients who had been treated or had not been treated with aspirin. Tx levels in the pericardial fluid, oxygenation, and bleeding were compared between the two groups. Thirty-two patients with coronary artery disease who were undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Fourteen of these patients received aspirin until the day of the operation, whereas 18 patients stopped receiving aspirin at least 1 week before undergoing the operation. Mean (+/- SD) Tx levels in the pericardial fluid were significantly lower in the aspirin group (117 +/- 47 pg/mL) compared to those in the control group (1,306 +/- 2,048 pg/mL; p = 0.02). The duration of ventilation after the operation was significantly longer in the nonaspirin group (9.6 +/- 5.6 h vs 3.8 +/- 1.4 h, respectively; p = 0.0004). Po(2) reached a higher level while patients breathed 100% O(2) in the aspirin group (235 +/- 54 mm Hg vs 176 +/- 27 mm Hg, respectively; p = 0.001). The mean amount of bleeding during the first 24 h after surgery was increased in the aspirin group (710 +/- 202 mL) compared with the nonaspirin group (539 +/- 143 mL; p = 0.01), but these patients did not require more transfusions. The

  8. Aspirin reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary inflammation in human models of ARDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, U; Krasnodembskaya, A; Fitzgerald, M; Shyamsundar, M; Kissenpfennig, A; Scott, C; Lefrancais, E; Looney, M R; Verghis, R; Scott, J; Simpson, A J; McNamee, J; McAuley, D F; O'Kane, C M

    2017-11-01

    Platelets play an active role in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Animal and observational studies have shown aspirin's antiplatelet and immunomodulatory effects may be beneficial in ARDS. To test the hypothesis that aspirin reduces inflammation in clinically relevant human models that recapitulate pathophysiological mechanisms implicated in the development of ARDS. Healthy volunteers were randomised to receive placebo or aspirin 75  or 1200 mg (1:1:1) for seven days prior to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhalation, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, allocation-concealed study. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 6 hours after inhaling 50 µg of LPS. The primary outcome measure was BAL IL-8. Secondary outcome measures included markers of alveolar inflammation (BAL neutrophils, cytokines, neutrophil proteases), alveolar epithelial cell injury, systemic inflammation (neutrophils and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP)) and platelet activation (thromboxane B2, TXB2). Human lungs, perfused and ventilated ex vivo (EVLP) were randomised to placebo or 24 mg aspirin and injured with LPS. BAL was carried out 4 hours later. Inflammation was assessed by BAL differential cell counts and histological changes. In the healthy volunteer (n=33) model, data for the aspirin groups were combined. Aspirin did not reduce BAL IL-8. However, aspirin reduced pulmonary neutrophilia and tissue damaging neutrophil proteases (Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-8/-9), reduced BAL concentrations of tumour necrosis factor α and reduced systemic and pulmonary TXB2. There was no difference between high-dose and low-dose aspirin. In the EVLP model, aspirin reduced BAL neutrophilia and alveolar injury as measured by histological damage. These are the first prospective human data indicating that aspirin inhibits pulmonary neutrophilic inflammation, at both low and high doses. Further clinical studies are indicated to assess the role of aspirin in the

  9. Aspirin vs Heparin for the Prevention of Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Kanellopoulou, Theoni; Makris, Thomas; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Nomikou, Efrosyni; Tousoulis, Dimitrios

    2016-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy that remains a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Preeclampsia can be resolved by delivery, and most of the proposed preventive treatment approaches are based on processes involved in placental development in early pregnancy. Yet, none of these has been established in clinical practice. Low-dose aspirin is the most promising candidate, nevertheless; while some individual randomized controlled trials showed minimal or no statistically significant benefit, recent metanalyses showed that early initiation before 16 weeks of gestation is associated with prevention of early-onset preeclampsia and reduction in prevalence of perinatal death or morbidity of pregnant women. Heparin could be an alternative antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory median to prevent preeclampsia either alone or in combination with aspirin; however, results are conflicting concerning efficacy.

  10. Aspirin Reduces Plasma Concentrations of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate: Results of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Crossover Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesenfeld, David B.; Botma, Akke; Habermann, Nina; Toth, Reka; Weigel, Christoph; Popanda, Odilia; Klika, Karel D.; Potter, John D.; Lampe, Johanna W.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspirin use is an effective strategy for the chemoprevention of colorectal cancer, even at low doses. However, in order to implement aspirin interventions, risk–benefit balances and biological mechanisms need to be better defined; to further this aim, we used a metabolomics approach. Methods We metabolically profiled 40 healthy, non-smoking men and women aged 20–45 years enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, crossover trial of 325 mg aspirin/d over 60 days. Gas and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry were used to comprehensively profile participants’ plasma samples after aspirin and placebo interventions. Results A total of 363 metabolites, covering most human biochemical pathways, were measured. Compared to placebo-treated participants, plasma concentrations of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (R+S) decreased after aspirin treatment in both men and women (p = 0.005). This signal proved robust during 20-fold random splitting of the data using 80% of the samples in each split. We subsequently performed functional follow-up studies using targeted, enantiospecific detection in human colorectal cancer cell lines and observed an aspirin-induced reduction of (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate. We further showed that salicylate, the primary aspirin metabolite, inhibits the hydroxyacid–oxoacid transhydrogenase (HOT) mediated production of (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate, thereby providing mechanistic evidence for the clinically observed effects of aspirin on total-2-hydroxyglutarate. Conclusion Using a metabolomics approach with functional follow-up, we propose that a decrease in the oncometabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate may identify an additional mechanism for aspirin or its metabolites in cancer prevention. Impact Reduction of the oncometabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate identifies a novel, non-COX-inhibition-mediated mechanism of aspirin. PMID:26585118

  11. Comparison of the effect of aspirin and amantadine for the treatment of fatigue in multiple sclerosis: a randomized, blinded, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaygannejad, Vahid; Janghorbani, Mohsen; Ashtari, Fereshteh; Zakeri, Hasanali

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the relative efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and amantadine for the treatment of fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS). A 10-week, randomized double-blind crossover clinical trial conducted from October 2009 to September 2010. Fifty-two patients with MS presenting fatigue at 21 to 53 years of age were randomly allocated to the two treatment groups. The first group received amantadine (100 mg twice daily) for a total of 4 weeks. The second group received ASA (500 mg once daily) for four weeks. After a 2-week washout period, they crossed over to the alternative treatment for 4 weeks. Patients were rated at baseline and the end of each phase with the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). ASA appeared to be equivalent in efficacy and safety to amantadine. A significant decrease in FSS occurred in both groups. Of the 26 patients treated with amantadine, the mean (SD) of FSS decreased from 4·8 (1·4) to 4·0 (1·4) (Pamantadine significantly reduce MS-related fatigue. Both ASA and amantadine have previously been shown to reduce fatigue, and we postulate that treatment with ASA and amantadine may have similar benefits.

  12. The effect of prostaglandin synthase inhibitor, aspirin on the rat intestinal membrane structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, G; Kaur, J; Mittal, N; Nath Sanyal, S

    2010-01-01

    Aspirin at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight was found to decrease the activity of the rat intestinal brush border membrane (BBM) - associated enzymes such as the sucrase, lactase, maltase and alkaline phosphatase. Aspirin treatment also led to a decrease in the microviscosity in the native as well as the benzyl alcohol treated membrane which might be due to the lipid peroxidative damage in the membrane. Physical correlation of the membrane oxidative damage was evident as the Fourier Transformation Infra Red (FTIR) study of the Aspirin treated membrane, which include an increased proportion of gauche to trans conformer, shift in the methylene C-H asymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies, C = O double bond stretching, NH bending, antisymmetric (N)-CH3 bending, C-N stretching and antisymmetric CNC stretching while there was no change in the CH2 wagging and twisting as well as in NH-bending amide bond I and II. Aspirin treatment also caused an alteration in the glucose and histidine transport, as evident by a decreased Vmax value while the apparent Km remaining unchanged in the control and Aspirin-treated animals confirming that there was no change in the substrate affinity constant of the membrane transport proteins for the glucose and the basic amino acid, although the rate of transport decreased considerably. There was a decrease noted in the energy of activation of glucose and histidine transport when studied at different temperature but no change in the temperature of phase transition in the BBM with Aspirin treatment, thus implying that perhaps the thermotropic phase transition in the membrane may have relatively little effect on the transport processes. The result suggests an underlying molecular mechanism indicating the implied membrane damage by Aspirin, an important member of the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) family which could possibly through an oxidative damage may lead to an altered molecular structure, physical state and biological

  13. Role of p38 MAPK in enhanced human cancer cells killing by the combination of aspirin and ABT-737

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong; Shi, Jing; Mao, Shi-ying; Xu, Ya-si; Zhang, Dan; Feng, Lin-yi; Zhang, Bo; Yan, You-you; Wang, Si-cong; Pan, Jian-ping; Yang, You-ping; Lin, Neng-ming

    2015-01-01

    Regular use of aspirin after diagnosis is associated with longer survival among patients with mutated-PIK3CA colorectal cancer, but not among patients with wild-type PIK3CA cancer. In this study, we showed that clinically achievable concentrations of aspirin and ABT-737 in combination could induce a synergistic growth arrest in several human PIK3CA wild-type cancer cells. In addition, our results also demonstrated that long-term combination treatment with aspirin and ABT-737 could synergistically induce apoptosis both in A549 and H1299 cells. In the meanwhile, short-term aspirin plus ABT-737 combination treatment induced a greater autophagic response than did either drug alone and the combination-induced autophagy switched from a cytoprotective signal to a death-promoting signal. Furthermore, we showed that p38 acted as a switch between two different types of cell death (autophagy and apoptosis) induced by aspirin plus ABT-737. Moreover, the increased anti-cancer efficacy of aspirin combined with ABT-737 was further validated in a human lung cancer A549 xenograft model. We hope that this synergy may contribute to failure of aspirin cancer therapy and ultimately lead to efficacious regimens for cancer therapy. PMID:25388762

  14. Protecting the source: Tools to evaluate fuel treatment cost vs. water quality protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Cooke; William Elliot; Mary Ellen Miller; Mark Finney; Matthew Thompson

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity wildfires are one of the leading causes of severe soil erosion in western U.S. watersheds. This erosion can lead to disruptive deposits of sediment in reservoirs and water supply systems. Fuel treatments such as controlled burns and forest thinning can reduce wildfire intensity and help preserve topsoil. But while these treatments are generally...

  15. ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY OF DIFFERENT PROTECTION TREATMENTS IN APPLE PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Tomaš

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apple is the most represented fruit species in Croatia. Codling moth, Cydia pomonella L, is one of the most important apple pests whose population is growing from year to year. The aim of this study was to determine the economic effectiveness of four treatments against codling moth (1 - based on baculovirus; 2 - based on the group of synthetic pyrethroid; 3 - based on kaolin, 4 - control treatment, on the three apple varieties. The experiment was performed at the Agricultural Institute Osijek, Croatia, during three years (2012-2014. In order to analyze the results of apple production it was necessary to calculate production efficiency, labor productivity, and profitability of production. The results of the research of economic efficiency according to market prices treatment 1 and treatment 2 had economic coefficient above 1 with tendency of significant growth, while treatment 3 and 4 were uneconomical. The treatment 1showed advantage over the treatment 2 because of its positive effects on human health and biodiversity, as well as satisfactory economic efficiency.

  16. Incidence of intracranial bleeds in new users of low-dose aspirin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Gaist, David; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-dose aspirin protects against ischemic cardiovascular (CV) events as well as colorectal cancer (CRC). However, low-dose aspirin may be associated with a small increased risk of intracranial bleeds (ICB). OBJECTIVES: To obtain incidence rates of ICB overall and by patient subgroups...... per 100 person-years for individuals with an indication of primary CV disease prevention were 0.07 (CI 0.06-0.07) and 0.09 (CI 0.08-0.10) for secondary CV disease prevention. Incidence rates were higher in men for SDH, and higher in women for ICH and SAH. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide valuable...

  17. Aspirin, platelets, and cancer: The point of view of the internist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilli, F; Boccatonda, A; Davì, G

    2016-10-01

    Growing evidence suggests the beneficial effect of aspirin against some types of cancer, particularly of the gastrointestinal tract, and it has been provided for an effect both in cancer prevention as well as in survival improvement of cancer patients. Aspirin benefits increase with duration of treatment, especially after 10years of treatment. The inhibition of platelet activation at sites of gastrointestinal mucosal lesions could be the primary mechanism of action of low-dose aspirin. Indeed, the formation of tumor cell-induced platelet aggregates may favor immune evasion, by releasing angiogenic and growth factors, and also by promoting cancer cell dissemination. Moreover, platelets may contribute to aberrant COX-2 expression in colon carcinoma cells, thereby contributing to downregulation of oncosuppressor genes and upregulation of oncogenes, such as cyclin B1. Platelet adhesion to cancer cells leads also to an increased expression of genes involved in the EMT, such as the EMT-inducing transcription factors ZEB1 and TWIST1 and the mesenchymal marker vimentin. The aspirin-mediated inactivation of platelets may restore antitumor reactivity by blocking the release of paracrine lipid and protein mediators that induce COX-2 expression in adjacent nucleated cells at sites of mucosal injury. Thus, recent findings suggest interesting perspectives on "old" aspirin and NSAID treatment and/or "new" specific drugs to target the "evil" interactions between platelets and cancer for chemoprevention. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Clopidogrel added to aspirin versus aspirin alone in secondary prevention and high-risk primary prevention: rationale and design of the Clopidogrel for High Atherothrombotic Risk and Ischemic Stabilization, Management, and Avoidance (CHARISMA) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Deepak L; Topol, Eric J

    2004-08-01

    Clopidogrel is a more potent antiplatelet agent than aspirin, resulting in greater clinical efficacy in patients with atherothrombotic disease. Furthermore, the combination of clopidogrel plus aspirin has been demonstrated to be superior to aspirin alone in the treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes and after coronary stenting. Whether dual antiplatelet therapy is superior to aspirin monotherapy for high-risk primary prevention and secondary prevention is unknown. The Clopidogrel for High Atherothrombotic Risk and Ischemic Stabilization, Management, and Avoidance (CHARISMA) study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of clopidogrel plus aspirin versus placebo plus aspirin in patients with established coronary, cerebral, or peripheral arterial disease or in patients with multiple risk factors for atherothrombosis who have not yet sustained an ischemic event. This randomized, international, multicenter, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study has finished enrolling patients worldwide. A total of 15,603 patients will be followed long term. The primary end point will be the composite of vascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. Rates of severe bleeding will also be compared between the two arms of the study. This large-scale trial of patients at high risk for atherothrombotic events will allow determination of the value of a strategy of adding clopidogrel to the current standard of care, including low-dose aspirin, for a wide spectrum of patients with atherothrombosis.

  19. Incidence of colorectal cancer in new users and non-users of low-dose aspirin without existing cardiovascular disease: A cohort study using The Health Improvement Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse; García Rodríguez, Luis A

    2017-12-01

    Evidence regarding the chemo-protective effects of aspirin has influenced expert opinion in favour of low-dose aspirin use in certain patient populations without cardiovascular disease (CVD). The effects of aspirin in reducing the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) may be a large contributor to this favourable risk-benefit profile of low-dose aspirin in primary CVD prevention. Using The Health Improvement Network, we estimated the incidence of CRC in individuals free of CVD and either prescribed or not prescribed prophylactic low-dose aspirin. Two cohorts - new-users of low-dose aspirin (N=109,426) and a comparator cohort of non-users (N=154,056) at start of follow-up - were followed (maximum 13years) to identify incident CRC cases. Individuals with a record of CVD, cancer or low-dose aspirin prescription before start of follow-up were excluded. 2330 incident cases of CRC occurred; 885 in the aspirin cohort and 1445 in the comparator cohort, after mean follow-ups of 5.43years and 5.17years, respectively. Incidence rates of CRC per 10,000 person-years (95% confidence interval) were 14.90 (13.95-15.92) in the aspirin cohort and 18.15 (17.24-19.12) in the comparator cohort; incidence rate ratio 0.82 (0.76-0.89) adjusted for age, sex and primary care practitioner (PCP) visits in the previous year. Lower incidence rates were seen in the aspirin cohort for all strata evaluated (gender, age group and number of PCP visits in the previous year) except those aged ≥80years. Among most individuals without established CVD, initiation of low-dose aspirin is associated with a reduced incidence of CRC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of low-dose aspirin and clopidogrel in clinical practice: a gastrointestinal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Angel; Gargallo, Carla J

    2015-06-01

    Low-dose aspirin, alone or combined with other antiplatelet agents, is increasingly prescribed for cardiovascular prevention. However, the cardiovascular benefits should be evaluated together with the gastrointestinal risks. Low-dose aspirin is associated with upper and lower gastrointestinal injury, although lower gastrointestinal effects are poorly characterized. This gastrointestinal risk differs among antiplatelets drugs users. The most important risk factors are history of peptic ulcer, older age, and concomitant use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or dual antiplatelet therapy. Effective upper gastrointestinal prevention strategies are available and should be used in at-risk patients taking low-dose aspirin or clopidogrel. Proton pump inhibitors seem to be the best gastroprotective agents, whereas the benefits of Helicobacter pylori eradication are still unclear. Low-dose aspirin has additional effects in the gastrointestinal tract. A large body of evidence indicates that it can protect against different cancers, in particular colorectal cancer. This effect could modify the future indications for use of low-dose aspirin and the risk-benefit balance.

  1. Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Circulation My alerts Sign In Join Sign out Facebook Twitter Home About this Journal Editorial Board General Statistics Circulation Doodle Information for Advertisers Author Reprints Commercial Reprints Customer Service and Ordering ...

  2. Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not make sense fear or nervousness dizziness double vision uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body confusion abnormally excited mood hallucination (seeing things or hearing voices that are not ...

  3. Mechanisms of aggregation inhibition by aspirin and nitrate-aspirin prodrugs in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Shona; Inkielewicz-Stepniak, Iwona; Jones, Michael; Ledwidge, Mark; Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Medina, Carlos; Radomski, Marek W; Gilmer, John F

    2012-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay of anti-platelet therapy in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, problems with aspirin safety and resistance demand clinical strategies based on multiple pharmacological approaches. Prodrugs of aspirin may offer beneficial effects in terms of gastro-intestinal safety and multiple pharmacological approaches. However, the pharmacological profile of aspirin prodrugs in human platelets has not been completed yet. We aimed to compare the effects of aspirin and prodrugs of aspirin (1-5) on human platelet aggregation stimulated by ADP and collagen and associated receptor expression (GPIIb/IIIa and P-selectin) in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and washed platelets (WP). As aspirin is released from prodrugs following esterase hydrolysis we studied the expression and activity of butyrylcholineterase (BuChE) and carboxyesterase (CE) in plasma and platelets. The mechanism of prodrug-induced platelet aggregation inhibition was explored by studying the effects of plasma and purified human BuChE on aggregation. Finally, the relative contribution of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity to nitrate-containing prodrugs of aspirin-induced inhibition of aggregation was determined using 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ,) a selective inhibitor of the soluble guanylyl cyclase. ST0702, 2, a nicotinic acid-aspirin codrug was equipotent with aspirin with respect to inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Compound 4, a NO releasing aspirin was the most potent inhibitor of ADP-induced platelet aggregation, an effect partially reversed by ODQ. The platelet inhibitory effects of aspirin prodrugs were time-dependent as the maximal inhibitory effects against collagen-induced aggregation were achieved by aspirin at 2 min, 1 at 5 min and ST0702 at 15 min. The aspirin prodrugs were significantly less potent in WP than in PRP and the reverse was true of aspirin. In the presence of complete BuChE inhibition in PRP, there was almost

  4. [Aspirin: Indications and use during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhomme, N; Doudnikoff, C; Polard, E; Henriot, B; Isly, H; Jego, P

    2017-12-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has been used ever since the Antiquity for its painkilling and anti-inflammatory effects. Its antiplatelet properties have then extended its indications to the field of coronaropathy and vascular cerebral disease, and finally to vascular placental disease. Aspirin has been widely prescribed since the 1980's to prevent pre-eclampsia, intra-uterine growth retardation and fetal death of vascular origin. It has also been proposed to prevent unexplained recurrent miscarriages. Its use during pregnancy is considered as safe, provided the daily doses do not exceed 100mg. Aspirin has been proven efficient to prevent pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction in high-risk patients. The benefits of prescribing aspirin have been demonstrated neither for vascular placental disease prevention in low risk patients, nor in cases of unexplained recurrent miscarriages. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Can common finishing treatments used in chef jacket fabrics improve protection against scald injury?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sushmitha Devarajan; Rachel H McQueen; ShuQin Wen

    2017-01-01

    ... may make them impractical in the kitchen environment. This study examined the effects of common finishing treatments used in chef jacket fabrics and the impact of layers on the protection offered against hot water burn injuries. The Teflon...

  6. of aspirin The use of renal enzymes indication of renal toxicity dose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-30

    Apr 30, 1983 ... Ten volunteers participated in a study comparing the effects on renal enzymes of multiple oral doses of aspirin relative to no treatment. The total urinary output was collected daily for 21 days from all sub- jects. The first 7 days were treatment-free. During the second 7-day period the subjects received.

  7. Synthesis and Chemical and Biological Comparison of Nitroxyl and Nitric Oxide Releasing Diazeniumdiolate-based Aspirin Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basudhar, Debashree; Bharadwaj, Gaurav; Cheng, Robert Y.; Jain, Sarthak; Shi, Sa; Heinecke, Julie L.; Holland, Ryan J.; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Caceres, Viviane M.; Spadari-Bratfisch, Regina C.; Paolocci, Nazareno; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.; Wink, David A.; Miranda, Katrina M.

    2013-01-01

    Structural modifications of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have successfully reduced the side effect of gastrointestinal ulceration without affecting anti-inflammatory activity, but may increase risk of myocardial infarction with chronic use. That nitroxyl (HNO) reduces platelet aggregation, preconditions against myocardial infarction and enhances contractility led us to synthesize a diazeniumdiolate-based HNO releasing aspirin and to compare it to an NO-releasing analogue. Here, the decomposition mechanisms are described for these compounds. In addition to protection against stomach ulceration, these prodrugs also exhibited significantly enhanced cytotoxcity compared to either aspirin or the parent diazeniumdiolate toward non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549) but were not appreciably toxic toward endothelial cells (HUVECs). The HNO-NSAID prodrug inhibited cylcooxgenase-2 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and triggered significant sarcomere shortening compared to control on murine ventricular myocytes. Together, these anti-inflammatory, anti-neoplasic and contractile properties suggest the potential of HNO-NSAIDs in the treatment of inflammation, cancer or heart failure. PMID:24102516

  8. Synthesis and chemical and biological comparison of nitroxyl- and nitric oxide-releasing diazeniumdiolate-based aspirin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basudhar, Debashree; Bharadwaj, Gaurav; Cheng, Robert Y; Jain, Sarthak; Shi, Sa; Heinecke, Julie L; Holland, Ryan J; Ridnour, Lisa A; Caceres, Viviane M; Spadari-Bratfisch, Regina C; Paolocci, Nazareno; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A; Wink, David A; Miranda, Katrina M

    2013-10-24

    Structural modifications of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have successfully reduced the side effect of gastrointestinal ulceration without affecting anti-inflammatory activity, but they may increase the risk of myocardial infarction with chronic use. The fact that nitroxyl (HNO) reduces platelet aggregation, preconditions against myocardial infarction, and enhances contractility led us to synthesize a diazeniumdiolate-based HNO-releasing aspirin and to compare it to an NO-releasing analogue. Here, the decomposition mechanisms are described for these compounds. In addition to protection against stomach ulceration, these prodrugs exhibited significantly enhanced cytotoxcity compared to either aspirin or the parent diazeniumdiolate toward nonsmall cell lung carcinoma cells (A549), but they were not appreciably toxic toward endothelial cells (HUVECs). The HNO-NSAID prodrug inhibited cylcooxgenase-2 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and triggered significant sarcomere shortening on murine ventricular myocytes compared to control. Together, these anti-inflammatory, antineoplasic, and contractile properties suggest the potential of HNO-NSAIDs in the treatment of inflammation, cancer, or heart failure.

