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Sample records for aspirin eye drops

  1. Dilating Eye Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dilating Eye Drops En Español Read in Chinese What are dilating eye drops? Dilating eye drops contain medication to enlarge ( ...

  2. Eye Drop Tips

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    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Drop Tips en Español email Send this article ... the reach of children. Steps For Putting In Eye Drops: Start by tilting your head backward while ...

  3. Clinical analysis of diclofenac sodium eye drops combined with sodium hyaluronate eye drops for dry eye after ophthalmic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ping Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study and analyze the clinical efficacy of diclofenac sodium eye drops combined with sodium hyaluronate eye drops in treating dry eyes after ophthalmic surgery. METHODS: Totally 94 eyes from 94 patients with dry eyes were slected, and they were randomly divided into orbervation group and control group. Fouty-seven patients in the control group using conventional treatment combined with sodium hyaluronate eye drops. Other 47 patients in orbervation group were treated with diclofenac sodium eye drops on the basis of control group. We compared symptoms, fluorescein station, tear film break time, Schirmer Ⅰ test between the two groups.RESULTS: Compared with before treatment, patients of both groups with sympotom, fluorescein station score, BUT, and Schirmer Ⅰ test were significantly improved(PPPCONCLUSION: Diclofenac sodium eye drops combined with sodium hyaluronate eye drops have significant efficacy in treatment of dry eyes after ophthalmic surgery, which can effectively relieve clinical symptoms, improve BUT and Schirmer Ⅰ test.

  4. Preparation and Stability of Voriconazole Eye Drop Solution▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dupuis, Antoine; Tournier, Nicolas; Le Moal, Gwenaël; Venisse, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    The combined systemic and topical administration of voriconazole has successfully been used to treat keratomycosis. Because no voriconazole eye drop product is commercially available, we prepared a sterile eye drop solution (10 mg/ml). Voriconazole remains stable over 30 days, providing an eye drop solution suitable for use for the topical treatment of fungal keratitis.

  5. [Objective evaluation of applying eye drops by elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomé-Campos, J; Martínez-Salcedo, I; Martorell-Hallado, M C; Romero-Aroca, P

    2014-05-01

    To objectively evaluate the ability and skills of patients older than 65 years to successfully administer a topical ocular eye drop. A prospective study was conducted on a group of 25 patients with a diagnosis of dry eye or glaucoma, undergoing daily treatment with eye drops for at least one year. The procedure was recorded with a video camera at the time of the application. Of the total, 64% were diagnosed with glaucoma and 36% with dry eye. Almost half (44%) needed a single attempt to apply the drop, and 56% required 2 attempts. In terms of the number of eye drops applied, 52% managed with a single drop, 16% 2 drops, a 12% 3 drops, and 20% 4 or more eye drops. Areas where the eye drop was deposited in the first attempt was, 32% into the conjunctival sac, 32% on the outer corner of the eye, 8% in the inner angle, 8% in the nose, 12% on the cheek, 8% in other areas. Self-administration of eye drops by the elderly is a complex activity that can have an effect on the expected results. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Application effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor derivative Eye drops in treatment of dry eye

    OpenAIRE

    Paerzhati·Tuerdi; Yan-Chun Wang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the application effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor derivative eye drops(Jinyinshu)in treatment of dry eye.METHODS:Sixty cases(87 eyes)of dry eye patients were randomly divided into control group and observation group, 42 eyes and 45 eyes respectively. The control group received Chondroitin sulfate eye drops treatment, and the observation group were used for treatment of Jinyinshu. The changes of clinical efficacy, correlation index(symptom score, BUT, S I ...

  7. Ready-made allogeneic ABO-specific serum eye drops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harritshøj, Lene Holm; Nielsen, Connie; Ullum, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To overcome problems and delays of the preparation of autologous serum eye drops, a production line of ABO-specific allogeneic serum eye drops from male blood donors was set up in a blood bank. Feasibility, clinical routine, safety and efficacy were evaluated in a cohort of patients...... serum treatment. CONCLUSION: Ready-made ABO-identical allogeneic serum eye drops were straightforwardly produced, quality-assured and registered as a safe standard blood product for the treatment of certain cases of severe dry eye disease. Therapeutic efficacy was comparable to previous reports...

  8. Assessment of eye drop instillation technique in glaucoma patients

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    Beatriz Fiuza Gomes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To study the technique of eye drop instillation in glaucoma patients and identify independent factors that may influence their performance. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 71 consecutive patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension, self-administering topical anti-glaucoma medications for ≥6 months were evaluated. All patients instilled a tear substitute into the eye with the worst eyesight using the technique normally used at home. The following parameters were evaluated: age, number of years receiving treatment with ocular hypotensive eye drops, time spent to instill the first drop, number of drops instilled, correct location of the eye drops, contact of the bottle with the eye, closing of the eyelids or occlusion of the tear punctum, and asepsis of the hands. Results: The mean age of the patients was 66 ± 10.8 years, and patients were on ocular hypotensive drugs for 11.3 ± 7.3 (range, 2-35 years. Only 28% of the patients were able to correctly instill the eye drops (squeeze out 1 drop and instill it into the conjunctival sac without bottle tip contact. Touching the tip of the bottle to the globe or periocular tissue occurred in 62% of the patients. In 49% of the patients, the eye drops fell on the eyelids or cheek. Two or more drops were squeezed by 27% of the patients. Conclusions: The majority of glaucoma patients were unable to correctly instill eye drops. Age was an independent factor associated with eye drop instillation performance.

  9. Improvement in the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease with dobesilate eye drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Pedro; Outeiriño, Luis Antonio; Azanza, Carlos; Angulo, Javier; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye is a multifactor disease of the tear film and ocular surface that substantially affects quality of life. Dobesilate administered as eye drops was well tolerated and effective in treating both the objective signs and subjective symptoms of dry eye disease in this 2-week study. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of using dobesilate in eye drops. Dobesilate may provide a novel approach to treating drying diseases of the eye.

  10. Tropicamide 1% mydriatic effect: comparison between spray in closed eyes and eye drops in open eyes.

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    Portes, Arlindo José Freire; Barbosa, Annamaria Ciminelli; de Mello, Guilherme Laport; Lopes, Marcelo Antunes; Cavalcanti, Rachel Simões

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate by serial measurements, pupil mydriasis produced by topical application of tropicamide 1% using a spray in a closed eye or instillation in an open eye in adult and elderly populations. The research was done from February to April of 2011 in the Policlinica Ronaldo Gazolla, located in the Arcos da Lapa Campus of Estacio de Sá University, RJ- Brazil. It was a clinical trial, controlled and randomized, made in a series of 50 patients that were being prepared for ophthalmoscopy examination. They were submitted to eye drop administration of 1% tropicamide in an open eye and to eyelid margin vaporization in a closed eye. The eyes were chosen for the administration of drops or spray according to a pseudo-random numbers table from Excel (2007) before application. The pupil diameter was measured before instillation and after 10, 20, and 30 min in both eyes, with a millimeter ruler. Biostat 5.0 software was used for statistical calculations. Tropicamide 1% was vaporized in a group that presented the following average pupil diameters: 3 mm before the application; 4.16 mm in 10 min; 5 mm in 20 min; and 5.35 mm in 30 min. The group in which tropicamide 1% was instilled presented 2.96 mm of average pupil diameter before the application; 4.22 mm at 10 min; 5.02 mm at 20 min; and 5.44 at 30 min. The two way analysis of variance showed Ptropicamide 1% mydriatic effect in closed eyes was clinically equivalent to the instillation effect of eye drop in open eyes. Other mydriatic drugs sprayed in closed eyes may not have the same effect.

  11. Handling test of eye drop dispenser--comparison of unit-dose pipettes with conventional eye drop bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkkari, Minna; Latvala, Terho; Ropo, Auli

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate how elderly people handle single-use eye drop dispensers (unit-dose pipettes) and to compare the performance with conventional eye drop bottles. In this open-label study, the handling of unit-dose pipettes and conventional eye drop bottles was compared in 41 elderly people who had little or no prior regular use of eye drop dispensers. The participants tested both types of dispenser once, and the following 7 variables were studied: ease/difficulty of opening the dispenser; influence of the size for handling of the dispenser; influence of the shape for handling of the dispenser; observation of the contents in the dispenser; the feeling of the dispenser in the hand; ease/difficulty of drop instillation on the eye from the dispenser; and overall performance of the eye drop dispenser. The dispensers contained isotonic saline, and a visual analog scale was used for assessment of each of the above variables. The mean age of the participants was 73 years. A statistically significant difference in favor of the unit-dose pipettes was found with respect to observation of the contents in the dispenser, ease of administration, and the overall performance. Women regarded the unit-dose pipettes generally better than the bottles, but such a difference was not seen in men. The study participants managed the unit-dose pipettes at least as well as the conventional eye drop bottles. If anything, the unit-dose pipettes appeared to be easier to use.

  12. Effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor eye drops and deproteinized calf blood extract eye drops on corneal edema after phacoemulsification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jia Wang

    2017-01-01

    AIM:To compare the effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor eye drops and deproteinized calf blood extract eye drops on corneal edema after phacoemulsification. METHODS:Totally 72 cases(72 eyes...

  13. Improvement in the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease with dobesilate eye drops

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas, Pedro; Outeiri?o, Luis Antonio; Azanza, Carlos; Angulo, Javier; Gim?nez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Background Dry eye is a multifactor disease of the tear film and ocular surface that substantially affects quality of life. Case presentation Dobesilate administered as eye drops was well tolerated and effective in treating both the objective signs and subjective symptoms of dry eye disease in this 2-week study. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of using dobesilate in eye drops. Dobesilate may provide a novel approach to treating drying diseases of the...

  14. Tear fluid-eye drops compatibility assessment using surface tension.

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    Hotujac Grgurević, Martina; Juretić, Marina; Hafner, Anita; Lovrić, Jasmina; Pepić, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the compatibility of commercially available eye drop surface tension with the tear film physiological range and to characterize commonly used ophthalmic excipients in terms of their surface activity under eye-biorelevant conditions. There are a number of quality requirements for the eye drops (e.g. tonicity, pH, viscosity, refractive index) that needs to comply with the physiological parameters of the eye surface. However, the adjustment of surface tension properties of the eye drops to the normal range of surface tension at the air/tear fluid interface (40-46 mN/m) has received rather less attention thus far. Yet, the surface tension at the air/tear fluid interface is of vital importance for the normal function of the eye surface. The surface tension compatibility of the isotonic aqueous solutions of commonly used ophthalmic excipients as well as 18 approved eye drops with the tear fluid have been evaluated using surface tension method. Each ophthalmic ingredient including the preservatives, solubilizing agents and thickening agents can influence the surface tension of the final formulation. In case of complex ophthalmic formulations one should also consider the possible interactions among excipients and consequent impact on overall surface activity. Out of 18 evaluated eye drops, three samples were within, 12 samples were below and three samples were above the physiological range of the tear fluid surface tension. Our results provide a rationale for clinical studies aiming to assess the correlation between the eye drops surface tension and the tear film (in)stability.

  15. Effect of rb-bFGF eye drops and hydroxyl indican eye drops on tear film stability and dry eye symptoms after age-related cataract surgery

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    Jing Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare and analyze the effect of recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor(bFGFeye drops and hydroxyl indican eye drops on the tear film stability and dry eye symptoms after age-related cataract surgery. METHODS: A total of 115 patients(115 affected eyeswith dry eyes after age-related cataract surgery were divided into the bFGF group, the hydroxyl indican group and the blank control group by the random number table method. The blank control group was only given routine anti-inflammatory treatment, and on the basis, the bFGF group and the hydroxyl indican group were treated with bFGF eye drops and hydroxyl indican eye drops respectively. The clinical efficacy, adverse reactions, changes in scores of dry eye symptoms, Schirmer test(SⅠt, tear film break-up time(BUTand corneal fluorescein staining(CFSscores at different time points were compared among the three groups. RESULTS: The total markedly effective rates in the bFGF group(89.5%was higher than that in the hydroxyl indican group(70.3%or the blank control group(47.5%(PPPCONCLUSION: The tear film is unstable in early stage after age-related cataract surgery, and there are dry eye symptoms. The intervention with bFGF eye drops and hydroxyl indican eye drops can effectively restore the tear film stability and significantly relieve dry eye symptoms, and the effect of bFGF eye drops is more significant.

  16. Handling Test of Eye Drop Dispenser—Comparison of Unit-Dose Pipettes with Conventional Eye Drop Bottles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latvala, Terho; Ropo, Auli

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Purpose The aims of this study were to investigate how elderly people handle single-use eye drop dispensers (unit-dose pipettes) and to compare the performance with conventional eye drop bottles. Methods In this open-label study, the handling of unit-dose pipettes and conventional eye drop bottles was compared in 41 elderly people who had little or no prior regular use of eye drop dispensers. The participants tested both types of dispenser once, and the following 7 variables were studied: ease/difficulty of opening the dispenser; influence of the size for handling of the dispenser; influence of the shape for handling of the dispenser; observation of the contents in the dispenser; the feeling of the dispenser in the hand; ease/difficulty of drop instillation on the eye from the dispenser; and overall performance of the eye drop dispenser. The dispensers contained isotonic saline, and a visual analog scale was used for assessment of each of the above variables. Results The mean age of the participants was 73 years. A statistically significant difference in favor of the unit-dose pipettes was found with respect to observation of the contents in the dispenser, ease of administration, and the overall performance. Women regarded the unit-dose pipettes generally better than the bottles, but such a difference was not seen in men. Conclusions The study participants managed the unit-dose pipettes at least as well as the conventional eye drop bottles. If anything, the unit-dose pipettes appeared to be easier to use. PMID:20565314

  17. Clinical utility of voriconazole eye drops in ophthalmic fungal keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Badriyeh, Daoud; Neoh, Chin Fen; Stewart, Kay; Kong, David CM

    2010-01-01

    Fungal keratitis is one of the major causes of ophthalmic mycosis and is difficult to treat. The range of common antifungal agents available for fungal keratitis remains inadequate and is generally associated with poor clinical outcomes. Voriconazole is a new generation triazole antifungal agent. Only marketed in systemic formulation and, with broad-spectrum activity and high intraocular penetration, voriconazole has demonstrated effectiveness against fungal keratitis. Systemic voriconazole, however, is not without side effects and is costly. Voriconazole eye drops have been prepared extemporaneously and used for the treatment of ophthalmic fungal keratitis. The current article sought to review the literature for evidence related to the effectiveness and safety of topical voriconazole and its corneal penetration into the aqueous humor of the eye. The voriconazole eye drops used are typically of 1% concentration, well tolerated by the eye, and are stable. Despite existing evidence to suggest that the eye drops are effective in the treatment of fungal keratitis, more studies are needed, especially in relation to using the eye drops as first-line and stand-alone treatment, preparation of higher concentrations, and optimal dosing frequency. PMID:20463910

  18. Effect of tropicamide and homatropine eye drops on a-scan parameters of the phakic normal eyes.

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    Bhatia, Jagdish

    2011-01-01

    A prospective study to evaluate the changes in A-Scan axial parameters of phakic normal eyes before and after instillation of 1% topical Tropicamide and 2% Homatropine eye drops. Anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, vitreous chamber length, and ocular axial length were measured in 76 eyes before and after cycloplegia induced by 1% topical Tropicamide, and in 28 eyes with 2% Homatropine eye drops. Anterior chamber depth demonstrated increase from baseline readings with Tropicamide and Homatropine eye drops, while lens thickness showed decrease from the baseline readings with both eye drops. Effect of both the eye drops on over all axial length and vitreous chamber length is statistically seen, but is clinically negligible and not significant. Cycloplegia induced by 1% Tropicamide eye drops and 2% Homatropine eye drops has a significant measurable influence on anterior chamber depth and lens thickness, while vitreous chamber length and overall axial length demonstrated negligible statistical difference on A-Scan parameters of the normal phakic eyes.

  19. [Preservative-containing eye drops and adherence in ophthalmological practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzl, I; Kaercher, T

    2012-11-01

    Chronic eye diseases, such as glaucoma or dry eye syndrome, require long-term drug application to the eyes. Good adherence is required to achieve the therapeutic goal and patient needs and requirements have to be taken into account. This distinguishes adherence to drug therapy from the former compliance which implies only following medical instructions. Adherence is influenced by socioeconomic, health system-related, disease-related, treatment-related and patient-related factors. It can be measured by tedious procedures, such as electronic monitoring, self-assessment, drop counting and laboratory findings of systemic drug levels. Non-adherence is a growing medical problem worldwide. An increase in adherence means an increased degree of therapeutic safety for the patient and long-term cost savings for the individual as well as society. Non-adherence in chronic diseases, such as glaucoma and dry eye syndrome is increased by eye drops that cause side effects. Often these side effects are caused by agents such as the preservative benzalkonium chloride. To achieve a good adherence preservative-free eye drops are advised.

  20. Application effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor derivative Eye drops in treatment of dry eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paerzhati·Tuerdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the application effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor derivative eye drops(Jinyinshuin treatment of dry eye.METHODS:Sixty cases(87 eyesof dry eye patients were randomly divided into control group and observation group, 42 eyes and 45 eyes respectively. The control group received Chondroitin sulfate eye drops treatment, and the observation group were used for treatment of Jinyinshu. The changes of clinical efficacy, correlation index(symptom score, BUT, S I t, FLbefore and after treatment, quality of life after treatment and the incidence of adverse reactions were compared.RESULTS: In the control group, the total clinical effective rate was 71%, which was significantly lower than that in the observation group(91%, the difference was statistically significant(PPPPP>0.05.CONCLUSION: Jinyinshu is significantly effective in the treatment of dry eye, and its clinical efficacy is better than chondroitin sulfate.

  1. Prospective, randomized, controlled comparison of SYSTANE UD eye drops versus VISINE INTENSIV 1% EDO eye drops for the treatment of moderate dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Christina; Kruse, Friedrich E; Cursiefen, Claus

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomized, clinical, single-center study was to compare the safety and efficacy of 2 ocular surface lubricant eye drops: preservative-free hydroxypropyl (HP)-Guar (SYSTANE UD(®)) eye drops versus preservative-free Tamarindus indica seed polysaccharide (TSP) 1% (VISINE INTENSIV 1% EDO(®)) eye drops. Fifty-six eyes of 28 patients with moderate keratoconjunctivitis sicca (DEWS severity level 2) were enrolled in the trial. Patients were randomized for 2 treatment groups (SYSTANE UD eye drops vs. VISINE INTENSIV 1% EDO eye drops). The eye drops in both groups were applied 5 times per day for 3 months. Statistical analyses were performed using Statistica™ software (Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon test). P-Values<0.05 were considered significant. After 3 months of treatment the patients of both groups had subjective benefit in the relief of symptoms of dry eye disease evaluated by the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire score. Patients treated with HP-Guar and TSP showed improvements in tear film stability measured by tear break-up time (TBUT), which are statistically significant in the HP-Guar group (P=0.02). The results of this clinical trial show improvements of symptoms and signs in patients with moderate dry eye after the consistent use of preservative-free HP-Guar and TSP lubricant eye drops. Both artificial tear formulations produce amelioration in tear film stability improving eye conditions and patient quality of life. HP-Guar seems to be slightly more effective in improving ocular surface protection by decreasing tear film evaporation.

  2. Corneal sensitivity after topical bromfenac sodium eye-drop instillation

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    Yanai K

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Kaori Yanai,1 Jane Huang,1 Kazuaki Kadonosono,2 Eiichi Uchio1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama, Japan Purpose: To evaluate the safety of bromfenac sodium eye drops from the standpoint of corneal sensitivity and tear secretion in healthy controls following instillation for 1 month. Methods: A prospective single-blind parallel clinical study was conducted in 20 eyes of ten healthy volunteers with no history of ocular or systemic allergic disease, dry eye, contact lens wear, or ocular surgery. Participants were instructed to instill either bromfenac sodium or artificial tears in each eye twice daily for 28 days. Corneal sensitivity tested using a Cochet–Bonnet esthesiometer was evaluated before and immediately after instillation at 7, 14, and 28 days after the initiation of treatment. Tear secretion was also evaluated by Schirmer's eye test before and at 28 days. Results: No significant difference in mean corneal sensitivity and tear-secretion rate was observed between the bromfenac and artificial-tear treatment groups at any time. Conclusion: These results indicate that bromfenac sodium eye drops are safe with respect to corneal sensitivity and tear secretion in subjects with a normal ocular surface condition. Further evaluation is still necessary to determine whether bromfenac is safe in pathological conditions, such as inflammatory disorders and postsurgical cases. Keywords: bromfenac sodium, cornea, sensitivity, tear, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug

  3. Effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor eye drops and deproteinized calf blood extract eye drops on corneal edema after phacoemulsification

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Wang

    2017-01-01

    AIM:To compare the effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor eye drops and deproteinized calf blood extract eye drops on corneal edema after phacoemulsification. METHODS:Totally 72 cases(72 eyes)of patients undergoing phacoemulsification were selected and divided into the observation group and the control group by random number table method. After surgery, the observation group were treated with deproteinized calf blood extract eye drops while the control group were treated with rec...

  4. Effect of polyethylene glycol eye drops in management of dry eyes after cataract surgery

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    Dong-Mei Cai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the effect of polyethylene glycol eye drops on tear film break-up time and symptoms for dry eyes after cataract surgery.METHODS: Eighty patients with dry eyes secondary to cataract surgery who were treated in our hospital from January to August 2013 were randomly divided into group A and group B. Group A was treated with sodium hyaluronate eye drops for one week, and Group B was treated with polyethylene glycol eye drops for one week. The break-up time of tear film was measured and the subjective symptoms were graded before and after the treatment.RESULTS: The tear film break-up time of group A was respectively 3.87±1.12s and 4.21±1.06s before and after the treatment, with no significant difference(P>0.05; it was respectively 3.98±1.04s and 8.98±1.30s with significant difference for group B(PPPPCONCLUSION: Polyethylene glycol eye drops can extend tear film break-up time and improve symptoms of dry eyes. It is an effective drug in treatment of dry eyes after cataract surgery.

  5. Fluorimetric quantification of brimonidine tartrate in eye drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunitha, G; Bhagirath, R; Alapati, V R; Ramakrishna, K; Subrahmanyam, C V S; Anumolu, P D

    2013-11-01

    A simple and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the estimation of brimonidine tartrate in pure and eye drops. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 0.2-3.0 ΅g/ml in dimethyl formamide as solvent at an emission wavelength (λem) of 530 nm after excitation wavelength (λex) of 389 nm with good correlation coefficient of 0.998. The limit of detection and limit of quantification for this method were 22.0 and 72.0 ng/ml, respectively. The developed method was statistically validated as per International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. The percentage relative standard deviation values were found to be less than 2 for accuracy and precision studies. The results obtained were in good agreement with the labelled amounts of the marketed formulations. The proposed method was effectively applied to routine quality control analysis of brimonidine tartrate in their eye drops.

  6. Impact of mydriatic eye drops on neonatal cerebral blood flow

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    Atef Alshafei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP screening is a common routine procedure carried out on preterm infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs. Mydriatic eye drops containing phenylephrine hydrochloride 2.5% (a sympathomimetic agent and tropicamide 0.5% (a cycloplegic medication are readily absorbed from the conjunctiva and produce systemic responses in various organs. To our knowledge, no studies have investigated the direct effects of these medications on cerebral blood flow velocities (CBFVs in preterm infants. To evaluate the systemic effects of locally instilled mydriatic eye drops (phenylephrine hydrochloride 2.5% and tropicamide 0.5% used for ROP screening, on cerebral blood flow velocity in preterm infants, a prospective observational study was conducted among preterm infants with gestational age (GA < 31 weeks admitted to the NICU at Dubai Hospital between February 20, 2017 and June 20, 2017. The infants (at a post-menstrual age of 31-34 weeks underwent duplex ultrasound evaluation of CBFV before and after mydriatic eye drops administration.Pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound studies were performed 1 h before and 1 h after eye mydriasis. We measured peak systolic velocity (PSV and end diastolic velocity (EDV for both the anterior cerebral artery (ACA and middle cerebral artery (MCA and calculated the resistive index (RI, defined as PSV – EDV/PSV. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, heart rate, oxygen saturation and pain score were assessed before and 1 h after ROP examination.A paired t-test and McNemar’s test were used to assess the statistical significance of the difference between pairs of means and the qualitative variables measured twice for the same study group.Among the 42 eligible preterm infants, the mean (SD GA was 27 (2.68 weeks (range, 24-31 weeks. The mean (SD RI of ACA before and 1 h after eye drops administration was 0.84 (0.06 and 0.83 (0.07 respectively (p = 0.453. The mean (SD RIs of MCA before and then 1 h after

  7. Topical dobesilate eye drops for ophthalmic primary pterygium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Pedro; Outeiriño, Luis A; Angulo, Javier; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2012-03-08

    Selective inhibition of fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor signalling pathways is effective in causing regression of pterygia. Prompt regression of fibrovascular mass and conjunctival angiogenesis was documented 2 weeks after topical administration of dobesilate eye drops twice daily. At 3-month follow-up, no recurrence was seen and no ocular irritation and burning were noted. The authors believe that this is the first known successful use of topical dobesilate in primary pterygium.

  8. Topical dobesilate eye drops for ophthalmic primary pterygium

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas, Pedro; Outeiriño, Luis A; Angulo, Javier; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Selective inhibition of fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor signalling pathways is effective in causing regression of pterygia. Prompt regression of fibrovascular mass and conjunctival angiogenesis was documented 2 weeks after topical administration of dobesilate eye drops twice daily. At 3-month follow-up, no recurrence was seen and no ocular irritation and burning were noted. The authors believe that this is the first known successful use of topical dobesilate in...

  9. Treatment of allergic conjunctivitis with olopatadine hydrochloride eye drops

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    Eiichi Uchio

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Eiichi UchioDepartment of Ophthalmology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, JapanAbstract: Olopatadine hydrochloride exerts a wide range of pharmacological actions such as histamine H1 receptor antagonist action, chemical mediator suppressive action, and eosinophil infiltration suppressive action. Olopatadine hydrochloride 0.1% ophthalmic solution (Patanol® was introduced to the market in Japan in October 2006. In a conjunctival allergen challenge (CAC test, olopatadine hydrochloride 0.1% ophthalmic solution significantly suppressed ocular itching and hyperemia compared with levocabastine hydrochloride 0.05% ophthalmic solution, and the number of patients who complained of ocular discomfort was lower in the olopatadine group than in the levocabastine group. Conjunctival cell membrane disruption was observed in vitro in the ketotifen fumarate group, epinastine hydrochloride group, and azelastine hydrochloride group, but not in the olopatadine hydrochloride 0.1% ophthalmic solution group, which may potentially explain the lower discomfort felt by patients on instillation. Many other studies in humans have revealed the superiority of olopatadine 0.1% hydrochloride eye drops to several other anti-allergic eye drops. Overseas, olopatadine hydrochloride 0.2% ophthalmic solution for a once-daily regimen has been marketed under the brand name of Pataday®. It is expected that olopatadine hydrochloride ophthalmic solutions may be used in patients with a more severe spectrum of allergic conjunctival diseases, such as vernal keratoconjunctivitis or atopic keratoconjunctivitis, in the near future.Keywords: olopatadine, eye drop, allergic conjunctivitis, anti-histaminergic

  10. Efficacy of atropine and anisodamine eye drops for adolescent pseudomyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jie Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the effect and local influence of atropine and anisodamine eye drops on adolescent pseudomyopia. METHODS:Totally 110 cases of juvenile pseudomyopia were randomly divided into two groups, the control group was given 10g/L atropine sulfate eye gel, and the observation group was treated with 5g/L raceanisodamine eye drops. The efficacy of two methods, the changes of axial length and intraocular pressure before and after treatment, and the incidence of adverse reactions were compared. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in cure rate between the two groups(χ2=0.533, P=0.465, but the effective rate of observation group was significantly better than the control group(χ2=3.907, P=0.048. Compared with the same group before treatment, the length of the axial length of the two groups increased in different degrees,and the increase value of the observation group was significantly higher than that of the control group, the difference was statistically significant(PP>0.05. The intraocular pressure of the two groups was significantly lower than that of the same group before treatment, and the difference between the two groups after treatments was not statistically significant(P >0.05. The incidence of adverse reactions in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group(χ2=18.939, PCONCLUSION: Anisodamine eye drops in the treatment of juvenile pseudomyopia has obvious curative effect, its efficacy and safety are better than atropine eye gel.

  11. Determining fluid level in a translucent eye-drop bottle: transillumination by penlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayikcioğlu, O; Akkin, C; Ates, H

    We describe an easy way to determine eye-drop contents in translucent bottles. Transillumination of eye-drop bottles from behind or the bottom by using a penlight clearly defines the fluid levels. The described procedure may prevent disposal of eye-drop bottles containing useful amounts of medication and prevent Ophthalmologists and Patients unexpectedly coming across an empty bottle.

  12. Efficacy of hypotonic 0.18% sodium hyaluronate eye drops in patients with dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo Seok; Ji, Yong Sok; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of hypotonic 0.18% sodium hyaluronate (SH) eye drops under the clinical settings of the dry eye workshop treatment guideline for mild dry eye disease (DED). This analysis included 60 patients with DED. Patients with level 1 DED were treated with either isotonic 0.1% SH (group 1) or with hypotonic 0.18% SH eye drops (group 2). Patients with level 2 DED were treated with 0.1% fluorometholone, 0.05% cyclosporine A, and either isotonic 0.1% SH (group 3) or hypotonic 0.18% SH (group 4) eye drops. Tear film breakup time (TBUT), Schirmer test, corneal staining with fluorescein, and ocular surface disease index score were recorded at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months after treatment. In group 2, TBUT at 3 months (P = 0.03) and corneal staining scores at 1 and 3 months (P ≤ 0.03) were significantly improved after the treatment compared with baseline scores, whereas these parameters were not changed during the follow-up period in group 1. In groups 3 and 4, TBUT and corneal staining scores at 1 and 3 months, and ocular surface disease index score and Schirmer test results at 3 months after the treatment showed significant improvements compared with the baseline score (P Hypotonic 0.18% SH eye drops seemed to be effective in improving tear film stability and ocular surface integrity compared with isotonic 0.1% SH eye drops in patients with mild DED.

  13. The Pain Response to Mydriatic Eye Drops in Preterm Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Amy M.; Cook, Noah; Harris, Mary Catherine; Ying, Gui-shuang; Binenbaum, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluate physiologic and behavioral pain responses of premature infants following instillation of mydriatic eye drops for ROP examinations. While burning and stinging occurs in older patients, the infant pain response is not well characterized. Study Design Vital sign and video monitor recorded infant responses before, during, and after mydriatic (tropicamide 1%, phenylephrine 2.5%) administration upon first ROP exam. Two masked observers graded Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores immediately prior and following eye drop administration. Scores 12 severe. Results Twenty infants had mean pre-mydriatic PIPP score 3.6 (SD 1.6), mean post-mydriatic score 5.7 (SD 3.4), mean change 2.1 (SD 3.4)(p=0.01). One (5%) had pre-mydriatic PIPP score ≥7, seven (35%) post scores ≥7 (p=0.07) with one >12. Conclusions Mydriatic drops cause a clinically significant pain response in one third of infants. Non-pharmacologic supportive measures are recommended for all infants until predictive factors are defined. PMID:23238569

  14. Effect of Tropicamide and Homatropine Eye Drops on A-Scan Parameters of the Phakic Normal Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish Bhatia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A prospective study to evaluate the changes in A-Scan axial parameters of phakic normal eyes before and after instillation of 1�0topical Tropicamide and 2�0Homatropine eye drops.Methods: Anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, vitreous chamber length, and ocular axial length were measured in 76 eyes before and after cycloplegia induced by 1�0topical Tropicamide, and in 28 eyes with 2�0Homatropine eye drops.Results: Anterior chamber depth demonstrated increase from baseline readings with Tropicamide and Homatropine eye drops, while lens thickness showed decrease from the baseline readings with both eye drops. Effect of both the eye drops on over all axial length and vitreous chamber length is statistically seen, but is clinically negligible and not significant.Conclusion: Cycloplegia induced by 1�0Tropicamide eye drops and 2�0Homatropine eye drops has a significant measurable influence on anterior chamber depth and lens thickness, while vitreous chamber length and overall axial length demonstrated negligible statistical difference on A-Scan parameters of the normal phakic eyes.

  15. Anisocoria Secondary to Anticholinergic Mydriasis from Homeopathic Similasan Pink-Eye-Relief Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Yeung, Joseph C; Anderson, Dennis R

    2017-10-17

    A 70-year-old-woman developed anisocoria after applying homeopathic eye drops (Similasan Pink Eye Relief) to her left eye. Her pupil was dilated for two weeks and did not respond to light or near stimuli for one week. Both 0.1 % and 1% pilocarpine failed to constrict her left pupil, and magnetic resonance imaging of her brain did not reveal any abnormality. The eye drops she had used contain belladonna extracts, which have a natural atropine component. This case demonstrates the importance, when evaluating a patient presenting with anisocoria, of knowing the chemical ingredients of the homeopathic eye drops, which often are not listed. © 2017 Marshfield Clinic.

  16. Effect of Tropicamide and Homatropine Eye Drops on A-Scan Parameters of the Phakic Normal Eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Jagdish Bhatia

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: A prospective study to evaluate the changes in A-Scan axial parameters of phakic normal eyes before and after instillation of 1�0topical Tropicamide and 2�0Homatropine eye drops.Methods: Anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, vitreous chamber length, and ocular axial length were measured in 76 eyes before and after cycloplegia induced by 1�0topical Tropicamide, and in 28 eyes with 2�0Homatropine eye drops.Results: Anterior chamber depth demonstrated increase from baseline reading...

  17. Effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor eye drops and deproteinized calf blood extract eye drops on corneal edema after phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To compare the effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor eye drops and deproteinized calf blood extract eye drops on corneal edema after phacoemulsification. METHODS:Totally 72 cases(72 eyesof patients undergoing phacoemulsification were selected and divided into the observation group and the control group by random number table method. After surgery, the observation group were treated with deproteinized calf blood extract eye drops while the control group were treated with recombinant human epidermal growth factor eye drops. The degree of corneal edema, subjective symptom score, corneal endothelium count, changes of corneal thickness and postoperative visual acuity recovery were compared between the two groups at different time points after surgery. RESULTS:Corneal edema in the two groups was significantly milder at 1wk after surgery than that on the 1st day after surgery(PP>0.05. Compared with 1d after surgery, the subjective symptom score and corneal thickness of the two groups significantly decreased on the 7th day after surgery(PPPCONCLUSION:Both of recombinant human epidermal growth factor eye drops and deproteinized calf blood extract eye drops can significantly relieve corneal edema and improve visual acuity of patients after phacoemulsification. However, the latter has obvious advantages over the former in the repair of corneal endothelial cell injury after surgery.

  18. An improved technique of eye drop self-administration for patients with limited vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritch, Robert; Jamal, Karim N; Gürses-Ozden, Rabia; Liebmann, Jeffrey M

    2003-04-01

    To describe a new, highly accurate, tactile technique to increase accuracy in the self-administration of eye drops. Interventional case series. Ten adult patients with loss of fixation (bottle, and location of the drops' landing points on the face or eye were recorded. The patients were then instructed in a new technique for instillation, guided through the procedure once, and allowed to practice until comfortable with it. All measurements were then repeated. In patients with loss of fixation in one eye, an additional 3.2 +/- 4.1 seconds were required to instill a drop using the new technique (P <.0001, paired t test; range, -7-18 seconds). The mean number of drops dispensed decreased by 0.1 +/- 0.6 drops (P =.60, paired t test; range, -2-1 drop). The accuracy of drop placement increased from 80.0% to 82.5% (P =.32, paired t test). In subjects with loss of fixation in both eyes, using the new technique increased the time needed to instill a drop by 3.8 +/- 3.8 seconds (P <.0001, paired t test; range, -3-13 seconds). The average number of drops dispensed decreased by 0.1 +/- 0.6 drops (P =.25, paired t test; range, -2-1 drop). The accuracy of placement increased from 63.0% to 85.0% (P =.001, paired t test). This technique of drop instillation may be beneficial for patients with significant visual impairment in both eyes.

  19. Microbial contamination of preservative free eye drops in multiple application containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Q; Tejwani, D; Wilson, J A; Butcher, I; Ramaesh, K

    2006-02-01

    The majority of eye drops used in the United Kingdom contain preservatives and are bottled in plastic containers. Preservative free drops are used to avoid ocular irritation and allergies in certain individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of microbial contamination of preservative free drops dispensed from multiusage containers. Eye drop bottles were collected from patients attending the Tennent Institute of Ophthalmology outpatient and inpatient departments. The bottles were collected on day 3 (for inpatients) and day 7 (for outpatients) of use. The drops were inoculated onto different culture plates (chocolate agar, blood agar, fungal culture media, and enriched media) and the resulting microbial growth was identified using standard microbial identification techniques. 95 eye drop bottles were collected, containing a variety of 10 different eye drops. Significant bacterial growth was found in eight bottles. In total, seven different types of organism were identified from the eye drops. The organisms identified were Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative staphylococcus, Bacillus spp, Serattia spp, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cloacae, and alpha streptococcus. Staph aureus was the commonest microbial organism. Preservative free eye drops in multiple application containers are at risk of contamination by potentially pathogenic micro-organisms.

  20. Semifluorinated Alkane Eye Drops for Treatment of Dry Eye Disease--A Prospective, Multicenter Noninterventional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Philipp; Scherer, Dieter; Krösser, Sonja; Beckert, Michael; Cursiefen, Claus; Kaercher, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Evaporation of the tear film is heavily discussed as one core reason for dry eye disease (DED). Subsequently, new artificial tear products are developed that specifically target this pathomechanism. Perfluorohexyloctane (F6H8, NovaTears(®)) from the family of semifluorinated alkanes is a novel substance that has been approved as a medical device, as a nonblurring wetting agent for the ocular surface. Thirty patients with hyperevaporative dry eye received F6H8 during a prospective, multicenter, observational 6-week study. Patients were advised to apply 1 drop 4 times daily in both eyes. Parameters assessed included best corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, Schirmer I test, tear fluid, tear film breakup time (TFBUT), corneal staining, meibum secretion, and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI(©)). From the 30 patients recruited, 25 completed the trial per protocol. Four patients discontinued F6H8 and 1 patient did not present for follow-up. F6H8 treatment led to significant reduction of corneal staining and significant increase of Schirmer I and TFBUT. In addition, OSDI score dropped significantly from a mean of 55 (± 23.0) to 34 (± 22.4). Visual acuity and ocular pressure did not change. This prospective observational study shows significant beneficial effects in patients suffering from evaporative DED, using F6H8 in all the relevant parameters tested. The decrease of the OSDI by a mean of 21 points was particularly remarkable and clearly exceeds minimal, clinical important differences for mild or moderate and severe disease. Overall, F6H8 (NovaTears) seems to be safe and effective in treating mild to moderate hyperevaporative DED.

  1. Semifluorinated Alkane Eye Drops for Treatment of Dry Eye Disease—A Prospective, Multicenter Noninterventional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Dieter; Krösser, Sonja; Beckert, Michael; Cursiefen, Claus; Kaercher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Evaporation of the tear film is heavily discussed as one core reason for dry eye disease (DED). Subsequently, new artificial tear products are developed that specifically target this pathomechanism. Perfluorohexyloctane (F6H8, NovaTears®) from the family of semifluorinated alkanes is a novel substance that has been approved as a medical device, as a nonblurring wetting agent for the ocular surface. Methods: Thirty patients with hyperevaporative dry eye received F6H8 during a prospective, multicenter, observational 6-week study. Patients were advised to apply 1 drop 4 times daily in both eyes. Parameters assessed included best corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, Schirmer I test, tear fluid, tear film breakup time (TFBUT), corneal staining, meibum secretion, and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI©). Results: From the 30 patients recruited, 25 completed the trial per protocol. Four patients discontinued F6H8 and 1 patient did not present for follow-up. F6H8 treatment led to significant reduction of corneal staining and significant increase of Schirmer I and TFBUT. In addition, OSDI score dropped significantly from a mean of 55 (±23.0) to 34 (±22.4). Visual acuity and ocular pressure did not change. Conclusions: This prospective observational study shows significant beneficial effects in patients suffering from evaporative DED, using F6H8 in all the relevant parameters tested. The decrease of the OSDI by a mean of 21 points was particularly remarkable and clearly exceeds minimal, clinical important differences for mild or moderate and severe disease. Overall, F6H8 (NovaTears) seems to be safe and effective in treating mild to moderate hyperevaporative DED. PMID:26296040

  2. A Case-Control Study on the Oxidative Balance of 50% Autologous Serum Eye Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Ioschpe Gus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance. Autologous serum (AS eye drops are recommended for severe dry eye in patients with ocular surface disease. No description of the antioxidant balance of AS eye drops has been reported in the literature. Objective. This study sought to evaluate the total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP and concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS in samples of 50% AS eye drops and their correlations with the demographic characteristics and lifestyle habits of patients with ocular surface disease and healthy controls. Design. This was a case-control study with a 3-month follow-up period. Participants. 16 patients with severe dry eye disease of different etiologies and 17 healthy controls matched by age, gender, and race were included. Results. TRAP and ROS were detected at all evaluated times. There were no differences in the mean ROS (p=0.429 or TRAP (p=0.475 levels between cases and controls. No statistically significant differences in the concentrations of ROS or TRAPs were found at 0, 15, or 30 days (p for ROS = 0.087 and p for TRAP = 0.93. Neither the demographic characteristics nor the lifestyle habits were correlated with the oxidative balance of the 50% AS eye drops. Conclusions and Relevance. Both fresh and frozen 50% AS eye drops present antioxidant capacities and ROS in an apparently stable balance. Moreover, patients with ocular surface disease and normal controls produce equivalent AS eye drops in terms of oxidative properties.

  3. A murine model of dry eye induced by topical administration of erlotinib eye drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi-Chen; Bao, Jing; Li, Cheng; Tan, Gang; Wu, An-Hua; Ye, Lei; Ye, Lin-Hong; Zhou, Qiong; Shao, Yi

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, the effects of erlotinib on mouse tear function and corneal epithelial tissue structure were investigated. Throughout the 3 weeks of treatment, no notable differences were observed in the body, eye or lacrimal gland weights of the control and experimental mice. However, in the experimental group, the tear volume and break‑up times of tear film were significantly lower following treatment with erlotinib compared with the control group. Corneal fluorescein staining in the experimental group revealed patchy staining, and the Lissamine green staining and inflammatory index were significantly higher in the experimental group at 3 weeks than in the control group. In the experimental group, the number of corneal epithelium layers increased significantly following treatment with erlotinib for 3 weeks and a significant increase in the number of vacuoles was observed compared with the control group. Treatment with erlotinib significantly increased the corneal epithelial cell apoptosis, and led to a significantly increased number of epithelial cell layers and increased keratin 10 expression. It also significantly reduced the number of conjunctival goblet cells. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the corneal epithelial surface was irregular and there was a substantial reduction and partial loss of the microvilli in the experimental group. Mice treated with erlotinib also exhibited an increased protein expression of tumor necrosis factor‑α and decreased protein expression of phosphorylated‑epidermal growth factor receptor in the corneal epithelial cells. The topical application of erlotinib eye drops was revealed to induce dry eyes in mice. This is a novel method of developing a model of dry eyes in mice.

  4. Clinical observation of diclofenac sodium eye drops for postoperative recurrence of pterygium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Rong Xu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinical efficacy of diclofenac sodium eye drops for postoperative recurrence of pterygium, and to provide safer drug regimens to prevent the recurrence of pterygium. METHODS: From November 2011 to September 2013, 124 patients 134 eyes who underwent surgery because of pterygium in our hospital were randomly divided into trial group( diclofenac sodium eye drops and sodium hyaluronate eye dropsand control group(tobramycin dexamethasone eye drops and sodium hyaluronate eye drops, all patients were followed up for 3mo(once a weekand the cornea, intraocular pressure and recurrence of pterygium were observed and compared between the two groups.RESULTS: Followed up for 3mo, 43 cases(45 eyesin the trial group and 38 cases(39 eyesin the control group had done the follow up as planned, in which 14 cases(15 eyesshowed the signs of recurrence, 2 cases(3 eyesrecurred eventually in the trial group, and in the meantime there were 12 cases(13 eyeswith signs of recurrence and 2 cases(2 eyeswith a recurrence eventually in the control group, but no statistical difference was found between the two groups(P>0.05; there were 6 cases(9 eyesdropped out of the study with a higher intraocular pressure in the control group, compared to trial group(0 cases of 0 eye, the difference was statistically significant(PP>0.05. CONCLUSION:Diclofenac sodium eye drops is effective and safe in preventing the recurrence of pterygium.

  5. Generic Eye Drops for Seniors Could Save Millions of Dollars a Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Drops for Seniors Could Save Millions of Dollars a Year Medicare is billed more than $1 ... save the U.S. government hundreds of millions of dollars a year, a new study suggests. Conditions like ...

  6. Clinical assessment of diclofenac sodium eye drops in toric intraocular lens implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Luo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the application of diclofenac sodium eye drops in toric intraocular lens implantation. METHODS: From January 2011 to February 2012, 38 eyes of 37 patients, who underwent toric intraocular lens implantation in this hospital, were randomly divided into diclofenac sodium eye drops group(trial groupand control group. Patient's degree of cooperation during surgery and inflammation postoperation after 1 day, 3,7, days, 1 month and 3 months were evaluated. RESULTS: Patient's degree of cooperation during surgery in the trial group(1.53±0.62was significantly better than in the control group(2.40±0.88, P<0.05. Inflammation reaction was gentle in the trial group 1 day postoperatively. CONCLUSION: Diclofenac sodium eye drops used during toric intraocular lens implantation can obviously alleviate eye irritation, and increase the cooperation of patients.

  7. Chloramphenicol eye drops in the treatment of conditions indicative of maxillary sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Iris Relling; Seim, Arnfinn; Bentzen, Niels

    2013-10-29

    Our own clinical experience of general practice over the last 15 years has indicated that chloramphenicol eye drops may have a favourable effect on many patients troubled by symptoms indicative of acute maxillary sinusitis. We wanted to conduct a pilot study to test whether this observation could be verified. Treatment with chloramphenicol eye drops or systemic peroral antibiotics was tested on patients with symptoms indicative of acute maxillary sinusitis. The patients were randomised to two groups, one of which received systemic peroral antibiotics, the other received chloramphenicol eye drops. A total of 33 patients were included in the trial--27 women and six men--15 of whom were randomised to the tablet group and 18 of whom were randomised to the chloramphenicol group. The patients who were treated with tablets experienced clear improvement after an average of 5.0 days, while patients who were treated with chloramphenicol eye drops, experienced improvement after 3.7 days (p = 0.047). Of the patients in the chloramphenicol group, 14 described improvement within three days, while this applied to only five patients in the tablet group. Treatment with chloramphenicol eye drops appears to represent a treatment option for some patients with symptoms indicative of acute maxillary sinusitis. In the pilot study, the period of treatment before symptoms improved was shorter in patients who were given eye drops than in patients who were given systemic peroral antibiotics. These promising results give grounds to undertake studies on a larger scale.

  8. Effect of textured eye drop bottles on the photostability of pranoprofen 0.1% ophthalmic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsuka, Kinya; Inada, Katsuhiro; Ueoka, Hiroki; Otsuka, Tadashi; Maeda, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Masazumi; Yasueda, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Ophthalmic solutions are usually filled in a plastic bottle due to its durability and disposability. In Japan, photostability is one of the concerns for the quality control because an eye drop bottle must be a transparent container. The present work studied the effect of textured eye drop bottles on its light blocking to improve the photostability of ophthalmic solutions. We investigated the photostability of Pranoprofen ophthalmic solution filled in a variety of textured eye drop bottles. Pranoprofen content was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and surface structure of textured eye drop bottles was evaluated by transmittance, calculated average roughness (Ra) and haze intensity. We observed that eye drop bottle which had greater than Ra value of 1.0 µm and haze intensity 62% clearly showed photostability improvement. This report is the first one which shows that photostability of ophthalmic solution is improved by using textured eye drop bottle. Moreover, this approach is a simple and effective method to improve the photostability. This method is available for not only various ophthalmic applications but also other liquid pharmaceuticals or food products.

  9. Evaluation of clinical outcomes in patients with dry eye disease using lubricant eye drops containing polyethylene glycol or carboxymethylcellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Cohen,1 Anna Martin,2 Kenneth Sall31Cohen Optometry, Scottsdale, AZ, USA; 2Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, TX, USA; 3Sall Research Medical Center Inc, Artesia, CA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to compare changes in corneal staining in patients with dry eye after 6 weeks of treatment with Systane® Gel Drops or Refresh Liquigel® lubricant eye drops.Methods: Patients aged ≥18 years with a sodium fluorescein corneal staining sum score of ≥3 in either eye and best-corrected visual acuity of 0.6 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution or better in each eye who were using a lubricant eye gel or ointment for dry eye were included in this randomized, parallel-group, multicenter, double-blind trial. Patients were randomized to four times daily Systane® Gel Drops (polyethylene glycol 400 0.4% and propylene glycol 0.3% or Refresh LiquiGel® Drops (carboxymethylcellulose sodium 1% for 6 weeks. The primary efficacy outcome was mean change from baseline to week 6 in sodium fluorescein corneal staining. Supportive efficacy outcomes included conjunctival staining, tear film break-up time, Patient Global Assessment of Improvement, Impact of Dry Eye on Everyday Life (IDEEL Treatment Satisfaction/Treatment Bother Questionnaire, Single Symptom Comfort Scale, and Ocular Symptoms Questionnaire. The safety analysis comprised recording of adverse events.Results: In total, 147 patients (Systane group, n=73; Refresh group, n=74; mean ± standard deviation age, 57±16 years were enrolled and included in the safety and efficacy analyses. Corneal staining was significantly reduced from baseline to week 6 for Systane and Refresh (−3.4±2.5 and −2.5±2.6 units, respectively; P<0.0001, t-test, with a significantly greater improvement with Systane versus Refresh (P=0.0294. Results for conjunctival staining, tear film break-up time, and patient-reported outcome questionnaires were not statistically different between groups. No safety

  10. Semifluorinated Alkane Eye Drops for Treatment of Dry Eye Disease Due to Meibomian Gland Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Philipp; Augustin, Albert J; Geerling, Gerd; Kaercher, Thomas; Kretz, Florian; Kunert, Kathleen; Menzel-Severing, Johannes; Schrage, Norbert; Schrems, Wolfgang; Krösser, Sonja; Beckert, Michael; Messmer, Elisabeth M

    2017-11-01

    Meibomian gland disease is generally accepted as the leading cause for evaporative dry eye disease (DED). In a previous study, perfluorohexyloctane, a semifluorinated alkane, has been demonstrated to significantly increase tear film breakup time and to reduce corneal fluorescein staining in patients with evaporative DED, thereby vastly reducing dry eye-related symptoms. This study was set up to evaluate perfluorohexyloctane in a larger population of patients with Meibomian gland dysfunction. Seventy-two patients with Meibomian gland disease and associated dry eye received 1 drop of perfluorohexyloctane 4 times daily during an observational, prospective, multicenter, 6-8-week study. Clinical assessment included best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, Schirmer test I, tear film breakup time, anterior and posterior blepharitis assessment, number of expressible Meibomian glands, meibum quality and quantity, ocular surface fluorescein staining, lid margin and symptom assessment, and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI © ). From the 72 patients recruited, 61 completed the trial per protocol. Nine patients did not apply the medication as recommended and 2 patients were lost to follow-up. Tear film breakup time, corneal and conjunctival fluorescein staining, number of expressible Meibomian glands, and severity of anterior and posterior blepharitis significantly improved after 6-8 weeks of perfluorohexyloctane application. In addition, symptoms improved as demonstrated by a significant decrease of OSDI-values from 37 (±13) to 26 (±16). In concordance with previous findings, 6-8 weeks of topical application of perfluorohexyloctane significantly improves clinical signs of Meibomian gland disease and associated mild to moderate DED.

  11. Anti-inflammatory and Antihistaminic Study of a Unani Eye Drop Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul, Latif; Abdul, Razique; Sukul, R R; Nazish, Siddiqui

    2010-01-01

    The Unani eye drop is an ophthalmic formulation prepared for its beneficial effects in the inflammatory and allergic conditions of the eyes. In the present study, the Unani eye drop formulation was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity, using in vivo and in vitro experimental models respectively. The Unani eye drop formulation exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in turpentine liniment-induced ocular inflammation in rabbits. The preparation also showed antihistaminic activity in isolated guinea-pig ileum. The anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity of eye drop may be due to presence of active ingredients in the formulation. Although there are many drugs in Unani repository which are mentioned in classical books or used in Unani clinical practice effectively in treatment of eye diseases by various Unani physicians. Inspite of the availability of vast literature, there is a dearth of commercial Unani ocular preparations. So, keeping this in mind, the eye drop formulation was prepared and its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity was carried out in animal models. Thus, in view of the importance of alternative anti-inflammatory and antiallergic drugs, it becomes imperative to bring these indigenous drugs to the front foot and evaluate their activities.

  12. Anti-inflammatory and Antihistaminic Study of a Unani Eye Drop Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Abdul

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Unani eye drop is an ophthalmic formulation prepared for its beneficial effects in the inflammatory and allergic conditions of the eyes. In the present study, the Unani eye drop formulation was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity, using in vivo and in vitro experimental models respectively. The Unani eye drop formulation exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in turpentine liniment-induced ocular inflammation in rabbits. The preparation also showed antihistaminic activity in isolated guinea-pig ileum. The anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity of eye drop may be due to presence of active ingredients in the formulation. Although there are many drugs in Unani repository which are mentioned in classical books or used in Unani clinical practice effectively in treatment of eye diseases by various Unani physicians. Inspite of the availability of vast literature, there is a dearth of commercial Unani ocular preparations. So, keeping this in mind, the eye drop formulation was prepared and its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity was carried out in animal models. Thus, in view of the importance of alternative anti-inflammatory and anti- allergic drugs, it becomes imperative to bring these indigenous drugs to the front foot and evaluate their activities.

  13. Anti-inflammatory and Antihistaminic Study of a Unani Eye Drop Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Unani eye drop is an ophthalmic formulation prepared for its beneficial effects in the inflammatory and allergic conditions of the eyes. In the present study, the Unani eye drop formulation was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity, using in vivo and in vitro experimental models respectively. The Unani eye drop formulation exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in turpentine liniment-induced ocular inflammation in rabbits. The preparation also showed antihistaminic activity in isolated guinea-pig ileum. The anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity of eye drop may be due to presence of active ingredients in the formulation. Although there are many drugs in Unani repository which are mentioned in classical books or used in Unani clinical practice effectively in treatment of eye diseases by various Unani physicians. Inspite of the availability of vast literature, there is a dearth of commercial Unani ocular preparations. So, keeping this in mind, the eye drop formulation was prepared and its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity was carried out in animal models. Thus, in view of the importance of alternative anti-inflammatory and antiallergic drugs, it becomes imperative to bring these indigenous drugs to the front foot and evaluate their activities.

  14. Effects of eye drops of Buddleja officinalis Maxim. extract on lacrimal gland cell apoptosis in castrated rats with dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing-hua; Yao, Xiao-lei; Wu, Quan-long; Tan, Han-yu; Zhang, Jing-rong

    2010-03-01

    To explore the possible mechanism of eye drops of Buddleja officinalis extract in treating dry eye of castrated rats by analyzing the expressions of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins. Forty-five Wistar male rats were randomly divided into sham-operated group, untreated group and eye drops of Buddleja officinalis Maxim. extract (treatment) group. The dry eye model was established with orchiectomy in the untreated group and treatment group. Rats in the treatment group were treated with eye drops of Buddleja officinalis Maxim. extract, one drop once, three times daily. Eyes of rats in the sham-operated group and untreated group were instilled with normal saline. After one-, two-, or three-month treatment, five rats in each group were scarified respectively. Then samples were taken to detect related indices. Expressions of Bax and Bcl-2 of lacrimal gland were checked by immunohistochemical method and quantity of apoptotic cells was counted. After one-, two- or three-month treatment, the quantities of expressions of Bax in acinar epithelial cells and glandular tube cells were significantly lower, and those of Bcl-2 were significantly higher in the treatment group than in the untreated group, and the quantities of apoptotic cells of the treatment group were significantly lower than those of the untreated group (PBuddleja officinalis Maxim. are flavonoids, which can significantly inhibit cell apoptosis in lacrimal gland.

  15. Lipid-containing osmoprotective eye drops in contact lens wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslan Bayhan S

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Seray Aslan Bayhan, Hasan Ali Bayhan Ophthalmology Department, Bozok University Faculty of Medicine, Yozgat, TurkeyWe would like to congratulate Kaercher et al1 on their prospective study of Optive Plus (Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA in the treatment of patients with dry eye. In this study the authors reported that Optive Plus effectively reduced the signs and symptoms of patients with all types of dry eye and they recommended the use of this artificial tear especially in lipid-deficient dry eye. We think that some important issues need more thorough discussion.View original paper by Kaercher and colleagues.

  16. The Effect of Low-Dose Aspirin on Dry Eye Parameters and Ocular Surface Disease Index Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazıcı, Alper; Sarı, Esin; Ayhan, Erkan; Şahin, Gözde; Tıskaoğlu, Nesime Setge; Gürbüzer, Taha; Kurt, Hüseyin; Ermiş, Sıtkı Samet

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) on tear film parameters and dry eye disease. Fifty-seven patients using low-dose aspirin regularly for antiaggregant purposes as well as 49 controls, who required antiaggregant treatment but who had not yet started, were included in the study. Tear osmolarity, tear break-up time (TBUT), Schirmer and Oxford grading of ocular surface staining were performed on all patients and dry eye symptomatology was assessed using the ocular surface disease index questionnaire (OSDI). The mean osmolarity was 302.11 ± 16.22 mOsm/L in the aspirin group and 313.88 ± 19.57 mOsm/L in the control group (P < 0.01). The mean Schirmer's score was 24.16 ± 10.52 mm and 21.94 ± 10.11 mm (P = 0.232), TBUT was 13.61 ± 3.31 s and 10.39 ± 4.46 s (P < 0.01), OSDI score was 5.15 ± 5.98 and 16.94 ± 14.17 (P < 0.01), and Oxford score was 0.12 ± 0.33 and 0.12 ± 0.44 in aspirin and control groups, respectively (P = 0.99). Dry eye diagnosis was lower in the aspirin group, but statistical significance was present only in TBUT and osmolarity-based dry eye diagnosis (P ≤ 0.01). In terms of symptom-based dry eye diagnosis with the threshold of OSDI ≥23, none of the aspirin group had dry eye diagnosis, whereas 32.6% of the control group had the diagnosis (P < 0.01). The use of low-dose aspirin might be great option for treatment of ocular surface inflammatory disease through increasing TBUT and decreasing tear osmolarity with a resultant symptomatic satisfaction.

  17. Factors affecting eye drop instillation in glaucoma patients with visual field defect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Naito

    Full Text Available To investigate the success rate of eye drop instillation in glaucoma patients with visual field defect as well as non-glaucoma volunteers. Factors that may affect the success rate of eye drop instillation were also evaluated.A prospective, observational study.Seventy-eight glaucoma patients and 85 non-glaucoma volunteers were recruited in this study.Open angle glaucoma patients with visual field defect as well as non-glaucoma volunteers were asked to video record their procedures of eye drop instillation using a 5-mL plastic bottle of artificial tear solution. Success of eye drop instillation was judged on video based on the first one drop of solution successfully applied on the cornea, by two investigators.Success rate of eye drop instillation in glaucoma patients and non-glaucoma volunteers. Factors related to success rate of eye drop instillation, such as visual field defect and clinical characteristics, were also analyzed using multivariable logistic regression.No significant deference in mean age was observed between two groups (glaucoma: 64.5 ± 14.4 years, non-glaucoma: 60.9 ± 14.1 years, P = 0.1156. Success rate of eye drop instillation was significantly lower (P = 0.0215 in glaucoma patients (30/78; 38.5% than in non-glaucoma volunteers (48/85; 56.5%. The most frequent reason of instillation failure in glaucoma patients was touching the bulbar conjunctiva, cornea, eyelid or eyelashes with the tip of the bottle (29.5%. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified lower corrected visual acuity (VA (≤ 1.0; odds ratio [OR] = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.04-0.93, P = 0.0411, lower mean deviation (MD (< -12 dB; OR = 0.20, 95% CI 0.05-0.86, P = 0.0307 and visual field defect (VFD in the inferior hemifield (OR = 0.11, 95% CI 0.02-0.34, P < 0.001 to be significantly related to instillation failure in glaucoma patients.Success rate of eye drop instillation was significantly lower in glaucoma patients than in non

  18. [Cyclosporine eye drops: A 4-year retrospective study (2009-2013)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauss Hornecker, M; Charles Weber, S; Brandely Piat, M-L; Darrodes, M; Jomaa, K; Chast, F

    2015-10-01

    The University Hospitals Paris Centre Pharmacy compounds three concentrations of cyclosporine eye drops: 20mg/mL (=2%); 5mg/mL (=0.5%) and 0.5mg/mL (=0.05%). Cyclosporine A 2% drops were developed in 1995 to prevent the rejection of high-risk cornea transplants after failure of topical steroids. The other concentrations of eye drops were developed for the treatment of various immune or inflammatory diseases of the cornea, conjunctiva and uvea. These eye drops are dispensed with a physician's prescription to hospitalized or ambulatory patients. A retrospective study over 4 years (2009-2013) was conducted to analyze the details of prescription and possible adverse events. Dispensations made from January 1st, 2009 through December 31st, 2013 were studied, including patient age, dose of cyclosporine and practice location of prescribing physician. We also recorded the indications for cyclosporine eye drops in a sample of ambulatory patients. The analysis of local tolerability and the effect on visual comfort was based on questionnaires sent to the patients on cyclosporine 2% over a period of 2 months. Cyclosporine eye drops prescription grew continuously from 2009 through 2013 for all concentrations. In 2013, 5,859 patients were treated, among which 3,616 patients with topical cyclosporine 2%, 1,681 patients with 0.5%, and 562 patients with 0.05%. In total, this represents 62,621 eye drops. Treated patients ranged from 1 week to 100 years old. Topical 2% cyclosporine is indicated in 61% of cases to prevent high-risk corneal graft rejection. Other indications are corneal ulcer (6%), atopic keratoconjunctivitis (5%), vernal keratoconjunctivitis (5%) and herpetic keratitis (4%). Topical 0.5% cyclosporine is prescribed primarily for dry eye syndrome (20%) and to prevent rejection of high-risk corneal transplantation (11%), to treat ocular rosacea (10%), vernal keratoconjunctivitis (10%), atopic keratoconjunctivitis (8%) and Sjögren's syndrome (7%). Topical 0

  19. Application of hydrochloric cyclopentolate eye drops in the mydriasis test and optometry for children with hyperopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ping Yin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe and study the comprehensive application effect of hydrochloric cyclopentolate eye drops in the mydriasis test and optometry for children with hyperopia.METHODS:Eighty-four children with hyperopia who were intervened with mydriasis test and optometry in our hospital from February 2014 to March 2015 were selected as the research object,and they were intervened with mydriasis test and optometry by tropicamide or hydrochloric cyclopentolate eye drops. The diopter, pupil diameter and residual regulation before administration and at different time after administration of the two methods were compared,and the detected results of the two groups with different severity degree were compared too.RESULTS:The diopter, pupil diameter and residual regulation before administration of the two eye drops had no significant differences(all P>0.05,while the residual regulation after using hydrochloric cyclopentolate eye drops at 20, 40, 60min and 24h were all smaller than those after using tropicamide(all PP>0.05. The pupil diameter of the two groups at 48h after administration both had no significant differences to those before administration(all P>0.05.CONCLUSION:The comprehensive application effect of hydrochloric cyclopentolate eye drops in the mydriasis test and optometry of children with hyperopia is better,and its paralysis effect for ciliaris is obvious.

  20. Novel plasminogen and hyaluronate sodium eye drop formulation for a patient with ligneous conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Franca Manganelli; Di Felice, Giovina; Bernaschi, Paola; Bartuli, Andrea; Bianco, Giuseppe; Simonetti, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Luca; Valente, Paola; Corsetti, Tiziana

    2016-04-15

    The development, analysis, and first clinical use of a novel eye drop formulation of plasminogen and hyaluronate sodium for the treatment of a patient with ligneous conjunctivitis (LC) are described. LC is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the eye that can in rare cases lead to corneal involvement and subsequent blindness. Topically administered plasminogen is an effective treatment for LC; however, the lack of a specific and validated formulation of plasminogen for topical treatment can constitute a gap in the quality of care. A novel formulation of plasminogen and hyaluronate sodium for the treatment of LC was developed by combining commercially available products. Through a series of tests, including microbiological, viscosity, and pH analyses, the novel eye drop formulation was demonstrated to have constant activity (3.3 IU/mL or greater), to be microbiologically stable (i.e., sterile), and to be safe enough for daily administration. The first clinical application of the novel eye drop formulation was in the case of a nine-year-old girl with LC affecting both eyes. Initially, the girl's parents administered two drops every three hours to the left eye each day while the girl was awake. On examination after 30 days of daily use of the eye drop formulation, the patient was found to have a clear cornea and no membrane development on the conjunctiva; the formulation was subsequently administered in both eyes, with positive results. A new formulation of plasminogen plus hyaluronate sodium was developed, tested, and used successfully in a girl with LC. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Influence of mydriatic eye drops on the aberrometer predicted phoropter refraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneri, S; Stottmeister, S; Krause, K

    2010-01-01

    Wavefront-guided ablations are based on wavefront sensing in a pupil dilated under mesopic conditions, or in patients with insufficient natural pupil dilation, after the application of mydriatic eye drops. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential influence of mydriatic eye drops on wavefront-sensing in terms of the predicted phoropter refraction (PPR). In this prospective study 70 myopic eyes were measured in miosis and pharmacologically induced mydriasis with the Zywave aberrometer and automated refraction (Canon R-F10). 52 eyes were dilated with eye drops containing tropicamide 0.5 % and phenylephrine 2.5 %, in the remaining 18 eyes tropicamide 0.5 % was used. The PPR for a pupil diameter of 3.5 mm in miosis and in mydriasis, respectively, were compared and correlated to the corresponding values of the automated refraction. PPR values obtained in mydriasis were less myopic than in miosis. The sphere of PPR differed by an average of + 0.19 +/- 0.3 diopters (range: -1.07 to + 0.37 diopters) when using tropicamide 0.5 % and phenylephrine 2.5 %. With tropicamide 0.5 % eye drops the difference was + 0.25 +/- 0.4 diopters (range: -1.12 diopters to + 0.27 diopters). Cylinder values were not affected. Automated refraction yielded a smaller difference of + 0.16 +/- 0.33 diopters (tropicamide 0.5 % and phenylephrine 2.5 %) and + 0.1 +/- 0.19 diopters (tropicamide 0.5 %). Cylinder values changed significantly. The cycloplegic effect of mydriatic eye drops should be taken into account when interpreting aberration measurements and planning a wavefront-guided laser ablation. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  2. In Vitro Evaluation of the Ophthalmic Toxicity Profile of Chlorhexidine and Propamidine Isethionate Eye Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ferreiro, Anxo; Santiago-Varela, María; Gil-Martínez, María; González-Barcia, Miguel; Luaces-Rodríguez, Andrea; Díaz-Tome, Victoria; Pardo, María; Méndez, José Blanco; Piñeiro-Ces, Antonio; Rodríguez-Ares, María Teresa; Lamas, Maria Jesus; Otero-Espinar, Francisco J

    2017-04-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis causes frequent epithelial lesions that fully expose the corneal stroma. The aim of this study was to determine the toxic profile of chlorhexidine and propamidine eye drops. We used primary human keratocytes in cell culture in combination with a novel technology that evaluates dynamic real-time cytotoxicity through impedance analysis. Additional studies such as a classic cell viability test (WST-1®), a bovine corneal opacity and permeability assay, and an irritation eye study (Hen's Egg Test [HET]) have been made. Both eye drop formulations showed a time- and concentration-dependent toxicity profile, in which long periods and high concentrations were more detrimental to cells. In prolonged times of exposure, propamidine is more harmful to cells than chlorhexidine. On the contrary, no irritation has been detected in using the HET-chorioallantoic membrane test and no alterations in the corneal transparency nor permeability was produced by the treatment with both eye drops. In culture assay, chlorhexidine eye drops have proven to be less cytotoxic than Brolene® for a long contact period of time, but no signs of irritation or alterations in transparency or permeability have been observed in the cornea after both treatments.

  3. Influence of mydriatic eye drops on wavefront sensing with the Zywave aberrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneri, Suphi; Oehler, Saskia; Azar, Dimitri T

    2011-09-01

    To investigate a potential influence of mydriatic eye drops on wavefront sensing with the Zywave aberrometer (Technolas Perfect Vision) in terms of predicted phoropter refraction (PPR) and higher order aberrations (HOA). In this prospective study, 200 myopic eyes were measured in miosis and pharmacologically induced mydriasis with an aberrometer and automated refraction. One hundred eyes were dilated with tropicamide 0.5%+phenylephrine 2.5% eye drops (tropicamide/phenylephrine group), and the remaining 100 eyes with tropicamide 0.5% (tropicamide only group). The PPR values for a pupil diameter of 3.5 mm in miosis and mydriasis, respectively, were compared and correlated to the corresponding values of automated refraction. Changes in HOAs up to the 4th order were recorded. Predicted phoropter refraction values obtained in mydriasis were less myopic than in miosis. The spherical equivalent refraction of PPR differed by an average of 0.36 ± 0.36 diopters (D) in the tropicamide/phenylephrine group. In the tropicamide only group, the difference was 0.24 ± 0.43 D. Sphere of PPR differed by an average of 0.33 ± 0.36 D in the tropicamide/phenylephrine group and by an average of 0.24 ± 0.35 D in the tropicamide only group. Patient age had no major influence on the level of difference. Automated refraction yielded a smaller difference in spherical equivalent refraction. Changes in HOA root-mean-square were statistically significant. The cycloplegic effect of mydriatic eye drops should be taken into account when interpreting aberration measurements and planning a wavefront-guided ablation. Ideally, the use of mydriatic eye drops should be avoided to minimize refractive surprises. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Cyclosporine A eye drops inhibit the early-phase reaction in a type-I allergic conjunctivitis model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shii, Daisuke; Oda, Tomoko; Shinomiya, Katsuhiko; Katsuta, Osamu; Nakamura, Masatsugu

    2009-08-01

    The effects of cyclosporine A eye drops on the early-phase reaction were investigated in a type-I allergic conjunctivitis model. Mice were actively sensitized with ragweed (RW) absorbed on aluminium hydroxide gel and challenged with RW for 10 days (single challenge model) or 10-14 days (repetitive challenge model) after the first sensitization. For the evaluation of itching, ovalbumin was used as an antigen instead of RW. The effects of cyclosporine A eye drops on increased vascular permeability, mast cell degranulation, and itching were evaluated and compared with those of other anti-allergic eye drops. In the single challenge model, cyclosporine A eye drops significantly inhibited the increase in vascular permeability and histological evaluations showed suppressed degranulation of mast cells. Disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) eye drops showed only a slight tendency to inhibit the increase in both pathophysiological parameters. Ketotifen or betamethasone eye drops significantly inhibited the increase in vascular permeability. The order of potency in the single challenge model was ketotifen > cyclosporine A > betamethasone. In the repetitive challenge model, cyclosporine A eye drops significantly inhibited the increase in vascular permeability and DSCG eye drops showed only slight inhibition. Ketotifen or betamethasone significantly inhibited the increase in vascular permeability. The order of potency in the repetitive challenge model was cyclosporine A > betamethasone > ketotifen. The effect of cyclosporine A eye drops on the itch-scratch response was studied. Cyclosporine A and DSCG significantly reduced the itch-scratch response in the single and repetitive challenge models; the effect of cyclosporine A in the repetitive challenge model was more potent than in the single challenge model. Those results suggest that administration of cyclosporine A eye drops inhibit the early-phase reaction in type-I allergic conjunctivitis, which may be mediated by the suppression of

  5. Evaluation of the Efficacy of 50% Autologous Serum Eye Drops in Different Ocular Surface Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Semeraro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study evaluated the efficacy of 50% autologous serum eye drops in ocular surface diseases not improved by conventional therapy. Methods. We analyzed two groups: (1 acute eye pathologies (e.g., chemical burns and (2 chronic eye pathologies (e.g., recurrent corneal erosion, neurotropic keratitis, and keratoconjunctivitis sicca. The patients were treated for surface instability after conventional therapy. The patients received therapy 5 times a day until stabilization of the framework; they then reduced therapy to 3 times a day for at least 3 months. We analyzed the best corrected visual acuity, epithelial defects, inflammation, corneal opacity, and corneal neovascularization. We also analyzed symptoms such as tearing, burning, sense of foreign body or sand, photophobia, blurred vision, and difficulty opening the eyelids. Results. We enrolled 15 eyes in group 1 and 11 eyes in group 2. The average therapy period was 16 ± 5.86 weeks in group 1 and 30.54 ± 20.33 weeks in group 2. The epithelial defects all resolved. Signs and symptoms improved in both groups. In group 2, the defect recurred after the suspension of therapy in 2 (18% patients; in group 1, no defects recurred. Conclusions. Autologous serum eye drops effectively stabilize and improve signs and symptoms in eyes previously treated with conventional therapy.

  6. Prevalence of self-reported early glaucoma eye drop bottle exhaustion and associated risk factors: a patient survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Daniel B; Walton, Charlene; Moeller, Kristy L; Slabaugh, Mark A; Mudumbai, Raghu C; Chen, Philip P

    2014-06-13

    One barrier to patient adherence with chronic topical glaucoma treatment is an inadequate amount of medication available between prescription refills. We examined the self-reported prevalence of early exhaustion of glaucoma eye drops prior to a scheduled refill, and associated risk factors. This cross-sectional survey was performed at a University-based clinical practice. Glaucoma patients at the University of Washington who were experienced with eye drop application and were on a steady regimen of self-administered glaucoma drops in both eyes took a survey at the time of clinic examination. The main outcome measure was self-reported early eye drop bottle exhaustion. 236 patients were eligible and chose to participate. In general, patients included were relatively healthy (mean 2.3 comorbid medical conditions). Sixty patients (25.4%) reported any problem with early exhaustion of eye drop bottles, and this was associated with visual acuity ≤ 20/70 in the better eye (P = .049). Twelve patients (5.1%) reported that they "often" (5-7 times per year), "usually" (8-11 times per year) or "always" ran out of eye drops prior to a scheduled refill. Patients affected by this higher level (≥ 5 times yearly) of eye drop bottle exhaustion were more likely to have poor visual acuity in their worse eye ≤  20/70 (P = .015) and had significantly lower worse-eye logMAR (P = .043). Self-reported early glaucoma bottle exhaustion regularly affected 5% of patients in our population and 25% reported early exhaustion at least once; the main risk factor was poor vision in at least one eye. These results may not be generalizable to a broad patient population, or to those inexperienced with eye drop self-administration. However, this pilot study compels further evaluation and consideration of early eye drop bottle exhaustion in glaucoma patients.

  7. Formulation and stability study of a pediatric 2% phenylephrine hydrochloride eye drop solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreno, C; Gicquel, T; Harry, M; Tribut, O; Aubin, F; Brandhonneur, N; Dollo, G

    2015-01-01

    We present formulation and stability evaluation of a 2% (w/v) phenylephrine hydrochloride biocompatible eye drop solution, routinely prepared in hospital pharmacy under aseptic conditions, for retinal examination of neonates and premature infants. Eye drop solution was formulated by dissolution of phenylephrine hydrochloride and disodium hydrogen phosphate as buffering agent in sterile water for injection and sodium chloride for injection as isotonic agent. The previous solution was sterile filtered through under aseptic conditions, in an iso class 5 air quality clean room under horizontal laminar airflow hood. Physical stability (visual inspection, osmolality measurements), chemical stability (pH measurement, phenylephrine assay by liquid chromatography coupled with an ultra-high resolution and accurate mass) and sterility evaluation of phenylephrine eye drop solution stored at ambient temperature were studied during 60 days. The formulated eye drop solution had a pH of 6.90±0.05 and an osmolality of 285±2 mOsm/kg. Throughout the 60 days study the solutions remained clear without any precipitation or color modification, sterility was maintained, pH and osmolality were not significantly modified and no significant loss of product was detected using liquid chromatography coupled with an ultra-high resolution and accurate mass instrument suggesting the lack of degradation. These results indicate that 2% phenylephrine hydrochloride eye drop solutions were physically, chemically and microbiologically stable for at least 60 days when stored in type I amber glass vials at room temperature, allowing the compounding of higher batch sizes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Cyclosporine A Eye Drop-Induced Elongated Eyelashes: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Lei Lei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The most common ocular adverse event following the use of cyclosporine A (CsA 0.05% ophthalmic emulsion is ocular burning (17%. Other adverse effects that have been reported include conjunctival hyperemia (1–5%, discharge, epiphora, eye pain, foreign body sensation, pruritus, stinging and blurred vision. Here, we report a specific side effect of CsA, namely eye drop-induced eyelash elongation in a patient with refractory giant papillary conjunctivitis. Design: Observational case report. Methods: Case report and review of the literature. Results: A 32-year-old female with giant papillary conjunctivitis on the left eye, who had undergone papillectomy 3 years previously and was refractory to topical steroid therapy, was treated with CsA 0.05% ophthalmic emulsion (Restasis 4 times a day, preservative-free artificial tears and gentamicin ophthalmic solution in the left eye. After 5 months of topical CsA treatment, elongated eyelashes of her left eye were observed without other adverse effects. Conclusion: Although hypertrichosis and trichomegaly have been documented in the literature as side effects of systemic CsA, topical CsA 0.05% eye drop-induced elongated eyelashes have not been reported, and we believe ophthalmologists should be mindful and inform patients about this specific side effect.

  9. Corneal staining reductions observed after treatment with Systane Lubricant Eye Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mike T

    2008-11-01

    Because of the added emphasis on ocular surface damage included in the Dry Eye Workshop's revised definition of dry eye, an evaluation of corneal staining reductions was conducted for propylene glycol/polyethylene glycol 400-based artificial tear drops (Systane Lubricant Eye Drops; Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, TX, USA). An analysis was conducted on the percent change from baseline in mean corneal staining scores as reported in two previously published, randomized, double-masked, 6-week clinical studies of Systane. A descriptive comparison was also made between the outcome of the composite analysis and data obtained for Optivetrade mark Lubricant Eye Drops (Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA). Finally, results were reviewed for an open-label study that investigated corneal staining over a 5-week period after patients discontinued Systane therapy. The composite analysis included 107 Systane-treated patients. The results showed that Systane consistently reduced corneal staining at each visit; the percent change from baseline to day 42 (exit) was 47.1% (P<0.0001). After discontinuing Systane, immediate and significant increases in corneal staining were reported by 20 patients, with an overall increase from baseline to day 35 (exit) of 195.0% (P<0.0001). Evaluations of sum corneal ocular staining scores provide clinically meaningful evidence of dry eye severity, and are an important indicator of dry eye disease progression. The results of the composite analysis of two peer-reviewed studies indicate that Systane significantly reduced corneal staining (P<0.0001), indicating a reduction in the severity of dry eye. Finally, discontinuation of Systane results in a rapid increase in corneal staining that further confirms Systane's ability to maintain ocular surface health.

  10. Safety and efficacy of autologous serum eye drop for treatment of dry eyes in graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Amir A; Karadag, Remzi; Kanavi, Mozhgan Rezaei; Nehls, Sarah; Barney, Neal; Kim, Kyungmann; Longo, Walter; Hematti, Peiman; Juckett, Mark

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the treatment of autologous serum eye drops (ASED) on dry eyes in patients with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). A retrospective chart review of 35 patients with a history of ocular GVHD following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation that used ASED to alleviate dry eye symptoms was performed. Patients were categorized into three different groups. If patients had available ophthalmic data before and after starting treatment was group 1 (n = 14), had available ophthalmic data after starting treatment in group 2 (n = 10) and had available ophthalmic data before treatment or did not have any data after starting treatment in group 3 (n = 11). Data were collected on patient's age, gender, primary diagnosis, visual acuity and fluorescein corneal staining were collected on individual eyes in order to evaluate the efficacy of the ASED on alleviating dry eye-related signs and symptoms. No adverse ocular effect from the ASED was found in our series (except one fungal keratitis). All patients reported either improvement (55%) or stability (45%) in their ocular symptoms upon the use of ASED. In patients with available data before and after starting treatment, the corneal staining score improved by a median of 1 (p = 0.003) and the LogMAR visual acuity had a non-significant improvement. In our study, ASED used by patients with ocular GVHD were both safe and effective. ASED should be considered in patients with GVHD who suffer from dry eyes.

  11. Clinical study on high concentrations of sodium hyaluronate eye drops for moderate to severe dry eye

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Jing Tian; Qin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To observe the efficacy of high concentrations of sodium hyaluronate(3g/L SH)for moderate to severe dry eye. METHODS: Forty moderate to severe dry eye patients were included in the study according to the diagnosis criteria and randomized into two groups. The patients of the trial group received topical administration of high concentration sodium hyaluronate(3g/L), and those of the control group received sodium hyaluronate(1g/L)plus recombinant human epidermal growth factor. The dry eye s...

  12. Antioxidant and inflammatory cytokine in tears of patients with dry eye syndrome treated with preservative-free versus preserved eye drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Donghyun; Park, Sang Hee; Kim, Man Soo; Kim, Eun Chul

    2014-07-03

    To compare the antioxidant and inflammatory cytokine activities in tears of patients with dry eye syndrome treated with preservative-free versus preserved eye drops. A total of 100 patients with moderate to severe dry eye syndrome were randomly divided into two groups. Fifty patients (group 1) were treated four times with preservative-free 0.1% sodium hyaluronate and 0.1% fluorometholone eye drops in the first month and with preservative-free 0.1% sodium hyaluronate and 0.05% cyclosporine eye drops in the second and third months. Another 50 patients (group 2) were treated with preserved eye drops on the same schedule. Ocular Surface Disease Index, corneal fluorescein staining, Schirmer I test, tear film breakup time, impression cytology, and antioxidant and inflammatory cytokine activities in tears were evaluated. Treatment with preservative-free eye drops led to significant improvements in symptoms, tear film breakup time, Schirmer I score, and impression cytologic findings compared to treatment with preserved eye drops (P tears in the preservative-free group at 1, 2, and 3 months compared to initial values, respectively (P ocular inflammation and in increasing antioxidant contents in tears of patients with dry eye syndrome. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  13. Improvement in the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease with dobesilate eye drops

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pedro Cuevas; Luis Antonio Outeirino; Carlos Azanza; Javier Angulo; Guillermo Gimenez-Gallego

    2015-01-01

      Dry eye disease (DED) is a progressive and multifactorial disease affecting the tear film and ocular surface that causes discomfort, visual disturbances and tear film instability with potential damage to the ocular surface [1...

  14. Comparison of 0.3% Hypotonic and Isotonic Sodium Hyaluronate Eye Drops in the Treatment of Experimental Dry Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Cui, Lian; Lee, Hyo Seok; Kang, Yeon Soo; Choi, Won; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2017-08-01

    To compare the efficacy of 0.3% hypotonic and isotonic sodium hyaluronate (SH) eye drops in the treatment of experimental dry eye. Experimental dry eye was established in female C57BL/6 mice by subcutaneous scopolamine injection and an air draft. The mice were divided into three groups (n = 15): control, preservative-free 0.3% isotonic SH, and preservative-free 0.3% hypotonic SH. The tear volume, tear film break-up time, and corneal fluorescein staining scores were measured 5 and 10 days after treatment. After conjunctival tissues were excised at 10 days, the levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-17, interferon (IFN)-γ, and IFN-γ inducible protein-10 were determined using the multiplex immunobead assay. In addition, PAS staining and flow cytometry were performed to evaluate the counts of conjunctival goblet cells and CD4+ IFN-γ+ T cells. Mice treated with 0.3% hypotonic SH showed a significant decrease in corneal staining scores (P = 0.04) and the levels of IL-6 (16.7 ± 1.4 pg/mL, P = 0.02) and IFN-γ (46.5 ± 11.5 pg/mL, P = 0.02) compared to mice treated with 0.3% isotonic SH (IL-6; 32.5 ± 8.8 pg/mL, IFN-γ; 92.0 ± 16.0 pg/mL) at day 10. Although no significant difference in CD4+ IFN-γ+ T cell numbers was observed, goblet cell counts were higher in the hyopotonic SH group than in the isotonic SH group (P = 0.02). When compared to 0.3% isotonic SH eye drops, 0.3% hypotonic SH eye drops can be more effective by improving corneal staining scores, decreasing inflammatory molecules, and increasing goblet cell counts for experimental dry eye. These data suggest that hypotonic artificial tears may be useful as an adjunctive treatment for inflammatory dry eye.

  15. [The observation of tacrolimus eye drops preventing the early immunological rejection after penetrating keratoplasty for fungal keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, D M; Wang, Y X; Jia, Y N; Li, S X; Zhai, H L; Shi, W Y; Gao, H

    2017-04-11

    Objective: To observe the early immunological rejection prevention effect of tacrolimus eye drops combined with glucocorticoids on fungal keratitis patients who received penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). Methods: In a retrospective case series study, medical records of fungal keratitis patients who received PKP in Shandong Eye Institute from March 2013 to December 2015 were reviewed. Twenty-six patients (26 eyes) were given tacrolimus eye drops, and 24 patients (24 eyes) were given 1% cyclosporine A eye drops immediately after PKP. Two weeks after PKP, these patients were given low concentration of glucocorticoids if no fungal recurrence was found. Immune rejection, fungal recurrence, intraocular pressure, and drug irritation symptoms were monitored. Data were analyzed by chi-square test and independent t-test. Results: The average follow-up was 7 months (range, 3 to 12 months) postoperatively. The rejection rate was 15.3% in the tacrolimus group and 47.8% in the cyclosporine A group (χ(2)=5.510, Ptacrolimus group and two patients in the cyclosporine A group suffered fungal recurrence. Two patients in the tacrolimus group and four patients in the cyclosporine A group had secondary glaucoma. The intraocular pressure was controlled. Three patients receiving tacrolimus eye drops and 13 patients receiving cyclosporine A eye drops had mild irritation symptoms. Conclusions: Tacrolimus eye drops combined with low concentration of glucocorticoids can prevent the early immunological rejection after PKP for fungalkeratitis effectively and safely. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53:305-310).

  16. Decrease in Corneal Damage due to Benzalkonium Chloride by the Addition of Mannitol into Timolol Maleate Eye Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yoshioka, Chiaki; Tanino, Tadatoshi; Ito, Yoshimasa; Okamoto, Norio; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects of mannitol on corneal damage caused by benzalkonium chloride (BAC), which is used as a preservative in commercially available timolol maleate eye drops, using rat debrided corneal epithelium and a human cornea epithelial cell line (HCE-T). Corneal wounds were monitored using a fundus camera TRC-50X equipped with a digital camera; eye drops were instilled into rat eyes five times a day after corneal epithelial abrasion. The viability of HCE-T cells was calculated by TetraColor One; and Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739) were used to measure antimicrobial activity. The reducing effects on transcorneal penetration and intraocular pressure (IOP) of the eye drops were determined using rabbits. The corneal wound healing rate and rate constant (kH), as well as cell viability, were higher following treatment with 0.005% BAC solution containing 0.5% mannitol than in the case BAC solution alone; the antimicrobial activity was approximately the same for BAC solutions with and without mannitol. In addition, the kH for rat eyes instilled with commercially available timolol maleate eye drops containing 0.5% mannitol was significantly higher than that for eyes instilled with timolol maleate eye drops without mannitol, and the addition of mannitol did not affect the corneal penetration or IOP reducing effect of the timolol maleate eye drops. A preservative system comprising BAC and mannitol may provide effective therapy for glaucoma patients requiring long-term treatment with anti-glaucoma agents.

  17. A comparative study of Bilvadi Yoga Ashchyotana and eye drops in Vataja Abhishyanda (Simple Allergic Conjunctivitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Jayshree; Vaghela, D B; Rajagopala, Manjusha; Matalia, P D

    2012-01-01

    Simple allergic conjunctivitis is the most common form of ocular allergy (prevalence 5 - 22 %). It is a hypersensitivity reaction to specific airborne antigens. The disease Vataja Abhishyanda, which is due to vitiation of Vata Pradhana Tridosha is comparable with this condition. The management of simple allergic conjunctivitis in modern ophthalmology is very expensive and it should be followed lifelong and Ayurveda can provide better relief in such manifestation. This is the first research study on Vataja Abhishyanda. Patients were selected from the Outpatient Department (OPD), Inpatient Department (IPD), of the Shalakya Tantra Department and were randomly divided into two groups. In Group-A Bilvadi Ashchyotana and in Group-B Bilvadi eye drops were instilled for three months. Total 32 patients were registered and 27 patients completed the course of treatment. Bilvadi Ashchyotana gave better results in Toda, Sangharsha, Parushya, Kandu and Ragata as compared with Bilvadi Eye Drops in Vataja Abhishyanda.

  18. Curative effect of Sodium hyaluronate and bFGF eye drops after corneal rust foreign body removal operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Xia Li1

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the combined effect of Sodium hyaluronate eye drops and recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor(bFGFeye drops on cornea epithelial repair after corneal rust foreign body extraction. METHODS: Alinety-eight cases(98 eyesof corneal rust foreign body patients were randomly distributed to combined treatment group(49 cases, 49 eyesand control group(49 cases, 49 eyes. Hyaluronate eye drops, recombinant bFGF eye drops and levofloxacin hydrochloride were applied in combined treatment group after corneal foreign body extraction. Recombinant bFGF eye drops and levofloxacin hydrochloride were applied in control group. Corneal fluorescein stain, cornea epithelial repair and local symptoms were examined thrice weekly for 2 weeks. RESULTS: General effective rate of treatment in combined group reach 96%, significantly higher than that in control group(88%, PCONCLUSION: Combined application of sodium hyaluronate eye drops and recombinant bFGF eye drops can prominently improve cornea epithelial repair after corneal lesion with proven effectiveness and safety.

  19. Evaluation of the in vitro ocular toxicity of the fortified antibiotic eye drops prepared at the Hospital Pharmacy Departments

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    Anxo Fernández-Ferreiro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of parenteral antibiotic eye drop formulations with non-marketed compositions or concentrations, commonly called fortified antibiotic eye drops, is a common practice in Ophthalmology in the hospital setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro ocular toxicity of the main fortified antibiotic eye drops prepared in the Hospital Pharmacy Departments. We have conducted an in vitro experimental study in order to test the toxicity of gentamicin, amikacin, cefazolin, ceftazidime, vancomycin, colistimethate sodium and imipenem-cilastatin eye drops; their cytotoxicity and acute tissue irritation have been evaluated. Cell-based assays were performed on human stromal keratocytes, using a cell-based impedance biosensor system [xCELLigence Real-Time System Cell Analyzer (RTCA], and the Hen’s Egg Test for the ocular irritation tests. All the eye drops, except for vancomycin and imipenem, have shown a cytotoxic effect dependent on concentration and time; higher concentrations and longer exposure times will cause a steeper decline in the population of stromal keratocytes. Vancomycin showed a major initial cytotoxic effect, which was reverted over time; and imipenem appeared as a non-toxic compound for stromal cells. The eye drops with the highest irritating effect on the ocular surface were gentamicin and vancomycin. Those antibiotic eye drops prepared at the Hospital Pharmacy Departments included in this study were considered as compounds potentially cytotoxic for the ocular surface; this toxicity was dependent on the concentration used

  20. Clinical study on high concentrations of sodium hyaluronate eye drops for moderate to severe dry eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jing Tian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the efficacy of high concentrations of sodium hyaluronate(3g/L SHfor moderate to severe dry eye. METHODS: Forty moderate to severe dry eye patients were included in the study according to the diagnosis criteria and randomized into two groups. The patients of the trial group received topical administration of high concentration sodium hyaluronate(3g/L, and those of the control group received sodium hyaluronate(1g/Lplus recombinant human epidermal growth factor. The dry eye symptom scores, ocular surface disease index(OSDIscores, tear film break-up time(BUT, Schirmer Ⅰ test and corneal fluorescein staining score were evaluated.All the indexes were compared between the two groups 2wk before and after treatment. RESULTS: There were no significant differences of the indicators between the two groups before treatment. After 2wk treatment, the differences were statistically significant compared to former except for the Schirmer Ⅰ test. Compared with the control group, the symptom scores and the OSDI scores were lowered. No significant differences were found in the other indicators between these two groups. CONCLUSION: Topical usage of highconcentrations of sodium hyaluronate(3g/Lis beneficial for remitting the ocular symptoms in moderate to severe dry eyes, and also improve the quality of life of patients.

  1. Tacrolimus eye drops as monotherapy for vernal keratoconjunctivitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Eduardo Gayger; Santos, Myrna Serapião Dos; Freitas, Denise; Gomes, José Álvaro Pereira; Belfort, Rubens

    2017-06-01

    To assess the efficacy of monotherapy using tacrolimus eye drops versus sodium cromoglycate for the treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC). Randomized double-masked controlled trial comparing the efficacy of tacrolimus 0.03% eye drops t.i.d. (Group 1) with sodium cromoglycate 4% eye drops t.i.d. (Group 2) for the symptomatic control of VKC at days 0, 15, 30, 45, and 90 of follow-up. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, and other complications were evaluated to assess safety and side effects. In total, 16 patients were included, with 8 enrolled in each group. Two patients from Group 2 were excluded from the analysis at days 45 and 90 because of corticosteroid use. Most patients were male (81.8%) and presented with limbal VKC (56.3%). There were statistically significant differences in favor of tacrolimus in the following severity scores: itching at day 90 (p=0.001); foreign body sensation at day 15 (p=0.042); photophobia at day 30 (p=0.041); keratitis at day 30 (p=0.048); and limbal activity at days 15 (p=0.011), 30 (p=0.007), and 45 (p=0.015). No relevant adverse effects were reported, except for a burning sensation with tacrolimus, though this did not compromise treatment compliance. Treatment with tacrolimus was superior to sodium cromoglycate when comparing severity scores for symptoms of itching, foreign body sensation, and photophobia, as well as for signs of limbal inflammatory activity and keratitis.

  2. A Comparative Study Between an Oil-in-Water Emulsion and Nonlipid Eye Drops Used for Rewetting Contact Lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Sarah E; Jones, Lyndon; Blackie, Caroline A; Korb, Donald R

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical impact of using SYSTANE BALANCE Lubricant Eye Drops (Alcon, Fort Worth, TX), an oil-in-water emulsion, as a rewetting eye drop in symptomatic contact lens wearers. Subjects who had previously experienced contact lens discomfort (CLD), with a mean lens wearing history of 18.6±12.8 years, were randomly assigned to use a Test (SYSTANE BALANCE Lubricant Eye Drops; n=76) or control (habitual nonlipid contact lens rewetting eye drop; n=30) drop over their contact lenses within 5 min of lens insertion and then subsequently at 2 hr intervals up to a maximum of 4 drops per eye daily for a 1-month period. Assessments of subjective comfort, comfortable wearing time, lid wiper epitheliopathy (LWE), and corneal staining were conducted at baseline and after 1 month, after 6 hr of lens wear. Comfort, wearing time, LWE, and corneal staining all showed statistically significant improvements in the test group using SYSTANE BALANCE Lubricant Eye Drops at the 1-month visit compared with baseline data (all P<0.01) and compared with the control group at the 1-month visit (P<0.01, P=0.01, P<0.01, and P=0.03, respectively). The use of SYSTANE BALANCE Lubricant Eye Drops as a rewetting drop in a group of wearers who experienced symptoms of CLD improved subjective comfort scores, increased comfortable wearing time, and reduced signs of LWE and corneal staining, when compared with the use of non-lipid-containing contact lens rewetting eye drops.

  3. Clinical research of loratadine and diclofenac sodium eye drops for allergic conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Shen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate clinical efficacy of loratadine and diclofenac sodium eye drops for allergic conjunctivitis and to improve the outcomes of patients with allergic conjunctivitis.METHODS: The selected 154 patients(158 eyeswith allergic conjunctivitis were randomly divided into control group and observation group, 77 patients(79 eyes in each group. Patients in control group were treated with loratadine. Patients in observation group were treated with diclofenac sodium eye drops besides loratadine. Scores on symptoms and physical signs of two groups were compared and clinical efficacy of two group was evaluated and compared. RESULTS: Before treatments, the scores on symptoms and physical signs of two groups were not significantly different(P>0.05. After treatments,the scores of observation group on eye itching, tearing, photophobia, burning sensation and foreign body sensation were respectively 1.03±0.10, 0.83±0.10, 0.62±0.06, 0.80±0.05 and 1.10±0.09score. The scores on conjunctival congestion and edema, secretions, nipple-like follicular on palpebral conjunctiva, limbus change, corneal epithelial changes as well as eyelid and periocular edema of observation group were respectively 0.95±0.08,0.63±0.05,1.32±0.13,0.67±0.06,0.72±0.06, 0.55±0.04score.All the aspects mentioned above were lower in observation group than in control group and the differences were statistically significant(PPCONCLUSION: Systemic treatment of loratadine combined with local treatment of diclofenac sodium eye drops for allergic conjunctivitis can relieve the clinical signs and symptoms better, make the treatment more effective with easy drug administration, which is an effective treatment.

  4. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a new device for eye drops instillation in patients with glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Daniela M; Lopes, Flavio S; de Souza, Fabiola C; Dorairaj, Syril; Prata, Tiago S

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new device (Eyedrop(®)) designed for eye drop instillation in patients with and without glaucoma. This prospective study included consecutive patients with glaucoma and healthy participants. After a complete eye examination and determination of baseline intraocular pressure (IOP), topical hypotensive medication was introduced in both eyes, and the Eyedrop(®) delivery device (a plastic device in which the bottle with eye drops is inserted) was made available to all participants (with video and written instructions) for use in one eye, randomly chosen. In the second phase, all patients were evaluated by an experienced examiner for IOP determination, investigation of possible associated side effects, and ease of instilling eye drops (by a visual analog scale [VAS]; 0-10). Thirty two participants (mean age 42.3±16.2 years) were evaluated. Of these, 44% had glaucoma. There was no significant difference in mean IOP variation when comparing the eye using (-3.9±2.9 mmHg) or not using the device (-3.3±2.6 mmHg; P=0.36). The subjective rating of the facility of drops instillation was significantly higher with the Eyedrop(®) applicator (VAS =7.6±1.6) than without it (VAS =6.2±1.8; P5) among participants without prior experience with eye drop instillation (78.6% [11/14]) versus those already experienced (66.7% [12/18]). No difference in the frequency of side effects or in the distribution pattern of fluorescein between eyes was observed (P≥0.63). Eyedrop(®) received a better subjective response regarding the ease of instillation of hypotensive eye drops compared to traditional instillation, especially in patients with no previous experience with eye drops. Using the device did not result in any loss of hypotensive effect or increase in the frequency of side effects.

  5. Recurrent Central Serous Chorioretinopathy with Dexamethasone Eye Drop used Nasally for Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Gunjan; Shephali, Jain; Tirupati, Nath; Ji, Pandey D

    2013-01-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is characterized by serous retinal detachment at the posterior pole. Several factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis, and endogenous or exogenous corticosteroids are thought to play a major role. Here we present a case of a 35-year-old male with complaints of a dark circle in front of his right eye. Fundus examination, optical coherence tomography and fundus fluorescein angiography were performed. The patient was diagnosed with CSC. CSC resolved completely within seven weeks. Four weeks later the CSC recurred and spontaneously resolved over eight weeks. Overall, the patient had three additional recurrences of CSC in the same eye over the next year. A detailed history taking revealed the patient was using 0.1% dexamethasone eye drops nasally for recurrent rhinitis for few days prior to each episode of CSC. This indicates the strong correlation between steroids given by any route and the pathogenesis of CSC.

  6. Therapeutic Effect of 0.1% Tacrolimus Eye Drops in the Tarsal Form of Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qi; Tang, Jing; Han, Yu; Wang, Dan; Ye, Hongquan

    2017-08-12

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 0.1% tacrolimus eye drops in the tarsal form of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) and to survey the changes of dendritic cells at the palpebral conjunctiva in patients with VKC by in vivo confocal microscopy. A total of 17 patients (34 eyes) with the tarsal form of VKC were enrolled in this prospective, nonrandomized case series. They were treated with 0.1% tacrolimus eye drops twice daily after discontinuation of all other topical medications. Subjective ocular symptoms and objective ocular signs were scored on a 4-point scale by one ophthalmologist and the characteristics of the dendritic cells in each right eye at the palpebral conjunctiva were evaluated by in vivo confocal microscopy before treatment and at the 1st, 2th, 4th, and 8th weeks after treatment. After 1 week of treatment with 0.1% tacrolimus eye drops, the score for each symptom in all patients showed a significant (p < 0.001) improvement, and 13 patients (76%) experienced dramatic relief of symptoms. In addition, there was a significantly (p < 0.001) decreased clinical sign score (except for giant papillae) after 4 weeks, and a significant (p < 0.001) improvement in the score of giant papillae after 8 weeks of treatment. The characteristics of dendritic cells (including cell count, total area, average size, perimeter, and diameter) showed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease after 2 weeks of treatment. During the follow-up, no other topical medications were required and no significant changes in visual acuity were documented. No cataracts or elevation of intraocular pressures were detected. Only 5 patients (29%) had a tingling or burning sensation or discomfort. Tacrolimus 0.1% eye drops are an effective and safe treatment for the tarsal form of VKC, and can rapidly inhibit the activity of dendritic cells, improve symptoms, reduce papillary hyperplasia, and reverse damage at the palpebral conjunctiva. The side effects could affect the

  7. Higher-Order Aberrations After Cyclopentolate, Tropicamide, and Artificial Tear Drops Application in Normal Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirshekarizadeh, Negin; Hashemi, Hassan; Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Mirzajani, Ali; Yekta, Abbasali; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2016-09-30

    To determine the effect of cyclopentolate, tropicamide, and artificial tear drops on higher-order aberrations (HOAs) in normal eyes with OPD-Scan III (Nidek Inc., Tokyo, Japan). In this study, 189 eyes of individuals aged 20 to 35 years were selected as samples. Inclusion criteria were a corrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better, a minimum size of about 5 mm for the pupil in the dark, hyperopia and myopia less than 5 D, and astigmatism less than 2 D. Moreover, participants with pathological eye problems, a history of intraocular surgery, and ocular diseases affecting the accommodation, pupil size, and corneal surface were excluded. Higher-order aberrations of the participants were assessed by the OPD-Scan III before and after cyclopentolate (Colircuss), tropicamide (Mydrax 0.5%), and artificial tears (Tearlose) drop instillation. After instilling cyclopentolate drops, the mean of the total root mean square (RMS) increased from 4.580 to 6.335 D, total spherical aberration increased from 0.155 to 0.381 D, and total coma increased from 0.195 to 0.369 D; the increases were significant for total RMS and total spherical aberration, but a significant relationship was not seen with total coma. After tropicamide, the mean aberrations of total RMS increased from 4.301 to 4.568 D, total spherical aberration increased from 0.146 to 0.160 D, and total coma increased from 0.213 to 0.230 D; the increase was only significant for total coma. On the other hand, after artificial tears, the average of all aberrations decreased in a nonsignificant manner. Most changes of mean aberrations were related to cyclopentolate drops. Tropicamide and artificial tears had the second and third rank according to their effect on mean errors. As a result, it seems that ocular accommodation is the most important impact on HOA than pupil size. However, the pupil size is the second factor for HOAs.

  8. The effect of 0.5% tropicamide/0.5% phenylephrine mixed eye drop in Chinese adults with myopia and its inter-eye difference in refractive outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiangjia; Chen, Minjie; Dai, Jinhui; Lu, Yi

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of 0.5% tropicamide/0.5% phenylephrine mixed eye drop and make the inter-eye comparison of refractive outcomes in Chinese adults with myopia. Refractive measurements were performed without cycloplegia and repeated 30 minutes later with 0.5% tropicamide/0.5% phenylephrine mixed eye drop (Mydrin-P*) on 341 myopic adults. Vector analysis was used to analyze the data. Changes of spherical equivalent (M) and astigmatism for both J0 and J45 components between these two refractions were calculated as Error_M, Error_J0 and Error_J45. Inter-eye correlations were studied. The inter-eye difference after cycloplegics were described as Diff M, Diff J0 and Diff J45. The effect of anisometropia, age and the higher order aberrations (HOAs) on inter-eye differences toward the cycloplegic agent were analyzed. Difference was found only for the Error_J45 component between the two eyes (p=0.0040). Pearson correlation coefficients between the two eyes for Error_M, Error_J0, and Error_J45 were 0.3140 (ptropicamide/phenylephrine eye drops in myopic adults. The changes of refraction due to cycloplegia were not well correlated between the two eyes in myopic patients. Anisometropia and ocular dominance might be an important factor for the inter-eye difference.

  9. The Eye Drop Preservative Benzalkonium Chloride Potently Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Preferentially Affects LHON Mutant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandipan; Baudouin, Christophe; Brignole-Baudouin, Francoise; Denoyer, Alexandre; Cortopassi, Gino A

    2017-04-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is the most commonly used eye drop preservative. Benzalkonium chloride has been associated with toxic effects such as "dry eye" and trabecular meshwork degeneration, but the underlying biochemical mechanism of ocular toxicity by BAK is unclear. In this study, we propose a mechanistic basis for BAK's adverse effects. Mitochondrial O2 consumption rates of human corneal epithelial primary cells (HCEP), osteosarcoma cybrid cells carrying healthy (control) or Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutant mtDNA [11778(G>A)], were measured before and after acute treatment with BAK. Mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis and cell viability were also measured in the BAK-treated control: LHON mutant and human-derived trabecular meshwork cells (HTM3). Benzalkonium chloride inhibited mitochondrial ATP (IC50, 5.3 μM) and O2 consumption (IC50, 10.9 μM) in a concentration-dependent manner, by directly targeting mitochondrial complex I. At its pharmaceutical concentrations (107-667 μM), BAK inhibited mitochondrial function >90%. In addition, BAK elicited concentration-dependent cytotoxicity to cybrid cells (IC50, 22.8 μM) and induced apoptosis in HTM3 cells at similar concentrations. Furthermore, we show that BAK directly inhibits mitochondrial O2 consumption in HCEP cells (IC50, 3.8 μM) at 50-fold lower concentrations than used in eye drops, and that cells bearing mitochondrial blindness (LHON) mutations are further sensitized to BAK's mitotoxic effect. Benzalkonium chloride inhibits mitochondria of human corneal epithelial cells and cells bearing LHON mutations at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, and we suggest this is the basis of BAK's ocular toxicity. Prescribing BAK-containing eye drops should be avoided in patients with mitochondrial deficiency, including LHON patients, LHON carriers, and possibly primary open-angle glaucoma patients.

  10. Efficacy of an eye drop mixture for pupillary dilatation: A randomized comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhurayanontachai, Patama; Saengkaew, Suwapat; Apiromruck, Penjamaporn

    Pupillary dilatation with three types of eye drops is used regularly in the clinic; however, a mixture of these drops in a single bottle may be more beneficial in reducing workloads and resources. This study compared the efficacy in pupillary dilatation between two protocols of dilating drop instillation. This prospective, randomized, comparative study included 30 eligible Thai patients. The patients randomly received preoperative pupillary dilatations by either the conventional protocol (1% tropicamide (T), 10% phenylephrine (P) and 0.1% diclofenac (D) in three separate bottles) or the fixed combination (TPD) protocol which had the three types of eye drops mixed in a single bottle in a ratio of 4:3:3. The chi-square test and independent t-test were used to analyze the data. The conventional protocol group and TPD protocol group each had 15 patients. Sixty minutes after the initial instillation, all patients in the TPD protocol and 13 patients (86.7%) in conventional protocol achieved at least 6mm in the shortest diameter. The mydriatic rate between protocols showed no difference. In patients who received the TPD protocol, the systemic effects on the mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate decreased over time. The mixture of tropicamide, phenylephrine and diclofenac had a comparable efficacy for a pupillary dilatation to the conventional dilating drops in separate bottles. The systemic complications on blood pressure and arterial pulse of the TPD mixture were less than the conventional protocol. TCTR20130325001. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of pharmacological activities and assessment of intraocular penetration of an ayurvedic polyherbal eye drop (Itone™) in experimental models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Velpandian, Thirumurthy; Gupta, Pankaj; Ravi, Alok Kumar; Sharma, Hanuman Prasad; Biswas, Nihar Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    The polyherbal eye drop (Itone™) is a mixture of aqueous distillates of nineteen traditionally used ingredients that sum up to impart potency to the formulation and make it a useful adjunct in various ocular pathologies...

  12. Regulation of retinal proteome by topical antiglaucomatous eye drops in an inherited glaucoma rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Schallenberg

    Full Text Available Examination of the response of the retinal proteome to elevated intraocular pressure (IOP and to the pharmacological normalization of IOP is crucial, in order to develop drugs with neuroptorective potential. We used a hereditary rat model of ocular hypertension to lower IOP with travaprost and dorzolamide applied topically on the eye surface, and examine changes of the retinal proteome. Our data demonstrate that elevated IOP causes alterations in the retinal protein profile, in particular in high-mobility-group-protein B1 (HMGB1, calmodulin, heat-shock-protein (HSP 70 and carbonic anhydrase II expression. The changes of the retinal proteome by dorzolamide or travoprost are different and independent of the IOP lowering effect. This fact suggests that the eye drops exert a direct IOP-independent effect on retinal metabolism. Further investigations are required to elucidate the potential neuroprotective mechanisms signaled through changes of HMGB1, calmodulin, HSP70 and carbonic anhydrase II expression in glaucoma. The data may facilitate development of eye drops that exert neuroprotection through direct pharmacological effect.

  13. Early signal of diverted use of tropicamide eye drops in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponté, Camille; Pi, Christian; Palmaro, Aurore; Jouanjus, Emilie; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse

    2017-08-01

    Tropicamide is a mydriatic drug used as eye-drops for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. From 2013, a diverted use by intravenous route has been suspected in Eastern Europe in opioids users. To date, no signal of misuse has been identified in France. The aims of this study were to investigate any early signals of a diverted use of tropicamide eye drops and to collect information regarding motives for the misuse and tropicamide-induced effects. Information was obtained at three levels: (1) at regional level (Midi-Pyrénées area), from reimbursement data and pharmacists' reports on suspicious requests; (2) at national level: from reimbursement data and prescriptions suggesting possible abuse from the OSIAP (Ordonnances Suspectes, Indicateur d'Abus Possible) survey; and (3) at international level: from VigiBase(®) reports and Web sources. Beta-blocker eye-drops were used as comparators. In France, in 2014-2015, 17 (0.91%, 95% CI [0.53-1.46%]) falsified prescriptions involving tropicamide were identified in the OSIAP survey (compared with 0%, 95% CI [0-0.19%] for beta-blockers). Moreover, 37 other suspicious prescriptions were presented in 2015 (notified in 2016). In Midi-Pyrénées, seven patients aged 35-49 were reimbursed for 19-45 vials of 10 ml, in a year. Since September 2014, the regional Addictovigilance Centre has received 91 notifications of suspicious requests to obtain tropicamide. In VigiBase(®) , two cases were identified but none in France. An increased interest in tropicamide-related Internet searches was observed from Russia and Ukraine. These results represent the first early warnings of a tropicamide diverted use in France. Tropicamide abusers would seek euphoria or hallucinations. The high doses involved in intravenous administration could lead to serious complications. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Respiratuvar depression after accidental nasal ingestion of brimonidine eye drops in infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gunes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Brimonidine tartrate is an alpha-2 agonist used for glaucoma treatment. It can lead to serious poisoning symptoms when misused by children. Case report: In this case report, 3 months-old male patient with severe central nervous system depression and respiratory arrest as a result of accidentally nasal instillation of 1 cc brimonidine tartrate that benefited from mechanic ventilation and naloxone treatment was presented. Conclusion: This case report suggested, that misuse of nasal brimonidine eye drop could result in serious respiratory distress and central nervous system depression. Mechanical ventilation and naloxone administration can be useful for these patients. Keywords: Brimonidine intoxication, Nasal ingestion, Children

  15. Pharmacodynamic equivalence study of two preparations of eye drops containing dorzolamide and timolol in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatchev, Emil; Petrov, Andrey; Kolev, Emil; Hristova, Russka; Demircheva, Irena; Koytchev, Rossen; Richter, Wolfram; Tegel, Friedrich; Thyroff-Friesinger, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the pharmacodynamic equivalence (lowering of intraocular pressure) of two preparations of eye drops containing 20 mg dorzolamide (CAS 120279-96-1) and 5 mg timolol (CAS 26839-75-8). The study was conducted as a monocentric, observer-blinded, randomized, single-dose, two-period crossover study in 38 healthy volunteers. Each volunteer received on day 1 in each period in a random way a single dose of 1 drop of the test or the reference formulation in the conjunctival sac of the right eye separated by a wash-out period of 7 days. Measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) of the right eye (by a blinded observer) was performed on day 1 of each study period pre-dose and 2 h post dosing by means of Goldmann applanation tonometry. In order to investigate the pharmacodynamic equivalence of both products, the two-sided 95% confidence interval was calculated for the difference of the primary target parameter (absolute decrease in IOP 2 h post dose), by means of a parametric (ANOVA) statistical method. The results of the statistical evaluation of the primary target parameter "absolute decrease in IOP 2 h post dose" demonstrated a decrease in the IOP of 4.72 mmHg for the eye treated with the test formulation (dorzolamide 20 mg/ml + timolol 5 mg/ml eye drops) and 4.61 mmHg for the treated with the reference formulation. The mean difference was 0.11 mmHg. The 95% confidence interval was between -0.33 and 0.55 mmHg and thus entirely within the pre-defined equivalence range (+/- 1.5 mmHg). The results of the statistical evaluation of the secondary target parameter relative (as % of baseline) decrease in IOP 2 h post dose demonstrated essentially similar effectiveness in lowering the IOP by 27.63% (test formulation) and 27.12% (reference formulation), respectively. Both drug products were well tolerated. Both formulations showed comparable results obtained at a time probably equal to the maximum effect concerning the primary target parameter

  16. The Effect of Autologous Platelet Lysate Eye Drops: An In Vivo Confocal Microscopy Study

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    Antonio M. Fea

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the effectiveness of autologous platelet lysate (APL eye drops in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (SS dry eye, refractory to standard therapy, in comparison with patients treated with artificial tears. We focused on the effect of APL on cornea morphology with the in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM. Methods. Patients were assigned to two groups: group A used autologous platelet lysate QID, and group B used preservative-free artificial tears QID, for 90 days. Ophthalmological assessments included ocular surface disease index (OSDI, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, Schirmer test, fluorescein score, and breakup time (BUT. A subgroup of patients in group A underwent IVCM: corneal basal epithelium, subbasal nerves, Langerhans cells, anterior stroma activated keratocytes, and reflectivity were evaluated. Results. 60 eyes of 30 patients were enrolled; in group A (n=20 patients mean OSDI, fluorescein score, and BUT showed significant improvement compared with group B (n=10 patients. The IVCM showed a significant increase in basal epithelium cells density and subbasal nerve plexus density and number and a decrease in Langerhans cells density (p<0.05. Conclusion. APL was found effective in the treatment of SS dry eye. IVCM seems to be a useful tool to visualize cornea morphologic modifications.

  17. [Usage and efficacy of timolol maleate eye drops in treatment of superficial infantile hemangioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qizhen; Shi, Qingmei; Long, Jianhong; Li, Jiaguang; Guo, Yu; Lei, Shaorong

    2017-06-28

    To determine drug dose and usage of timolol maleate eye drops in the treatment of superficial infantile hemangioma.
 Methods: A total of 250 superficial hemangioma infants were recruited and assigned into 5 groups (n=50 for each group): an external application group and 4 exterior coating groups (2, 4, 6, 8 times per day). We evaluated the therapeutic effect of different methods for drug application (external application or exterior coating) and the frequency for drug administration on superficial infantile hemangioma.
 Results: The external application group (twice a day and 0.5 hour per time) showed better effect than that in the exterior coating group with twice a day (Pexterior coating group with 6 times a day and exterior coating group with twice a day or with 3 times a day was significant (Pexterior coating group with 6 times a day, the exterior coating group with 8 times a day, or the external application group with twice a day (All P>0.05).
 Conclusion: Drug dose may affect the therapeutic effect of timolol maleate eye drops in superficial hemangioma infants, and exterior coating with 6 times a day may achieve the best curative effect.

  18. Levels of vancomycin in aqueous humor after topical eye drops administration.

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    Huerva, V; Sinués, B; del Buey, M A; Cristóbal, J A; Mínguez, E; Lanuza, J; Palomar, A

    1993-01-01

    Vancomycin is an antibiotic which is especially active against Gram positive bacteria. At present, numerous infections of the anterior segment of the eye are caused by the Staphilococcus aureus and epidermis. Strains which are resistant to methicilin are more and more frequent and for this reason Vancomycin is becoming the antibiotic of choice to combat these infections since no resistance of the Staphilococcus to it has been demonstrated. The authors evaluated the levels of Vancomycin in aqueous humor after the administration of topical eye-drops. For the first two hours after the last administration, levels of 0.52 micrograms/ml were detected. These inhibit the growth of the majority of bacteria sensitive to Vancomycin. Between two and four hours, the levels decreased to 0.15 micrograms/ml; these are therapeutic levels for a large number of Gram positive bacteria. From four hours after the last administration, these levels are undetectable. Due to the success of its penetration, topical administration of Vancomycin should be considered as a therapeutic modality against infections by gram positive bacteria of the anterior segment. The ideal guideline for administration would be one drop every two hours, especially if the infection is severe. In this way, subconjunctival injection could be avoided.

  19. Levocabastine eye drops are effective and well tolerated for the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis in children

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    Brunello Wüthrich

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This open-label, prospective, multicentre, 4-week trial was undertaken to assess the efficacy and tolerability of twice daily levocabastine eye drops (0.5 mg/ml, with sodium cromoglycate nasal spray for the relief of concurrent nasal symptoms if required, in a total of 233 children with seasonal allergic conjunctivitis. No correlation between efficacy, tolerability and age was found. Investigator assessments revealed that the total severity of ocular symptoms decreased by 84 ± 34% in patients < 12 years and 85 ± 30% in those ≥ 12 years, with corresponding reductions in the total severity of ocular findings of 84% in both patient groups over the 4-week treatment period. Global assessments of therapeutic efficacy revealed the effect of therapy on ocular symptoms to be excellent or good in 81% of patients < 12 years and 82% of those ≥ 12 years after 2 weeks of treatment, with corresponding values at the end of the trial of 88% and 82% in the two groups, respectively. Treatment tolerability was considered to be excellent or good by 94% of patients overall. Application site reactions were the most common adverse event associated with ocular levocabastine, occurring in 13% of patients < 12 years and 9% of those ≥ 12 years. Twice daily levocabastine eye drops therefore appear to be effective and well tolerated for the treatment of seasonal allergic conjunctivitis in children.

  20. Parents' views on their children's use of eye drops and willingness to accept a new sustained-release subconjunctival injection

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    Ozdemir S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Semra Ozdemir,1,* Hong King Wu,1,* Eric A Finkelstein,1 Tina T Wong2 1Signature Program in Health Services and Systems Research, Duke-NUS Medical School Singapore, 2Glaucoma Department, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore *These authors contributed equally to this work Aim: The objectives of this study were to explore parents' views about their children's use of regular eye drops and whether they would consider a sustained-release subconjunctival injection as a replacement for daily drops.Methods: A survey was conducted with 134 parents of children with chronic eye diseases at the Singapore National Eye Centre. Parents were asked their views about their children’s use of eye drops and were then presented with a discrete choice experiment that, via a series of trade-off tasks, allowed for estimating demand for a series of hypothetical subconjunctival injections that varied along product features, including interval between administrations, risk of complications, out-of-pocket cost and whether it is recommended by the patient’s treating physician.Results: Results showed that the vast majority of parents did not find administration of eye drops to be inconvenient (78% nor did children complain about using daily eye drops (78%. Furthermore, only about half of parents whose child missed doses stated concerns about the consequences of non-compliance. The discrete choice experiment revealed that only one in five parents would consider a subconjunctival injection for their children. These parents tended to be more concerned about the consequences of non-compliance with eye drops, had children who administered the drops themselves or had other chronic disease requiring regular medication. Among these parents, risk of complications had the largest effect on injection uptake.Conclusion: This study shows that parents do not find administration of daily eye drops to be a significant burden. As a result, most would not consider a subconjunctival

  1. Additive Effect of preservative-free sodium hyaluronate 0.1% in treatment of dry eye syndrome with diquafosol 3% eye drops.

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    Hwang, Ho Sik; Sung, Yoon-Mi; Lee, Weon Sun; Kim, Eun Chul

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment effect of diquafosol 3% with preservative-free sodium hyaluronate 0.1% eye drops in dry eye syndrome. In total, 150 patients with dry eye syndrome were divided randomly into 3 groups. Group 1 (50 patients) was treated 4 times daily with preserved sodium hyaluronate 0.1%, group 2 (50 patients) was treated 4 times daily with diquafosol 3%, and group 3 (50 patients) was treated 4 times daily with diquafosol 3% and preservative-free sodium hyaluronate 0.1% eye drops for 3 months. Ocular surface disease index (OSDI) score, tear film break-up time, Schirmer I test, corneal fluorescein staining, and impression cytology were evaluated. There were significant improvements in the OSDI score, tear film break-up time, Schirmer I score, fluorescein and Rose Bengal staining, goblet cell density, and impression cytological findings in groups 2 and 3 compared with those for group 1 in patients with dry eye syndrome at 1, 2, and 3 months (P hyaluronate 0.1% was more effective than diquafosol 3% monotherapy or treatment with preserved sodium hyaluronate 0.1% in dry eye syndrome. Preservative-free sodium hyaluronate 0.1% eye drops can increase the effect of diquafosol 3% in dry eye syndrome.

  2. Effects of extract of Buddleja officinalis eye drops on androgen receptors of lacrimal gland cells of castrated rats with dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing-Hua; Yao, Xiao-Lei; Wu, Quan-Long; Tan, Han-Yu; Zhang, Jing-Rong

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the extract of Buddleja officinalis eye drops in basic tears secretory volume, tear film stability, expression of androgen receptors (AR) in castrated rats with dry eye, and to investigate the therapeutic effects of the extract of Buddleja officinalis on dry eye caused by gonadal hormones level imbalance. Forty-five Wistar masculinity rats were divided at random into nine groups, including normal groups (A1, A2 and A3); model groups (B1, B2 and B3); therapy groups with extract of Buddleja officinalis eye drops (C1, C2 and C3). The "1" stood for being fed for 1 month, and "2" for 2 months, and "3" for 3 months. The dry eye model was established with orchiectomy on groups B and C. Group C was treated with Buddleja officinalis extract eye drops for one month. All rats were checked with Schirmer I test (SIT) and tear film break-up time (BUT). Expression of AR was analyzed by flow cytometer (FCM). The SIT value of group C was significantly higher than that of group B (PBuddleja officinalis is the flavonoids that can significantly inhibit happening of dry eye of rat after androgen level lowered. Its mechanism is like androgen's and it can display androgen-like activity to keep basic tears secretory volume and tear film stability.

  3. Nerve growth factor eye drops improve visual acuity and electrofunctional activity in age-related macular degeneration: a case report

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    Alessandro Lambiase

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD is a severe disease affecting visual function in the elderly. Currently available surgical and medical options do not guarantee a significant impact on the outcome of the disease. We describe the effects of nerve growth factor eye drop treatment in a 94 years old female with ARMD, whose visual acuity was progressively worsening in spite of previous surgical and medical treatments. NGF eye drops improved visual acuity and electrofunctional parameters as early as 3 months after initiation of treatment. These results are in line with previous reports on a neuroprotective effect of NGF on retinal cells and on NGF eye drops bioavailability in the retina and optic nerve. No side effects were observed after five years of follow-up, suggesting that topical NGF treatment may be a safe and effective therapy for ARMD.

  4. Effects analysis of pranoprofen and sodium hyaluronate eye drops combined with traditional Chinese medicines on elderly patients with phacoemulsification sequela

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    Xing-Yan Xu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To discuss the effects of pranoprofen and sodium hyaluronate eye drops combined with traditional Chinese medicines in the treatments on elderly patients with diabetics and dry eyes, injuring of corneal epithelial after phacoemulsification.METHODS:Randomly selected 82 elderly patients(108 eyeswith diabetics who were dry eyes and injuring of corneal epithelial after phacoemulsification in our hospital from March 2013 to September 2014. According to the random number methods, 82 cases were divided into experimental group with 45 cases(58 eyesand control group with 37 cases(50 eyes. The cases in control group were treated with pranoprofen and sodium hyaluronate eye drops, besides those in experimental group were treated with grains of Qi Ming. All cases were respectively detected with Schimer test, Break-up time(BUT, Fluorescein(FLbefore and after the treatments.RESULTS:The Schimer value, BUT(10.17+3.12mm,16.21+4.29safter the treatments were significantly higher than those(4.91+0.69mm,7.74+2.01sbefore the treatments for the cases in experimental group(PPPCONCLUSION:The effects of pranoprofen and sodium hyaluronate eye drops combined with traditional Chinese medicines on elderly patients with diabetics and dry eyes, injuring of corneal epithelial after phacoemulsification are very good.

  5. Treatment of Recurrent Corneal Epithelial Defect by Autologous Serum Eye Drop

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    Hossein Mohammad Rabei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of autologous serum eye drop in treatment of recurrent corneal epithelial defect.Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients with recurrent corneal epithelial defect were studied. Autologous serum was prepared from the patients and diluted in 20% normal saline. The patients were instructed to use the autologous serum every six hours. Patients were followed for a mean period of 18 months.Results: Four males (28.6% and 10 females (71.4% entered the study. Four patients stopped the treatment after three months with complete satisfaction from treatment. Patients reported a reduction in frequency and severity of attacks 4.6±2 weeks after the start of treatment. The mean number of attacks before the procedure was 7.6±0.9 per year which was reduced to 2.2±0.9 per year after treatment (p<0.001. The main side effects in patients were eye pruritus and redness which were well tolerated by patients.Conclusion: Autologous serum application seems to be a safe and effective method to treat recurrent corneal epithelial defect.

  6. Assessing the adherence behavior of glaucoma patients to topical eye drops

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    Welge-Lussen U

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ulrich Welge-Lussen,1 Stefanie Weise,2 Alice L Yu3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen, Germany; 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the adherence of glaucoma patients to their topical glaucoma medication. Furthermore, the relationships between the adherence behavior and the patients’ demographic data, clinical characteristics, and their knowledge about glaucoma were evaluated. Methods: This was a prospective study of 123 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma who were given two standardized questionnaires. The first questionnaire at time point T1 comprised a knowledge assessment and the self-reported adherence measures Adherence to Refills and Medication Scale 2 (ARMS2, visual analogue scale for adherence (VAS-AD, and missed doses in the past 14 days. Two months later at time point T2, a second questionnaire reevaluated the adherence measures ARMS2, VAS-AD, and missed doses in the past 14 days. Results: There was a good correlation among all the three adherence measures at T1 and T2. The mean values of ARMS2 were in the lower range, with 3.38 at T1 and 2.8 at T2. The VAS-AD detected that 18.5% of patients always took their eye drops correctly, and 77.9% of patients reported not to have missed a single dose in the past 14 days. There was no significant correlation between the patients’ demographic data or knowledge about glaucoma and the adherence measures ARMS2 or VAS-AD. Among the clinical characteristics, only single-eye blindness showed a significant correlation with VAS-AD. Conclusion: In this study, no general relationships were found between medication adherence and the patients’ demographic data, clinical characteristics, or knowledge about glaucoma. It may be assumed that more individualized strategies are required to optimize

  7. In Vivo and Impression Cytology Study on the Effect of Compatible Solutes Eye Drops on the Ocular Surface Epithelial Cell Quality in Dry Eye Patients

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    Manuela Lanzini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate in vivo and ex vivo ocular surface alterations induced by dry eye disease and modification after osmoprotective therapy. Forty-eight eyes of 24 patients suffering from dry eye have been recruited. All patients received Optive (compatible solutes eye drops in one randomly selected eye and Hylogel (sodium hyaluronate 0,2% in the other. Follow-up included a baseline visit and further examination 30-, 60-, and 90-day intervals (which comprises clinical evaluation, in vivo confocal microscopy—IVCM—of the ocular surface, and conjunctival impression cytology. No significant difference in Schirmer I Test, TBUT, and vital staining results was observed during the follow-up period in both groups. IVCM showed in all patients an improvement of ocular surface epithelial morphology and signs of inflammation (oedema and keratocyte activation. However, these modifications were more evident in patients treated with Optive therapy. A significant reduction of the expression of MMP9 and IL6 in Optive group was observed during the follow-up period in comparison to Hylogel treatment. Our results show that in dry eye disease therapy based on osmoprotective eye drops determines a reduction of inflammatory activation of ocular surface, with consequent improvement of the quality of corneal and conjunctival epithelium.