  9. Impact of aspirin and statins on long-term survival in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction complicated by heart failure: an analysis of 1706 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinter, Christian; Bland, John M; Crouch, Simon; Cleland, John G F; Doherty, Patrick; LeWinter, Martin M; Køber, Lars; Hall, Alistair S; Gale, Christopher P

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin and statins are established therapies for acute myocardial infarction (MI), but their benefits in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) remain elusive. We investigated the impact of aspirin and statins on long-term survival in patients hospitalized with acute MI complicated by HF. Of 4251 patients in the Evaluation of Methods and Management of Acute Coronary Events (EMMACE)-1 and -2 observational studies, 1706 patients had HF. A propensity score-matching method estimated the average treatment effects (ATEs) of aspirin and statins on survival over 90 months. ATEs were calculated as relative risk differences in all-cause mortality comparing patients receiving aspirin and statins with controls, respectively. Moreover, combined aspirin and statins vs. none (ATE I), aspirin or statins vs. none (ATE II), and aspirin and statins vs. aspirin or statins (ATE III) were assessed. The median survival times of the ATE I, ATE II and ATE III were 25, 50, and 85 months, respectively. Regarding aspirin, the ATE was significantly improved at 6, 12, and 90 months [ATE 6 months: 10%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3-18%], where the ATE of statins favoured survival at 1-24 months (ATE 1 month: 5%, 95% CI 0.3-10%). Mortality was lower at 1, 6, and 24 months in those who received aspirin and statins (ATE I). When the combination was compared with either treatment alone, an effect persisted between 6 and 90 months (ATE III). In patients with acute MI complicated by HF, prescription of aspirin and statins either alone or together was associated with better long-term survival. © 2013 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2013 European Society of Cardiology.

  10. Vitamin D-Binding Protein Acts in the Actin Scavenge System and Can Have Increased Expression During Aspirin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziquan; Gao, Jifang; Ma, Yongchen; Li, Zongze; Wang, Miaomiao; Qin, Zhaoyu; Yang, Mingchong; Liu, Shilian

    2016-01-01

    While the clinical efficacy of aspirin in cerebral thrombosis prevention has been well established, its mechanism of action is still controversial. In an effort to better understand these mechanisms and to identify potential biomarkers, comparative proteomic analysis between 18 patients both pre-aspirin treatment at the time of cerebral thrombotic onset (control group) and post-aspirin treatment (experiment group) was carried out using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDITOF/ MS). Of the 228 2-DE identified differentially expressed protein spots, 11 proteins showed more than a 1.5-fold difference. Of these, vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) and actin were further examined via Western blot and showed consistent results, with DBP levels significantly increased post-aspirin treatment (114.04 ± 16.69) relative to pre-treatment (66.33 ± 5.61) while actin showed the opposite trend (p aspirin therapy in cerebral thrombotic patients. These findings also suggest that aspirin may prevent platelet aggregation and thrombosis through the actions of DBP and other DBP related proteins.

  11. Aspirin in venous leg ulcer study (ASPiVLU): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Carolina D; Barker, Anna; Darby, Ian; Haines, Terrence; Underwood, Martin; Ward, Stephanie; Aldons, Pat; Dapiran, Elizabeth; Madan, Jason J; Loveland, Paula; Sinha, Sankar; Vicaretti, Mauro; Wolfe, Rory; Woodward, Michael; McNeil, John

    2016-04-11

    Venous leg ulceration is a common and costly problem that is expected to worsen as the population ages. Current treatment is compression therapy; however, up to 50 % of ulcers remain unhealed after 2 years, and ulcer recurrence is common. New treatments are needed to address those wounds that are more challenging to heal. Targeting the inflammatory processes present in venous ulcers is a possible strategy. Limited evidence suggests that a daily dose of aspirin may be an effective adjunct to aid ulcer healing and reduce recurrence. The Aspirin in Venous Leg Ulcer study (ASPiVLU) will investigate whether 300-mg oral doses of aspirin improve time to healing. This randomised, double-blinded, multicentre, placebo-controlled, clinical trial will recruit participants with venous leg ulcers from community settings and hospital outpatient wound clinics across Australia. Two hundred sixty-eight participants with venous leg ulcers will be randomised to receive either aspirin or placebo, in addition to compression therapy, for 24 weeks. The primary outcome is time to healing within 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes are ulcer recurrence, wound pain, quality of life and wellbeing, adherence to study medication, adherence to compression therapy, serum inflammatory markers, hospitalisations, and adverse events at 24 weeks. The ASPiVLU trial will investigate the efficacy and safety of aspirin as an adjunct to compression therapy to treat venous leg ulcers. Study completion is anticipated to occur in December 2018. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12614000293662.

  12. Polypill for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases part 2. LC-MS/TOF characterization of interaction/degradation products of atenolol/lisinopril and aspirin, and mechanisms of formation thereof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Malik, Satish; Singh, Saranjit

    2008-11-04

    A polypill for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is under development. It is proposed to contain a combination of antithrombotic agent (aspirin), low-dose blood pressure lowering agents, i.e., angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril), one among a beta-blocker (atenolol) or diuretic (hydrochlorothiazide), and a statin (simvastatin/atorvastatin/pravatsatin, etc.). Due to the presence of multiple drugs in the same formulation, there is a strong likelihood of interaction among the drugs and/or their products. In a previous study, we observed formation of a number of interaction/degradation products from atenolol and lisinopril in the presence of aspirin. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to characterize the resolved products using high resolution mass spectrometric and fragmentation analyses using a LC-MS/TOF system. Initially, studies were carried out on the drugs (atenolol, lisinopril and aspirin) to establish their complete fragmentation pattern. These studies were then extended to degraded samples to postulate the structures of interaction/degradation products. The characterized structures were justified through mechanistic explanations.

  13. Pengaruh lama pemberian aspirin pada ekspresi protein KI-67 dan ketebalan epitel mukosa rongga mulut tikus Wistar jantan (The effect of aspirin administration period on KI-67 expression protein and oral epithelial mucosal thickness in male Wistar mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Yosi Arinawati

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aspirin has been widely used as an anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, and analgesics drugs. It has seriously side effects like gastrointestinal ulceration, delayed healing ulcer, and oral mucosal ulceration when Aspirin is administered for long time. Purpose: The aim of study was to examine the effect of Aspirin administration period on Kiehl-67 (KI-67 protein expressions and oral mucosal epithelial thickness in male Wistar mice. Methods: Experimental laboratory study with post-test only control group design was performed and 40 male Wistar mice were used in this experiment. The samples were divided into 2 groups. Group I was treated with Aspirin, whereas group II was receive aquadest. Each group was divided into 5 subgroups for assessment of the length administration effect. All of mice were sacrificed on day 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 after treatment. Aspirin was orally administrated with doses of 9 mg/kg body weight. The buccal right of mice oral mucosal tissue was sliced and delivered for immunohistochemistry staining using anti-KI-67. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining was performed to measure the oral epithelial thickness. Examination of KI-67 expressions and oral epithelial thickness were performed by using ImageJ software. Two-way Anova and Kruskall-Wallis test were carried-out for data analysis with significant level of 95%. Results: The results revealed that the administration of Aspirin in mice on day 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 was markedly decreased in the KI-67 protein expressions and oral epithelial thickness compared with that of control (p<0.05, otherwise the duration of Aspirin administration did not affect mucosal epithelial thickness. Conclusion: Aspirin administration period has the potential to suppress the KI-67 protein expression within 10 days; the effect in line with the length of duration. The epithelial thickness was not influenced by the length of Aspirin administration.Latar belakang: Aspirin digunakan sebagai anti inflamasi

  14. Low-dose aspirin use and survival in breast cancer patients: A nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Menamin, Úna C; Cardwell, Chris R; Hughes, Carmel M; Murray, Liam J

    2017-04-01

    Preclinical evidence from breast cancer cell lines and animal models suggest that aspirin could have anti-cancer properties. In a large breast cancer patient cohort, we investigated whether post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use was associated with a reduction in the risk of breast cancer-specific mortality. We identified 15,140 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients within the Scottish Cancer Registry. Linkages to the Scottish Prescribing Information System provided data on dispensed medications and breast cancer-specific deaths were identified from National Records of Scotland Death Records. Time-dependent Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% CIs for breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality by post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use. HRs were adjusted for a range of potential confounders including age at diagnosis, year of diagnosis, cancer stage, grade, cancer treatments received, comorbidities, socioeconomic status and use of statins. Secondary analysis investigated the association between pre-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use and breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. Post-diagnostic users of low-dose aspirin appeared to have increased breast cancer-specific mortality compared with non-users (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.26, 1.65) but this association was entirely attenuated after adjustment for potential confounders (adjusted HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.75, 1.14). Findings were similar in analysis by increasing duration of use and in analysis of pre-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use. In this large nationwide study of breast cancer patients, we found little evidence of an association between post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use and cancer-specific mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Exhaled Eicosanoids following Bronchial Aspirin Challenge in Asthma Patients with and without Aspirin Hypersensitivity: The Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalerz, L.; Sanak, M.; Kumik, J.; Gawlewicz-Mroczka, A.; Celejewska-Wójcik, N.; Ćmiel, A.; Szczeklik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Special regulatory role of eicosanoids has been postulated in aspirin-induced asthma. Objective. To investigate effects of aspirin on exhaled breath condensate (EBC) levels of eicosanoids in patients with asthma. Methods. We determined EBC eicosanoid concentrations using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS2) or both. Determinations were performed at baseline and following bronchial aspirin challenge, in two well-defined phenotypes of asthma: aspirin-sensitive and aspirin-tolerant patients. Results. Aspirin precipitated bronchial reactions in all aspirin-sensitive, but in none of aspirin-tolerant patients (ATAs). At baseline, eicosanoids profile did not differ between both asthma groups except for lipoxygenation products: 5- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-, 15-HETE) which were higher in aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) than inaspirin-tolerant subjects. Following aspirin challenge the total levels of cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs) remained unchanged in both groups. The dose of aspirin had an effect on magnitude of the response of the exhaled cys-LTs and prostanoids levels only in AIA subjects. Conclusion. The high baseline eicosanoid profiling of lipoxygenation products 5- and 15-HETE in EBC makes it possible to detect alterations in aspirin-sensitive asthma. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes, and eoxins levels in EBC after bronchial aspirin administration in stable asthma patients cannot be used as a reliable diagnostic index for aspirin hypersensitivity. PMID:22291720

  16. Exhaled Eicosanoids following Bronchial Aspirin Challenge in Asthma Patients with and without Aspirin Hypersensitivity: The Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mastalerz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Special regulatory role of eicosanoids has been postulated in aspirin-induced asthma. Objective. To investigate effects of aspirin on exhaled breath condensate (EBC levels of eicosanoids in patients with asthma. Methods. We determined EBC eicosanoid concentrations using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS2 or both. Determinations were performed at baseline and following bronchial aspirin challenge, in two well-defined phenotypes of asthma: aspirin-sensitive and aspirin-tolerant patients. Results. Aspirin precipitated bronchial reactions in all aspirin-sensitive, but in none of aspirin-tolerant patients (ATAs. At baseline, eicosanoids profile did not differ between both asthma groups except for lipoxygenation products: 5- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-, 15-HETE which were higher in aspirin-induced asthma (AIA than inaspirin-tolerant subjects. Following aspirin challenge the total levels of cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs remained unchanged in both groups. The dose of aspirin had an effect on magnitude of the response of the exhaled cys-LTs and prostanoids levels only in AIA subjects. Conclusion. The high baseline eicosanoid profiling of lipoxygenation products 5- and 15-HETE in EBC makes it possible to detect alterations in aspirin-sensitive asthma. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes, and eoxins levels in EBC after bronchial aspirin administration in stable asthma patients cannot be used as a reliable diagnostic index for aspirin hypersensitivity.

  17. Clinical Outcomes and Bioprosthetic Valve Function After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Under Dual Antiplatelet Therapy vs. Aspirin Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichibori, Yasuhiro; Mizote, Isamu; Maeda, Koichi; Onishi, Toshinari; Ohtani, Tomohito; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Torikai, Kei; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Nakatani, Satoshi; Sakata, Yasushi

    2017-02-24

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is commonly used after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI); however, the supporting evidence is limited. To determine if aspirin alone is a better alternative to DAPT, we compared the outcomes of patients treated with DAPT or aspirin alone after TAVI.Methods and Results:We analyzed a total of 144 consecutive patients (92 females, mean age 83±6 years) who underwent implantation of a balloon-expandable transcatheter valve (SAPIEN or SAPIEN XT, Edwards Lifesciences). Patients were divided into DAPT (n=66) or aspirin-alone treatment groups (n=78). At 1 year after TAVI, the composite endpoint, which consisted of all-cause death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and major or life-threatening bleeding complications, occurred significantly less frequently (Kaplan-Meier analysis) in the aspirin-alone group (15.4%) than in the DAPT group (30.3%; P=0.031). Valve function assessed by echocardiography was similar between the 2 treatment groups with respect to effective orifice area (1.78±0.43 cm2in DAPT vs. 1.91±0.46 cm2in aspirin-alone group; P=0.13) and transvalvular pressure gradient (11.1±3.5 mmHg in DAPT vs. 10.3±4.1 mmHg in aspirin-alone group; P=0.31). Treatment with aspirin alone after TAVI had greater safety benefits and was associated with similar valve function as DAPT. These results suggest that treatment with aspirin alone is an acceptable regimen for TAVI patients.

  18. Is clopidogrel better than aspirin following breakthrough strokes while on aspirin? A retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng; Wu, Yi-Ling; Saver, Jeffrey L; Lee, Hsuei-Chen; Lee, Jiann-Der; Chang, Ku-Chou; Wu, Chih-Ying; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Wang, Hui-Hsuan; Rao, Neal M; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is insufficient evidence on which to base a recommendation for optimal antiplatelet therapy following a stroke while on aspirin. The objective was to compare clopidogrel initiation vs aspirin reinitiation for vascular risk reduction among patients with ischaemic stroke on aspirin at the time of their index stroke. Design Retrospective. Setting We conducted a nationwide cohort study by retrieving all hospitalised patients (≥18 years) with a primary diagnosis of ischaemic stroke between 2003 and 2009 from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Participants Among 3862 patients receiving aspirin before the index ischaemic stroke and receiving either aspirin or clopidogrel after index stroke during follow-up period, 1623 were excluded due to a medication possession ratio aspirin was prescribed during the follow-up period. Follow-up was from time of the index stroke to admission for recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction, death or the end of 2010. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary end point was hospitalisation due to a new-onset major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE: composite of any stroke or myocardial infarction). The leading secondary end point was any recurrent stroke. Results Compared to aspirin, clopidogrel was associated with a lower occurrence of future MACE (HR=0.54, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.68, paspirin, clopidogrel initiation was associated with fewer recurrent vascular events than aspirin reinitiation. PMID:25468508

  19. Sulphide oxidation in ornamental slates: protective treatment with siloxanes

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    Rivas, T.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the results of the measurement of the effectiveness of two silanes-siloxanes based products applied on roofing slates with the aim of slowing down the oxidation of the iron sulphide inclusions. The products were applied by immersion and spraying and also at different dilutions. The effectiveness of the treatments were evaluated by means of static contact angle measurements and water absorption coefficient variations; also, the durability under thermal cycles and the colour variations before treatment and before UVA exposition were tested. In all the cases, a very low product consumptions were obtained, due to the particular porous system of these rocks; also, any of the treatments increased the static angle. Nevertheless, the products tested remarkably increased the resistance of sulphides to the oxidation during thermal cycles without producing important changes in rock colour and also they have shown a good durability under UVA exposition

    En este trabajo se presentan los resultados de la medida de la eficacia de dos silanos-siloxanos aplicados en pizarras de techar con el objetivo de reducir la oxidación de las inclusiones de sulfuros de hierro. Los productos fueron aplicados por inmersión y spray a diferentes concentraciones. La efectividad de los tratamientos fue evaluada mediante la medida del ángulo de contacto estático y las variaciones del coeficiente de absorción de agua y su durabilidad mediante ciclos térmicos y de exposición a luz ultravioleta. A pesar del bajo consumo de ambos productos, debido al particular sistema poroso de estas rocas, y del bajo incremento del ángulo de contacto, ambos silanos-siloxanos incrementan notablemente la resistencia de los sulfuros a la oxidación durante los ciclos térmicos sin producir cambios relevantes en el color de la roca y muestran una aceptable durabilidad bajo la luz ultravioleta.

  20. Safety and efficacy of warfarin plus aspirin combination therapy for giant coronary artery aneurysm secondary to Kawasaki disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Danyan; Wang, Kai; Qin, Suyuan; Pang, Yusheng

    2014-01-01

    To compare the safety and efficacy of warfarin plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for the treatment of children with giant coronary artery aneurysm (CAA) secondary to Kawasaki disease (KD). We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CNKI, WANFAN and VIP databases. We selected case-controlled trials of warfarin plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for the treatment of children with giant CAA secondary to KD. Six retrospective studies met our inclusion criteria. There was no significant difference between the warfarin plus aspirin and aspirin alone groups in the rate of CAA regression (OR 1.38, 95% CI 0.52-3.68, p = 0.52) or the incidence of persistent CAA (OR 2.34, 95% CI 0.16-33.50, p = 0.53), coronary artery stenosis (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.18-1.72, p = 0.30) or thrombus formation (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.15-1.69, p = 0.26). There was evidence that warfarin plus aspirin reduced the incidence of coronary artery occlusion (OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.02-0.29, p aspirin therapy reduced the incidence of occlusion, cardiac infarction and death in children with giant CAA secondary to KD. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Gastroprotective effects of combination of hot water extracts of turmeric (Curcuma domestica L.), cardamom pods (Ammomum compactum S.) and sembung leaf (Blumea balsamifera DC.) against aspirin-induced gastric ulcer model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutmainah; Susilowati, Rina; Rahmawati, Nuning; Nugroho, Agung Endro

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the protective effect of the combination of turmeric (Curcuma domestica), cardamom pods (Amomum compactum) and sembung leaf (Blumea balsamifera) on gastric mucosa in aspirin-induced gastric ulcer model rats. Thirty male Wistar rats weighing 150-200 g were divided into 6 groups. Four groups were administered with the hot water extracts combination consisted of cardamom pods 36.6 mg/200 g body weight and sembung leaf 91.5 mg/200 g body weight (fixed doses). The herbal extracts combination were also consisted of turmeric in various doses i.e. 10 mg/200 g body weight in the second group, 30 mg/200 g body weight in the first and third groups, and 50 mg/200 g body weight in the fourth group. The fifth group rats received sucralfate 72 mg /200 g body weight. Ten minutes after receiving herbal extracts combinations or sucralfate, the rats were induced with aspirin 90 mg/200 g body weight except the first group. Another group (sixth group) only received aspirin without any protective agent. All treatments were adsministered orally for seven days. The number and area of the gastric ulcers were counted and measured macroscopically. Score of mucosal damage and the number of eosinophils as well as the number of mast cells were observed in paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin eosin and toluidine blue, respectively. The groups receiving herbal infuse combination exhibited less number and smaller area of gastric ulcers as well as smaller score of mucosal damage in comparison to those of aspirin group (Pturmeric (Curcuma domestica), cardamom pods (Amomum compactum) and sembung leaf (Blumea balsamifera) has potential gastroprotective effects.

  2. Aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease: Current topics and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, José Carlos; Moreno-Paz, Fernanda Judith; Terán, Luis Manuel; Guaní-Guerra, Eduardo

    2018-02-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease is a chronic and treatment-resistant disease, characterized by the presence of eosinophilic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyposis, bronchial asthma, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs hypersensitivity. Alterations in arachidonic acid metabolism may induce an imbalance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory substances, expressed as an overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and an underproduction of prostaglandin E2. Although eosinophils play a key role, recent studies have shown the importance of other cells and molecules in the development of the disease like mast cells, basophils, lymphocytes, platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, epithelial respiratory cells, IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin, making each of them promissory diagnostic and treatment targets. In this review, we summarize the most important clinical aspects of the disease, including the current topics about diagnosis and treatment, like provocation challenges and aspirin desensitization. We also discuss recent findings in the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as future trends in diagnosis and treatment, including monoclonal antibodies and a low salicylate diet as a treatment option. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pharmacodynamic effects of a new fixed-dose clopidogrel-aspirin combination compared with separate administration of clopidogrel and aspirin in patients treated with coronary stents: The ACCEL-COMBO trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jin-Sin; Park, Yongwhi; Tantry, Udaya S; Ahn, Jong-Hwa; Kang, Min Gyu; Kim, Kyehwan; Jang, Jeong Yoon; Park, Hyun Woong; Park, Jeong Rang; Hwang, Seok-Jae; Kwak, Choong Hwan; Hwang, Jin-Yong; Gurbel, Paul A; Jeong, Young-Hoon

    2017-03-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with clopidogrel and aspirin is a widely prescribed regimen to prevent ischemic events in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A fixed-dose combination (FDC) capsule (HCP0911) has been developed to provide dosing convenience and improve adherence. We compared the antiplatelet effects of single daily dose HCP0911 with separate treatment with daily 75 mg clopidogrel plus 100 mg aspirin. This was a randomized, open-label, two-period, crossover, non-inferiority study conducted in stented patients who had been treated for at least 6 months with clopidogrel and aspirin. Thirty patients were randomly assigned to receive either daily 75 mg clopidogrel plus 100 mg aspirin treatment or HCP0911 for 2 weeks and then were crossed over to the other treatment for 2 weeks. Pharmacodynamic effects were measured with VerifyNow, light transmittance aggregometry (LTA), and thromboelastography (TEG®). The primary endpoint was P2Y12 Reaction Units (PRU) measured by VerifyNow. PRUs during treatment with HCP0911 were not inferior to those during separate treatment (202 ± 52 vs. 207 ± 60 PRU; mean difference, -5 PRU; 90% confidence interval of difference, -23 to 13 PRU; P for non-inferiority = 0.015 for predetermined limit). "BASE" and Aspirin Reaction Units by VerifyNow did not differ between the two treatments. During each treatment, there were no differences in maximal and final platelet aggregations by LTA (all P values ≥0.822) and TEG® measurements. In conclusion, in stented patients, the antiplatelet effect of a fixed-dose clopidogrel-aspirin combination, HCP0911, was not inferior to separate administration of clopidogrel and aspirin.