  8. Efficacy and safety of azithromycin 1.5% eye drops in paediatric population with purulent bacterial conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Nezzar, Hachemi; Bianchi, Paolo Emilio; Messaoud, Riadh; Lazreg, Sihem; Voinea, Liliana; Speeg-Schatz, Claude; Hartani, Dahbia; Kaercher, Thomas; Kocyla-Karczmarewicz, Beata; Murta, Joaquim; Delval, Laurent; Renault, Didier; Chiambaretta, Frédéric

    2014-06-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of azithromycin 1.5% eye drops in a paediatric population with purulent bacterial conjunctivitis. This was a multicentre, international, randomised, investigator-masked study in 286 children with purulent discharge and bulbar conjunctival injection. Patients received either azithromycin 1.5% eye drops (twice daily for 3 days) or tobramycin 0.3% eye drops (every 2 h for 2 days, then four times daily for 5 days). Clinical signs were evaluated on day (D) 0, 3 and 7, and cultures on D0 and D7. The primary variable was the clinical cure (absence of bulbar conjunctival injection and discharge) on D3 in the worse eye for patients with positive cultures on D0. 286 patients (mean age 3.2 years; range 1 day-17 years) were included; 203 had positive cultures on D0. Azithromycin was superior to tobramycin in clinical cure rate on D3 (47.1% vs 28.7%, p=0.013) and was non-inferior to tobramycin on D7 (89.2% vs 78.2%, respectively). Azithromycin treatment eradicated causative pathogens, including resistant species, with a similar resolution rate to tobramycin (89.8% vs 87.2%, respectively). These results were confirmed in a subgroup of patients younger than 24 months old. Azithromycin 1.5% eye drops provided a more rapid clinical cure than tobramycin 0.3% eye drops in the treatment of purulent bacterial conjunctivitis in children, with a more convenient twice-a-day dosing regimen. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Adverse reactions following routine anticholinergic eye drops in a paediatric population: an observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Minderhout, Helena M; Joosse, Maurits V; Grootendorst, Diana C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the presence, nature and relationship to age, sex, ethnicity and body mass index (BMI) of adverse reactions following routine cycloplegic eye drops in children. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting Ophthalmology outpatient clinic Dutch metropolitan hospital; February, March and April 2009. Participants Children aged 3–14-year-old children receiving two drops of cyclopentolate 1% (C+C) or one drop of cyclopentolate 1% and one drop of tropicamide 1% (C+T). Patients were categorised by age (3–6, 7–10 and 11–14 years), sex, ethnicity and body mass index (BMI) (low, normal or high). Outcome measures Rate and nature of adverse reactions reported at 45 min following treatment. Crude and adjusted ORs for reporting an adverse reaction using stepwise regression analysis with BMI, age, ethnicity and sex. Results 912 of 915 eligible patients participated (99.7%). Adverse reactions were reported for C+C in 10.3% and in C+T in 4.8% (42/408 and 24/504, p=0.002), respectively. Central effects were present in 95% in C+C and in 92% in C+T. Compared to C+T, an increased risk was present in C+C (crude OR 2.3 (1.4 to 3.9), p=0.002). Forward adjustment showed BMI to be an influencing factor in treatment (OR 3.1 (1.7 to 5.6), p<0.001). In a multivariate model, a dose of cyclopentolate remained associated with adverse reactions. Analysis per BMI and regime and age category and regime, indicated associations with low BMI (OR C+C 21.4 (6.7 to 67.96), p<0.001, respectively, C+T 5.2 (2.1 to 12.8), p<0.001) and young age (OR C+C 8.1 (2.7 to 24.8), p<0.001). Conclusions Adverse reactions were common and almost exclusively involved the central nervous system. Both presence and severity were associated with repeated instillation of cyclopentolate 1%, low BMI and young age. In specific paediatric populations, a single dose of cyclopentolate must be considered. Vital function monitoring facilities are advisable. Adjustment of guidelines is

  10. Combination of serum eye drops with hydrogel bandage contact lenses in the treatment of persistent epithelial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Stefan; Wedel, Thilo; Moll, Ralf; Geerling, Gerd

    2006-10-01

    The treatment of persistent epithelial defects (PED) with autologous serum eye drops is often combined with conventional medication such as artificial tears and topical antibiotics, but until now no report exists on the use of a bandage contact lens (BCL) in combination with autologous serum eye drops in the treatment of PEDs. We report six eyes (five patients) which were all treated with autologous serum eye drops in combination with an FDA group IV hydrogel contact lens. Five patients aged 36-88 years, were suffering from six PEDs for 73.5+/-46.9 days due to rheumatoid sterile corneal ulcer (n=1), neurotrophic keratopathy (n=3) or partial limbal stem cell deficiency (n=1). All patients had been unsuccessfully treated with conventional therapy before. Three of them had already had an amniotic membrane transplantation and two had undergone a keratoplasty; however, the epithelial defect persisted or recurred. In all cases, an FDA group IV hydrogel contact lens (Biomedics 55, ocufilcon D, 55% water content) was fitted and serum eye drops applied 8 times a day. The PED healed in five of six eyes after a treatment period of 14.2+/-8.9 days. In one eye the PED became smaller, but it took 90 days until the lesion healed completely. In three eyes (two patients) white deposits appeared on the surface of the BCL during the treatment after 12.3+/-5.1 days. Because no signs of inflammation were observed and since the epithelial defect improved, a new identical lens was applied and the medication continued unaltered. The surface of contaminated and non-contaminated BCLs were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and SDS gel-electrophoresis. The scanning electron microscopic examination presented a coating of amorphous material with a wrinkled appearance and many corpuscular deposits. There was no indication of bacterial colonisation. The SDS gel-electrophoresis showed a small band at 65 kDa, probably albumin. These findings suggest that the combination of a therapeutic

  11. Safety and efficacy of switching from dorzolamide 1.0%/timolol maleate 0.5% eye drops to brinzolamide 1.0%/timolol maleate 0.5% eye drops

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    Inoue K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kenji Inoue,1 Minako Shiokawa,1 Kyoko Ishida,2 Goji Tomita2 1Inouye Eye Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of switching from dorzolamide 1.0%/timolol maleate 0.5% fixed-combination (DTFC eye drops to brinzolamide 1.0%/timolol maleate 0.5% fixed-combination (BTFC eye drops in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Methods: A total of 35 eyes of 35 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension using DTFC eye drops were included. Participants discontinued DTFC drops and immediately began using BTFC drops. All other eye drops currently being used were continued. Intraocular pressure (IOP 1 and 3 months after switching medications was compared with baseline IOP. One month after switching medications, participant preference and adherence were evaluated. Adverse reactions were monitored at each study visit. Results: The IOP was 17.9±2.6 mmHg at baseline and 18.3±4.1 mmHg and 17.8±3.4 mmHg 1 month and 3 months after switching medications, respectively (P=0.633. The frequency of missing a dose was not different before (6.1% and after (6.1% switching to BTFC. Significantly fewer participants reported stinging after switching to BTFC (15.2% than while using DTFC (51.5%, P<0.01. Blurred vision was reported with the same frequency before (39.4% and after (42.4% switching to BTFC. A total of 33.3% and 27.3% of patients preferred DTFC and BTFC, respectively. Several patients withdrew from the study because of discomfort (n=2, 5.7%, discharge (n=1, 2.9%, dizziness (n=1, 2.9%, or increased IOP (n=2, 5.7%. Conclusion: Switching from DTFC to BTFC was well tolerated and did not result in IOP changes or a decreased patient adherence. When glaucoma patients complain of stinging with DTFC administration, switching to BTFC is an acceptable treatment option. Keywords: brinzolamide/timolol fixed

  12. Application of Ratio Derivative Spectrophotometry for Simultaneous Determination of Naphazoline and Antazoline in Eye Drops

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    R. Hajian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ratio derivative spectrophotometrie method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of naphazoline (NAP and antazoline (ANT at micromolar levels in Britton Robinson buffer (pH 9 medium. In this method the overlapping spectra of naphazoline and antazoline were well resolved by making use of the first-derivative of the ratios of their direct absorption spectra. The derivative ratio absorbances of naphazoline and antazoline were measured at 227.2 and 235 nm, respectively for their quantification. The method is simple, fast and does not require separation of naphazoline and antazoline. Another salient feature of the method is that simultaneous standard additions of both analytes permitted to resolve matrix effect and quantification at a unique standard addition plot. Naphazoline and antazoline were determined in the concentration range of 10-150 μmol L-1 (NAP/ANT ratio varying from about 10 to 150 in the same aliquot with a precision and accuracy of about 1.7% and 1.8%, respectively. The recommended procedure was successfully applied for analysis of naphazoline and antazoline in eye drops.

  13. Effect of hypotonic 0.4% hyaluronic acid drops in dry eye patients: a cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Pasquale; Monaco, Gaspare

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the short-term effects of 2 kinds of artificial tears, both containing 0.4% hyaluronic acid in an aqueous solution yet having different osmolarity, on the typical symptoms of patients suffering from dry eye and on the vitality of corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. A cross-over, randomized, balanced, single-blind study involving 28 patients was divided into 2 treatment groups: group A (unpreserved 0.4% hyaluronic acid eye drops 300 mOsm/L) and group B (unpreserved 0.4% hyaluronic acid eye drops 150 mOsm/L). Both treatments were administered for 7 days, being dosed as a 1 solution drop 4 times daily. After a 1-day wash-out period, the patients in group A passed over to group B and vice versa. Treatment with hypotonic solution gave better results in relieving symptoms, along with a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.001) in the state of the corneoconjunctival epithelium, than the isotonic solution. At the end of the study, 60.7% of the patients declared that they preferred hypotonic solution and only 10.7% preferred isotonic solution; the remaining 28.6% did not notice any difference between the 2 treatments. By reducing the osmolarity of tear film, the hypotonic solution not only improves the characteristics of tear film and the vitality of the epithelial cells of the cornea and conjunctiva but also proves to be effective in reducing dry eye symptoms.

  14. Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis with Ectoine Containing Nasal Spray and Eye Drops in Comparison with Azelastine Containing Nasal Spray and Eye Drops or with Cromoglycic Acid Containing Nasal Spray

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Werkhäuser; Andreas Bilstein; Uwe Sonnemann

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Allergic rhinitis is a common disease with increasing prevalence and high impact on economic burden and comorbidities. As treatment with pharmacological drugs is not always satisfactory due to side effects and incomplete efficacy, alternative treatment strategies are needed. Ectoine is an osmolyte with membrane stabilizing and inflammation reducing capacities. Nasal spray and eye drops containing ectoine are promising new treatment regimens for allergic rhinitis sufferers. Design ...

  15. Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis with Ectoine Containing Nasal Spray and Eye Drops in Comparison with Azelastine Containing Nasal Spray and Eye Drops or with Cromoglycic Acid Containing Nasal Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Werkhäuser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Allergic rhinitis is a common disease with increasing prevalence and high impact on economic burden and comorbidities. As treatment with pharmacological drugs is not always satisfactory due to side effects and incomplete efficacy, alternative treatment strategies are needed. Ectoine is an osmolyte with membrane stabilizing and inflammation reducing capacities. Nasal spray and eye drops containing ectoine are promising new treatment regimens for allergic rhinitis sufferers. Design and Methods. The current two noninterventional trials evaluated the efficacy and safety of ectoine containing nasal spray and eye drops for treating allergic rhinitis in comparison with either azelastine or cromoglycic acid containing products. Nasal and ocular symptom developments as well as judgment of tolerability and efficacy were assessed both by investigators and patients over a time period of one to two weeks. Results. Both trials confirmed that ectoine containing products reduced nasal and ocular symptoms in allergic rhinitis patients. Results clearly demonstrated good safety profiles of the ectoine products comparable to those of azelastine and even better to those of cromoglycate products. Conclusion. Ectoine containing nasal spray and eye drops are interesting new treatment strategies for sufferers of allergic rhinitis, combining both good efficacy and absence of side effects.

  16. Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis with Ectoine Containing Nasal Spray and Eye Drops in Comparison with Azelastine Containing Nasal Spray and Eye Drops or with Cromoglycic Acid Containing Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkhäuser, Nina; Sonnemann, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Allergic rhinitis is a common disease with increasing prevalence and high impact on economic burden and comorbidities. As treatment with pharmacological drugs is not always satisfactory due to side effects and incomplete efficacy, alternative treatment strategies are needed. Ectoine is an osmolyte with membrane stabilizing and inflammation reducing capacities. Nasal spray and eye drops containing ectoine are promising new treatment regimens for allergic rhinitis sufferers. Design and Methods. The current two noninterventional trials evaluated the efficacy and safety of ectoine containing nasal spray and eye drops for treating allergic rhinitis in comparison with either azelastine or cromoglycic acid containing products. Nasal and ocular symptom developments as well as judgment of tolerability and efficacy were assessed both by investigators and patients over a time period of one to two weeks. Results. Both trials confirmed that ectoine containing products reduced nasal and ocular symptoms in allergic rhinitis patients. Results clearly demonstrated good safety profiles of the ectoine products comparable to those of azelastine and even better to those of cromoglycate products. Conclusion. Ectoine containing nasal spray and eye drops are interesting new treatment strategies for sufferers of allergic rhinitis, combining both good efficacy and absence of side effects. PMID:24982680

  17. Cyclosporine a 0.05% eye drops for the treatment of subepithelial infiltrates after epidemic keratoconjunctivitis

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    Okumus Seydi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the treatment with topical 0.05% cyclosporine A (CsA in patients with subepithelial corneal infiltrates (SEI. Methods We reviewed 16 patients (22 eyes before and after the treatment with 0.05% CsA eye drops. All patients had been treated previously with topical corticosteroids without any improvement and also they had to stop the medication secondary to intraocular pressure elevation. The objective data recorded included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, evaluation of corneal subepithelial infiltrate scores (CSIS, intraocular pressure (IOP prior to treatment and the last follow-up visit. Results Six males (37.5% and 10 females (62.5%, mean age of 35.2 ± 16.6 years, were included. The patients’ average topical CsA use duration was 5.1 ± 3.5 months (1 – 13 months. The average follow up time of the patients was 9.2 ± 4.7 months (4 – 22 months. One patient, although he didn’t have a 0 scale of SCIS, did not show up for follow up examinations after six months. The mean BCVA (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution before and after the treatment were 0.15 ± 0.15 and 0.07 ± 0.07 respectively, CSIS 1.68 ± 0.89 and 0.23 ± 0.53 respectively, IOP 18.50 ± 3.82 and 16.86 ± 2.76 mmHg respectively. There were statistically significant improvements in BCVA (p = 0.002, reduction of CSIS (p = 0.002 and reduction of IOP (p  Conclusions Topical 0.05% CsA is a safe and effective alternative treatment in patients with SEI who do not respond to other treatment modalities or have undesired side effects from topical steroids.

  18. Autologous serum eye drops diluted with sodium hyaluronate: clinical and experimental comparative study.

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    López-García, José S; García-Lozano, Isabel; Rivas, Luis; Ramírez, Nuria; Raposo, Rafaela; Méndez, Maria T

    2014-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of sodium hyaluronate as vehicle for diluting autologous serum. The concentration and temporal stability of EGF, TGF-β, PDGF-AB and albumin in fresh and frozen samples of autologous serum diluted with sodium hyaluronate and saline solution, as well as the pH, osmolarity and density was studied. In parallel, the clinic effects of autologous serum diluted to 20% with sodium hyaluronate were compared with another solution of autologous serum diluted to 20% with saline in a prospective, comparative, randomized and double-blind study in 26 patients (52 eyes) with Sjögren syndrome. Patients underwent a complete ophthalmic assessment including tear film evaluation and corneal and conjunctival impression cytology at the beginning of the study and 2 months later. The growth factor (GF) concentration remained stable during 1 month at 4°C both in fresh and defrosted samples without any differences being found between both preparations. No differences were found related to osmolarity, pH and density between these preparations before and after frosting. Autologous serum diluted with sodium hyaluronate caused a significant improvement of the tear film stability, fluorescein and rose Bengal stain, break-up time, corneal and conjunctival squamous metaplasia as well as in the patient subjective perception. Sodium hyaluronate is an excellent vehicle for diluting autologous serum due to the gradual release of GF and increasing their duration and effect on the ocular surface. Preparations diluted with sodium hyaluronate are better tolerated by patients and require a lower number of drops administrations. © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. PERFLUOROCARBON LIQUIDS' ABILITY TO PROTECT THE MACULA FROM INTRAOCULAR DROPPING OF METALLIC FOREIGN BODIES: A Model Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Chirag M; Gentile, Ronald C; Mehta, Mitul C

    2016-07-01

    To examine the utility of perfluoro-n-octane (PFO) in balanced salt solution (BSS) to shield the macula from the impact of dropped metallic intraocular foreign bodies (IOFBs) by modeling scenarios in which they may fall during surgical removal. Model eyes were filled with various fluid mixtures (Group 1: 10% PFO/90% BSS; Group 2: 100% BSS; Group 3: 100% PFO; Group 4: 10% PFO/90% air; Group 5: 10% BSS/90% air). In Groups 1, 4, and 5, the 10% fluid volume covered the theoretical macula. For each fluid mixture, up to 30 IOFB drop scenarios were performed for each of the 5 sample IOFBs from 3 locations. Trajectories were recorded using a camera attached to a Zeiss operating microscope (Carl Zeiss, Jena, Germany). The percentages of IOFBs impacting the macula were calculated and Fisher exact test was used to assess differences. In Group 1, 93% (417/450) of the dropped IOFBs were deflected by the PFO-BSS interface compared with 0% (0/500) in Groups 2, 3, 4, and 5 (P macula in 30% of tests when dropped from the superior posterior segment (P < 0.01), all other IOFBs (2.8-13.4 mg) were deflected by the PFO-BSS interface in 100% of Group 1 drops (P < 0.01). As demonstrated by these simulations, the PFO-BSS interface can deflect IOFBs dropped during surgery in a wide range of scenarios, especially when the IOFB is of lower mass.

  20. The Experimental Study on Anti-bacterial Potency of Various Herbal Eye drops on Staphylococcus aureus induced keratitis

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    Hyeong-sik Seo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This experimental study was performed to investigate the effect of herbal eye drops(Sean-tang, Jinpi-san, Tangpo-san, Copitdis Rhizoma on Staphylococcus aureus keratitis. Methods : After administering various herbal eye drops on Staphylococcus aureus, I measured MIC and the size of inhibition zone. MIC was measured by dropping from 20 to 50㎕ according to density. Anti-bacterial potency was measured by the size of inhibition zone with change of volume under2days culture condition. Also continuous anti-bacterial potency of herbal eye drops was measured by the size of inhibition zone according to 2 days and 6 days culture each under the 50㎕condition. Results : 1. MIC on Staphylococcus aureus in Sean-tang, Jinpi-san and Tangpo-san was 100%, 20㎕. 2. MIC on Staphylococcus aureus in Coptidis rhizoma was 10%, 30㎕. 3. MIC on Staphylococcus aureus in Cravit was 0.1%, 50㎕. 4. Under the 2 days culture condition, the size of inhibition zone on Staphylococcus aureus by volume for Sean-tang was 12.0mm in 50㎕, Jinpi-san was 19.0mm in 50㎕, Tangpo-san was 15.0mm in 50㎕, Coptidis rhizoma was 32.7 mm in 50㎕and Cravit was 31mm in 50㎕, Coptidis rhizoma showed the highest anti-bacterial potency. 5. Under the 50㎕condition, the size of inhibition zone on Staphylococcus aureus by 2 and 6 culture days for Sean-tang was 12.0mm, Jinpi-san was 19.0mm, Tangpo-san was 15.0mm, Coptidis rhizoma was 32.7mm and Cravit was 31.0 mm, which showed sameness anti-bacterial potency in 2 days and 6 days. Conclusions : The present author think that the herbal eye drops can be used to cure Staphylococcus aureus keratitis and if further study is performed, the use of the herbal eye drops will be valuable and beneficial in the clinical medicines.

  1. Tat PTD-Endostatin-RGD: A novel protein with anti-angiogenesis effect in retina via eye drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Li, Lian; Li, Zhiwei; Sheng, Juzheng; Zhang, Xinke; Feng, Danyang; Zhang, Xu; Yin, Fengxin; Wang, Aijun; Wang, Fengshan

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness. The objective was to design a novel fusion protein, Tat PTD-Endostatin-RGD, to treat retinal neovascularization via eye drops instead of traditional intravitreal injection trepapeutical methods. The anti-angiogenesis ability was evaluated in vitro by chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay, wound healing assay and tube formation assay. Corneal barrier and blood-retina barrier were constructed in vitro to investigate the penetration ability of Tat PTD-Endostatin-RGD. Western blot was used to detect the integrin αvβ3 expression level in rat retina microvascular endothelial cells which was stimulated by S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. The binding affinity of Tat PTD-Endostatin-RGD to integrin αvβ3 was investigated by evaluating the penetration ability on blood-retina barriers treated with S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. The pharmacodynamics and efficacy analysis were further carried out in the oxygen-induced retinopathy model in vivo. In addition, the pharmacokinetic profile via eye drops was studied on a C57BL/6 mice model. Tat PTD-Endostatin-RGD showed high anti-angiogenesis activity and high ability to penetrate these two barriers in vitro. The Western blot results indicated S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine upregulated the expression level of integrin αvβ3 in a dose-dependent manner. Tat PTD-Endostatin-RGD showed a high affinity to rat retina microvascular endothelial cells treated with S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. The results showed that Tat PTD-Endostatin-RGD could inhibit abnormal angiogenesis in retina via eye drops. Tat PTD-Endostatin-RGD showed high penetration ability through ocular barriers, bound specifically to integrin αvβ3 and effectively inhibited the abnormal angiogenesis. Tat PTD-Endostatin-RGD represents a potent novel drug applied via eye drops for fundus oculi neovascularization diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Observation of oral acyclovir combined with sodium hyaluronate and fluorometholone eye drops on the treatment of herpes zoster keratitis

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    Yao-Hua Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the effects of oral acyclovir combined with sodium hyaluronate and fluorometholone eye drops on the treatment of herpes zoster keratitis. METHODS:Forty patients with ocular herpes zoster were divided into two groups, 20 cases in the observation group, 20 cases in the control group. Observation group was treated with 200mg oral acyclovir for 5 times a day and sodium hyaluronate eye drops for 4 times a day. When stromal keratitis, disciform keratitis or corneal endotheliitis occurred, fluorometholone was used for 4 times a day. The control group was treated with ganciclovir ophthalmic gel for 4 times a day. The efficacy of two groups was observed, patients were followed up for 3-4wk. RESULTS:The observation group of local pain and photophobia in remission time and corneal damage healing time were better than control group, and there were significant differences(PCONCLUSION: Effects of oral acyclovir combined with sodium hyaluronate and fluorometholone eye drops on the treatment of herpes zoster keratitis are satisfactory.

  3. The inhibitory effect of different concentrations of KH902 eye drops on corneal neovascularization induced by alkali burn

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    Yan Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of different concentrations of KH902 eye drops on rabbit corneal neovascularization (CNV induced by alkali burn. Methods: Forty-eight adult rabbits were randomized into four groups after alkali burning: Group A (2.5 mg/ml, Group B (5 mg/ml, and Group C (10 mg/ml by different concentrations of KH902 eye drops and Group D by saline solution as control with three times a day for 2 weeks. At days 7, 14, and 28, the anterior segment photographs, confocal microscopy, and histopathology were performed to evaluate corneal opacity, neovascularization, inflammatory cell density, vessel size, and edema. Immunohistochemistry was applied to analyze the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF level. Results: (1 The CNV in the medicine-treated groups showed a reduction without obvious corneal side effects histologically. (2 Compared to the control group, the three medicine-treated groups showed a reduction in the VEGF levels and CNV areas on days 7, 14, and 28 and in the inflammatory cell density on days 14 and 28 (P 0.05. Conclusion: KH902 eye drops in lower concentration showed an obvious reduction of the CNV growing for rabbit corneal alkali burn without side effects.

  4. Aspirin overdose

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002542.htm Aspirin overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An overdose of aspirin means you have too much aspirin in your ...

  5. Aspirin Desensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nerve Decompression Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Aspirin Desensitization Kevin C. Welch, MD Zara Patel, MD Introduction The term "aspirin-sensitive asthma" (also known as "aspirin triad" or " ...

  6. Synergistic effect of regenerating agent plus cord blood serum eye drops for the treatment of resistant neurotrophic keratitis: a case report and a hypothesis for pathophysiologic mechanism

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    Giannaccare G

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Giannaccare,1 Michela Fresina,1 Aldo Vagge,2 Piera Versura1 1Ophthalmology Unit, DIMES, S Orsola-Malpighi Teaching Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; 2Eye Clinic, DiNOGMI, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy Abstract: This report describes a case of a 72-year-old Caucasian woman presenting with a large neurotrophic keratitis with a large persistent epithelial defect, with a longest linear diameter of 7 mm and greatest perpendicular width of 5 mm, affecting epithelium, Bowman membrane, and anterior stroma. Corneal disease was resistant to conventional treatment and classified as stage 2 according to Mackie classification. Patient was instructed to instill regenerating agent (RGTA eye drops in the morning, as the first eye drop, once every 5 days in combination with daily cord blood serum (CBS eye drops 6 times/day. The patient was asked to visit after 1 week (V1, 2 weeks (V2, 3 weeks (V3, and 4 weeks (V4 of study treatment. In V4 treatment, corneal sensitivity improved, and keratitis healed with resolution of stromal inflammation. Global treatment tolerance was very satisfactory. Patient continued the therapy for a further month after complete healing. Currently, the patient has been followed up for 3 months without any sign of keratitis recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, this case report describes for the first time the successful combined use of RGTA and CBS eye drops for the treatment of neurotrophic keratitis resistant to conventional treatment. We hypothesize that RGTA eye drops could provide an optimal migration substrate and that growth factors supplied by CBS eye drops could strengthen the repair process by promoting cell growth over the matrix. Combined RGTA and CBS eye drop therapy could be a new potential option for the successful treatment of resistant neurotrophic keratitis, particularly when each drug alone is not effective. Keywords: neurotrophic keratitis, regenerating agent, cord blood serum eye drops

  7. Safety and efficacy of a hydroxypropyl guar/polyethylene glycol/propylene glycol-based lubricant eye-drop in patients with dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labetoulle, Marc; Messmer, Elisabeth M; Pisella, Pierre-Jean; Ogundele, Abayomi; Baudouin, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    To demonstrate non-inferiority of a hydroxypropyl guar/polyethylene glycol/propylene glycol lubricating eye-drop (HPG/PEG/PG) compared with an osmoprotective carboxymethylcellulose/glycerine eye-drop (O/CMC) for ocular surface staining. This was a multicentre, randomised, observer-masked, parallel-group study. Adults with dry eye instilled HPG/PEG/PG/ or O/CMC 4 times daily for 35 days and then as needed through day 90. Total ocular surface staining (TOSS) score changes from baseline and Impact of Dry Eye on Everyday Life (IDEEL) treatment satisfaction module scores were assessed. Non-inferiority, based on TOSS score change from baseline, was concluded if the upper limit of the 2-sided CI was <2 units. Mean±SD patient age was 64.4±13.7 years; 94 patients were randomised to treatment (HPG/PEG/PG, n=46; O/CMC, n=48). Mean±SE TOSS score change from baseline to day 35 was -2.2±0.33 with HPG/PEG/PG and -1.7±0.47 with O/CMC (treatment difference, -0.47±0.47; p=0.38), and the non-inferiority criterion was met. IDEEL treatment satisfaction scores were similar between groups at day 35 and day 90. The most frequently reported adverse event was eye irritation (HPG/PEG/PG, n=2; O/CMC, n=3). HPG/PEG/PG and O/CMC reduced ocular surface damage, and HPG/PEG/PG was non-inferior to O/CMC. Both treatments were effective, convenient and well tolerated. NCT01863368, Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Propranolol 0.1% eye micro-drops in newborns with retinopathy of prematurity: a pilot clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Luca; Cavallaro, Giacomo; Bagnoli, Paola; Dal Monte, Massimo; Fiorini, Patrizio; Berti, Elettra; Padrini, Letizia; Donzelli, Gianpaolo; Araimo, Gabriella; Cristofori, Gloria; Fumagalli, Monica; la Marca, Giancarlo; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Pasqualetti, Roberta; Fortunato, Pina; Osnaghi, Silvia; Tomasini, Barbara; Vanni, Maurizio; Calvani, Anna Maria; Milani, Silvano; Cortinovis, Ivan; Pugi, Alessandra; Agosti, Massimo; Mosca, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    Oral propranolol reduces retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) progression, although not safely. This study evaluated safety and efficacy of propranolol eye micro-drops in preterm newborns with ROP. A multicenter open-label trial, planned according to the Simon optimal two-stage design, was performed to analyze safety and efficacy of propranolol micro-drops in newborns with stage 2 ROP. To this end, hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were monitored, and blood samples were collected weekly, for 3 wk. Propranolol plasma levels were also monitored. The progression of the disease was evaluated with serial ophthalmologic examinations. Twenty-three newborns were enrolled. Since the fourth of the first 19 newborns enrolled in the first stage of the study showed a progression to stage 2 or 3 with plus, the second stage was prematurely discontinued. Even though the objective to complete the second stage was not achieved, the percentage of ROP progression (26%) was similar to that obtained previously with oral propranolol administration. However, no adverse effects were observed and propranolol plasma levels were significantly lower than those measured after oral administration. Propranolol 0.1% eye micro-drops are well tolerated, but not sufficiently effective. Further studies are required to identify the optimal dose and administration schedule.

  9. A pharmacoeconomic analysis to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of bimatoprost 0.03% eye drops and brimonidine 0.2% eye drops in patients of primary open-angle glaucoma/ocular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natt, Navreet Kaur; Gupta, A; Singh, G; Singh, T

    2014-12-01

    The aim was to compare efficacy and cost-effectiveness of bimatoprost 0.03% and brimonidine 0.2% in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG)/ocular hypertension (OHT). Open, randomized, cross-over, comparative study. Forty patients of POAG or OHT with intraocular pressure (IOP) brimonidine 0.2% eye drops twice daily for a period of 4 weeks. After a washout period of 4 weeks, the patients were crossed over that is, group A was administered brimonidine 0.2% and group B bimatoprost 0.03%. Fall in IOP at 4 weeks was recorded. The daily cost of each drug was calculated by maximum retail price and the average number of drops per bottle. The cost-effectiveness was then calculated as the cost of drug/mm Hg fall in IOP. Independent samples t-test was used to compare the efficacy of both drugs. IOP lowering with bimatoprost (8.9 ± 1.598 mm Hg) was significantly (P brimonidine (6.55 ± 1.26 mm Hg). The number of drops/ml were 33.43 ± 0.52 and 25.49 ± 0.26, respectively, for bimatoprost and brimonidine. Treatment with bimatoprost was costlier than brimonidine with daily costs/eye Rs. 4.02 ± 0.06 and 3.14 ± 0.03, yearly costs/eye Rs. 1467.46 ± 20.74 and 1147.75 ± 11.15, respectively. Bimatoprost was more cost-effective than brimonidine with the cost-effectiveness ratio (CER) respectively Rs. 13.10 ± 2.61/mm Hg and Rs. 13.96 ± 2.86/mm Hg. Incremental CER Rs. 10.43/mm Hg implies lower costs/mm Hg extra IOP lowering by bimatoprost than Rs. 13.96 for brimonidine. In spite of being costlier, bimatoprost is more efficacious and cost-effective than brimonidine.

  10. A pharmacoeconomic analysis to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of bimatoprost 0.03% eye drops and brimonidine 0.2% eye drops in patients of primary open-angle glaucoma/ocular hypertension

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    Navreet Kaur Natt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to compare efficacy and cost-effectiveness of bimatoprost 0.03% and brimonidine 0.2% in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG/ocular hypertension (OHT. Settings and Design: Open, randomized, cross-over, comparative study. Materials and Methods: Forty patients of POAG or OHT with intraocular pressure (IOP <30 mm Hg were included in the study after a written informed consent. The patients were divided randomly into two groups of 20 patients each. Patients of group A were administered bimatoprost 0.03% eye drops once daily, and those of group B brimonidine 0.2% eye drops twice daily for a period of 4 weeks. After a washout period of 4 weeks, the patients were crossed over that is, group A was administered brimonidine 0.2% and group B bimatoprost 0.03%. Fall in IOP at 4 weeks was recorded. The daily cost of each drug was calculated by maximum retail price and the average number of drops per bottle. The cost-effectiveness was then calculated as the cost of drug/mm Hg fall in IOP. Statistics: Independent samples t-test was used to compare the efficacy of both drugs. Results: IOP lowering with bimatoprost (8.9 ± 1.598 mm Hg was significantly (P < 0.0001 higher than brimonidine (6.55 ± 1.26 mm Hg. The number of drops/ml were 33.43 ± 0.52 and 25.49 ± 0.26, respectively, for bimatoprost and brimonidine. Treatment with bimatoprost was costlier than brimonidine with daily costs/eye Rs. 4.02 ± 0.06 and 3.14 ± 0.03, yearly costs/eye Rs. 1467.46 ± 20.74 and 1147.75 ± 11.15, respectively. Bimatoprost was more cost-effective than brimonidine with the cost-effectiveness ratio (CER respectively Rs. 13.10 ± 2.61/mm Hg and Rs. 13.96 ± 2.86/mm Hg. Incremental CER Rs. 10.43/mm Hg implies lower costs/mm Hg extra IOP lowering by bimatoprost than Rs. 13.96 for brimonidine. Conclusion: In spite of being costlier, bimatoprost is more efficacious and cost-effective than brimonidine.

  11. Objective and subjective assessing efficacy of a lubricating drop in eyes wearing silicone hydrogel contact lenses

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    Amir Asharlous

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Our results showed that although the lubricating drop did not improve the tear film stability and optical quality in the silicone hydrogel contact lens wearers, subjects experienced a subjective improvement.

  12. Topical Coenzyme Q10 Eye Drops as an Adjuvant Treatment in Challenging Refractory Corneal Ulcers: A Case Series and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Koray

    2017-03-01

    The management of nonhealing corneal ulcers, particularly in patients with neurotrophic corneas, remains a challenging problem today. Some patients may fail to respond to conventional therapy, making new alternative agents necessary to treat these resistant cases. In this article, we aim to present six challenging cases of refractory corneal ulcers that revealed healing response to the adjuvant treatment with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) eye drops and to review the literature examining of new therapeutic agents. Our study was designed as a descriptive case series demonstrating the use of novel coenzyme Q10 eye drops in refractory corneal ulcers. In our case series, CoQ10 eye drops were added to the existing therapies as an adjuvant agent in six cases: three cases with neurotrophic corneal ulcers, two cases with postinfectious corneal ulcers (one unknown etiology+one Acanthamoeba keratitis), and 1 case with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. All cases were monitored regularly and corneal images were taken at all visits. All nonhealing corneas with conventional therapy revealed recovery after the addition of CoQ10 eye drops. Except for two cases that responded to the CoQ10 eye drops more rapidly (within 1 to 2 weeks), complete corneal healing was observed in four cases between weeks 4 and 8. No adverse events were reported in these cases throughout the follow-up period. Coenzyme Q10 eye drops can be considered as an important adjuvant therapeutic agent promoting corneal epithelial wound healing in challenging cases.

  13. [Experimental study on preclinical quality control, urgent poison and irritation of Dendrobium aurantiacum eye drops, a class I new drug against diabetic cataract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yan-Qun; Yang, Qiao-Hong; Su, Jun-Fang; Chen, Jian; Qi, Hui; Chen, Dan; Wei, Xiao-Yong

    2013-04-01

    To establish a quality control method of Dendrobium aurantiacum eye drops, in order to evaluate acute toxicity, irritation and irritability and lay a foundation for its development and utilization in the future. The content of gigantol and SA in D. aurantiacum eye drops were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The linear ranges of gigantol and SA were 0.040 8-1.530 0 g x L(-1) (r = 0.999 9) and 0.100 8-0.504 0 g x L(-1) (r = 0.999 9), with the average recoveries being 100.8%, 99.84%, and RSD being 1.4%, 1.8% (n = 9) respectively. The sample solution was stable at room temperature within 72 h. The acute toxicity test showed no toxic reaction of D. aurantiacum eye drops in mice. The irritating test for single-dose and multiple-dose administrations of D. aurantiacum eye drops and physiological saline in rabbit eyes and skin, as well as the allergic test in guinea pigs showed no eye irritation and skin irritation and irritability. These findings indicated that D. aurantiacum eye drops are safe and stable, with a good druggability.

  14. A study to assess the feasibility of undertaking a randomized controlled trial of adherence with eye drops in glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Cliff; Brunton, Lisa; Olleveant, Nicola; Henson, David B; Pilling, Mark; Mottershead, Jane; Fenerty, Cecilia H; Spencer, Anne Fiona; Waterman, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Adherence with therapy could influence the progression of glaucoma and ultimately affect the onset of visual impairment in some individuals. This feasibility study evaluated the measures to be used for a future randomized controlled trial assessing the effects of group-based education on adherence with eye drops. People diagnosed with glaucoma within the previous 12 months attending a regional ophthalmology clinic in the North West of England were recruited. A two-session education program delivered one week apart had been devised as part of a previous project. A combined adult learning and health needs approach to education was taken. Outcomes measured were knowledge of glaucoma, self-report of adherence, illness perception, beliefs about medicines, patient enablement, and general health (Short Form-12). Adherence was also measured objectively using a Medical Events Monitoring System device. Twenty-six participants consented to undertake the educational program and 19 produced analyzable data. Knowledge of glaucoma, illness perception, beliefs about medicine, and patient enablement all showed statistically significant improvements after education. Mean adherence with eye drops was maintained above 85% before and for 3 months after attendance at the educational program. Self-report exaggerated adherence by at least 10% when compared with the objective Medical Events Monitoring System data, and in fact the kappa agreement was zero. All questionnaires other than the Short Form-12 were considered to be valuable measures and use of a Medical Events Monitoring System device was considered to be an objective surrogate measure for adherence with eye drops. A multicenter, randomized, controlled equivalence trial of group versus individualized education using adherence as the primary outcome is the next step.

  15. Dexamethasone/Povidone Eye Drops versus Artificial Tears for Treatment of Presumed Viral Conjunctivitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Roberto Damian Pacheco; Lira, Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti; Abe, Ricardo Yuji; Zacchia, Rafael Santos; Felix, João Paulo Fernandes; Pereira, Andre Venancio Fernandes; Arieta, Carlos Eduardo Leite; de Castro, Rosane Silvestre; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves

    2015-09-01

    To determine whether topical dexamethasone 0.1%/povidone-iodine 0.4% reduces the duration of presumed viral conjunctivitis better than artificial tears and whether the treatment relieves the symptoms of this disease. Randomized, masked and controlled trial. One-hundred twenty-two patients with a clinical diagnosis of presumed viral conjunctivitis were randomized to either the treatment group or the control group. Physicians and patients were masked to the treatment. Swabs were taken from the conjunctival fornix for adenovirus PCR analyses. Patients in the treatment group received topical dexamethasone 0.1%/povidone-iodine 0.4% eye drops four times daily, and patients in the placebo group received artificial tears four times daily, both for seven days. Symptoms were recorded on the day of recruitment and at the time of a follow-up examination 5, 10 and 30 d later. The main outcome was duration of the disease. The others outcomes were overall discomfort, itching, foreign body sensation, tearing, redness, eyelid swelling, side effects of the eye drops, intraocular pressure and the incidence of subepithelial corneal infiltrates. There was no statistically significant difference between the treatment group and the control group in terms of the patients' symptoms, intraocular pressure and incidence of subepithelial cornea infiltrates during the entire follow-up period. Patients of the treatment group reported more stinging (p conjunctivitis duration (9.4 ± 4.6 d in the dexamethasone 0.1%/povidone-iodine 0.4% group versus 11.8 ± 4.9 d in the artificial tears group, p = 0.009). The use of topical dexamethasone 0.1%/povidone-iodine 0.4% eye drops four times daily appears to reduce the duration of conjunctivitis, although it causes more stinging than artificial tears.

  16. Development of the conceptual framework for the Eye-Drop Satisfaction Questionnaire (EDSQ© in glaucoma using a qualitative study

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    Trudeau Elyse

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compliance is a major issue in glaucoma care. It is usually poor in glaucomatous patients, and may ultimately result in an acceleration of the disease progression and a risk of blindness. Reasons for this poor compliance are complex and multifactorial, amongst which patient satisfaction can be counted. The objective of this study was to develop a questionnaire to assess patient satisfaction and compliance with eye-drop treatment. Methods A qualitative study was carried out to develop the questionnaire. An interview guide was developed based on a literature review. Structured interviews of fifteen French and English patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or intraocular hypertension were conducted by trained interviewers of the native language of the interviewees. General concepts and subconcepts were identified from the transcripts. The questionnaire was developed using the patient verbatim, and submitted to six patients (French and English for cognitive debriefing. Following patients' comments, items were modified and restructured, and a pilot questionnaire was designed. Results Analysis of data from the interviews with patients and clinicians resulted in the elicitation of concepts related to patient satisfaction and compliance with glaucomatous treatment. These were further refined and used to generate a test questionnaire, which consisted of 46 items grouped into 6 domains: patient characteristics, treatment characteristics, patient-clinician relationship, patient experience with the disease and the treatment, interaction between the patient and the treatment, and patient knowledge of the disease and the treatment. Conclusion The Eye-Drop Satisfaction Questionnaire (EDSQ conceptual framework and items were developed simultaneously in French and in English. This questionnaire could be used to evaluate patient satisfaction and compliance with eye-drop treatment and would facilitate the identification of patients at risk

  17. Twenty-Four-Hour Variation of Intraocular Pressure in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Treated with Triple Eye Drops

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    Yoshinori Itoh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP variation in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG treated with triple eye drops. Subjects and Methods. The IOP was measured in 74 eyes in 74 POAG patients (seated on triple therapy (PG analogue, β-blocker, carbonic anhydrase inhibitor at about every 3 hours. Results. The peak IOP was 13.5 ± 3.1 at 1:00, and the trough IOP was at 12.6 ± 2.4 mmHg at 7:00. The IOP at 7:00 was significantly lower than that at 10:00, 1:00, and 3:00 (p<0.05. Based on the time of the peak IOP, we classified the patients into two groups: diurnal (28 eyes and nocturnal types (37 eyes. There was significant difference at the spherical equivalent between diurnal and nocturnal types (p=0.014. To assess the influence of reflective error, we conducted subanalysis for two groups: high myopic (26 eyes, ≤−6D and low/nonmyopic (24 eyes, ≥−2D groups. In the low/nonmyopia group, the IOP was significantly higher at 1:00 and 3:00 than at 13:00, 16:00, and 7: 00 (p<0.05. Conclusion. The mean of IOP elevated outside of clinic hour in the POAG patients on triple therapy. The low/nonmyopia patient should be carefully treated because the IOP of the patients at night elevated significantly.

  18. Healing rate of corneal erosions: comparison of the effect of chloramphenicol eye drops and ointment and high-concentration hyaluronic acid in an animal model.

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    Barequet, Irina S; Harizman, Noga; Ziv, Hana; Rosner, Mordechai

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of chloramphenicol eye drops or ointment, high-concentration hyaluronic acid, or no treatment on reepithelialization of corneal erosions in an experimental model. Uniform 6-mm corneal erosions were created in 23 rabbit eyes. The rabbits were randomized to 4 treatment groups: (1) chloramphenicol eye drops group, (2) chloramphenicol ointment, (3) hyaluronic acid 2.3%, and (4) untreated. Treatment was administered every 8 hours until reepithelialization occurred. Eyes were photographed every 8 hours with a cobalt blue-filtered light with fluorescein drops until reepithelialization occurred. The area of the erosion at each time point was analyzed. There were no significant differences in the reepithelialization of the corneal erosion among the 3 treatment groups (72-75 hours, P > 0.05). The time was significantly shorter (51 hours) for the control untreated group (P = 0.005). The use of chloramphenicol in the form of eye drops or ointment for prophylaxis in corneal erosions has a similar effect on the healing rate of the erosion. Both forms of the antibiotic and high-concentration hyaluronic acid had an effect of slowing down the healing of the erosion when compared with when no treatment was given. Therefore, the decision to treat erosions with eye drops or ointment can be based on the patient's comfort.

  19. Systane® lubricant eye drops in the management of ocular dryness

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    Benelli U

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Umberto BenelliDepartment of Neurosciences, Section of Ophthalmology, University of Pisa, Pisa, ItalyAbstract: The understanding of dry eye disease has advanced recently through increasing recognition that the etiology of the condition involves both tear evaporation and insufficient tear production, and that tear film instability and inflammation play roles in the various stages of the disease. Of significance, it has been recognized that lipid layer thickness correlates with tear film stability. The management of dry eye involves various strategies and therapeutic approaches that address one or more etiopathological components of the disease. The purpose of this review is to outline the characteristics and clinical utility of the Systane® ocular lubricants that contain hydroxypropyl-guar and one or both of the demulcents, ie, polyethylene glycol 400 and propylene glycol. Clinically, these products are safe and are indicated for the temporary relief of burning and irritation due to dryness of the eye. In particular, this review describes the formulations, mechanisms of action, and clinical utility of the newest additions to this topical ocular lubricant family, Systane Ultra® and Systane Balance®. Both of these ocular products are formulated with an intelligent delivery system and both provide symptomatic relief to patients with dry eye. However, Systane Balance is a novel formulation that contains both polymer and lipid components designed to protect the ocular surface and replenish tear film lipids simultaneously, a factor that is of particular relevance to patients who have dry eye associated with meibomian gland dysfunction.Keywords: Systane Ultra, Systane Balance, dry eye, hydroxypropyl-guar, meibomian gland dysfunction, dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol 

  20. A study to assess the feasibility of undertaking a randomized controlled trial of adherence with eye drops in glaucoma patients

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    Richardson C

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cliff Richardson,1 Lisa Brunton,1 Nicola Olleveant,1 David B Henson,1 Mark Pilling,1 Jane Mottershead,2 Cecilia H Fenerty,2 Anne Fiona Spencer,2 Heather Waterman1 1School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, 2Royal Manchester Eye Hospital, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom Background: Adherence with therapy could influence the progression of glaucoma and ultimately affect the onset of visual impairment in some individuals. This feasibility study evaluated the measures to be used for a future randomized controlled trial assessing the effects of group-based education on adherence with eye drops. Methods: People diagnosed with glaucoma within the previous 12 months attending a regional ophthalmology clinic in the North West of England were recruited. A two-session education program delivered one week apart had been devised as part of a previous project. A combined adult learning and health needs approach to education was taken. Outcomes measured were knowledge of glaucoma, self-report of adherence, illness perception, beliefs about medicines, patient enablement, and general health (Short Form-12. Adherence was also measured objectively using a Medical Events Monitoring System device. Results: Twenty-six participants consented to undertake the educational program and 19 produced analyzable data. Knowledge of glaucoma, illness perception, beliefs about medicine, and patient enablement all showed statistically significant improvements after education. Mean adherence with eye drops was maintained above 85% before and for 3 months after attendance at the educational program. Self-report exaggerated adherence by at least 10% when compared with the objective Medical Events Monitoring System data, and in fact the kappa agreement was zero. Conclusion: All questionnaires other than the Short Form-12 were considered to be valuable measures and use of a Medical Events Monitoring System device was

  1. Novel formulation of glycerin 1% artificial tears extends tear film break-up time compared with Systane lubricant eye drops.

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    Gensheimer, William G; Kleinman, David M; Gonzalez, Mithra O; Sobti, Deepak; Cooper, Eugene R; Smits, Gerard; Loxley, Andrew; Mitchnick, Mark; Aquavella, James V

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of glycerin 1% formulated with the novel and proprietary ophthalmic excipient poly(l-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) (Eyeon Particle Sciences LLC) in extending tear film break-up time (TFBUT) compared with a market-leading artificial tear formulation of propylene glycol (0.3%) and polyethylene glycol (0.4%) (Systane(®) Lubricant Eye Drops; Alcon, Fort Worth, TX). This prospective single-center, single visit, randomized, double-masked exploratory trial compared the new formulation and Systane using TFBUT. Noninvasive break-up time (NIBUT) was measured in subjects with asymptomatic to mild (n=5), mild to moderate (n=5), and moderate to severe (n=6) dry eye disease using the TearscopePlus™ at pre-instillation and again at 15, 30, 60, and 120 min after instillation. Fluorescein break-up time (FBUT) was measured at 120 min after instillation. At 15 min (N=16), the new formulation extended mean NIBUT by 14.67 s (P=0.05) compared with 7.40 s (P=0.34) by Systane. The new formulation had a mean FBUT of 4.92 s longer than Systane at 120 min (P=0.12). With outliers removed (N=13), the difference between the mean NIBUT change from baseline for the new formulation and Systane at 120 min was statistically significant (P=0.03). This study demonstrates that PLL-g-PEG as a polymer excipient in artificial tears is effective in improving the performance of demulcents to significantly prolong NIBUT at 15 min, and that protective activity from this artificial tear product for 2 or more hours after eye drop instillation is possible.

  2. Comparison of Two Marketed Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose Based Artificial Tear Drops in Young Patients with Dry Eye Syndrome

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    Haleh Kangari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Artificial tears have been among the first line of therapy in management of Dry Eye Syndrome (DES. This study was conducted to compare a local artificial tear with an imported one in reduction of DES. This comparison would help to evaluate the cost and benefits of each drop in the proper management of DES.Materials and Methods: In this double-blind randomized clinical trial study, a total 65 students meeting our inclusion criteria for DES entered the study. The OSDI questionnaire, TBUT, corneal and conjunctival staining and Schirmer test, were performed. The patients were divided into two groups by block randomization. Group 1 received first drop and group 2 received second drop. Both groups were instructed to use the drops 4 times a day for 14 days. The same tests were performed by the same examiner who was blind to the treatment type after two weeks. Repeated measured ANOVA was used to analyze the data.Results: A total of 58 patients completed the study. In both groups, after the intervention, the OSDI scores (P<0.001, TBUT score (P=0.041, corneal (P<0.001 and conjunctival staining scores (P<0.001 showed improvement in compare to those before the intervention. However, the Schirmer test score did not show significantly difference before and after intervention. In comparing two groups the OSDI scores, the TBUT score, the corneal and conjunctival staining scores and the Schirmer scores did not show statistically significant difference.Conclusion: The two artificial tears equally reduced the symptoms and signs of DES in two weeks.

  3. Bacterial Contamination of Multi-dose Eye Drops at Ophthalmology Department, University of Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia.

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    Tsegaw, Asegedech; Tsegaw, Asamere; Abula, Tefera; Assefa, Yared

    2017-01-01

    Ophthalmic solutions used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes were found to be contaminated with bacteria pathogens and caused serious ocular infections such as keratitis and endophthalmitis. The objective was to assess the magnitude and pattern of bacterial contamination of multi-dose ophthalmic medications and investigate the drug susceptibility pattern of the isolates in the Department of Ophthalmology at Gondar University Teaching Hospital. A total of 100 ophthalmic medications in-use by patients and eye-care workers have been taken and cultured for potential bacterial contamination in the Microbiology Department after 1 week and >1 week of use. The dropper tip and the residual eye medications were examined for contamination. The contaminating bacteria were identified using a standard procedure and drug susceptibility testing to selected antimicrobial agents was done. Eleven ophthalmic medications were contaminated by different bacterial species with a prevalence of 11%. Multi-use and longer duration of use of eye medications were associated with higher rate of contamination. The contamination level ranges from 0% for antibiotics, 20% for local anesthetics, and 40% for povidone iodine. Among bacteria identified, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species were resistant to methicillin while others were sensitive to the antibiotics tested. The prevalence of contamination was low, but methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus was a potential risk. It is recommended that the Department of Ophthalmology should design set of rules about duration of use and safe handling of ophthalmic medications by the staff and patients.

  4. Aspirin revealed

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    Lacey, D.; Hu, X. K.; Loboda, A. V.; Mosey, N. J.; Lipson, R. H.

    2007-03-01

    Experiments are described where the experimental conditions have been optimized to detect aspirin by MALDI mass spectrometry. Although protonated aspirin was not observed by MALDI, sodium and potassium aspirin adducts could be found. Significantly better signals could be obtained by using Rb and Cs salts as cationization sources. Quantum calculations were carried out to determine the structure and energetics of the Li, K, Rb, and Cs alkali--aspirin adducts.

  5. Cefazolin-Gentamicin versus Vancomycin-Ceftazidime Eye Drops for Bacterial Corneal Ulcers; a Randomized Clinical Trial

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    Ali-Reza Dehghani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy of topical cefazolin-gentamicin versus vancomycin-ceftazidime for treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. METHODS: This randomized double-masked clinical trial was performed on consecutive patients with bacterial corneal ulcers referred to Feiz Hospital, Isfahan, Iran from 2004 to 2005. Patients were randomly assigned to cefazolin-gentamicin or vancomycin-ceftazidime eye drops in a masked fashion. Outcome measures included time for resolution of stromal infiltration, re-epithelization of the epithelial defect, and clearance of anterior chamber inflammation as well as culture results and complications. RESULTS: The study included 89 eyes of 89 patients with bacterial corneal ulcers consisting of 57 (64% male and 32 (36% female subjects. Specimens were culture-negative in 46% of cases. Forty-one eyes received cefazolin-gentamicin and 48 eyes were treated with vancomycin-ceftazidime. Time for resolution of stromal infiltration was 17.7±4.3 days versus 13.8±3.6 days (P=0.04, time to complete re-epithelization was 13.2±3.1 days versus 9.6±2.7 days (P=0.01 and time for clearing of the anterior chamber was 11.6±2.9 days versus 8.1±2.3 days (P

  6. Design and Evaluation of Voriconazole Eye Drops for the Treatment of Fungal Keratitis

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    Sakshi Malhotra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Voriconazole is a novel antifungal agent with excellent broad spectrum activity commercially available for oral and intravenous administration. The purpose of this study was to prepare ophthalmic formulation of hydroxypropyl beta cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD based voriconazole containing benzalkonium chloride BAK and EDTA with or without viscosity modifiers and study its permeation characteristics through freshly excised goat cornea. The results were observed that viscosity and force of bioadhesion of the voriconazole HP-β-CD solutions containing xanthan gum (XG are more as compared to polyvinyl alcohol. The results revealed that voriconazole drop containing PVA provided least viscosity and higher corneal permeation of drug, while drop formulated with XG had maximum viscosity and least permeation. The HP-β-CD based voriconazole (1.5% ophthalmic formulation containing xanthan gum (1.5, preserved with BAK and EDTA, could provide shelf life of 2 years. The microbiological studies showed that voriconazole ophthalmic solution containing xanthan gum shows better antifungal activity as compared to voriconazole and xanthan gum alone. Thus, it can be concluded that HP-β-CD based voriconazole (1.5%, pH 7.0 ophthalmic solution containing BAK and EDTA with viscosity modifier XG provided maximum precorneal residence time as compared to other viscosity modifiers and polyvinyl alcohol provided less precorneal residence time than other viscosity modifiers.

  7. Over the counter (OTC) artificial tear drops for dry eye syndrome

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    Pucker, Andrew D; Ng, Sueko M; Nichols, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the counter (OTC) artificial tears historically have been the first line of treatment for dry eye syndrome and dry eye-related conditions like contact lens discomfort, yet currently we know little regarding the overall efficacy of individual, commercially available artificial tears. This review provides a much needed meta-analytical look at all randomized and quasi-randomized clinical trials that have analyzed head-to-head comparisons of OTC artificial tears. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and toxicity of OTC artificial tear applications in the treatment of dry eye syndrome compared with another class of OTC artificial tears, no treatment, or placebo. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2015, Issue 12), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to December 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to December 2015), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en) and the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) website (www.fda.gov). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 4 December 2015. We searched reference lists of included trials for any additional trials not identified by the electronic searches. Selection criteria This review includes randomized controlled trials with adult participants who were diagnosed with dry eye, regardless of race and gender. We included trials in which the age of participants was not reported, and clinical trials comparing OTC artificial tears with another class of OTC artificial tears, placebo, or no treatment. This review did not

  8. Vaccination of chickens with liposomal inactivated avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) vaccine by eye drop or coarse spray administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, K; Ohgitani, T; Noro, T; Kaneshige, T; Shimizu, Y

    2009-06-01

    One hundred and twenty 30-day-old specific-pathogen-free chickens were inoculated with the liposomal inactivated avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) vaccine by eye drop or coarse spraying. All of the chickens produced anti-lipopolysaccharide antibodies of the IgG subclass in their sera as well as IgA antibodies in their oral mucus. The results demonstrated a rise in antibodies in the serum of chickens administered the APEC vaccine through nonparenteral mucosal routes. Bacterial counts in the blood decreased, and clinical signs were moderated in the vaccinated chickens after challenge with a strain of APEC. No harmful effects from the vaccination were observed. The liposomal inactivated APEC vaccine described in this paper would contribute to a practical method of control for avian colibacillosis.

  9. [Effects of extract of Buddleja officinalis eye drops on androgen receptors of lacrimal gland cells of castrated rats with dry eye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing-Hua; Yao, Xiao-Lei; Wu, Quan-Long

    2012-01-01

    To observe the effects of the extract of Buddleja officinalis eye drops (EBOED) on basic tears secretory volume, tear film stability, and expressions of androgen receptors (AR) in castrated rats with dry eye, and to investigate the mechanism of EBOED on dry eye caused by decreased anti-androgen levels. Forty-five male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the blank group, the model group, and the treatment group (treated by EBOED), respectively. Rats in each group were further divided into three sub-groups (fed for one month, two months, and three months, respectively). There were totally nine groups, with five in each. The dry eye model was established with orchiectomy of rats in the model group and the treatment group. EBOED was given to rats in the treatment group for one successive month. Schirmer I test (SIT) and breakup time of tear film (BUT) were determined in all experimental rats. Expressions of AR was analyzed by flow cytometer. Ths SIT value, BUT, and AR positive rate in the model group at the 1st, 2nd, 3rd month were lower than those in the blank group of the same time points (P < 0.01). There was statistical difference in SIT value, BUT, and AR positive rate between the model group and the treatment group at the three time points (P < 0.01). Take the three-month subgroup as an example, the SIT value in the treatment group was (12.667 +/- 5.221) mm, obviously higher than that in the model group (2.676 +/- 1.987) mm. The BUT in the treatment group was (11.758 +/- 4.415) s, obviously longer than that of the model group (4.667 +/- 2.108) s. The AR positive rate in the treatment group was 49.33% +/- 3.44%, obviously higher than that of the model group (33.32% +/- 7.12%, all P < 0.01). The main components of EBOED was the flavonoids which could significantly inhibit the occurrence of dry eye in rats with decreased androgen levels. Its mechanism might possibly be similar to androgen.

  10. Preservative toxicity in glaucoma medication: clinical evaluation of benzalkonium chloride-free 0.5% timolol eye drops

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    Rosin LM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lauren M Rosin,1 Nicholas P Bell1,2 1Ruiz Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, 2Robert Cizik Eye Clinic, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Timolol (generic name is a frequently used medication for the control of glaucoma. Benzalkonium chloride (BAK is a commonly used preservative in ophthalmic solutions with a broad range of antimicrobial activity; however, this nonspecificity can result in toxicity. Adverse effects attributed to BAK, including conjunctival inflammation and fibrosis, tear film instability, corneal cytotoxicity, anterior chamber inflammation, trabecular meshwork cell apoptosis, cataract development, macular edema, and even systemic effects, have been well documented. These effects can lead to ocular discomfort, poor intraocular pressure control, glaucoma surgery failure, and decreased patient compliance. BAK use in topical medications has decreased recently as newer and less toxic preservatives have become available. Yet these preservatives still exert some toxic effects, especially in patients with chronic eye disease who use multiple drops over extended periods of time. Thus, attempts to reduce overall preservative loads for patients are important, whether it be decreasing the amount of preservative, decreasing the total number of drops patients use, or eliminating preservatives entirely. A preservative-free formulation of timolol, TIMOPTIC® in OCUDOSE®, is available in unit-dose vials. Preservative-free unit-dose vials minimize toxic adverse effects and are a good option for patients with ocular surface disease, on long-term multidrop therapy, or who simply do not tolerate the effects of preservatives due to discomfort. Keywords: glaucoma, ocular toxicity, benzalkonium chloride, preservative-free timolol

  11. Pupillary autonomic dysfunction in multiple system atrophy and Parkinson's disease: an assessment by eye-drop tests.

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    Yamashita, Fumitada; Hirayama, M; Nakamura, T; Takamori, M; Hori, N; Uchida, K; Hama, T; Sobue, Gen

    2010-06-01

    To compare pupillary autonomic dysfunction in multiple system atrophy (MSA) and Parkinson's disease (PD). We administered eye-drop tests to 40 MSA patients, 40 PD patients with similar disease duration, and 20 age-matched healthy controls. Pupillary supersensitivity to a parasympathomimetic agent (0.05% pilocarpine hydrochloride) and to a sympathomimetic agent (0.02% dipivefrine hydrochloride) was examined by assessing changes in pupil diameter. Pupillary supersensitivity to a parasympathomimetic agent (0.05% pilocarpine hydrochloride) and to a sympathomimetic agent (0.02% dipivefrine hydrochloride) was examined by assessing changes in pupil diameter. Pupillary supersensitivity to 0.05% pilocarpine was greatest among the PD patients (PD -23.1 +/- 14.4%, MSA -12.4 +/- 11.5%, control -9.5 +/- 8.2%, p disease duration. Pupillary sensitivity to 0.02% dipivefrine was significantly greater in the PD and MSA patients versus controls (PD 10.5 +/- 12.0%, MSA 11.8 +/- 11.0%, control 3.1 +/- 5.8%, p disease advanced. In MSA patients, pupillary sympathetic sensitivity to 0.02% dipivefrine was correlated with the severity of orthostatic hypotension during a head-up tilt test and with the elevation of systolic blood pressure during a noradrenaline infusion test. In PD patients, pupillary sympathetic sensitivity to 0.02% dipivefrine was correlated with a reduction of the heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio using delayed-phase iodine-123 meta-iodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy. These data indicate that eye-drop tests can reveal differences in the progression of pupillary autonomic dysfunction in patients with MSA and PD.

  12. Rapamycin Eye Drops Suppress Lacrimal Gland Inflammation In a Murine Model of Sjögren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mihir; Edman, Maria C.; Reddy Janga, Srikanth; Yarber, Frances; Meng, Zhen; Klinngam, Wannita; Bushman, Jonathan; Ma, Tao; Liu, Siyu; Louie, Stan; Mehta, Arjun; Ding, Chuanqing; MacKay, J. Andrew; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of topical rapamycin in treating autoimmune dacryoadenitis in a mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome. Methods We developed rapamycin in a poly(ethylene glycol)-distearoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-DSPE) micelle formulation to maintain solubility. Rapamycin or PEG-DSPE eye drops (vehicle) were administered in a well-established Sjögren's syndrome disease model, the male nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, twice daily for 12 weeks starting at 8 weeks of age. Mouse tear fluid was collected and tear Cathepsin S, a putative tear biomarker for Sjögren's syndrome, was measured. Lacrimal glands were retrieved for histological evaluation, and quantitative real-time PCR of genes associated with Sjögren's syndrome pathogenesis. Tear secretion was measured using phenol red threads, and corneal fluorescein staining was used to assess corneal integrity. Results Lymphocytic infiltration of lacrimal glands from rapamycin-treated mice was significantly (P = 0.0001) reduced by 3.8-fold relative to vehicle-treated mice after 12 weeks of treatment. Rapamycin, but not vehicle, treatment increased tear secretion and decreased corneal fluorescein staining after 12 weeks. In rapamycin-treated mice, Cathepsin S activity was significantly reduced by 3.75-fold in tears (P eye. PMID:28122086

  13. A 3-Year Review of the Outcome of Pars Plana Vitrectomy for Dropped Lens Fragments after Cataract Surgery in a Tertiary Eye Hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olokoba, Lateefat; Islam, Tajul; Nahar, Nazmun; Mahmoud, Abdulraheem; Olokoba, Abdulfatai

    2017-07-01

    Dropped lens fragments into the vitreous are uncommon, but potentially sight threatening complications of cataract surgery. The recommended approach for removal of dropped lens matter is pars plana vitrectomy with or without ultrasonic emulsification with the fragmatome. This study aimed to determine the visual outcome following pars plana vitrectomy for dropped lens fragments complicating cataract surgery at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months. This study is a retrospective review of patients who had PPV as treatment for dropped lens fragments complicating cataract surgery at Ispahani Islamia Eye hospital and Institute. The case notes of all patients who had PPV for dropped nucleus from January 2013 to December 2015 were reviewed. Information retrieved included the bio-data of the patients, clinical features such as visual acuity, intraocular pressure, cornea clarity, presence of anterior chamber activity, Lens status and fundus findings at presentation, 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months post surgery. Details of intra ocular procedure (Cryotherapy, Endo laser, Silicon oil or gas tamponade) in addition to PPV were noted. Thirty-two cases were reviewed within the 36-month time period. There were 8(25%) females and 24(75%) males. Male to female ratio was 1:3. The best corrected visual acuity of patients at presentation was better than or equal to 6/60 in 56.3% of the patients. Dropped nucleus occurred during phacoemulsification cataract surgery in the majority (59.6%) of the patients. The best corrected visual acuity was 6/18 or better in 10(31.3%) eyes at 6 months post-surgery. Worsening of visual acuity to light perception occurred in 3(9.4%) eyes at 6 months, and 3 eyes (9.4%) developed phthisis bulbi. Modest improvement in visual acuity can be achieved after dropped nucleus complicating cataract surgery by Pars plana vitrectomy and removal of dislocated lens fragment.