  4. Aspirin ameliorates cerebral infarction through regulation of TLR4/NF‑κB‑mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Shen, Bin; Sun, Dezhou; Cui, Xiangyu

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral infarction is a cerebrovascular disease caused by local brain ischemic necrosis or softening, which is associated with diabetes, obesity, hypertension and rheumatic heart arrhythmia. Previous studies have indicated that aspirin is a potential oral anticoagulant in the treatment of cerebral ischemic stroke. However, the potential mechanism mediated by aspirin in cerebral infarction therapy is not well understood. The present study analyzed the therapeutic effects of aspirin on cerebral infarction and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism of aspirin‑ameliorated benefits for thrombolysis. The results demonstrated that aspirin inhibited inflammation and apoptosis of cerebrovascular endothelial cells in a mouse model of cerebral infarction. Aspirin treatment suppressed toll‑like receptor (TLR)4 and nuclear factor (NF)‑κB expression in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was suppressed by aspirin treatment through the downregulation of protein kinase R‑like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 subunit 1 and C/EBP homologous protein expression levels in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. It was identified that knockdown of TLR4 inhibited aspirin‑mediated downregulation of NF‑κB signaling pathway and ER stress in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. Expression levels of adenosine diphosphate plasminogen activator inhibitors, von Willebrand factor and thromboxane were downregulated in cerebrovascular endothelial cells and in serum in experimental mice. The results demonstrated that aspirin was beneficial forthrombolysis by decreasing thrombin‑activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor and plasminogen activator inhibitor‑1 expression in a mouse model of cerebral infarction. These results suggested that aspirin may improve cerebral infarction by downregulating TLR4/NF‑κB‑mediated ER stress in a mouse model.

  5. Antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel compared with aspirin after myocardial infarction: enhanced inhibitory effects of combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshfegh, K; Redondo, M; Julmy, F; Wuillemin, W A; Gebauer, M U; Haeberli, A; Meyer, B J

    2000-09-01

    We sought to compare the inhibitory effects of the combination of two doses of aspirin plus clopidogrel with either drug alone on platelet aggregation and activation. Enhanced platelet inhibitory effects of clopidogrel by aspirin on platelet aggregation and activation are suggested by experimental studies but have not been shown in humans. The effects of clopidogrel 75 mg or aspirin 100 (300) mg on platelet aggregation and activation by flow cytometry after stimulation with various agonists were determined in 30 patients with a past history of myocardial infarction. Clopidogrel alone or in combination with aspirin markedly inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-mediated platelet aggregation compared with monotherapy with aspirin (24.6 +/- 3.3% or 26.6 +/- 2.7% vs. 44.7 +/- 2.9%; p after stimulation with ADP or thrombin (p after activation with low dose thrombin (p after stimulation with collagen and thrombin compared with monotherapies. Thus, this dual antiplatelet treatment strategy deserves further evaluation in clinical trials for secondary prevention of acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina.

  6. Prediction of preeclampsia by placental protein 13 and background risk factors and its prevention by aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiri, Hamutal; Sammar, Marei; Herzog, Ayelet; Grimpel, Yael-Inna; Fihaman, Galina; Cohen, Aliza; Kivity, Vered; Sharabi-Nov, Adi; Gonen, Ron

    2014-09-01

    Evaluation of placental protein 13 (PP13) and risk factors (RFs) as markers for predicting preeclampsia (PE) and use of aspirin for PE prevention. First-trimester pregnancy screening was based on having PP13 level ≤0.4 multiple of the median (MoM) and/or at least one major risk factor (RF) for PE. Management was by routine care or combined with daily treatment with 75 mg aspirin between 14 and 35 weeks of gestation. Of 820 deliveries, 63 women developed PE (7.7%). Median PP13 levels was 0.2MoM in the PE group compared with 0.83MoM among unaffected and 1.0MoM in unaffected not treated with aspirin (Pprevention by aspirin was most effective when the risk was determined by low PP13 alone, less effective for combining low PP13 with RFs, and ineffective when determined by RFs alone. When PE risk is determined by low first trimester PP13 or by combined low PP13 and RFs, prevention with aspirin is warranted.

  7. Aspirin and low-molecular weight heparin combination therapy effectively prevents recurrent miscarriage in hyperhomocysteinemic women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratip Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The management of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL still remains a great challenge, and women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS are at a greater risk for spontaneous abortion. Treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH has become an accepted treatment option for women with RPL; however, the subgroup of women, who are likely to respond to LMWH, has not been precisely identified. The present study evaluated the efficacy of LMWH with reference to PCOS and associated metabolic phenotypes including hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy, insulin resistance (IR and obesity. This prospective observational study was conducted at Institute of Reproductive Medicine, Kolkata, India. A total of 967 women with history of 2 or more consecutive first trimester abortions were screened and 336 were selected for the study. The selected patients were initially divided on the basis of presence or absence of PCOS, while subsequent stratification was based on HHcy, IR and/or obesity. The subjects had treatment with aspirin during one conception cycle and aspirin-LMWH combined anticoagulant therapy for the immediate next conception cycle, if the first treated cycle was unsuccessful. Pregnancy salvage was the sole outcome measure. The overall rate of pregnancy salvage following aspirin therapy was 43.15%, which was mostly represented by normohomocysteinemic women, while the salvage rate was lower in the HHcy populations irrespective of the presence or absence of PCOS, IR, or obesity. By contrast, aspirin-LMWH combined therapy could rescue 66.84% pregnancies in the aspirin-failed cases. Logistic regression analyses showed that HHcy remained a significant factor in predicting salvage rates in the PCOS, IR, and obese subpopulations controlled for other confounding factors. With regard to pregnancy salvage, combined anticoagulant therapy with aspirin and LMWH conferred added benefit to those with HHcy phenotype.

  8. Aspirin Inhibits Degenerative Changes of Aneurysmal Wall in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengjie; Wang, Dehui; Tian, Ye; Wei, Huijie; Zhou, Ziwei; Liu, Li; Wang, Dong; Dong, Jing-Fei; Jiang, Rongcai; Zhang, Jianning

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage still has a high mortality and morbidity despite notable advances in surgical approaches to cerebral aneurysm (CA). We examined the role of aspirin in vascular inflammation and degeneration. CA was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by ligating left common carotid artery and bilateral posterior renal arteries with or without aspirin treatment. The right anterior cerebral artery/olfactory artery (ACA/OA) bifurcations were stripped and assessed morphologically after Verhoeff's Van Gieson staining. Blood sample was obtained to examine circulating CD34(+) CD133(+) endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), platelet aggregation and platelet counts. Macrophages infiltration in aneurysmal wall was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 (MMP-2 and 9), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was examined by RT-PCR. 2 months after CA induction, surgically treated rats manifested aneurysmal degeneration in ACA/OA bifurcations. Aspirin-treated rats exhibited a significant decrease in degradation of internal elastic lamina (IEL), medial layer thinning, CA size and macrophages infiltration with reduced expression of MMP-2 and 9 compared with rats in the CA group. RT-PCR demonstrated that the upregulation of NF-κB, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 after CA induction was reversed by aspirin treatment. Aspirin treatment following CA induction increased circulating EPCs to near control levels and reduced platelet aggregation without changing platelet counts. The evidence suggested that aspirin significantly reduced degeneration of aneurysm walls by inhibiting macrophages-mediated chronic inflammation and mobilizing EPCs.

  9. EB/UV treatment of protective coatings for porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bemporad, E.; Carassiti, F.; Tata, A.; Gallinaro, G.; Paris, M

    2000-03-01

    A method for improving surface properties of porous inorganic materials is presented. The method is particularly tailored to cement-based materials in order to obtain properties suitable for mechanical applications such as dies manufacturing, where hardness, abrasion resistance and low friction are requested. The coating system is based upon using two coatings of different characteristics. The underlying base coating layer is infiltrated in air on three different formulations of hardened cement composite. Two different bi-component resins, one relatively soft and the other relatively hard, were tested as underlying surface coating. The outer surface coating, based upon a bi-component resin characterized by high hardness, is added after hardening and curing of the first layer. Both coatings were chemically hardened and then cured with EB. UV curing is also suitable for the outer surface coating. An experimental campaign was carried out in order to evaluate the influence of radiation processing as curing treatment with reference to particular investigated materials. Hardness and resistance to peeling of coating systems have been measured and are presented. (author)

  10. EB/UV treatment of protective coatings for porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemporad, E.; Carassiti, F.; Tata, A.; Gallinaro, G.; Paris, M.

    2000-03-01

    A method for improving surface properties of porous inorganic materials is presented. The method is particularly tailored to cement-based materials in order to obtain properties suitable for mechanical applications such as dies manufacturing, where hardness, abrasion resistance and low friction are requested. The coating system is based upon using two coatings of different characteristics. The underlying base coating layer is infiltrated in air on three different formulations of hardened cement composite. Two different bi-component resins, one relatively soft and the other relatively hard, were tested as underlying surface coating. The outer surface coating, based upon a bi-component resin characterized by high hardness, is added after hardening and curing of the first layer. Both coatings were chemically hardened and then cured with EB. UV curing is also suitable for the outer surface coating. An experimental campaign was carried out in order to evaluate the influence of radiation processing as curing treatment with reference to particular investigated materials. Hardness and resistance to peeling of coating systems have been measured and are presented.

  11. Pharmacokinetics and relative bioavailability of fixed-dose combination of clopidogrel and aspirin versus coadministration of individual formulations in healthy Korean men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyang-Ki; Ghim, Jong-Lyul; Shon, Jihong; Choi, Young-Kyung; Jung, Jin Ah

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous prescription of clopidogrel and low-dose aspirin is recommended for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome because of improvements in efficacy and patient compliance. In this study, the pharmacokinetics of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of clopidogrel and aspirin was compared with coadministration of individual formulations to clarify the equivalence of the FDC. This was a randomized, open-label, two-period, two-treatment, crossover study in healthy Korean men aged 20-55 years. Subjects received two FDC capsules of clopidogrel/aspirin 75/100 mg (test) or two tablets of clopidogrel 75 mg and two capsules of aspirin 100 mg (reference) with a 14-day washout period. Plasma concentrations of clopidogrel, aspirin, and salicylic acid were measured using validated ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Bioequivalence was assessed by analysis of variance and calculation of the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the ratios of the geometric means (GMRs) for AUClast and Cmax for clopidogrel and aspirin. Sixty healthy subjects were enrolled, and 53 completed the study. Clopidogrel, aspirin, and salicylic acid showed similar absorption profiles and no significant differences in Cmax, AUClast, and Tmax between FDC administration and coadministration of individual formulations. The GMRs (90% CI) for the Cmax and AUClast of clopidogrel were 1.08 (0.95, 1.23) and 0.93 (0.84, 1.03), respectively. The GMRs (90% CI) for the Cmax and AUClast of aspirin were 0.98 (0.84, 1.13) and 0.98 (0.93, 1.04), respectively. Both treatments were well tolerated in the study subjects. The FDC of clopidogrel and aspirin was bioequivalent to coadministration of each individual formulation. The FDC capsule exhibited similar safety and tolerability profiles to the individual formulations. Therefore, clopidogrel/aspirin 75 mg/100 mg FDC capsules can be prescribed to improve patient compliance.

  12. Clopidogrel plus long-term aspirin after femoro-popliteal stenting. The CLAFS project: 1- and 2-year results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Ernst-Peter K.; Boos, Irene B.L.; Goettmann, Dieter; Vetter, Sylvia [Department of Imaging, Interventional Radiology, and Nuclear Medicine, Diakonissen Hospital, Diakonissenstrasse 28, 76199, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the patency rate after femoro-popliteal stenting followed by oral clopidogrel plus long-term aspirin. In a prospective trial, 31 patients with a total of 33 femoro-popliteal artery lesions (21 stenoses, 12 occlusions; 24 femoral, 9 popliteal) were treated with flexible tantalum stents after unsuccessful percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) preceded by local fibrinolysis in 5 of 12 patients with total occlusion. Post-interventionally, oral aspirin 100 mg was started simultaneously for the long term and was combined with an oral loading dose of 300 mg clopidogrel, followed by 75 mg clopidogrel daily for 28 days. Patients were followed for at least 12 months (maximum 34 months) by clinical examination, Doppler pressure measurement, color and duplex sonography, and angiography in case of suspicion of restenosis. In a retrospective analysis, the results were compared with those of historical groups of patients having received aspirin only (41 patients) or a long-term high-dose low molecular weight heparin (LMWH)+aspirin treatment (42 patients). Three small puncture aneurysms were treated successfully by conservative means and were categorized as minor bleeding complication. Cumulative primary patency rate (PPR) was 76{+-}7.5% (1 year), and 70{+-}9.6% (2 years) in the clopidogrel+aspirin group, thus being tendentiously better than in the aspirin-only group showing 75{+-}4.6% (1 year), and 50{+-}8.1% (2 years). Long-term high-dose LMWH+aspirin treatment showed 87{+-}5.8% (1 year), and 72{+-}9.1% (2 years), thus being superior to the other treatment regimes, with a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between the LMWH+aspirin and the aspirin group. Clopidogrel plus aspirin is a safe medication regimen and may be effective in the prevention of early stent thrombosis. Mid- and long-term patency rate seems to be intermediate as compared with other therapeutic regimens. The LMWH+aspirin seems to be superior compared with

  13. Relation of aspirin failure to clinical outcome and to platelet response to aspirin in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigel, Roy; Hod, Hanoch; Fefer, Paul; Asher, Elad; Novikov, Ilia; Shenkman, Boris; Savion, Naphtaly; Varon, David; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2011-02-01

    Aspirin failure, defined as occurrence of an acute coronary syndrome despite aspirin use, has been associated with a higher cardiovascular risk profile and worse prognosis. Whether this phenomenon is a manifestation of patient characteristics or failure of adequate platelet inhibition by aspirin has never been studied. We evaluated 174 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction. Of them, 118 (68%) were aspirin naive and 56 (32%) were regarded as having aspirin failure. Platelet function was analyzed after ≥72 hours of aspirin therapy in all patients. Platelet reactivity was studied by light-transmitted aggregometry and under flow conditions. Six-month incidence of major adverse coronary events (death, recurrent acute coronary syndrome, and/or stroke) was determined. Those with aspirin failure were older (p = 0.002), more hypertensive (p aspirin-failure group (14.3% vs 2.5% p aspirin failure had lower arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation (32 ± 24 vs 45 ± 30, p = 0.003) after aspirin therapy compared to their aspirin-naive counterparts. However, this was not significant after adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics (p = 0.82). Similarly, there were no significant differences in adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation and platelet deposition under flow conditions. In conclusion, our results suggest that aspirin failure is merely a marker of higher-risk patient profiles and not a manifestation of inadequate platelet response to aspirin therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nitric oxide-releasing aspirin but not conventional aspirin improves healing of experimental colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolinska-Wcislo, Malgorzata; Brzozowski, Tomasz; Ptak-Belowska, Agata; Targosz, Aneta; Urbanczyk, Katarzyna; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Sliwowski, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, selective COX-2 inhibitors and nitric oxide (NO)-releasing aspirin in the healing of ulcerative colitis. METHODS: Rats with 2,4,6 trinitrobenzenesulfon-ic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis received intragastric (ig) treatment with vehicle, aspirin (ASA) (a non-selective COX inhibitor), celecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) or NO-releasing ASA for a period of ten days. The area of colonic lesions, colonic blood flow (CBF), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and expression of proinflammatory markers COX-2, inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were assessed. The effects of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a NO donor, and 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-4,4,5,5-​tetramethyl-1H-imidazolyl-1-oxy-3-oxide, onopotassium salt (carboxy-PTIO), a NO scavenger, administered without and with ASA or NO-ASA, and the involvement of capsaicin-sensitive afferent nerves in the mechanism of healing the experimental colitis was also determined. RESULTS: Rats with colitis developed macroscopic and microscopic colonic lesions accompanied by a significant decrease in the CBF, a significant rise in colonic weight, MPO activity and plasma IL-1β and TNF-α levels. These effects were aggravated by ASA and 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazole (SC-560), but not celecoxib and counteracted by concurrent treatment with a synthetic prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) analog. Treatment with NO-ASA dose-dependently accelerated colonic healing followed by a rise in plasma NOx content and CBF, suppression of MPO and downregulation of COX-2, iNOS, IL-1β and TNF-α mRNAs. Treatment with GTN, the NO donor, significantly inhibited the ASA-induced colonic lesions and increased CBF, while carboxy-PTIO or capsaicin-denervation counteracted the NO-ASA-induced improvement of colonic healing and the accompanying increase in the CBF. These effects were restored by co-treatment

  15. Comparative effect of clopidogrel plus aspirin and aspirin monotherapy on hematological parameters using propensity score matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayasaka M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Masatoshi Hayasaka,1 Yasuo Takahashi,2 Yayoi Nishida,2 Yoshikazu Yoshida,1 Shinji Hidaka,3 Satoshi Asai41Department of Pharmacy, Nihon University Itabashi Hospital, Tokyo, 2Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Clinical Trials Research Center, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 3Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Regulatory Science, Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Nihon University, Chiba, 4Division of Pharmacology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Clopidogrel and aspirin are antiplatelet agents that are recommended to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other cardiovascular events. Dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin has been shown to increase the risk of hemorrhage, but the effects of the drugs on laboratory parameters have not been well studied in real-world clinical settings. Therefore, we evaluated and compared the effects of combination therapy with clopidogrel plus aspirin and aspirin monotherapy on laboratory parameters.Methods: We used data from the Nihon University School of Medicine Clinical Data Warehouse obtained between November 2004 and May 2011 to identify cohorts of new users (n = 130 of clopidogrel (75 mg/day plus aspirin (100 mg/day and a propensity score matched sample of new users (n = 130 of aspirin alone (100 mg/day. We used a multivariate regression model to compare serum levels of creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase, as well as hematological parameters including hemoglobin level, hematocrit, and white blood cell, red blood cell, and platelet counts up to 2 months after the start of administration of the study drugs.Results: There were no significant differences for any characteristics and baseline laboratory parameters between users of clopidogrel plus aspirin and users of aspirin alone. Reductions in white blood cell and red blood cell counts, hemoglobin levels, and

  16. Confidentiality protections versus collaborative care in the treatment of substance use disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Practitioners in federally-assisted substance use disorder (SUD) treatment programs are faced with increasingly complex decisions when addressing patient confidentiality issues. Recent policy changes, intended to make treatment more available and accessible, are having an impact on delivery of SUD treatment in the United States. The addition of electronic health records provides opportunity for more rapid and comprehensive communication between patients’ primary and SUD care providers while promoting a collaborative care environment. This shift toward collaborative care is complicated by the special protections that SUD documentation receives in SUD treatment programs, which vary depending on what care is provided and the setting where the patient is treated. This article explores the special protections for substance abuse documentation, discrepancies in treatment documentation, ways to deal with these issues in clinical practice, and the need for more knowledge about how to harmonize treatment in the SUD and primary care systems. PMID:23972141

  17. Low dose aspirin like analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of mono-hydroxybenzoic acids in stressed rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saba Anjum; Chatterjee, Shyam Sunder; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-03-01

    To compare analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of aspirin and mono-hydroxybenzoic acids after their daily oral doses. Efficacies of repeated daily stress response suppressing low oral doses (20mg/kg) of aspirin and 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids in mice hot plate test for centrally acting analgesics, and in acetic acid induced writing test were compared. Effects of their same daily doses and treatment regimen in cotton pellet granuloma and carrageenan edema test for anti-inflammatory drugs in stressed rats were compared in a second experiment. Effects of treatments on body weights, basal rectal temperatures, organ weights and plasma glucose, insulin and cortisol levels in stressed animals were compared also. Although stress response suppressing effects of aspirin and all the three hydroxybenzoic acids in both mice and rats were almost equal, effectiveness of 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids as analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents were lower than those of aspirin or salicylic acid. Observations made after single oral doses of aspirin or of mono-hydroxybenzoic acids are not very reliable predictors of their pharmacologically interesting bioactivity profiles and efficacies. Prostaglandin synthesis inhibition is not involved in low dose anti-inflammatory activities of 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids. After their repeated daily low oral doses they are almost as potent stress response desensitizers as aspirin or salicylic acid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lack of effect of multiple doses of vortioxetine on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of aspirin and warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Grace; Zhang, Wencan; Serenko, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multimodal activity approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. Two separate randomized, placebo-controlled trials evaluated the effects of multiple doses of vortioxetine (10 mg/day) on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of aspirin and warfarin in healthy volunteers. In the aspirin study, subjects received vortioxetine 10 mg or placebo once daily for 14 days, followed by coadministration with aspirin 150 mg once daily for 6 days, in 2 periods with a crossover design. In the warfarin study, subjects were randomized after reaching target international normalized ratio (INR) values on warfarin to receive vortioxetine 10 mg or matching placebo once daily for 14 days, with all subjects receiving a maintenance dose of warfarin (1-10 mg). Vortioxetine had no effect on the steady-state pharmacokinetic parameters of aspirin or its metabolite salicylic acid, and no statistically significant effect on the inhibition of arachidonic acid-, adenosine-5'-diphosphate-, or collagen-induced platelet aggregation at any time points. Coadministration of vortioxetine did not alter the pharmacokinetics of (R)- and (S)-warfarin enantiomers, or the mean coagulation parameters of warfarin treatment alone. Coadministration of vortioxetine doses in healthy volunteers had no effect on aspirin or warfarin pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics. Vortioxetine was well tolerated when coadministered with aspirin or warfarin. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  19. Aspirin and Reye's syndrome — do parents know?

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Amid growing concern over the association between aspirin and Reye's syndrome, the Aspirin Foundation has recently mounted a publicity campaign advising against the use of aspirin in children. Of 50 parents questioned at a children's ward of a district general hospital, 46 (92%) had heard of the publicity, 38 via the television. The number of parents who would give aspirin to their child had dropped significantly from 45 before the campaign to five after it (P

  20. Aspirin and Reye's syndrome — do parents know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Amid growing concern over the association between aspirin and Reye's syndrome, the Aspirin Foundation has recently mounted a publicity campaign advising against the use of aspirin in children. Of 50 parents questioned at a children's ward of a district general hospital, 46 (92%) had heard of the publicity, 38 via the television. The number of parents who would give aspirin to their child had dropped significantly from 45 before the campaign to five after it (PReye's syndrome as the reason. PMID:3505289

  1. Statins but not aspirin reduce thrombotic risk assessed by thrombin generation in diabetic patients without cardiovascular events: the RATIONAL trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Macchia

    Full Text Available The systematic use of aspirin and statins in patients with diabetes and no previous cardiovascular events is controversial. We sought to assess the effects of aspirin and statins on the thrombotic risk assessed by thrombin generation (TG among patients with type II diabetes mellitus and no previous cardiovascular events.Prospective, randomized, open, blinded to events evaluation, controlled, 2×2 factorial clinical trial including 30 patients randomly allocated to aspirin 100 mg/d, atorvastatin 40 mg/d, both or none. Outcome measurements included changes in TG levels after treatment (8 to 10 weeks, assessed by a calibrated automated thrombogram. At baseline all groups had similar clinical and biochemical profiles, including TG levels. There was no interaction between aspirin and atorvastatin. Atorvastatin significantly reduced TG measured as peak TG with saline (85.09±55.34 nmol vs 153.26±75.55 nmol for atorvastatin and control groups, respectively; p = 0.018. On the other hand, aspirin had no effect on TG (121.51±81.83 nmol vs 116.85±67.66 nmol, for aspirin and control groups, respectively; p = 0.716. The effects of treatments on measurements of TG using other agonists were consistent.While waiting for data from ongoing large clinical randomized trials to definitively outline the role of aspirin in primary prevention, our study shows that among diabetic patients without previous vascular events, statins but not aspirin reduce thrombotic risk assessed by TG.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00793754.