  14. Evaluation of pharmacological activities and assessment of intraocular penetration of an ayurvedic polyherbal eye drop (Itone™ in experimental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velpandian Thirumurthy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polyherbal eye drop (Itone™ is a mixture of aqueous distillates of nineteen traditionally used ingredients that sum up to impart potency to the formulation and make it a useful adjunct in various ocular pathologies. However, as there have been no controlled experimental studies accounting to the above claim, therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the polyherbal formulation (PHF for antiangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, anticataract, antioxidant and cytotoxicity in addition to the evaluation of intraocular penetration of PHF in rabbit eyes using LC-MS/MS. Materials and methods Antiangiogenic activity of the PHF was evaluated using in ovo chick chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM assay and in vivo cautery induced corneal neovascularization assay in rats. Anticataract potential was evaluated using steroid induced cataract in developing chick embryos, sodium selenite induced cataract in rat pups and galactose induced cataract in rats. The antioxidant activity was evaluated using di-phenyl picryl hydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging assay. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in vitro using inhibition of LTB4 formation in human WBCs and in vivo using carrageenan induced paw edema assay in rats. The cytotoxicity was evaluated against HeLa cancer cell lines using (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Furthermore evaluation of the intraocular penetration of the PHF was carried out in rabbit eyes via aqueous humor paracentesis and further analysis using LC-MS/MS. Results PHF significantly inhibited VEGF induced proliferation of new blood vessels in CAM assay and inhibited the cautery induced corneal neovascularization in rats. Additionally, PHF showed noticeable delay in the progression of cataract in the selenite and galactose induced cataract models whereby the PHF treated lenses were graded for stages II and III respectively. However, the PHF did not show any anticataract activity in

  15. A New Method to Predict the Epidemiology of Fungal Keratitis by Monitoring the Sales Distribution of Antifungal Eye Drops in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Marlon Moraes; de Angelis, Rafael; Lima, Acacio Souza; Viana de Carvalho, Glauco Dreyer; Ibrahim, Fuad Moraes; Malki, Leonardo Tannus; de Paula Bichuete, Marina; de Paula Martins, Wellington; Rocha, Eduardo Melani

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Fungi are a major cause of keratitis, although few medications are licensed for their treatment. The aim of this study is to observe the variation in commercialisation of antifungal eye drops, and to predict the seasonal distribution of fungal keratitis in Brazil. Methods Data from a retrospective study of antifungal eye drops sales from the only pharmaceutical ophthalmologic laboratory, authorized to dispense them in Brazil (Opthalmos) were gathered. These data were correlated with geographic and seasonal distribution of fungal keratitis in Brazil between July 2002 and June 2008. Results A total of 26,087 antifungal eye drop units were sold, with a mean of 2.3 per patient. There was significant variation in antifungal sales during the year (p<0.01). A linear regression model displayed a significant association between reduced relative humidity and antifungal drug sales (R2 = 0.17,p<0.01). Conclusions Antifungal eye drops sales suggest that there is a seasonal distribution of fungal keratitis. A possible interpretation is that the third quarter of the year (a period when the climate is drier), when agricultural activity is more intense in Brazil, suggests a correlation with a higher incidence of fungal keratitis. A similar model could be applied to other diseases, that are managed with unique, or few, and monitorable medications to predict epidemiological aspects. PMID:22457787

  16. Safety and comfort evaluation of a new formulation of Visine® lubricant eye drops containing HydroBlend™ and GentlePur™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torkildsen G

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gail Torkildsen,1 Sherryl Frisch,2 Mingqi Bai,2 Louis Gentner III,2 Uday Doshi,2 Jane Zhang2 1Andover Eye Associates, Andover, MA, USA; 2Johnson & Johnson Consumer and Personal Products Worldwide, Division of Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies, Inc, Morris Plains, NJ, USA Purpose: To evaluate the clinical safety and comfort of a new benzalkonium chloride-free Visine® lubricant eye drop formulation (Hydroblend™ and GentlePur™ in healthy and dry eye subjects.Methods: This was a single-site, open-label clinical study comprised of 22 healthy and 22 dry eye subjects. Subjects were instructed to instill 1–2 drops of the test product four times a day for 2 weeks and were examined at visit 1 (day 0, visit 2 (day 7, and visit 3 (day 14. Assessments at each visit included postdosing product usage comfort scores, predosing fluorescein corneal staining score, predosing visual acuity, and pre- and postdosing ocular structure change using slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Adverse events were monitored throughout the course of the study.Results: Throughout the 14 days of the trial period, subjects from both healthy and dry eye groups rated the eye drops as “very comfortable”. For dry eye group, the mean product usage comfort scores for the first 3 minutes postdosing ranged from 8.5 to 8.8 at visit 1 and 9.2 to 9.6 at visit 3 on a 0–10 point scale, with 0 being very uncomfortable and 10 being very comfortable. The mean corneal staining scores over five corneal regions changed from 0.65 at visit 1 to 0.39 at visit 3 for dry eye group. The individual region corneal staining scores were also decreased from visits 1 to 3 for dry eye group. All subjects maintained pretreatment means visual acuity at visits 2 and 3. Biomicroscopic examination indicated no structural changes at all visits. There were no significant adverse events reported during the course of the study.Conclusion: The study confirms that GentlePur™ is an appropriate choice as a preservative

  17. Respiratory effect of beta-blocker eye drops in asthma: population-based study and meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Daniel R; Dreischulte, Tobias; Lipworth, Brian J; Donnan, Peter T; Jackson, Cathy; Guthrie, Bruce

    2016-09-01

    To measure the prevalence of beta-blocker eye drop prescribing and respiratory effect of ocular beta-blocker administration in people with asthma. We measured the prevalence of ocular beta-blocker prescribing in people with asthma and ocular hypertension, and performed a nested case-control study (NCCS) measuring risk of moderate exacerbations (rescue steroids in primary care) and severe exacerbations (asthma hospitalization) using linked data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We then performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials evaluating changes in lung function following ocular beta-blocker administration in people with asthma. From 2000 to 2012, the prevalence of non-selective and selective beta-blocker eye drop prescribing in people with asthma and ocular hypertension fell from 23.0% to 13.4% and from 10.5% to 0.9% respectively. In the NCCS, the relative incidence (IRR) of moderate exacerbations increased significantly with acute non-selective beta-blocker eye drop exposure (IRR 4.83, 95% CI 1.56-14.94) but not with chronic exposure. In the meta-analysis, acute non-selective beta-blocker eye drop exposure caused significant mean falls in FEV1 of -10.9% (95% CI -14.9 to -6.9), and falls in FEV1 of ≥20% affecting one in three. Corresponding values for selective beta-blockers in people sensitive to ocular non-selective beta-blockers was -6.3% (95% CI -11.7 to -0.8), and a non-significant increase in falls in FEV1 of ≥20%. Non-selective beta-blocker eye drops significantly affect lung function and increase asthma morbidity but are still frequently prescribed to people with asthma and ocular hypertension despite safer agents being available. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Respiratory effect of beta‐blocker eye drops in asthma: population‐based study and meta‐analysis of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreischulte, Tobias; Lipworth, Brian J.; Donnan, Peter T.; Jackson, Cathy; Guthrie, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Aims To measure the prevalence of beta‐blocker eye drop prescribing and respiratory effect of ocular beta‐blocker administration in people with asthma. Methods We measured the prevalence of ocular beta‐blocker prescribing in people with asthma and ocular hypertension, and performed a nested case–control study (NCCS) measuring risk of moderate exacerbations (rescue steroids in primary care) and severe exacerbations (asthma hospitalization) using linked data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We then performed a systematic review and meta‐analysis of clinical trials evaluating changes in lung function following ocular beta‐blocker administration in people with asthma. Results From 2000 to 2012, the prevalence of non‐selective and selective beta‐blocker eye drop prescribing in people with asthma and ocular hypertension fell from 23.0% to 13.4% and from 10.5% to 0.9% respectively. In the NCCS, the relative incidence (IRR) of moderate exacerbations increased significantly with acute non‐selective beta‐blocker eye drop exposure (IRR 4.83, 95% CI 1.56–14.94) but not with chronic exposure. In the meta‐analysis, acute non‐selective beta‐blocker eye drop exposure caused significant mean falls in FEV1 of −10.9% (95% CI −14.9 to −6.9), and falls in FEV1 of ≥20% affecting one in three. Corresponding values for selective beta‐blockers in people sensitive to ocular non‐selective beta‐blockers was −6.3% (95% CI −11.7 to −0.8), and a non‐significant increase in falls in FEV1 of ≥20%. Conclusion Non‐selective beta‐blocker eye drops significantly affect lung function and increase asthma morbidity but are still frequently prescribed to people with asthma and ocular hypertension despite safer agents being available. PMID:27161880

  19. Comparison of the replication and transmissibility of an infectious laryngotracheitis virus vaccine delivered via eye-drop or drinking-water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppo, Mauricio J C; Devlin, Joanne M; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2012-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccines have been extensively used to control infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT). Most vaccines are registered/recommended for use via eye-drop although vaccination via drinking-water is commonly used in the field. Drinking-water vaccination has been associated with non-uniform protection. Bird-to-bird passage of chick-embryo-origin (CEO) ILT vaccines has been shown to result in reversion to virulence. The purpose of the present study was to examine the replication and transmission of a commercial CEO infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) vaccine strain following drinking-water or eye-drop inoculation. Two groups of 10 specific-pathogen-free chickens were each vaccinated with Serva ILTV vaccine strain either via eye-drop or drinking-water. Groups of four or five unvaccinated birds were placed in contact with vaccinated birds at regular intervals. Tracheal swabs were collected every 4 days from vaccinated and in-contact birds to assess viral replication and transmission using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with eye-drop-vaccinated birds, drinking-water-vaccinated birds showed delayed viral replication but had detectable viral DNA for a longer period of time. Transmission to chickens exposed by contact on day 0 of the experiments was similar in both groups. Birds exposed to ILTV by contact with eye-drop vaccinated birds on days 4, 8, 12 and 16 of the experiment had detectable ILTV for up to 8 days post exposure. ILTV was not detected in chickens that were exposed by contact with drinking-water vaccinated birds on day 12 of the experiment or later. Results from this study provide valuable practical information for the use of ILT vaccine.

  20. Treatment with sodium hyaluronate eye drops in a patient who had early-onset bleb leakage after trabeculectomy with mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Hideto; Sekiryu, Tetsuju; Noji, Hiroki; Ogasawara, Masashi; Imaizumi, Kimihiro; Yago, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 47-year-old man who had bilateral proliferative diabetic retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma. Schirmer I test revealed tear secretions of 5 mm and 3 mm in the right and left eyes, respectively. Tear breakup times in the right and left eyes were 7 and 8 seconds, respectively. The ocular surface staining in both eyes was scored as Grade 1 as per the Oxford scheme. Retinal photocoagulation was performed for correction of the proliferative diabetic retinopathy and rubeosis iridis, which resolved with treatment. However, the intraocular pressure in the left eye could not be adequately controlled. Therefore, trabeculectomy with mitomycin C using limbal-based conjunctival flap was performed. Three hours after the surgery, the patient developed a large and diffuse filtering bleb, but no leakage occurred from the conjunctival scar. However, on the first postoperative day, leakage was noted and the conjunctiva was at the leakage point. The leakage resolved transiently, but recurred the next day. Severe keratoconjunctival epithelial failure was detected, and the patient was administrated 0.1% sodium hyaluronate eye drops six times daily. The epithelial failure improved, and many microcysts were detected on the bleb surface where the epithelial failure improved. The leakage resolved 2 days after initiation of the sodium hyaluronate eye drops. The microcysts disappeared and the bleb surface became smooth 1 month later.

  1. A review of the tolerability and safety of levocabastine eye drops and nasal spray. Implications for patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. Howarth

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Levocabastine is a highly potent and selective H1-receptor antagonist specifically developed for topical administration by ocular and nasal routes. The clinical effects of levocabastine occur rapidly and are predominantly due to local antihistaminic effects at the site of application. Clinically, levocabastine is well tolerated with an adverse effect profile comparable with that of sodium cromoglycate and placebo. As might be expected from the route of drug administration, local irritation is the most frequent adverse event seen with levocabastine eye drops and nasal spray with an incidence comparable with that in placebo-treated controls. Intranasal application of levocabastine has been shown to have no adverse effect on ciliary activity both in vitro and in vivo, while ocular administration has not been shown to have any significant or consistent adverse effect in both animal and human studies. At therapeutic doses, levocabastine appears to be devoid of significant systemic activity producing no apparent effects on cardiovascular, psychomotor and cognitive function. Since levocabastine undergoes little hepatic metabolism, and only low plasma levels of the drug are attained following topical administration, drug interactions are unlikely.

  2. Ocular tissue distribution and pharmacokinetic study of a small 13kDa domain antibody after intravitreal, subconjuctival and eye drop administration in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Gerald; Szapacs, Matthew; Shah, Tejash; Clements, Peter; Struble, Craig; Wilson, Robert

    2017-10-23

    Domain antibodies (dAb's) comprise the smallest functional unit of human IgG and can be targeted to a range of different soluble cytokine and receptor targets in the eye. In particular their small size may offer advantage for ocular tissue penetration and distribution. To investigate this we used a 13kDa tool molecule to undertake a preliminary short term ocular tissue distribution and pharmacokinetic study in the rabbit eye. The dAb was administered by the intravitreal or subconjunctival route or, as topical eye drops for up to five days and dAb concentrations measured in vitreous, aqueous, conjunctiva, choroid-RPE, retina, iris, sclera, and ciliary body. The observed elimination half-live of the dAb (~3 days) in vitreous showed a similar elimination rate to that of a much larger (∼50kDa) Fab fragment whilst the half-life following subconjunctival administration was ∼24 h and, after eye drop dosing the dAb was detectable in aqueous and conjunctiva. These preliminary data show that the intravitreal half-life of dAb's are similar to much larger antibody fragments, offering the potential to deliver significantly more drug to target on a molar basis with a single intravitreal injection potentially enabling dosing frequencies of once a month or less. Subconjunctival injection may provide short duration therapeutic levels of dAb to the anterior and posterior chamber whilst topical eye drop delivery of dAbs may be useful in front-of-eye disease. These data indicate that small domain antibodies may have utility in ophthalmology. Further studies are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Aspirin and Reye's syndrome — do parents know?

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Amid growing concern over the association between aspirin and Reye's syndrome, the Aspirin Foundation has recently mounted a publicity campaign advising against the use of aspirin in children. Of 50 parents questioned at a children's ward of a district general hospital, 46 (92%) had heard of the publicity, 38 via the television. The number of parents who would give aspirin to their child had dropped significantly from 45 before the campaign to five after it (P

  4. Aspirin and Reye's syndrome — do parents know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Amid growing concern over the association between aspirin and Reye's syndrome, the Aspirin Foundation has recently mounted a publicity campaign advising against the use of aspirin in children. Of 50 parents questioned at a children's ward of a district general hospital, 46 (92%) had heard of the publicity, 38 via the television. The number of parents who would give aspirin to their child had dropped significantly from 45 before the campaign to five after it (PReye's syndrome as the reason. PMID:3505289

  5. Eye Drop Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Small Text Medium Text Large Text Contrast Dark on Light Light on Dark Donate Search Menu Donate What is Glaucoma? Care ... Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Where the Money Goes Have ...

  6. Benefits of switching from latanoprost to preservative-free tafluprost eye drops: a meta-analysis of two Phase IIIb clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uusitalo H

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hannu Uusitalo,1 Evgeniy Egorov,2 Kai Kaarniranta,3 Yuri Astakhov,4 Auli Ropo5 On behalf of the Switch Study Tafluprost Study Groups 1Department of Ophthalmology, SILK, University of Tampere, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Russian National Research Medical University, Moscow, Russia; 3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland, 4Department of Ophthalmology, First Pavlov State Medical University of St Petersburg, Saint Petersburg, Russia, 5Global Medical Affairs, Santen Oy, Tampere, Finland Introduction: Glaucoma patients frequently exhibit ocular surface side effects during treatment with prostaglandin eye drops. The present work investigated whether glaucoma patients suffering from signs and symptoms of ocular surface disease while using preserved latanoprost eye drops benefited from switching to preservative-free tafluprost eye drops. Patients and methods: The analysis was based on 339 glaucoma patients enrolled in two Phase IIIb trials. The patients were required to have two symptoms, or one sign and one symptom of ocular surface disease at baseline, and at least 6 months preceding treatment with latanoprost eye drops preserved with benzalkonium chloride. All eligible patients were switched from latanoprost to preservative-free tafluprost for a total of 12 weeks. Ocular symptoms and ocular signs were evaluated at baseline and at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks after commencing treatment with tafluprost. Intraocular pressure (IOP, drop discomfort, and treatment preference were evaluated to investigate the clinical efficacy and patient-related outcomes. Results: After 12 weeks of treatment with preservative-free tafluprost, the incidences of irritation/burning/stinging, foreign body sensation, tearing, itching, and dry eye sensation had diminished to one-third of those reported for preserved latanoprost at baseline. The incidences

  7. Cycloplegic effect of 0.5% tropicamide and 0.5% phenylephrine mixed eye drops: objective assessment in Japanese schoolchildren with myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Ichiro; Hasebe, Satoshi; Kimura, Shuhei; Miyata, Manabu; Ohtsuki, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the cycloplegic effect of mixed eye drops containing 0.5% tropicamide and 0.5% phenylephrine in myopic children, and to determine whether their efficacy was associated with their clinical characteristics. Eighty-one myopic children (age, mean +/- SD, 11.0 +/- 1.5 years; mean spherical equivalent refractive error, -4.27 +/- 1.41 D; range, -1.57 to -8.66 D) were recruited. One drop of Mydrin-P was administered to each eye twice, with an interval of 5 min between. Twenty-five minutes after the second drop, accommodative responses were measured with an open-view autorefractometer, while the subject was encouraged to accommodate by binocularly looking at a Maltese cross located at a distance of 33 cm. The difference between the refractive reading and that obtained with a Maltese cross at 500 cm was regarded as residual accommodation (RA). The repeatability of this measurement was also evaluated. The mean RA was 0.21 +/- 0.29 D (range, -0.31 to 0.99 D). There was no association in RA between the right and left eyes, between RA and age, or between RA and sex, but RA was weakly correlated with refractive error (r = 0.274, P = 0.019). The intersubject difference found in RA can be explained mostly by the extent of repeatability (+/-0.71 D). The insignificant magnitude of RA indicated that the mixed eye drop is an acceptable and useful cycloplegic agent in Japanese schoolchildren with a wide range of myopic refractive errors.

  8. Treatment with sodium hyaluronate eye drops in a patient who had early-onset bleb leakage after trabeculectomy with mitomycin C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagara H

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hideto Sagara,1,2 Tetsuju Sekiryu,2 Hiroki Noji,2 Masashi Ogasawara,2 Kimihiro Imaizumi,2 Keiko Yago31The Marui Eye Clinic, Minamisoma, 2Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Fukushima Medical University. 3Northern Fukushima Medical Center, Fukushima, JapanAbstract: We present the case of a 47-year-old man who had bilateral proliferative diabetic retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma. Schirmer I test revealed tear secretions of 5 mm and 3 mm in the right and left eyes, respectively. Tear breakup times in the right and left eyes were 7 and 8 seconds, respectively. The ocular surface staining in both eyes was scored as Grade 1 as per the Oxford scheme. Retinal photocoagulation was performed for correction of the proliferative diabetic retinopathy and rubeosis iridis, which resolved with treatment. However, the intraocular pressure in the left eye could not be adequately controlled. Therefore, trabeculectomy with mitomycin C using limbal-based conjunctival flap was performed. Three hours after the surgery, the patient developed a large and diffuse filtering bleb, but no leakage occurred from the conjunctival scar. However, on the first postoperative day, leakage was noted and the conjunctiva was at the leakage point. The leakage resolved transiently, but recurred the next day. Severe keratoconjunctival epithelial failure was detected, and the patient was administrated 0.1% sodium hyaluronate eye drops six times daily. The epithelial failure improved, and many microcysts were detected on the bleb surface where the epithelial failure improved. The leakage resolved 2 days after initiation of the sodium hyaluronate eye drops. The microcysts disappeared and the bleb surface became smooth 1 month later.Keywords: trabeculectomy, bleb, bleb leak, microcyst, sodium hyaluronate

  9. [Combined rapamycin eye drop in nanometer vector and poly (lactic acid) wafers of cyclosporine A effectively prevents high-risk corneal allograft rejection in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Sun, Hui-Min; Li, Xiao-Rong; Yuan, Xu-Bo; Wang, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Shu-Xian; Tian, En-Jiang; Yuan, Jia-Qin

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the combined effect of topical rapamycin (RAPA) eye drop in nanometer vector and poly (lactic acid) (PLA) wafers of cyclosporine A (CsA) in the prevention of acute allograft rejection after rabbit corneal transplantation. Methods It was an experimental study. RAPA was incorporated into the nanometer particles and CsA was incorporated into PLA wafers. A was syngeneic control whose both donor and recipient are New Zealand rabbit. Gray donor corneas were implanted into the 102 recipients of New Zealand albino rabbits with corneal neovascularization who were randomly divided into B, C, D, E, F, G 6 groups to receive the different types of therapy: B was no therapy control; C was eye drop of nanometer vector but no RAPA twice a day, 28 days; D was PLA wafers in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes but no drugs; E was 0.5% RAPA eye drop of nanometer vector twice a day, 28 days; F was PLA wafers of CsA in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes; G was PLA wafers of CsA in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes and 0.5% RAPA eye drop of nanometer vector eye drop twice a day for 28 days together. Postoperative evaluation included slit-lamp biomicroscopy, histopathology and immunohistology, Cytokines related with neovascularization and immunosuppression in the corneal tissue by RT-PCR. The graft survival was assessed by One-Way ANOVA and q test. Corneal allograft survival time: A (100.00 +/- 0.00), B (8.44 +/- 1.24), C (8.89 +/- 2.57), D (8.56 +/- 2.30), E (43.11 +/- 5.58), F (43.67 +/- 9.54), G (72.00 +/- 15.34) d. Group G led to a statistically significant prolongation of transplant survival and was superior than group E and F which was a statistical prolongation compared with group B, C and D (qGE = 11.42, qGF = 11.24, qEB = 13.64, qEC = 13.38, qED = 13.46, qFB = 13.82, qFC = 13.56, qFD = 13.64; P < 0.01). Immunohistopathologically, the grafts were subjected to an immune response contained a dense infiltrate of neutrophils, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the group B

  10. Comparison of the anti-inflammatory effects of fluorometholone 0.1% combined with levofloxacin 0.5% and tobramycin/dexamethasone eye drops after cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Qing Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the combination of fluorometholone 0.1% and levofloxacin 0.5% to tobramycin/dexamethasone eye drops in controlling inflammation and preventing infection after phacoemulsification with an intraocular lens implantation. METHODS: Sixty eyes from 60 patients undergoing cataract phacoemulsification were randomized into two groups; half of the patients were treated with fluorometholone (6 times/d combined with levofloxacin (4 times/d, while the other half were treated with tobramycin/dexamethasone (4 times/d eye drops for one week. Preoperative and postoperative intraocular pressure, aqueous flare, corneal thickness, and signs and symptoms were recorded before the operation and 1wk following treatments. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in corneal thickness (P≥0.629, aqueous flare (P≥0.398, and signs and symptoms scores (P≥0.350 at each time point. Ocular hypertension was only observed in two eyes in the tobramycin/dexamethasone group. CONCLUSION: Fluorometholone combined with levofloxacin treatment shows comparable efficacy but without the tendency to increase intraocular pressure; thus, it might be a better regimen for postoperative use.

  11. Local anaesthetic eye drops for prevention of pain in preterm infants undergoing screening for retinopathy of prematurity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dempsey, Eugene

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Screening examinations for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) are performed routinely in the neonatal intensive care unit and are a recognised cause of pain in the newborn. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of instillation of topical anaesthetic eye drops compared with placebo or no treatment on pain in infants undergoing ROP screening. SEARCH STRATEGY: We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. This included a search of the Cochrane Neonatal Group register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 10, 2010). We identified relevant studies by searching the following: (1) computerised bibliographic databases: MEDLINE (1966 to October 2010), EMBASE (1988 to October 2010) and Web of Science (1975 to March 2010; (2) the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials. We searched electronically abstracts from PAS from 2000 to 2010 and handsearched abstracts from ESPR from 2000 to 2009. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised, or quasi-randomised controlled trials, or randomised cross-over trials. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. MAIN RESULTS: We identified two studies for inclusion. Both studies were randomised cross-over trials performed in single centres. Both studies used the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) score as a measure of pain response. Different methods of evaluating PIPP scores are presented including the absolute PIPP score, a PIPP score > 10 or > 12 and an increase in PIPP >\\/= 4 from the baseline value. There is a nonsignificant reduction in pain scores at one minute and a nonsignificant increase at five minutes post insertion of the speculum. PIPP score > 12 at one minute resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the number of patients who experienced pain (typical risk ratio (RR) 0.56, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.89; typical risk difference (RD) -0.23, 95% CI -0.39 to -0.86; number needed to treat to

  12. Multiple endpoint analysis of BAC-preserved and unpreserved antiallergic eye drops on a 3D-reconstituted corneal epithelial model

    OpenAIRE

    Pauly, A; Brasnu, E.; Riancho, L.; Brignole-Baudouin, F.; Baudouin, C

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effects of benzalkonium chloride (BAC)-preserved and unpreserved antiallergic eye drops on the human 3D-reconstituted corneal epithelial model (3D-HCE). Methods 3D-HCE were treated for 24 h followed or not by a 24 h post-incubation recovery period (24 h+24 h) with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), 0.01% BAC, unpreserved formulations of ketotifen, N Acetyl-Aspartyl Glutamic Acid (NAAGA), cromoglycate, or BAC-preserved commercial formulations of ketotifen, olopatadine, epi...

  13. Adjuvant effect of Chakshushya Rasayana with beta-blocker eye drops in the management of progressive glaucomatous optic neuropathy: An open-label randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, K S; Adhoor, Veeranagouda S; Agarwal, Riju; Mehta, Amit J

    2016-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma is an insidious and chronic vision-threatening eye ailment due to neuro-retino-optic nerve degeneration, which may be due to the raised intraocular pressure (IOP) or due to independent factors. Management of glaucoma is mainly concentrated on lowering IOP that requires lifetime topical medication, different ocular medicaments for lowering of IOP, and surgical interventions, but it has its own limitations to control the progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON), and this is the reason behind the use of alternative neuroprotective adjuvants. To evaluate the neuroprotective effect of Ayurvedic line of management of progressive GON. Ingredients of trial drug Vara Fort powder (Chakshushya Rasayana) were procured from the Institute Pharmacy, except Swarnamakshika Bhasma, which was purchased from Dhootapapeshwar Pharmaceuticals. The patients fulfilling inclusion criteria, attending outpatient and inpatient departments, irrespective of their sex, race, religion, occupation, etc., were selected and divided into two groups with open-labeled randomization. In Group A, in addition to betaxolol (0.1%) or timolol (0.5%) (non-iobrim), Chakshushya Rasayana 6 g/day orally with Triphala Ghrita and honey along with Koshtha-Shuddhi (body-microchannel clearing treatment) protocol was tried. Nasya (oleation through nasal route) with Jeevantyadi Taila and Tarpana (eye satiation) with Go-Ghrita were also performed. In Group B (control), brimonidine (iobrim) 0.2% eye drop was used for 3 months. Significant improvement was observed in subjective parameters in Group A such as blurred vision, frequent change of presbyopic glasses, and delayed dark adaptation. Chakshushya Rasayana, if administered in a systematic approach along with a modern topical betaxolol or timolol eye drops, has a definite role in improving the lost retinal sensitivity as much as up to 12 dB in 3 months duration.

  14. Therapeutic outcomes of combined topical autologous serum eye drops with silicone-hydrogel soft contact lenses in the treatment of corneal persistent epithelial defects: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Kuei; Lin, Yen-Chun; Tsai, Shih-Hao; Chen, Wei-Li; Chen, Yan-Ming

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the combination of topical 20% autologous serum eye drops (ASEs) and silicone-hydrogel soft contact lenses (SCLs) for the treatment of corneal persistent epithelial defects (PEDs), and to compare the recurrence of epithelial breakdown with or without continuous use of ASEs after silicone-hydrogel SCLs removal. We conducted a prospective interventional study of 21 eyes of 21 patients with PEDs treated with combined ASEs and silicone-hydrogel SCLs from September 2014 to August 2015. SCLs were removed after total re-epithelialization and patients were subsequently randomized divided into two groups: (1) with and (2) without continuous use of ASEs for an additional 2 weeks. PEDs healing rate and epithelial defect recurrence were evaluated. PEDs healed in all eyes within 3 weeks. Recurrence was noted in five eyes (50%) in patients without continued use of ASEs for 2weeks after total re-epithelialization and SCLs removal during a 3-month follow-up (odds ratio: 23.0; PContact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A New UPLC Method with Chemometric Design-Optimization Approach for the Simultaneous Quantitation of Brimonidine Tartrate and Timolol Maleate in an Eye Drop Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büker, Eda; Dinç, Erdal

    2017-02-01

    A new ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with photodiode array was proposed for the quantitation of Brimonidine Tartrate (BRI) and Timolol Maleate (TIM) in eye drop using experimental design and optimization methodology. A 33 full factorial design was applied to uncover the effects of the selected factors and their interactions on the chromatographic response function for the optimization of experimental conditions in the development of a new UPLC method. As a result, the optimal chromatographic conditions giving a better separation and short analysis time were found to be 49.2°C for column temperature; 0.38 mL/min for flow rate and 56.7 % (v/v) for 0.1 M CH3COOH used in mobile phase. The elution of BRI and TIM was reported as 0.508 and 0.652 min within a short runtime of 1.5 min, respectively. Calibration graphs for BRI and TIM were obtained by the regression of the concentration on the peak area, which was detected at 246 and 298 nm, respectively. The method validation was performed by the analysis of the synthetic mixtures, intra-day and inter-day samples and standard addition samples. This study shows that the optimized and validated UPLC method is very promising and available for the quantification of BRI and TIM in an eye drop formulation. © Crown copyright 2016.

  16. Aspirin and Omeprazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of aspirin and omeprazole is used to reduce the risk of stroke or heart attack in patients who have had or ... risk of developing a stomach ulcer when taking aspirin. Aspirin is in a class of medications called ...

  17. The effects of lubricant eye drops on visual function as measured by the Inter-blink interval Visual Acuity Decay test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Torkildsen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Gail TorkildsenAndover Eye Associates, Andover, MA, USAObjective: The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effects of two marketed ocular lubricants on the visual decay in dry eye patients using the Inter-blink interval Visual Acuity Decay (IVAD test.Methods: This controlled, randomized, double-masked crossover study compared the effects of a polyethylene glycol/propylene glycol-based (PEG/PG tear and a carboxymethylcellulose sodium (CMC/glycerin tear on the visual acuity decay between blinks of dry eye patients. At visit 1 (Day 0, baseline IVAD measurements were recorded prior to instillation of a single drop of randomized study medication. IVAD testing was repeated at 15-, 45-, and 90-minutes post-instillation. Reading rate and functional blink rate were also evaluated. At the second visit (Day 7 ± 3, study procedures were repeated using crossover treatment.Results: Forty-eight (48 subjects with dry eye (61.1 ± 14.8 years old, 79.2% female, 95.8% white completed the study. Treatment with the PEG/PG-based tear demonstrated statistically significantly longer time to one-line loss of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA as determined by the IVAD test at 90 minutes post-instillation compared to the CMC/glycerin tear (P = 0.0365. Measurements of median time at BCVA, reading rate, and functional blink rate were similar for both treatments. Both formulations were well tolerated in the population studied.Conclusions: Treatment with the PEG/PG-based tear demonstrated statistically significant improved maintenance of visual acuity between blinks at 90 minutes post-instillation compared to the CMC/glycerin tear. This is the first study to demonstrate the ability of an artificial tear to extend visual acuity maintenance between blinks, as measured by the IVAD test.Keywords: dry eye, visual function, artificial tears, ocular lubricant

  18. The Effect of Autologous Serum Eye Drop Application on Epithelization in the Treatment of Various Ocular Surface Disorders and its Safety

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    Fatma Selin Kaya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To evaluate the effect of autologous serum application on epithelization in the treatment of ocular surface disorders in hard cases and its safety. Ma te ri al and Met hod: Patients with serious ocular surface disorders, unresponsive to conventional treatment were recruited. Clinical features of retrospective cohort of patients who were prescribed serum drops are presented. From July 2007 to January 2010, 31 eyes of 21 patients, who were given autologous serum eye drops, were included into the study. Clinical examination included epithelial changes, rose bengal/lissamine green staining, fluorescein staining, and tear film break-up time. A history of systemic disease was recorded together with systemic medications used. A complete ocular history was also obtained. Re sults: Autologous serum was used in 7 patients with delayed epithelization after penetrating keratoplasty, in 4 patients with epithelial disturbances secondary to keratitis, in 2 patients with alkali burns, in 3 patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome, in 1 patient with ligneous conjunctivitis, in 1 patient with epidermolysis bullosa, in 1 patient with corneal burn with hot water, and in 2 patients with Sjogren syndrome. The female:male ratio was 13:8. The mean age was 36.23±24.80 standard deviation (range: 7 months-87 years. No significant sight-threatening complication has been observed with the use of serum drops. Dis cus si on: Autologous serum application is safe and efficient additional therapy in the treatment of serious ocular surface problems in difficult cases. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 336-41

  19. Bioactivation antioxidant and transglycating properties of N-acetylcarnosine autoinduction prodrug of a dipeptide L-carnosine in mucoadhesive drug delivery eye-drop formulation: powerful eye health application technique and therapeutic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2012-06-01

    A considerable interest in N-acetylcarnosine ocular drug design for eye health is based on clinical strategies to improve ocular drug delivery through metabolic enzymatic activation. Human biology aspects of ocular N-acetylcarnosine deacetylation during its pass through the cornea to the aqueous humor and dipeptide hydrolyzing enzymes are characterized. Novel approaches to ocular drug delivery increasing intraocular bioavailability of N-acetylcarnosine biologically activated metabolite carnosine become an integral development ensuring prolonged retention of the medication in the mucoadhesive precorneal area and facilitating transcorneal penetration of the natural dipeptide with the corneal promoters. A comprehensive list of techniques for peptide drug design, synthesis, purification, and biological analyses was considered: liquid chromatography (LC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), (1) H and (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectroscopy, and spectrophotometry. The antioxidant activity of therapeutics-targeted molecules was studied in aqueous solution and in a lipid membrane environment. A deglycation therapeutic system was developed involving removal, by transglycation of sugar or aldehyde moieties from Schiff bases by histidyl-hydrazide compounds or aldehyde scavenger L-carnosine. Clinical studies included ophthalmoscopy, visual acuity (VA), halometer disability glare tests, slit-image, and retro-illumination photography. N-acetylcarnosine 1% lubricant eye drops are considered as an auto-induction prodrug and natural ocular redox state balance therapies with implications in prevention and treatment of serious eye diseases that involve pathways of continuous oxidative damage to ocular tissues(cataracts, primary open-angle glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration) and sight-threatening glycosylation processes (diabetic retinopathy and consequent visual impairment) important for public health. The results of

  20. INFLUENCE OF NON-STEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EYE DROPS ON THE EPITHELIUM CELLS OF THE CORNEA AND CONJUNCTIVA IN VITRO

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    O. I. Aleksandrova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the effect of NSAIDs eye drops with different preservatives on the viability of epithelial cells of human eyes in vitro. Materials and methods. The object of the study was four of the drug Broxinac®, Acular LS®, Diclo-F ®, Indocollyre®. As test-systems were used permanent cell lines of transformed conjunctival (Chang Conjunctiva, Clone 1-5c-4 and corneal (HCEC. The cytotoxicity of NSAID drops were assessed by the morphology and functional cells activity by the methods of phase contrast microscopy (PCM, MTT test and cell analysis in real time using the xCELLigence system. Results. It was found with MTT-test that cell lines HCEC are more sensitive to the cytotoxic action of the studied drugs than cell lines of Chang Conjunctiva, Clone 1-5C-4. The metabolic activity of conjunctiva cells in the presence of drugs, Acular LS® and Broxinac® was three times lower than in control; in the presence of drugs Indocollyre® and Diclo-F® — 20 times lower vs. the control. The metabolic activity of the cornea cells e in the presence of drugs, Acular LS® and Broxinac® was four times lower than in control; in the presence of drugs Indocollyre® and Diclo-F® viable cells were not identified. Drugs Indocollyre® and Diclo-F® has had a very high toxic effect on both cell types. The results of cell analysis xCELLIgence for both types of cells are consistent with the results of MTT test and in vivo observation of cells. Conclusion. Based on these data, there is the following gradation of NSAID eye drop’s cytotoxic potential: (reduce toxicity: Indocollyre® = Diclo-F® > Acular LS® = Broxinac®.

  1. Aspirin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled Mansour; Ali T. Taher; Khaled M. Musallam; Samir Alam

    2009-01-01

    The development of adverse cardiovascular events despite aspirin use has established an interest in a possible resistance to the drug. Several definitions have been set and various laboratory testing modalities are available. This has led to a wide range of prevalence reports in different clinical entities. The etiologic mechanism has been related to clinical, genetic, and other miscellaneous factors. The clinical implications of this phenomenon are significant and warrant concern. Management...

  2. Drug delivery to the ocular posterior segment using lipid emulsion via eye drop administration: effect of emulsion formulations and surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Lin; Tahara, Kohei; Takeuchi, Hirofumi

    2013-09-10

    This work explored submicron-sized lipid emulsion as potential carriers for intraocular drug delivery to the posterior segment via eye drops. The effects of physicochemical properties of lipid emulsion on drug delivery were evaluated in vivo using mice. Different formulations of submicron-sized lipid emulsions were prepared using a high pressure homogenization system. Using coumairn-6 as a model drug and fluorescent marker, fluorescence could be observed in the retina after administration of the lipid emulsion. The fluorescence intensity observed after administration of medium chain triglycerides containing the same amount of coumarin-6 was much lower than that observed after administration of lipid emulsions. The inner oil property and phospholipid emulsifier did not affect the drug delivery efficiency to the retina. However, compared with unmodified emulsions, the fluorescence intensity in the retina increased by surface modification using a positive charge inducer and the functional polymers chitosan (CS) and poloxamer 407 (P407). CS-modified lipid emulsions could be electrostatically interacted with the eye surface. By its adhesive property, poloxamer 407, a surface modifier, possibly increased the lipid emulsion retention time on the eye surface. In conclusion, we suggested that surface-modified lipid emulsions could be promising vehicles of hydrophobic drug delivery to the ocular posterior segment. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Effect of aspirin in "aspirin sensitive" patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Asad, S I; Kemeny, D M; Youlten, L J; Frankland, A W; Lessof, M H

    1984-01-01

    Eighteen patients with a history of urticaria or asthma, or both, induced by aspirin were studied before and after provocation of symptoms with aspirin. The plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha concentration, which was characteristically raised before challenge, fell significantly at the time of adverse reactions. Repeated administration of aspirin up to a dose of 650 mg daily induced tolerance in most of the patients, and several developed bronchodilator responses to aspirin. Although median total ...

  4. Patients undergoing long-term treatment with antihypertensive eye drops responded positively with respect to their ocular surface disorder to oral supplementation with antioxidants and essential fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbis-Estrada C

    2013-06-01

    as dryness, burning, photophobia, eye heaviness, and blurred vision, as well as positive changes in eyelashes, hair, nails and skin, were significantly improved in DEDG +S and POAGG +S patients relative to unsupplemented patients.Conclusion: Inflammation biomarkers were differentially expressed in glaucomatous tears, but the differences changed upon antioxidant/essential polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation. Chronic instillation of antihypertensive eye drops must be considered for integrating protocols to glaucoma standards of care.Keywords: glaucoma, dry eye disorders, tears, cytokines, antioxidants, essential fatty acids

  5. Can an Aspirin a Day Keep a Pregnancy Complication Away?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Can an Aspirin a Day Keep a Pregnancy Complication Away? Odds of preeclampsia dropped 62 percent for ... suggests. "Preeclampsia is one of the most serious complications of pregnancy, with a high risk of death for the ...

  6. Aspirin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Mansour

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of adverse cardiovascular events despite aspirin use has established an interest in a possible resistance to the drug. Several definitions have been set and various laboratory testing modalities are available. This has led to a wide range of prevalence reports in different clinical entities. The etiologic mechanism has been related to clinical, genetic, and other miscellaneous factors. The clinical implications of this phenomenon are significant and warrant concern. Management strategies are currently limited to dosing alteration and introduction of other anitplatelet agents. However, these measures have not met the expected efficacy or safety.

  7. Phenylephrine 5% added to tropicamide 0.5% eye drops does not influence retinal oxygen saturation values or retinal vessel diameter in glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewalle, Evelien; Abegão Pinto, Luis; Olafsdottir, Olof Birna; Stalmans, Ingeborg

    2013-12-01

    To test whether adding topical phenylephrine 5% to tropicamide 0.5% eye drops in the protocol for pupil dilation affects the retinal vessel oximeter measurements in patients with glaucoma. To test whether phenylephrine 5% has an influence as a vasoconstrictor on the retinal vessel width and can improve the proportion of high-quality retinal images in patients with glaucoma. Retinal images of 66 patients with chronic open-angle glaucoma were obtained before and after the administration of phenylephrine 5% eye drops to patients already dilated with tropicamide 0.5% with the Oxymap Retinal Oximeter (Oxymap ehf, Reykjavik, Iceland). Specialized software, Oxymap Analyzer, analysed the images and measured the oxygen saturation and vessel diameter. Oxygen saturation was measured in first- and second-degree vessels. A Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare both groups. Quality of the images was assessed, and a Fisher's exact test was used to compare the proportion of high- and poor-quality images. There was no significant difference in arterial and venous oxygen saturation in patients with glaucoma whether dilated by tropicamide alone or a combination of tropicamide and phenylephrine (97 ± 6% versus 96 ± 5%, p = 0.88 for arterial saturation and 66 ± 6% versus 67 ± 6%, p = 0.78 for venous saturation, n = 27). There was no significant difference in vessel diameter between both conditions for the different vessels (p = 0.61 for arterial saturation and p = 0.51 for venous saturation, n = 27). The proportion of high-quality images was significantly higher after the combination regimen compared with tropicamide only (p = 0.0001). The addition of topical phenylephrine 5% after tropicamide 0.5% improved the proportion of high-quality retinal oximetry images without influencing the retinal oxygen saturation values or the retinal vessel diameter in patients with glaucoma. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  8. Comparison of 1% cyclosporine eye drops in olive oil and in linseed oil to treat experimentally-induced keratoconjunctivitis sicca in rabbits

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    Leticia Rodrigues Parrilha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:To evaluate the effectiveness of topical 1% cyclosporine eye drops diluted in either of the two vehicles-olive and linseed oil-and that of the oils themselves in treating experimentally-induced keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS in rabbits.Methods:KCS was induced in 25 New Zealand rabbits using 1% atropine sulfate eye drops for 7 days before treatment and throughout the treatment period (12 weeks. The rabbits were divided into five groups: one control (C group without KCS induction and four treatment groups in which KCS was induced and treated topically with olive oil (O, linseed oil (L, cyclosporine in olive oil (CO, and cyclosporine in linseed oil (CL. The animals were evaluated using Schirmer tear test 1 (STT, the fluorescein test (FT, tear-film break-up time (TBUT, the rose bengal test (RBT, and histopathological analysis.Results:Values of STT and TBUT significantly decreased 1 week post-induction (p<0.05 and were similar to initial values after the 4th week of treatment, in all groups. After KCS induction, there was significantly less corneal damage in group L than in group CL, as assessed FT and RBT. Histopathology demonstrated that Groups L and CL presented less edema and corneal congestion. There was no significant difference in the goblet cell density (cells/mm2 between the groups (p=0.147.Conclusion:Cyclosporine diluted in olive oil or linseed oil was effective in the treatment of KCS, although it had better efficacy when diluted in linseed oil. Linseed oil presented better effectiveness, whether associated or not, than olive oil. These results may contribute to the creation of novel topical ophthalmic formulations for KCS treatment in future.

  9. Why patients with Alzheimer's disease may show increased sensitivity to tropicamide eye drops: role of locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, R H; Samuels, E R; Raisi, M; Langley, R W; Szabadi, E; Bradshaw, C M

    2006-01-01

    Patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) may show increased sensitivity to tropicamide, a muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonist. AD is associated with a severe loss of noradrenergic neurones in the locus coeruleus (LC), which can be "switched off" experimentally by the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine. The possibility arises that increased pupillary sensitivity to tropicamide in AD may be due to diminished LC activity. To examine the hypothesis that clonidine may potentiate tropicamide-evoked mydriasis. Sixteen healthy male volunteers participated in two experimental sessions (0.2 mg clonidine or placebo) conducted 1 week apart. In each session tropicamide (0.01% 10 microl x 2) was applied to the left eye and artificial tear (10 microl x 2) was applied to the right eye. Pupillary functions (resting pupil diameter and light and darkness reflexes), alertness and non-pupillary autonomic functions (blood pressure, heart rate, core temperature and salivary output) were measured. Data were analysed by ANOVA, with multiple comparisons. Tropicamide increased resting pupil diameter, velocity and amplitude of the darkness reflex response, and decreased recovery time of the light reflex response. Clonidine affected all these pupillary measures in the opposite direction with the exception of the recovery time. The mydriatic response to tropicamide was potentiated by pre-treatment with clonidine. Clonidine reduced critical flicker fusion frequency, subjective alertness, blood pressure, salivation and temperature. The potentiation of tropicamide-evoked pupil dilatation by clonidine may be due to the abolition of the increase in parasympathetically mediated pupil constriction due to reduced LC activity.

  10. Paroxetine markedly increases plasma concentrations of ophthalmic timolol; CYP2D6 inhibitors may increase the risk of cardiovascular adverse effects of 0.5% timolol eye drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäenpää, Jukka; Volotinen-Maja, Marjo; Kautiainen, Hannu; Neuvonen, Mikko; Niemi, Mikko; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Backman, Janne T

    2014-12-01

    Although ophthalmic timolol is generally well tolerated, a significant fraction of topically administered timolol can be systemically absorbed. We investigated the effect of the strong CYP2D6 inhibitor paroxetine on the pharmacokinetics of timolol after ophthalmic administration. In a four-phase crossover study, 12 healthy volunteers ingested either paroxetine (20 mg) or placebo daily for 3 days. In phases 1-2, timolol 0.1% gel, and in phases 3-4, timolol 0.5% drops were administered to both eyes. Paroxetine increased the plasma concentrations of timolol with both timolol formulations to a similar degree. The geometric mean ratio (95% confidence interval) of timolol peak concentration was 1.53-fold (1.23-1.91) with 0.1% timolol and 1.49-fold (0.94-2.36) with 0.5% timolol, and that of timolol area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from time 0 to 12 hours was 1.61-fold (1.26- to 2.06-fold) and 1.78-fold (1.21-2.62), respectively. During paroxetine administration, six subjects on 0.5% timolol drops, but none on 0.1% timolol gel, had plasma timolol concentrations exceeding 0.7 ng/ml, which can cause systemic adverse effects in patients at risk. There was a positive correlation between the AUC from time 0 to 13 hours of paroxetine and the placebo phase AUC from time 0 to infinity of timolol after timolol 0.5% drops (P paroxetine phase than during the placebo phase at 1 and 3 hours after 0.5% timolol dosing. In conclusion, paroxetine and other CYP2D6 inhibitors can have a clinically important interaction with ophthalmic timolol, particularly when patients are using 0.5% timolol formulations. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Tacrolimus Versus Interferon Alpha-2b Eye Drops in the Treatment of Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis: A Randomized, Double-Masked Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanjani, Habibollah; Aminifard, Mohammad Naim; Ghafourian, Abdolhossein; Pourazizi, Mohsen; Maleki, Alireza; Arish, Mohammed; Shahrakipoor, Mahnaz; Rohani, Mohammad Reza; Abrishami, Mojtaba; Khafri Zare, Ehsan; Barzegar Jalali, Farhad

    2017-06-01

    Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a bilateral, chronic, external ocular inflammatory disorder that mainly affects patients in their first or second decade. This study was designed to compare tacrolimus and interferon alpha-2b (IFN alpha-2b) eye drops in the treatment of VKC. In this randomized, double-masked clinical trial, 40 consecutive patients with VKC were sent to a referral eye hospital in a tropical region southeast of Iran. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either 0.005% tacrolimus or IFN alpha-2b (1,000,000 units/cc). Chi-square and t tests were used for comparison of outcomes between both groups. Mean ± SD age was 11.1 ± 5.2 years. Thirty-one patients (77.5%) were male. The mean duration of disease was 3.4 ± 2.9 years. In this study, the signs and symptoms were significantly reduced in patients after treatment in both groups (P = 0.0001). In the tacrolimus group, all patients responded to treatment whereas only one subject in the IFN group failed to respond (P = 0.99). Side effects in both groups were mild and tolerable. This study indicated that both 0.005% tacrolimus and IFN alpha-2b are effective and appear to be safe in treatment of recalcitrant VKC.

  12. Efficacy and safety of preoperative IOP reduction using a preservative-free fixed combination of dorzolamide/timolol eye drops versus oral acetazolamide and dexamethasone eye drops and assessment of the clinical outcome of trabeculectomy in glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Lorenz

    Full Text Available To demonstrate that preoperative treatment for 28 days with topical dorzolamide/timolol is non-inferior (Δ = 4 mm Hg to oral acetazolamide and topical dexamethasone (standard therapy in terms of intraocular pressure (IOP reduction 3 and 6 months after trabeculectomy in glaucoma patients.Sixty-two eyes undergoing trabeculectomy with mitomycin C were included in this monocentric prospective randomized controlled study. IOP change between baseline and 3 months post-op was defined as the primary efficacy variable. Secondary efficacy variables included the number of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU injections, needlings, suture lyses, preoperative IOP change, hypertension rate and change of conjunctival redness 3 and 6 months post-op. Safety was assessed based on the documentation of adverse events.Preoperative treatment with topical dorzolamide/timolol was non-inferior to oral acetazolamide and topical dexamethasone in terms of IOP reduction 3 months after trabeculectomy (adjusted means -8.12 mmHg versus -8.30 mmHg; Difference: 0.18; 95% CI -1.91 to 2.26, p = 0.8662. Similar results were found 6 months after trabeculectomy (-9.13 mmHg versus -9.06 mmHg; p = 0.9401. Comparable results were also shown for both groups concerning the classification of the filtering bleb, corneal staining, and numbers of treatments with 5-FU, needlings and suture lyses. More patients reported AEs in the acetazolamide/dexamethasone group than in the dorzolamide/timolol group.Preoperative, preservative-free, fixed-dose dorzolamide/timolol seems to be equally effective as preoperative acetazolamide and dexamethasone and has a favourable safety profile.

  13. Effect of In Vitro Transcorneal Approach of Aceclofenac Eye Drops through Excised Goat, Sheep, and Buffalo Corneas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Dave

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study involves the evaluation of factors that influence the transcorneal permeation of aqueous drops of aceclofenac ophthalmic formulation through freshly excised goat, sheep, and buffalo corneas. Aceclofenac formulation with different concentrations 0.1–0.5% (w/v and with different pH and different preservatives, was taken into account. The amount of drug permeated from different formulations was estimated using an Franz diffusion cell. A linear increase in drug permeation was observed with increase in pH (5.5 to 7.4. The apparent permeability coefficient was found to be maximum 15.01±0.45 on goat cornea and maximum transport of aceclofenac was observed at physiological pH of tears (i.e., 7. The results advocate that aceclofenac 0.5% (w/v ophthalmic solution (pH 7.0 containing BAK (0.01% provides maximum in vitro ocular permeability through goat, sheep, and buffalo corneas.

  14. Super-Cationic Carbon Quantum Dots Synthesized from Spermidine as an Eye Drop Formulation for Topical Treatment of Bacterial Keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hong-Jyuan; Wu, Ren-Siang; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Li, Yu-Jia; Lin, Han-Jia; Harroun, Scott G; Lai, Jui-Yang; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2017-07-25

    We have developed a one-step method to synthesize carbon quantum dots (CQDPAs) from biogenic polyamines (PAs) as an antibacterial agent for topical treatment of bacterial keratitis (BK). CQDs synthesized by direct pyrolysis of spermidine (Spd) powder through a simple dry heating treatment exhibit a solubility and yield much higher than those from putrescine and spermine. We demonstrate that CQDs obtained from Spds (CQDSpds) possess effective antibacterial activities against non-multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis bacteria and also against the multidrug-resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of CQDSpds is ∼2500-fold lower than that of spermidine alone, demonstrating their strong antibacterial capabilities. Investigation of the possible mechanisms behind the antibacterial activities of the as-synthesized CQDSpds indicates that the super-cationic CQDSpds with small size (diameter ca. 6 nm) and highly positive charge (ζ-potential ca. +45 mV) cause severe disruption of the bacterial membrane. In vitro cytotoxicity, hemolysis, hemagglutination, genotoxicity, and oxidative stress and in vivo morphologic and physiologic cornea change evaluations show the good biocompatibility of CQDSpds. Furthermore, topical ocular administration of CQDSpds can induce the opening of the tight junction of corneal epithelial cells, thereby leading to great antibacterial treatment of S. aureus-induced BK in rabbits. Our results suggest that CQDSpds are a promising antibacterial candidate for clinical applications in treating eye-related bacterial infections and even persistent bacteria-induced infections.

  15. Coenzyme Q10 instilled as eye drops on the cornea reaches the retina and protects retinal layers from apoptosis in a mouse model of kainate-induced retinal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulli, Matteo; Witort, Ewa; Papucci, Laura; Torre, Eugenio; Schipani, Christian; Bergamini, Christian; Dal Monte, Massimo; Capaccioli, Sergio

    2012-12-17

    To evaluate if coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) can protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from apoptosis and, when instilled as eye drops on the cornea, if it can reach the retina and exert its antiapoptotic activity in this area in a mouse model of kainate (KA)-induced retinal damage. Rat primary or cultured RGCs were subjected to glutamate (50 μM) or chemical hypoxia (Antimycin A, 200 μM) or serum withdrawal (FBS, 0.5%) in the presence or absence of CoQ10 (10 μM). Cell viability was evaluated by light microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses. Apoptosis was evaluated by caspase 3/7 activity and mitochondrion depolarization tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester analysis. CoQ10 transfer to the retina following its instillation as eye drops on the cornea was quantified by HPLC. Retinal protection by CoQ10 (10 μM) eye drops instilled on the cornea was then evaluated in a mouse model of KA-induced excitotoxic retinal cell apoptosis by cleaved caspase 3 immunohistofluorescence, caspase 3/7 activity assays, and quantification of inhibition of RGC loss. CoQ10 significantly increased viable cells by preventing RGC apoptosis. Furthermore, when topically applied as eye drops to the cornea, it reached the retina, thus substantially increasing local CoQ10 concentration and protecting retinal layers from apoptosis. The ability of CoQ10 eye drops to protect retinal cells from apoptosis in the mouse model of KA-induced retinal damage suggests that topical CoQ10 may be evaluated in designing therapies for treating apoptosis-driven retinopathies.

  16. Comparison of the effectiveness of mydriasis by two instillation methods of combined 0.75% tropicamide and 2.5% phenylephrine eye drop in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phamonvaechavan, Pittaya; Chutasmit, Kanya; Damrongrak, Parichat; Koukiatkul, Supanna; Wongkiatkajorn, Tassanee; Ngerncham, Sopapan

    2012-04-01

    To compare the effectiveness and safety of two instillation methods of combined 0.75% tropicamide and 2.5% phenylephrine at 0, 5 minutes (min) with the same combined regimen at 0,30 minutes in preterm infants. A prospective, cross-over, randomized controlled trial was performed to compare 0, 5-min instillation (Method A) of combined 0.75% tropicamide and 2.5% phenylephrine with 0, 30-min instillation (Method B) of the same regimen. Forty-two preterm infants scheduled for screening retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) were randomly assigned to two groups. Group 1 was defined as preterms applied by Method A at first examination then by Method B 1-4 weeks apart whereas vice versa in Group 2. Pupil size, heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) were recorded before and after eye-drop instillation. Mean time to 7-mm pupil size was no statistically significant difference between the two methods (Method A 46.47 min, Method B 46.58 min; p = 0.894). Method B has mean longer time to maintain 7-mm pupil size than Method A (Method A 67.67 min, Method B 75.33 min); but not statistically significant different (p = 0.323). HR, SBP and DBP were not significant change between the two methods. Both instillation methods produced consistently sufficient mydriasis and safety for evaluation peripheral fundus. Method B has slight longer mydriatic effect than Method A; thus giving more time to evaluate infant's eye for ophthalmologists.

  17. Aspirin, Butalbital, and Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of aspirin, butalbital, and caffeine comes as a capsule and tablet to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 4 ... explain any part you do not understand. Take aspirin, butalbital, and caffeine exactly as directed. Do not ...

  18. N-Acetylcarnosine sustained drug delivery eye drops to control the signs of ageless vision: Glare sensitivity, cataract amelioration and quality of vision currently available treatment for the challenging 50,000-patient population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Babizhayev

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mark A Babizhayev1, Leslie Burke2, Philip Micans3, Stuart P Richer4,51Innovative Vision Products, Inc., County of New Castle, Delaware, USA; 2Wise Choice Products LLC, London, England, United Kingdom; 3IAS Group, Sark, United Kingdom; 4Eye Clinic DVA Medical Center, North Chicago, Illinois, USA; 5Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, Illinois, USABackground: Innovative Vision Products, Inc. (IVP’s scientists developed the lubricant eye drops (Can-C™ designed as 1% N-acetylcarnosine (NAC prodrug of L-carnosine containing a mucoadhesive cellulose-based compound combined with corneal absorption promoters in a sustained drug delivery system. Only the natural L-isomeric form of NAC raw material was specifically synthesized at the cGMP facility and employed for the manufacturing of Can-C™ eye drops.Objective and study design: In the present clinical study the authors assessed vision before and after 9 month term of topical ocular administration of NAC lubricant eye drops or placebo in 75 symptomatic patients with age-related uncomplicated cataracts in one or both eyes, with acuity in one eye of 20/40 or worse (best-corrected distance, and no previous cataract surgery in either eye and no other ocular abnormality and 72 noncataract subjects ranged in age from 54 to 78 years.Setting: Subjects in these subsample groups have reported complaints of glare and wanted to administer eye drops to get quick eye relief and quality of vision for their daily activities including driving and computer works. Following 9 months of treatment with NAC lubricant eye drops, most patients’ glare scores were improved or returned to normal in disability glare tests with Halometer DG. Improvement in disability glare was accompanied with independent improvement in acuity. Furthermore, patients with the poorest pretreatment vision were as likely to regain certain better visual function after 9

  19. Aspirin in Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Yolanda Aburto-Murrieta; Dulce Bonifacio-Delgadillo; Juan Marquez

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin is widely used for the prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with transient ischaemic attack (TIA) of arterial origin, because it is effective and inexpensive. Clopidogrel and the combination of aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole are more effective than aspirin, but are also much more expensive. No other antithrombotic regimens provide significant advantages over aspirin, although cilostazol and the novel platelet protease-activated receptor-1 antagonist, SCH 530348, are c...

  20. Absorption of uv-radiation by Chibro {sup trademark} -Uvelin eye drops; Absorption von Chibro {sup trademark} -Uvelin Augentropfen fuer UV-Schutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreder, J.G.; Blumthaler, M. [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik; Daxer, A. [Krankenhaus der Landeshauptstadt St. Poelten (Austria). Abt. fuer Augenheilkunde; Ettl, A. [Krankenhaus der Landeshauptstadt St. Poelten (Austria). Abt. fuer Orthoptik

    1998-12-31

    The preparation Chibro {sup trademark} -Uvelin is recommended against both solar and artificial uv-radiation. At wavelengths greater than 290 nm and at an effective layer thickness of 10 {mu}m measurements with a high resolution doublemonochromator showed a transmission larger than 90%. The solar spectrum is characterised by almost no irradiance on the earth`s surface for wavelengths smaller than 290 nm due to absorption in the atmospheric ozon layer. Therefore, no significant protective effect of the eye-drops against keratitis and cataract under solar exposure can be expected. A significantly better sagging of the radiation of artificial UV-sources with a high amount of UV-C is reached. The recommended application as chemical protective goggles in this spectral range is not permissible. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das apothekenpflichtige Praeparat Chibro {sup trademark} -Uvelin wird zum Schutz gegen solare und kuenstliche ultraviolette Strahlung empfohlen. Eigene Messungen mit einem Doppelmonochromator ergaben fuer Wellenlaengen groesser 290 nm sowie fuer realistische Fluessigkeitsfilme von 10 {mu}m Dicke eine Transparenz von groesser 90%. Das Sonnenspektrum weist aufgrund der Ozonabsorption in der Atmosphaere auf der Erdoberflaeche keine relevante Strahlung mit Wellenlaengen kleiner 290 nm auf. Fuer solare Strahlung ist daher kein Schutz gegen Keratitis und Katarakt gegeben. Die Strahlung kuenstlicher Lichtquellen mit einem hohen UV-C Anteil wird deutlich abgeschwaecht. Die empfohlene Verwendung als `chemische Schutzbrille` ist auch in diesen Spektralbereich nicht zulaessig. (orig.)

  1. Experiments with Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Londa L.; Barry, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Presents a series of experiments that can be used to demonstrate how aspirin can be synthesized and characterized, how the hydrolysis of aspirin can be used as an introduction to kinetics, and how coordination chemistry (chelation) can be introduced by preparing and characterizing the copper complexes of aspirin and salicylic acid. (Contains over…

  2. Stability indicating HPLC-DAD method for analysis of Ketorolac binary and ternary mixtures in eye drops: Quantitative analysis in rabbit aqueous humor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yazbi, Fawzy A; Hassan, Ekram M; Khamis, Essam F; Ragab, Marwa A A; Hamdy, Mohamed M A

    2017-11-15

    Ketorolac tromethamine (KTC) with phenylephrine hydrochloride (PHE) binary mixture (mixture 1) and their ternary mixture with chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) (mixture 2) were analyzed using a validated HPLC-DAD method. The developed method was suitable for the in vitro as well as quantitative analysis of the targeted mixtures in rabbit aqueous humor. The analysis in dosage form (eye drops) was a stability indicating one at which drugs were separated from possible degradation products arising from different stress conditions (in vitro analysis). For analysis in aqueous humor, Guaifenesin (GUF) was used as internal standard and the method was validated according to FDA regulation for analysis in biological fluids. Agilent 5 HC-C18(2) 150×4.6mm was used as stationary phase with a gradient eluting solvent of 20mM phosphate buffer pH 4.6 containing 0.2% triethylamine and acetonitrile. The drugs were resolved with retention times of 2.41, 5.26, 7.92 and 9.64min for PHE, GUF, KTC and CPM, respectively. The method was sensitive and selective to analyze simultaneously the three drugs in presence of possible forced degradation products and dosage form excipients (in vitro analysis) and also with the internal standard, in presence of aqueous humor interferences (analysis in biological fluid), at a single wavelength (261nm). No extraction procedure was required for analysis in aqueous humor. The simplicity of the method emphasizes its capability to analyze the drugs in vivo (in rabbit aqueous humor) and in vitro (in pharmaceutical formulations). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. N-Acetylcarnosine sustained drug delivery eye drops to control the signs of ageless vision: glare sensitivity, cataract amelioration and quality of vision currently available treatment for the challenging 50,000-patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Burke, Leslie; Micans, Philip; Richer, Stuart P

    2009-01-01

    Innovative Vision Products, Inc. (IVP)'s scientists developed the lubricant eye drops (Can-C) designed as 1% N-acetylcarnosine (NAC) prodrug of L-carnosine containing a mucoadhesive cellulose-based compound combined with corneal absorption promoters in a sustained drug delivery system. Only the natural L-isomeric form of NAC raw material was specifically synthesized at the cGMP facility and employed for the manufacturing of Can-C eye drops. In the present clinical study the authors assessed vision before and after 9 month term of topical ocular administration of NAC lubricant eye drops or placebo in 75 symptomatic patients with age-related uncomplicated cataracts in one or both eyes, with acuity in one eye of 20/40 or worse (best-corrected distance), and no previous cataract surgery in either eye and no other ocular abnormality and 72 noncataract subjects ranged in age from 54 to 78 years. Subjects in these subsample groups have reported complaints of glare and wanted to administer eye drops to get quick eye relief and quality of vision for their daily activities including driving and computer works. Following 9 months of treatment with NAC lubricant eye drops, most patients' glare scores were improved or returned to normal in disability glare tests with Halometer DG. Improvement in disability glare was accompanied with independent improvement in acuity. Furthermore, patients with the poorest pretreatment vision were as likely to regain certain better visual function after 9 months of treatment with N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops as those with the worth pretreatment vision. The authors made a reference to electronic records of the product sales to patients who have been made the repurchase of the Can-C eye drops since December 2001. Based on this analysis of recorded adjustments to inventory, various parameters were analyzed during the continued repurchase behavior program, including testimonials from buyers. With these figures, researchers judged on the

  4. Paradoxical Effect of Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Doutremepuich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-dose aspirin is an important therapeutic option in the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI and ischemic stroke, basedon its unique cost-effectiveness and widespread availability. In addition, based on the results of a number of large studies, aspirin is also widely used in the primary prevention of MI. This paper provides an update of the available data to offer greater clarity regarding the risks of aspirin with respect to hemorrhagic stroke. In the secondary prevention of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and ischemic events, the evidence supports that the benefits of aspirin treatment significantly outweigh the risk of a major hemorrhage. When considering whether aspirin is appropriate, the absolute therapeutic cardiovascular benefits of aspirin must be balanced with the possible risks associated with its use, being hemorrhagic stroke. Regarding these clinical facts, normal, COX 1 −/−, and COX 2 −/− mice were treated with a wide range of doses of aspirin and studied by induced hemorrhagic time. The results outlined three major conclusions: high doses of aspirin induce hemorrhage, while low doses of aspirin do not. In the absence of COX 1, ultra low doses of aspirin produce an antihemorrhagic effect not observed with intermediate doses. The absence of COX 2 induced a hemorrhagic effect that needs further research, probably originated in compensatory phenomena.