  2. Does low-dose aspirin improve pregnancy rate in IVF/ICSI? A randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirckx, K; Cabri, P; Merien, A; Galajdova, L; Gerris, J; Dhont, M; De Sutter, P

    2009-04-01

    It has been suggested in the literature that low-dose aspirin leads to an increased number of oocytes in IVF/ICSI as well as a higher pregnancy rate. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of daily administration of low-dose aspirin, compared with placebo, on pregnancy rate in IVF and ICSI. This study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo controlled trial, performed in the fertility centre of the University Hospital of Ghent. Concealed allocation by computerized randomization was done by the central pharmacy of the hospital. Daily oral administration of aspirin 100 mg or placebo started before stimulation and was continued until confirmation of pregnancy by detection of fetal heart activity on ultrasound. The primary outcome measure assessed in this trial was clinical pregnancy rate per cycle. Two hundred and one couples were included in this study, 193 women (aspirin group n = 97, placebo group n = 96) started treatment and 181 underwent an embryo transfer. There were 31 clinical pregnancies (31/97 or 32%) in the aspirin group versus 30 (30/96 or 31%; P = 0.916; OR 1.033; 95% CI 0.565-1.890) in the placebo group. This randomized controlled trial could not show a significant difference in clinical pregnancy rate between the aspirin and the placebo group in a first or second IVF/ICSI cycle. Given the lack of evidence for a beneficial effect of low-dose aspirin, it appears that low-dose aspirin should not be prescribed routinely in IVF/ICSI treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00644085.

  3. Aspirin disrupts the mTOR-Raptor complex and potentiates the anti-cancer activities of sorafenib via mTORC1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Danni; Liu, Hongchun; Dai, Xiaoyang; Zheng, Xingling; Yan, Juan; Wei, Rongrui; Fu, Xuhong; Huang, Min; Shen, Aijun; Huang, Xun; Ding, Jian; Geng, Meiyu

    2017-10-10

    Aspirin is associated with a reduced risk of cancer and delayed progression of malignant disease. Adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mTOR signaling is believed to partially contribute to these anticancer effects, although the mechanism is unclear. In this study, we revealed the mechanism underlying the effects of aspirin on AMPK-mTOR signaling, and described a mechanism-based rationale for the use of aspirin in cancer therapy. We found that aspirin inhibited mTORC1 signaling through AMPK-dependent and -independent manners. Aspirin inhibited the AMPK-TSC pathway, thus resulting in the suppression of mTORC1 activity. In parallel, it directly disrupted the mTOR-raptor interaction. Additionally, the combination of aspirin and sorafenib showed synergetic effects via inhibiting mTORC1 signaling and the PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK pathways. Aspirin and sorafenib showed synergetic anticancer efficacy in the SMMC-7721 model. Our study provides mechanistic insights and a mechanism-based rationale for the roles of aspirin in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Topical diclofenac does not affect the antiplatelet properties of aspirin as compared to the intermediate effects of oral diclofenac: A prospective, randomized, complete crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowcliffe, M; Nezami, B; Westphal, E S; Rainka, M; Janda, M; Bates, V; Gengo, F

    2016-04-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) adversely interact with aspirin, diminishing its antiplatelet effect and potentially placing patients at an increased risk for recurrent thrombotic events. This crossover study aimed to determine whether the topical NSAID diclofenac epolamine 1.3% patch or oral diclofenac 50 mg interfered with the antiplatelet effects of aspirin 325 mg. Twelve healthy men and women aged 18-50 were included. Participants were randomized into 5 treatment arms: aspirin, diclofenac potassium 50 mg, diclofenac patch, diclofenac potassium plus ASA 325 mg, and diclofenac patch plus aspirin. Platelet responsiveness was determined using whole-blood impedance aggregation (WBA) to collagen 1 μg/mL and arachidonic acid (AA) 0.5 mM and was sampled every 2 hours. No significant difference in platelet function was observed following the diclofenac patch and aspirin vs aspirin alone. Oral diclofenac produced a mixed effect with significant reduction in platelet inhibition at hour 2 and hour 8 following aspirin administration. Topical diclofenac does not significantly interfere with the antiplatelet effects of aspirin and may be a safer alternative to the oral formulation. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  5. Molecular targets of aspirin and cancer prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, L; Ai, G; Spitale, R C; Bhat, G J

    2014-01-01

    Salicylates from plant sources have been used for centuries by different cultures to treat a variety of ailments such as inflammation, fever and pain. A chemical derivative of salicylic acid, aspirin, was synthesised and mass produced by the end of the 19th century and is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Its cardioprotective properties are well established; however, recent evidence shows that it can also act as a chemopreventive agent. Its antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory actions occur through the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. The precise mechanisms leading to its anticancer effects are not clearly established, although multiple mechanisms affecting enzyme activity, transcription factors, cellular signalling and mitochondrial functions have been proposed. This review presents a brief account of the major COX-dependent and independent pathways described in connection with aspirin's anticancer effects. Aspirin's unique ability to acetylate biomolecules besides COX has not been thoroughly investigated nor have all the targets of its primary metabolite, salicylic acid been identified. Recent reports on the ability of aspirin to acetylate multiple cellular proteins warrant a comprehensive study to investigate the role of this posttranslational modification in its anticancer effects. In this review, we also raise the intriguing possibility that aspirin may interact and acetylate cellular molecules such as RNA, and metabolites such as CoA, leading to a change in their function. Research in this area will provide a greater understanding of the mechanisms of action of this drug. PMID:24874482

  6. Synergistic effect of nutlin-3 combined with aspirin in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells through activation of Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Runchen; Xu, Xinsen; Wang, Zhixin; Liu, Sushun; Qu, Kai; Chen, Wei; Liu, Chang

    2017-12-22

    Aspirin as an antitumor drug has been studied in various malignancies with regards to its effects on apoptosis, proliferation, metastasis and senescence of tumor cells. However, the clinical application is limited by its side effects. Nutlin‑3 is a novel antitumor compound, which has not been clinically approved. The present study investigated the value of combining aspirin and nutlin‑3 on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. MTT was performed to detect the proliferation of HepG2 cells treated with aspirin or/and nutlin‑3. Transwell invasion assays were performed to estimate the invasion ability of HepG2 cells treated with aspirin or/and nutlin‑3. Then the apoptotic analysis of HepG2 cells evaluated the synergistic effect of aspirin and nutlin‑3. Apoptosis markers, including B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax), caspase‑3, caspase‑8 and caspase‑9 were estimated by western blot analysis at various time points. In addition, a Xenograft mouse model was established by infection with HepG2 cells, and aspirin and/or nutlin‑3 was administrated to verify the anti‑apoptotic effect of the two drugs in vivo. A high dose of aspirin and nutlin‑3 inhibit the proliferation and apoptosis of HepG2 cells. The antitumor effect was enhanced with the combined treatment of the two drugs, particularly in the group with a low concentration of aspirin and nutlin‑3. Nutlin‑3 was able to increase the level of Bax in HepG2 cells treated with aspirin significantly after treatment for 8 h. When treated with a low concentration of aspirin and nutlin‑3, the level of Bax in HepG2 cells was enhanced for 2 h. In the animal model, tumor volume and tumor angiogenesis were significantly decreased in combination group compared with other groups (P<0.01). Although there were side effects in the group treated with aspirin alone, no side effects were observed in the combination group. Nutlin‑3 enhanced the apoptotic effect of a low dose of

  7. 21 CFR 520.1409 - Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets. 520.1409... Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains 0.5 milligram of methylprednisolone and 300 milligrams of aspirin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) NAS/NRC...

  8. The effect of simvastatin, aspirin, and their combination in reduction of atheroma plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniati, Neng Fisheri; Permatasari, Anita

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by high level of cholesterol especially low density lipoprotein (LDL) and accumulation of neutrophil and macrophage in the artery wall. Thickness of aortic wall is an early stage of atherosclerosis plaque formation. Identification of atherosclerosis plaque formation was done by measuring level of total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, interleukin-18 (IL-18), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and measuring the thickness of aortic wall. Atherosclerosis's model induced by high fat diet and CCT (cholesterol, cholic acid, and propyltiouracil) oral administration. Rats induced cholesterol divided into positive control, simvastatin 25 mg/kg bw, aspirin 20 mg/kg bw, and combination simvastatin 25 mg/kg and aspirin 20 mg/kg bw group for 3 weeks. In the third week, therapy was given to atherosclerosis's model. Then, in the fourth and fifth week, therapy was given but induction of high cholesterol was stopped due to the massive loss of body weight. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, MPO, and IL-18 measured by uv-vis spectrophotometry and ELISA. In the end of therapy, aorta's rats was isolated to identify the thickness of aorta wall. In the fourth week, after 1 week of treatment, only combination group showed significantly higher total cholesterol, LDL and MPO compared to positive control group. Level of triglycerides and HDL in all groups did not significantly differ compared to positive control group. After 2 weeks continuing drug treatment, the level of total cholesterol, MPO, and IL-18 were decreased in all groups, and aspirin group showed the lowest level. The level of triglycerides was decreased in simvastatin and aspirin group, and aspirin group showed the lowest. Only combination group showed the lowest level of LDL. Based on histopathology result, the thickness of aortic wall was reduced in all groups and aspirin group showed the lowest.

  9. Beta blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors’ purported benefit on breast cancer survival may be explained by aspirin use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michelle D.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Feskanich, Diane; Chen, Wendy Y.

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical and epidemiologic evidence supports a possible role for beta-adrenergic blocking drugs (beta-blockers), and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) in promoting survival after breast cancer. However, these drugs are often used concurrently with aspirin, and there is a growing body of evidence indicating a survival benefit for aspirin. Therefore, we analyzed the use of beta-blockers and ACEIs after a breast cancer diagnosis and their association with breast cancer mortality, both individually, combined with each other, and in combination with aspirin use in the Nurses’ Health Study, using updated measures of medication use and Cox proportional hazards models. There were 4,661 women with stages I-III breast cancer included; 292 breast cancer deaths occurred during median follow-up time of 10.5 years. Modeled individually, the multivariable relative risk and 95% confidence intervals (RR, 95% CI) for breast cancer death were (0.76, 0.54-1.05) for beta blockers, (0.89, 0.60-1.32) for ACEIs, and (0.46, 0.35-0.60) for aspirin. Modeled simultaneously, the multivariable (RR, 95% CI) for breast cancer death were (0.83, 0.60-1.16) for beta blockers, (1.00, 0.68-1.46) for ACEIs, and (0.46, 0.35-0.61) for aspirin. We did not see a significant association with beta blockers and survival, but there was a suggestion. Our study was limited in that we could not assess type of beta blocker and the number of events among users was still quite low. We found no evidence of a protective effect for ACEIs. The strong protective association with aspirin use confounds the associations with these other drugs and underscores the importance of considering aspirin use in analyses of breast cancer survival PMID:23649190

  10. Beta blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors' purported benefit on breast cancer survival may be explained by aspirin use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michelle D; Hankinson, Susan E; Feskanich, Diane; Chen, Wendy Y

    2013-06-01

    Preclinical and epidemiologic evidence supports a possible role for beta-adrenergic blocking drugs (beta-blockers), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) in promoting survival after breast cancer. However, these drugs are often used concurrently with aspirin, and there is a growing body of evidence indicating a survival benefit for aspirin. Therefore, we analyzed the use of beta-blockers and ACEIs after a breast cancer diagnosis and their association with breast cancer mortality, both individually, combined with each other, and in combination with aspirin use in the Nurses' Health Study, using updated measures of medication use and Cox proportional hazards models. There were 4,661 women with stages I-III breast cancer included; 292 breast cancer deaths occurred during median follow-up time of 10.5 years. Modeled individually, the multivariable relative risk and 95 % confidence intervals (RR, 95 % CI) for breast cancer death were (0.76, 0.54-1.05) for beta blockers, (0.89, 0.60-1.32) for ACEIs, and (0.46, 0.35-0.60) for aspirin. Modeled simultaneously, the multivariable (RR, 95 % CI) for breast cancer death were (0.83, 0.60-1.16) for beta blockers, (1.00, 0.68-1.46) for ACEIs, and (0.46, 0.35-0.61) for aspirin. We did not see a significant association with beta blockers and survival, but there was a suggestion. Our study was limited in that we could not assess type of beta blocker and the number of events among users was still quite low. We found no evidence of a protective effect for ACEIs. The strong protective association with aspirin use confounds the associations with these other drugs and underscores the importance of considering aspirin use in analyses of breast cancer survival.

  11. Low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in Japanese patients 60 years or older with atherosclerotic risk factors: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yasuo; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Teramoto, Tamio; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Oikawa, Shinichi; Sugawara, Masahiro; Ando, Katsuyuki; Murata, Mitsuru; Yokoyama, Kenji; Ishizuka, Naoki

    2014-12-17

    Prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases is an important public health priority in Japan due to an aging population. To determine whether daily, low-dose aspirin reduces the incidence of cardiovascular events in older Japanese patients with multiple atherosclerotic risk factors. The Japanese Primary Prevention Project (JPPP) was a multicenter, open-label, randomized, parallel-group trial. Patients (N = 14,464) were aged 60 to 85 years, presenting with hypertension, dyslipidemia, or diabetes mellitus recruited by primary care physicians at 1007 clinics in Japan between March 2005 and June 2007, and were followed up for up to 6.5 years, with last follow-up in May 2012. A multidisciplinary expert panel (blinded to treatment assignments) adjudicated study outcomes. Patients were randomized 1:1 to enteric-coated aspirin 100 mg/d or no aspirin in addition to ongoing medications. Composite primary outcome was death from cardiovascular causes (myocardial infarction, stroke, and other cardiovascular causes), nonfatal stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic, including undefined cerebrovascular events), and nonfatal myocardial infarction. Secondary outcomes included individual end points. The study was terminated early by the data monitoring committee after a median follow-up of 5.02 years (interquartile range, 4.55-5.33) based on likely futility. In both the aspirin and no aspirin groups, 56 fatal events occurred. Patients with an occurrence of nonfatal stroke totaled 114 in the aspirin group and 108 in the no aspirin group; of nonfatal myocardial infarction, 20 in the aspirin group and 38 in the no aspirin group; of undefined cerebrovascular events, 3 in the aspirin group and 5 in the no aspirin group. The 5-year cumulative primary outcome event rate was not significantly different between the groups (2.77% [95% CI, 2.40%-3.20%] for aspirin vs 2.96% [95% CI, 2.58%-3.40%] for no aspirin; hazard ratio [HR], 0.94 [95% CI, 0.77-1.15]; P = .54). Aspirin

  12. Adherence to topical treatment of glaucoma, risk and protective factors: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez-Gómez, M C; Vásquez-Trespalacios, E M

    2018-02-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic asymptomatic disease, progressing to loss of vision. Elevated intraocular pressure is the only modifiable factor. Adherence to glaucoma treatment varies from 2-80%. To evaluate factors associated with adherence to topical glaucoma treatment reported in the literature, and to identify protective factors and risk factors, as well as modifiable and non-modifiable factors, in order to take them into account to perform interventions in adherence. A bibliographic search of articles published in the last 8 years in databases such as Clinical Key, Cochrane (OVID), EBSCO, Lilacs, PubMed and Science Direct, of different observational studies that performed a measurement of the treatment of glaucoma and to identify associated factors. A total of 7 studies were selected that directly and indirectly measured adherence to glaucoma treatment. Different risk and protective factors for adherence to treatment were found. These showed that African-American race, poor education, low personal income, and high treatment costs, are strongly related to poor adherence to treatment. It was also found that educational interventions and a good patient- physician relationship impacted positively on adherence. The results found are a guide for risk and protective factors for adherence to treatment of glaucoma. It is cost effective to educate patients to positively impact adherence. By identifying such factors, attention can be focused on poor adherence patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Co-lyophilized Aspirin with Trehalose Causes Less Injury to Human Gastric Cells and Gastric Mucosa of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lee-Shuan; Kayasuga-Kariya, Yuko; Nakamura, Shugo; Shimohata, Nobuyuki; Sakai, Takamasa; Fujisawa, Ayano; Akagi, Yuki; Suzuki, Shigeki; Chung, Ung-Il; Sasaki, Nobuo; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2016-08-01

    Aspirin is one of the most popular NSAIDs worldwide because of its anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant effects, and however, gastrointestinal injury remains a major complication. We previously reported co-lyophilized aspirin/trehalose (Lyo A/T) decreased the aspirin-induced gastric lesions in dogs. This study investigated the mechanism of gastroprotective effects of trehalose in vitro and in vivo. The apoptotic assays were performed in a human gastric carcinoma cell line, which was treated with aspirin, mixed aspirin/trehalose (Mix A/T) or Lyo A/T. Gastric ulcer severity was examined after oral administration of drugs in rats. In addition, the mucosal tissue apoptotic status in drug-treated rats was evaluated. Molecular dynamics simulations and laser Raman spectroscopy were performed in order to examine the molecular properties of Lyo A/T. DNA fragmentation was detected in AGS cells that were treated with aspirin and Mix A/T, but not in the Lyo A/T-treated cells. There were fewer apoptotic cells in the Lyo A/T-treated cells than in the other cells. Gastric injury was reduced in rats that received oral Lyo A/T compared with the others, while PGE2 synthesis was equally decreased in all groups. TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry of cleaved caspase-3 in the mucosal tissues also revealed that Lyo A/T treatment induced less apoptosis than the others. The Lyo A/T spectrum showed clear differences in several Raman bands compared with that of Mix A/T. Our data showed that co-lyophilization of aspirin with trehalose reduced gastric injury, potentially through suppression of aspirin-induced mucosal cell apoptosis while retaining its anti-inflammatory effects.

  14. Evaluation of the effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptors blockers on aspirin antiplatelet effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F; Quttina, Maram; Zayadeen, Raya

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the major burdens on societies and healthcare systems. Antiplatelet aspirin is used to prevent the occurrence or reoccurrence of cardiovascular events. However, studies have shown that a good portion of patients still suffer from cardiovascular events in spite of using aspirin (also called aspirin nonresponders). On the other hand, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) as well as angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) are widely used in patients with different spectrums of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, the possible interactive effect of ACEIs and ARBs on aspirin response was evaluated in vitro. A multiplate analyzer was used to assay the possible interactions between ACEIs and ARBs drugs on antiplatelet effect of aspirin using blood obtained from 6 healthy volunteers. Means of area under the aggregation curves (AUCs) of the blood samples treated with 10 μg/mL aspirin were calculated before and after exposure to captopril, lisinopril, candesartan, or losartan. Results showed potential antithrombotic effect of ACEIs and ARBs only at high concentrations (3.3 μg/mL).The antiplatelet effect of aspirin 10 μg/mL was significantly enhanced by the addition of captopril or lisinopril at high dose (3.3 μg/mL), candesartan at all tested doses (0.03 μg/mL, 0.33 μg/mL, 3.3 μg/mL), and losartan at doses of 0.33 μg/mL and 3.3 μg/m. Treatment with ACEIs (captopril and lisinopril) and ARBs (candesartan and losartan) improved the antiplatelet response to aspirin. Further studies are needed to confirm this action and potentially apply it to clinical practice.

  15. Discontinuation of low dose aspirin and risk of myocardial infarction: case-control study in UK primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Luis A García; Cea-Soriano, Lucía; Martín-Merino, Elisa; Johansson, Saga

    2011-07-19

    To evaluate the risk of myocardial infarction and death from coronary heart disease after discontinuation of low dose aspirin in primary care patients with a history of cardiovascular events. Nested case-control study. The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database in the United Kingdom. Individuals aged 50-84 with a first prescription for aspirin (75-300 mg/day) for secondary prevention of cardiovascular outcomes in 2000-7 (n=39,513). Individuals were followed up for a mean of 3.2 years to identify cases of non-fatal myocardial infarction or death from coronary heart disease. A nested case-control analysis assessed the risk of these events in those who had stopped taking low dose aspirin compared with those who had continued treatment. There were 876 non-fatal myocardial infarctions and 346 deaths from coronary heart disease. Compared with current users, people who had recently stopped taking aspirin had a significantly increased risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction or death from coronary heart disease combined (rate ratio 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.84) and non-fatal myocardial infarction alone (1.63, 1.23 to 2.14). There was no significant association between recently stopping low dose aspirin and the risk of death from coronary heart disease (1.07, 0.67 to 1.69). For every 1000 patients, over a period of one year there were about four more cases of non-fatal myocardial infarction among patients who discontinued treatment with low dose aspirin (recent discontinuers) compared with patients who continued treatment. Individuals with a history of cardiovascular events who stop taking low dose aspirin are at increased risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction compared with those who continue treatment.

  16. Low-Dose Aspirin Discontinuation and Risk of Cardiovascular Events: A Swedish Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Johan; Hedberg, Jakob; Thuresson, Marcus; Aarskog, Pernilla; Johannesen, Kasper Munk; Oldgren, Jonas

    2017-09-26

    There are increasing concerns about risks associated with aspirin discontinuation in the absence of major surgery or bleeding. We investigated whether long-term low-dose aspirin discontinuation and treatment gaps increase the risk of cardiovascular events. We performed a cohort study of 601 527 users of low-dose aspirin for primary or secondary prevention in the Swedish prescription register between 2005 and 2009 who were >40 years of age, were free from previous cancer, and had ≥80% adherence during the first observed year of treatment. Cardiovascular events were identified with the Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death registers. The first 3 months after a major bleeding or surgical procedure were excluded from the time at risk. During a median of 3.0 years of follow-up, 62 690 cardiovascular events occurred. Patients who discontinued aspirin had a higher rate of cardiovascular events than those who continued (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-1.41), corresponding to an additional cardiovascular event observed per year in 1 of every 74 patients who discontinue aspirin. The risk increased shortly after discontinuation and did not appear to diminish over time. In long-term users, discontinuation of low-dose aspirin in the absence of major surgery or bleeding was associated with a >30% increased risk of cardiovascular events. Adherence to low-dose aspirin treatment in the absence of major surgery or bleeding is likely an important treatment goal. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Multiple episodes of aspirin overdose in an individual patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debasish; Williams, Kenneth M; Graham, Garry G; Nair, Priya; Buscher, Hergen; Day, Richard O

    2014-11-19

    Aspirin overdose, though now infrequently encountered, nevertheless continues to contribute to significant morbidity and mortality. The patient described in this case report intentionally ingested overdoses of aspirin on repeated occasions. The case provided an unusual and possibly one-of-a-kind opportunity to focus on the variability in the time course of plasma salicylate concentrations with current treatment modalities of aspirin overdose in an individual patient. A 75-year-old Caucasian man who weighed 45 kg and had an extensive history of various drug overdoses and stage 3 chronic kidney disease presented to a tertiary university hospital on three occasions within 2 months after successive overdoses of aspirin. During his third admission, he overdosed with aspirin, while on the ward recovering from the previous aspirin overdose. The overdoses were categorized as "potentially lethal" on two occasions and as "serious" in the other two, based on the alleged dose of aspirin ingested (over 500 mg/kg in the first two overdoses, and 320 mg/kg and 498 mg/kg in the other two, respectively). However, as assessed by the observed salicylate concentrations, the ingestions would more appropriately have been categorized as being of "moderate" severity for the first and second overdose and "mild" severity for each of the others. This categorization was more consistent with the clinical severity of his admissions. A single dose of activated charcoal was administered only after the second overdose. On each occasion, he was given intravenous fluid with the aim of achieving euvolemia. Urinary alkalization was not attempted during the first admission, which was associated with the longest apparent elimination half-life of salicylate (30 hours). A plasma potassium concentration of approximately 4 mmol/L appeared to be needed for adequate urinary alkalization. In a patient with impaired renal function, intravenous fluid and urinary alkalization are the mainstays of treatment of

  18. The use of aspirin for primary and secondary prevention in venous thromboembolism and other cardiovascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, A T; Imfeld, S; Markham, J; Granziera, S

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a number of conditions such as myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease, stroke, and venous thromboembolism. CVD is a leading health problem worldwide and a major cause of mortality, morbidity, and disability; it is also associated with high healthcare costs. The incidence of CVD is predicted to increase in the forthcoming years, and thus it is crucial that physicians are aware of the benefits and limitations of the available therapies to ensure patients receive optimized treatment. Current clinical practice guidelines provide recommendations on the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelets for both the prevention and treatment of CVD. Aspirin is the most studied antiplatelet agent in this context. The benefits of aspirin are well documented and supported by data from robust clinical trials for CVD conditions, such as acute coronary syndrome and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, the clinical benefits of aspirin are less clear for other conditions, namely for primary prevention of venous thromboembolism after major orthopaedic surgery, particularly in comparison with newer drugs such as the direct oral anticoagulants. This article provides an outline of the current guidelines and a critical assessment of the efficacy and safety data supporting the recommendations for the use of aspirin in the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism and other cardiovascular disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Aspirin versus Placebo in Pregnancies at High Risk for Preterm Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolnik, Daniel L; Wright, David; Poon, Liona C; O'Gorman, Neil; Syngelaki, Argyro; de Paco Matallana, Catalina; Akolekar, Ranjit; Cicero, Simona; Janga, Deepa; Singh, Mandeep; Molina, Francisca S; Persico, Nicola; Jani, Jacques C; Plasencia, Walter; Papaioannou, George; Tenenbaum-Gavish, Kinneret; Meiri, Hamutal; Gizurarson, Sveinbjorn; Maclagan, Kate; Nicolaides, Kypros H

    2017-08-17

    Preterm preeclampsia is an important cause of maternal and perinatal death and complications. It is uncertain whether the intake of low-dose aspirin during pregnancy reduces the risk of preterm preeclampsia. In this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 1776 women with singleton pregnancies who were at high risk for preterm preeclampsia to receive aspirin, at a dose of 150 mg per day, or placebo from 11 to 14 weeks of gestation until 36 weeks of gestation. The primary outcome was delivery with preeclampsia before 37 weeks of gestation. The analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. A total of 152 women withdrew consent during the trial, and 4 were lost to follow up, which left 798 participants in the aspirin group and 822 in the placebo group. Preterm preeclampsia occurred in 13 participants (1.6%) in the aspirin group, as compared with 35 (4.3%) in the placebo group (odds ratio in the aspirin group, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, 0.20 to 0.74; P=0.004). Results were materially unchanged in a sensitivity analysis that took into account participants who had withdrawn or were lost to follow-up. Adherence was good, with a reported intake of 85% or more of the required number of tablets in 79.9% of the participants. There were no significant between-group differences in the incidence of neonatal adverse outcomes or other adverse events. Treatment with low-dose aspirin in women at high risk for preterm preeclampsia resulted in a lower incidence of this diagnosis than placebo. (Funded by the European Union Seventh Framework Program and the Fetal Medicine Foundation; EudraCT number, 2013-003778-29 ; Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN13633058 .).

  20. The role of aspirin-triggered lipoxins in the mechanism of action of aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Derek W

    2005-01-01

    Few drugs have treated so many diseases, provided us with so much understanding of their pathogenesis, and tested our scientific creativity over the last 100 years as much as aspirin. Originally, the beneficial effects of aspirin were shown to stem from its inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX 2)-derived prostanoids, fatty acid metabolites that modulate host defense and regulate the cardiovascular system. However, the inhibition of COX 2 enzyme activity and prostaglandin synthesis has never fully explained aspirin's repertoire of anti-inflammatory effects, leaving many questions pertaining to its true mechanism of action unanswered. Here, data from a series of comparatively recent experiments exploring aspirin's unique ability to acetylate the active site of inducible COX 2 and generate a family of lipid mediators called the epi-Lipoxins will be discussed in light of their ability to exert profound modulatory effects on the innate and adaptive immune systems.

  1. Epidemiology of Upper Gastrointestinal Damage Associated with Low-Dose Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ping-I; Tsai, Tzung-Jiun

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose aspirin, commonly defined as 75-325 mg daily, is widely used for cardiovascular (CV) protection. It reduced the risk of CV events and death in patients with coronary and cerebrovascular diseases and has the advantages of both low cost and long duration of antiplatelet action. However, low-dose aspirin therapy is associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, which range from dyspepsia (point prevalence: 31%), gastroduodenal erosions (point prevalence: 60%), endoscopic peptic ulcer (3-month incidence: 7%) to symptomatic or complicated ulcers (annual incidence of upper GI bleeding: 0.6%; relative risk of upper GI bleeding: 2.6). The important factors that increase the risk of low-dose aspirin-related ulcer complications include a history of bleeding peptic ulcer, prior peptic ulcer, age > 70 years, H pylori infection, and concomitant drug therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, other antiplatelet agents (e.g., clopidogrel) or anticoagulants. The use of enteric-coated or buffered preparations do not reduce the risk of upper GI complications. Assessment of GI risk for patients is a crucial step in preventing complications of antiplatelet agents. Patients with a high GI risk should prevent peptic ulcer or ulcer complications by co-therapy with an antisecretory agent, especially proton pump inhibitors. H pylori eradication is recommended for patients requiring long-term low-dose aspirin therapy who have a prior history of peptic ulcer or GI bleeding.

  2. A General Chemistry Laboratory Theme: Spectroscopic Analysis of Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Houston; O'Donnell, Stephen E.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the introduction of spectroscopy into the general chemistry laboratory using a series of experiments based on a common substance, aspirin. In the first lab the students synthesize and recrystallize aspirin and take melting points of their product, an aspirin standard, and salicylic acid. The students perform the remaining experiments on a rotating basis where the following four labs run simultaneously: structural characterization of the synthesized aspirin by IR and NMR; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by UV vis spectroscopy; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by HPLC; and analysis of calcium in commercial buffered aspirin tablets by AAS. In each of the analysis experiments, students collect, graph, and analyze their data using a spreadsheet. We have found that this series of labs has been very beneficial to our students. From the course evaluations, students indicate that they are beginning to understand how chemistry is applied outside of the classroom.

  3. Rivaroxaban with or without aspirin in stable cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eikelboom, John W; Connolly, Stuart J; Bosch, Jackie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. METHODS: In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive...... rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin (100 mg once daily), rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily), or aspirin (100 mg once daily). The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. The study was stopped for superiority of the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group after...... a mean follow-up of 23 months. RESULTS: The primary outcome occurred in fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group than in the aspirin-alone group (379 patients [4.1%] vs. 496 patients [5.4%]; hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.86; P

  4. Upper gastrointestinal bleed in a post menopausal woman due to combination of high first dose aspirin and clopidogrel prescribed for acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal R Tandon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combination of aspirin, clopidogrel and enoxaparin remains the standard treatment for acute coronary syndrome (ACS but is known to increase the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB. We hereby report an unusual case of gastrointestinal bleed (GIB as it resulted inspite of proton pump inhibitor (PPI prophylaxis within the second day of treatment in a post-menopausal woman (PMW with high first dose of aspirin clopidogrel dual combination in a patient of ACS.

  5. Aspirin for Venous Ulcers: Randomised Trial (AVURT): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilbrook, Helen; Forsythe, Rachael O; Rolfe, Debbie; Clark, Laura; Bland, Martin; Buckley, Hannah; Chetter, Ian; Cook, Liz; Dumville, Jo; Gabe, Rhian; Harding, Keith; Layton, Alison; Lindsay, Ellie; McDaid, Catriona; Moffatt, Christine; Phillips, Ceri; Stansby, Gerard; Vowden, Peter; Williams, Laurie; Torgerson, David; Hinchliffe, Robert J

    2015-11-10

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are the commonest cause of leg ulceration, affecting 1 in 100 adults. There is a significant health burden associated with VLUs - it is estimated that the cost of treatment for 1 ulcer is up to £1300 per year in the NHS. The mainstay of treatment is with graduated compression bandaging; however, treatment is often prolonged and up to one quarter of venous leg ulcers do not heal despite standard care. Two previous trials have suggested that low-dose aspirin, as an adjunct to standard care, may hasten healing, but these trials were small and of poor quality. Aspirin is an inexpensive, widely used medication but its safety and efficacy in the treatment of VLUs remains to be established. AVURT is a phase II randomised double blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled efficacy trial. The primary objective is to examine whether aspirin, in addition to standard care, is effective in patients with chronic VLUs (i.e. over 6 weeks in duration or a history of VLU). Secondary objectives include feasibility and safety of aspirin in this population. A target of 100 participants, identified from community leg ulcer clinics and hospital clinics, will be randomised to receive either 300 mg of aspirin once daily or placebo. All participants will receive standard care with compression therapy. The primary outcome will be time to healing of the reference ulcer. Follow-up will occur for a maximum of 27 weeks. The primary analysis will use a Cox proportional hazards model to compare time to healing using the principles of intention-to-treat. Secondary outcomes will include ulcer size, pain evaluation, compliance and adverse events. The AVURT trial will investigate the efficacy and safety of aspirin as a treatment for VLU and will inform on the feasibility of proceeding to a larger phase III study. This study will address the paucity of information currently available regarding aspirin therapy to treat VLU. The study is registered on a public database with

  6. Is clopidogrel better than aspirin following breakthrough strokes while on aspirin? A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng; Wu, Yi-Ling; Saver, Jeffrey L; Lee, Hsuei-Chen; Lee, Jiann-Der; Chang, Ku-Chou; Wu, Chih-Ying; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Wang, Hui-Hsuan; Rao, Neal M; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2014-12-02

    There is insufficient evidence on which to base a recommendation for optimal antiplatelet therapy following a stroke while on aspirin. The objective was to compare clopidogrel initiation vs aspirin reinitiation for vascular risk reduction among patients with ischaemic stroke on aspirin at the time of their index stroke. Retrospective. We conducted a nationwide cohort study by retrieving all hospitalised patients (≥18 years) with a primary diagnosis of ischaemic stroke between 2003 and 2009 from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Among 3862 patients receiving aspirin before the index ischaemic stroke and receiving either aspirin or clopidogrel after index stroke during follow-up period, 1623 were excluded due to a medication possession ratio history of atrial fibrillation, valvular heart disease or coagulopathy. Therefore, 1884 patients were included in our final analysis. Patients were categorised into two groups based on whether clopidogrel or aspirin was prescribed during the follow-up period. Follow-up was from time of the index stroke to admission for recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction, death or the end of 2010. The primary end point was hospitalisation due to a new-onset major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE: composite of any stroke or myocardial infarction). The leading secondary end point was any recurrent stroke. Compared to aspirin, clopidogrel was associated with a lower occurrence of future MACE (HR=0.54, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.68, paspirin, clopidogrel initiation was associated with fewer recurrent vascular events than aspirin reinitiation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. 34 CFR 98.4 - Protection of students' privacy in examination, testing, or treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection of students' privacy in examination, testing, or treatment. 98.4 Section 98.4 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education STUDENT... are not directly related to academic instruction and that is designed to affect behavioral, emotional...

  8. [Cyclooxigenase-1 gene polymorphism and aspirin resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar', T N; Kravchenko, N A

    2012-01-01

    The literature data concerning structure of cyclo-oxigenase-1--the key enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis and the main target of anti-platelet therapy with the use of acetylsalicilic acid are presented in the review. The data on cyclooxigenase-1 gene polymorphism, distribution of the revealed variants in various populations and their possible correlation with biochemical and functional aspirin resistance are presented.

  9. Aspirin augments hyaluronidase induced adhesion inhibition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative adhesions occur after virtually all abdomino-pelvic surgery and are the leading cause of intestinal obstruction and other gynaecologic problems. We used an animal model to test the efficacy of combined administration of aspirin and hyaluronidase on adhesion formation. Adhesions were induced using ...

  10. Van der Waals Interactions in Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Anthony; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The ability of molecules to yield multiple solid forms, or polymorphs, has significance for diverse applications ranging from drug design and food chemistry to nonlinear optics and hydrogen storage. In particular, aspirin has been used and studied for over a century, but has only recently been shown to have an additional polymorphic form, known as form II. Since the two observed solid forms of aspirin are degenerate in terms of lattice energy, kinetic effects have been suggested to determine the metastability of the less abundant form II. Here, first-principles calculations provide an alternative explanation based on free-energy differences at room temperature. The explicit consideration of many-body van der Waals interactions in the free energy demonstrates that the stability of the most abundant form of aspirin is due to a subtle coupling between collective electronic fluctuations and quantized lattice vibrations. In addition, a systematic analysis of the elastic properties of the two forms of aspirin rules out mechanical instability of form II as making it metastable.

  11. Aspirin in pregnancy : clinical and biochemical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A. Bremer (Henk)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAspirin, acetylsalicylic acid, is the most frequently consumed drug in pregnancy,47 mostly taken without a prescription because of headache or a minor ailment. 226,277 Numerous preparations containing acetylsalicylic acid are freely available over the counter under a variety of

  12. Native and aspirin-triggered lipoxins control innate immunity by inducing proteasomal degradation of TRAF6

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Esper, L?sia; Dias, Alexandra; Madan, Rajat; Gu, YuanYuan; Hildeman, David; Serhan, Charles N.; Karp, Christopher L.; Aliberti, J?lio

    2008-01-01

    Innate immune signaling is critical for the development of protective immunity. Such signaling is, perforce, tightly controlled. Lipoxins (LXs) are eicosanoid mediators that play key counterregulatory roles during infection. The molecular mechanisms underlying LX-mediated control of innate immune signaling are of interest. In this study, we show that LX and aspirin (ASA)-triggered LX (ATL) inhibit innate immune signaling by inducing suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 2–dependent ubiquiti...

  13. Combination treatment for hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pressure, and the potential benefit of a low dose of aspirin in the treatment of hypertension. 18 790 patients, aged 50-80 years ... In addition, 9 399 patients were randomly assigned 75 mg/day aspirin and. 9 391 patients were ... hypertensive and non-hypertensive patients with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack.

  14. Comprehensive Assessment of Degradation Behavior of Aspirin and Atorvastatin Singly and in Combination by Using a Validated RP-HPLC Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sherikar, Omkar; Mehta, Priti

    2012-01-01

    A fixed-dose combination of atorvastatin and aspirin is widely used for the treatment of myocardial infarction. The present work describes a compre-hensive study of the stress degradation behavior of atorvastatin and aspirin alone as well as in combination of 1:1 and 1:7.5 ratios, respectively, as per ICH guidelines. The degradation products of aspirin as well as atorvastatin were successfully separated by a developed simple, selective, and precise stability-indicating reversed-phase HPLC met...

  15. High-Dose Aspirin is Associated with Anemia and Does Not Confer Benefit to Disease Outcomes in Kawasaki Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Chang Kuo

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD is also known as multiple mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome of systemic vasculitis and is a leading cause of coronary artery lesions (CAL in childhood. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG has been proven to effectively reduce the incidence of CAL, but the role and effect dose of aspirin in KD is still unclear. Moreover, overt bleeding and anemia are associated with the use of aspirin, and anemia is common in patients with KD. Thus, the aim of this study was conducted to compare the treatment efficacy, degree of anemia and inflammation, and changes in serum hepcidin in children who received a combination of high-dose aspirin and IVIG in the acute stage of KD, and those who received IVIG alone.KD patients from two medical centers were retrospectively analyzed from 1999-2009. All patients were initially treated with a single dose of IVIG (2 g/kg as the standard care of treatment. In group 1, high-dose aspirin was prescribed (> 30 mg/kg/day until the fever subsided, and then low-dose aspirin (3-5 mg/kg/day was prescribed until all the inflammation signs had resolved. In group 2, low-dose aspirin was prescribed without high-dose aspirin. Laboratory data were collected for analysis in both groups.A total of 851 KD patients (group 1, N = 305, group 2, N = 546 were enrolled in this study. There were no significant differences between group 1 and group 2 in terms of gender (p = 0.51, IVIG resistance rate (31/305 vs. 38/546, p = 0.07, CAL formation (52/305 vs. 84/546, p = 0.67, and duration of hospitalization (6.3 ± 0.2 vs. 6.7 ± 0.2 days, p = 0.13. There were also initially no significant differences in total white blood cell count, hemoglobin level, platelet count, and CRP before IVIG treatment between groups (all p>0.1. After IVIG treatment, group 1 had significantly lower levels of hemoglobin (p = 0.006 and higher CRP (p<0.001 as well as a smaller decrease in CRP level (p = 0.012. Furthermore, there was also a higher serum level of

  16. The Comparative Study Of Efficiency Of Intravenous Heparin And Oral Aspirin On 48 Hours Beginning Primary Medication In Ischemic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ehsan Asadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was done for comparing efficiency of Intravenous Heparin and Oral Aspirin among patients who had cerebral thrombi embolitic vascular accidents. Effectives of Heparin and Aspirin on prognosis and recovery of these patients were evaluated.  Method: This study was a clinical randomized trial. Patients were classified randomly in one of the heparin (n=40 and one group Aspirin (n=40 treatment. At first in the Heparin treatment group, patients were medicated by Heparin 100 IU/kg and then it was followed by 1000IU/hour for 48 hours. In the Aspirin treated group, whom took 325mg/day for 48 hours. The effectiveness of both treatments were evaluated after 48 hours on neuro-muscular, speech, vision, and sphincter function. Results: The results showed that both treatments were effective on improvement of neuro-muscular, speech, vision, and sphincter function, while Heparin effectiveness was more than Aspirin. Improvement of Nervous function in the Heparin group was 53.2% in compare of 31.2% for Aspirin (p=0.40. In addition, in the Heparin treatment group 59.6% of muscular dysfunction was attained optimum muscular function in compare of 30.7% with Aspirin (p=0.001. It was found significant relation for improvement of speech function in Heparin treatment group (P=0.01. There were not a significant finding relation for improvement of vision, and sphincter function between Heparin and Aspirin treated groups. Conclusion: Beginning primary medication with Heparin would be effective for achieving optimum function among patients with cerebral thrombi embolitic vascular accidents.

  17. A Review on the Relationship between Aspirin and Bone Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Yong Chin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin is a cyclooxygenase inhibitor commonly used in primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Its users are elderly population susceptible to osteoporosis. It also inhibits the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 essential in bone remodeling. This prompts the question whether it can influence bone health among users. This review aimed to summarize the current literature on the use of aspirin on bone health. A literature search on experimental and clinical evidence on the effects of aspirin on bone health was performed using major scientific databases. In vitro studies showed that aspirin could enhance the survival of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the progenitors of osteoblasts, and stimulate the differentiation of preosteoblasts. Aspirin also inhibited the nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB pathway and decreased the expression of receptor activator of NFκB ligand, thus suppressing the formation of osteoclast. Aspirin could prevent bone loss in animal models of osteoporosis. Despite a positive effect on bone mineral density, the limited human epidemiological studies revealed that aspirin could not reduce fracture risk. A study even suggested that the use of aspirin increased fracture risk. As a conclusion, aspirin may increase bone mineral density but its effect on fracture prevention is inconclusive. More data are needed to determine the effects of aspirin and bone health in human.

  18. Exploring clinicians' attitudes about using aspirin for risk reduction in people with Lynch Syndrome with no personal diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanni; Peate, Michelle; Kaur, Rajneesh; Meiser, Bettina; Wong, Tim; Kirk, Judy; Ward, Robyn L; Goodwin, Annabel; Macrae, Finlay; Hiller, Janet; Trainer, Alison H; Mitchell, Gillian

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has shown that aspirin reduces the risk of cancers associated with Lynch Syndrome. However, uncertainty exists around the optimal dosage, treatment duration and whether the benefits of aspirin as a risk-reducing medication (RRM) outweigh adverse medication related side-effects. Little is known about clinicians' attitudes, current practice, and perceived barriers to recommending aspirin as a RRM. To explore the attitudes of clinicians who discuss risk management options with patients with Lynch Syndrome towards using aspirin as a RRM. Clinicians were invited through professional organisations to complete an online survey. Topics included their clinical experience with Lynch Syndrome, views and practice of recommending aspirin as a RRM, and knowledge about clinical risk management guidelines for Lynch Syndrome. Comparison of attitudes was made between three professional groups. 181 respondents were included in the analysis: 59 genetics professionals (genetic counsellors and clinical geneticists, medical oncologists with specialist training in familial cancer), 49 gastroenterologists and 73 colorectal surgeons. Most clinicians (76 %) considered aspirin to be an effective RRM and most (72 %) were confident about discussing it. In all professional categories, those who were confident about discussing aspirin with patients perceived it to be an effective RRM (OR = 2.8 [95 % CI = 1.8-4.2], p Lynch Syndrome patients compared to 69 % of gastroenterologists and 68 % of colorectal surgeons. Those who considered aspirin as an effective RRM or who felt confident in their knowledge of the aspirin literature were more likely (OR = 10 [95 % CI = 1.5-65], p = 0.010, OR = 6 [95 % CI = 2.2-16], p Lynch Syndrome per year were more likely to be confident in their knowledge of the aspirin literature and discussing it with patients (OR = 4.1 [95 % CI = 1.6-10.2], p = 0.003). Explicit recommendations to take aspirin, was reported by 65

  19. Fasting vs dietary restriction in cellular protection and cancer treatment: from model organisms to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C; Longo, V D

    2011-07-28

    The dietary recommendation for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, as described by the American Cancer Society, is to increase calorie and protein intake. Yet, in simple organisms, mice, and humans, fasting--no calorie intake--induces a wide range of changes associated with cellular protection, which would be difficult to achieve even with a cocktail of potent drugs. In mammals, the protective effect of fasting is mediated, in part, by an over 50% reduction in glucose and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) levels. Because proto-oncogenes function as key negative regulators of the protective changes induced by fasting, cells expressing oncogenes, and therefore the great majority of cancer cells, should not respond to the protective signals generated by fasting, promoting the differential protection (differential stress resistance) of normal and cancer cells. Preliminary reports indicate that fasting for up to 5 days followed by a normal diet, may also protect patients against chemotherapy without causing chronic weight loss. By contrast, the long-term 20 to 40% restriction in calorie intake (dietary restriction, DR), whose effects on cancer progression have been studied extensively for decades, requires weeks-months to be effective, causes much more modest changes in glucose and/or IGF-I levels, and promotes chronic weight loss in both rodents and humans. In this study, we review the basic as well as clinical studies on fasting, cellular protection and chemotherapy resistance, and compare them to those on DR and cancer treatment. Although additional pre-clinical and clinical studies are necessary, fasting has the potential to be translated into effective clinical interventions for the protection of patients and the improvement of therapeutic index.