  5. Aspirin-Exacerbated Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese, Mathew; Lockey, Richard F

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on aspirin-exacerbated asthma (AEA). The review includes historical perspective of aspirin, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of AEA. The pathogenesis of AEA involves the cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. Aspirin affects both of these pathways by inhibiting the enzyme cycooxygenase-1 (COX-1). Inhibition of COX-1 leads to a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The decrease in PGE2 results in an increase in cysteinyl leukotrienes by the lipoo...

  6. Aspirin for Primary Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Ilana B; Owens, Douglas K

    2017-07-01

    Aspirin reduces the risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke, and the risk of colorectal cancer. Aspirin increases the risk of gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding. The best available evidence supports initiating aspirin in select populations. In 2016, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended initiating aspirin for the primary prevention of both cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer among adults ages 50 to 59 who are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Adults 60 to 69 who are at increased cardiovascular disease risk may also benefit. There remains considerable uncertainty about whether younger and older patients may benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Aspirin and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancher, Adrien; Michel, Pierre; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Sefrioui, David

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a worldwide public health problem. Aspirin has been identified as a protective factor against the apparition of colorectal cancer. There are several mechanisms about the actions by aspirin on colorectal tumorogenesis. These are not perfectly known nowadays. On one hand, there are direct mechanisms on colorectal mucosa, on the other hand there are indirect mechanisms through platelet functions. Aspirin also plays a role by its anti-inflammatory action and the stimulation of antitumor immunity. Several studies show that long-term treatment with low-doses of aspirin decreases the incidence of adenomas and colorectal cancers. In the United States, aspirin is currently recommended for primary prevention of the risk of colorectal cancer in all patients aged 50 to 59, with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular event greater than 10 %. However, primary prevention with aspirin should not be a substitute for screening in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, aspirin seems to be beneficial when used in post-diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It could actually decrease the risk of metastasis in case of a localized colorectal cancer, and increase the survival in particular, concerning PIK3CA mutated tumors. The association of aspirin with neoadjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer by radiochimiotherapy seems to have beneficial effects. French prospective randomized study is currently being conducted to investigate postoperative aspirin in colorectal cancers with a PIK3CA mutation. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Técnica da instilação de colírios em pacientes portadores de glaucoma crônico Eye drop instillation technique in chronic glaucoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Gelman Vaidergorn

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a técnica da instilação de colírio em pacientes portadores de glaucoma crônico. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo realizado em 193 pacientes glaucomatosos. Para cada participante era entregue um frasco de colírio lubrificante (Dunason®, Laboratório Alcon, São Paulo, Brasil e solicitado que realizasse uma instilação. RESULTADOS: Os participantes utilizaram, em média, 1,64 ± 1,26 gotas de colírio por instilação e 54,5% dos pacientes fizeram contato do bico do colírio com a superfície ocular. Em 3,1% das instilações nenhuma gota de medicamento atingiu o olho, com o paciente não se dando conta do fato. A oclusão do ponto lacrimal ou a manutenção do olho fechado por dois minutos após a instilação não foi realizada em 87,0% dos participantes, e 61,6% piscaram repetidas vezes imediatamente após instilar a droga. CONCLUSÕES: Verificou-se que a maior parte dos participantes deste estudo efetuou a instilação do colírio de modo incorreto. Isto significa desperdiçar grande parte do conteúdo do frasco, aumentar as possibilidades de toxicidade sistêmica, não aproveitar a plenitude do efeito hipotensor das drogas e contaminar a extremidade do frasco de colírio. Portanto, o ensino da técnica adequada da instilação de colírio é absolutamente necessária para todos os pacientes.PURPOSE: To observe eye drop instillation technique in chronic glaucoma patients. METHODS: This is a prospective study enrolling 193 glaucomatous patients. Each received a sample of lubricant eye drop bottle (Dunason®, Alcon Laboratories, São Paulo, Brazil and was instructed to use it once. RESULTS: All patients used a mean amount of 1.64 ± 1.26 drops. In 54.5% of the patients, the eyedropper touched the eye and adnexa. In 3.1% the drops were not placed in the eye, without the patient being aware of this. In 87.0% of them, neither the lacrimal point occlusion nor the closure of the eyes for two minutes after instillation were

  9. Multiple endpoint analysis of BAC-preserved and unpreserved antiallergic eye drops on a 3D-reconstituted corneal epithelial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, A; Brasnu, E; Riancho, L; Brignole-Baudouin, F; Baudouin, C

    2011-03-16

    To compare the effects of benzalkonium chloride (BAC)-preserved and unpreserved antiallergic eye drops on the human 3D-reconstituted corneal epithelial model (3D-HCE). 3D-HCE were treated for 24 h followed or not by a 24 h post-incubation recovery period (24 h+24 h) with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), 0.01% BAC, unpreserved formulations of ketotifen, N Acetyl-Aspartyl Glutamic Acid (NAAGA), cromoglycate, or BAC-preserved commercial formulations of ketotifen, olopatadine, epinastine, and levocabastine. The 3D-HCE viability was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl) -2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) test at 24 h and 24 h+24 h. At 24 h, the numbers of Cluster of Differentiation 54 (CD54)- and Ki67-immunopositive cells as well as the number of apoptotic deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells were evaluated on 3D-HCE frozen sections. The expression of the tight junction-associated protein occludin was also assessed using fluorescence confocal microscopy on flat-mounted 3D-HCE epithelia. The MTT and the TUNEL tests revealed a significant decrease of cell viability and an increased apoptosis in the superficial layers of the 3D-HCE only when treated with BAC-containing formulations and in a BAC concentration-dependent manner. The expression of CD54 and Ki67 in the basal layers was also increased in this group. A concentration-dependent disorganization of occludin distribution in the epithelium treated with BAC-containing solutions was also observed. The unpreserved formulations induced effects comparable to the control. BAC-preserved solutions decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, they induced CD54 expression, proliferation in the basal layers, and changes in the distribution of occludin, which is consistent with a disorganization of the tight-junctions and suggests the loss of the epithelial barrier function. On the contrary, the unpreserved solutions did

  10. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack . Your provider may recommend to take daily aspirin if: You do not have a history of heart disease or stroke, but you are at high risk for a heart attack or stroke. You have been diagnosed ... already. Aspirin helps get more blood flowing to your legs. ...

  11. Aspirin and Extended-Release Dipyridamole

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin) and heparin; beta-blockers such as acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), ... such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant ...

  12. Eye muscle repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child may go home. You should have a follow-up visit with the eye surgeon 1 to 2 weeks after the surgery. To prevent infection, you will probably need to put drops or ointment in your child's eyes.

  13. Comparison of hyaluronic acid-containing topical eye drops with carbomer-based topical ocular gel as a tear replacement in canine keratoconjunctivitis sicca: A prospective study in twenty five dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Williams

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a hyaluronic acid containing eye drop in ameliorating ocular surface pathology and discomfort in canine keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS. Twenty five dogs with KCS treated with a topical carbomer (CA-based tear replacement gel were moved to treatment with a hyaluronic acid (HA-containing tear replacement eye drop. Dogs were subject to a full ophthalmic examination at the beginning of the study and after two and four weeks of treatment, Schirmer tear tests (STTs were performed at each examination. Conjunctival hyperemia, ocular discharge and ocular irritation were evaluated and scored on a 0-3 semi-quantitative scale. Values were compared before and after 4 weeks of treatment using a paired t-test. Evaluation scores were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The transfer from CA-based to HA-containing tear replacement significantly decreased the conjunctival hyperemia score from 2.12 ± 0.73 to 1.26 ± 0.59 and ocular discomfort was lowered from 2.11 ± 0.97 to 0.93 ± 0.75. Ocular discharge was reduced from a score of 1.04 ± 0.82 to 0.70 ± 0.53, however, the decrease did not reach statistical significance. Schirmer tear test was increased with statistical significance (p < 0.001 but given that the increase was only from 5.42 ± 3.50 to 6.19 ± 3.86 mm min-1; this was not considered clinically significant. This study demonstrated that HA-containing eye drops used twice daily in dogs with KCS had greater ameliorative effects on ocular surface health and discomfort than did CA-based topical gels used as or more frequently.

  14. Foot Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seizures Information Page Fibromuscular Dysplasia Information Page Foot Drop Information Page Friedreich's Ataxia Information Page Gaucher Disease Information Page Generalized Gangliosidoses Information Page Gerstmann's Syndrome ...

  15. Primary Newcastle disease vaccination of broilers: comparison of the antibody seroresponse and adverse vaccinal reaction after eye-nose drop or coarse spray application, and implication of the results for a previously developed coarse dry powder vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, W J M; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P; Huyge, K; van Eck, J H H

    2017-08-01

    To compare antibody seroresponse and adverse vaccinal reaction induced by Newcastle disease (ND) vaccination after eye-nose drop or coarse spray, groups of SPF broiler hens were vaccinated at day 4 (day of hatch is day 0) and intratracheally inoculated with Escherichia coli at day 11. Body weight gain (BWG) was assessed between day 4 and day 18; colibacillosis lesions and serum antibodies were determined at day 18. Meaningful comparison requires similar vaccine uptake. Vaccine virus loss during spray relative to eye-nose drop, which was assessed by comparing the results of endpoint titrations, was 3 log10. Colibacillosis lesions in birds spray vaccinated with 106.4 EID50/chicken were significantly more severe (P drop vaccinated with 103.4 EID50/chicken, while the seroresponse was slightly but significantly (P < 0.05) stronger. Colibacillosis lesion scores inversely paralleled BWG. It is concluded that: (1) There is room to improve the coarse ND vaccine spray used regarding adverse vaccinal reaction, while maintaining a sufficient immune response. This is also applicable to the coarse ND powder vaccine studied in previous research, which induced similar antibody response and adverse vaccinal reaction as the spray vaccine used here. (2) The vaccine virus dose influences the colibacillosis susceptibility at seven days post vaccination, as the dynamics of the vaccine virus infection is likely dose-dependent. (3) Low vaccine virus doses likely result in heterogeneous vaccine-take followed by vaccine virus spread from vaccine shedding birds to their non-vaccine virus infected flock mates ("rolling vaccinal reaction").

  16. Medications Containing Aspirin (Acetylsalicylate) and Aspirin-Like Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    updated 3/10/08 Medications Containing Aspirin (Acetylsalicylate) and Aspirin-Like Products © National Reye's Syndrome Foundation Inc. 2008 Epidemiologic research has shown an association between the development of Reye's ...

  17. Aspirin: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Nikołajewna Dołżenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical utility of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA is one of the more important issues in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. The present paper provides analysis of aspirin history, mechanisms of its antiplatelet activity, and expediency of the use of low- and high-dose aspirin in the groups including patients after myocardial revascularization, and requiring secondary prevention of stroke. Also gender-specific aspirin properties were mentioned, highlighting the especially important role of aspirin in women at the age of >65 years, and its utility in all women, irrespectively of age, and those who are at high risk of cardiovascular disease, including atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease. Moreover, the mechanisms of aspirin resistance, characterized by inability of aspirin to prevent thromboembolic complications or inadequate platelet inhibition showed in laboratory results, were mentioned. Prevalence of resistance in aspirin-treated patients is estimated to be between 1 and 68%. Stress was also put on the aspirin safety, associated with prophylaxis of peptic ulcer disease, which can be achieved i.e. by the use of the enteric-coated aspirin. This form of aspirin is associated with lower risk of gastrointestinal mucosae damage and bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract. At the end of the article, the importance of the adherence to therapeutic guidelines of aspirin use, including assessment of variation in aspirin bioavailability associated with improper dosing and altered absorption in the gastrointestinal tract, was stressed.

  18. Low dose aspirin and pregnancy: how important is aspirin resistance?

    OpenAIRE

    Navaratnam, K; Alfirevic, A; Alfirevic, Z

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet agents are pivotal for prevention of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease worldwide. Individual patient data meta?analysis indicates that low?dose aspirin causes a 10% risk reduction in pre?eclampsia for women at high individual risk. However, in the last 15 years it has emerged that a significant proportion of aspirin?treated individuals exhibit suboptimal platelet response, determined biochemically and clinically, termed ?aspirin non?responsiveness?, ?aspirin res...

  19. Aspirin: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Nikołajewna Dołżenko

    2014-01-01

    Clinical utility of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is one of the more important issues in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. The present paper provides analysis of aspirin history, mechanisms of its antiplatelet activity, and expediency of the use of low- and high-dose aspirin in the groups including patients after myocardial revascularization, and requiring secondary prevention of stroke. Also gender-specific aspirin properties were mentioned, hi...

  20. Synergistic effect of regenerating agent plus cord blood serum eye drops for the treatment of resistant neurotrophic keratitis: a case report and a hypothesis for pathophysiologic mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Giannaccare G; Fresina M; Vagge A; Versura P

    2015-01-01

    Giuseppe Giannaccare,1 Michela Fresina,1 Aldo Vagge,2 Piera Versura1 1Ophthalmology Unit, DIMES, S Orsola-Malpighi Teaching Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; 2Eye Clinic, DiNOGMI, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy Abstract: This report describes a case of a 72-year-old Caucasian woman presenting with a large neurotrophic keratitis with a large persistent epithelial defect, with a longest linear diameter of 7 mm and greatest perpendicular width of 5 mm, affecting epithelium, Bow...

  1. Aspirin-Exacerbated Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Mathew

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on aspirin-exacerbated asthma (AEA. The review includes historical perspective of aspirin, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of AEA. The pathogenesis of AEA involves the cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. Aspirin affects both of these pathways by inhibiting the enzyme cycooxygenase-1 (COX-1. Inhibition of COX-1 leads to a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. The decrease in PGE2 results in an increase in cysteinyl leukotrienes by the lipooxygenase pathway involving the enzyme 5-lipooxygenase (5-LO. Leukotriene C4 (LTC4 synthase is the enzyme responsible for the production of leukotriene C4, the chief cysteinyl leukotriene responsible for AEA. There have been familial occurences of AEA. An allele of the LTC4 synthase gene in AEA is known as allele C. Allele C has a higher frequency in AEA. Clinical presentation includes a history of asthma after ingestion of aspirin, nasal congestion, watery rhinorrhea and nasal polyposis. Treatment includes leukotriene receptor antagonists, leukotriene inhibitors, aspirin desinsitaztion and surgery. AEA is the most well-defined phenotype of asthma. Although AEA affects adults and children with physician-diagnosed asthma, in some cases there is no history of asthma and AEA often goes unrecognized and underdiagnosed.

  2. Aspirin and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrignani, Paola; Patrono, Carlo

    2016-08-30

    The place of aspirin in primary prevention remains controversial, with North American and European organizations issuing contradictory treatment guidelines. More recently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended "initiating low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and colorectal cancer in adults aged 50 to 59 years who have a 10% or greater 10-year CVD risk, are not at increased risk for bleeding, have a life expectancy of at least 10 years, and are willing to take low-dose aspirin daily for at least 10 years." This recommendation reflects increasing evidence for a chemopreventive effect of low-dose aspirin against colorectal (and other) cancer. The intent of this paper is to review the evidence supporting a chemopreventive effect of aspirin, discuss its potential mechanism(s) of action, and provide a conceptual framework for assessing current guidelines in the light of ongoing studies. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Twisted aspirin crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Rohl, Andrew L; Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2013-03-06

    Banded spherulites of aspirin have been crystallized from the melt in the presence of salicylic acid either generated from aspirin decomposition or added deliberately (2.6-35.9 mol %). Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and optical polarimetry show that the spherulites are composed of helicoidal crystallites twisted along the growth directions. Mueller matrix imaging reveals radial oscillations in not only linear birefringence, but also circular birefringence, whose origin is explained through slight (∼1.3°) but systematic splaying of individual lamellae in the film. Strain associated with the replacement of aspirin molecules by salicylic acid molecules in the crystal structure is computed to be large enough to work as the driving force for the twisting of crystallites.

  4. Aspirin desensitization for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessner, Katharine M

    2015-08-01

    The use of aspirin in coronary artery disease and address the unmet need of aspirin therapy in patients with history of hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) or other nonsteroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Aspirin hypersensitivity is reported in 1.5% of patients with cardiovascular disease. However, many of those labeled as allergic to aspirin had experienced side-effects and could be safely treated with aspirin. Those with true hypersensitivity reactions were often not placed on appropriate antiplatelet therapy. A number of protocols of varying complexity exist in the literature for aspirin desensitization. The focus of this review is to identify the types of aspirin reactions that can occur and provide a rational approach to oral aspirin challenge and desensitization. In summary, with rare exceptions, patients with a history of 'aspirin/NSAID allergy' who need ASA for cardiovascular issues will be able to safely take aspirin either after a graded challenge or desensitization providing a central role of the allergist in the management of these patients.

  5. Reye Syndrome and Aspirin

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-six cases of Reye syndrome occurring between 1973 and 1982 have been reviewed in relation to aspirin ingestion at the Children’s Hospital, Camperdown, Australia (formerly the Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children in Sydney), where Reye first described his syndrome of encephalopathy and fatty degeneration of the viscera in 1963.

  6. Sodium hyaluronate eye drops treatment for superficial corneal abrasion caused by mechanical damage: a randomized clinical trial in the People’s Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin T

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tong Lin, Lan Gong Department of Ophthalmology, Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of 0.3% sodium hyaluronate (HA compared to recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor (rb-bFGF for the treatment of corneal epithelial abrasion caused by mechanical damage in Chinese patients.Methods: Thirty patients were randomly assigned to the HA or rb-bFGF treatment group. The HA group was treated with 0.3% HA and 0.5% levofloxacin, and the rb-bFGF group was treated with topical rb-bFGF and 0.5% levofloxacin. The primary endpoint was the clinical effectiveness rates at day 3. Secondary endpoints were the dimensions of the wound area and the percentage of wound closure.Results: After 3 days of treatment, the clinical effectiveness rates of the HA group and the rb-bFGF group were 86.67% (13/15 and 93.33% (14/15, respectively. The dimensions of the wound area were reduced from 9.83±8.50 to 0.02±0.06 mm2 for the HA group at day 7, and from 10.58±9.94 to 0.02±0.07 mm2 for the rb-bFGF group. At day 3, the wound closure was almost complete in both groups; 94.73% in the HA group compared to 95.77% in the rb-bFGF group (P>0.05.Conclusion: Topical 0.3% HA provided a promising treatment for superficial corneal abrasion caused by mechanical damage in a manner similar to rb-bFGF. Keywords: sodium hyaluronate, superficial corneal abrasion, bovine basic fibroblast growth factor

  7. Aspirin, 110 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrono, C; Rocca, B

    2009-07-01

    Although conceived at the end of the 19th century as a synthetic analgesic agent with improved gastric tolerability vs. naturally occurring salicylates, acetylsalicylic acid (marketed as aspirin in 1899) turned out to be an ideal antiplatelet agent about 90 years later, following the understanding of its mechanism of action, the development of a mechanism-based biomarker for dose-finding studies, and the initiation of a series of appropriately sized, randomized clinical trials to test its efficacy and safety at low doses given once daily. At the turn of its 110th anniversary, aspirin continues to attract heated debates on a number of issues including (i) the optimal dose to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity; (ii) the possibility that some patients may be 'resistant' to its antiplatelet effects; and (iii) the balance of benefits and risks in primary vs. secondary prevention.

  8. Aspirin and Reye's syndrome: the change in prescribing habits of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahwan, G L; Rahwan, R G

    1986-02-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate the possible increased risk of Reye's syndrome after aspirin ingestion in children suffering from viral influenza or chicken pox. This study was conducted to determine whether the possible association between aspirin and Reye's syndrome in viral influenza and chicken pox deterred pediatricians and pharmacists in a large American city (Columbus, Ohio) from prescribing or recommending aspirin to their pediatric patients suffering from other causes of fever or pain. The results indicate that 90.6 percent of pediatricians and 97.8 percent of pharmacists no longer recommend aspirin to their pediatric patients, and an almost identical percentage recommend acetaminophen instead of aspirin. This change in prescribing habits of health professionals is reflected in a drop in sales of pediatric aspirin products with a simultaneous rise in sales of pediatric acetaminophen products reported by 93.3 percent of pharmacies. However, only 69.8 percent of pediatricians and 86.7 percent of pharmacists noted that their abstention from prescribing or recommending aspirin to children was rooted in a belief in a possible association between aspirin and Reye's syndrome.

  9. Clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for preventing cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Bellesini, Marta; Takeda, Andrea; Middeldorp, Saskia; Donadini, Marco Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin is the prophylactic antiplatelet drug of choice for people with cardiovascular disease. Adding a second antiplatelet drug to aspirin may produce additional benefit for people at high risk and people with established cardiovascular disease. This is an update to a previously published review

  10. Clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for preventing cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Keller, Tymen; Romualdi, Erica; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin is the prophylactic antiplatelet drug of choice for people with cardiovascular disease. Adding a second antiplatelet drug to aspirin may produce additional benefit for those at high risk and those with established cardiovascular disease. To quantify the benefit and harm of adding clopidogrel

  11. Choosing Wisely When It Comes to Eye Care: Punctal Plugs for Dry Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pads or washcloths over the eyes and using artificial tears or lubricating eye drops. There are other ... eye. If the problem persists and makes good vision difficult, punctual plugs can be considered. Ultimately, the ...

  12. Induction of antibody response in the oral cavity of dogs following intraocular (eye drop) immunization with Porphyromonas gingivalis cell lysate incorporated in pH-sensitive fusogenic polymer-modified liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yosuke; Iwasaki, Tadashi; Tajima, Tomoko; Yuba, Eiji; Kono, Kenji; Watarai, Shinobu

    2017-02-14

    Induction of mucosal immune responses against Porphyromonas gingivalis within the oral cavity of dogs was studied by immunizing with pH-sensitive fusogenic polymer (MGluPG)-modified liposome-associated cell lysate. Dogs immunized with P. gingivalis cell lysate-containing MGluPG-modified liposomes by intraocular (eye drop) route displayed significant levels of P. gingivalis cell lysate-specific serum IgG and IgA as well as mucosal IgA antibodies in saliva secretion. Serum and salivary antibodies generated by intraocularly immunized with MGluPG-modified liposome-associated P. gingivalis cell lysate revealed a significant aggregation activity against P. gingivalis, whereas serum and saliva from dogs receiving MGluPG-modified liposomes unentrapping P. gingivalis cell lysate did not show the aggregation activity against P. gingivalis. Furthermore, P. gingivalis-specific antibodies in saliva of immunized dogs inhibited the adherence of P. gingivalis to cultured HeLa cells. More importantly, salivary antibodies induced by intraocular immunization with P. gingivalis cell lysate-containing MGluPG-modified liposomes significantly inhibited the coaggregation of P. gingivalis with Actinomyces naeslundii and the cell damage activity of P. gingivalis against FaDu cells, an oral epithelial cell. These results suggest that intraocularly administered P. gingivalis cell lysate-containing MGluPG-modified liposomes should be an effective mucosal vaccine against P. gingivalis infection in dogs and may be an important tool for the prevention of periodontitis.

  13. Greener Methods for Aspirin Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Barilone, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    In this semester long study, I used microwave irradiation to synthesize aspirin. I compared this method to a traditional method that utilizes a strong acid. I compared the percent yield and the purity of the methods to pure aspirin

  14. MACULAR DEGENERATION AND ASPIRIN USE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Kent W; Garabetian, Christine A; Shaya, Fadi S

    2017-09-01

    To review current literature of the benefits that aspirin provides for patients' cardiovascular health compared with the risk of AMD worsening. We performed a review and critically analyzed six cardiovascular and four ophthalmological trials regarding risks and benefits of aspirin use. The prospective randomized cardiovascular trials had a cumulative 167,580 while the 3 smaller ophthalmological data sets had a cumulative 12,015 subjects. The reviewed meta-analysis literature demonstrated a statistically significant 32% reduction in the risk of nonfatal stroke with regular aspirin users. The study also documented that aspirin users decreased the risk of fatal vascular deaths by 15%. Of the three ophthalmological studies highlighting the adverse affects of aspirin association with AMD, all suggested an exacerbation of AMD without statistical significance and broad confidence bands. Overall, the number, size, and quality of the cardiovascular studies recommending aspirin use are far superior to the fewer, smaller and conflicting studies suggesting a possible adverse effect of aspirin use in relation to AMD. The benefits of aspirin usage include preserving the duration and quality of life by decreasing stroke and heart attack risk. These benefits seem to far outweigh the theoretical risks of possibly exacerbating wet AMD, which can be reasonably controlled with anti-VEGF therapy.

  15. Comparative bioequivalence assessment of aspirin tablets marketed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: In the last few years, aspirin has become a life saver against cardiovascular accidents. This investigation was carried out to determine possible bioequivalence between regular aspirin and soluble aspirin tablets marketed in Nigeria. Methods: The in vivo bioavailability profiles of three commercial brands of aspirin ...

  16. Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolkit No. 23 Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart What can taking aspirin do for me? If you are at high risk for or if you have heart disease, taking a low dose aspirin every day may help. Aspirin can also help ...

  17. Aspirin mono-therapy continuation does not result in more bleeding after knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Pierre-Emmanuel; Lavand'homme, Patricia; Yombi, JeanCyr; Thienpont, Emmanuel

    2017-08-01

    Current clinical practice guidelines sometimes still recommend stopping aspirin five to seven days before knee arthroplasty surgery. Literature regarding multimodal blood management and continuation of anti-platelet therapy in this type of surgery is scant. The study hypothesis was that knee arthroplasty under low-dose aspirin mono-therapy continuation does not cause more total blood loss than knee arthroplasty performed without aspirin. Blood loss would be measured by haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrit (HTC) levels drop at day 2 or day 4 for patients who benefit from multimodal bleeding control measures. A database of all patients undergoing knee arthroplasty between 2006 and 2014 was analysed. Demographic, surgical and complete blood workup data were collected. A retrospective comparison study analysed both groups in terms of blood loss, by mean calculated blood loss as haemoglobin or haematocrit drop between the preoperative Nadir value and the postoperative day 2 and 4 value. A group of 198 (44 UKA and 154 TKA) patients underwent surgery without interrupting their aspirin therapy for cardiovascular prevention. Mean (SD) age was 71 (8) and the mean (SD) BMI was 29 (5.5) kg/m 2 . The control group consisted of 403 (102 UKA and 301 TKA) patients who were not under aspirin, or any other anti-platelet agent. Mean (SD) age was 65 (10) (p aspirin mono-therapy for cardiovascular prevention. III.

  18. Aspirin-Induced Acute Liver Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Laster, Janese; Satoskar, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin is thought to be a relatively safe drug in adults. The association of aspirin and Reye syndrome in children is well documented. We report a 41-year-old female with pericarditis who was treated with high-dose aspirin and developed subsequent acute liver injury. After discontinuation of aspirin, liver enzyme elevation and right upper quadrant pain both resolved. We conclude that high-dose aspirin should be considered as a potentially hepatotoxic agent.

  19. Platelets, aspirin, and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, P C; Hughes, C; O'Brien, J R

    1998-10-01

    Aspirin was first synthesised 100 years ago and its preparation and marketing is generally reckoned to have been the foundation of the pharmaceutical industry. For most of the time since then it has been used for the relief of pain and fever. The modern phase of aspirin use commenced with the reporting in 1974 of a randomised controlled trial in the secondary prevention of death by low-dose aspirin given to patients who had suffered a myocardial infarct. Reports of other trials followed and an overview of the first six trials was presented to the inaugural meeting of the Society for Clinical Trials in Philadelphia in 1980. There have been two further major overviews and the most recent, based on 145 trials, established that low-dose aspirin reduces vascular events by around one third. It has been estimated that, used appropriately, aspirin could prevent 100,000 premature deaths each year worldwide, at a cost of about 250 Pounds ($400) per life saved, and about 80 Pounds ($130) per cardiovascular event prevented. The evidence indicates that it is seriously underused at present. The aspirin story continues and trials are in progress to test other possible uses of aspirin, in vascular dementia, colorectal cancer, and cataract.

  20. Gastrointestinal symptoms in low-dose aspirin users: a comparison between plain and buffered aspirin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers Focks, J.; Tielemans, M.M.; Rossum, L.G.M. van; Eikendal, T.; Brouwer, M.A.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Oijen, M.G.H. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin is associated with gastrointestinal side effects such as gastric ulcers, gastric bleeding and dyspepsia. High-dose effervescent calcium carbasalate (ECC), a buffered formulation of aspirin, is associated with reduced gastric toxicity compared with plain aspirin in healthy

  1. Platelets, aspirin, and cardiovascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Elwood, P. C.; Hughes, C.; O'Brien, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    Aspirin was first synthesised 100 years ago and its preparation and marketing is generally reckoned to have been the foundation of the pharmaceutical industry. For most of the time since then it has been used for the relief of pain and fever. The modern phase of aspirin use commenced with the reporting in 1974 of a randomised controlled trial in the secondary prevention of death by low-dose aspirin given to patients who had suffered a myocardial infarct. Reports of other trials followed and a...

  2. Lipoxin and Aspirin-Triggered Lipoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Romano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoxins and their 15 epimers, aspirin triggered lipoxins (ATL, are eicosanoids derived from sequential lipoxygenase (LO metabolism of arachidonic acid. The main routes of lipoxin biosynthesis involve cooperation between 15- and 5-LO, and between 12- and 5-LO. ATL are generated by interactions between 5-LO and aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2. Cellular models recapitulating these interactions involve leukocytes, platelets, vascular endothelium, and epithelium. To circumvent rapid lipoxin and ATL metabolism and inactivation, stable analogs, bearing potent and long-lasting biological activity, have been synthesized. Some of these analogs displayed therapeutic potential by showing strong anti-inflammatory activity in a number of animal models of disease, including reperfusion injury; arthritis; gastrointestinal, renal, respiratory, and vascular inflammatory disorders; eye damage; periodontitis; and selected infectious diseases. Counter-regulatory signaling by lipoxin A4 and 15-epi-lipoxin A4 is triggered by the activation of a seven-transmembrane domain receptor, termed FPR2/ALX, which is highly expressed in myeloid cells and has been recognized as a main anti-inflammatory receptor.

  3. Increased platelet expression of glycoprotein IIIa following aspirin treatment in aspirin-resistant but not aspirin-sensitive subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Christopher N; Goodman, Timothy; Becker, Silke; Chen, Nan; Mustafa, Agnesa; Schofield, Emma; Campbell, James; Ward, Malcolm; Sharma, Pankaj; Ferro, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Aims Aspirin is widely used as an anti-platelet agent for cardiovascular prophylaxis. Despite aspirin treatment, many patients experience recurrent thrombotic events, and aspirin resistance may contribute to this. We examined the prevalence of aspirin resistance in a healthy population, and investigated whether the platelet proteome differed in aspirin-resistant subjects. Methods Ninety-three healthy subjects received aspirin 300 mg daily for 28 days. Before and at the end of treatment, urine was taken to determine 11-dehydrothromboxane B2, and blood was taken to measure arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation of platelet-rich plasma and to interrogate the platelet proteome by mass spectrometric analysis with further confirmation of findings using Western blotting. Results In two of the 93 subjects, neither AA-induced aggregation nor urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 was effectively suppressed by aspirin, despite measurable plasma salicylate concentrations, suggesting the presence of true aspirin resistance. Despite no detectable differences in the platelet proteome at baseline, following aspirin a marked increase was seen in platelet glycoprotein IIIa expression in the aspirin-resistant but not aspirin-sensitive subjects. An increase in platelet glycoprotein IIIa expression with aspirin resistance was confirmed in a separate cohort of 17 patients with stable coronary artery disease on long term aspirin treatment, four of whom exhibited aspirin resistance. Conclusions In a healthy population, true aspirin resistance is uncommon but exists. Resistance is associated with an increase in platelet glycoprotein IIIa expression in response to aspirin. These data shed new light on the mechanism of aspirin resistance, and provide the potential to identify aspirin-resistant subjects using a novel biomarker. PMID:25099258

  4. Daily Aspirin Therapy: Understand the Benefits and Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily aspirin therapy: Understand the benefits and risks Daily aspirin therapy can be a lifesaving option, but it's not ... everyone. Get the facts before considering a daily aspirin. By Mayo Clinic Staff Daily aspirin therapy may ...

  5. Effect of Aspirin on Spinal Cord Injury: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Reihani Kermani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin is an anti-inflammatory drug, peroxyl radical scavenger, and antioxidant agent that inhibits phospholipases, nitric oxide synthetases, and cyclooxygenase enzymes. The existing literature contains no studies on the effects of various doses of aspirin on spinal cord injury (SCI. Therefore, we sought to investigate the putative effects of aspirin on experimental SCI. The weight-drop injury model was used to produce SCI in 100 albino Wistar rats. The animals were allocated to five groups: a control group, where the rats did not undergo any surgical or medical intervention except for anesthesia; a sham-treated group, where laminectomy was performed without SCI and no further therapy was administered; and three other groups, where the rats with SCI received low-dose aspirin [20 mg/kg], high-dose aspirin [80 mg/kg], and a vehicle, respectively. Half of the rats were sacrificed 24 hours later, and their spinal cords were excised for biochemical studies. The other rats were subjected to Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB locomotor rating scale scoring once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. Aspirin decreased lipid peroxidation following SCI as the mean (± standard error catalase level was significantly higher in the high-dose aspirin group (46.10±12.01 than in the sham-treated group (16.07±2.42 and the vehicle-treated group (15.31±3.20 (P<0.05; P<0.05, respectively. Both of the groups treated with high-dose and low-dose aspirin demonstrated a higher mean BBB score than did the control group (P<0.001 and the sham-treated group (P<0.001. Our data provide evidence in support of the potential effects of aspirin in biochemical and neurobehavioral recovery after SCI.

  6. Reduction in drop size of ophthalmic topical drop preparations and the impact of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we devised a method to create smaller eye drops of the glaucoma medication timolol maleate by altering the dropper tip design and changing the physical properties of the formulation. Most ocular diseases are treated with topical application of eye drops. After instillation of an eye drop, typically, less than 5% of the applied drug penetrates the cornea and reaches the intraocular tissues; the major fraction of the instilled drug is absorbed and enters the systemic circulation. Ophthalmic solutions are available in multidose or single-dose glass/plastic dropper bottles that deliver drops with a volume that ranges from 25 μL to 70 μL (average 40 μL. Because of the low capacity of the precorneal area, the optimal drop volume is about 20 μL; with larger volumes there is the risk of adverse systemic effects due to absorption of the drug via the nasal mucosa. Thus, both from the biopharmaceutical and economic point of view, drops of only 5-15 mL volume should be instilled into the eye. In this present work we devised a method to reduce the size of the drop by inserting a glass capillary tube into the dropper tip and by changing the physical properties of the formulation (by altering the concentration of Tween 80™, i.e., 0.05% and 0.1% of Tween 80™. We measured the drop sizes of the different timolol eye drop formulations available in the market and estimated the yearly cost of the medications. Our timolol maleate formulation with 0.1% concentration of Tween 80™ delivered through the dropper tip with the inserted glass capillary was shown to be better than the other formulations available in the market in terms of ability to deliver smaller drops, meaning that each bottle would last longer and that the yearly cost of treatment would be lower.

  7. Aspirin and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Bradley A; Rosalind Lai, Pui Man; Frerichs, Kai U; Du, Rose

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence has suggested a potential beneficial effect of aspirin on the risk of aneurysm rupture. This benefit must be weighed against its potential adverse effects as an antiplatelet agent in the setting of acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A total of 747 consecutive patients with cerebral aneurysms were reviewed, comparing demographics, aneurysm features, presenting clinical and radiographic grades, vasospasm, and outcome at 1 year between patients with aneurysmal SAH taking aspirin on presentation and those who were not. The rate of hemorrhagic presentation was significantly greater in patients not taking aspirin (40% vs. 28%; P = 0.016). Among 274 patients presenting with aneurysmal SAH, there was no significant difference in presenting clinical (Hunt and Hess) and radiographic (Fisher) grade between patients taking aspirin and those who were not. There was also no significant difference in the rate of subsequent angiographic and delayed cerebral ischemia. Multivariate analysis of outcome at 1 year found only increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.12), Hunt and Hess grade (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.81-5.03), and associated hypertension (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.39-7.81) to be statistically significant risk factors for poor outcome (death or dependence), whereas aspirin use was not associated with poor outcome (OR 1.19, 95% CI 0.35-4.09; P = 0.78). In the present study, patients taking aspirin had a lower rate of hemorrhagic presentation. In addition, taking aspirin did not adversely impact presenting clinical grade or radiographic grade, vasospasm, and outcome in the setting of aneurysmal SAH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel Proresolving Aspirin-Triggered DHA Pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Serhan, Charles N; Fredman, Gabrielle; Yang, Rong; Karamnov, Sergey; Belayev, Ludmila S; Bazan, Nicolas G; Zhu, Min; Winkler, Jeremy W; Petasis, Nicos A

    2011-01-01

    .... We report an aspirin-triggered DHA metabolome that biosynthesizes a potent product in inflammatory exudates and human leukocytes, namely aspirin-triggered Neuroprotectin D1/Protectin D1 [AT-(NPD1/PD1...

  9. Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work By Emily Carlson ... biology of how cancer cells grow. Antihistamines, Antidepressants, Aspirin Adrenergic receptor with carazolol, a beta-blocker. View ...

  10. Aspirin during Pregnancy: Is It Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week Is it safe to take aspirin during pregnancy? Answers from Yvonne Butler Tobah, M. ... 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/aspirin-during-pregnancy/ ...

  11. Aspirin resistant patients with recent ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Navas-Alcántara, M S; Fernández-Moreno, M C

    2014-04-01

    Some patients with a recent ischemic stroke who are being treated with aspirin as an antiaggregant suffer a new ischemic stroke. These patients (15-25%) have been called unresponsive to aspirin or aspirin resistant. The aspirin-resistant patients have a four-time greater risk of suffering a stroke. Furthermore, these strokes are generally more severe, with increased infarct volume and greater risk of recurrence. There is currently no ideal laboratory test to detect the resistance to the antiaggregant effect of aspirin. The study of resistance to aspirin would only be indicated in selected cases. In these patients, one should first rule out any "pseudo-resistance" to aspirin (lack of compliance, concomitant treatments that interfere with the action of the aspirin). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Aspirin: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, P C

    2001-01-01

    Many folk remedies used since pre-historic times have depended upon salicylates for their effect. One hundred years ago aspirin was formulated from salicylic and acetic acids. It was the first drug to be synthesised and its formulation is regarded as the foundation of the modern pharmaceutical industry. The benefit of low-dose aspirin as a prophylactic after a thrombotic event was first reported 25 years ago. Its use after coronary or cerebral thrombosis is virtually mandatory, unless there are signs of intolerance. A 'loading dose' of soluble aspirin should be given on first contact with a patient who may be suffering from myocardial infarction. Patients considered to be at increased risk of a vascular event should also be advised to carry their own aspirin and, if they experience sudden severe chest pain, to chew and swallow a 300 mg tablet or a soluble preparation immediately. The current phase of the aspirin story is, however, not over, and its possible value in a variety of conditions, including dementia and certain cancers, seems likely to ensure that it will long continue to play a remarkable part in clinical practice.

  13. The role of aspirin in women's health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.; Bolte, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this review is to discuss the role of aspirin for various conditions in women. METHODS: A nonsystematic review of articles published on PubMed((R)) that examines the role of aspirin in women. RESULTS: Aspirin is associated with a significant reduction of stroke risk in women,

  14. Aspirin: Pharmacology and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enma V. Paez Espinosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiplatelet therapy has been documented to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease after acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft, and in chronic atrial fibrillation patients, amongst other risk factors. Conventional management of thrombosis-based disorders includes the use of heparin, oral anticoagulants, and the preferred antiplatelet agent aspirin. Interestingly, aspirin was not intended to be used as an antiplatelet agent; rather, after being repurposed, it has become one of the most widely prescribed antithrombotic drugs. To this end, there have been several milestones in the development of antiplatelet agents in the last few decades, such as adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitors, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors. However, given some of the limitations of these therapies, aspirin continues to play a major role in the management of thrombotic and cardiovascular disorders and is expected to do so for years to come.

  15. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M. (Assiut Univ. (Egypt))

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author).

  16. Eye Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Allergies Sections What Are Eye Allergies? Eye Allergy ... Eye allergy diagnosis Eye allergy treatment What Are Eye Allergies? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Son las Alergias ...

  17. TRUE RESISTANCE AND PSEUDORESISTANCE TO ASPIRIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Martynov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low dose aspirin reduces the secondary incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke. Drug resistance to aspirin might result in treatment failure. Despite this concern, no clear definition of aspirin resistance has emerged, and estimates of its incidence have varied remarkably. Researchers from university of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, the USA, led by Dr. Tilo Grosser, aimed to determine the specific phenotype of true pharmacological resistance to aspirin — such as might be explained by genetic causes. However the study failed to identify a single case of true drug resistance. Pseudoresistance, reflecting delayed and reduced drug absorption, complicates enteric coated but not immediate release aspirin administration.

  18. Compound list: aspirin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aspirin ASA 00014 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/aspirin....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/aspirin....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/aspirin....Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/aspirin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  19. Eye redness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral injection; Conjunctival injection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies. Others are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Many are nothing to worry about. Eye ...

  20. Aspirin in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devereaux, P J; Mrkobrada, Marko; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial variability in the perioperative administration of aspirin in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, both among patients who are already on an aspirin regimen and among those who are not. METHODS: Using a 2-by-2 factorial trial design, we randomly assigned 10......,010 patients who were preparing to undergo noncardiac surgery and were at risk for vascular complications to receive aspirin or placebo and clonidine or placebo. The results of the aspirin trial are reported here. The patients were stratified according to whether they had not been taking aspirin before...... the study (initiation stratum, with 5628 patients) or they were already on an aspirin regimen (continuation stratum, with 4382 patients). Patients started taking aspirin (at a dose of 200 mg) or placebo just before surgery and continued it daily (at a dose of 100 mg) for 30 days in the initiation stratum...

  1. Rapid Aspirin Challenge in Patients with Aspirin Allergy and Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kevin A; White, Andrew A

    2016-02-01

    Aspirin allergy in a patient with acute coronary syndrome represents one of the more urgent challenges an allergist may face. Adverse reactions to aspirin are reported in 1.5% of patients with coronary artery disease. A history of adverse reaction to aspirin often leads to unnecessary withholding of this medication or use of alternative antiplatelet therapy which may be inferior or more costly. Aspirin therapy has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary artery disease. Rapid aspirin challenge/desensitization in the aspirin allergic patient has been consistently shown to be both safe and successful in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

  2. Clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for preventing cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Bellesini, Marta; Takeda, Andrea; Middeldorp, Saskia; Donadini, Marco Paolo

    2017-12-14

    Aspirin is the prophylactic antiplatelet drug of choice for people with cardiovascular disease. Adding a second antiplatelet drug to aspirin may produce additional benefit for people at high risk and people with established cardiovascular disease. This is an update to a previously published review from 2011. To review the benefit and harm of adding clopidogrel to aspirin therapy for preventing cardiovascular events in people who have coronary disease, ischaemic cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, or were at high risk of atherothrombotic disease, but did not have a coronary stent. We updated the searches of CENTRAL (2017, Issue 6), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 4 July 2017) and Embase (Ovid, 1947 to 3 July 2017) on 4 July 2017. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP portal, and handsearched reference lists. We applied no language restrictions. We included all randomised controlled trials comparing over 30 days use of aspirin plus clopidogrel with aspirin plus placebo or aspirin alone in people with coronary disease, ischaemic cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, or at high risk of atherothrombotic disease. We excluded studies including only people with coronary drug-eluting stent (DES) or non-DES, or both. We collected data on mortality from cardiovascular causes, all-cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction, fatal and non-fatal ischaemic stroke, major and minor bleeding. The overall treatment effect was estimated by the pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI), using a fixed-effect model (Mantel-Haenszel); we used a random-effects model in cases of moderate or severe heterogeneity (I 2 ≥ 30%). We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We used GRADE profiler (GRADE Pro) to import data from Review Manager to create a 'Summary of findings' table. The search identified 13 studies in addition to the two studies in the previous version of our systematic review. Overall

  3. Eye cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draelos, Z K

    1991-01-01

    Eye cosmetics are useful to highlight and emphasize the eyes. Currently available eye cosmetics include eye shadows, eye shadow setting creams, under-eye concealers, eye-liners, mascaras, artificial eyelashes, and eyebrow pencils. Special care must be taken when patients with sensitive skin or contact lens wearers select eye cosmetics. Eye cosmetics may also be the cause of either irritant or allergic contact dermatitis, which are two causes of the upper-eyelid dermatitis syndrome.

  4. The role of aspirin in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Michael J; Jacobs, Eric J; Patrono, Carlo

    2012-04-03

    Clinical guidelines for prophylactic aspirin use currently only consider the cardiovascular benefits of aspirin, weighed against the potential harm from aspirin-induced bleeding. Daily aspirin use has been convincingly shown to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and recurrence of adenomatous polyps, but in average-risk populations, these benefits alone do not outweigh harms from aspirin-induced bleeding. Recently published secondary analyses of cardiovascular trials provide the first randomized evidence that daily aspirin use may also reduce the incidence of all cancers combined, even at low doses (75-100 mg daily). This Review considers the general mechanism of action that defines aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a class, the specific advantages of aspirin over other NSAIDs for prophylactic use, the current evidence concerning the main health outcomes affected by aspirin use, and the hypothesis that inhibition of platelet activation may mediate both the cardioprotective and cancer-preventive effects of low-dose aspirin. It also considers how even a 10% reduction in overall cancer incidence beginning during the first 10 years of treatment could tip the balance of benefits and risks favourably in average-risk populations.

  5. Aspirin resistance following pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholette, Jill M; Mamikonian, Lara; Alfieris, George M; Blumberg, Neil; Lerner, Norma B

    2010-09-01

    Aspirin is often used to prevent thrombosis in pediatric cardiac surgery. The primary study aim was to assess aspirin resistance in this context. Secondary aims were to evaluate (1) the relationship between elevated inflammatory markers and thrombosis and (2) aspirin's effect on these levels. This was a prospective observational study of children undergoing cardiac surgery managed with and without aspirin. Aspirin response was assessed using the VerifyNow system and urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 (uTxB2) measurements. Laboratory studies of inflammation were also obtained. 101 subjects were studied; 50 received aspirin. Six subjects (5.9%), 5 aspirin-treated, experienced symptomatic thrombosis. When measured by VerifyNow resistance was 43% after aspirin suppositories and 14% after additional days of oral aspirin. There was no correlation with thrombosis. Upper quartile post-operative day (POD) #5 uTxB2 was correlated with thrombosis in aspirin treated subjects (paspirin-treated subjects who experienced thrombosis had higher POD#5 uTxB2. This finding did not reach statistical significance (p=0.07). Elevated pre-operative C-reactive protein (CRP) was independently associated with thrombosis (paspirin. Aspirin inhibited ex-vivo platelet function with a low incidence of resistance. Elevated POD#5 uTxB2 and pre-operative CRP were correlated with thrombosis in aspirin treated subjects. Further studies are needed to determine whether children with high levels of uTxB2 despite aspirin therapy and/or those with elevated preoperative CRP are at increased risk for thrombosis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Pathogenesis and prevention tactics of aspirin resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ren-gang; Zhang, Jun-ping

    2007-05-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Despite its wide uses for more than 100 years, knowledge about mechanism of action and therapeutic issues of aspirin are still under discussion. The use of aspirin has been changed from an analgesic, anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory agent to an anti-thrombotic agent, especially in secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Aspirin has reduced the risk of cardiovascular events by 25%. However, the phenomenon of "aspirin resistance" has been described that in 5%-60% of patients aspirin may not achieve adequate efficacy of suppressing platelet activity. The convinced causes of this phenomenon are still unknown. It is probably due to drugs interaction, inadequate dosage and so on. By far the existing studies of aspirin are insufficient to explain all phenomena of aspirin resistance. And the results are not always uniform about the same research. Therefore, the characteristics in different population with aspirin resistance may account for the complexity. It is unrealistic to elucidate all aspirin resistance by only one pathway. More studies are required to investigate the mechanisms in different population respectively. According to the theory of traditional Chinese medicine and the trait of cardiovascular disease, which often relapses and has a long history, aspirin resistance should be considered as collaterals disease. It can be treated with aspirin and traditional Chinese drugs which have the power to strengthen body resistance, reduce phlegm, remove blood stasis and toxic materials from meridians. The problem of aspirin resistance might be solved by this way, because the traditional Chinese medicine has the superiority of selecting appropriate therapeutic methods based on syndrome differentiation for different population and regulating the whole body's function. Subsequently, cardiovascular disease might be effectively prevented.

  7. Studies of Drop/Drop and Drop/Interface Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowengrub, John; Cristini, Vittorio; Kim, Jun-Seok; Zheng, Xiaoming; Mohammed-Kassim, Zulfaa; Longmire, Ellen

    2003-11-01

    In this talk, we will study the impact and coalescence of liquid drops using a physically-based numerical model that allows seamless transitions in interface topologies combined with adaptive mesh refinement. By using a mesh size that is adaptive to the length scales associated to the lubrication pressure generated by interfaces in near contact, we accurately describe the near contact motion and recover the predictions of asymptotic analyses. We compare simulation results to recent experiments performed by Mohamed-Kassim and Longmire. The effects of multiple drops, van der Waal forces and surfactants will also be considered.

  8. Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En español Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin to Prevent Disease Browse Sections The Basics Overview ... and Risks What are the benefits of taking aspirin regularly? Low-dose aspirin can reduce your risk ...

  9. Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke Also known as aspirin primary prevention. ... if I’m taking aspirin to prevent another heart attack or stroke? The information discussed in Who may ...

  10. Antithrombotic properties of aspirin and resistance to aspirin: beyond strictly antiplatelet actions

    OpenAIRE

    Undas, Anetta; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Mann, Kenneth G.

    2007-01-01

    Aspirin is effective in the prevention of cardiovascular events in high-risk patients. The primary established effect of aspirin on hemostasis is to impair platelet aggregation via inhibition of platelet thromboxane A2 synthesis, thus reducing thrombus formation on the surface of the damaged arterial wall. Growing evidence also indicates that aspirin exerts additional antithrombotic effects, which appear to some extent unrelated to platelet thromboxane A2 production. Aspirin can reduce thromb...

  11. Effects of Aspirin on Rheological Properties of Erythrocytes In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Elblbesy, Mohamed A.; Hereba, Abdel Rahman M.; Shawki, Mamdouh M.

    2012-01-01

    Aspirin is of proven value as an antithrombotic drug. In unstable angina it reduces the risk of death and myocardial infarction by half. Most studies on the mechanism of action of aspirin have concentrated on the effect of aspirin on platelets. In the present study we have tried to prove that there is another biophysical mechanism of aspirin, and that is through the effect of aspirin on erythrocytes. In this study ten blood samples were incubated with aspirin at different concentrations. The ...

  12. Genetic Markers for Differentiating Aspirin-Hypersensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Park, Hae-Sim

    2006-01-01

    Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) and aspirin-induced urticaria/angioedema (AIU) are two major aspirin-related allergies. We summarize recent findings related to their molecular genetic mechanisms in order to identify genetic susceptibility markers for differentiating AIU and AIA. The overproduction of cysteinyl leukotriene has been suggested as a mechanism in both AIU and AIA. Increased expression of CYSLTR1 with CYLSTR1 and CYSLTR2 polymorphisms are new findings in AIA, while the ALOX5 promoter ...

  13. [From the willow to aspirin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafont, Olivier

    2007-07-01

    At the beginning was the willow bark, which was considered as a medicine by Hippocrates, Dioscorides and Plinus. During the XVIIIth century, the Reverend Edward Stone re-discovered the willow for the cure of agues. In 1829, the french pharmacist Pierre Joseph Leroux isolated salicin. Raffaelle Piria was the first to synthesize salicylic acid from salicin (salicoside). Hermann Kolbe prepared salicylic acid from sodium phenate and carbon dioxide. And then acetylsalicylic acid was first prepared by Charles Gerhardt in 1853, but he did not succeed in identifying its structure. Felix Hoffmann, Arthur Eichengrun and Heinrich Dresen from Bayer Laboratories were at the origin of the use of Aspirin as a medicine. In 1971, John Vane showed that aspirin-like drugs inhibited prostaglandine synthesis.

  14. Scanning drop sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Shinde, Aniketa A.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Jones, Ryan J.; Marcin, Martin R.; Mitrovic, Slobodan

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical or electrochemical and photochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  15. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  16. Immunological mechanisms in aspirin hypersensitivity. Studies on the immunogenicity of free aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cîrstea, M; Suhaciu, G; Cîrje, M; Ciontescu, L

    1976-10-01

    Anti-aspiryl antibodies were produced in rabbits and guinea pigs by inoculation of aspirin incorporated in complete or incomplete Freund's adjuvant. These antibodies were readily detected by passive haemagglutination using rabbit erythrocytes incubated with aspirin at alkaline pH. Aspiryl conjugates with ovalbumin, human gamma-globulin, bovine gamma-globulin and rabbit serum were also prepared by incubating the proteins with aspirin at alkaline pH. Aspiryl conjugates prepared by this technique behaved, immunologically, identically with the conjugates prepared from aspirin chloride. By contrast, the molar absorbance at 305 nm of the conjugates prepared from aspirin was about 25 times lower than the molar absorbance of the conjugates prepared from aspirin chloride. Since the absorbance of salicylic acid is about eight times greater than that of aspirin, the conclusion is drawn that the aspiryl/salicylyl ratio is significantly higher in the conjugates prepared by incubating proteins with aspirin at alkaline pH than in the conjugates prepared from aspirin chloride. In parallel experiments, salicylic acid did not induce formation of specific antibodies capable of reacting with aspirin- or salicylic acid-treated red cells. Sera giving positive passive haemagglutination with aspirin-treated erythrocytes did not react with erythrocytes treated with salicylic acid or acetic anhydride.

  17. Influence of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use on ovarian and endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdoodt, F.; Kjaer, S. K.; Friis, S.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for aspirin use in reducing the incidence and mortality of several cancer types. This has spurred a new wave of interest in this widely used drug. In this review, we present and evaluate the epidemiologic evidence of the association between the use of aspirin....... Overall, observational studies indicate modest reductions in risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer with aspirin use, whereas the results for non-aspirin NSAID use are equivocal. The strongest inverse associations have been reported for long-term consistent aspirin use, notably among subgroups of users (e.......g., those with high body mass index). Few studies have evaluated the influence of NSAID use on the mortality of ovarian or endometrial cancer, and substantial heterogeneity of study characteristics and results preclude any conclusions. Additional studies of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and ovarian...

  18. EFFECT OF ACETYLSALICYCLIC ACID (ASPIRIN ) AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIVINGSTON

    Aspirin as such, irreversibly blocks the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase (prostaglandin synthase) which catalyzes the conversion of. Archidonic acid to endoperoxide compounds. In addition to reducing the synthesis of eicosanoid mediators, ASA also interferes with the chemical mediators of the kalikrein system. As a result, aspirin ...

  19. Dynamics of deforming drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, W.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid drops play a dominant role in numerous industrial applications, such as spray coating, spray painting, inkjet printing, lithography processes, and spraying/sprinkling in agriculture or gardening. In all of these examples, the generation, flight, impact, and spreading of drops are separate

  20. Lambda-dropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    1997-01-01

    Lambda-lifting a functional program transforms it into a set of recursive equations. We present the symmetric transformation: lambda-dropping. Lambda-dropping a set of recursive equations restores block structure and lexical scope.For lack of scope, recursive equations must carry around all...... to float (for lambda-lifting) or to sink (for lambda-dropping) along the vertices of the scope tree.We believe lambda-lifting and lambda-dropping are interesting per se, both in principle and in practice, but our prime application is partial evaluation: except for Malmkjær and Ø...... with dozens of parameters, which most compilers do not handle efficiently. Lambda-dropping in a post-processing phase restores their block structure and lexical scope thereby significantly reducing both the compile time and the run time of residual programs....

  1. Pharmacogenetics of the antiplatelet effect of aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würtz, Morten; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2012-01-01

    The concept of "pharmacogenetics" addresses genetically determined variation in how individuals respond to drugs. Accordingly, specific genetic variants have been suggested as contributors to a reduced response to various antiplatelet drugs. Aspirin is a cornerstone in secondary cardiovascular prevention and has been thoroughly investigated. The efficacy of aspirin is well documented, although with considerable interindividual variation. According to meta-analyses, a reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin confers an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The platelet response to aspirin is assessed by in vitro evaluation of thromboxane-dependent platelet function. A reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin can be explained by several mechanisms, which are largely determined by clinical, pharmacodynamic, biological and genetic factors. During the past decade, numerous studies have identified genetic polymorphisms significantly associated with cardiovascular events and modulating the antiplatelet effect of aspirin. However, results have been contradictory allowing only few firm conclusions to be drawn. Polymorphisms in genes encoding glycoproteins (IIb/IIIa, Ia/IIa, VI and Ibα), cyclooxygenases (1 and 2), adenosine diphosphate receptors (P2Y1 and P2Y12) and proteins of importance for haemostasis (thromboxane A2 receptor, coagulation factor XIII, etc.) have been investigated. In particular, a polymorphism in the gene encoding glycoprotein IIb/IIIa has been associated with a reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin. The additive value of an individual's genetic makeup in predicting the antiplatelet effect of aspirin and the risk of cardiovascular events remains controversial. The present review outlines the pharmacology of aspirin and provides an overview of specific genetic variations considered to influence the antiplatelet effect of aspirin.

  2. Effect of aspirin on nasal resistance to airflow.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, A S; Lancer, J M; Moir, A A; Stevens, J C

    1985-01-01

    The effect of aspirin on nasal resistance to airflow was investigated by rhinomanometry in 25 healthy subjects before and after ingestion of aspirin or vitamin C in a double blind crossover trial. Aspirin caused a significant increase in nasal resistance compared with vitamin C. The effect of aspirin may be due to its inhibition of the synthesis of prostaglandins.

  3. Eye Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eye wear protects or corrects your vision. Examples are Sunglasses Safety goggles Glasses (also called eyeglasses) Contact ... jobs and some sports carry a risk of eye injury. Thousands of children and adults get eye ...

  4. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  5. Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or work ...

  6. Eye emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Keep flushing the eye with clean water or saline for at least 15 minutes. Seek medical help right away. Do not delay. EYE CUT, SCRATCH, OR BLOW Gently apply a clean cold compress to the eye to reduce swelling and ...

  7. Efeito do colírio de 5-fluorouracil sobre o epitélio corneano íntegro de coelhos Effects of 5-fluorouracil eye drops on intact rabbit corneal epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucieni Cristina Barbarini Ferraz

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Observar os efeitos da aplicação tópica de 5-fluorouracil (5-FU sobre o epitélio corneano íntegro. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 10 coelhos albinos (14 olhos, divididos em: grupo controle (GC, 4 olhos nos quais não se administraram drogas, grupo 1 (G1, 5 olhos que receberam 5-fluorouracil na concentração 1,25% e grupo 2 (G2, 5 olhos que receberam 5-fluorouracil na concentração de 2,5%. A droga foi instilada 4 vezes por dia, durante 7 dias, quando os animais foram sacrificados, os olhos removidos, separando-se a córnea que foi preparada de modo convencional para estudo em microscópico eletrônico de varredura. RESULTADOS: GC: observaram-se células de formato hexagonal, claras, escuras e intermediárias, compondo o epitélio corneano de coelhos. Presença de numerosas microplicas, principalmente nas células claras. Cada célula possui cerca de 1 a 3 criptas. Nos animais do G1, observou-se maior número de células escuras, regiões com diminuição no número de criptas; alterações da superfície celular, protusão na região do núcleo e descamação de células epiteliais. Os do G2 tiveram aumento de microprojeções na superfície celular, modificações nas junções intercelulares até separação de células adjacentes; diminuição do número e variabilidade no tamanho das criptas. As alterações mais freqüentes ocorreram nas células da periferia da córnea. CONCLUSÃO: O 5-fluorouracil teve efeitos deletérios no epitélio íntegro corneano de coelhos. As alterações observadas foram mais importantes nos animais que receberam a droga mais concentrada (G2 e mais freqüentes na periferia da córnea.PURPOSE: To assess the influence of the antiproliferative agent (5-FU on the intact rabbit corneal epithelium. METHODS: 10 rabbits (14 eyes,were divided into: control group (CG, 4 eyes without drug administration; G1, 5 eyes underwent treatment with topical 12.5 mg/ml 5-fluorouracil and G2, 5 eyes received 5-fluorouracil

  8. The Drop Tower Bremen -An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kampen, Peter; Könemann, Thorben; Rath, Hans J.

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University of Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of ZARM`s drop tower began. Since its inau-guration in September 1990, the eye-catching Drop Tower Bremen with a height of 146m and its characteristic glass roof has become twice a landmark on the campus of the University of Bremen and the emblem of the technology park Bremen. As such an outstanding symbol of space science in Bremen the drop tower provides an european unique facility for experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness with residual gravitational accelerations in the microgravity regime. The period of maximum 4.74s of each freely falling experiment at the Drop Tower Bremen is only limited by the height of the drop tower vacuum tube, which was fully manufactured of steal and enclosed by an outer concrete shell. Thus, the pure free fall height of each microgravity drop experiment is approximately 110m. By using the later in-stalled catapult system established in 2004 ZARM`s short-term microgravity laboratory is able to nearly double the time of free fall. This world-wide inimitable capsule catapult system meets scientists` demand of extending the period of weightlessness. During the catapult operation the experiment capsule performs a vertical parabolic flight within the drop tower vacuum tube. In this way the time of microgravity can be extended to slightly over 9s. Either in the drop or in the catapult operation routine the repetition rates of microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility are the same, generally up to 3 times per day. In comparison to orbital platforms the ground-based laboratory Drop Tower Bremen represents an economic alternative with a permanent access to weightlessness on earth. Moreover, the exceptional high quality of weightlessness in order of 1e-6 g (in the frequency range below 100

  9. A multicentre double-blind comparison of oxaprozin aspirin therapy on rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubsher, J A; Ballard, I M; Walker, B R; Gold, J A

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary clinical studies showed that oxaprozin (4,5 Diphenyl-2-oxazolepropionic acid) has anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties with a plasma half-life of about 40 hours. Consequently, a multicentre, double-blind parallel trial was conducted for 12 weeks at thirteen investigator sites, utilizing 212 patients with classic rheumatoid arthritis and comparing oxaprozin 600 mg/day, oxaprozin 1200 mg/day and aspirin 3900 mg/day. Both the oxaprozin and aspirin-treated patients had statistically significant improvement from baseline periods, in most key categories evaluated. Oxaprozin administered twice a day (b.i.d.) was as effective as aspirin administered four times a day (q.i.d.) and caused significantly less tinnitus (p less than 0.001). Fewer patients receiving high dose oxaprozin (2%) dropped out of the study because of unsatisfactory response than did those receiving aspirin (10%). There were no clinically significant laboratory abnormalities in the gastro-intestinal, renal, hepatic or haematological parameters monitored. This study suggests that oxaprozin is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. The Aspirin Foundation Scientific Conference: the history, the present state and the future of aspirin prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Tom; Elwood, Peter; Keating, Conrad; Rothwell, Peter; Detering, Elmar; Freedman, Andrew; Langley, Ruth; Logan, Richard; Phillips, Ceri; DeCensi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Aspirin Foundation Conference covered a range of topics from clinical and medical history, epidemiology, health economics, and the current uses of aspirin in general practice and in the treatment and prevention of cancer. The use of aspirin as primary prevention in people at risk of atherosclerotic events is now well known, but its use as a preventative agent in some cancer types is still under discussion, and data on colorectal and lung cancer were presented at this meeting. The pot...

  11. Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Circulation My alerts Sign In Join Sign out Facebook Twitter Home About this Journal Editorial Board General Statistics Circulation Doodle Information for Advertisers Author Reprints Commercial Reprints Customer Service and Ordering ...

  12. Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not make sense fear or nervousness dizziness double vision uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body confusion abnormally excited mood hallucination (seeing things or hearing voices that are not ...