  20. Changes in dynamic risk and protective factors for violence during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment: Predicting reductions in postdischarge community recidivism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries Robbé, M. de; Vogel, V. de; Douglas, K.S.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies have rarely investigated the association between improvements on dynamic risk and protective factors for violence during forensic psychiatric treatment and reduced recidivism after discharge. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of treatment progress in risk and

  1. Risk for Major Bleeding in Patients Receiving Ticagrelor Compared With Aspirin After Transient Ischemic Attack or Acute Ischemic Stroke in the SOCRATES Study (Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated With Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, J Donald; Aunes, Maria; Albers, Gregory W; Amarenco, Pierre; Bokelund-Singh, Sara; Denison, Hans; Evans, Scott R; Held, Peter; Jahreskog, Marianne; Jonasson, Jenny; Minematsu, Kazuo; Molina, Carlos A; Wang, Yongjun; Wong, K S Lawrence; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2017-09-05

    Patients with minor acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack are at high risk for subsequent stroke, and more potent antiplatelet therapy in the acute setting is needed. However, the potential benefit of more intense antiplatelet therapy must be assessed in relation to the risk for major bleeding. The SOCRATES trial (Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated With Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes) was the first trial with ticagrelor in patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack in which the efficacy and safety of ticagrelor were compared with those of aspirin. The main safety objective was assessment of PLATO (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes)-defined major bleeds on treatment, with special focus on intracranial hemorrhage (ICrH). An independent adjudication committee blinded to study treatment classified bleeds according to the PLATO, TIMI (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction), and GUSTO (Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries) definitions. The definitions of ICrH and major bleeding excluded cerebral microbleeds and asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformations of cerebral infarctions so that the definitions better discriminated important events in the acute stroke population. A total of 13 130 of 13 199 randomized patients received at least 1 dose of study drug and were included in the safety analysis set. PLATO major bleeds occurred in 31 patients (0.5%) on ticagrelor and 38 patients (0.6%) on aspirin (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-1.34). The most common locations of major bleeds were intracranial and gastrointestinal. ICrH was reported in 12 patients (0.2%) on ticagrelor and 18 patients (0.3%) on aspirin. Thirteen of all 30 ICrHs (4 on ticagrelor and 9 on aspirin) were hemorrhagic strokes, and 4 (2 in each group) were symptomatic hemorrhagic transformations of brain infarctions. The ICrHs were spontaneous in 6 and 13, traumatic in 3 and 3, and procedural in 3 and 2

  2. Aspirin-induced gastrointestinal damage is associated with an inhibition of epithelial cell autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Carlos; Barrachina, Maria Dolores; Vallecillo-Hernández, Jorge; Álvarez, Ángeles; Ortiz-Masiá, Dolores; Cosín-Roger, Jesús; Esplugues, Juan Vicente; Calatayud, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Aspirin (ASA) causes gastrotoxicity by hampering the epithelial defense against luminal contents through cyclooxygenase inhibition. Since cell survival in tough conditions may depend on rescue mechanisms like autophagy, we analyzed whether epithelial cells rely on this process to defend themselves from aspirin's damaging action. Rats received a single dose of ASA (150 mg/kg, p.o.) with or without pretreatment with the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine, and gastric injury and epithelial autophagy were evaluated 3 h later. The effects of ASA on cell viability and autophagy were also evaluated in gastric epithelial AGS cells. Basal autophagy in the gastric mucosa was inhibited by ASA as demonstrated by increased levels of p62 and ubiquitinated proteins and total LC3 and a reduced LC3-II/LC3-I ratio. Similarly, ASA increased p62 and decreased LC3-II accumulation and the number of EmGFP/LC3B puncta in AGS cells. ASA activated the PI3K/Akt-GSK3-mTOR pathway, which phosphorylates ULK1 to prevent autophagy initiation, changes that were inhibited by the PI3K-inhibitor wortmannin. Autophagy inhibition seems to enhance the vulnerability of gastric epithelial cells as a combination of ASA with 3-methyladenine exacerbated rat gastric damage and AGS cell apoptosis. Our data highlight the importance of autophagy in the gastric mucosa as a protective mechanism when the epithelium is injured. In the stomach, aspirin induces mucosal damage and reduces autophagy, thus, eliminating a protective mechanism that epithelial cells could use to escape death. We hypothesize that the combination of aspirin with drugs that activate autophagy could protect against gastric damage.

  3. Aspirin (single dose) for perineal pain in the early postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molakatalla, Sujana; Shepherd, Emily; Grivell, Rosalie M

    2017-02-09

    Perineal trauma (due to spontaneous tears, surgical incision (episiotomy) or in association with operative vaginal birth) is common after vaginal birth, and is often associated with postpartum perineal pain. Birth over an intact perineum may also lead to perineal pain. There are adverse health consequences associated with perineal pain for the women and their babies in the short- and long-term, and the pain may interfere with newborn care and the establishment of breastfeeding. Aspirin has been used in the management of postpartum perineal pain and its effectiveness and safety should be assessed. To determine the efficacy of a single dose of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), including at different doses, in the relief of acute postpartum perineal pain. We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (30 August 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (31 May 2016) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing single dose aspirin compared with placebo, no treatment, a different dose of aspirin, or single dose paracetamol/acetaminophen for women with perineal pain in the early postpartum period. We planned to include cluster-RCTs but none were identified. Quasi-RCTs and cross-over studies were not eligible for inclusion in this review. Two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included RCTs. Data were checked for accuracy. The quality of the evidence for the main comparison (aspirin versus placebo) was assessed using the GRADE approach. We included 17 RCTs, with 16 involving 1132 women randomised to aspirin or placebo (one RCT did not report numbers of women). Two RCTs (of 16) did not contribute data to review meta-analyses. All women had perineal pain post-episiotomy, and were not breastfeeding. Studies were published between 1967 and 1997, and the risk of bias was often unclear due to poor

  4. A multicentre double-blind comparison of oxaprozin aspirin therapy on rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubsher, J A; Ballard, I M; Walker, B R; Gold, J A

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary clinical studies showed that oxaprozin (4,5 Diphenyl-2-oxazolepropionic acid) has anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties with a plasma half-life of about 40 hours. Consequently, a multicentre, double-blind parallel trial was conducted for 12 weeks at thirteen investigator sites, utilizing 212 patients with classic rheumatoid arthritis and comparing oxaprozin 600 mg/day, oxaprozin 1200 mg/day and aspirin 3900 mg/day. Both the oxaprozin and aspirin-treated patients had statistically significant improvement from baseline periods, in most key categories evaluated. Oxaprozin administered twice a day (b.i.d.) was as effective as aspirin administered four times a day (q.i.d.) and caused significantly less tinnitus (p less than 0.001). Fewer patients receiving high dose oxaprozin (2%) dropped out of the study because of unsatisfactory response than did those receiving aspirin (10%). There were no clinically significant laboratory abnormalities in the gastro-intestinal, renal, hepatic or haematological parameters monitored. This study suggests that oxaprozin is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Prevention of Preeclampsia with Aspirin in Multiple Gestations: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Tessa S; Roberge, Stéphanie; Carpentier, Caroline; Sibai, Baha; McCaw-Binns, Affette; Bujold, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of low-dose aspirin in multiple gestations to prevent preeclampsia and small for gestational age (SGA) neonates. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed through electronic database searches. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of women with multiple gestations assigned to receive aspirin or placebo or no treatment were included. Outcomes included preeclampsia (mild and severe) and SGA neonates. Relative risks (RR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Result Out of 6,853 citations, 6 RCTS, including 898 pregnancies, were included. We observed a significant reduction in the risk of preeclampsia (RR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.48-0.94) and mild preeclampsia (RR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.24-0.82) but not severe preeclampsia (RR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.61-1.72) with low-dose aspirin. The risk of SGA was not changed (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.80-1.47). The reduction of preeclampsia was not different between women randomized before (RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.41-1.81) or after 16 weeks' gestation (RR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.43-0.96) (p = 0.50). Conclusion There is low level of evidence supporting the use of low-dose aspirin for the prevention of preeclampsia and SGA neonates in multiple gestations. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Aspirin overutilization for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VanWormer JJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey J VanWormer,1 Aaron W Miller,2 Shereif H Rezkalla3 1Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health, 2Biomedical Informatics Research Center, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, WI, USA; 3Department of Cardiology, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, WI, USA Background: Aspirin is commonly used for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD in the US. Previous research has observed significant levels of inappropriate aspirin use for primary CVD prevention in some European populations, but the degree to which aspirin is overutilized in the US remains unknown. This study examined the association between regular aspirin use and demographic/clinical factors in a population-based sample of adults without a clinical indication for aspirin for primary prevention.Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed using 2010–2012 data from individuals aged 30–79 years in the Marshfield Epidemiologic Study Area (WI, USA. Regular aspirin users included those who took aspirin at least every other day.Results: There were 16,922 individuals who were not clinically indicated for aspirin therapy for primary CVD prevention. Of these, 19% were regular aspirin users. In the final adjusted model, participants who were older, male, lived in northern Wisconsin, had more frequent medical visits, and had greater body mass index had significantly higher odds of regular aspirin use (P<0.001 for all. Race/ethnicity, health insurance, smoking, blood pressure, and lipid levels had negligible influence on aspirin use. A sensitivity analysis found a significant interaction between age and number of medical visits, indicating progressively more aspirin use in older age groups who visited their provider frequently.Conclusion: There was evidence of aspirin overutilization in this US population without CVD. Older age and more frequent provider visits were the strongest predictors of inappropriate aspirin use. Obesity was the only significant

  7. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality events in diabetes: updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunutsor, S K; Seidu, S; Khunti, K

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the benefits and harms of aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality events in people with diabetes by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. Randomized controlled trials of aspirin compared with placebo (or no treatment) in people with diabetes with no history of cardiovascular disease were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library and a manual search of bibliographies to November 2015. Study-specific relative risks with 95% CIs were aggregated using random effects models. A total of 10 randomized trials were included in the review. There was a significant reduction in risk of major adverse cardiovascular events: relative risk of 0.90 (95% CI 0.81-0.99) in groups taking aspirin compared with placebo or no treatment. Limited subgroup analyses suggested that the effect of aspirin on major adverse cardiovascular events differed by baseline cardiovascular disease risk, medication compliance and sex (P for interaction for all > 0.05).There was no significant reduction in the risk of myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease, stroke, cardiovascular mortality or all-cause mortality. Aspirin significantly reduced the risk of myocardial infarction for a treatment duration of ≤ 5 years. There were differences in the effect of aspirin by dosage and treatment duration on overall stroke outcomes (P for interaction for all diabetes who are at increased cardiovascular disease risk. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  8. Initial aspirin dose and outcome among ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients treated with fibrinolytic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jeffrey S; Stebbins, Amanda; Granger, Christopher B; Ohman, Eric M; Armstrong, Paul W; Van de Werf, Frans; White, Harvey D; Simes, R John; Harrington, Robert A; Califf, Robert M; Peterson, Eric D

    2008-01-15

    Although treatment with immediate aspirin reduces morbidity and mortality in ST-elevation myocardial infarction, the optimal dose is unclear. We therefore compared the acute mortality and bleeding risks associated with the initial use of 162 versus 325 mg aspirin in fibrinolytic-treated ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. Using combined data from the Global Utilization of Streptokinase and Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO I) and Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO III) trials (n=48 422 ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients), we compared the association between initial aspirin dose of 162 versus 325 mg and 24-hour and 7-day mortality, as well as rates of in-hospital moderate/severe bleeding. Results were adjusted for previously identified mortality and bleeding risk factors. Overall, 24.4% of patients (n=11 828) received an initial aspirin dose of 325 mg, and 75.6% (n=36 594) received 162 mg. The 24-hour mortality rates were 2.9% versus 2.8% (P=0.894) for those receiving an initial aspirin dose of 325 versus 162 mg. Mortality rates at 7 and 30 days were 5.2% versus 4.9% (P=0.118) and 7.1% versus 6.5% (P=0.017) among patients receiving the 325 versus 162 mg aspirin. After adjustment, aspirin dose was not associated with 24-hour (odds ratio [OR], 1.01; 95% CI, 0.82 to 1.25), 7-day (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.17), or 30-day (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.12) mortality rates. No significant difference was noted for myocardial infarction or the composite of death or myocardial infarction between groups. In-hospital moderate/severe bleeding occurred in 9.3% of those treated with 325 mg versus 12.2% among those receiving 162 mg (Paspirin may be as effective as and perhaps safer than 325 mg for the acute treatment of ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

  9. Aspirin is associated with an increased risk of subdural hematoma in normal-pressure hydrocephalus patients following shunt implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Peter; Lauritsen, Jens; Poulsen, Frantz Rom

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT: In this paper the authors investigate whether shunt-treated patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus receiving aspirin therapy are at increased risk of developing subdural hematoma (SDH). METHODS: Records from 80 consecutive patients who had undergone implantation of a cerebrospinal...... fluid shunt for the treatment of normal-pressure hydrocephalus were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Eleven cases of symptomatic SDH occurred, all among patients receiving aspirin or clopidogrel. The 5-year survival estimate was 0.3 (p ...% CI 3.1-53). CONCLUSIONS: Patients on an aspirin therapy regimen have a markedly increased risk of SDH after a shunt has been implanted for the treatment of normal-pressure hydrocephalus. Users of clopidogrel may have an even greater risk....

  10. The role of aspirin in the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittaman, Sunitha V; VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Rezkalla, Shereif H

    2014-12-01

    Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. © 2013 Marshfield Clinic.

  11. The Role of Aspirin in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittaman, Sunitha V.; VanWormer, Jeffrey J.; Rezkalla, Shereif H.

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. PMID:24573704

  12. Residual cyclooxygenase-1 activity and epinephrine reduce the antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscardó, Antonio; Santos, María Teresa; Fuset, María Paz; Ruano, Miguel; Vallés, Juana

    2011-04-01

    Aspirin treatment is essential in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to block platelet thromboxane (TXA)₂ synthesis. Epinephrine is known to enhance platelet reactivity induced by other agonists and to be elevated in patients with AMI due to stress. Our objective was to study the influence of epinephrine on platelet TXA₂ synthesis in patients treated with aspirin for AMI at early onset (within 48 hours) and the potential biochemical mechanisms involved in the functional response. Washed platelets from 45 patients with AMI and 10 aspirin-free controls were stimulated with arachidonic acid (AA) or AA + epinephrine, and aggregation and TXA₂ synthesis were evaluated. Full platelet aggregation was recorded in 8/45 patients (18%) with a partial TXA₂ inhibition (86%) vs. the aspirin-free controls. Platelets from the remaining 37 patients did not aggregate to AA and had TXA₂ inhibition >95%. However, when platelets were simultaneously stimulated with AA + epinephrine, in 25/37 patients a large intensity of aggregation (73%) was observed and a 5.5-fold increase in TXA₂ synthesis, although this remained residual (aspirin-free controls). This residual-TXA₂ was critical in the functional response, as demonstrated by the complete inhibition by TXA₂ receptor blockade or additional aspirin in vitro. The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase activity and the cytosolic calcium levels participated in this platelet response elicited by a receptor cooperation mechanism, while the Rho/p160(ROCK) pathway or the blockade of the ADP receptors (P2Y1, P2Y12) were without effect. Residual-cyclooxygenase -1 activity and epinephrine enhance TXA₂-dependent platelet function, which may reduce the clinical benefit of aspirin in patients with AMI.

  13. Effects of Combined Aspirin and Clopidogrel Therapy on Cardiovascular Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian; Ye, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Mei-Jing; Xu, Jin-Fang; Qin, Ying-Yi; He, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Background Aspirin and clopidogrel monotherapies are effective treatments for preventing vascular disease. However, new evidence has emerged regarding the use of combined aspirin and clopidogrel therapy to prevent cardiovascular events. We therefore performed a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the benefits and harms of combined aspirin and clopidogrel therapy on major cardiovascular outcomes. Methodology/Principal Findings We systematically searched Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, reference lists of articles, and proceedings of major meetings to identify studies to fit our analysis. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of combined aspirin and clopidogrel therapy compared with aspirin or clopidogrel monotherapy. We identified 7 trials providing data with a total of 48248 patients. These studies reported 5134 major cardiovascular events, 1626 myocardial infarctions, 1927 strokes, and 1147 major bleeding events. Overall, the addition of aspirin to clopidogrel therapy as compared to single drug therapy resulted in a 9% RR reduction (95%CI, 2 to 17) in major cardiovascular events, 14% RR reduction (95%CI, 3 to 24) in myocardial infarction, 16% RR reduction (95%CI, 1 to 28) in stroke, and 62% RR increase (95%CI, 26 to 108) in major bleeding events. We also present the data as ARR to explore net value as the reduction in cardiovascular events. Overall, we observed that combined therapy yielded 1.06% decrease (95%CI, 0.23% to 1.99%) in major cardiovascular events and 1.23% increase (95%CI, 0.52% to 2.14%) in major bleeding events. Conclusion/Significance Although the addition of aspirin to clopidogrel resulted in small relative reductions in major cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, it also resulted in a relative increase in major bleeding events. In absolute terms the benefits of combined therapy, a 1.06% reduction in major cardiovascular events, does

  14. Microhardness of glass ionomer cements indicated for the ART technique according to surface protection treatment and storage time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Keiko Shintome

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the microhardness of 5 glass ionomer cements (GIC - Vidrion R (V, SS White, Fuji IX (F, GC Corp., Magic Glass ART (MG, Vigodent, Maxxion R (MR, FGM and ChemFlex (CF, Dentsply - in the presence or absence of a surface protection treatment, and after different storage periods. For each GIC, 36 test specimens were made, divided into 3 groups according to the surface protection treatment applied - no protection, varnish or nail varnish. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h, 7 and 30 days and the microhardness tests were performed at these times. The data obtained were submitted to the ANOVA for repeated measures and Tukey tests (α = 5%. The results revealed that the mean microhardness values of the GICs were, in decreasing order, as follows: F > CF = MR > MG > V; that surface protection was significant for MR, at 24 h, without protection (64.2 ± 3.6a, protected with GIC varnish (59.6 ± 3.4b and protected with nail varnish (62.7 ± 2.8ab; for F, at 7 days, without protection (97.8 ± 3.7ab, protected with varnish (95.9 ± 3.2b and protected with nail varnish (100.8 ± 3.4a; and at 30 days, for F, without protection (98.8 ± 2.6b, protected with varnish (103.3 ± 4.4a and protected with nail varnish (101 ± 4.1ab and, for V, without protection (46 ± 1.3b, protected with varnish (49.6 ± 1.7ab and protected with nail varnish (51.1 ± 2.6a. The increase in storage time produced an increase in microhardness. It was concluded that the different GICs, surface protection treatments and storage times could alter the microhardness values.

  15. Corrosion Protection and Surface Treatment of Magnesium Alloys Used for Orthopedic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Nassif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview is reported about the history of prevailing magnesium alloys as orthopedic biodegradable materials. Important features of the effect of alloying additions, along with surface treatments for corrosion protection of magnesium alloys, are described. Hydroxyapatite (HA, the promising coat deposited by different direct and electrochemical methods to tailor corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, is discussed. Surface modifications, such as microarc oxidation or anodization which lead to nanostructures fabricated to provide better adhesion for HA coatings, are presented.

  16. Aspirin-induced histone acetylation in endothelial cells enhances synthesis of the secreted isoform of netrin-1 thus inhibiting monocyte vascular infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passacquale, Gabriella; Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Warboys, Christina; Cooper, Margaret; Lavin, Begona; Alfieri, Alessio; Andia, Marcelo E; Botnar, Rene M; Ferro, Albert

    2015-07-01

    There are conflicting data regarding whether netrin-1 retards or accelerates atherosclerosis progression, as it can lead either to monocyte repulsion from or retention within plaques depending on its cellular source. We investigated the effect of aspirin, which is widely used in cardiovascular prophylaxis, on the synthesis of different isoforms of netrin-1 by endothelial cells under pro-inflammatory conditions, and defined the net effect of aspirin-dependent systemic modulation of netrin-1 on atherosclerosis progression. Netrin-1 synthesis was studied in vitro using human endothelial cells stimulated with TNF-α, with or without aspirin treatment. In vivo experiments were conducted in ApoE(-/-) mice fed with a high-fat diet (HFD), receiving either aspirin or clopidogrel. TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation up-regulated the nuclear isoform of netrin-1, while simultaneously reducing secreted netrin-1. Down-regulation of the secreted isoform compromised the chemorepellent action of the endothelium against monocyte chemotaxis. Aspirin counteracted TNF-α-mediated effects on netrin-1 synthesis by endothelial cells through COX-dependent inhibition of NF-κB and concomitant histone hyperacetylation. Administration of aspirin to ApoE(-/-) mice on HFD increased blood and arterial wall levels of netrin-1 independently of its effects on platelets, accompanied by reduced plaque size and content of monocytes/macrophages, compared with untreated or clopidogrel-treated mice. In vivo blockade of netrin-1 enhanced monocyte plaque infiltration in aspirin-treated ApoE(-/-) mice. Aspirin counteracts down-regulation of secreted netrin-1 induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli in endothelial cells. The aspirin-dependent increase of netrin-1 in ApoE(-/-) mice exerts anti-atherogenic effects by preventing arterial accumulation of monocytes. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. The Fixation of New Alternative Wood Protection Systems by Means of Oil Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura LIIBERT

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the improvement of a combined impregnation process (CIP, also known as the Royal process. This treatment combines the protective properties of a wood protection agent and the hydrophobic properties of a subsequent oil treatment in a wood product. Copper-based wood preservatives, which are traditionally used in CIP, are very effective but their long-term future use is questionable because of environmental concerns, especially the toxicity against water-living organisms. There is a need for new environmentally friendly wood preservative systems for a use in CIP. The substitutes for copper used in this study are natural polymers and organic biocides. The aim of this research is to describe the fixation effectiveness of the following compounds: Chitosan, Propiconazole, Wolmanit CX-8, Tannin, fire protection agent, Alginate. The scots pine sapwood samples (50´25´15 mm were impregnated and oil treated. The treated products were analysed for their preservative-and oil-retention. Preservative fixation time influence on oil treatment was tested. The treated samples were leached according to EN84. Water samples were analyzed for the amount of active ingredient.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.4.777

  18. Rivaroxaban with or without Aspirin in Stable Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelboom, John W; Connolly, Stuart J; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R; Hart, Robert G; Shestakovska, Olga; Diaz, Rafael; Alings, Marco; Lonn, Eva M; Anand, Sonia S; Widimsky, Petr; Hori, Masatsugu; Avezum, Alvaro; Piegas, Leopoldo S; Branch, Kelley R H; Probstfield, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Deepak L; Zhu, Jun; Liang, Yan; Maggioni, Aldo P; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; O'Donnell, Martin; Kakkar, Ajay K; Fox, Keith A A; Parkhomenko, Alexander N; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Keltai, Matyas; Ryden, Lars; Pogosova, Nana; Dans, Antonio L; Lanas, Fernando; Commerford, Patrick J; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Guzik, Tomek J; Verhamme, Peter B; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Tonkin, Andrew M; Lewis, Basil S; Felix, Camilo; Yusoff, Khalid; Steg, P Gabriel; Metsarinne, Kaj P; Cook Bruns, Nancy; Misselwitz, Frank; Chen, Edmond; Leong, Darryl; Yusuf, Salim

    2017-10-05

    We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin (100 mg once daily), rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily), or aspirin (100 mg once daily). The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. The study was stopped for superiority of the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group after a mean follow-up of 23 months. The primary outcome occurred in fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group than in the aspirin-alone group (379 patients [4.1%] vs. 496 patients [5.4%]; hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.86; Paspirin group (288 patients [3.1%] vs. 170 patients [1.9%]; hazard ratio, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.40 to 2.05; Paspirin group as compared with 378 (4.1%) in the aspirin-alone group (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.96; P=0.01; threshold P value for significance, 0.0025). The primary outcome did not occur in significantly fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-alone group than in the aspirin-alone group, but major bleeding events occurred in more patients in the rivaroxaban-alone group. Among patients with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease, those assigned to rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin had better cardiovascular outcomes and more major bleeding events than those assigned to aspirin alone. Rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily) alone did not result in better cardiovascular outcomes than aspirin alone and resulted in more major bleeding events. (Funded by Bayer; COMPASS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01776424 .).

  19. Improving the Gastrointestinal Tolerability of Aspirin in Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Julia L.

    2006-01-01

    Interventions to reduce mortality and disability in older people are vital. Aspirin is cheap and effective and known to prevent cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, many cancers, and Alzheimer dementia. The widespread use of aspirin in older people is limited by its gastrointestinal side effects. Understanding age-related changes in gastrointestinal physiology that could put older people at risk of the side effects of aspirin may direct strategies to improve tolerance and hence lead to...

  20. Aspirin and Other COX-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrono, Carlo; Rocca, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    Currently available antiplatelet drugs interfere with the process of platelet activation and aggregation by selectively blocking key enzymes involved in the synthesis of platelet agonists, or membrane receptors mediating activation signals. Pharmacological interference with critical molecular pathways of platelet activation and aggregation may reduce the risk of atherothrombotic complications through mechanisms that are also responsible for an increased risk of bleeding. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) represents a prototypic antiplatelet agent. The aim of this chapter is to integrate our current understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of aspirin with the results of clinical trials and epidemiological studies assessing its efficacy and safety. Moreover, the antiplatelet properties of reversible inhibitors of the same drug target will also be reviewed.

  1. Aspirin: a history, a love story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Jeannette Y

    2012-05-01

    Most pharmacists know that aspirin's origins lie with willow bark, but they may be unaware of its role in the development of the pharmaceutical industry. Evolving from salacin (the active ingredient in many plant remedies) to salicylic acid (an analgesic in its own right) to the more effective, less toxic acetylsalicylic acid, this pain reliever cornered the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory market for more than 70 years. It helped the dye industry branch into pharmaceuticals, and is now used in multiple indications.

  2. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignone, Michael; Williams, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin is effective for the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with a history of vascular disease, as so-called secondary prevention. In general populations with no history of previous myocardial infarction or stroke, aspirin also seems useful for primary prevention of cardiovascular events, although the absolute benefits are smaller than those seen in patients with previous cardiovascular disease. Patients with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk of cardiovascular events, but new trials have raised questions about the benefit of aspirin for primary prevention in patients with this disorder. This Review comprehensively examines the basic pharmacology of aspirin and provides an overview of the randomized, controlled trials of aspirin therapy that have included patients with diabetes mellitus. On the basis of currently available evidence from primary prevention trials, aspirin is estimated to reduce the relative risk of myocardial infarction and stroke by about 10% in patients with diabetes mellitus; however, aspirin also increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. As such, low-dose aspirin therapy (75–162 mg) is reasonable for patients with diabetes mellitus and a 10-year risk of cardiovascular events >10%. Results from upcoming large trials will help clarify the effects of aspirin with greater precision, including whether the benefits differ between men and women. PMID:20856266

  3. Aspirin and metformin exhibit antitumor activity in murine breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Maoyuan; Wang, Yuyi; Du, Chi; Liu, Yanyang; Zhang, Nan; Luo, Feng

    2018-03-01

    Studies have shown that aspirin and metformin play important roles in chemoprevention and repression of breast cancers, even though the exact mechanism remains unclear. Aspirin is capable of stimulating apoptosis through prostaglandin-dependent or prostaglandin-independent pathways. Metformin inhibits cell growth by enhancing the tumor suppressive function of transforming growth factor (TGF-β). In the present study, we report a new link between aspirin, metformin, TGF-β1 and murine breast cancer inhibition. Specifically, we showed that aspirin and metformin enhanced 4T1 cell apoptosis by inducing secretion of TGF-β1, whereas estradiol weakened the effect.

  4. NO-aspirin: mechanism of action and gastrointestinal safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, S; Del Soldato, P

    2003-05-01

    Nitric oxide-releasing aspirins are new chemical entities obtained by adding a nitric oxide-releasing moiety to aspirin. NCX-4016 is the prototype of this family of molecules. NCX-4016 consists of the parent molecule (aspirin) linked to a 'spacer' via an ester linkage, which is in turn connected to a nitric oxide-releasing moiety. Both aspirin and nitric oxide moieties of NCX-4016 contribute to its effectiveness, the latter occurring via both cyclic guanosyl monophosphate-dependent and -independent mechanisms. In vitro studies have shown that NCX-4016 inhibits platelet aggregation induced by aspirin-sensitive (arachidonic acid) and aspirin-insensitive (thrombin) agonist. In contrast to aspirin, NCX-4016 exerts a multilevel regulation of inflammatory target, including caspase-1 and NF-kappaB. This broad spectrum of activities translates to an increased potency of this drug in modulating cardiovascular inflammation. Human studies have shown, that while nitric oxide-aspirin maintains its anti-thrombotic activity, it spares the gastrointestinal tract. Indeed, a 7-day course of NCX-4016 results in 90% reduction of gastric damage caused by equimolar doses of aspirin. Further studies are ongoing to define whether this superior anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic profile translates in clinical benefits in patients with cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Protocatechualdehyde synergizes with aspirin at the platelet cyclooxygenase-1 level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shiqing; Hao, Haiping; Gong, Ping; Tang, Zhiyuan; Li, Feiyan; Chen, Xiaohu; Shi, Haibo; Wang, Guangji

    2011-11-01

    Polyphenol-aspirin interactions were recently identified; however, the interaction mode and underlying mechanisms remained elusive. Here, we quantitatively assessed the potential interactions among two important polyphenolic compounds, caffeic acid (CA) and protocatechualdehyde (Pro), and aspirin in the AA-induced platelet aggregation model by applying the isobologram and universal response surface approach (URSA) methods. A molecular docking approach and an originally developed platelet-associated aspirin clearance approach (PAACA) were then applied to explore the potential interaction mechanisms. Although Pro and CA themselves exhibited weak inhibitory effect on arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation and the production of thromboxane B₂ (TXB₂), both Pro and CA potentiated aspirin action in a synergistic manner. The most prominent synergism was found between Pro and aspirin. Pro formed a stable complex into the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) channel by in silico docking and significantly promoted the platelet-associated aspirin clearance, suggesting that the Pro interaction with COX-1 was favorable to the binding of aspirin with COX-1. Taken together, our findings suggest that the capacity of Pro and potentially other structurally similar polyphenolic compounds on promoting the binding of aspirin on platelet COX-1 might be the main mechanism of their synergism with aspirin. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Trends in early aspirin use among patients with acute myocardial infarction in China, 2001-2011: the China PEACE-Retrospective AMI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Masoudi, Frederick A; Hu, Shuang; Li, Jing; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Xi; Desai, Nihar R; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2014-10-10

    Aspirin is an effective, safe, and inexpensive early treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with few barriers to administration, even in countries with limited healthcare resources. However, the rates and recent trends of aspirin use for the early treatment of AMI in China are unknown. Using data from the China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events Retrospective Study of Acute Myocardial Infarction (China PEACE-Retrospective AMI Study), we identified a cohort of 14 041 patients with AMI eligible for early aspirin therapy. Early use of aspirin for AMI increased over time (78.4% in 2001, 86.5% in 2006, and 90.0% in 2011). However, about 15% of hospitals had a rate of use of <80% in 2011. Treatment was less likely in patients who were older, presented with cardiogenic shock at admission, presented without chest discomfort, had a final diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction, or did not receive reperfusion therapy. Hospitalization in rural regions was also associated with aspirin underuse. Despite improvements in early use of aspirin for AMI in China, there remains marked variation in practice and opportunities for improvement that are concentrated in some hospitals and patient groups. ClinicalTrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT01624883. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  7. Aspirin Has Antitumor Effects via Expression of Calpain Gene in Cervical Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Koo Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs show efficacy in the prevention of cancers. It is known that they can inhibit cyclooxygenases, and some studies have shown that they can induce apoptosis. Our objective in this study was to investigate the mechanism by which aspirin exerts its apoptosis effects in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. The effect of aspirin on the gene expression was studied by differential mRNA display RT-PCR. Among the isolated genes, mu-type calpain gene was upregulated by aspirin treatment. To examine whether calpain mediates the antitumor effects, HeLa cells were stably transfected with the mammalian expression vector pCR3.1 containing mu-type calpain cDNA (pCRCAL/HeLa, and tumor formations were measured in nude mice. When tumor burden was measured by day 49, HeLa cells and pCR/HeLa cells (vector control produced tumors of 2126 mm3 and 1638 mm3, respectively, while pCRCAL/HeLa cells produced markedly smaller tumor of 434 mm3 in volume. The caspase-3 activity was markedly elevated in pCRCAL/HeLa cells. The increased activity levels of caspase-3 in pCRCAL/HeLa cells, in parallel with the decreased tumor formation, suggest a correlation between caspase-3 activity and calpain protein. Therefore, we conclude that aspirin-induced calpain mediates an antitumor effect via caspase-3 in cervical cancer cells.

  8. Effect of Low-Dose Aspirin on Chronic Acid Reflux Esophagitis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takahiro; Yano, Fumiaki; Omura, Nobuo; Tsuboi, Kazuto; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Se Ryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2018-01-01

    Clinical role of low-dose aspirin (LDA) in pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease is by far controversial. This can be attributed to the paucity of basic research detailing the mechanism of LDA-induced esophageal mucosal injury (EI) on underlying chronic acid reflux esophagitis (RE). The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of LDA on chronic RE in rats. Esophagitis was induced in 8-week-old male Wistar rats by ligating the border between forestomach and glandular portion with a 2-0 silk tie and covering the duodenum with a small piece of 18-Fr Nélaton catheter. Seventy-eight chronic RE rat models were divided into five treatment groups, consisting of orally administered vehicle (controls), and aspirin doses of 2, 5, 50 or 100 mg/kg once daily for 28 days. EI was assessed by gross area of macroscopic mucosal injury, severity grade of esophagitis and microscopic depth of infiltration by inflammatory cells. Area of esophagitis in animals with aspirin dose of 100 mg/kg/day showed a 36.5% increase compared with controls, although it failed to achieve statistical significance (p = 0.812). Additionally, the rate of severe EI was increased in animals with aspirin dose of 100 mg/kg/day as compared with controls (p < 0.05). The grade of severity correlated with the depth of inflammation (r s = 0.492, p < 0.001). Maximal dose aspirin (100 mg/kg/day) contributed in exacerbating preexisting EI. LDA (2 and 5 mg/kg/day), on the other hand, did not affect chronic RE in this model. LDA seems to be safe for use in patients with chronic RE.

  9. New insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of aspirin- induction of nitric oxide through the generation of epi-lipoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek W Gilroy

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin has always remained an enigmatic drug. Not only does it present with new benefits for treating an ever-expanding list of apparently unrelated diseases at an astounding rate but also because aspirin enhances our understanding of the nature of these diseases processe. Originally, the beneficial effects of aspirin were shown to stem from its inhibition of cyclooxygenase-derived prostaglandins, fatty acid metabolites that modulate host defense. However, in addition to inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity aspirin can also inhibit pro-inflammatory signaling pathways, gene expression and other factors distinct from eicosanoid biosynthesis that drive inflammation as well as enhance the synthesis of endogenous protective anti-inflammatory factors. Its true mechanism of action in anti-inflammation remains unclear. Here the data from a series of recent experiments proposing that one of aspirin's predominant roles in inflammation is the induction of nitric oxide, which potently inhibits leukocyte/endothelium interaction during acute inflammation, will be discussed. It will be argued that this nitric oxide-inducing effects are exclusive to aspirin due to its unique ability, among the family of traditional anti-inflammatory drugs, to acetylate the active site of inducible cyclooxygenase and generate a family of lipid mediators called the epi-lipoxins that are increasingly being shown to have profound roles in a range of host defense responses.

  10. Irradiation treatment for the protection and conservation of cultural heritage artefacts in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katušin-Ražem, Branka; Ražem, Dušan; Braun, Mario

    2009-07-01

    The application of irradiation treatment for the protection of cultural heritage artefacts in Croatia was made possible by the development of radiation processing procedures at the Radiation Chemistry and Dosimetry Laboratory of the Ruđer Bo\\vsković Institute. After the upgrading of the 60Co gamma irradiation source in the panoramic irradiation facility in 1983 it became possible to perform both research and pilot plant-scale irradiations for sterilization, pasteurization and decontamination of various materials, including medical supplies, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and foods, but also for disinfestation of cultural heritage artefects. The demand for irradiation treatment of cultural heritage objects has particularly increased as the increasing number of these objects, especially polychromic wooden sculptures, were requiring salvation, restauration and conservation as a consequence of direct and indirect damages inflicted to them during the war in Croatia, 1991-1995. The irradiation facility at the Ruđer Bo\\vsković Institute is briefly described and an account of its fifteen years' activities in the irradiation treatment of cultural heritage objects is given. Some case studies performed in cooperation with the Croatian Conservation Institute and other interested parties are presented, as well as some cases of protective and curative treatments for disinfestation and decontamination. International cooperations and activities are also mentioned.

  11. Irradiation treatment for the protection and conservation of cultural heritage artefacts in Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katusin-Razem, Branka [Department of Chemistry, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: brazem@irb.hr; Razem, Dusan [Department of Chemistry, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Braun, Mario [Croatian Conservation Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-07-15

    The application of irradiation treatment for the protection of cultural heritage artefacts in Croatia was made possible by the development of radiation processing procedures at the Radiation Chemistry and Dosimetry Laboratory of the Ruder Boskovic Institute. After the upgrading of the {sup 60}Co gamma irradiation source in the panoramic irradiation facility in 1983 it became possible to perform both research and pilot plant-scale irradiations for sterilization, pasteurization and decontamination of various materials, including medical supplies, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and foods, but also for disinfestation of cultural heritage artefects. The demand for irradiation treatment of cultural heritage objects has particularly increased as the increasing number of these objects, especially polychromic wooden sculptures, were requiring salvation, restauration and conservation as a consequence of direct and indirect damages inflicted to them during the war in Croatia, 1991-1995. The irradiation facility at the Ruder Boskovic Institute is briefly described and an account of its fifteen years' activities in the irradiation treatment of cultural heritage objects is given. Some case studies performed in cooperation with the Croatian Conservation Institute and other interested parties are presented, as well as some cases of protective and curative treatments for disinfestation and decontamination. International cooperations and activities are also mentioned.

  12. High-Dose Aspirin is Associated with Anemia and Does Not Confer Benefit to Disease Outcomes in Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Lo, Mao-Hung; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Guo, Mindy Ming-Huey; Huang, Ying-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is also known as multiple mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome of systemic vasculitis and is a leading cause of coronary artery lesions (CAL) in childhood. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been proven to effectively reduce the incidence of CAL, but the role and effect dose of aspirin in KD is still unclear. Moreover, overt bleeding and anemia are associated with the use of aspirin, and anemia is common in patients with KD. Thus, the aim of this study was conducted to compare the treatment efficacy, degree of anemia and inflammation, and changes in serum hepcidin in children who received a combination of high-dose aspirin and IVIG in the acute stage of KD, and those who received IVIG alone. KD patients from two medical centers were retrospectively analyzed from 1999-2009. All patients were initially treated with a single dose of IVIG (2 g/kg) as the standard care of treatment. In group 1, high-dose aspirin was prescribed (> 30 mg/kg/day) until the fever subsided, and then low-dose aspirin (3-5 mg/kg/day) was prescribed until all the inflammation signs had resolved. In group 2, low-dose aspirin was prescribed without high-dose aspirin. Laboratory data were collected for analysis in both groups. A total of 851 KD patients (group 1, N = 305, group 2, N = 546) were enrolled in this study. There were no significant differences between group 1 and group 2 in terms of gender (p = 0.51), IVIG resistance rate (31/305 vs. 38/546, p = 0.07), CAL formation (52/305 vs. 84/546, p = 0.67), and duration of hospitalization (6.3 ± 0.2 vs. 6.7 ± 0.2 days, p = 0.13). There were also initially no significant differences in total white blood cell count, hemoglobin level, platelet count, and CRP before IVIG treatment between groups (all p>0.1). After IVIG treatment, group 1 had significantly lower levels of hemoglobin (p = 0.006) and higher CRP (paspirin in the acute phase of KD does not confer any benefit with regards to inflammation and it does not appear to

  13. [Rapid aspirin desensitization in patients with a history of aspirin hypersensitivity requiring coronary angioplasty. Report of four cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veas P, Nicolás; Martínez, Gonzalo; Jalil M, Jorge; Martínez S, Alejandro; Castro G, Pablo

    2013-02-01

    Aspirin use is necessary after a coronary angioplasty. It should not be used in patients with a history of hypersensitivity. However, rapid desensitization protocols have been reported to allow its use in such patients. One of these protocols consists in the administration of progressive doses of aspirin, from 1 to 100 mg in a period of 5.5 hours, in a controlled environment. We report four male patients aged 45,49, 59 and 73 years with a history of aspirin hypersensitivity, who were subjected to a coronary angioplasty. In all, the rapid aspirin desensitization protocol was successfully applied, allowing the use of the drug after the intervention without problems.

  14. Aspirin content determination with control systems by image processing technology. Gazo shori gijutsu wo katsuyoshita jozai aspirin kensa sochi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K. (Lion Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-08-05

    An inspection apparatus for aspirin tablets utilizing image processing technology was developed. One side of a tablet consists of aspirin layer and another side consists of alkiline layer. The alkaline layer is opaque at all but the aspirin layer is translucent. Image of overall configuration of the tablet is taken in CCD camera by illumination from all surrounding sides. The area is measured by using these images. Then, when switching off the surrounding illumination and illuminating the aspirin side, only aspirin side layer shines. The area is determined by taking the image in CCD. Aspirin content is calculated by the ratio of overall images to aspirin image and the predetermined tablet weight. Tablets of different aspirin content were prepared, and the content determined by this method and the chemically determined contents were compared. High correlation was found between both contents, indicating the validity of the image processing method. When the aspirin content is out of 330 {plus minus} 10mg, the controlling mechanism works, by which unmanned operation will be possible. 8 figs.

  15. Changes in dynamic risk and protective factors for violence during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment: predicting reductions in postdischarge community recidivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries Robbé, Michiel; de Vogel, Vivienne; Douglas, Kevin S; Nijman, Henk L I

    2015-02-01

    Empirical studies have rarely investigated the association between improvements on dynamic risk and protective factors for violence during forensic psychiatric treatment and reduced recidivism after discharge. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of treatment progress in risk and protective factors on violent recidivism. For a sample of 108 discharged forensic psychiatric patients pre- and posttreatment assessments of risk (HCR-20) and protective factors (SAPROF) were compared. Changes were related to violent recidivism at different follow-up times after discharge. Improvements on risk and protective factors during treatment showed good predictive validity for abstention from violence for short- (1 year) as well as long-term (11 years) follow-up. This study demonstrates the sensitivity of the HCR-20 and the SAPROF to change and shows improvements on dynamic risk and protective factors are associated with lower violent recidivism long after treatment.

  16. Combination of raloxifene, aspirin and estrogen as novel paradigm of hormone replacement therapy in rabbit model of menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fa-lin; Hu, Ke-qing; Wang, Xin; Liu, Zi-mo; Hu, Qin; Li, Ji-fu; He, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To assess a novel hormone replacement therapy (HRT) paradigm using raloxifene, aspirin combined with estrogen in rabbit model of menopause. Methods: Female New Zealand white rabbits were ovariectomized or sham-operated. The ovariectomized rabbits were divided into 7 groups: estradiol valerate (E2), raloxifene, aspirin, E2 /raloxifene, E2/aspirin, E2 /raloxifene/aspirin and vehicle. Two weeks after the operation, the rabbits were administered the above drugs for 12 weeks. Then, the mammary glands were examined histologically, uterus was weighted, and blood sample was collected for analyzing the levels of estrogen, serum lipids and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and platelet aggregation. The aortic tissue was examined morphometrically. Results: Compared with E2 0.1 mg·kg−1·d−1 treatment alone, the pairing of raloxifene 10 mg·kg−1·d−1 with E2 significantly decreased the extent of mammary gland branches and ducts (5.53%±1.23% vs 15.4%±2.17%, Praloxifene or E2 alone treatment significantly stimulated platelet aggregation relative to vehicle group. Addition of aspirin 5 mg·kg−1·d−1 reduced platelet aggregation to almost the same level as the vehicle group. E2 treatment exerted a positive effect on serum lipids and MCP-1, and a regression in aortic intimal plaque size compared to the vehicle. Raloxifene reinforced the positive effects of E2. Conclusion: The combination of raloxifene, aspirin and E2 exhibits positive lipid, MCP-1 and atherosclerotic responses with minimal stimulation of breast and uterine tissues as well as platelet aggregation in a rabbit model of the menopause. PMID:21765446

  17. Aspirin decreases vascular endothelial growth factor release during myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrah, Rabin; Fogel, Mina; Gilon, Dan

    2004-03-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is an important angiogenesis factor involved in pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. Controlling this factor's level in the serum might have significant prognostic outcomes. Twenty-four patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting were prospectively categorized into two groups according to aspirin administration before surgery. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor levels were compared and correlated and adjusted with platelets count between two groups in the serum, before and after the surgery. Serum creatine kinase (CK) levels were determined before and after the operation in parallel to other clinical data. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor levels were significantly lower in patients of the aspirin group compared to those of the non-aspirin group; 94+/-61 vs. 241+/-118 pg/ml, p=0.0003, respectively, this-despite an absence of difference in the platelet count between the groups. These titers decreased postoperatively in both groups, 94+/-61 to 10+/-9 pg/ml, p=0.001 in aspirin group and from 241+/-118 to 84+/-54 pg/ml, p=0.001 in control group. Serum creatine kinase levels were higher in the non-aspirin group, 214+/-83 u/l compared to 70+/-32 u/l in the aspirin group. Creatine kinase levels increased significantly postoperatively in both groups; however, the aspirin group had a significantly lower creatine kinase levels compared to non-aspirin group, 107+/-51 vs. 401+/-127 u/l, respectively, p=<0.0001. A significant correlation was seen between VEGF levels and platelets count in both groups, r=0.5. Aspirin treated patients have lower Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor titer levels in the perioperative course. This difference between the aspirin and the non-aspirin group is not accounted for by the platelets count.