  13. Mechanisms of aggregation inhibition by aspirin and nitrate-aspirin prodrugs in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Shona; Inkielewicz-Stepniak, Iwona; Jones, Michael; Ledwidge, Mark; Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Medina, Carlos; Radomski, Marek W; Gilmer, John F

    2012-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay of anti-platelet therapy in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, problems with aspirin safety and resistance demand clinical strategies based on multiple pharmacological approaches. Prodrugs of aspirin may offer beneficial effects in terms of gastro-intestinal safety and multiple pharmacological approaches. However, the pharmacological profile of aspirin prodrugs in human platelets has not been completed yet. We aimed to compare the effects of aspirin and prodrugs of aspirin (1-5) on human platelet aggregation stimulated by ADP and collagen and associated receptor expression (GPIIb/IIIa and P-selectin) in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and washed platelets (WP). As aspirin is released from prodrugs following esterase hydrolysis we studied the expression and activity of butyrylcholineterase (BuChE) and carboxyesterase (CE) in plasma and platelets. The mechanism of prodrug-induced platelet aggregation inhibition was explored by studying the effects of plasma and purified human BuChE on aggregation. Finally, the relative contribution of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity to nitrate-containing prodrugs of aspirin-induced inhibition of aggregation was determined using 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ,) a selective inhibitor of the soluble guanylyl cyclase. ST0702, 2, a nicotinic acid-aspirin codrug was equipotent with aspirin with respect to inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Compound 4, a NO releasing aspirin was the most potent inhibitor of ADP-induced platelet aggregation, an effect partially reversed by ODQ. The platelet inhibitory effects of aspirin prodrugs were time-dependent as the maximal inhibitory effects against collagen-induced aggregation were achieved by aspirin at 2 min, 1 at 5 min and ST0702 at 15 min. The aspirin prodrugs were significantly less potent in WP than in PRP and the reverse was true of aspirin. In the presence of complete BuChE inhibition in PRP, there was almost

  14. [Aspirin: Indications and use during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhomme, N; Doudnikoff, C; Polard, E; Henriot, B; Isly, H; Jego, P

    2017-12-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has been used ever since the Antiquity for its painkilling and anti-inflammatory effects. Its antiplatelet properties have then extended its indications to the field of coronaropathy and vascular cerebral disease, and finally to vascular placental disease. Aspirin has been widely prescribed since the 1980's to prevent pre-eclampsia, intra-uterine growth retardation and fetal death of vascular origin. It has also been proposed to prevent unexplained recurrent miscarriages. Its use during pregnancy is considered as safe, provided the daily doses do not exceed 100mg. Aspirin has been proven efficient to prevent pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction in high-risk patients. The benefits of prescribing aspirin have been demonstrated neither for vascular placental disease prevention in low risk patients, nor in cases of unexplained recurrent miscarriages. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibitory Effect of Aspirin on Cholangiocarcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boueroy, Parichart; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Boonmars, Thidarut; Sriraj, Pranee; Ratanasuwan, Panaratana; Juasook, Amornrat; Wonkchalee, Nadchanan; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Wongkham, Sopit

    2017-11-26

    Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs reduce the risk of cancer due to their anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects, which are the important mechanisms for their anti-tumor activity. Here, the effect of aspirin on human cholangiocarcinoma cells (KKU-214) and the underlying mechanisms of its action were explored. Cell proliferation was measured by sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay, while cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. Western blotting was used to explore protein expression underlying molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer treatment of aspirin. Aspirin reduced cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and altered the cell cycle phase distribution of KKU-214 cells by increasing the proportion of cells in the G0/G1 phase and reducing the proportion in the S and G2/M phases. Consistent with its effect on the cell cycle, aspirin also reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin‑dependent kinase 4 (Cdk-4), which are important for G0/G1 cell cycle progression. Treatment with aspirin led to increased induction of apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis of the mechanism underlying the effect of this drug showed that aspirin induced the expression of the tumor-suppressor protein p53 while inhibiting the anti-apoptotic protein B‑cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2). Correspondingly, the activation of caspase-9 and -3 was also increased. These findings suggest that aspirin causes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, both of which could contribute to its anti-proliferative effect. Creative Commons Attribution License

  16. Analysis on therapy efficacy of different drugs for dry eyes after cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ping Yang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the therapy efficacy of different drugs for dry eyes after cataract surgery.METHODS: Collected from June 2014 to June 2016 in patients with dry eyes in our departments of cataract surgery, a total of 60 cases with 120 eyes, according to the doctor order divided into pure sodium hyaluronate eye drops group 20 cases(40 eyes, sodium hyaluronate eye drops combined pranoprofen eye drops group 20 cases(40 eyes, sodium hyaluronate eye drops combined pranoprofen eye drops and Qiju Dihuang pill group of 20 cases(40 eyes. All patients were treated for 1mo. Observation of break up time(BUT, Shimmer Ⅰ test(SItand fluorescein corneal staining(FIwere recorded before the treatment and 1, 2wk, 1, 3mo after treatment. RESULTS: Difference of efficient rates of three groups 1mo after treatment were statistically significant(PP>0.05; at 1, 3mo after treatment compared with before treatment, the differences of the three groups were statistically significant(PPP>0.05; but sodium hyaluronate eye drops combined pranoprofen eye drops and Qiju Dihuang pill group(12.14±1.97swas superior to pure sodium hyaluronate eye drops group(10.54±1.88sand sodium hyaluronate eye drops combined pranoprofen eye drops group(12.05±1.63s.SIt: there was no statistically significant difference among three groups before treatment(P>0.05; at 1, 3mo after treatment compared with before treatment, the differences of the three groups were statistically significant(PPP>0.05; at 1, 3mo after treatment compared with before treatment, the differences of the three groups were statistically significant(PPP>0.05.CONCLUSION:Sodium hyaluronate eye drops combined pranoprofen eye drops and Qiju Dihuang pill in the treatment of dry eye after cataract surgery is better than that of sodium hyaluronate eye drops combined pranoprofen eye drops group and simple application of sodium hyaluronate eye drops, which can better improve the visual function, improve tear film stability, get better

  17. Exhaled Eicosanoids following Bronchial Aspirin Challenge in Asthma Patients with and without Aspirin Hypersensitivity: The Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalerz, L.; Sanak, M.; Kumik, J.; Gawlewicz-Mroczka, A.; Celejewska-Wójcik, N.; Ćmiel, A.; Szczeklik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Special regulatory role of eicosanoids has been postulated in aspirin-induced asthma. Objective. To investigate effects of aspirin on exhaled breath condensate (EBC) levels of eicosanoids in patients with asthma. Methods. We determined EBC eicosanoid concentrations using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS2) or both. Determinations were performed at baseline and following bronchial aspirin challenge, in two well-defined phenotypes of asthma: aspirin-sensitive and aspirin-tolerant patients. Results. Aspirin precipitated bronchial reactions in all aspirin-sensitive, but in none of aspirin-tolerant patients (ATAs). At baseline, eicosanoids profile did not differ between both asthma groups except for lipoxygenation products: 5- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-, 15-HETE) which were higher in aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) than inaspirin-tolerant subjects. Following aspirin challenge the total levels of cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs) remained unchanged in both groups. The dose of aspirin had an effect on magnitude of the response of the exhaled cys-LTs and prostanoids levels only in AIA subjects. Conclusion. The high baseline eicosanoid profiling of lipoxygenation products 5- and 15-HETE in EBC makes it possible to detect alterations in aspirin-sensitive asthma. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes, and eoxins levels in EBC after bronchial aspirin administration in stable asthma patients cannot be used as a reliable diagnostic index for aspirin hypersensitivity. PMID:22291720

  18. Exhaled Eicosanoids following Bronchial Aspirin Challenge in Asthma Patients with and without Aspirin Hypersensitivity: The Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mastalerz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Special regulatory role of eicosanoids has been postulated in aspirin-induced asthma. Objective. To investigate effects of aspirin on exhaled breath condensate (EBC levels of eicosanoids in patients with asthma. Methods. We determined EBC eicosanoid concentrations using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS2 or both. Determinations were performed at baseline and following bronchial aspirin challenge, in two well-defined phenotypes of asthma: aspirin-sensitive and aspirin-tolerant patients. Results. Aspirin precipitated bronchial reactions in all aspirin-sensitive, but in none of aspirin-tolerant patients (ATAs. At baseline, eicosanoids profile did not differ between both asthma groups except for lipoxygenation products: 5- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-, 15-HETE which were higher in aspirin-induced asthma (AIA than inaspirin-tolerant subjects. Following aspirin challenge the total levels of cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs remained unchanged in both groups. The dose of aspirin had an effect on magnitude of the response of the exhaled cys-LTs and prostanoids levels only in AIA subjects. Conclusion. The high baseline eicosanoid profiling of lipoxygenation products 5- and 15-HETE in EBC makes it possible to detect alterations in aspirin-sensitive asthma. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes, and eoxins levels in EBC after bronchial aspirin administration in stable asthma patients cannot be used as a reliable diagnostic index for aspirin hypersensitivity.

  19. Generation of reactive oxygen species in the anterior eye segment. Synergistic codrugs of N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops and mitochondria-targeted antioxidant act as a powerful therapeutic platform for the treatment of cataracts and primary open-angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Babizhayev

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondrial targeting of compounds with universal types of antioxidant activity represents a promising approach for treating a number of ROS-related ocular diseases of the aging eye and can be implicated in the management of cataracts and primary open-angle glaucoma.

  20. Impact of granular drops

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spreading and splashing of granular drops during impact with a solid target. The granular drops are formed from roughly spherical balls of sand mixed with water, which is used as a binder to hold the ball together during free-fall. We measure the instantaneous spread diameter for different impact speeds and find that the normalized spread diameter d/D grows as (tV/D)1/2. The speeds of the grains ejected during the “splash” are measured and they rarely exceed twice that of the impact speed.

  1. High dose aspirin and left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction: aspirin and myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, Anna; Hu, Kai; Bayer, Barbara; Wagner, Helga; Ertl, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann; Frantz, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    Proinflammatory proteins like inflammatory cytokines are implicated in myocardial depression and left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction. High-dose aspirin inhibits cytokine activation. Therefore, we tested the influence of high-dose aspirin treatment on left ventricular remodeling in mice after myocardial infarction. Mice were treated for 4 weeks with placebo or aspirin (120 mg/kg per day) by Alzet mini-osmotic pumps after ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Serial transthoracic echocardiography was performed at days 1, 7, and 28. Over the 4 weeks, mortality was not different between the groups (placebo 30.8%, aspirin 30.8%). On echocardiography, animals after myocardial infarction exhibited left ventricular dilatation (week 4, end-systolic area, placebo sham 8.9 +/- 1.7 vs. placebo MI 15.9 +/- 2.5 mm(2)), which was not changed by aspirin treatment (week 4, end-systolic area, aspirin MI 14.5 +/- 1.3 mm(2), p= ns vs. placebo MI). The expression of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-1beta were markedly upregulated in mice with myocardial infarction on placebo. Cytokine expression was significantly reduced by aspirin treatment while collagen deposition was not influenced. Continuous aspirin treatment (120 mg/kg/d) reduces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines after myocardial infarction, but does not affect post-infarct cardiac remodeling and cardiac function.

  2. Is clopidogrel better than aspirin following breakthrough strokes while on aspirin? A retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng; Wu, Yi-Ling; Saver, Jeffrey L; Lee, Hsuei-Chen; Lee, Jiann-Der; Chang, Ku-Chou; Wu, Chih-Ying; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Wang, Hui-Hsuan; Rao, Neal M; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is insufficient evidence on which to base a recommendation for optimal antiplatelet therapy following a stroke while on aspirin. The objective was to compare clopidogrel initiation vs aspirin reinitiation for vascular risk reduction among patients with ischaemic stroke on aspirin at the time of their index stroke. Design Retrospective. Setting We conducted a nationwide cohort study by retrieving all hospitalised patients (≥18 years) with a primary diagnosis of ischaemic stroke between 2003 and 2009 from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Participants Among 3862 patients receiving aspirin before the index ischaemic stroke and receiving either aspirin or clopidogrel after index stroke during follow-up period, 1623 were excluded due to a medication possession ratio aspirin was prescribed during the follow-up period. Follow-up was from time of the index stroke to admission for recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction, death or the end of 2010. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary end point was hospitalisation due to a new-onset major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE: composite of any stroke or myocardial infarction). The leading secondary end point was any recurrent stroke. Results Compared to aspirin, clopidogrel was associated with a lower occurrence of future MACE (HR=0.54, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.68, paspirin, clopidogrel initiation was associated with fewer recurrent vascular events than aspirin reinitiation. PMID:25468508

  3. Aspirin plus dipyridamole versus aspirin alone after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin (ESPRIT): randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkes, P H A; van Gijn, J; Kappelle, L J; Koudstaal, P J; Algra, A

    2006-05-20

    Results of trials of aspirin and dipyridamole combined versus aspirin alone for the secondary prevention of vascular events after ischaemic stroke of presumed arterial origin are inconsistent. Our aim was to resolve this uncertainty. We did a randomised controlled trial in which we assigned patients to aspirin (30-325 mg daily) with (n=1363) or without (n=1376) dipyridamole (200 mg twice daily) within 6 months of a transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke of presumed arterial origin. Our primary outcome event was the composite of death from all vascular causes, non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or major bleeding complication, whichever happened first. Treatment was open, but auditing of outcome events was blinded. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial (number ISRCTN73824458) and with (NCT00161070). Mean follow-up was 3.5 years (SD 2.0). Median aspirin dose was 75 mg in both treatment groups (range 30-325); extended-release dipyridamole was used by 83% (n=1131) of patients on the combination regimen. Primary outcome events arose in 173 (13%) patients on aspirin and dipyridamole and in 216 (16%) on aspirin alone (hazard ratio 0.80, 95% CI 0.66-0.98; absolute risk reduction 1.0% per year, 95% CI 0.1-1.8). Addition of the ESPRIT data to the meta-analysis of previous trials resulted in an overall risk ratio for the composite of vascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction of 0.82 (95% CI 0.74-0.91). Patients on aspirin and dipyridamole discontinued trial medication more often than those on aspirin alone (470 vs 184), mainly because of headache. The ESPRIT results, combined with the results of previous trials, provide sufficient evidence to prefer the combination regimen of aspirin plus dipyridamole over aspirin alone as antithrombotic therapy after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin.

  4. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... form of childhood eye cancer. Hemangioma is a benign tumor of the choroid and retina that starts in the blood vessels. Other, rare cancers of the eye include: Conjunctival melanoma is a tumor of the conjunctiva, which is ...

  5. Eye Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Anatomy en Español email Send this article to a ... You at Risk For Glaucoma? Childhood Glaucoma Eye Anatomy Five Common Glaucoma Tests Glaucoma Facts and Stats ...

  6. Relation of aspirin failure to clinical outcome and to platelet response to aspirin in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigel, Roy; Hod, Hanoch; Fefer, Paul; Asher, Elad; Novikov, Ilia; Shenkman, Boris; Savion, Naphtaly; Varon, David; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2011-02-01

    Aspirin failure, defined as occurrence of an acute coronary syndrome despite aspirin use, has been associated with a higher cardiovascular risk profile and worse prognosis. Whether this phenomenon is a manifestation of patient characteristics or failure of adequate platelet inhibition by aspirin has never been studied. We evaluated 174 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction. Of them, 118 (68%) were aspirin naive and 56 (32%) were regarded as having aspirin failure. Platelet function was analyzed after ≥72 hours of aspirin therapy in all patients. Platelet reactivity was studied by light-transmitted aggregometry and under flow conditions. Six-month incidence of major adverse coronary events (death, recurrent acute coronary syndrome, and/or stroke) was determined. Those with aspirin failure were older (p = 0.002), more hypertensive (p aspirin-failure group (14.3% vs 2.5% p aspirin failure had lower arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation (32 ± 24 vs 45 ± 30, p = 0.003) after aspirin therapy compared to their aspirin-naive counterparts. However, this was not significant after adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics (p = 0.82). Similarly, there were no significant differences in adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation and platelet deposition under flow conditions. In conclusion, our results suggest that aspirin failure is merely a marker of higher-risk patient profiles and not a manifestation of inadequate platelet response to aspirin therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative effect of clopidogrel plus aspirin and aspirin monotherapy on hematological parameters using propensity score matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayasaka M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Masatoshi Hayasaka,1 Yasuo Takahashi,2 Yayoi Nishida,2 Yoshikazu Yoshida,1 Shinji Hidaka,3 Satoshi Asai41Department of Pharmacy, Nihon University Itabashi Hospital, Tokyo, 2Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Clinical Trials Research Center, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 3Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Regulatory Science, Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Nihon University, Chiba, 4Division of Pharmacology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Clopidogrel and aspirin are antiplatelet agents that are recommended to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other cardiovascular events. Dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin has been shown to increase the risk of hemorrhage, but the effects of the drugs on laboratory parameters have not been well studied in real-world clinical settings. Therefore, we evaluated and compared the effects of combination therapy with clopidogrel plus aspirin and aspirin monotherapy on laboratory parameters.Methods: We used data from the Nihon University School of Medicine Clinical Data Warehouse obtained between November 2004 and May 2011 to identify cohorts of new users (n = 130 of clopidogrel (75 mg/day plus aspirin (100 mg/day and a propensity score matched sample of new users (n = 130 of aspirin alone (100 mg/day. We used a multivariate regression model to compare serum levels of creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase, as well as hematological parameters including hemoglobin level, hematocrit, and white blood cell, red blood cell, and platelet counts up to 2 months after the start of administration of the study drugs.Results: There were no significant differences for any characteristics and baseline laboratory parameters between users of clopidogrel plus aspirin and users of aspirin alone. Reductions in white blood cell and red blood cell counts, hemoglobin levels, and

  8. The mechanism of action of aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, J R; Botting, R M

    2003-06-15

    The therapy of rheumatism began thousands of years ago with the use of decoctions or extracts of herbs or plants such as willow bark or leaves, most of which turned out to contain salicylates. Following the advent of synthetic salicylate, Felix Hoffman, working at the Bayer company in Germany, made the acetylated form of salicylic acid in 1897. This drug was named "Aspirin" and became the most widely used medicine of all time. In 1971, Vane discovered the mechanism by which aspirin exerts its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic actions. He proved that aspirin and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit the activity of the enzyme now called cyclooxygenase (COX) which leads to the formation of prostaglandins (PGs) that cause inflammation, swelling, pain and fever. However, by inhibiting this key enzyme in PG synthesis, the aspirin-like drugs also prevented the production of physiologically important PGs which protect the stomach mucosa from damage by hydrochloric acid, maintain kidney function and aggregate platelets when required. This conclusion provided a unifying explanation for the therapeutic actions and shared side effects of the aspirin-like drugs. Twenty years later, with the discovery of a second COX gene, it became clear that there are two isoforms of the COX enzyme. The constitutive isoform, COX-1, supports the beneficial homeostatic functions, whereas the inducible isoform, COX-2, becomes upregulated by inflammatory mediators and its products cause many of the symptoms of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid and osteoarthritis.

  9. Molecular targets of aspirin and cancer prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, L; Ai, G; Spitale, R C; Bhat, G J

    2014-01-01

    Salicylates from plant sources have been used for centuries by different cultures to treat a variety of ailments such as inflammation, fever and pain. A chemical derivative of salicylic acid, aspirin, was synthesised and mass produced by the end of the 19th century and is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Its cardioprotective properties are well established; however, recent evidence shows that it can also act as a chemopreventive agent. Its antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory actions occur through the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. The precise mechanisms leading to its anticancer effects are not clearly established, although multiple mechanisms affecting enzyme activity, transcription factors, cellular signalling and mitochondrial functions have been proposed. This review presents a brief account of the major COX-dependent and independent pathways described in connection with aspirin's anticancer effects. Aspirin's unique ability to acetylate biomolecules besides COX has not been thoroughly investigated nor have all the targets of its primary metabolite, salicylic acid been identified. Recent reports on the ability of aspirin to acetylate multiple cellular proteins warrant a comprehensive study to investigate the role of this posttranslational modification in its anticancer effects. In this review, we also raise the intriguing possibility that aspirin may interact and acetylate cellular molecules such as RNA, and metabolites such as CoA, leading to a change in their function. Research in this area will provide a greater understanding of the mechanisms of action of this drug. PMID:24874482

  10. A Double Blind Clinical Trial on the Efficacy of Honey Drop in Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Salehi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical honey eye drops in patients with diagnosed VKC. Methods. This clinical trial was conducted on 60 patients with diagnosed VKC. The patients were selected and randomly allocated between two groups of 30. Patients in two groups received honey eye drop (60% in artificial tear or placebo, other than cromolyn and fluorometholone 1% eye drops, to be used topically in each eye, four times per day. The patients were examined with slit lamp and torch at baseline and the follow-up visits on the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months of the study for redness, limbal papillae, and intraocular pressure. Results. Out of 60 patients who completed the study, 19 patients (31.7% were female. There was significant increase in eye pressure and reduction in redness as well as limbal papillae, following the consumption of the honey drop in honey group compared to placebo control group (P<0.05. At the end of trial, one patient in honey group and 7 ones in placebo group had limbal papillae (P<0.05. Conclusion. Topical honey eye drops, when used along with Cromolyn and Fluorometholone eye drops, might be beneficial for the treatment of VKC.

  11. A double blind clinical trial on the efficacy of honey drop in vernal keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Ali; Jabarzare, Solmaz; Neurmohamadi, Mohammadreza; Kheiri, Soleiman; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. This trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical honey eye drops in patients with diagnosed VKC. Methods. This clinical trial was conducted on 60 patients with diagnosed VKC. The patients were selected and randomly allocated between two groups of 30. Patients in two groups received honey eye drop (60% in artificial tear) or placebo, other than cromolyn and fluorometholone 1% eye drops, to be used topically in each eye, four times per day. The patients were examined with slit lamp and torch at baseline and the follow-up visits on the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months of the study for redness, limbal papillae, and intraocular pressure. Results. Out of 60 patients who completed the study, 19 patients (31.7%) were female. There was significant increase in eye pressure and reduction in redness as well as limbal papillae, following the consumption of the honey drop in honey group compared to placebo control group (P < 0.05). At the end of trial, one patient in honey group and 7 ones in placebo group had limbal papillae (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Topical honey eye drops, when used along with Cromolyn and Fluorometholone eye drops, might be beneficial for the treatment of VKC.

  12. 21 CFR 520.1409 - Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets. 520.1409... Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains 0.5 milligram of methylprednisolone and 300 milligrams of aspirin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) NAS/NRC...

  13. A critical appraisal of the phenomenon of aspirin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup Poulsen, Tina; Risom Kristensen, Søren; Atar, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay antiplatelet treatment in patients with high risk of cardiovascular atherothrombotic events, and its beneficial effect is documented in several clinical trials. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of aspirin has been questioned by the emergence of the concept of 'aspirin...

  14. PIXE analysis of trace metals in aspirin-treated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rinsvelt, H.A.; Sater, R.; Hurd, R.W.; Andres, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Aspirin is known to complex metals, yet its effect on trace metals of the body remains poorly characterized. Chronic aspirin treatment of rats for one week produced significant alterations of serum iron, zinc, and selenium, and liver selenium and copper. Implications of metal complexation on the mechanism of action of aspirin and the association with Reye's Syndrome are discussed.

  15. PIXE analysis of trace metals in aspirin-treated rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rinsvelt, H. A.; Sater, R.; Hurd, R. W.; Andres, J. M.

    1985-05-01

    Aspirin is known to complex metals, yet its effect on trace metals of the body remains poorly characterized. Chronic aspirin treatment of rats for one week produced significant alterations of serum iron, zinc, and selenium, and liver selenium and copper. Implications of metal complexation on the mechanism of action of aspirin and the association with Reye's Syndrome are discussed.

  16. Drop tube technical tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Criteria, using fundamental thermochemical dynamics, were developed to assist a scientist using the Drop Tube Facility in designing a good experiment. The types of parameters involved in designing the experiments include the type of furnace, the type of atmosphere, and in general which materials are better behaved than others as determined by past experience in the facility. One of the major advantages of the facility lies in its ability to provide large undercoolings in the cooling curve during the drops. A beginning was to consider the effect of oxygen and other gases upon the amount of undercooling observed. The starting point of the thermochemistry was given by Ellingham and later transformed into what is known as the Richardson Chart. The effect of surface oxidations upon the nucleation phenomena can be observed in each specimen.

  17. Outcomes after complete endoscopic sinus surgery and aspirin desensitization in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adappa, Nithin D; Ranasinghe, Viran J; Trope, Michal; Brooks, Steven G; Glicksman, Jordan T; Parasher, Arjun K; Palmer, James N; Bosso, John V

    2018-01-01

    In this study we assessed patient outcomes after complete endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) and aspirin desensitization for patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients with aspirin challenge-proven AERD who underwent complete ESS followed by aspirin desensitization. Outcomes assessed included need for revision surgery and quality-of-life measures using the 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcomes Test (SNOT-22). Data were collected preoperatively, postoperatively prior to desensitization, and then at intervals post-desensitization through 30 months after aspirin desensitization. A longitudinal linear mixed-effects model was used for data analysis. Thirty-four patients met the inclusion criteria for this study. Thirty-two patients successfully completed aspirin desensitization and were subsequently followed for 30 months after desensitization. Two patients were unable to complete desensitization. Five patients discontinued aspirin maintenance therapy due to gastrointestinal and respiratory side effects. Within the follow-up period, there were only 3 (9.4%) revision sinus surgeries. Notably, 1 of these revision cases occurred in a patient who had discontinued aspirin maintenance therapy. After surgical treatment and prior to desensitization patients had significant reductions in SNOT-22 scores. Our results demonstrate that total SNOT-22 scores remained statistically unchanged from immediate post-desensitization throughout the 30-month follow-up period. Complete sinus surgery followed by timely aspirin desensitization and maintenance therapy is an effective combination in the long-term management of sinus disease in patients with AERD. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  18. Dropped object protection analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsen, Ingve

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Offshore structural engineering Impact from dropped object is a typical accident action (NOKSOK N-004, 2013). Hence, the DOP structure is to be analyzed in an accidental limit state (ALS) design practice, which means that a non-linear finite element analysis can be applied. The DOP structure will be based on a typical DOP structure. Several FEM analyses are performed for the DOP structure. Different shapes size and weights and various impact positions are used for si...

  19. Mechanisms of aspirin-sensitive asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Ying

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now widely accepted that aspirin, along with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, may precipitate asthma attacks in a minority of susceptible individuals. The syndrome is part of a mucosal inflammatory disease that typically affects the nasal, as well as the bronchial, mucosa and sometimes the gut and skin also. Although the mucosal cellular infiltrate in aspirin-sensitive asthma and rhinitis resembles that of asthma and rhinitis in general, there is evidence of increased expression of asthma-relevant cytokines, such as interleukin-5 and granulocyte–macrophage colony stimulating factor, and a more intense infiltrate of mast cells and eosinophils. One key feature of aspirin-sensitive asthma is thought to be the overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes, principally by these local mast cells and eosinophils, but whether this represents a fundamental abnormality or is simply a consequence of greater numbers and activation of inflammatory cells is unclear. Genetic polymorphisms of the leukotriene C4 synthase gene, which result in elevated expression of this enzyme, may also play a role. In addition, overexpression of cysteinyl leukotriene receptors, particularly CysLT1, may contribute to an enhanced response of local inflammatory and structural cells to cysteinyl leukotrienes. Aspirin challenge in these patients is accompanied by acute further elevation of the already elevated baseline cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis, a phenomenon that is most closely related to the ability of aspirin and related NSAIDs to inhibit the cyclooxygenase enzyme COX-1. The reason for this is unknown, although it has been suggested that the COX-1 product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 serves as a ‘brake’ to leukotriene synthesis and that somehow this mechanism is deficient in aspirin-sensitive asthmatics. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of aspirin-sensitive asthma will undoubtedly lead to better approaches to treatment. Aside from the use of

  20. Aspirin and colorectal cancer: the promise of precision chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, David A; Cao, Yin; Chan, Andrew T

    2016-03-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has become one of the most commonly used drugs, given its role as an analgesic, antipyretic and agent for cardiovascular prophylaxis. Several decades of research have provided considerable evidence demonstrating its potential for the prevention of cancer, particularly colorectal cancer. Broader clinical recommendations for aspirin-based chemoprevention strategies have recently been established; however, given the known hazards of long-term aspirin use, larger-scale adoption of an aspirin chemoprevention strategy is likely to require improved identification of individuals for whom the protective benefits outweigh the harms. Such a precision medicine approach may emerge through further clarification of aspirin's mechanism of action.

  1. The role of aspirin-triggered lipoxins in the mechanism of action of aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Derek W

    2005-01-01

    Few drugs have treated so many diseases, provided us with so much understanding of their pathogenesis, and tested our scientific creativity over the last 100 years as much as aspirin. Originally, the beneficial effects of aspirin were shown to stem from its inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX 2)-derived prostanoids, fatty acid metabolites that modulate host defense and regulate the cardiovascular system. However, the inhibition of COX 2 enzyme activity and prostaglandin synthesis has never fully explained aspirin's repertoire of anti-inflammatory effects, leaving many questions pertaining to its true mechanism of action unanswered. Here, data from a series of comparatively recent experiments exploring aspirin's unique ability to acetylate the active site of inducible COX 2 and generate a family of lipid mediators called the epi-Lipoxins will be discussed in light of their ability to exert profound modulatory effects on the innate and adaptive immune systems.

  2. Oral aspirin for treating venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Carvalho, Paulo Eduardo; Magolbo, Natiara G; De Aquino, Rebeca F; Weller, Carolina D

    2016-02-18

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) or varicose ulcers are the final stage of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), and are the most common type of leg ulcer. The development of VLUs on ankles and lower legs can occur spontaneously or after minor trauma. The ulcers are often painful and exudative, healing is often protracted and recurrence is common. This cycle of healing and recurrence has a considerable impact on the health and quality of life of individuals, and healthcare and socioeconomic costs. VLUs are a common and costly problem worldwide; prevalence is estimated to be between 1.65% to 1.74% in the western world and is more common in adults aged 65 years and older. The main treatment for a VLU is a firm compression bandage. Compression assists by reducing venous hypertension, enhancing venous return and reducing peripheral oedema. However, studies show that it only has moderate effects on healing, with up to 50% of VLUs unhealed after two years of compression. Non-adherence may be the principal cause of these poor results, but presence of inflammation in people with CVI may be another factor, so a treatment that suppresses inflammation (healing ulcers more quickly) and reduces the frequency of ulcer recurrence (thereby prolonging time between recurrent episodes) would be an invaluable intervention to complement compression treatments. Oral aspirin may have a significant impact on VLU clinical practice worldwide. Evidence for the effectiveness of aspirin on ulcer healing and recurrence in high quality RCTs is currently lacking. To assess the benefits and harms of oral aspirin on the healing and recurrence of venous leg ulcers. In May 2015 we searched: The Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. Additional searches were made in trial registers and reference lists of relevant publications for

  3. A General Chemistry Laboratory Theme: Spectroscopic Analysis of Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Houston; O'Donnell, Stephen E.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the introduction of spectroscopy into the general chemistry laboratory using a series of experiments based on a common substance, aspirin. In the first lab the students synthesize and recrystallize aspirin and take melting points of their product, an aspirin standard, and salicylic acid. The students perform the remaining experiments on a rotating basis where the following four labs run simultaneously: structural characterization of the synthesized aspirin by IR and NMR; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by UV vis spectroscopy; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by HPLC; and analysis of calcium in commercial buffered aspirin tablets by AAS. In each of the analysis experiments, students collect, graph, and analyze their data using a spreadsheet. We have found that this series of labs has been very beneficial to our students. From the course evaluations, students indicate that they are beginning to understand how chemistry is applied outside of the classroom.

  4. Rivaroxaban with or without aspirin in stable cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eikelboom, John W; Connolly, Stuart J; Bosch, Jackie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. METHODS: In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive...... rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin (100 mg once daily), rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily), or aspirin (100 mg once daily). The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. The study was stopped for superiority of the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group after...... a mean follow-up of 23 months. RESULTS: The primary outcome occurred in fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group than in the aspirin-alone group (379 patients [4.1%] vs. 496 patients [5.4%]; hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.86; P

  5. Is clopidogrel better than aspirin following breakthrough strokes while on aspirin? A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng; Wu, Yi-Ling; Saver, Jeffrey L; Lee, Hsuei-Chen; Lee, Jiann-Der; Chang, Ku-Chou; Wu, Chih-Ying; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Wang, Hui-Hsuan; Rao, Neal M; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2014-12-02

    There is insufficient evidence on which to base a recommendation for optimal antiplatelet therapy following a stroke while on aspirin. The objective was to compare clopidogrel initiation vs aspirin reinitiation for vascular risk reduction among patients with ischaemic stroke on aspirin at the time of their index stroke. Retrospective. We conducted a nationwide cohort study by retrieving all hospitalised patients (≥18 years) with a primary diagnosis of ischaemic stroke between 2003 and 2009 from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Among 3862 patients receiving aspirin before the index ischaemic stroke and receiving either aspirin or clopidogrel after index stroke during follow-up period, 1623 were excluded due to a medication possession ratio history of atrial fibrillation, valvular heart disease or coagulopathy. Therefore, 1884 patients were included in our final analysis. Patients were categorised into two groups based on whether clopidogrel or aspirin was prescribed during the follow-up period. Follow-up was from time of the index stroke to admission for recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction, death or the end of 2010. The primary end point was hospitalisation due to a new-onset major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE: composite of any stroke or myocardial infarction). The leading secondary end point was any recurrent stroke. Compared to aspirin, clopidogrel was associated with a lower occurrence of future MACE (HR=0.54, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.68, paspirin, clopidogrel initiation was associated with fewer recurrent vascular events than aspirin reinitiation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Reverse effect of aspirin: is the prothrombotic effect after aspirin discontinuation mediated by cyclooxygenase 2 inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutremepuich, Christian; Aguejouf, Omar; Eizayaga, Francisco X; Desplat, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    While aspirin is the drug most often used to prevent cardiovascular complications, its discontinuation induces an increased risk of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic stroke in some patients. We hypothesized that infinitesimal concentrations of aspirin could persist in plasma after its discontinuation, thereby inducing a prothrombotic effect that could be due to a modification in the mechanism of action of aspirin via the cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) and COX-2 pathways. We studied the effects of ultra-low-dose aspirin (ULDA) as well as those of sc-560 and ns-398, specific COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors, on induced hemorrhagic time and in a model of laser-induced thrombosis in rats. In the laser-induced thrombosis model, ULDA treatment increased the number of emboli and the duration of embolization, thereby confirming its prothrombotic effect described in previous publications. This effect was also observed in rats pretreated with sc-560 but not in those pretreated with ns-398. We demonstrated that ULDA induced a prothrombotic effect in the rats studied. This strongly suggests that a very small amount of aspirin could remain in the patient's blood after aspirin therapy, leading to cardiovascular complications. This effect may be mediated by the COX-2 pathway. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Inappropriate combination of warfarin and aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Burak; Demir, Hakan; Mutlu, Ayhan; Daşlı, Tolga; Erkol, Ayhan; Erden, İsmail

    2016-03-01

    A combination of warfarin and aspirin is associated with increased bleeding compared with warfarin monotherapy. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence and appropriateness of the combination of warfarin and aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or mechanical heart valve (MHV). This cross-sectional study included consecutive patients with AF or MHV on chronic warfarin therapy (>3 months) without acute coronary syndrome or have not undergone a revascularization procedure in the preceding year. Medical history, concomitant diseases, and treatment data were acquired through patient interviews and from hospital records. Three hundred and sixty patients (213 with AF, 147 with MHV) were included. In those with AF, a significantly higher warfarin-aspirin combination was observed with concomitant vascular disease (38.8% vs. 14.6%), diabetes (36.6% vs. 16.3%), statin therapy (40% vs. 16.9%), left ventricular systolic dysfunction (33.3% vs. 17.5%) (paspirin combination were concomitant vascular disease, diabetes, and (younger) age in patients with AF and were concomitant AF and male sex in patients with MHV. Interestingly, the incidence of combination therapy was found to increase with a higher HAS-BLED score in both patients with AF and MHV (paspirin was found to be prescribed to patients with AF mainly for the prevention of cardiovascular events, for which warfarin monotherapy usually suffices. On the other hand, co-treatment with aspirin appeared to be underused in patients with MHV.

  8. [Cyclooxigenase-1 gene polymorphism and aspirin resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar', T N; Kravchenko, N A

    2012-01-01

    The literature data concerning structure of cyclo-oxigenase-1--the key enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis and the main target of anti-platelet therapy with the use of acetylsalicilic acid are presented in the review. The data on cyclooxigenase-1 gene polymorphism, distribution of the revealed variants in various populations and their possible correlation with biochemical and functional aspirin resistance are presented.

  9. Aspirin augments hyaluronidase induced adhesion inhibition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative adhesions occur after virtually all abdomino-pelvic surgery and are the leading cause of intestinal obstruction and other gynaecologic problems. We used an animal model to test the efficacy of combined administration of aspirin and hyaluronidase on adhesion formation. Adhesions were induced using ...

  10. Van der Waals Interactions in Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Anthony; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The ability of molecules to yield multiple solid forms, or polymorphs, has significance for diverse applications ranging from drug design and food chemistry to nonlinear optics and hydrogen storage. In particular, aspirin has been used and studied for over a century, but has only recently been shown to have an additional polymorphic form, known as form II. Since the two observed solid forms of aspirin are degenerate in terms of lattice energy, kinetic effects have been suggested to determine the metastability of the less abundant form II. Here, first-principles calculations provide an alternative explanation based on free-energy differences at room temperature. The explicit consideration of many-body van der Waals interactions in the free energy demonstrates that the stability of the most abundant form of aspirin is due to a subtle coupling between collective electronic fluctuations and quantized lattice vibrations. In addition, a systematic analysis of the elastic properties of the two forms of aspirin rules out mechanical instability of form II as making it metastable.

  11. Aspirin treatment reduces platelet resistance to deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, S M; Smith, C M; Rao, G H; White, J G

    1987-01-01

    The present investigation has evaluated the influence of aspirin, its constituents, and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on the resistance of human platelets to aspiration into micropipettes. Aspirin increased the length of platelet extensions into the micropipette over the entire negative tension range of 0.04 to 0.40 dynes/cm after exposure to the drug in vitro or after ingestion of the agent. Other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, ibuprofen and indomethacin, did not increase platelet deformability. The influence of aspirin was mimicked to some degree by high concentrations of salicylic acid, but acetylation of platelets with acetic anhydride had little influence on platelet deformability. Incubation of platelets with both salicylic acid and acetic anhydride had no more effect than salicylic acid alone. Benzoic acid, chemically similar to salicylic acid, had a minimal effect. The studies demonstrate that aspirin makes platelets more deformable, while components of the drug or other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents and cyclooxygenase inhibitors do not have the same influence on resistance to deformation.

  12. Aspirin in pregnancy : clinical and biochemical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A. Bremer (Henk)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAspirin, acetylsalicylic acid, is the most frequently consumed drug in pregnancy,47 mostly taken without a prescription because of headache or a minor ailment. 226,277 Numerous preparations containing acetylsalicylic acid are freely available over the counter under a variety of

  13. Diabetes eye exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam ...

  14. Drop jumping. II. The influence of dropping height on the biomechanics of drop jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M F; Huijing, P A; van Ingen Schenau, G J

    In the literature, athletes preparing for explosive activities are recommended to include drop jumping in their training programs. For the execution of drop jumps, different techniques and different dropping heights can be used. This study was designed to investigate for the performance of bounce

  15. Tuberculosis; Eye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    muscle could present as a painful swelling over the corresponding part of the eye with associated restriction of ocular motility involving the muscle. TUBERCULOSIS OF THE EYE. CORNEA: Primary infection of the cornea is very rare. Corneal involvement is usually due to a hypersentitivity or cross-reaction whereby the.

  16. Eye cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, M N

    2000-10-01

    There are many eye cosmetics available to enhance the beauty or improve the appearance of the face. To prevent infection, most eye cosmetics contain preservatives. Fragrance is usually absent to keep the products as safe as possible. Hypoallergenic products contain fewer ingredients and may be more appropriate for patients with sensitive skin.

  17. Platelet hyperfunction is decreased by additional aspirin loading in patients presenting with myocardial infarction on daily aspirin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Ingrid; Spiel, Alexander O; Frossard, Martin; Derhaschnig, Ulla; Riedmüller, Eva; Jilma, Bernd

    2010-06-01

    Currently 162-325 mg aspirin is recommended for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome. We tested the effect of an additional loading dose of 250 mg aspirin at the onset of acute coronary syndrome in patients who were already on chronic therapy with 100 mg aspirin. This was a prospective trial in patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome that included a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial subgroup. An emergency department in a tertiary care center. Consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome were enrolled, including a cohort already on chronic aspirin therapy. Patients received an intravenous infusion of 250 mg aspirin. Platelet function was measured with a platelet function analyzer in 234 patients before and after aspirin infusion. Aspirin infusion prolonged collagen epinephrine closure times in almost all patients. Aspirin infusion further lowered thromboxane B(2) levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome who were on chronic aspirin therapy before admission. Concomitantly, collagen epinephrine closure times increased by 22% from 223 secs (95% confidence interval, 192-255 secs) before to 273 secs (95% confidence interval, 252-294 secs) after aspirin infusion (p myocardial infarction on daily aspirin therapy (53%) displayed platelet hyperfunction (collagen epinephrine closure times aspirin infusion further decreased platelet function in these patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (30% prolongation of collagen epinephrine closure times; p myocardial infarction still displayed platelet hyperfunction (p = .02). Aspirin loading in the emergency room further reduced thromboxane B(2) levels and further inhibited platelet function in many patients with acute coronary syndrome already on 100 mg aspirin.

  18. A Review on the Relationship between Aspirin and Bone Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Yong Chin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin is a cyclooxygenase inhibitor commonly used in primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Its users are elderly population susceptible to osteoporosis. It also inhibits the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 essential in bone remodeling. This prompts the question whether it can influence bone health among users. This review aimed to summarize the current literature on the use of aspirin on bone health. A literature search on experimental and clinical evidence on the effects of aspirin on bone health was performed using major scientific databases. In vitro studies showed that aspirin could enhance the survival of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the progenitors of osteoblasts, and stimulate the differentiation of preosteoblasts. Aspirin also inhibited the nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB pathway and decreased the expression of receptor activator of NFκB ligand, thus suppressing the formation of osteoclast. Aspirin could prevent bone loss in animal models of osteoporosis. Despite a positive effect on bone mineral density, the limited human epidemiological studies revealed that aspirin could not reduce fracture risk. A study even suggested that the use of aspirin increased fracture risk. As a conclusion, aspirin may increase bone mineral density but its effect on fracture prevention is inconclusive. More data are needed to determine the effects of aspirin and bone health in human.

  19. Duration of increased bleeding tendency after cessation of aspirin therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin has a significant effect on hemostasis, so it is often recommended that patients taking aspirin discontinue treatment before elective surgery. While off aspirin, these patients may be at risk of thrombosis. The optimum period of time that aspirin should be withheld is controversial. The aim of this study was to establish the duration of the antihemostatic effect of prolonged aspirin therapy. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective study, 51 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into 3 groups, each receiving an identical tablet for 14 days. One group received a placebo tablet; individuals in the other two groups received either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin once a day. Template bleeding times and specific platelet function testing (using the PFA-100; Dade Behring) were carried out on subjects before therapy and again after its completion until they returned to baseline. RESULTS: Thirty-eight volunteers complied sufficiently with the protocol to provide useful results. All bleeding times normalized within 96 hours and all platelet function tests within 144 hours after stopping aspirin. There was no demonstrable hemostatic defect in any volunteer persisting by or beyond the sixth day after treatment cessation. There was no apparent difference in duration of effect between those taking either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin. CONCLUSIONS: This study uses sensitive measures of platelet function to demonstrate the duration of increased bleeding tendency after withdrawal of aspirin therapy. It supports discontinuation of aspirin therapy 5 days before elective surgery (with the operation being performed on the sixth day).

  20. The role of aspirin in childhood tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, Johan F; Janse van Rensburg, Anita; Laubscher, Jacoba A; Springer, Priscilla

    2011-08-01

    Arterial stroke is the main cause of poor outcome in childhood tuberculous meningitis. Aspirin has an antithrombotic action at low dose and anti-ischemic and anti-inflammatory properties, which are dose-related. The aim of the study was to explore the possible benefits of aspirin in children with tuberculous meningitis. A total of 146 consecutive children with a diagnosis of probable tuberculous meningitis were studied. Patients were randomized into 3 groups: (1) placebo group, (2) low-dose aspirin group, and (3) high-dose aspirin group. Twenty-nine additional patients who received aspirin before admission were excluded from the randomized study, but continued on low-dose aspirin. Aspirin, irrespective of dose, did not show any significant benefit regarding morbidity (hemiparesis and developmental outcome) and mortality. Aspirin was well tolerated, but 1 death was probably related to aspirin. The fact that the outcome of the high-dose aspirin group compared favorably with the other treatment groups despite younger age and more severe neurological involvement at baseline needs further investigation.

  1. Pupil dilation using drops vs gel: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseiev, E; Loberman, D; Zunz, E; Kesler, A; Loewenstein, A; Mandelblum, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy in pupil dilation and degree of discomfort between topical instillation of mydriatic drops and gel. Methods The study included 60 patients with no previous ocular history of trauma and surgery. One eye was dilated with two drops (tropicamide 0.5% and phenylephrine 10%), and the other with one drop of gel (tropicamide 0.5%+phenylephrine 5%). Pupil size was measured by a Colvard pupillometer at baseline and 5, 15, 30, and 45 min following instillation. Pain upon instillation was measured by visual analog scale (VAS). Results There was no difference in pupil size at baseline. Use of the gel achieved greater mydriasis than drops (P=0.01), and was also associated with lower pain scores (P=0.003). In diabetic patients, pupil size was smaller at baseline and following instillation of drops and gel. Use of the gel achieved an even greater degree of pupil dilation in this subset of patients than drops (P=0.019). Conclusions Gel formulation achieved significantly greater pupil dilation than drops, despite a lower concentration of phenylephrine, and was also associated with significantly lower patient discomfort. This study is the first report of improved mydriatic efficacy in diabetic patients. PMID:25857606

  2. Glaucoma and dry eye disease: the role of preservatives in glaucoma medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Sitompul

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a common cause of irreversible blindness with increasing prevalence. Some of glaucoma patients will also experience dry eye. Dry eye is the most frequent side effect related to benzalkonium chloride (BAC-containing eye drop  used for glaucoma patients. In addition, glaucoma and dry eyes have shared risk factors that are old age and female. Dry eye among glaucoma patients need to be treated promptly as it produces discomfort, reduces patients’ compliance and   decreases success rate of glaucoma therapy. Dry eye symptoms can be treated by applying preservative-free eye drop, giving combination of preservative containing and preservative-free eye drop to reduce BAC exposure, prescribing artificial tear and conducting surgery to minimize or eliminate the need of topical medication. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:302-5Keywords: benzalkonium chloride, dry eye, glaucoma

  3. An alkyne-aspirin chemical reporter for the detection of aspirin-dependent protein modification in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Leslie A; Zaro, Balyn W; Miller, Stephanie M; Pratt, Matthew R

    2013-10-02

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is widely used for the acute treatment of inflammation and the management of cardiovascular disease. More recently, it has also been shown to reduce the risk of a variety of cancers. The anti-inflammatory properties of aspirin in pain-relief, cardio-protection, and chemoprevention are well-known to result from the covalent inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes through nonenzymatic acetylation of key serine residues. However, any additional molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the beneficial effects of aspirin remain poorly defined. Interestingly, studies over the past 50 years using radiolabeled aspirin demonstrated that other proteins are acetylated by aspirin and enrichment with antiacetyl-lysine antibodies identified 33 potential targets of aspirin-dependent acetylation. Herein we describe the development of an alkyne-modified aspirin analogue (AspAlk) as a chemical reporters of aspirin-dependent acetylation in living cells. When combined with the Cu(I)-catalyzed [3 + 2] azide-alkyne cycloaddition, this chemical reporter allowed for the robust in-gel fluorescent detection of acetylation and the subsequent enrichment and identification of 120 proteins, 112 of which have not been previously reported to be acetylated by aspirin in cellular or in vivo contexts. Finally, AspAlk was shown to modify the core histone proteins, implicating aspirin as a potential chemical-regulator of transcription.

  4. Aspirin overutilization for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VanWormer JJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey J VanWormer,1 Aaron W Miller,2 Shereif H Rezkalla3 1Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health, 2Biomedical Informatics Research Center, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, WI, USA; 3Department of Cardiology, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, WI, USA Background: Aspirin is commonly used for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD in the US. Previous research has observed significant levels of inappropriate aspirin use for primary CVD prevention in some European populations, but the degree to which aspirin is overutilized in the US remains unknown. This study examined the association between regular aspirin use and demographic/clinical factors in a population-based sample of adults without a clinical indication for aspirin for primary prevention.Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed using 2010–2012 data from individuals aged 30–79 years in the Marshfield Epidemiologic Study Area (WI, USA. Regular aspirin users included those who took aspirin at least every other day.Results: There were 16,922 individuals who were not clinically indicated for aspirin therapy for primary CVD prevention. Of these, 19% were regular aspirin users. In the final adjusted model, participants who were older, male, lived in northern Wisconsin, had more frequent medical visits, and had greater body mass index had significantly higher odds of regular aspirin use (P<0.001 for all. Race/ethnicity, health insurance, smoking, blood pressure, and lipid levels had negligible influence on aspirin use. A sensitivity analysis found a significant interaction between age and number of medical visits, indicating progressively more aspirin use in older age groups who visited their provider frequently.Conclusion: There was evidence of aspirin overutilization in this US population without CVD. Older age and more frequent provider visits were the strongest predictors of inappropriate aspirin use. Obesity was the only significant

  5. State of the Art: Medical treatment of aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Von; Simon, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is characterized as adult onset asthma, nasal polyps, chronic rhinosinusitis, and hypersensitivity to a cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitor, viz aspirin or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The method for diagnosing AERD is with aspirin challenge, and treatment includes aspirin desensitization followed by continued daily aspirin. Although oral challenge has been the mainstay in the United States, lysyl-aspirin has been validated as a diagnostic tool for aspirin-sensitive asthma and will be discussed further in this article. The challenges with aspirin therapy surrounding endoscopy and perioperative aspirin therapy will be discussed. Additionally, daily aspirin therapy is not for everyone. Aspirin is relatively contraindicated in those with a history of gastrointestinal bleed and an absolute contraindication in pregnancy. Aspirin desensitization and subsequent treatment has been shown to be highly effective for AERD.

  6. Comparison of increased aspirin dose versus combined aspirin plus clopidogrel therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease and impaired antiplatelet response to low-dose aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzenli, Mehmet Akif; Ozdemir, Kurtulus; Aygul, Nazif; Soylu, Ahmet; Tokac, Mehmet

    2008-08-15

    The effects of therapy with aspirin 300 mg/day and with combined aspirin 100 mg/day plus clopidogrel 75 mg/day on platelet function were compared in patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease and impaired antiplatelet responses to aspirin 100 mg/day. The study population consisted of 151 outpatients with type II diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease who were taking aspirin 100 mg/day. Of the 151 patients, a subgroup of subjects with impaired aspirin response were selected on the basis of the results of platelet aggregometry. Nonresponsiveness to aspirin was defined as mean aggregation > or =69% with 3 micromol/L adenosine diphosphate and mean aggregation > or =70% with 2 micromol/L collagen. Aspirin semiresponders were defined as meeting 1 but not both of these criteria. Nonresponders and semiresponders were randomized equally to aspirin 300 mg/day and aspirin 100 mg/day plus clopidogrel 75 mg/day, and aggregation tests were repeated after 2 weeks. Sixty of the 151 patients with diabetes (40%) were found to respond to aspirin inadequately. Platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate and collagen decreased significantly after aspirin 300 mg/day or combined therapy. Combined treatment was found to have a stronger inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate than aspirin 300 mg/day (p = 0.002). Impaired aspirin response was resolved by increasing the aspirin dose or adding clopidogrel to aspirin (p <0.0001 for each). However, desired platelet inhibition was achieved in significantly more patients by combined treatment than by aspirin 300 mg/day (p <0.05). In conclusion, aspirin 100 mg/day does not inhibit platelet function adequately in a significant number of patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease. Increasing the aspirin dose to 300 mg/day or adding clopidogrel to aspirin can provide adequate platelet inhibition in a significant number of those patients with impaired responses to

  7. The role of aspirin in the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittaman, Sunitha V; VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Rezkalla, Shereif H

    2014-12-01

    Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. © 2013 Marshfield Clinic.

  8. The Role of Aspirin in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittaman, Sunitha V.; VanWormer, Jeffrey J.; Rezkalla, Shereif H.

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. PMID:24573704

  9. Drop-out probabilities of IrisPlex SNP alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg; Tvedebrink, Torben; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2013-01-01

    In certain crime cases, information about a perpetrator's phenotype, including eye colour, may be a valuable tool if no DNA profile of any suspect or individual in the DNA database matches the DNA profile found at the crime scene. Often, the available DNA material is sparse and allelic drop......-out when the amount of DNA was greater than 125 pg for 29 cycles of PCR and greater than 62 pg for 30 cycles of PCR. With the use of a logistic regression model, we estimated the allele specific probability of drop-out in heterozygote systems based on the signal strength of the observed allele...

  10. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  11. Red Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AskMayoExpert. Conjunctivitis. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014. Jan. 11, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/red-eye/basics/definition/SYM-20050748 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  12. Aspirin resistance: Prevalence and clinical outcome in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Salah; Mohammed El-Desuky; Amal Rizk; Amr El-Hadidy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The antiplatelet drug aspirin is considered as a cornerstone in medical treatment of patients with CV or cerebrovascular diseases. Despite its use, a significant number of patients had recurrent adverse ischemic events. Inter-individual variability of platelet aggregation in response to aspirin may be an explanation for some of these events. Multiple trials have linked aspirin resistance to these adverse events. Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence...

  13. Aspirin Metabolomics in Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Substantial evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for cancer chemoprevention in addition to its well-established role in cardiovascular protection. In recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in humans, daily aspirin use reduced incidence, metastasis and mortality from several common types of cancer, especially colorectal cancer. The mechanism(s) by which aspirin exerts an anticancer benefit is uncertain; numerous effects have been described involving both cyclooxygenase-dependent and -independent pathways. |

  14. Rivaroxaban with or without Aspirin in Stable Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelboom, John W; Connolly, Stuart J; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R; Hart, Robert G; Shestakovska, Olga; Diaz, Rafael; Alings, Marco; Lonn, Eva M; Anand, Sonia S; Widimsky, Petr; Hori, Masatsugu; Avezum, Alvaro; Piegas, Leopoldo S; Branch, Kelley R H; Probstfield, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Deepak L; Zhu, Jun; Liang, Yan; Maggioni, Aldo P; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; O'Donnell, Martin; Kakkar, Ajay K; Fox, Keith A A; Parkhomenko, Alexander N; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Keltai, Matyas; Ryden, Lars; Pogosova, Nana; Dans, Antonio L; Lanas, Fernando; Commerford, Patrick J; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Guzik, Tomek J; Verhamme, Peter B; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Tonkin, Andrew M; Lewis, Basil S; Felix, Camilo; Yusoff, Khalid; Steg, P Gabriel; Metsarinne, Kaj P; Cook Bruns, Nancy; Misselwitz, Frank; Chen, Edmond; Leong, Darryl; Yusuf, Salim

    2017-10-05

    We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin (100 mg once daily), rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily), or aspirin (100 mg once daily). The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. The study was stopped for superiority of the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group after a mean follow-up of 23 months. The primary outcome occurred in fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group than in the aspirin-alone group (379 patients [4.1%] vs. 496 patients [5.4%]; hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.86; Paspirin group (288 patients [3.1%] vs. 170 patients [1.9%]; hazard ratio, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.40 to 2.05; Paspirin group as compared with 378 (4.1%) in the aspirin-alone group (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.96; P=0.01; threshold P value for significance, 0.0025). The primary outcome did not occur in significantly fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-alone group than in the aspirin-alone group, but major bleeding events occurred in more patients in the rivaroxaban-alone group. Among patients with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease, those assigned to rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin had better cardiovascular outcomes and more major bleeding events than those assigned to aspirin alone. Rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily) alone did not result in better cardiovascular outcomes than aspirin alone and resulted in more major bleeding events. (Funded by Bayer; COMPASS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01776424 .).

  15. Improving the Gastrointestinal Tolerability of Aspirin in Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Julia L.

    2006-01-01

    Interventions to reduce mortality and disability in older people are vital. Aspirin is cheap and effective and known to prevent cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, many cancers, and Alzheimer dementia. The widespread use of aspirin in older people is limited by its gastrointestinal side effects. Understanding age-related changes in gastrointestinal physiology that could put older people at risk of the side effects of aspirin may direct strategies to improve tolerance and hence lead to...

  16. Aspirin and Other COX-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrono, Carlo; Rocca, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    Currently available antiplatelet drugs interfere with the process of platelet activation and aggregation by selectively blocking key enzymes involved in the synthesis of platelet agonists, or membrane receptors mediating activation signals. Pharmacological interference with critical molecular pathways of platelet activation and aggregation may reduce the risk of atherothrombotic complications through mechanisms that are also responsible for an increased risk of bleeding. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) represents a prototypic antiplatelet agent. The aim of this chapter is to integrate our current understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of aspirin with the results of clinical trials and epidemiological studies assessing its efficacy and safety. Moreover, the antiplatelet properties of reversible inhibitors of the same drug target will also be reviewed.

  17. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Dry Eye Symptoms ... Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? ...

  18. Recurrence of retinal vein thrombosis with Pycnogenol® or Aspirin® supplementation: a registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, P; Belcaro, G; Dugall, M; Hu, S; Luzzi, R; Ledda, A; Ippolito, E; Corsi, M; Ricci, A; Feragalli, B; Cornelli, U; Gizzi, C; Hosoi, M

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to use Pycnogenol® to reduce the recurrence of retinal vein thrombosis (RVT) after a first episode. Pycnogenol® is an anti-inflammatory, anti-edema and an antiplatelet agent with a "mild" antithrombotic activity. The registry, using Pycnogenol® was aimed at reducing the number of repeated episodes of RVT. Possible management options--chosen by patients--were: standard management; standard management + oral Aspirin® 100 mg once/day (if there were no tolerability problems before admission); standard management + Pycnogenol® two 50 mg capsules per day (for a total of 100 mg/day). Number of subjects, age, sex, distribution, percentage of smokers, and vision were comparable. Recurrent RVT was seen in 17.39% of controls and in 3.56% of subjects supplemented with Pycnogenol® (PPycnogenol® supplementation in comparison with Aspirin®. Vision level was better with Pycnogenol® (20/25 at nine months; PPycnogenol®, edema at the retinal level was also significantly reduced compared to the other groups. Pycnogenol® has a very good safety profile. In the Aspirin® group 26 completed 9 months and 6 subjects dropped out for tolerability problems. In the Aspirin® group, 2 minor, subclinical, retinal, hemorrhagic episodes during the follow-up were observed (2 subjects out of 26, equivalent to 7.69%). This pilot registry indicates that Pycnogenol® seems to reduce the recurrence of RVT without side effects. It does not induce new hemorrhagic episodes that may be theoretically linked to the use of Aspirin® (or other antiplatelets). Larger studies should be planned involving a wider range of conditions, diseases and risk factors associated to RVT and to its recurrence.

  19. Aspirin: a history, a love story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Jeannette Y

    2012-05-01

    Most pharmacists know that aspirin's origins lie with willow bark, but they may be unaware of its role in the development of the pharmaceutical industry. Evolving from salacin (the active ingredient in many plant remedies) to salicylic acid (an analgesic in its own right) to the more effective, less toxic acetylsalicylic acid, this pain reliever cornered the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory market for more than 70 years. It helped the dye industry branch into pharmaceuticals, and is now used in multiple indications.

  20. Evaluation of antimicrobial effectiveness of ophthalmic drops according to the pharmacopeial tests criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Samadi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: In this study antimicrobial effectiveness test was performed on eye-drops which had high microbial contaminations in hospital practice to find out whether their antimicrobial efficacies affect the magnitude of microbial contamination during their uses. Materials and Methods: Artificial tear, atropine sulfate, betamethasone, homatropine hydrobromide, phenylephrine hydrochloride, phenylephrine zinc, pilocarpine hydrochloride, tetracaine hydrochloride and tropicamide eye-drops were subjected to the United States Pharmacopeia (USP and British Pharmacopeia (BP antimicrobial preservative effectiveness tests. Results: The results of this study showed that eight out of the nine products met the BP 'B' and USP criteria. The preservative employed in phenylephrine zinc eye-drop did not possess adequate antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa. Other eye-drops showed appropriate reductions in bacterial viability after 6 hrs, 24 hrs and 7 days, but showed a very low bacterial recovery after 28 days which didn't comply with the no recovery (NR term of BP 'A' criteria. Since viable microbial counts were usually determined by plate count method, it seems that the term of NR should define an acceptable range. Conclusion: The results indicated that there is not a clear correlation between antimicrobial efficacy testing of eye-drops and the rate of their microbial contamination while are being used. Other factors such as hygienic practices of eye-drops, proper bottle design and training of patients could influence their microbial contaminations. Regulation of in-use efficacy testing of eye-drops which is influenced by the environment, the frequency and technique of use, might be essential

  1. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignone, Michael; Williams, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin is effective for the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with a history of vascular disease, as so-called secondary prevention. In general populations with no history of previous myocardial infarction or stroke, aspirin also seems useful for primary prevention of cardiovascular events, although the absolute benefits are smaller than those seen in patients with previous cardiovascular disease. Patients with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk of cardiovascular events, but new trials have raised questions about the benefit of aspirin for primary prevention in patients with this disorder. This Review comprehensively examines the basic pharmacology of aspirin and provides an overview of the randomized, controlled trials of aspirin therapy that have included patients with diabetes mellitus. On the basis of currently available evidence from primary prevention trials, aspirin is estimated to reduce the relative risk of myocardial infarction and stroke by about 10% in patients with diabetes mellitus; however, aspirin also increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. As such, low-dose aspirin therapy (75–162 mg) is reasonable for patients with diabetes mellitus and a 10-year risk of cardiovascular events >10%. Results from upcoming large trials will help clarify the effects of aspirin with greater precision, including whether the benefits differ between men and women. PMID:20856266

  2. Aspirin and metformin exhibit antitumor activity in murine breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Maoyuan; Wang, Yuyi; Du, Chi; Liu, Yanyang; Zhang, Nan; Luo, Feng

    2018-03-01

    Studies have shown that aspirin and metformin play important roles in chemoprevention and repression of breast cancers, even though the exact mechanism remains unclear. Aspirin is capable of stimulating apoptosis through prostaglandin-dependent or prostaglandin-independent pathways. Metformin inhibits cell growth by enhancing the tumor suppressive function of transforming growth factor (TGF-β). In the present study, we report a new link between aspirin, metformin, TGF-β1 and murine breast cancer inhibition. Specifically, we showed that aspirin and metformin enhanced 4T1 cell apoptosis by inducing secretion of TGF-β1, whereas estradiol weakened the effect.

  3. NO-aspirin: mechanism of action and gastrointestinal safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, S; Del Soldato, P

    2003-05-01

    Nitric oxide-releasing aspirins are new chemical entities obtained by adding a nitric oxide-releasing moiety to aspirin. NCX-4016 is the prototype of this family of molecules. NCX-4016 consists of the parent molecule (aspirin) linked to a 'spacer' via an ester linkage, which is in turn connected to a nitric oxide-releasing moiety. Both aspirin and nitric oxide moieties of NCX-4016 contribute to its effectiveness, the latter occurring via both cyclic guanosyl monophosphate-dependent and -independent mechanisms. In vitro studies have shown that NCX-4016 inhibits platelet aggregation induced by aspirin-sensitive (arachidonic acid) and aspirin-insensitive (thrombin) agonist. In contrast to aspirin, NCX-4016 exerts a multilevel regulation of inflammatory target, including caspase-1 and NF-kappaB. This broad spectrum of activities translates to an increased potency of this drug in modulating cardiovascular inflammation. Human studies have shown, that while nitric oxide-aspirin maintains its anti-thrombotic activity, it spares the gastrointestinal tract. Indeed, a 7-day course of NCX-4016 results in 90% reduction of gastric damage caused by equimolar doses of aspirin. Further studies are ongoing to define whether this superior anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic profile translates in clinical benefits in patients with cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Protocatechualdehyde synergizes with aspirin at the platelet cyclooxygenase-1 level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shiqing; Hao, Haiping; Gong, Ping; Tang, Zhiyuan; Li, Feiyan; Chen, Xiaohu; Shi, Haibo; Wang, Guangji

    2011-11-01

    Polyphenol-aspirin interactions were recently identified; however, the interaction mode and underlying mechanisms remained elusive. Here, we quantitatively assessed the potential interactions among two important polyphenolic compounds, caffeic acid (CA) and protocatechualdehyde (Pro), and aspirin in the AA-induced platelet aggregation model by applying the isobologram and universal response surface approach (URSA) methods. A molecular docking approach and an originally developed platelet-associated aspirin clearance approach (PAACA) were then applied to explore the potential interaction mechanisms. Although Pro and CA themselves exhibited weak inhibitory effect on arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation and the production of thromboxane B₂ (TXB₂), both Pro and CA potentiated aspirin action in a synergistic manner. The most prominent synergism was found between Pro and aspirin. Pro formed a stable complex into the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) channel by in silico docking and significantly promoted the platelet-associated aspirin clearance, suggesting that the Pro interaction with COX-1 was favorable to the binding of aspirin with COX-1. Taken together, our findings suggest that the capacity of Pro and potentially other structurally similar polyphenolic compounds on promoting the binding of aspirin on platelet COX-1 might be the main mechanism of their synergism with aspirin. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. ESPRIT: is aspirin plus dipyridamole superior to aspirin alone in TIA or minor stroke patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhl, R P W; Lodder, J

    2008-11-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) or a (minor) ischemic stroke increases the risk of a recurrent stroke or death. Antiplatelet therapy with aspirin or clopidogrel is, in the absence of a potential cardiac embolic source, common practice to lower this risk. Until recently, adjuvant dipyridamole or low intensity oral anticoagulation were not generally prescribed in secondary prevention. In this article, we will summarize and discuss the published results of the European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischemia Trial (ESPRIT). In this trial, treatments with anticoagulants, aspirin alone and the combination of aspirin plus dipyridamole were compared, in a multicenter, three-armed, randomized, open-label study in patients with TIA or minor stroke.

  6. Pressure drop in contraction flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) page 178. DPL gives an equation for the pressure drop in a tapered (and circular) contraction, valid only at low angles. Here the general definition of contraction flow (the Bagley correction) and a more general method to find...... the pressure drop in a contraction are given....

  7. Laser impact on a drop

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Alexander L; Bouwhuis, Wilco; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Lohse, Detlef; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2016-01-01

    The impact of a laser pulse on a highly absorbing liquid drop can lead to a violent response: the drop is accelerated, strongly deforms, and eventually fragments. Shock waves, the ejection of matter, and even plasma formation can accompany this process ...

  8. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  9. [Rapid aspirin desensitization in patients with a history of aspirin hypersensitivity requiring coronary angioplasty. Report of four cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veas P, Nicolás; Martínez, Gonzalo; Jalil M, Jorge; Martínez S, Alejandro; Castro G, Pablo

    2013-02-01

    Aspirin use is necessary after a coronary angioplasty. It should not be used in patients with a history of hypersensitivity. However, rapid desensitization protocols have been reported to allow its use in such patients. One of these protocols consists in the administration of progressive doses of aspirin, from 1 to 100 mg in a period of 5.5 hours, in a controlled environment. We report four male patients aged 45,49, 59 and 73 years with a history of aspirin hypersensitivity, who were subjected to a coronary angioplasty. In all, the rapid aspirin desensitization protocol was successfully applied, allowing the use of the drug after the intervention without problems.

  10. Aspirin content determination with control systems by image processing technology. Gazo shori gijutsu wo katsuyoshita jozai aspirin kensa sochi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K. (Lion Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-08-05

    An inspection apparatus for aspirin tablets utilizing image processing technology was developed. One side of a tablet consists of aspirin layer and another side consists of alkiline layer. The alkaline layer is opaque at all but the aspirin layer is translucent. Image of overall configuration of the tablet is taken in CCD camera by illumination from all surrounding sides. The area is measured by using these images. Then, when switching off the surrounding illumination and illuminating the aspirin side, only aspirin side layer shines. The area is determined by taking the image in CCD. Aspirin content is calculated by the ratio of overall images to aspirin image and the predetermined tablet weight. Tablets of different aspirin content were prepared, and the content determined by this method and the chemically determined contents were compared. High correlation was found between both contents, indicating the validity of the image processing method. When the aspirin content is out of 330 {plus minus} 10mg, the controlling mechanism works, by which unmanned operation will be possible. 8 figs.

  11. Aspirin decreases vascular endothelial growth factor release during myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrah, Rabin; Fogel, Mina; Gilon, Dan

    2004-03-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is an important angiogenesis factor involved in pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. Controlling this factor's level in the serum might have significant prognostic outcomes. Twenty-four patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting were prospectively categorized into two groups according to aspirin administration before surgery. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor levels were compared and correlated and adjusted with platelets count between two groups in the serum, before and after the surgery. Serum creatine kinase (CK) levels were determined before and after the operation in parallel to other clinical data. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor levels were significantly lower in patients of the aspirin group compared to those of the non-aspirin group; 94+/-61 vs. 241+/-118 pg/ml, p=0.0003, respectively, this-despite an absence of difference in the platelet count between the groups. These titers decreased postoperatively in both groups, 94+/-61 to 10+/-9 pg/ml, p=0.001 in aspirin group and from 241+/-118 to 84+/-54 pg/ml, p=0.001 in control group. Serum creatine kinase levels were higher in the non-aspirin group, 214+/-83 u/l compared to 70+/-32 u/l in the aspirin group. Creatine kinase levels increased significantly postoperatively in both groups; however, the aspirin group had a significantly lower creatine kinase levels compared to non-aspirin group, 107+/-51 vs. 401+/-127 u/l, respectively, p=<0.0001. A significant correlation was seen between VEGF levels and platelets count in both groups, r=0.5. Aspirin treated patients have lower Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor titer levels in the perioperative course. This difference between the aspirin and the non-aspirin group is not accounted for by the platelets count.

  12. Aspirin use and endometrial cancer risk and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiuchi, Tsuyoshi; Blake, Erin A; Matsuo, Koji; Sood, Anil K; Brasky, Theodore M

    2018-01-01

    The role of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) as a chemo-preventive and adjuvant therapeutic agent for cancers is generating attention. Mounting evidence indicates that aspirin reduces the incidence and mortality of certain obesity-related cancers, particularly colorectal cancer. In endometrial cancer, previous studies examining the effect of aspirin remain inconsistent as to the reduction in the risk of endometrial cancer. While some evidence indicates protective effects in obese women, other studies have showed a potential deleterious effect of these medications on endometrial cancer outcomes. However, exposure measurement across studies has been inconsistent in recording dose, duration, and frequency of use; thus making comparisons difficult. In this article, we review the evidence for the association between endometrial cancer and obesity, the pharmacological differences between regular- and low-dose aspirin, as well as the potential anti-tumor mechanism of aspirin, supporting a possible therapeutic effect on endometrial cancer. A proposed mechanism behind decreased cancer mortality in endometrial cancer may be a result of inhibition of metastasis via platelet inactivation and possible prostaglandin E 2 suppression by aspirin. Additionally, aspirin use in particular may have a secondary benefit for obesity-related comorbidities including cardiovascular disease in women with endometrial cancer. Although aspirin-related bleeding needs to be considered as a possible adverse effect, the benefits of aspirin therapy may exceed the potential risk in women with endometrial cancer. The current evidence reviewed herein has resulted in conflicting findings regarding the potential effect on endometrial cancer outcomes, thus indicating that future studies in this area are needed to resolve the effects of aspirin on endometrial cancer survival, particularly to identify specific populations that might benefit from aspirin use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aspirin dose and ticagrelor benefit in PLATO: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebruany, Victor L

    2010-01-01

    To summarize the available evidence regarding whether or not a higher aspirin maintenance dose inversely affects the ticagrelor benefit observed in the US cohort of the PLATO trial. In the recent PLATO trial, the daily aspirin dosages in the USA were split between 81 and 325 mg while the vast majority of dosing outside of the USA was 75 or 100 mg. The FDA conducted exhaustive analyses of the aspirin dosage in a framework of primary clinical efficacy. Considering the post hoc, not prespecified nature of such analyses as well as multiple confounding problems with biologic plausibility, sensitivity to reclassification of small numbers of cases regarding loading versus maintenance aspirin dosing, and the distribution of events in high-dose aspirin observed outside of the USA, the FDA documents clearly suggest that aspirin dosing does not explain the disparate outcome results. In addition, the Advisory Committee members found no evidence to establish a reasonable link, and they uniformly rejected the hypothesis that aspirin dose affects the heterogeneity of outcomes in PLATO. Additional evidence driven from the FDA review on aspirin dose and PLATO outcomes is reassessed. The wide distribution of outcomes differing from country to country, and inconsistency in European data despite identical aspirin doses, preclude the acceptance of the hypothesis that aspirin affects PLATO outcomes in general or adversely impacts the benefit of ticagrelor in the US cohort in particular. Differences in primary site monitoring by the study sponsor in most countries versus a third-party CRO in the USA represent an alternative explanation and deserve further attention. There is no solid evidence that aspirin dose affects outcomes after ticagrelor. Reevaluation of the overall endpoint differences, especially focusing on mortality, driven from sponsor-monitored sites versus outcomes observed by independent CROs is neccessary. The practice of self-monitoring in pivotal indication

  14. Long term treatment with sodium hyaluronate-containing artificial tears reduces ocular surface damage in patients with dry eye

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aragona, Pasquale; Papa, Vincenzo; Micali, Antonio; Santocono, Marcello; Milazzo, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    ... abnormalities of the ocular surface. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of sodium hyaluronate-containing eye drops on the ocular surface of patients with dry eye during long term treatment...

  15. The thrombolytic effect of aspirin in animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmohapatra, Soumendra K; Kahn, Nighat N; Sinha, Asru K

    2007-10-01

    The aspirin induced platelet aggregation has been reported to be mediated through the inhibition of platelet prostaglandin synthesis. This compound has also been recently reported to stimulate nitric oxide synthesis in platelets. Since nitric oxide has been reported to produce fibrinogen/fibrinolytic effect, investigation was carried out to determine fibrinolytic effect of in vivo exposure of platelets to aspirin in normal volunteers on the fibrinolysis of the clotted platelet-rich plasma in vitro. The thrombolytic effect of aspirin in situ was also carried out by injecting aspirin solution in the mice with ADP induced formed thrombi in the coronary artery. It was found that the clotted platelet-rich plasma prepared from the volunteers (n = 10, F = 5, M = 5) who ingested 150 mg aspirin, began to undergo spontaneous and progressive fibrinolysis for 200 min at 37 degrees C with the generation of fibrin degradation products in the lysate. No such fibrinolysis could be seen in control experiments. When platelet thrombi were produced in the coronary artery of mice by injecting ADP, and these animals subsequently received intravenous injection of aspirin (4 muM final), they not only survived (P < 0.0001, n = 10) the thrombogenic assault but the lysis of the platelet thrombi was also noted in the post mortem examination. The thrombolytic effect of aspirin was found to be comparable to that of streptokinase in these animals. Aspirin, through the stimulation of NO synthesis, may produce thrombolysis in vivo.

  16. Aspirin and lipid mediators in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2015-09-01

    Aspirin is an unique compound because it bears two active moieties within one and the same molecule: a reactive acetyl group and the salicylate metabolite. Salicylate has some effects similar to aspirin, however only at higher concentrations, usually in the millimolar range, which are not obtained at conventional antiplatelet aspirin doses of 100-300 mg/day. Pharmacological actions of aspirin in the cardiovascular system at these doses are largely if not entirely due to target structure acetylation. Several classes of lipid mediators become affected: Best known is the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in platelets with subsequent inhibition of thromboxane and, possibly, thrombin formation. By this action, aspirin also inhibits paracrine thromboxane functions on other lipid mediators, such as the platelet storage product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an inflammatory mediator. Acetylation of COX-2 allows for generation of 15-(R)HETE and subsequent formation of "aspirin-triggered lipoxin" (ATL) by interaction with white cell lipoxygenases. In the cardiovascular system, aspirin also acetylates eNOS with subsequent upregulation of NO formation and enhanced expression of the antioxidans heme-oxygenase-1. This action is possibly also COX-2/ATL mediated. Many more acetylation targets have been identified in live cells by quantitative acid-cleavable activity-based protein profiling and might result in discovery of even more aspirin targets in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthesis of peptide derivatives of aspirin and their antibiogram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peptide derivatives of Aspirin (1 to 8) were synthesized by using Ac2O/AcOH reaction with Salicyclic acid. Aspirin was coupled with amino acid amide and dipeptide amide and tripeptide amide using its p-nitro phenyl (NP) ester. The ester (Aspirin–ONP) was prepared using p-nitro phenol and DCC in EtOAc and was ...

  18. Aspirin Risks in Perspective: A Comparison against Marathon Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin has public health potential to reduce the risk of ischaemic vascular events and sporadic cancer. One objection to the wider use of aspirin for primary prevention, however, is the undesirable effects of the medicine, which include increasing risk of bleeding and haemorrhagic stroke. Marathons also carry risks of serious events such as…

  19. Rivaroxaban with or without Aspirin in Stable Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelboom, John W.; Connolly, Stuart J.; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R.; Hart, Robert G.; Shestakovska, Olga; Diaz, Rafael; Alings, Marco; Lonn, Eva M.; Anand, Sonia S.; Widimsky, Petr; Hori, Masatsugu; Avezum, Alvaro; Piegas, Leopoldo S.; Branch, Kelley R. H.; Probstfield, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Zhu, Jun; Liang, Yan; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; O'Donnell, Martin; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Parkhomenko, Alexander N.; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Keltai, Matyas; Ryden, Lars; Pogosova, Nana; Dans, Antonio L.; Lanas, Fernando; Commerford, Patrick J.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Guzik, Tomek J.; Verhamme, Peter B.; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Tonkin, Andrew M.; Lewis, Basil S.; Felix, Camilo; Yusoff, Khalid; Steg, P. Gabriel; Metsarinne, Kaj P.; Cook Bruns, Nancy; Misselwitz, Frank; Chen, Edmond; Leong, Darryl; Yusuf, Salim; Aboyans, V.; Ha, J.; Keltai, K.; Lamy, A.; Liu, L.; Moayyedi, P.; Sharma, M.; Stoerk, S.; Varigos, J.; Bhagirath, V.; Bogaty, P.; Botto, F.; Catanese, L.; Donato Magno, J.; Fabbri, G.; Gabizon, I.; Gosselin, G.; Halon, D.; Heldmann, M.; Lamelas, P.; Lauw, M.; Leong, Y.; Liang, D.; Lutay, Y.; Maly, M.; Mikulik, R.; Nayar, S.; Ng, K.; Perera, K.; Pirvu, O.; Ronner, E.; Sato, S.; Smyth, A.; Sokolova, E.; Wiendl, M.; Winkelmann, B.; Yang, X.; Yufereva, Y.; Cairns, J.; Sleight, P.; deMets, D.; Momomura, S. I.; Prins, M. [=Martin H.; Ramsay, T.; Goto, S.; Rouleau, J. L.; Schumi, J.; Thabane, L.; Casanova, A.; Bangdiwala, S.; Deng, E.; Dyal, L.; Khatun, R.; Marsden, T.; Pogue, J.; Tang, C.; Wong, G.; Yuan, F.; Aman, S.; Ariz, A.; Ashton, H.; Belanger, J.; Belanger, M.; Brettell, K.; Chandra, J.; Choppick, C.; Cisternino, D.; Cuncins-Hearn, A.; Di Marino, M.; Diao, L.; Dwomoh, S.; Dykstra, A.; Galatsis, E.; Gasic, T.; Gutierrez, J.; Hamilton, L.; Irwin, L.; Lapensee, C.; Li, A.; Lu, X.; MacRae, L.; Malik, S.; Malvestiti, A.; Mastrangelo, J.; Maystrenko, A.; O'Donnell, L.; Reeh, K.; Szymkow, P.; Thomas, S.; Thrasher, D.; Tyrwhitt, J.; White, L.; Bastone, R.; Berkowitz, S.; Dias, A.; Ho, K.; Keller, L.; Lanius, V.; Lister, K.; Merten, C.; Muehlhofer, E.; Schmidt, K.; Tasto, C.; Tsihlias, E.; Woroniecka-Osio, A.; Orlandini, A.; Niemann, G.; Pascual, A.; Toscanelli, S.; Cabezón, M.; Debaveye, B.; Meeusen, K.; Luys, C.; Broos, K.; Vandenberghe, K.; Luyten, A.; Oliveira, G. B. F.; Vila Nova, D. C.; Konishi, M. Y. N.; Lonn, A.; Turbide, G.; Cayer, M.; Rovito, C.; Standen, D.; Li, J.; Lopez Pico, M.; Dusek, R.; Buzalka, V.; Larsen, J.; Paucar, M. J.; Saarinen, M.; Simon, T.; Bezault, M.; Le Lay, M.; Epstein, L.; Fajardo-Moser, M.; Röser, C.; Putz-Todd, G.; Scheidemantel, F.; Poehler, D.; Renner, J.; Hargitai, A.; Doherty, A. O.; Duffy, N.; Roarty, C.; Nolan, A.; Power, A.; Yuval, R.; Ben Ari, M.; Greenblatt, S.; Marmor, Y.; Lucci, D.; Ceseri, M.; Baldini, E.; Cipressa, L.; Miccoli, M.; Goto, M.; Yamasowa, H.; Kajiwara, M.; Takase, D.; Ikeguchi, K.; Matsumoto, M.; Ishii, M.; Asai, J.; Nozaki, D.; Akatsuka, T.; Yoshida, T.; Shahadan, S.; Md Nasir, N.; Schut, Astrid; Vinck, Leonie; van Leeuwen, Marjelle; Sanchez, J.; Aquino, M. R.; Mararac, T.; Benedyk, K.; Iordache, A.; Ciobanu, A.; Rimbas, R.; Dragoi Galrinho, R.; Magda, S.; Mihaila, S.; Mincu, R.; Suran, B.; Cotoban, A.; Matei, L.; Kursakov, A.; Rusnak, P.; Zakharova, A.; Demidova, E.; Commerford, A.; Lee, S.; Ju, I.; Gunolf, M.; Lorimer, A.; Parkhomenko, L.; Johnson, J.; Anderson, J.; Norby-Slycord., C.; Sala, J.; Sicer, M.; Rasmussen, M.; Luciani, C.; Cartasegna, L.; Beltrano, C.; Medek, G.; Vico, M.; Lanchiotti, P.; Martella, C.; Hominal, M.; Castoldi, M.; Casali, W.; Raimondi, S.; Hasbani, E.; Prado, A.; Paterlini, G.; Waisman, F.; Leonard, M.; Caccavo, A.; Alarcon, V.; Zaidman, C.; Guerlloy, F.; Vogel, D.; Imposti, H.; Dominguez, A.; Hrabar, A.; Fernandez, A.; Schygiel, P.; Sokn, F.; Cuneo, C.; Gutierrez Carrillo, N.; Martinez, G.; Luquez, H.; Costantino, M.; Ruiz, M.; Beccetti, N.; Mackinnon, I.; Cluigt, N.; Ahuad Guerrero, R.; Fanuele, M.; Campisi, V.; Costabel, J.; Romanelli, M.; Bartolacci, I.; Echeverria, M.; Pedrotti, M.; Montaña, O.; Camino, A.; Crespo, C.; Barbieri, M.; Lopez Santi, R.; Tonin, H.; Heffes, R.; Gomez Vilamajo, O.; Vanesio, F.; Allegrini, E.; Garcia Duran, R.; Garcia, C.; Garcia Duran, L.; Schiavi, L.; Mana, M.; Bordonava, A.; Rodriguez, M.; Gutierrez, M.; Garrido, M.; Rodriguez, C.; Ingaramo, A.; Costamagna, O.; Almagro, S.; Gerbaudo, C.; Pelagagge, M.; Bustamante Labarta, M.; Novaretto, L.; Maldini, A.; Lopez, L.; Albisu Di Gennero, J.; Ibanez Saggia, L.; Garcia Vilkas, A.; Alvarez, M.; Stoermann, W.; Vita, N.; Vottero, E.; Macin, S.; Cocco, M.; Onocko, M.; Dran, R.; Gimenez, C.; Cardona, M.; Guzman, L.; Guzman, P.; Martinez, D.; Sarjanovich, R.; Huerta, C.; Scaro, G.; Cuadrado, J.; Rodriguez, G.; Nani, S.; Guardiani, F.; Litvak Bruno, M.; Ceconi, G.; Chacon, C.; Casado, M.; Fernandez Moutin, M.; Maffei, L.; Sassone, S.; Yantorno, M.; Grinfeld, D.; Vensentini, N.; Rolandi, F.; Fallabrino, L.; Majul, C.; Paez, O.; Visser, M.; Luciardi, H.; Mansilla, V.; Gonzalez Colaso, P.; Ferre Pacora, F.; Jure, H.; Parody, M.; Espeche, E.; Whelan, A.; Boyle, A.; Collins, N.; Roberts-Thomson, P.; Rogers, J.; Caroll, P.; Colquhoun, D.; Williams, L.; Shaw, J.; Blombery, P.; Amerena, J.; Lee, C.; Hii, C.; Royse, A.; Royse, C.; Singh, B.; Selvanayagam, J.; Jansen, S.; Thompson, P.; Lo, W.; Hammett, C.; Poulter, R.; Graves, S.; Narasimhan, S.; van den Heuvel, P.; Wollaert, B.; Sinnaeve, P.; Fourneau, I.; Meuris, B.; Vanassche, T.; Ector, B.; Janssens, L.; Debonnaire, P.; Vandekerckhove, Y.; van de Borne, P.; Wautrecht, J.; Motte, S.; Leroy, J.; Schroë, H.; Vrolix, M.; Ferdinande, B.; Vranckx, P.; Benit, E.; Elegeert, I.; Lerut, P.; Wallaert, P.; Hoffer, E.; Borgoens, P.; Dujardin, K.; Brasil, C. K. O. I.; del Monaco, M. I.; Uint, L.; Pavanello, R.; Precoma, D. B.; Vianna, H. S.; Abrantes, J.; Morelli, J.; Manenti, E.; Jaeger, C.; Reis, G.; Giorgeto, F. E.; França, C. C. B.; Quadros, T. F. S.; Saraiva, J.; Costa, M.; de Camargo, O.; Marson Lopes, M.; Silva, J.; Maia, L. N.; Nakazone, M. A.; Mouco, O. M. C. C.; Lemos, M. A. B. T.; Hernandes, M. E.; Pântano, G. S.; de Castro, J. C. M.; Rossi, P. R. F.; Guedes, A. A. M.; Dos Santos, L. B.; dos Santos, F. R.; Vidotti, M. H.; Zimmermann, S. L.; Rech, R.; Nunes, C.; Abib, E.; Oliveira, K. L. C.; Leaes, P. E.; Botelho, R. V.; Navarro, A. L. C.; Silva, R. A.; Arantes, F. B. B.; Dutra, O.; Vaz, R.; Souza, W. K. S. B.; Souza, A. S. B.; Queiroz, W. C. B.; Braile, M.; Ferreira, V.; Izukawa, N. M.; Prakasan, A. K.; Nicolau, J. C.; Dalçóquio, T. F.; Tanajura, L. F. L.; Serrano, C. V.; Hueb, W. A.; Minelli, C.; Borsetti Neto, F. A.; Nasi, L. A.; Martins, S. C. O.; Oliveira, L. F. A.; Silva, M. A. V.; Ferreira, J. O.; de Carvalho Cantarelli, M. J.; Tytus, R.; Pasyk, E.; Pandey, A. S.; Rowe, A.; Cha, J.; Vizel, S.; Babapulle, M.; Semelhago, L.; Saunders, K.; Haligowski, D.; Berlingieri, J.; Nisker, W.; Kiaii, B.; Romsa, J.; Chu, M.; Nagpal, D.; Guo, R.; Mckenzie, N.; Quantz, M.; Bhargava, R.; Bhargava, M.; Mehta, P.; Hill, L.; Heslop, W.; Fell, D.; Hess, A.; Zadra, R.; Zeman, P.; Srivamadevan, M.; Lam, A.; Tai, S.; Al-Qoofi, F.; Spence, F.; Anderson, T.; Kieser, T.; Kidd, W.; Fedak, P.; Smith, E.; Har, B.; Brown, C.; Forgie, R.; Hassan, A.; Pelletier, M.; Searles, G.; Marr, D.; Bessoudo, R.; Douglas, G.; Legare, J.; Petrella, R.; Pavlosky, W.; Ricci, J.; Galiwango, P.; Janmohamed, A.; Kassam, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Vijayaraghavan, R.; Burstein, J.; D'Mello, N.; Glanz, A.; Noiseux, N.; Stevens, L. M.; Basile, F.; Prieto, I.; Normandin, L.; Helou, J.; Do, Q. B.; Bainey, K.; Tymchak, W.; Welsh, R.; Merali, F.; Pandith, V.; Heffernan, M.; Orfi, J.; Mcconachie, D.; Jedrzkiewicz, S.; Della Siega, A.; Robinson, S.; Nadra, I.; Poirier, P.; Dagenais, F.; Voisine, P.; Mohammadi, S.; Doyle, D.; Baillot, R.; Charbonneau, E.; Dumont, E.; Kalavrouziotis, D.; Perron, J.; Jacques, F.; Laflamme, M.; Brulotte, S.; Crete, M.; Degrâce, M.; Delage, F.; Grondin, F.; Lemieux, A.; Michaud, N.; Saulnier, D.; Ross, M. K.; Nguyen, M.; Harvey, R.; Daneault, B.; Hartleib, M.; Guzman, R.; Nguyen, T.; Singal, R.; Bourgeois, R.; Landry, D.; Kamel, S.; Rupka, D.; Kuritzky, R.; Khaykin, Y.; Phaneuf, D. C.; Desjardins, V.; Coll, X.; Huynh, T.; Pilon, C.; Mansour, S.; Lemire, F.; Kokis, A.; Potvin, J.; Campeau, J.; Audet, M.; Boulianne, M.; Dupuis, R.; Lauzon, C.; Pruneau, G.; Senay, B.; Pichette, F.; Cieza, T.; Breton, R.; Belisle, P.; Barabas, M.; Diaz, A.; Costa, R.; Absi, F.; Garand, M.; Rheault, A.; Lemay, C.; Gisbert, A.; Raymond, A.; Barrero, M.; Gagne, C. E.; Rheault, P.; Pepin-Dubois, Y.; Johnston, J.; Mundi, A.; Cohen, G.; Shukle, P.; Baskett, R.; Hirsch, G.; Ali, I.; Stewart, K.; Fenton, J.; Pudupakkam, S.; Willoughby, R.; Czarnecki, W.; Roy, A.; Montigny, M.; Descarries, L.; Mayrand, H.; Comtois, H.; Essiambre, R.; Ringuette, G.; Boutros, G.; Gendreau, R.; Pham, L.; Nguyen, V.; Nguyen-Thanh, H. K.; Ben-Yedder, N.; Nawaz, S.; Fremes, S.; Moussa, F.; Shukla, D.; Labonte., R.; Jano, G.; Bobadilla, B.; Saavedra, J.; Bahamondes, J.; Cobos, J.; Grunberg, E.; Corbalan, R.; Verdejo, H.; Medina, M.; Vega, M.; Nahuelpan, L.; Castañia, F.; Raffo, C.; Vargas, A.; Reyes, T.; Vargas, D.; Perez, L.; Arriagada, G.; Potthoff, S.; Godoy, J.; Stockins, B.; Larenas, G.; Quiñinao, F.; Sepulveda, P.; Trucco, V.; Pincetti, C.; Saavedra, S.; Silva, P.; Vejar, M.; Rodríguez, T.; Rodriguez, J.; Tian, H.; Zhang, J.; Meng, Y.; Wu, X.; Wu, Q.; Wang, Q.; Mu, Y.; Yang, J.; Wang, F.; Zhang, W.; Ke, Y.; Jiang, H.; Yin, P.; Jia, K.; Chen, C.; Wang, Z.; Qi, B.; Yu, L.; Feng, G.; Li, L.; Jiang, L.; Wu, S.; Yu, H.; Wu, Z.; Ding, R.; Liu, S.; Xu, H.; Cao, H.; Bai, X.; Zheng, Y.; Liu, Z.; Sun, H.; Yang, P.; Li, B.; Feng, Z.; Yang, Y.; Xu, Z.; Wu, W.; Meng, Q.; Ge, J.; Dai, Y.; Yang, H.; Chen, X.; Tian, X.; Shi, Y.; Hu, T.; Zhang, R.; Zhao, Q.; Quan, W.; Zhu, Y.; Zheng, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, C.; Wang, R.; Tao, L.; Hu, D.; Wang, Y.; Fan, F.; Huang, W.; Xia, X.; Fu, G.; Jiang, D.; Wang, M.; Li, C.; Xu, K.; Dong, Y.; Chen, Y.; Wu, D.; Wang, C.; Sun, X.; Lu, S.; Zhou, X.; Kong, Y.; Zhang, B.; Sotomayor, A.; Suarez, M.; Ripoll, D.; Herrera, O.; Accini Mendoza, J.; Saad Cure, C.; Reyes, M.; Vidal, T.; Donado Beltran, P.; Hernandez Jaimes, E.; Castillo, H.; Rocha, C.; Forero, L.; Zarate Bernal, D.; Vanstrrahle Gonzalez, L.; Urina Triana, M.; Quintero, A.; Ramirez, N.; Balaguera Mendoza, J.; Aroca Martinez, G.; Cotes, C.; Mercado, A.; Lastra Percy, X.; Perez Mayorga, M.; Rodriguez, N.; Molina de Salazar, D.; Perez Agudelo, J.; Lopez Villegas, L.; Agudelo Ramos, L.; Melo Polo, M.; Esparza Albornoz, A.; Forero Gomez, J.; Sanchez Vallejo, G.; Aristizabal, J.; Gallego, A.; Contreras, C.; Yepez, J.; Angel Escobar, J.; Manzur J, F.; Cohen, L.; Boneu, D.; Garcia Lozada, H.; Barrios, L.; Celemin, C.; Diego, M.; Garcia Ortiz, L.; Montoya, C.; Ramirez, E.; Arcos Palma, E.; Ceron, J.; Acosta, G.; Gomez Mesa, J.; Velasquez, J.; Barreto, D.; Trujillo Dada, F.; Trujillo Accini, F.; Cano, R.; Corredor de La Cruz, K.; Maria, V.; Palmera, J.; Vesga, B.; Hernandez, H.; Moreno Silgado, G.; Aruachan Vesga, S.; Burgos Martinez, E.; Quintero Villareal, G.; Solano Ayazo, F.; Porto Valiente, J.; Zidkova, E.; Krupicka, P.; Bultas, J.; Mandysova, E.; Lubanda, J.; Horak, J.; Belohlavek, J.; Kovarnik, T.; Gorican, K.; Rucka, D.; Smid, O.; Dostalova, G.; Skalicka, H.; Karetova, D.; Pavlinak, V.; Kuchynkova, S.; Marek, J.; Rob, D.; Ravlykova, K.; Prochazka, P.; Siranec, M.; Urbanec, T.; Vareka, T.; Nesvadbova, P.; Kaletova, M.; Indrakova, J.; Kryza, R.; Heczko, M.; Hanak, P.; Jancar, R.; Kocurkova, L.; Marcinek, G.; Cermak, O.; Drasnar, T.; Richter, M.; Kaspar, J.; Spinar, J.; Parenica, J.; Parenicova, I.; Schildberger, J.; Toman, O.; Ludka, O.; Poloczek, M.; Musil, V.; Miklik, R.; Labrova, R.; Lokaj, P.; Felsoci, M.; Bocek, O.; Kanovsky, J.; Zatocil, T.; Jerabek, P.; Matuska, J.; Jankovic, M.; Jankovicova, H.; Tesak, M.; Sulc, D.; Svacinova, H.; Radvan, M.; Bednar, J.; Motovska, Z.; Petr, R.; Fischerova, M.; Branny, M.; Vodzinska, A.; Cerny, J.; Indrak, J.; Sknouril, L.; Maly, J.; Vacek, T.; Prazak, O.; Broulikova, K.; Hajsl, M.; Jarkovsky, P.; Kamenik, L.; Kotik, I.; Krcova, E.; Sedlon, P.; Skvaril, J.; Cernohous, M.; Kohoutek, J.; Levcik, M.; Holek, M.; Hajdusek, P.; Foltynova Caisova, L.; Novak, V.; Kladivkova, M.; Slaby, J.; Houra, M.; Vojtisek, P.; Novotny, V.; Lazarak, T.; Pliva, M.; Pirk, J.; Barciakova, L.; Jandova, R.; Adamkova, V.; Galovcova, M.; Peterkova, L.; Turek, D.; Prochazka, J.; Belohoubek, J.; Spinarova, L.; Panovsky, R.; Novotny, P.; Krejci, J.; Hude, P.; Ozabalova, E.; Godava, J.; Honek, T.; Kincl, V.; Benesova, M.; Buckova, J.; Canadyova, J.; Mokracek, A.; Homza, M.; Stverka, P.; Florian, J.; Lukac, B.; Polasek, R.; Kucera, P.; Seiner, J.; Karasek, J.; Coufal, Z.; Stastny, J.; Cernicek, V.; Skalnikova, V.; Jiresova, E.; Brat, R.; Sieja, J.; Gloger, J.; Berger, P.; Prochazkova, I.; Samlik, J.; Brtko, M.; Tuna, M.; Polansky, P.; Omran, N.; Myjavec, A.; Hrdinova, M.; Jansky, P.; Kratochvilova, R.; Burkert, J.; Koubek, F.; Fiala, R.; Paulasova Schwabova, J.; Lindner, J.; Hlubocky, J.; Spacek, M.; Marcian, P.; Hanak, V.; Pozdisek, Z.; Lonsky, V.; Santavy, P.; Troubil, M.; Straka, Z.; Budera, P.; Fojt, R.; Talavera, D.; Tretina, M.; Nemec, P.; Orban, M.; Bedanova, H.; Wiggers, H.; Tougaard, R.; Larsen, A.; Nielsen, H.; Mattsson, N.; Gunnar, G.; Bruun, N.; Folke, F.; Soendergaard, K.; Koeber, L.; Frydland, M.; Fuchs, A.; Bang, L.; Houlind, K.; Olsen, M.; Soerensen, V.; Overgaard Andersen, U.; Dixen, U.; Refsgaard, J.; Moeller, D.; Zeuthen, E.; Lund, J.; Soegaard, P.; Jensen, S.; Duarte, Y.; Duarte, W.; Cáceres, S.; Pow Chon Long, F.; Peñaherrera, C.; Anzules, N.; Sánchez, M.; Zuleta, I.; López, J.; Villota, M.; Sánchez, H.; Perugachi, C.; Gómez, S.; Morejón, P.; Mármol, R.; Guamán, S.; Trujillo, F.; Escobar, M.; Carrera, F.; Ponce, F.; Terán, P.; Carrasco, S.; Tuomilehto, J.; Humaloja, K.; Lindberg, L.; Tuomilehto, H.; Tuominen, M.-L.; Kantola, I.; Juliard, J.; Feldman, L.; Ducrocq, G.; Boulogne, C.; Petitalot, V.; Leclercq, F.; Roubille, F.; Agullo, A.; Ferrari, E.; Chiche, O.; Moceri, P.; Boccara, F.; Charbonnier, M.; Azeddine, B.; Ederhy, S.; Soulat Dufour, L.; Cohen, A.; Etienney, A.; Messas, E.; Calvalido, A.; Galloula, A.; Zarka, S.; Courtois, M.-C.; Mismetti, P.; Accassat, S.; Buchmuller, A.; Moulin, N.; Bertoletti, L.; Seffert, B.; Sevestre, M.; Samy Modeliar Remond, S.; Dupas, S.; Mardyla, J.; Le Gloan, S.; Cayla, G.; Cornillet, L.; Schmutz, L.; Motreff, P.; Souteyrand, G.; Amonchot, A.; Barber-Charmoux, N.; Combaret, N.; Malcles, G.; Brenner, S.; Christa, M.; Duengen, H.; Krackhardt, F.; Bobenko, A.; Hashemi, D.; Stellbrink, C.; Stellbrink, E.; Köster, C.; Guerocak, O.; Bourhaial, H.; Oumbe Tiam, S.; Kemala, E.; Froemke, J.; Kadel, C.; Moellinger, H.; Friedrich, K.; Rafoud, K.; Braun-Dullaeus, R.; Herold, J.; Ganzer, M.; Jeserich, M.; Kimmel, S.; Haggenmiller, S.; Schoengart, H.; Voehringer, H.; Opitz, C.; Appel, K.; Appel, S.; Utech, A.; Finger, C.; Duersch, M.; Dorsel, T.; Wistorf, N.; Grude, M.; Nikol, S.; Ueberschaer, D.; Kast, P.; Darius, H.; Sommer, S.; Girke, F.; Oeztuerk, C.; Ranft, J.; Mikalo, A.; Schellong, S.; Voigts, B.; Mueller, C.; Jungmair, W.; Davierwala, P.; Misfeld, M.; Bomke, K.; Akhavuz, O.; Haensig, M.; Vorpahl, M.; Blem, A.; Langer, G.; Nover, I.; Koehler, T.; Bajnok, L.; Marton, Z.; Laszlo, Z.; Noori, E.; Veress, G.; Fogarassy, G.; Aradi, D.; Kelemen, B.; Vertes, A.; Davidovits, Z.; Zsary, A.; Kis, E.; Hepp, T.; Koranyi, L.; Peterfai, E.; Bezzegh, K.; Bakai, J.; Agardi, I.; Boda, Z.; Razso, K.; Poor, F.; Varallyay, Z.; Jarai, Z.; Sallai, L.; Dudas, M.; Barton, J.; Mahmood, K.; Makki, H.; McAdam, B.; Salim, T.; Murphy, A.; Crean, P.; Liddy, A. M.; Mahon, N.; Khan, I.; Hassan, S.; Curtin, R.; McFadden, E.; MacNeill, B.; Kyvelou, S.; Canavan, M.; Veerasingam, D.; Dinneen, S.; Halabi, M.; Rosenfeld, I.; Levinas, T.; Goldberg, A.; Khateeb, A.; Zimlichman, R.; Ben-Aharon, J.; Beniashvili, A.; Betsalel, A.; Zeltser, D.; Rogowski, O.; Mardi, T.; Rozenbaum, Z.; Turgeman, Y.; Or, T.; Rabkin, Y.; Klainman, E.; Halabi, S.; Halon, D. A.; Katz, A.; Plaev, T.; Drogenikov, T.; Atar, S.; Kilimnik, M.; Wishniak, A.; Merei, M.; Zvi, Y.; Nikolsky, E.; Zukermann, R.; Petcherski, S.; Bosi, S.; Gaitani, S.; Naldi, M.; Barbieri, A.; Faggiano, P.; Guidetti, F.; Adamo, M.; D’Aloia, A.; Magatelli, M.; Robba, D.; Mos, L.; Vriz, O.; Sinagra, G.; Maras, P.; Doimo, S.; Cosmi, F.; D'Orazio, S.; Oltrona Visconti, L.; Leonardi, S.; Vullo, E.; Sbaffi, A.; Azzara, G.; Mauri, S.; Gianni, U.; de Matteis, C.; Campidonico, U.; Di Pasquale, G.; Di Niro, M.; Riva, L.; Filippini, E.; Di Biase, M.; Ieva, R.; Martone, A.; Mandorla, S.; Regni, O.; Capponi, E. A.; Martinelli, S.; Bernardinangeli, M.; Proietti, G.; Piccinni, G. C.; Gualtieri, M. R.; Gulizia, M. M.; Francese, G. M.; Portale, A.; Galvani, M.; Ottani, F.; Capatano, O. G.; Conficoni, E.; Longhi, S.; Bachetti, C.; Venturi, F.; Capati, E.; Morocutti, G.; Bisceglia, T.; Fresco, C.; Baldin, M. G.; Gamba, C.; Olivieri, C.; Perna, G. P.; Battistoni, I.; Marini, M.; Cirrincione, V.; Ingrilli, F.; Kanno, T.; Ishii, Y.; Kohmura, C.; Igawa, T.; Izawa, K.; Daida, H.; Miyauchi, K.; Shimada, K.; Ohmura, H.; Ito, S.; Okazaki, S.; Konishi, H.; Miyazaki, T.; Hiki, M.; Kurata, T.; Suzuki, H.; Morimoto, R.; Yokoyama, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Okai, I.; Isoda, K.; Fujimoto, S.; Dohi, T.; Shimada, A.; Ozaki, Y.; Watanabe, E.; Kawai, H.; Naruse, H.; Takada, K.; Okuda, K.; Okumura, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Ohtsuki, M.; Ohta, M.; Sarai, M.; Koshikawa, M.; Kawai, M.; Miyagi, M.; Motoyama, S.; Matsui, S.; Ichikawa, T.; Kato, Y.; Nagahara, Y.; Muramatsu, T.; Hashimoto, Y.; Hoshino, N.; Harada, M.; Yamada, A.; Yoshiki, Y.; Motoike, Y.; Nomura, Y.; Miyajima, K.; Takatsu, H.; Nishimura, H.; Nagasaka, R.; Kawada, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Seki, K.; Inoue, A.; Higashiue, S.; Kojima, S.; Kuroyanagi, S.; Furuya, O.; Komooka, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Wakabayashi, N.; Domae, H.; Ata, T.; Hashidomi, H.; Kawahara, R.; Hosokawa, S.; Hiasa, Y.; Otani, R.; Kishi, K.; Takahashi, T.; Yuba, K.; Miyajima, H.; Tobetto, Y.; Yoneda, K.; Ogura, R.; Kobayashi, H.; Takamura, T.; Enkou, K.; Ochi, Y.; Yamada, D.; Kuramochi, T.; Misumi, K.; Iiduka, D.; Hirose, M.; Tone, K.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ebihara, T.; Makino, M.; Yokota, M.; Nitta, M.; Udo, A.; Shimizu, S.; Fujii, K.; Iwakura, K.; Okamura, A.; Inoue, K.; Nagai, H.; Hirao, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, N.; Yamasaki, T.; Oka, T.; Iwamoto, M.; Tanaka, T.; Nakamaru, R.; Okada, M.; Takayasu, K.; Sumiyoshi, A.; Inoue, H.; Kitagaki, R.; Ninomiya, Y.; Mizutomi, K.; Koizumi, I.; Funada, A.; Tagawa, S.; Kamide, S.; Saku, K.; Ideishi, M.; Ogawa, M.; Uehara, Y.; Iwata, A.; Nishikawa, H.; Ike, A.; Sugihara, M.; Imaizumi, S.; Fujimi, K.; Kawamura, A.; Sako, H.; Morito, N.; Morii, J.; Fukuda, Y.; Yahiro, E.; Matsunaga, A.; Matsumoto, N.; Noda, K.; Shiga, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Kimura, K.; Ebina, T.; Hibi, K.; Iwahashi, N.; Maejima, N.; Konishi, M.; Matsushita, K.; Minamimoto, Y.; Kawashima, C.; Nakahashi, H.; Kimura, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Matsuzawa, Y.; Kirigaya, J.; Sato, R.; Kikuchi, S.; Ogino, Y.; Kirigaya, H.; Kashiwase, K.; Hirata, A.; Takeda, Y.; Amiya, R.; Higuchi, Y.; Sakaguchi, T.; Nakano, T.; Matsusaki, N.; Suzuki, S.; Hayashi, T.; Nakatani, S.; Koide, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Hamanaka, Y.; Makino, N.; Sotomi, Y.; Abe, M.; Fujieda, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Teratani, Y.; Abe, Y.; Yokoyama, Y.; Higashino, H.; Okuda, H.; Yamazato, M.; Noda, T.; Arai, M.; Ono, K.; Hirose, T.; Iwama, M.; Warita, S.; Goto, Y.; Abe, S.; Kojima, T.; Yoshizane, T.; Tanihata, S.; Fujii, T.; Yagasaki, H.; Miwa, H.; Ishiguro, M.; Kato, T.; Watanabe, R.; Horio, S.; Mita, T.; Hirayama, A.; Watanabe, I.; Hiro, T.; Nakai, T.; Takayama, T.; Yoda, S.; Yajima, Y.; Okubo, K.; Okumura, Y.; Kato, M.; Fukamachi, D.; Aizawa, Y.; Sonoda, K.; Iida, K.; Sasaki, N.; Iso, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kougo, T.; Haruta, H.; Kurokawa, S.; Mano, H.; Nagashima, K.; Onaka, H.; Doi, H.; Hirano, N.; Okamoto, F.; Mori, K.; Ri, G.; Zushi, R.; Otsuka, K.; Inoko, M.; Haruna, T.; Nakane, E.; Miyamoto, S.; Izumi, T.; Honjo, S.; Ikeda, H.; Wada, Y.; Funasako, M.; Hayashi, H.; Hamasaki, A.; Sasaki, K.; Seko, Y.; Nakasone, K.; Hanyu, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwasaki, K.; Ayano, S.; Hirokami, M.; Omoto, Y.; Sasaki, H.; Sato, H.; Yuda, S.; Okubo, M.; Matsuo, H.; Tsuchiya, K.; Kawase, Y.; Miyake, T.; Kondo, H.; Hattori, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Okamoto, S.; Hirata, T.; Kawamura, I.; Ota, H.; Omori, H.; Tanigaki, T.; Kamiya, H.; Sobue, Y.; Komoda, T.; Akatsuka, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Isegawa, K.; Takanezawa, M.; Kataoka, C.; Imamaki, M.; Shibata, Y.; Yasuda, K.; Shimano, M.; Ozaki, R.; Morishita, Y.; Okabe, K.; Kondo, K.; Miura, A.; Manita, M.; Tabata, K.; Asahi, T.; Mashidori, T.; Higa, N.; Nakata, M.; Himi, T.; Matsudo, Y.; Sekine, T.; Hou, K.; Tonoike, N.; Hama, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Ge, B.; Takahara, M.; Ishimura, M.; Shikada, T.; Ueno, H.; Amemiya, H.; Hisamatsu, Y.; Sada, K.; Sato, T.; Harada, K.; Nakamura, T.; Ako, J.; Tojo, T.; Shimohama, T.; Kishihara, J.; Ishii, S.; Fukaya, H.; Meguro, K.; Nishino, Y.; Inoue, M.; Matsui, Y.; Omura, Y.; Kawakami, H.; Matsuoka, H.; Oshita, A.; Seike, F.; Kondo, N.; Miyoshi, T.; Yamada, Y.; Uchiya, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Koretsune, Y.; Abe, H.; Shinouchi, K.; Nishida, H.; Yasumura, K.; Date, M.; Ueda, Y.; Iida, Y.; Idemoto, A.; Toriyama, C.; Yokoi, K.; Mishima, T.; Yamada, T.; Fukunami, M.; Morita, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Kikuchi, A.; Tamaki, S.; Seo, M.; Shirakawa, Y.; Ikeda, I.; Fukuhara, E.; Kawai, T.; Kayama, K.; Kawahira, M.; Tanabe, K.; Nakamura, J.; Shimomura, H.; Kudo, T.; Morisaki, S.; Ogura, Y.; Chazono, N.; Onoue, Y.; Matsumuro, Y.; Shirakawa, T.; Nishi, M.; Kinoshita, N.; Nakamura, R.; Miyai, N.; Ohta, K.; Sawanishi, T.; Takahashi, A.; Hada, T.; Nakajima, S.; Taniguchi, N.; Mizuguchi, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Hashimoto, S.; Machida, M.; Hirabayashi, K.; Morimoto, S.; Higashino, Y.; Otsuji, S.; Takiuchi, S.; Yabuki, M.; Hasegawa, K.; Shishikura, D.; Ibuki, M.; Ishibuchi, K.; Nagayama, S.; Ishii, R.; Tamaru, H.; Yamamoto, W.; Utsu, N.; Miyakoshi, K.; Nakashima, D.; Tsukuda, K.; Ueda, K.; Nakano, A.; Fukuda, T.; Ikeda, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Toshima, S.; Tateno, R.; Ishikubo, T.; Suguta, M.; Nakamura, S.; Funatsu, A.; Mizobuchi, M.; Tanaka, M.; Nagai, T.; Hirano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Doi, T.; Shirasaka, A.; Takeda, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Ohya, H.; Hosokawa, A.; Nishina, N.; Koki, B.; Ando, K.; Hiramori, S.; Soga, Y.; Tomoi, Y.; Tohoku, S.; Shirai, S.; Hyodo, M.; Isotani, A.; Domei, T.; Kuramitsu, S.; Morinaga, T.; Hayashi, M.; Hiromasa, T.; Nagae, A.; Yamaji, Y.; Nakao, K.; Sakamoto, T.; Taguchi, E.; Tsurugi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Suzuyama, H.; Koyama, J.; Nagano, M.; Okamatsu, H.; Kodama, K.; Nakamura, M.; Horibata, Y.; Sone, M.; Tsunemori, M.; Bando, M.; Nakayama, T.; Tanigaito, Y.; Nomoto, M.; Sawamura, T.; Unoki, T.; Lim, C. W.; Zainal Rashid, R.; Najme Khir, R.; Ibrahim, K. S.; Wan Azman, W. A.; Sridhar, G. S.; Watson, T.; Abu Kassim, Z.; Mahmood Zuhdi, A. S.; Abdul Hafidz, M. I.; Abu Hassan, M. R.; Wan Rahimi Shah, W. F.; Karthikesan, D.; Mohd Suan, M. A.; Md Ali, S. M.; Kasim, S.; Mohd Arshad, M. K.; Ismail, J. R.; Ibrahim, Z. O.; Chua, N. Y. L.; Abdul Rahim, A. A.; Rusani, B. I.; Yap, L. B.; Zamrin, D. M.; Amir, M. A.; Ismail, N. I.; Mohammad Razi, A. A.; Prins, F.; Bendermacher, P.; Burg, M.; Lok, D.; van der Sluis, A.; Martens, F.; Badings, E.; Milhous, J.; van Rossum, P.; Viergever, E.; van Hessen, M.; Willems, F.; Tjon Joe Gin, R.; Swart, H.; Oomen, A.; Kromhout, S.; Lauwerijssen, I.; Daalmans, M.; Breedveld, R.; de Vries, K.; Feenema Aardema, M.; Hofma, S.; van der Borgh, R.; van Nes, E.; Göbel, E.; Oei, F.; Dorman, H.; Bos, R.; Zoet-Nugteren, S.; Emans, M.; Kragten, H.; Lenderink, T.; Feld, R.; Herrman, J.; van Bergen, P.; Gosselink, M.; Elvan, A.; Hoekstra, E.; The, S.; de Vries, R.; Zegers, E.; Oude Ophuis, T.; Remmen, J.; Bech, J.; Kooistra, J.; den Hartog, F.; Oosterhof, T.; Bartels, G.; Posma, J.; Nierop, P.; Liem, A.; van der Zwaan, C.; Asselman, M.; van Eck, J.; Gevers, R.; van Gorselen, E.; van Hal, J.; Terpstra, W.; Groenemeijer, B.; Jerzewski, A.; Hoogslag, P.; Geertman, J.; de Groot, M.; Dijkstra, B.; Loyola, A.; Sulit, D.; Mercado, M. J.; Rey, N.; Evangelista, L.; Abola, M.; Padua, L.; Morales, D.; Palomares, E.; Abat, M.; Santos, R.; Rogelio, G.; Chua, P.; Baello, R.; del Pilar, J.; Alianza, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alcaraz, L.; Ebo, G.; Guido-Saliot, I.; Tirador, L.; Estoce, E.; Ygpuara, M.; Cruz, J.; Anonuevo, J.; Pitargue, A.; Janion, M.; Drewniak, Z.; Guzik, B.; Nowak, M.; Nosal, M.; Niewiara, Ł; Gajos, G.; Bury, K.; Czubek, U.; Misztal, M.; Grzybczak, R.; Zalewski, J.; Kruszelnicka-Kwiatkowska, O.; Żabówka, M.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Grzybowski, A.; Szałkowski, P.; Broncel, M.; Gorzelak, P.; Możdżan, M.; Olszewska Banaszczyk, M.; Szuba, A.; Tabin, M.; Chachaj, A.; Czarnecka, D.; Terlecki, M.; Klocek, M.; Maga, P.; Coman, I.; Tarlea, M.; Ghionea, M.; Gavrila, C.; Dimulescu, D.; Popescu, A.; Stoicescu, C.; Vintila, V.; Florescu, M.; Baghilovici Cretu, D.; Suran, M.; Mihalcea, D.; Lungeanu Juravle, L.; Cinteza, M.; Calin, I.; Bicescu, G.; Vasile Toma, N.; Udroiu, C.; Gherghinescu, C.; Darabont, R.; Patrascu, N.; Constantinescu, C.; Popescu, I.; Sinescu, C.; Andrei, C.; Axente, L.; Arsenescu, C.; Statescu, C.; Ardeleanu, I.; Anghel, L.; Benedek, I.; Benedek, T.; Kinga, P.; Banga, D. K.; Bobescu, E.; Doka, B.; Dobreanu, D.; Sirbu, V.; Rudzik, R.; Kantor, K.; Sus, I.; Gaita, D.; Maximov, D.; Brie, D.; Mosteoru, S.; Olariu, I.; Iancu, A.; Marc, M.; Hagiu, R.; Manole, V.; Molnar, A.; Dregoesc, I.; Iliesiu, A.; Armean, P.; Parvu, I.; Deleanu, A.; Lighezan, D.; Buzas, R.; Petrescu, L.; Nicola, R.; Dan, R.; Crisan, S.; Trasca, L.; Teodorescu, I.; Zara, O.; Tiron, T.; Tesloianu, D.; Spiridon, M.; Vintila, M.; Baluta, M.; Chioncel, O.; Stoica, E.; Kulcsar, I.; Antohi, L.; Strazhesko, I.; Tkacheva, O.; Sharashkina, N.; Pykhtina, V.; Vasyuk, Y.; Shkolnik, E.; Khadzegova, A.; Sadulaeva, I.; Ivanova, S.; Nesterova, E.; Nesvetov, V.; Shupenina, E.; Shcherbak, M.; Sizova, Z.; Beloborodova, A.; Pozdnyakov, Y.; Tarasov, A.; Shvedov, I.; Zabashta, S.; Ryzhikova, I.; Barbarash, O.; Pecherina, T.; Vatutin, M.; Inozemceva, A.; Kazachek, Y.; Mineeva, E.; Kupriyanova, T.; Voevoda, M.; Gafarov, V.; Gromova, E.; Panov, D.; Voevoda, E.; Kovalkova, N.; Ragino, Y.; Poponina, T.; Poponina, Y.; Garganeeva, N.; Repin, A.; Vershinina, E.; Borodina, E.; Kalashnikova, T.; Safyanova, O.; Osipova, I.; Antropova, O.; Pyrikova, N.; Polyakova, I.; Efremushkina, A.; Guryanova, N.; Kiseleva, E.; Lomteva, E.; Shtyrova, T.; Novikova, N.; Parfenov, D.; Volovchenko, A.; Averkov, O.; Pavlikova, E.; Vaulina, L.; Pletnikova, I.; Mishchenko, L.; Saranin, S.; Tsupko, I.; Kuznetsova, N.; Zateyshchikov, D.; Dankovtseva, E.; Vlazneva, Y.; Tolokonnikova, N.; Zhurina, M.; Zubova, E.; Aseycheva, O.; Sigalovich, E.; Vertkin, A.; Rodiukova, I.; Komissarov, S.; Sokolova, R.; Ausheva, A.; Salbieva, A.; Yusubova, A.; Isakova, S.; Hranai, M.; Obona, P.; Cisar, P.; Semetko, J.; Vanova, P.; Ferencikova, Z.; Vykoukalova, T.; Gaspar, L.; Caprnda, M.; Bendzala, M.; Pella, D.; Fedacko, J.; Hatalova, K.; Drozdakova, E.; Peter, O.; Ntsekhe, M.; de Andrade, M.; Seedat, S.; Gani, M.; van Zyl, L.; Naude, M.; Cronje, T.; van Zyl, F.; Engelbrecht, J.; Jansen, J.; Roos, J.; Makotoko, E.; Pretorius, C.; Mirna, S.; Nell, H.; Pretorius, M.; Basson, M.; Njovane, X.; Mohamed, Z.; Pillay, T.; Dawood, S.; Horak, A.; Lloyd, E.; Hitzeroth, J.; Mabin, T.; Abelson, M.; Klug, E.; Gebka, M.; Hellig, F.; Alison, M.; Bae, J.; Kim, C.; Kim, D.; Joo, S.; Park, C.; Kim, Y.; Jarnert, C.; Rydén, L.; Mooe, T.; Binsell-Gerdin, E.; Dellborg, M.; Torstensson, I.; Albertsson, P.; Hiller, M.; Perers, E.; Johansson, L.; Jansson, J. H.; Al-Khalili, F.; Almroth, H.; Andersson, T.; Eriksson Östman, M.; Pantev, E.; Utter, F.; Tengmark, B. O.; Olsson, Å; Liu, B.; Rasmanis, G.; Wahlgren, C. M.; Thott, O.; Moccetti, T.; Rossi, M. G.; Crljenica, C.; Dovgan, N.; Skarzhevskyi, O.; Kozhukhov, S.; Tseluyko, V.; Mishchuk, N.; Kuznetsov, I.; Semenikhin, S.; Matviichuk, N.; Matuzok, O.; Yakovleva, L.; Volkov, V.; Zaprovalna, O.; Serik, S.; Riabukha, V.; Koval, O.; Kaplan, P.; Ivanov, A.; Romanenko, S.; Skoromna, A.; Kononenko, L.; Saprychova, L.; Lazareva, S.; Prokhorov, O.; Vdovychenko, V.; Bychkov, M.; Demydova, A.; Kapustynska, O.; Bazylevych, A.; Dutka, R.; Vlasyuk, Z.; Shabat, M.; Rudenko, L.; Beregova, O.; Fedtchouk, L.; Gusak, I.; Vizir, V.; Sadomov, A.; Shkolovoy, V.; Nasonenko, O.; Demidenko, O.; Karpenko, O.; Ponomarenko, K.; Oryshych, G.; Nevolina, I.; Mitskevych, L.; Bezuglova, S.; Kizim, S.; Todoriuk, L.; Brodi, N.; Karpenko, L.; Malynovsky, Y.; Fedotov, S.; Malynovska, O.; Goydenko, O.; Miroshnykov, S.; Rabota, I.; Koval, V.; Ohirko, O.; Khaba, U.; Storozhuk, B.; Danylchuk, I.; Danylchuk, A.; Gutsuliak, R.; Cotton, J.; Luckraz, H.; Wrigley, B.; Venkataraman, A.; Maher, A.; Moriarty, A.; McEneaney, D.; Connolly, D.; Davis, R.; Banerjee, P.; Davey, P.; Elmahi, E.; Senior, R.; Ahmed, A.; Birdi, I.; Gedela, S.; Singh, A.; Calvert, J.; Butler, M.; Donnelly, P.; Jasinka, A.; Orr, C.; Trevelyan, J.; Routledge, H.; Carter, J.; Oxenham, H.; Peace, A.; McNeill, A.; Austin, D.; Jackson, M.; Kukreja, N.; Kotwinski, P.; Hilton, T.; Bilizarian, S.; Srivastava, S.; Walsh, R.; Fields, R.; Portnay, E.; Gogia, H.; Deits, R.; Salacata, A.; Hunter, J.; Bacharach, J.; Shammas, N.; Suresh, D.; Gurbel, P.; Banerjee, S.; Grena, P.; Bedwell, N.; Sloan, S.; Lupovitch, S.; Soni, A.; Gibson, K.; Pepper, D.; Sangrigoli, R.; Mehta, R.; Patel, J.; I-Hsuan Tsai, P.; Gillespie, E.; Harrison, A.; Dempsey, S.; Phillips, R.; Hamroff, G.; Hametz, C.; Black, R.; Lader, E.; Kostis, J.; Bittner, V.; Mcguinn, W.; Cheng, R.; Pal, J.; Malhotra, V.; Michaelson, S.; Vacante, M.; Mccormick, M.; Arimie, R.; Dukkipati, R.; Camp, A.; Dagher, G.; Kosh y, N.; Culp, J.; Thew, S.; Ferraro, A.; Costello, F.; Heiman, M.; Chilton, R.; Moran, M.; Adler, F.; Balingit, P.; Comerota, A.; Seiwert, A.; French, W.; Vardi, G.; Singh, T.; Serota, H.; Qayyum, U.; Das, S.; Harrison, R.; Vora, A.; Bakeen, F.; Omer, S.; Chandra, L.; Casaccia, G.; Tinto, J.; Sighel, C.; Giozzi, E.; Morell, Y.; Bianchini, M.; Yossen, M.; Hoyos, M.; Venturini, C.; Merkusa, C.; Carrique, A.; Carrique, P.; Fracaro, V.; Torres, M.; Crunger, P.; Espinosa, M.; Passarello, A.; Zaidman, M.; Ledesma, M.; Troncoso, C.; Aviles, A.; Rodera Vigil, S.; Vogel, M.; Takla, M.; Funosas, C.; Ferreiro, M.; Bruno, T.; Buzzetti, C.; Lozano, J.; Alvarez Dámelio, A.; Bocanera, M.; Vicente, D.; Cenci, A.; Deluca, C.; Santana, R.; Ahuad Calvelo, A.; Alvarez D'Amelio, A.; Ahuad Calvelo, J.; Herrero, S.; Robertson, M.; Tapia, D.; Escalante, M.; Cañas, M.; Cendali, G.; Esposito, L.; Muñiz, M.; Montaña, J.; Di Vruno, M.; Strevezza, M.; Lopez Santi, M.; Massei, N.; Garate, V.; Perlo, D.; Campora, F.; Jakubowski, I.; Gonzalez Moisello, M.; Actis, M.; Schiavi, S.; Aguirre, M.; Ceirano, C.; Zillo, M.; Yunis, M.; Berdini, A.; Gerbaudo, R.; Berdini, J.; Palma, F.; Pinero, S.; Virulio, S.; Vitale, A.; Sosa Flores, G.; Ibanez Saggia, C.; Ibanez Saggia, D.; Roses, A.; Martinelli, C.; Vargas, L.; Galarza Salazan, M.; Dran, P.; Tinnirello, V.; Pelayes, S.; Bordoni, P.; Navarro, A.; Barilati, P.; Serra, R.; Nigro, A.; Cleiman, S.; Bianchi, M.; Vallejo, M.; Ingratta, M.; Tonelli, L.; Levantini, M.; Bonifacio, M.; Hansen, V.; Chaieb, A.; Majul, S.; Medina, F.; Gallinotti, P.; Madariaga, T.; Andrea, G.; Blumberg, C.; Volpe, M.; Gandur, H.; Benincasa, V.; Barreto, M.; Jure, D.; Tulloch, G.; Greenwell, D.; Forrest, N.; Nyman, E.; Mcintosh, C.; O'May, V.; Grabek, T.; Conway, B.; O’Donoghue, M.; Brady, L.; Duroux, M.; Ratcliffe, M.; Shone, S.; Connelly, A.; Ferreira-Jardim, A.; Vandernet, R.; Downes, R.; Davids, F.; Teal, L.; Knight, S.; Soraghan, D.; Spence, C.; Smith, K.; Tivendale, L.; Williams, Z.; O'Connor, M.; Walker, I.; Ferguson, L.; Holiday, J.; Griffin, R.; Palethorpe, L.; Hindom, L.; Lilwall, L.; Wadham, S.; Narasimhan, K.; van Extergem, P.; Joris, I.; Oreglia, M.; Jacobs, C.; Leus, W.; Robesyn, V.; Vanheule, K.; van den Bossche, K.; Albertijn, S.; Vissers, C.; Badts, G.; Vangenechten, K.; Derycker, K.; Dejaegher, K.; de Grande, T.; de Clippel, M.; Gayet, F.; Jorion, M.; Jourdan, A.; Tartaglia, K.; Zwinnen, W.; Roijakkers, I.; van Genechten, G.; Schoonis, A.; Bollen, J.; Janssen, A.; de Coninck, M.; Ruell, S.; Grimonprez, A.; Bouckaert, N.; van Eeckhoutte, H.; Malmendier, D.; Massoz, M.; Jacquet, S.; Vanhalst, E.; Casier, T.; Barroso, S. L.; Tamashiro, N.; Correa, C. P.; Sehnem, E. A. B.; Precoma, C. B.; Pinheiro, L.; Ruschel, K. B.; dos Reis, A. L.; Santos, M. S.; de Oliveira, L. O. S. P.; de Carvalho, L. M. G.; dos Santos, M. E. S.; Reis, L. L. F.; da Cunha, G. T.; França, F. F.; Bessa, S. K.; Vicente, C.; Ormundo, C.; Trama, L.; Pires, N. F.; Esteves, D.; Sila, O. L.; Góes, N. C.; Amorin, R. C.; Faria, M. O.; Bucalon, E. C.; Marin, L. P.; Herek, L.; Araujo, V. L.; Silva, A. F.; Lima, F.; Gomes, C. G.; Pagnan, L. G.; Novelli, C. M.; Carvalho, J. K. C.; Teodoro, A. R.; Zimmermann, E. M. B.; Beiersdorf, J. R.; Machado, B. G.; Pedroso, F. B. V.; de Vargas, T.; Peres, C. S.; dos Santos, T. F.; de Souza, S. F.; Luiz, R. O.; Ferreira, P.; Souza, D. F.; Cunha, S. M. C.; de Resende, I. M.; Furtado, C. C. F.; Soprane, A. A.; Brum, A. B.; Zorzo, J. A. T.; dos Santos, J. C.; Queiroz, L. B.; Barros, F. E.; Vianna, C. O.; Zanateli, A.; Vieira, A. P. Z.; Melo, G.; Zambonin, G. E. C.; Paiva, P.; Viana, R. M. M.; Yagihara, M. M.; Takiuti, M. M.; Miyamoto, P. B.; da Silva, M. F.; Borin, L. A.; Chiazzini, S. M. L.; Fleck, N.; Batista, R. F.; Cardoso, D. T.; MCamasmie, P.; Assompção, R. P.; Marques, L. L.; Leung, S.; Lewis, C.; Tytus, A.; Clarus, S.; Juranics, S.; Pandey, M.; Frenette, L.; Magi, A.; Nowacki, B.; Otis, J.; Fox, B.; Corke, R.; Miller, B.; Rizzo, A.; Trombetta, L.; Power, P.; Richert, L.; Haligowski, R.; Macrae, C.; Kooistra, L.; Urso, C.; Fox, S.; Felbel, S.; Stafford, C.; Stata, C.; Barnabe, B.; Mehta, K.; Faul, J.; Gohel, J.; Bhakta, S.; Harwood, A.; McPherson, C.; Marucci, J.; Manasterski, L.; Veenhuyzen, J.; Ramadan, D.; Madden, B.; Jetha, A.; Pajevic, M.; Dube, C.; Rolfe, B.; O’Blenis, G.; Roy, L.; Dihel, C.; Butler, J.; Simmavong, K.; Bartol, C.; Bozek, B.; Hart, B.; Shier, M.; Coughlin, M.; Lamantia, C.; Lamantia, D.; Vilag, C.; Fecteau, J.; Dionne, J.; Péloquin, G.; Hogg, N.; Welsh, S.; Weerasingam, S.; Lantz, M.; Lounsbury, N.; Martin, E.; Mitchell, L.; Morgen, G.; Nelson, S.; Pelzer, E.; Sorensen, S.; Leblanc, A.; Bourlaud, A. S.; Prémont, A.; Léger, P.; Larivière, M. M.; Tremblay, H.; Bergeron, A.; Dumont, J.; Keilani, S.; Landry, P.; Deneufbourg, I.; Breton, C.; Bilodeau, N.; Côté, M.; Dumont, F.; Dufort, L.; Marcoux, D.; David, M.; Otis, R.; Parks, J.; Cepidoza, C.; Janz, W.; Weighell, W.; Yaworski, S.; Boyd, K.; Lambert, J.; Shea-Landry, G.; Reid, K.; Thiessen, S.; Nemtean, D.; Futers, S.; Drouin, K.; Masson, C.; Arseneault, M. C.; Lachance, N.; Bergeron, C.; Boudreault, C.; Perkins, L.; Barnett, A.; Fortin, J.; Duclos, R.; Vallières, C.; Bouchard-Pilote, C.; Ouimet, F.; Roberge, B.; Couture, M. L.; Deshaies, D.; Bastien, A.; Chartrand, M. J.; Gagné, N. L.; Desbiens, K.; Alarie, P.; Cassan, J.; Ducharme, Y.; Roy D Tapps, I.; Bolduc, H.; Laliberté, J.; Hickey, L.; Spero, M.; Bernstein, M.; Clement, J.; Pawluch, A.; Ricci-Bonzey, M.; Richer, J.; Vaillancourt, J.; Ward, B.; Mostafai Rad, P.; Oleski, L.; Karkhanis, R.; Hartleib, V.; Poirier, R.; Hidalgo, J.; Hernandez, C.; Obreque, C.; Quilapi, D.; Villa, F.; Iturriaga, C.; Ferrada, M.; Navarrete, S.; Becerra, E.; Vargas, C.; Roque, C.; Alarcon, J.; Diaz, D.; Sepulveda, M.; Villan, C.; Garcia, N.; Lara, C.; Lezana, B.; Basso, N.; Torres, G.; Pasmino, C.; Gonzalez, S.; Medina, D.; Rodriguez, T.; Guo, T.; Chen, S.; Han, W.; Shi, D.; Zhang, Q.; Li, W.; Cui, L.; Huang, Z.; Gong, X.; Liu, D.; Tan, S.; Caicedo, L.; Rodriguez, A.; Mejia, I.; Escalante Ruiz, J.; Camera Ochoa, C.; Conrrado Ortega, Y.; Accini Diaz, A.; Rodriguez, B.; Lopez-Lopez, J.; Di Stefano, K.; Florez, L.; Manco, T.; Rodriguez, D.; Urina, A.; de La Hoz, L.; Almendrales, L.; Bello, O.; Urrea Valencia, H.; Correa Rivera, P.; Perdomo, I.; Alzate, J.; Rivera, E.; Jimenez, N. N.; DMoreno, N.; Guzman, A.; Betancourt, S.; Mendoza Marin, H.; Leyva, M.; Ortiz, M.; Marin, E.; Angie Lorena, A.; Alvarez, Y.; Cervantes Hurtado, A.; Accini Mendoza, A.; Trujillo Accini, M.; Eguis, B.; del Portillo, C.; Ortega, M.; Delgado, P.; Arciniegas, J.; Rodriguez, L.; Melo Sanchez, S.; Chavera, I.; Pastrana Mendoza, M.; Negrette Quintero, A.; Zidek, M.; Hajkova, D.; Rozskowska, P.; Opavska, I.; Souckova, E.; Matuskova, E.; Kratochvilova, T.; Pavelec, P.; Zelenkova, V.; Dolezalova, Z.; Márquez, M.; Moreira, D.; Zuleta, M.; Santana, G.; Coello, A.; Andrade, G.; Salazar, J.; Rivadeneira, J.; Vaerma, J.; Lappalainen, S.; Silvennoinen, S.; Haaraoja, A.; Valimaki, S.; Roine, E.; Abergel, H.; Msakni, W.; Fuentes, A.; Briday, G.; David, A.; Soltani, S.; Decorps, A.; Chettouh, M.; Douillet, M.; Zamiti-Smondel, A.; Cuccu, L.; Salhi, N.; Helene, M.; Martin, S.; Merah, A.; Daher, P.; Laurie, S.; Roussel, L.; Leperchois, C.; Delelo, E.; Thalamy, A.; Chazot, E.; Tahirovic, E.; Watson, S.; Brettschneider, B.; Maas, M.; Euler, K.; Rahn, G.; Beissner, S.; Anuschek, V.; Tu, E.; Buerger, M.; Schemann, J.; Klinger, C.; Kurzidim, T.; Sahbani, S.; Laszig, S.; Beilfuss, M.; Foerster, A.; Eichinger, G.; Rupprecht, M.; Kuehnert, J.; Wendler-Huelse, I.; Buelow-Johansen, B.; Baierlein, A.; Iselt, M.; Sievert, B.; Frommhold, R.; Wolf, T.; Hahn, M.; Schoen, B.; Acimic, C.; Ludwig, M.; Funkat, A.; Wagner, I.; Schink, M.; Calvo-Sanchez, D.; Felfoldine Feil, J.; Patakine Sumegi, T.; Miko-Pauer, R.; Courcy, M.; Kelly, C.; Farrell, D.; Kirrane, C.; Hall, M.; Gilroy, E.; Kelsey, M.; Andrew, G.; Joyce, M.; Conway, S.; Duane, L.; Omer, T.; Zuker, S.; Platner, N.; Saranga, H.; Kaufman, E.; Livshitz, L.; Genin, I.; Klainman, M.; Uziel Iunger, K.; Abitbul, A.; Fishman, B.; Greenshtein, I.; Tubul, O.; Lasri, E.; Zvi, R.; Yablonski, A.; Helmer Levin, L.; Lunetto, M. L.; Savoldi, D.; Fiorini, M.; Ramani, F.; Mariottoni, B.; Rizzotti, D.; Di Matteo, C.; Musio, S.; Pieroni Minciaroli, S.; Serani, S.; Aloisi, A.; Attanasio, C.; Tricoli, M.; Giordano, V.; Andrioli, V.; Biundo, V.; Tullio, L.; Schiff, D.; Trovarelli, P.; Chiodi, R.; Sampaolesi, S.; Cina, M. T.; Abatello, M.; de Tora, M.; Pietrucci, F.; Pezzetta, S.; Chiminelli, E.; Dall’Asta, A.; Bennati, M.; Elia, A.; Bizzoco, M.; Iaquaniello, A.; Spigarelli, R.; Cremonesi, C.; Gagliardi, M.; Torricelli, L.; Ijichi, N.; Shiraiwa, K.; Murakami, M.; Takeshita, K.; Sato, M.; Shiratori, A.; Kinjo, K.; Tomita, K.; Mizuno, M.; Kurihara, F.; Tachibana, M.; Nitta, Y.; Unno, K.; Hiramatsu, H.; Sano, A.; Nanatsumura, M.; Tanikawa, I.; Uesugi, K.; Banno, S.; Miyata, T.; Kujuji, A.; Kawai, K.; Maegawa, A.; Koseki, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Aoki, S.; Maesawa, M.; Suzuki, A.; Itose, Y.; Konishi, K.; Fujieda, K.; Nakade, S.; Minami, M.; Yoneda, J.; Akiyama, R.; Sakai, S.; Nakatani, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Funama, M.; Kaneko, E.; Morii, S.; Onishi, M.; Sone, A.; Sagawa, N.; Iwai, F.; Kawahara, A.; Hasimoto, C.; Ueki, M.; Kamiji, M.; Ando, M.; Yokoo, M.; Okada, Y.; Yamada, H.; Matsushige, N.; Nagato, A.; Matsumoto, R.; Nishikawa, M.; Oka, I.; Kitou, S.; Tachiuchi, M.; Nakagawa, M.; Yoneda, S.; Iwasa, K.; Matsuda, J.; Oda, A.; Tokudome, S.; Kaneyuki, Y.; Higaki, M.; Yoneda, H.; Kajita, C.; Suwa, K.; Sato, E.; Nagata, T.; Kubo, Y.; Umesu, A.; Ohashi, K.; Takeuchi, M.; Tanaka, I.; Nobehara, T.; Yamano, R.; Yumiba, A.; Hamada, M.; Nishihata, T.; Ohashi, Y.; Morita, M.; Endo, M.; Matsugi, M.; Tateishi, H.; Nakamori, R.; Yamashita, Y.; Okabe, M.; Matsuo, M.; Ono, T.; Shigeyama, Y.; Ichiyanagi, M.; Sugimori, K.; Ohmura, C.; Igarashi, M.; Aotsuka, S.; Komoda, N.; Watanabe, M.; Enomoto, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawaguchi, A.; Kasahara, A.; Koide, A.; Sakatani, T.; Kurihara, T.; Yokota, S.; Futagi, R.; Amemiya, Y.; Ono, E.; Maeda, A.; Kadono, K.; Ishiguchi, Y.; Kikuchi, R.; Kuramatsu, M.; Nakamura, E.; Chiba, S.; Higa, A.; Kitahashi, M.; Tanaka, H.; Ito, T.; Oba, M.; Tsubouchi, M.; Toshima, M.; Morishita, M.; Miyano, A.; Kondo, M.; Watanabe, K.; Shibata, R.; Tosaki, Y.; Ito, Y.; Saoda, M.; Yamasaki, E.; Kadosaki, S.; Motooka, S.; Akiyoshi, H.; Morio, S.; Nemoto, H.; Yoshizawa, S.; Okabe, N.; Semba, K.; Yoshida, A.; Lee, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Iwashita, Y.; Takeda, A.; Maezato, M.; Kawahira, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Okamoto, N.; Nishimura, M.; Matsuura, K.; Fukunaga, M.; Fukai, K.; Osakabe, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Koike, M.; Shibuya, S.; Shiramata, M.; Ono, Y.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Tadokoro, T.; Morishita, N.; Matsuo, Y.; Yumoto, I.; Sakazaki, S.; Atarashi, A.; Nabata, Y.; Okuda, N.; Fujita, A.; Matsuo, A.; Ishizawa, Y.; Shibata, H.; Ootsuka, M.; Taimatsu, R.; Takeuchi, A.; Sumi, Y.; Yamamoto, F.; Araki, Y.; Tanaka, A.; Kuroda, S.; Sakata, R.; Okada, N.; Sawada, Y.; Miyata, M.; Asayama, H.; Koga, N.; Miki, T.; Yamaguchi, N.; Hashimoto, A.; Fukuike, C.; Kubo, A.; Yamasaki, M.; Mori, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Takenaka, S.; Mashima, M.; Katsuta, H.; Matsumura, T.; Yanagida, S.; Watanabe, N.; Kodama, S.; Kusano, M.; Yamamoto, N.; Kamada, R.; Suzuki, K.; Itami, K.; Hasebe, Y.; Fujita, N.; Kubota, S.; Usuki, A.; Okamoto, M.; Uno, S.; Chikuma, A.; Kishikawa, H.; Yano K Nakano, C.; Otaguro, M.; Kayashima, Y.; Shinoda, M.; Jaafar, S. M.; Baharuddin, S.; Gembor, J.; Ahmad, H.; Syed Mansor, S. M.; Abdullah, W. M.; Shafie, Z.; Muhamad Yunus, S.; Alwi, S. M.; Hussin, N.; Basri, N. A.; Ling Ling, L.; Naem, N. S.; Rutten, R.; Rademaker, H.; van Buijsen, M.; Scholten, M.; Stuij, S.; van Zeijst, M.; van Houwelingen, K.; Engelen, W.; Kramer, H.; Maassen, E.; Verhoeven, P.; Awater, J.; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, C.; Meijlis, P.; Blom, L.; Bos, M.; van der Wal, M.; van Laerhoven, G.; Jacobs, T.; Tan-Urgert, B.; van de Gaag, J.; den Boer, P.; Verlek, E.; Lardinois, R.; Coenjaerds, C.; Hendrick, R.; Schoep, J.; Froma, E.; van Nes, C.; Beuving, D.; Krikken, J.; Drent, I.; Geerlings, F.; Buvelot, S.; Wissenburg, A.; Dijkshoorn, A.; van Setten van der Meer, L.; Singerling, M.; van Wijk, D.; Bor, A.; Aukema-Wouda, Z.; Hendriks-van Woerden, M.; Kort, I.; Danse, I.; van der Knaap, M.; de Jong, C.; Temminck, M.; Schaefer, T.; van der Ven, N.; Drost, I.; Mulder, R.; de Vos, A.; de Hoop, M.; Post, G.; Wielandt, D.; Edorot, N.; de Castro, K.; Flotildes, M.; Mulingtapang, T.; Vasquez, S.; Facundo, S.; Peralta, M.; Jose, M.; Bandiez, J.; Sulit, P.; Joaquin, F.; Arbis, M. G.; Silva, C.; Delgado, D.; de Leon, R.; Maglasang, P.; Sian, A.; Alagban, C.; Alcorano, J.; Marcelo, M. J.; Dela Pena, C.; Hyra, I.; Malkiewicz, B.; Mosakowska, K.; Cana, I.; Dobrin, I.; Lautaru, A.; Manescu, G.; Samoila, N.; Lacatus, M.; Apostoie, A.; Prunoiu, M.; Tilinca, M.; Budeanu, A.; Nedelcu, C.; Dumitrache, N.; Boeru, L.; Zhuravleva, E.; Gundova, M.; Hoffmannova, J.; Svitkova, M.; Pekarova, T.; Ujacka, K.; Zsoriova, T.; Kubincova, K.; Jankovicova, Z.; Talliard, C.; Tyumbu, N.; Mngoma, N.; Kannemeyer, M.; Mostert, J.; Page, A.; Krahenbuhl, C.; Tredoux, C.; Hendricks, L.; Oliver, S.; Le Grange, M.; Naidoo, V.; Bae, Y.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.; Yu, N.; An, S.; Kim, E.; Yang, K.; Woo, J.; Kim, S.; Rasck, J.; Smetana, S.; Ajax, K.; Bylander, L.; Lindberg, A.; Dellborg, H.; Hultsberg-Olsson, G.; Harsmar, K.; Knutsson, A.; Håkansson, L.; Kåveryd-Holmström, M.; Lundmark, L. M.; Norrfors, B.; Löf, P.; Skoglund, K.; Torgersruud, M.; Johansson, K.; Mattsson, A.; Quist, M.; Haglund, P.; Lundell, L.; Gunvasdotter, S.; Rangman, B.; Liu, R.; Shi, J.; Förstedt, G.; Nylund, L.; Welin-Berger, B.; Nilsson, O.; Garcia-Värlid, A.; Forlenza, R.; Kaminska, K.; Nagorna, T.; Cottam, V.; Harper, R.; Gilchrist, M.; Musanhu, R.; Mackin, A.; Turner, A.; Willetts, S.; Cadd, A.; Evans, J.; Young, G.; Sevillano, A.; Brodie, K.; Eccles, A.; Kelly, S.; Doughty, A.; Gray, J.; Gibson, M.; Finlayson, M.; Domingo, D.; Brazee, L.; Renaud, K.; Doman, A.; Meyer, R.; Beatty, J.; Morgan, T.; Rodas, E.; Campbell, D.; Mcquarrie, M.; Battistelli, E.; Eisenbraun, P.; Farley, R.; Park, H.; Dwyer, J.; Adams, K.; Schneider, W.; Barbour, C.; Whyne, E.; Budzinski, S.; Craig, M.; Gilley Elmore, J.; Scott, D.; Bellini, S.; Pepper, M.; Gunderson, K.; Stipek, I.; Schwarz, L.; Watkins, K.; Moore, V.; Palao, A.; Keane-Richmond, P.; Franklin, L.; Ward, L.; Kostedt, G.; Bailey, S.; Hollenweger, L.; Solomon, A.; Johnson, D.; Gloer, K.; Meyer, M.; Boleyn, M.; Nieters, D.; Humphrey, K.; Bohn, A.; Mueller, G.; Mckenzie, H.; Edwards, T.; Velky, J.; Cole, C.; Diederick, M.; Burg, S.; Coulson, T.; Karunaratne, K.; Gunasekera, R.; Cook, S.; Fisher, S.; Garrison, K.; Passey, L.; Kuykendall, K.; Luck, K.; Ramia, L.; Joan, H.; Reynoso, F.; Farley, M.; Shuman, S.; Santana-Fernandes, E.; Ventimiglia, A.; Steele, V.; Gers, L.; Brown, P.; Wilson, J.; Freebersyser, J.; Reno, M.; Buettner, N.; McGovern, M.; Hubbard, T.; Elmore, H.; Payne, D.; Mccann, M.; Decker, S.; Sharp, A.; Forgey, E.; Broussard, E.; Juett, U.; Siddiqui, A.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive rivaroxaban (2.5 mg