  18. Aspirin dose and ticagrelor benefit in PLATO: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebruany, Victor L

    2010-01-01

    To summarize the available evidence regarding whether or not a higher aspirin maintenance dose inversely affects the ticagrelor benefit observed in the US cohort of the PLATO trial. In the recent PLATO trial, the daily aspirin dosages in the USA were split between 81 and 325 mg while the vast majority of dosing outside of the USA was 75 or 100 mg. The FDA conducted exhaustive analyses of the aspirin dosage in a framework of primary clinical efficacy. Considering the post hoc, not prespecified nature of such analyses as well as multiple confounding problems with biologic plausibility, sensitivity to reclassification of small numbers of cases regarding loading versus maintenance aspirin dosing, and the distribution of events in high-dose aspirin observed outside of the USA, the FDA documents clearly suggest that aspirin dosing does not explain the disparate outcome results. In addition, the Advisory Committee members found no evidence to establish a reasonable link, and they uniformly rejected the hypothesis that aspirin dose affects the heterogeneity of outcomes in PLATO. Additional evidence driven from the FDA review on aspirin dose and PLATO outcomes is reassessed. The wide distribution of outcomes differing from country to country, and inconsistency in European data despite identical aspirin doses, preclude the acceptance of the hypothesis that aspirin affects PLATO outcomes in general or adversely impacts the benefit of ticagrelor in the US cohort in particular. Differences in primary site monitoring by the study sponsor in most countries versus a third-party CRO in the USA represent an alternative explanation and deserve further attention. There is no solid evidence that aspirin dose affects outcomes after ticagrelor. Reevaluation of the overall endpoint differences, especially focusing on mortality, driven from sponsor-monitored sites versus outcomes observed by independent CROs is neccessary. The practice of self-monitoring in pivotal indication

  19. Assessment of the prophylactic role of aspirin and/or clopidogrel on experimentally induced acute myocardial infarction in hypercholesterolemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Adham R; El-Hadidy, Wessam F; Mannaa, Hazem F

    2014-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases such as acute infarction. Inflammation and platelet activation are critical phenomena in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of the study was to assess potential protective effects of aspirin and/or clopidogrel on AMI in hypercholesterolemic rats. Forty adult male Wistar rats were divided into five groups (eight rats in each). Group I included normal healthy rats. The other 32 rats were subjected to induction of hypercholesterolemia by high-fat diet for 3 weeks, followed by induction of AMI by subcutaneous injections of isoproterenol (85 mg/kg/day, for 2 days). Rats were divided into the following groups: group II, rats with induced hypercholesterolemia and AMI; group III, hypercholesterolemic rats that received aspirin 30 mg/kg/day orally for 7 days before induction of AMI; group IV, hypercholesterolemic rats that received clopidogrel 10 mg/kg/day orally for 7 days before induction of AMI; and group V, hypercholesterolemic rats treated with both aspirin and clopidogrel in the same doses for 7 days before induction of AMI. Serum levels of pentraxin 3 (PTX3), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total cholesterol and triglycerides were estimated in all rats. Isoproterenol-induced AMI in hypercholesterolemic rats was associated with an increase in serum levels of PTX3, TGF-β1, CK and LDH. Aspirin and/or clopidogrel pretreatment for 1 week led to a reduction of their levels as compared with non-treated rats. However, the reduction caused by combination of aspirin and clopidogrel was more than that caused by each drug separately. Combination of aspirin and clopidogrel could be a therapeutic option for hypercholesterolemic patients to attenuate the complex vascular inflammatory process which is a key step in the setting of AMI.

  20. A plane screw fixation is a nidus for Paecilomyces sinusitis in a patient with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony M. Szema

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium plane screw fixation of the frontal sinus is an approach used by otolaryngologists to obliterate this space in an attempt to reduce sinus infections. In this case, however, the titanium used became a nidus of infection which cultured the fungus Paecilomyces. The patient also had a hypersensitivity reaction to mold with positive skin tests and IgE, as well as eosinophilic esophagitis. Treatment entailed anti-fungals, anti-IgE, and fungal immunotherapy to multiple fungal antigens prevalent to the geographic region. The patient also had aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease which responded to aspirin desensitization. Her symptoms resolved after 3 months.

  1. Trends in Early Aspirin Use Among Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction in China, 2001–2011: The China PEACE‐Retrospective AMI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Hu, Shuang; Li, Jing; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Xi; Desai, Nihar R.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Jiang, Lixin

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspirin is an effective, safe, and inexpensive early treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with few barriers to administration, even in countries with limited healthcare resources. However, the rates and recent trends of aspirin use for the early treatment of AMI in China are unknown. Methods and Results Using data from the China Patient‐centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events Retrospective Study of Acute Myocardial Infarction (China PEACE‐Retrospective AMI Study), we identified a cohort of 14 041 patients with AMI eligible for early aspirin therapy. Early use of aspirin for AMI increased over time (78.4% in 2001, 86.5% in 2006, and 90.0% in 2011). However, about 15% of hospitals had a rate of use of myocardial infarction, or did not receive reperfusion therapy. Hospitalization in rural regions was also associated with aspirin underuse. Conclusions Despite improvements in early use of aspirin for AMI in China, there remains marked variation in practice and opportunities for improvement that are concentrated in some hospitals and patient groups. Clinical Trial Registration URL: ClinicalTrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT01624883. PMID:25304853

  2. Aspirin-induced inhibition of adipogenesis was p53-dependent and associated with inactivation of pentose phosphate pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ying-Fang; Yang, Shih-Huang; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Wu, Buor-Chang; Huang, Shu-Ching; Liu, Chia-Ming; Chen, Shiow-Ling; Pan, Ya-Fang; Chou, Shih-Shen; Chou, Ming-Yung; Yang, Hui-Wen

    2014-09-05

    Obesity has become a major public health problem of global significance. Today, aspirin remains the most commonly used medication for the treatment of pyrexia, pain, inflammation and antiplatelet. The present study aims at evaluating the possible existence of a putative p53-dependent pathway underlying the aspirin-induced inhibition of adipogenesis. Cell migration assay was identified by the ability to migrate through Transwell insert. Oil Red O staining was employed to quantify adipose accumulation. The concentration of glucose and triglyceride were measured by using assay kits. The expression levels of several master regulatory molecules controlling various signal pathways were monitored using the immunoblotting techniques. Aspirin significantly inhibited preadipocyte migration and adipose accumulation. The p53-p21 signaling and the expression of differentiation marker glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were increased in a dose-dependent manner. It indicated that aspirin induced adipocyte differentiation through p53-p21 pathway. The oncogenic ERK 1/2 MAPK signaling was induced, whereas, the expression of adipogenic markers peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) and inflammatory factors cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were inhibited. Aspirin negatively regulated the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) by inhibiting the expression of rate-limiting enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Knockdown the expression of oncogenic ERK 1/2 MAPK by using 10 μM PD98059 significantly increased triglyceride synthesis, adipose accumulation and activated PPP, however, decreased glucose uptake. Diverted the glucose flux to PPP, rather than increased glucose uptake, was associated with adipogenesis. Down-regulated the expression of tumor suppressor p53 by 10 μM pifithrin-α (PFTα) alone had no effect on adipose accumulation. However, administration

  3. Regulation effect of Aspirin Eugenol Ester on blood lipids in Wistar rats with hyperlipidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Karam, Isam; Ma, Ning; Liu, Xi-Wang; Li, Shi-Hong; Kong, Xiao-Jun; Li, Jian-Yong; Yang, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspirin eugenol ester (AEE) is a promising drug candidate for treatment of inflammation, pain and fever and prevention of cardiovascular diseases with less side effects. The experiment will be conducted to investigate the efficacy of AEE on curing hyperlipidemia in Wistar rats. The rats were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 8?weeks to induce hyperlipidemia. Results Compared with the model group, the results showed that AEE at 54?mg/kg dosage could significantly decrease the hyperli...

  4. Aspirin sensitivity syndrome (Samter's Triad): an unrecognized disorder in children with nasal polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Brian S; Virant, Frank S; Parikh, Sanjay R; Manning, Scott C

    2013-02-01

    Aspirin sensitivity syndrome is an underdiagnosed entity in pediatric otolaryngology. The diagnosis must be considered in a pediatric non-cystic fibrosis patient with florid nasal polyposis. In this small case series, we will describe 2 patient's presentation, work up, allergic and surgical therapies and their postoperative course. In doing so, we hope to increase awareness and to illustrate the details that are involved in its diagnosis and treatment. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Xenon treatment protects against cold ischemia associated delayed graft function and prolongs graft survival in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Watts, H R; Chong, M; Huang, H; Tralau-Stewart, C; Maxwell, P H; Maze, M; George, A J T; Ma, D

    2013-08-01

    Prolonged hypothermic storage causes ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in the renal graft, which is considered to contribute to the occurrence of the delayed graft function (DGF) and chronic graft failure. Strategies are required to protect the graft and to prolong renal graft survival. We demonstrated that xenon exposure to human proximal tubular cells (HK-2) led to activation of range of protective proteins. Xenon treatment prior to or after hypothermia-hypoxia challenge stabilized the HK-2 cellular structure, diminished cytoplasmic translocation of high-mobility group box (HMGB) 1 and suppressed NF-κB activation. In the syngeneic Lewis-to-Lewis rat model of kidney transplantation, xenon exposure to donors before graft retrieval or to recipients after engraftment decreased caspase-3 expression, localized HMGB-1 within nuclei and prevented TLR-4/NF-κB activation in tubular cells; serum pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were reduced and renal function was preserved. Xenon treatment of graft donors or of recipients prolonged renal graft survival following IRI in both Lewis-to-Lewis isografts and Fischer-to-Lewis allografts. Xenon induced cell survival or graft functional recovery was abolished by HIF-1α siRNA. Our data suggest that xenon treatment attenuates DGF and enhances graft survival. This approach could be translated into clinical practice leading to a considerable improvement in long-term graft survival. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  6. Beneficial effect of aspirin on renal function in patients with renal insufficiency postcardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrah, R; Ehrlich, S; Tshori, S; Sahar, G

    2004-12-01

    Renal function is one of the most important prognostic factors following cardiac surgery. Whether aspirin affects cardiopulmonary bypass related renal injury is investigated in this study. Ninety-four patients with impaired renal function (creatinine = or >1.5 mg/dl) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) were categorized into 2 groups according to aspirin administration before surgery. Serum creatinine, urinary output and creatinine clearance along with other perioperative factors were compared between the 2 groups prior to surgery, 24 hours and 48 hours following cardiopulmonary bypass. Creatinine levels increased significantly in the second postoperative day only in the non-aspirin (control) group (3.7+/-1.6 vs 2.9+/-1.7 mg/dl, p=0.03). Aspirin (study) group had lower creatinine levels in day 1 (p=0.03) and day 2 (p=0.001). Furthermore, in the study group creatinine clearance was higher in day 1 (34.3+/-14.3 vs 30.9+/-13.1 ml/min, p=0.01) and in day 2 (32.6+/-13.8 vs 26.4+/-9.8 ml, p<0.0001). Creatinine levels at discharge were elevated compared to the preoperative levels in the control group (p=0.01). However, the study group had lower creatinine levels at discharge (2.6+/-1.4 vs 3.8+/-1.6 mg/dl, p<0.0001). Urinary output was higher in the study group in the first postoperative day compared to the control group (p=0.01). Postoperative bleeding was slightly increased in the study group compared to the control group (760+/-230 ml vs 530+/-210 ml, p=0.01). Continuation of aspirin administration until the day of surgery may have a protective effect against renal injury resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass, with only a negligible increase in bleeding. Possible explanations for this effect are antiplatelet activity of aspirin during cardiopulmonary bypass causing inhibition of vasoconstrictive agents like thromboxane, and improvement of renal perfusion by reducing blood viscosity.

  7. Effects of aspirin dose escalation on platelet function and urinary thromboxane and prostacyclin levels in normal dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLewee, N; Archer, T; Wills, R; Mackin, A; Thomason, J

    2018-02-01

    Established "low" aspirin dosages inconsistently inhibit platelet function in dogs. Higher aspirin dosages consistently inhibit platelet function, but are associated with adverse effects. The objectives of this study were to use an escalation in dosage to determine the lowest aspirin dosage that consistently inhibited platelet function without inhibiting prostacyclin synthesis. Eight dogs were treated with five aspirin dosages: 0.5 mg/kg q24h, 1 mg/kg q24h, 2 mg/kg q24h, 4 mg/kg q24h and 10 mg/kg q12h for 7 days. Utilizing aggregometry and a whole-blood platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), platelet function was evaluated before and after treatment. Urine 11-dehydro-thromboxane-B2 (11-dTXB2 ) and 6-keto-prostaglandin-F1α (6-keto-PGF1α ), were measured. Compared to pretreatment, there were significant post-treatment decreases in the maximum aggregometry amplitude and increases in the PFA-100 closure times for all dosages expect 0.5 mg/kg q24h. There was no difference in amplitude or closure time among the 2 mg/kg q24h, 4 mg/kg q24h, and 10 mg/kg q12h dosages. Compared to pretreatment values, there was a significant decrease in urinary 11-dTXB2 -to-creatinine and 6-keto-PGF1α -to-creatinine ratios, but there was no dose-dependent decrease for either metabolite. An aspirin dosage of 2 mg/kg q24h consistently inhibits platelet function without decreasing prostacyclin synthesis significantly more than lower aspirin dosages. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The thrombolytic effect of aspirin in animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmohapatra, Soumendra K; Kahn, Nighat N; Sinha, Asru K

    2007-10-01

    The aspirin induced platelet aggregation has been reported to be mediated through the inhibition of platelet prostaglandin synthesis. This compound has also been recently reported to stimulate nitric oxide synthesis in platelets. Since nitric oxide has been reported to produce fibrinogen/fibrinolytic effect, investigation was carried out to determine fibrinolytic effect of in vivo exposure of platelets to aspirin in normal volunteers on the fibrinolysis of the clotted platelet-rich plasma in vitro. The thrombolytic effect of aspirin in situ was also carried out by injecting aspirin solution in the mice with ADP induced formed thrombi in the coronary artery. It was found that the clotted platelet-rich plasma prepared from the volunteers (n = 10, F = 5, M = 5) who ingested 150 mg aspirin, began to undergo spontaneous and progressive fibrinolysis for 200 min at 37 degrees C with the generation of fibrin degradation products in the lysate. No such fibrinolysis could be seen in control experiments. When platelet thrombi were produced in the coronary artery of mice by injecting ADP, and these animals subsequently received intravenous injection of aspirin (4 muM final), they not only survived (P < 0.0001, n = 10) the thrombogenic assault but the lysis of the platelet thrombi was also noted in the post mortem examination. The thrombolytic effect of aspirin was found to be comparable to that of streptokinase in these animals. Aspirin, through the stimulation of NO synthesis, may produce thrombolysis in vivo.

  9. Aspirin and lipid mediators in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2015-09-01

    Aspirin is an unique compound because it bears two active moieties within one and the same molecule: a reactive acetyl group and the salicylate metabolite. Salicylate has some effects similar to aspirin, however only at higher concentrations, usually in the millimolar range, which are not obtained at conventional antiplatelet aspirin doses of 100-300 mg/day. Pharmacological actions of aspirin in the cardiovascular system at these doses are largely if not entirely due to target structure acetylation. Several classes of lipid mediators become affected: Best known is the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in platelets with subsequent inhibition of thromboxane and, possibly, thrombin formation. By this action, aspirin also inhibits paracrine thromboxane functions on other lipid mediators, such as the platelet storage product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an inflammatory mediator. Acetylation of COX-2 allows for generation of 15-(R)HETE and subsequent formation of "aspirin-triggered lipoxin" (ATL) by interaction with white cell lipoxygenases. In the cardiovascular system, aspirin also acetylates eNOS with subsequent upregulation of NO formation and enhanced expression of the antioxidans heme-oxygenase-1. This action is possibly also COX-2/ATL mediated. Many more acetylation targets have been identified in live cells by quantitative acid-cleavable activity-based protein profiling and might result in discovery of even more aspirin targets in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis of peptide derivatives of aspirin and their antibiogram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peptide derivatives of Aspirin (1 to 8) were synthesized by using Ac2O/AcOH reaction with Salicyclic acid. Aspirin was coupled with amino acid amide and dipeptide amide and tripeptide amide using its p-nitro phenyl (NP) ester. The ester (Aspirin–ONP) was prepared using p-nitro phenol and DCC in EtOAc and was ...

  11. Aspirin Risks in Perspective: A Comparison against Marathon Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin has public health potential to reduce the risk of ischaemic vascular events and sporadic cancer. One objection to the wider use of aspirin for primary prevention, however, is the undesirable effects of the medicine, which include increasing risk of bleeding and haemorrhagic stroke. Marathons also carry risks of serious events such as…

  12. Rivaroxaban with or without Aspirin in Stable Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelboom, John W.; Connolly, Stuart J.; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R.; Hart, Robert G.; Shestakovska, Olga; Diaz, Rafael; Alings, Marco; Lonn, Eva M.; Anand, Sonia S.; Widimsky, Petr; Hori, Masatsugu; Avezum, Alvaro; Piegas, Leopoldo S.; Branch, Kelley R. H.; Probstfield, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Zhu, Jun; Liang, Yan; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; O'Donnell, Martin; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Parkhomenko, Alexander N.; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Keltai, Matyas; Ryden, Lars; Pogosova, Nana; Dans, Antonio L.; Lanas, Fernando; Commerford, Patrick J.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Guzik, Tomek J.; Verhamme, Peter B.; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Tonkin, Andrew M.; Lewis, Basil S.; Felix, Camilo; Yusoff, Khalid; Steg, P. Gabriel; Metsarinne, Kaj P.; Cook Bruns, Nancy; Misselwitz, Frank; Chen, Edmond; Leong, Darryl; Yusuf, Salim; Aboyans, V.; Ha, J.; Keltai, K.; Lamy, A.; Liu, L.; Moayyedi, P.; Sharma, M.; Stoerk, S.; Varigos, J.; Bhagirath, V.; Bogaty, P.; Botto, F.; Catanese, L.; Donato Magno, J.; Fabbri, G.; Gabizon, I.; Gosselin, G.; Halon, D.; Heldmann, M.; Lamelas, P.; Lauw, M.; Leong, Y.; Liang, D.; Lutay, Y.; Maly, M.; Mikulik, R.; Nayar, S.; Ng, K.; Perera, K.; Pirvu, O.; Ronner, E.; Sato, S.; Smyth, A.; Sokolova, E.; Wiendl, M.; Winkelmann, B.; Yang, X.; Yufereva, Y.; Cairns, J.; Sleight, P.; deMets, D.; Momomura, S. I.; Prins, M. [=Martin H.; Ramsay, T.; Goto, S.; Rouleau, J. L.; Schumi, J.; Thabane, L.; Casanova, A.; Bangdiwala, S.; Deng, E.; Dyal, L.; Khatun, R.; Marsden, T.; Pogue, J.; Tang, C.; Wong, G.; Yuan, F.; Aman, S.; Ariz, A.; Ashton, H.; Belanger, J.; Belanger, M.; Brettell, K.; Chandra, J.; Choppick, C.; Cisternino, D.; Cuncins-Hearn, A.; Di Marino, M.; Diao, L.; Dwomoh, S.; Dykstra, A.; Galatsis, E.; Gasic, T.; Gutierrez, J.; Hamilton, L.; Irwin, L.; Lapensee, C.; Li, A.; Lu, X.; MacRae, L.; Malik, S.; Malvestiti, A.; Mastrangelo, J.; Maystrenko, A.; O'Donnell, L.; Reeh, K.; Szymkow, P.; Thomas, S.; Thrasher, D.; Tyrwhitt, J.; White, L.; Bastone, R.; Berkowitz, S.; Dias, A.; Ho, K.; Keller, L.; Lanius, V.; Lister, K.; Merten, C.; Muehlhofer, E.; Schmidt, K.; Tasto, C.; Tsihlias, E.; Woroniecka-Osio, A.; Orlandini, A.; Niemann, G.; Pascual, A.; Toscanelli, S.; Cabezón, M.; Debaveye, B.; Meeusen, K.; Luys, C.; Broos, K.; Vandenberghe, K.; Luyten, A.; Oliveira, G. B. F.; Vila Nova, D. C.; Konishi, M. Y. N.; Lonn, A.; Turbide, G.; Cayer, M.; Rovito, C.; Standen, D.; Li, J.; Lopez Pico, M.; Dusek, R.; Buzalka, V.; Larsen, J.; Paucar, M. J.; Saarinen, M.; Simon, T.; Bezault, M.; Le Lay, M.; Epstein, L.; Fajardo-Moser, M.; Röser, C.; Putz-Todd, G.; Scheidemantel, F.; Poehler, D.; Renner, J.; Hargitai, A.; Doherty, A. O.; Duffy, N.; Roarty, C.; Nolan, A.; Power, A.; Yuval, R.; Ben Ari, M.; Greenblatt, S.; Marmor, Y.; Lucci, D.; Ceseri, M.; Baldini, E.; Cipressa, L.; Miccoli, M.; Goto, M.; Yamasowa, H.; Kajiwara, M.; Takase, D.; Ikeguchi, K.; Matsumoto, M.; Ishii, M.; Asai, J.; Nozaki, D.; Akatsuka, T.; Yoshida, T.; Shahadan, S.; Md Nasir, N.; Schut, Astrid; Vinck, Leonie; van Leeuwen, Marjelle; Sanchez, J.; Aquino, M. 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