  20. The role of aspirin in women’s health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verheugt FWA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Freek WA Verheugt1, Antoinette C Bolte21Department of Cardiology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis (OLVG, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 2VU University Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsBackground: The aim of this review is to discuss the role of aspirin for various conditions in women.Methods: A nonsystematic review of articles published on PubMed® that examines the role of aspirin in women.Results: Aspirin is associated with a significant reduction of stroke risk in women, which may be linked to age. However, despite this evidence, underutilization of aspirin in eligible women is reported. In women of reproductive age, it may also have a role to play in reducing early-onset preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction, and in the prevention of recurrent miscarriage in women with antiphospholipid antibodies; it may also reduce cardiovascular risk in associated systemic conditions such as lupus. Aspirin may reduce colorectal cancer risk in women, but its role in breast cancer warrants further data from controlled trials.Conclusions: The risk–benefit threshold for aspirin use in women has been established for several conditions. Reasons why women are less likely to be prescribed aspirin have not been established, but the overall underuse of aspirin in women needs to be addressed.Keywords: CVD, cancer, menopause, preeclampsia

  1. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of aspirin and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr J. T. Ekanem

    Novel complexes of Co (11), Ni (11) and Fe (111) with aspirin and paracetamol have synthesized and characterized using infrared, electronic and Hnmr spectral, melting point and conductivity measurements. The two ligands have been found to act as bidentate chelating agents. Aspirin complexes coordinate through the ...

  2. Aspirin plus Heparin or Aspirin Alone in Women with Recurrent Miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaandorp, Stef P.; Goddijn, Mariette; van der Post, Joris A. M.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Verhoeve, Harold R.; Hamulyak, Karly; Mol, Ben Willem; Folkeringa, Nienke; Nahuis, Marleen; Papatsonis, Dimitri N. M.; Buller, Harry R.; van der Veen, Fulco; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aspirin and low-molecular-weight heparin are prescribed for women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage, with the goal of improving the rate of live births, but limited data from randomized, controlled trials are available to support the use of these drugs. METHODS In this randomized

  3. Aspirin plus heparin or aspirin alone in women with recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaandorp, Stef P.; Goddijn, Mariëtte; van der Post, Joris A. M.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Verhoeve, Harold R.; Hamulyák, Karly; Mol, Ben Willem; Folkeringa, Nienke; Nahuis, Marleen; Papatsonis, Dimitri N. M.; Büller, Harry R.; van der Veen, Fulco; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2010-01-01

    Aspirin and low-molecular-weight heparin are prescribed for women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage, with the goal of improving the rate of live births, but limited data from randomized, controlled trials are available to support the use of these drugs. In this randomized trial, we enrolled 364

  4. The role of aspirin desensitization in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Jonas Willian; Valera, Fabiana Cardoso Pereira; Cordeiro, Daniel Loiola; de Mendonça, Taís Nociti; Leite, Marcelo Gonçalves Junqueira; Tamashiro, Edwin; Arruda, Luiza Karla; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) consists of a classic tetrad: moderate/severe asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and intolerance to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Clinical control with drugs, surgery, and desensitization are treatment options. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of aspirin desensitization in patients with AERD. Periodic symptom assessment and endoscopy in patients with AERD undergoing surgery who were desensitized. Seventeen patients were desensitized. Eight patients completed the desensitization and were followed for a minimum of a one-year period (mean 3.1 years). These patients showed improvement in all symptoms. Moreover, surgical reassessment was not indicated in any of these patients and there was a decrease in costs with medication and procedures. Eight patients did not complete desensitization, mainly due to procedure intolerance and uncontrolled asthma, whereas another patient was lost to follow-up. Aspirin desensitization, when tolerated, was effective in patients with AERD and with poor clinical/surgical response. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Eye trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-02

    Feb 2, 2011 ... Industrial workers should be protected by safety glasses but injuries occur nonetheless. Eye trauma is frequent in homes, farms and backyards where safety glasses are not available. Angle-grinders, metal beating, hammering, fence mending, herding animals, forestry, fire fighting and cutting sugar cane ...

  6. Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OK if you ask to see their liver! Big as a Ping Pong Ball The eye is about as big as a ping-pong ball and sits in ... of sight! Reviewed by: Jonathan H. Salvin, MD Date reviewed: February 2015 More on this topic for: ...

  7. Eye trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-02

    Feb 2, 2011 ... Stain cornea with fluorescein. It is advisable to examine the eye as soon as possible since a delay will invariably lead to lid swelling, making the examination far more difficult. This can be overcome using cotton tips to retract the eyelids, or lid retractors can be made from bent paper clips (Illustration 1).

  8. Aspirin as a Chemopreventive Agent for Cancer: a New Hope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isnatin Miladiyah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: inflammation has been shown to play a major role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Inflammatory process activates the immune system through pro-inflammatory mediators and subsequent triggers transformation into malignant cells. Some tumors or cancers has been associated with chronic infections, such as hepatitis B and C viruses (hepatocellular carcinoma, human papilloma virus (cervical cancer, Helicobacter pylori (gastric cancer and lymphoma, and prostatitis (prostate cancer. A considerable study have investigated the benefits of aspirin for the prevention and treatment of cancer or tumors. Objectives: This paper aims to describe the relationship between inflammation and cancer incidence, so that use of aspirin as an anti-inflammatory agent is a rational choice in the treatment and prevention of cancer. Conclusion: Aspirin potential for chemoprevention of various types of cancer. Considering the high risk of side effects of aspirin, aspirin is not intended as a routine therapy to prevent the occurrence of cancer.

  9. Monitoring aspirin therapy with the Platelet Function Analyzer-100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jette; Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2008-01-01

    . The Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PFA-100) is a commonly used platelet function test. We aimed to assess the reproducibility of the PFA-100 and the agreement with optical platelet aggregometry (OPA) in healthy volunteers and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) treated with low-dose aspirin....... MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 43 patients with CAD took part in the study. During treatment with aspirin 75 mg daily, all participants had platelet function assessed in duplicate with the PFA-100 and OPA on 4 consecutive days. Additionally, platelet function was assessed before...... aspirin treatment in healthy subjects. Serum-thromboxane B(2) (S-TxB(2)) was measured to assess compliance. RESULTS: In healthy volunteers not receiving aspirin, duplicate measurements resulted in coefficients of variation (CV) of 7.9 % for the PFA-100 and 5.2 % for OPA. During aspirin treatment, CVs were...

  10. Aspirin decreases platelet uptake on Dacron vascular grafts in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, W.C.; Connolly, R.J.; Callow, A.D.; Keough, E.M.; Ramberg-Laskaris, K.; McCullough, J.L.; O' Donnell, T.F. Jr.; Melaragno, A.; Valeri, C.R.; Weiblen, B.

    1984-07-01

    The influence of a single dose of aspirin (5.4-7.4 mg/kg) on platelet uptake on 4-mm Dacron interposition grafts was studied in a baboon model using gamma camera scanning for 111-Indium labeled platelets. In vitro assessment of platelet function after aspirin administration revealed that in the baboon, as in the human, aspirin abolished arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation, prolonged the lag time between exposure to collagen and aggregation, and decreased plasma thromboxane B2 levels. Aspirin also prolonged the template bleeding time. Scans for 111-Indium labeled platelets revealed that pretreatment with a single dose of aspirin decreased platelet uptake on 4-mm Dacron carotid interposition grafts. This decrease in platelet uptake was associated with a significant improvement in 2-hour graft patency and with a trend toward improved 2-week patency.

  11. Is aspirin a cause of Reye's syndrome? A case against.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, James P; Hanhan, Usama A; Fiallos, Mariano R

    2002-01-01

    Reye's syndrome was a rare disease which appeared suddenly in the early 1950s and disappeared just as suddenly in the late 1980s. An association between Reye's syndrome and the ingestion of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) was claimed, although no proof of causation was ever established. The presence of salicylates in the blood or urine of Reye's syndrome patients has not been demonstrated, and no animal model of Reye's syndrome has been developed where aspirin causes the disease. It is clear from epidemiological data that the incidence of Reye's syndrome was decreasing well before warning labels were placed on aspirin products. Reye's syndrome disappeared from countries where aspirin was not used in children as well as from countries which continued to use aspirin in children. Reye's syndrome was probably either a viral mutation which spontaneously disappeared, or a conglomeration of metabolic disorders that had not been recognized or described at that time.

  12. Willow species and aspirin: different mechanism of actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachojannis, J; Magora, F; Chrubasik, S

    2011-07-01

    Many believe that willow is the natural source of aspirin. However, willow species contain only a low quantity of the prodrug salicin which is metabolized during absorption into various salicylate derivatives. If calculated as salicylic acid, the daily salicin dose is insufficient to produce analgesia. Salicylic acid concentrations following an analgesic dose of aspirin are an order of magnitude higher. Flavonoids and polyphenols contribute to the potent willow bark analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect. The multi-component active principle of willow bark provides a broader mechanism of action than aspirin and is devoid of serious adverse events. In contrast to synthetic aspirin, willow bark does not damage the gastrointestinal mucosa. An extract dose with 240 mg salicin had no major impact on blood clotting. In patients with known aspirin allergy willow bark products are contraindicated. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated v...

  14. 45-FOOT HIGH DROP TOWER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Drop Tower is used to simulate and measure the impact shocks that are exerted on parachute loads when they hit the ground. It is also used for HSL static lift to...

  15. Aspirin inhibits formation of cholesterol rafts in fluid lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Richard J; Toppozini, Laura; Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Harroun, Thad A; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-03-01

    Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a high affinity for phospholipid membranes, altering their structure and biophysical properties. Aspirin has been shown to partition into the lipid head groups, thereby increasing membrane fluidity. Cholesterol is another well known mediator of membrane fluidity, in turn increasing membrane stiffness. As well, cholesterol is believed to distribute unevenly within lipid membranes leading to the formation of lipid rafts or plaques. In many studies, aspirin has increased positive outcomes for patients with high cholesterol. We are interested if these effects may be, at least partially, the result of a non-specific interaction between aspirin and cholesterol in lipid membranes. We have studied the effect of aspirin on the organization of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) membranes containing cholesterol. Through Langmuir-Blodgett experiments we show that aspirin increases the area per lipid and decreases compressibility at 32.5 mol% cholesterol, leading to a significant increase of fluidity of the membranes. Differential scanning calorimetry provides evidence for the formation of meta-stable structures in the presence of aspirin. The molecular organization of lipids, cholesterol and aspirin was studied using neutron diffraction. While the formation of rafts has been reported in binary DPPC/cholesterol membranes, aspirin was found to locally disrupt membrane organization and lead to the frustration of raft formation. Our results suggest that aspirin is able to directly oppose the formation of cholesterol structures through non-specific interactions with lipid membranes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Aspirin in the Chemoprevention of Colorectal Neoplasia: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andrew T.; Arber, Nadir; Burn, John; Chia, John Whay-Kuang; Elwood, Peter; Hull, Mark A.; Logan, Richard F.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Schrör, Karsten; Baron, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) in addition to its well-established benefits in the prevention of vascular disease. Epidemiologic studies have consistently observed an inverse association between aspirin use and risk of CRC. A recent pooled analysis of a long-term post-trial follow-up of nearly 14,000 patients from 4 randomized, cardiovascular disease prevention trials showed that daily aspirin treatment for about 5 years was associated with a 34% reduction in 20-year CRC mortality. A separate meta-analysis of nearly 3,000 patients with a history of colorectal adenoma or cancer in 4 randomized adenoma prevention trials demonstrated that aspirin reduced the occurrence of advanced adenomas by 28% and any adenoma by 17%. Aspirin has also been shown to be beneficial in a clinical trial of patients with Lynch syndrome, a hereditary CRC syndrome; in those treated with aspirin for at least 2 years, there was a ≥ 50% reduction in the risk of CRC commencing 5 years after randomization and after aspirin had been discontinued. A few observational studies have shown an increase in survival among patients with CRC who use aspirin. Taken together, these findings strengthen the case for consideration of long-term aspirin use in CRC prevention. Despite these compelling data, there is a lack of consensus about the balance of risks and benefits associated with long-term aspirin use, particularly in low-risk populations. The optimal dose to use for cancer prevention and the precise mechanism underlying aspirin’s anticancer effect require further investigation. PMID:22084361

  17. Prevention of dipyrone (metamizole) induced inhibition of aspirin antiplatelet effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Amin; Richter, Stefan; Schrör, Karsten; Rassaf, Tienush; Merx, Marc W; Kelm, Malte; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Zeus, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    We have recently shown that dipyrone (metamizole), a non-opioid analgesic, can nullify aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) antiplatelet effects in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this study, we analysed the aspirin and dipyrone drug-drug interaction in order to identify strategies to prevent the dipyrone induced inhibition of asprin antiplatelet effects. Platelet function was measured by arachidonic acid-induced light-transmission aggregometry, thromboxane (TX) B2- formation by immunoassay. Dipyrone metabolite plasma levels were determined by high-performance-liquid-chromatography (HPLC). In seven healthy individuals, in vitro ASA (30 µM/ 100 µM/ 300 µM/ 1,000 µM) and dipyrone (10 µM) coincubation revealed, that the aspirin and dipyrone interaction can be overcome by increasing doses of aspirin. In 36 aspirin and dipyrone comedicated CAD patients, addition of ASA (30 µM/ 100 µM) in vitro inhibited, but did not completely overcome the dipyrone induced reduction of aspirin antiplatelet effects. Notably, the inhibition of thromboxane formation in aspirin and dipyrone comedicated CAD patients coincided with dipyrone plasma levels. In a cross-over designed study in four healthy individuals, we were able to prove that inhibition of aspirin (100 mg/ day) effects by dipyrone (750 mg/ day) was reversible. Furthermore, aspirin (100 mg/ day) medication prior to dipyrone (750 mg/ day) intake prevented the inhibition of antiplatelet effects by dipyrone in 12 healthy individuals. In conclusion, aspirin medication prior to dipyrone intake preserves antiplatelet effects, circumventing the pharmacodynamic drug-drug interaction at the level of cyclooxygenase-1.

  18. Aspirin: History and Applications; Cross-Curricular Instructional Strategies, Ideas, and Applications for Teaching about Aspirin in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hademenos, George

    2005-01-01

    Of the thousands of drugs and medicines available for the prevention, treatment, and control of human disease and discomfort, the most widely used is aspirin. The primary reason for aspirin's popularity is its capabilities as a pain reliever, fever reducer, and anti-inflammatory agent. This article explores the historical development of aspirin…

  19. Controlled delivery of aspirin: effect of aspirin on polymer degradation and in vitro release from PLGA based phase sensitive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu; Singh, Jagdish

    2008-06-05

    The objective of this study was to develop poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) based injectable phase sensitive in situ gel forming delivery system for controlled delivery of aspirin, and to characterize the effect of drug/polymer interaction on the in vitro release of aspirin and polymer degradation. Aspirin was dissolved into PLGA solution in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. Poly(ethylene glycol)400 was used as plasticizer to reduce initial burst release. The solution formulation was injected into aqueous release medium to form a gel depot. Released samples were withdrawn periodically and assayed for aspirin content by high performance liquid chromatography. The effect of aspirin on the degradation of PLGA matrix was evaluated using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Gel Permeation Chromatography. PLGA based in situ gel forming formulations controlled the in vitro release of aspirin for 7 days only. Analysis of PLGA matrix residuals revealed that PLGA in aspirin loaded formulations exhibited a significantly (pdegradation compared to blank formulations. These findings suggest that aspirin causes an unusually faster degradation of PLGA. Such faster degradation of PLGA has not been noticed for any other drugs reported in the literature.

  20. Treatment of contact lens related dry eye with antibacterial honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel; Albietz, Julie M; Tran, Huan; Du Toit, Cimonette; Li, Anita Hui; Yun, Tina; Han, Jee; Schmid, Katrina L

    2017-12-01

    Contact lens induced dry eye affects approximately 50% of contact lens wearers. The aim was to assess the effects of Manuka (Leptospermum sp.) honey eye drops (Optimel, Melcare, Australia) on dry eye in contact lens wearers. The safety of the honey eye drops in contact lens wear and contact lens wearers' compliance were also evaluated. Prospective, randomised, cross over study, examiner masked, pilot treatment trial. Twenty-four participants aged 20 to 55 years with contact lens related dry eye were recruited and randomised to two treatment groups; 20 completed the study. One group used Optimel eye drops twice a day for two weeks followed by conventional lubricant (Systane Ultra, Alcon) therapy for two weeks; the other group completed the treatments in the reverse order. Before and after each treatment dry eye symptomology, ocular surface inflammation, and tear quantity and quality were assessed. Participants completed a daily log detailing their usage of treatments and any issues. Dry eye symptoms improved significantly after Optimel treatment. Patients with more severe symptoms at baseline showed a greater improvement in symptoms. No significant differences were observed in the objective signs of dry eye; presumably because of the short treatment duration. Seventy-five% of contact lens wearers reported good adherence to Optimel treatment and 95% reported no issues using this product. Optimel Eye Drops reduce the symptoms of dry eye in contact lens wearers and are safe to use. A longer treatment period to assess the effect on clinical signs of dry eye is required. Copyright © 2017 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative effect of clopidogrel and aspirin versus aspirin alone on laboratory parameters: a retrospective, observational, cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Clopidogrel and aspirin are antiplatelet agents that are recommended to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other cardiovascular events. Combination therapy of clopidogrel and aspirin has been shown to increase the risk of hemorrhage, but the effects of the drugs on laboratory parameters have not been well studied in patients in routine clinical practice. Therefore, we evaluated and compared the effects of combination therapy with clopidogrel plus aspirin and aspirin monotherapy on laboratory parameters using a clinical database. Methods We used data from the Clinical Data Warehouse of Nihon University School of Medicine obtained between November 2004 and April 2011, to identify cohorts of new users (n = 159) of clopidogrel (75 mg/day) plus aspirin (100 mg/day) and new users (n = 834) of aspirin alone (100 mg/day). We used a multivariable regression model and regression adjustment with the propensity score to adjust for differences in baseline covariates between settings, and compare the mean changes in serum levels of creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and hematological parameters, including hemoglobin level, hematocrit, and white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell and platelet counts up to two months after the start of study drug administration. Results After adjustment, the reduction of WBC count in clopidogrel plus aspirin users was significantly greater than that in aspirin alone users. All other tests showed no statistically significant difference in the mean change from baseline to during the exposure period between clopidogrel plus aspirin users and aspirin alone users. The combination of clopidogrel and aspirin increased the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with aspirin alone, with a relative risk ranging from 2.06 (95% CI, 1.02 to 4.13; p = 0.043) for the multivariate model and 2.61 (95% CI, 1.18 to 5.80; p = 0.0184) for propensity adjustment. Conclusion Our findings suggested that

  2. Genetics of hypersensitivity to aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Sanak, Marek; Park, Hae-Sim

    2013-05-01

    Various hypersensitivity reactions have been reported with aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Hypersensitivity can occur regardless of a chemical drug structure or its therapeutic potency. Allergic conditions include aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD or aspirin-induced asthma), aspirin-induced urticaria/angioedema (AIU), and anaphylaxis. Several genetic studies on aspirin hypersensitivity have been performed to discover the genetic predisposition to aspirin hypersensitivity and to gain insight into the phenotypic diversity. This article updates data on the genetic mechanisms that govern AERD and AIU and summarizes recent findings on the molecular genetic mechanism of aspirin hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of aspirin desensitization on T-cell cytokines and plasma lipoxins in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Kurtuluş; Kurt, Emel; Alatas, Özkan; Gülbas, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is thought to be based on, mainly, overproduction of eicosanoid lipid mediators and on defective anti-inflammatory regulators. Aspirin desensitization treatment, the mainstay of controlling asthma and rhinitis in AERD patients, however, is the least understood aspect of the disease. The study was designed to determine the effect of aspirin desensitization on T-lymphocyte cytokine expression and on plasma lipoxin levels in AERD. Spirometry, skin-prick test and asthma control test were documented and intracellular cytokine expression in T lymphocytes and plasma lipoxin levels were measured in 23 AERD patients, 17 aspirin-tolerant asthmatic (ATA) patients, and 16 healthy controls. In the AERD group nasal symptom and smell scores were assessed. Of the 23 AERD patients 15 accepted to undergo aspirin desensitization protocol and 14 of them were desensitized successfully. In the desensitized AERD group, cytokine and lipoxin measurements were repeated after 1-month aspirin treatment. CD4(+) IL-10 levels were higher in AERD patients than in healthy controls and CD4(+) interferon (IFN) gamma levels were higher in AERD and ATA patients than in controls. Plasma lipoxin-A4 and 15-epi-lipoxin-A4 levels were similar among the three study groups. In the AERD group, subjects underwent aspirin desensitization followed by a 1-month aspirin treatment. Clinical parameters improved and CD4(+) IFN-gamma levels decreased significantly. No significant change in lipoxin levels was recorded. CD4(+) IFN-gamma and CD4(+) IL-10 levels in AERD patients after 1-month aspirin desensitization treatment were similar to the healthy controls. The study confirms aspirin desensitization is effective clinically in AERD patients and suggests that IFN gamma and IL-10 expression in CD4(+) T lymphocytes may be related to the mechanism of action.

  4. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can put on your web pages. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye) One-Page Overview Pink, itchy eyes? Conjunctivitis – or ... yourself from getting and spreading pink eye . Pink Eye: What To Do Discusses causes and treatment, when ...

  5. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NEI for Kids > About the Eye All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun ...

  6. Eye Disease Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... USAJobs Home > Eye Health Information > Eye Disease Simulations Eye Disease Simulations Age-Related Macular Degeneration Cataract Diabetic ... information page Back to top Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic Eye Disease information page Back to top Glaucoma Glaucoma ...

  7. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... USAJobs Home > NEI for Kids > About the Eye All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video ... Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information ...

  8. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... USAJobs Home > NEI for Kids > About the Eye All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many ...

  9. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  10. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group ... eye diseases that can threaten your sight are Diabetic retinopathy The retina is the inner lining at ...

  11. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eye behind the iris that helps to focus light on the retina. It allows the eye to ... of the eye. It regulates the amount of light entering the eye through the pupil. Pupil (PYOO- ...

  12. Why Do Eyes Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth / For Kids / Why Do Eyes Water? What's ... coming out of your nose. Why Do Eyes Water? Eyes water for lots of different reasons besides ...

  13. Eye Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  14. Adverse drug events leading to emergency department visits at an eye hospital: A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Safa; Mohebbi, Niayesh; Gholami, Kheirollah; Jabbarvand, Mahmoud

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate adverse drug events (ADEs) resulting in emergency department visits in an eye hospital. Emergency department visits at Farabi Eye Hospital were assessed for a 7-day period. The patients' eye disorders and drug history were evaluated to detect ADEs. Of 1631 emergency visits, 5 (0.3%, 95% CI: 0.13-0.71%) were drug related. Tetracaine eye drops accounted for 4 (80%, 95% CI: 38-96%) cases with corneal involvement. The other case was an intense conjunctival injection due to naphazoline eye drops. ADEs should be considered in differential diagnosis of ocular emergency problems and preventive measure should be considered.

  15. [Aspirin hypersensitivity: characteristics and diagnostic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudrand, H; Zaouche, S; Dubost, R; Carsin, A; Chatte, G; Freymond, N; Piperno, D; Dubreuil, C; Froehlich, P; Pacheco, Y; Devouassoux, G

    2015-03-01

    In routine medical practice, the diagnosis of aspirin hypersensitivity (AH) remains difficult. No clinical feature or biomarker is available to reliably confirm this diagnosis and oral provocation tests (OPT) are rarely performed. To compare asthmatics with and without AH. The clinical characteristics of 21 asthmatics with and 24 without AH respectively were determined. AH was defined by a positive OPT. A full blood count was done before and 24 hours after the OPT. The medical history was associated with a weak sensitivity (52%) and a good specificity (96%) for assessing the diagnosis of AH. There was a higher prevalence of AH in women, and a higher frequency of allergic rhinitis in AH, but no characteristic was useful to facilitate the diagnosis of AH in asthmatic patients. Our results demonstrate higher values of platelets in AH patients. Following OPT, in AH patients only, a decrease in blood eosinophils and an increase in neutrophils was observed. These results confirm that the diagnosis of AH is challenging, with the history having only weak sensitivity. The observation that fluctuations in eosinophils and neutrophils occur following OPT in AH patients only warrants further investigations and suggests a rapid pro-inflammatory role for aspirin. Copyright © 2014 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Eye Contricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Wade

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pictorial images are icons as well as eye-cons: they provide distillations of objects or ideas into simpler shapes. They create the impression of representing that which cannot be presented. Even at the level of the photograph, the links between icon and object are tenuous. The dimensions of depth and motion are missing from icons, and these alone introduce all manner of potential ambiguities. The history of art can be considered as exploring the missing link between icon and object. Eye-cons can also be illusions—tricks of vision so that what is seen does not necessarily correspond to what is physically presented. Pictorial images can be spatialised or stylised; spatialised images generally share some of the projective characteristics of the object represented. Written words are also icons, but they do not resemble the objects they represent—they are stylised or conventional. Icons as stylised words and spatialised images were set in delightful opposition by René Magritte in a series of pipe paintings, and this theme is here alluded to. Most of visual science is now concerned with icons—two-dimensional displays on computer monitors. Is vision now the science of eye-cons?

  17. Beclin 1 acetylation impairs the anticancer effect of aspirin in colorectal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Ting; Ming, Liang; Yan, Yunmeng; Zhang, Yan; Xue, Haikuo

    2017-01-01

    Regular use of aspirin can reduce cancer incidence, recurrence, metastasis and cancer-related mortality. Aspirin suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells, but the precise mechanism is not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that aspirin induced autophagosome formation in colorectal cancer cells, but autophagic degradation was blocked through aspirin-mediated Beclin 1 acetylation. Blocked autophagic degradation weakened aspirin-induced cell deat...

  18. Force-length recording of eye muscles during local-anesthesia surgery in 32 strabismus patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAbstract. Force-length recordings were made from isolated human eye muscles during strabismus surgery in local, eye-drop anesthesia in 32 adult patients. From each muscle three recordings were made: (1) while the patient looked with the other eye into the field of action of the recorded

  19. VTrans Small Culvert Inventory - Drop Inlets

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Vermont Agency of Transportation Small Culvert Inventory: Drop Inlets. This data contains drop inlets locations along VTrans maintained roadways. The data was...

  20. Mechanistic insights into a classic wonder drug--aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jinping; Zhou, Yanzi; Xie, Daiqian; Zhang, Yingkai

    2015-01-14

    Aspirin, one of the oldest and most common anti-inflammatory agents, has recently been shown to reduce cancer risks. The principal pharmacological effects of aspirin are known to arise from its covalent modification of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) through acetylation of Ser530, but the detailed mechanism of its biochemical action and specificity remains to be elucidated. In this work, we have filled this gap by employing a state-of-the-art computational approach, Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical potential and umbrella sampling. Our studies have characterized a substrate-assisted inhibition mechanism for aspirin acetylating COX: it proceeds in two successive stages with a metastable tetrahedral intermediate, in which the carboxyl group of aspirin serves as the general base. The computational results confirmed that aspirin would be 10-100 times more potent against COX-1 than against COX-2, and revealed that this inhibition specificity between the two COX isoforms can be attributed mainly to the difference in kinetics rate of the covalent inhibition reaction, not the aspirin-binding step. The structural origin of this differential inhibition of the COX enzymes by aspirin has also been elucidated.

  1. Mode of action of aspirin as a chemopreventive agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovizio, Melania; Bruno, Annalisa; Tacconelli, Stefania; Patrignani, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Aspirin taken for several years at doses of at least 75 mg daily reduced long-term incidence and mortality due to colorectal cancer. The finding of aspirin benefit at low-doses given once daily, used for cardioprevention, locates the antiplatelet effect of aspirin at the center of its antitumor efficacy. In fact, at low-doses, aspirin acts mainly by an irreversible inactivation of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 in the presystemic circulation, which translates into a long-lasting inhibition of platelet function. Given the short half-life of aspirin in the human circulation(approximately 20 min) and the capacity of nucleated cells to resynthesize the acetylated COX-isozyme(s), it seems unlikely that a nucleated cell could be the target of aspirin chemoprevention. These findings convincingly suggest that colorectal cancer and atherothrombosis may share a common mechanism of disease, i.e. platelet activation in response to epithelial(in tumorigenesis) and endothelial(in tumorigenesis and atherothrombosis) injury. Activated platelets may also enhance the metastatic potential of cancer cells (through a direct interaction and/or the release of soluble mediators or exosomes) at least in part by inducing the overexpression of COX-2. COX-independent mechanisms of aspirin, such as the inhibition of NF-kB signaling and Wnt/β-catenin signaling and the acetylation of extra-COX proteins, have been suggested to play a role in its chemopreventive effects. However, their relevance remains to be demonstrated in vivo at clinical doses.

  2. MICROBIAL CONTAMINATION OF PRESERVED OPHTHALMIC DROPS IN OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENTS: POSSIBILITY OF AN EXTENDED PERIOD OF USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD REZA FAZELI

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocular infections may arise from topical ophthalmic medications. A standard imposed by the British Pharmaceutical Codex implies that eye drops should be discarded after 1-day use when these remedies are used in outpatient departments. In this study the bioburden rates arising from 2, 4 and 7 days’ use were evaluated and compared with those of 1 day’s use to determine whether it is possible to extend the period of use of preserved eye drops in outpatient departments. A total of 200 eye drops were taken from outpatient departments of Farabi Eye Hospital after 1, 2, 4 and 7 days’ use and the contamination rates of the residual contents, caps and droppers were determined using conventional techniques. High biobudren rates were obtained in all the samples tested. Although the overall recorded incidences of microbial contamination in the 2 and 4-day drops were not considerably different from those of first day (P>0.01 but those of 7 days’ use were significant (P<0.01. However, when contamination rate of drop contents was taken into account there was a significant difference between 4 and 7 days’ use compared to 1-day drops. Most of the isolated organisms were either of human flora types of Gram-positive bacteria or air-borne fungi. It is concluded that the use of eye drops for outpatient practice may be extended up to 2 days; yet, care should be taken to reduce the overall contamination rates of these preparations for prevention of ocular nosocomial infections.

  3. Preventing Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Preventing Eye Injuries Leer en Español: Lesiones de los Ojos Reviewed ...

  4. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  5. Aspirin and clonidine in non-cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garg, Amit; Kurz, Andrea; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Perioperative Ischaemic Evaluation-2 (POISE-2) is an international 2×2 factorial randomised controlled trial of low-dose aspirin versus placebo and low-dose clonidine versus placebo in patients who undergo non-cardiac surgery. Perioperative aspirin (and possibly clonidine) may reduce...... and preoperative chronic aspirin use. At the time of randomisation, a subpopulation agreed to a single measurement of serum creatinine between 3 and 12 months after surgery, and the authors will examine intervention effects on this outcome. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The authors were competitively awarded a grant...

  6. Comparison of mydriatic efficacy of spray application and drop instillation of tropicamide 1%.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, A; Aydin, P

    1999-10-01

    To determine whether the mydriatic efficacy of spray application of tropicamide 1% is comparable to drop instillation of tropicamide 1%, and to compare the ocular discomfort caused by these methods. Thirty-four healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two groups, and received either a single drop of tropicamide 1% eye drops or a single puff of tropicamide 1% spray into open eyes. Pupil diameters were measured from anterior segment images taken using a Topcon Imagenet system at baseline and at the fifth, tenth and fifteenth minute after drug administration. Ocular discomfort experienced with each method was also compared. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed that a statistically significant increase in pupil diameter was achieved with both application methods over time (p tropicamide 1% spray was 1.45 +/- 0.56, and for tropicamide 1% eye drops was 2.71 +/- 0.67. This difference was statistically significant (p tropicamide 1% spray is similar to that of conventional tropicamide 1% eye drops, and spray application causes less ocular discomfort.

  7. Comparative effects of aspirin and enteric-coated aspirin on loss of chromium 51-labeled erythrocytes from the gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, D.C.; Schwartz, R.S.; Kutny, K.; Vallejo, G.; Horton, E.S.; Cotter, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium chromate Cr 51 was used to label red blood cells of 19 healthy male volunteers, whose stools were collected for four days before and four days during oral administration of either uncoated (N . 9) or enteric-coated (N . 10) aspirin. Each subject received 2.925 gm/day of aspirin, in three equal doses separated by eight-hour intervals, for a total of seven days. During drug use, stools were collected on days 4 through 7. Fecal blood content, estimated by measuring radioactivity in the stools, was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) during use of either type of aspirin than at baseline, but losses measured during use of the coated aspirin (mean, 1.54 ml/day) were significantly lower (P less than 0.001) than those measured during use of the uncoated aspirin (mean, 4.33 ml/day). The two types of aspirin produced equivalent serum concentrations of salicylates. We conclude that enteric-coated aspirin reduces gastrointestinal blood loss.

  8. Comparative study measuring the dilatory effect of a mydriatic device (Mydriasert® versus topical drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Saenz-de-Viteri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the mydriatic efficacy of an ophthalmic insert (Mydriasert, MY versus phenylephrine and tropicamide (PT eye drops.METHODS:Two controlled, prospective, randomized, single-blind studies were performed. In the first study, a total of 80 eyes from 40 outpatient-clinic patients were analyzed. PT drops were applied to the right eye, and a MY device was inserted in the left eye for 30min. Time until maximal pupil dilation for each eye was then assessed. In the second study, 80 eyes from 80 patients undergoing cataract surgery were analyzed. Pupil dilation was achieved using either PT drops three-times for one hour prior to surgery (40 patients, or a MY device was inserted one hour prior to surgery (40 patients.RESULTS: In the first study, MY achieved superior mydriasis compared to PT eye drops at 90min (9.04±1.33mm vs 8.78±1.37mm, P=0.012. However MY took longer than PT drops to achieve maximal dilation, and mydriasis was inferior in eyes with MY compared to PT drops at 30min (7.21±1.73mm vs 8.22±1.43mm, P<0.001, the two groups only becoming similar by 60min (8.85±1.44mm vs 8.71±1.27mm, P=0.236. In the second study, both MY and PT achieved similar levels of mydriasis at the beginning of surgery (8.75±0.76mm with MY vs 8.77±0.63mm with PT, and also at the end of surgery (7.96±1.06mm with MY vs 8.32±0.72mm with PT, with no significant difference between groups (P=0.08. MY was well tolerated and cardiovascular effects were not influenced by dilation method.CONLUSION: MY could be a safe and efficacious alternative for mydriasis. The mydriatic effect of MY is as good as conventional PT eye drops after 60min, and is superior after 90min. MY also maintains good pupil dilation during cataract surgery.

  9. Safety and outcomes of aspirin desensitization for aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: A single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldram, Jeremy; Walters, Kristen; Simon, Ronald; Woessner, Katherine; Waalen, Jill; White, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Aspirin desensitization is an effective treatment option for aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease. Aspirin desensitization protocol modifications have improved the safety and efficiency of this procedure, yet some providers remain reluctant to perform it. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and outcomes of outpatient aspirin desensitization procedures. A secondary objective was to assess clinical characteristics that might predict reaction severity during aspirin desensitization. Two hundred seventy-five patients underwent aspirin desensitization at Scripps Clinic between January 2009 and August 2015. Baseline patient characteristics and reaction results were analyzed in the 167 patients who reacted during desensitization. All of the 167 reactors, including 23 who were classified as severe reactors, were successfully desensitized in the outpatient setting. The average desensitization duration among reactors was 1.67 days, and the average duration for gastrointestinal reactors was 2.29 days. The mean baseline Sino-Nasal Outcome Test score was higher in severe reactors compared with nonsevere reactors (P = .05). Overall, patients receiving omalizumab had a similar reaction profile to those not receiving omalizumab. Most patients undergoing aspirin desensitization will have symptoms. It remains difficult to predict the severity of these symptoms. However, desensitization can be done safely and efficiently in an appropriately equipped outpatient setting. This treatment option should be made available to all patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease. The Sino-Nasal Outcome Test score might be able to predict more severe reactions and merits further study. Eight of the 9 patients receiving omalizumab reacted during desensitization, suggesting that it does not block reactions during aspirin desensitization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Evaluation of potentiating effect of a drop of lignocaine on tropicamide-induced mydriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, S; Garodia, V K; Sachdev, M S; Kumar, H; Biswas, N R; Pandey, R M

    2001-06-01

    To analyze whether preinstillation of lignocaine potentiates mydriasis by tropicamide in dark eyes and to determine possible mechanisms for this effect. This investigation was conducted in two phases, the first being a double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, enrolling 60 healthy dark brown eyes in 30 subjects aged 7 to 58 years. The control eye received a drop of (nonlignocaine) placebo before tropicamide 1%, and the contralateral study eye received a 4% lignocaine drop 3-minutes before the 1 drop of tropicamide was administered. A ruled pupillometer recorded pupil diameters every 10 minutes for 50 minutes. In phase II, to elucidate pathomechanisms after lignocaine, corneal and tear parameters were compared with baseline records in a further 60 such eyes. Pupillary diameters in the study eyes increased by 3.62 +/- 0.75 mm, significantly more than in the placebo (control) group (P = 0.000). Ninety percent of study eyes attained the clinically significant 6-mm size with preinstillation of lignocaine-many more than the 67% of control eyes (P = 0.016). The median time to achieve this critical 6-mm size was significantly faster in the study group (P = 0.005). In phase II, the 1 drop 4% lignocaine did not show corneal changes with slit lamp or fluorescein staining and did not reduce media clarity or induce a significant change in tear pH. It markedly decreased Schirmer values (P = 0.000), reduced tear break-up time (P = 0.003), and increased corneal thickness measured by optical pachymetry (P = 0.010). The phase II findings indicate corneal microepithelial damage and reduced tearing. Both may enhance intraocular penetration and hence potentiation of tropicamide. This remarkable phenomenon could find use with many other important topical medications.

  11. Aspirin as a chemoprevention agent for colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Chun Seng

    2012-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of mortality in the western world. It is widely accepted that neoplasms such as colonic polyps are precursors to CRC formation; with the polyp-adenoma-carcinoma sequences well described in medical literature [1, 2]. It has been shown that Aspirin and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) have a negative effect on polyp and cancer formation. This review aims to describe some of the mechanism behind the chemoprotective properties of aspirin; COX 2 inhibition, regulation of proliferation and apoptosis and effects on the immune system and also the current evidence that supports its use as a chemoprevention agent against CRC. We will also aim to explore the side effects with the use of aspirin and the pitfalls of using aspirin routinely for primary prophylaxis against CRC.

  12. The Role of Platelet and its Interaction with Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Fernanda Zúñiga Cerón

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion. It is recognized the role of platelet in different physiopathological processes and thus its interaction with aspirin, preventing its aggregation and thrombus formation in the spleen and other organs, this way contributing to the prevention of future cardiovascular events.

  13. Perioperative aspirin and clonidine and risk of acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garg, Amit X; Kurz, Andrea; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Acute kidney injury, a common complication of surgery, is associated with poor outcomes and high health care costs. Some studies suggest aspirin or clonidine administered during the perioperative period reduces the risk of acute kidney injury; however, these effects are uncertain...... and each intervention has the potential for harm. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether aspirin compared with placebo, and clonidine compared with placebo, alters the risk of perioperative acute kidney injury. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A 2 × 2 factorial randomized, blinded, clinical trial of 6905...... patients undergoing noncardiac surgery from 88 centers in 22 countries with consecutive patients enrolled between January 2011 and December 2013. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were assigned to take aspirin (200 mg) or placebo 2 to 4 hours before surgery and then aspirin (100 mg) or placebo daily up to 30 days...

  14. Using the Platelet Function Analyzer-100 for monitoring aspirin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Mickley, Hans; Korsholm, Lars

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to evaluate the test characteristics of the Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PFA-100) in patients treated with aspirin. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study consisted of two sub-studies. In study 1, 10 patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 10 controls had...... platelet function assessed by optical platelet aggregation and the PFA-100 method in two 5-week periods. Patients with IHD were treated with aspirin 150 mg/day (first 5-week period), and 300 mg/day (second 5-week period), whereas the controls only received aspirin (150 mg/day) during the second 5-week...... period. From the results of study 1, we found that a cut-off value for the PFA-100 collagen/epinephrine cartridge aspirin (sensitivity 0.91, specificity 1.00). A good agreement between the PFA-100 method and optical platelet aggregation was found. Within...

  15. Rivaroxaban or Aspirin for Extended Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitz, Jeffrey I; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Prins, Martin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although many patients with venous thromboembolism require extended treatment, it is uncertain whether it is better to use full- or lower-intensity anticoagulation therapy or aspirin. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study, we assigned 3396 patients with venous...... thromboembolism to receive either once-daily rivaroxaban (at doses of 20 mg or 10 mg) or 100 mg of aspirin. All the study patients had completed 6 to 12 months of anticoagulation therapy and were in equipoise regarding the need for continued anticoagulation. Study drugs were administered for up to 12 months...... in 17 of 1107 patients (1.5%) receiving 20 mg of rivaroxaban and in 13 of 1127 patients (1.2%) receiving 10 mg of rivaroxaban, as compared with 50 of 1131 patients (4.4%) receiving aspirin (hazard ratio for 20 mg of rivaroxaban vs. aspirin, 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20 to 0.59; hazard ratio...

  16. Aspirin Prophylaxis for the Prevention of Thrombosis: Expectations and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gundu H. R. Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets play a very important role in the pathogenesis of acute vascular events leading to thrombosis of the coronary and cerebral arteries. Blockage of these arteries leading to regional ischemia of heart and brain tissues precipitate heart attacks and stroke. Acetyl salicylic acid (Aspirin has been the drug of choice for over half a century for the primary and secondary prophylaxis of thrombotic events. In spite of its extensive use as an antiplatelet drug for the prevention of vascular thrombosis, there is considerable concern about the degree of protection it offers, to patients under aspirin therapy. In this paper, we explain the phenomenon of aspirin resistance, discuss the limitations of aspirin therapy, and suggest methods to monitor “at-risk” individuals. Ability to monitor and determine at risk patients will provide opportunities for the clinicians to customize antiplatelet therapies.

  17. Aspirin resistance: Prevalence and clinical outcome in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Salah

    2015-04-01

    Results: Prevalence of aspirin resistance was 48% in our study group. Aspirin resistance was significantly higher in patients with family history of CAD (p = 0.044, smoking (p = 0.011, history of MI (p = 0.024, history of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI (p = 0.001, and concomitant NSAIDs intake (p = 0.047. Moreover, aspirin resistance was more common among patients with multi-vessel CAD (p = 0.024. Aspirin-resistant patients had a significantly higher rate of UA (p = 0.001 and all major adverse cardiac events (MACE (p < 0.001.

  18. [Study of aspirin and its interaction with DNA by Raman and UV spectroscopies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Qian-qian; Zhou, Guang-ming

    2012-03-01

    Normal Raman spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of aspirin and aspirin tablet were reported, and the vibrational and enhanced peaks were assigned; the interaction of aspirin with DNA was investigated by SERS and UV. The results showed that NRS and SERS of aspirin and aspirin tablet were consistent basically, which indicated that excipient hardly affected the detection of aspirin; in SERS, aspirin was absorbed perpendicularly on silver colloid through the carboxyl group and the benzene ring; The interaction was mainly caused by the inserting-action mode between aspirin and DNA, and the benzene ring and C=O of aspirin were inserted between the base pair of the double helix structure of DNA, which provided important information and useful reference for understanding deeply the mechanism of action of this kind of drug.

  19. Novel Resveratrol-Based Aspirin Prodrugs: Synthesis, Metabolism, and Anticancer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingdong; Fu, Junsheng; Shurlknight, Kelly L; Soroka, Dominique N; Hu, Yuhui; Chen, Xiaoxin; Sang, Shengmin

    2015-08-27

    Regular aspirin use has been convincingly shown to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. However, long-term use of aspirin leads to gastrotoxicity. Herein, we designed and synthesized a novel class of resveratrol-based aspirin prodrugs to simultaneously release aspirin and resveratrol to attenuate the side effects caused by aspirin. Prodrug RAH exerted enhanced anticancer activities which are better than a physical mixture of aspirin and resveratrol as well as each individually. Metabolism of RAH in mice showed that the majority of RAH is decomposed to release resveratrol and aspirin or salicylic acid either in the intestine or after absorption. Mechanistic studies demonstrate RAH inhibits cell cycle arrest through downregulation of cyclins and induces apoptosis by activation of caspase-3 in cancer cells. These findings highlighted the improved anticancer properties of resveratrol-based aspirin prodrugs. RAH may represent novel and safe alternatives of aspirin for the purpose of daily use in the future.

  20. Drops, contact lines, and electrowetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Mannetje, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we study the behaviour of drops and contact lines under the influence of electric fields, and how these can answer fundamental and industrial questions. Our focus is on studying the varying balance of the electric field, hysteresis forces and inertia as the speed of a contact line

  1. Antiplatelet effects of aspirin in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, A; Dannenberg, L; Sansone, R; Levkau, B; Kelm, M; Hohlfeld, T; Zeus, T

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have a high risk of cardiovascular events. A pharmacodynamic evaluation of the effects of aspirin in 116 patients was carried out. The antiplatelet effects of aspirin are associated with impaired renal function. The optimal antithrombotic regimen in CKD patients must be investigated on a larger scale. The pharmacodynamic response to aspirin varies significantly between individuals. Insufficient antiplatelet effects of aspirin are associated with increased risk of ischemic events. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is suggested to affect the pharmacodynamic response to antiplatelet medication. High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) to clopidogrel has been reported to partially account for the enhanced risk of death and cardiovascular events in CKD patients. Objective To investigate the antiplatelet effects of aspirin in patients with CKD. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 116 patients on permanent aspirin medication. The pharmacodynamic response to aspirin was determined by arachidonic acid-induced thromboxane formation. HTPR to aspirin was more frequent in patients with impaired renal function (47% vs. 22%; odds ratio, 3.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-7.41; P = 0.008). The pharmacodynamic response to aspirin was impaired in patients with moderate/severe CKD (92; interquartile range [IQR], 282 ng mL(-1) ) as compared to patients with normal/mildly reduced renal function (36; IQR, 100 ng mL(-1) ; difference in medians, 57; CI, 5-110 ng mL(-1) ; P = 0.013). Bivariate Pearson analysis showed residual thromboxane formation to be correlated with glomerular filtration rate (R = -0.303; R(2) = 0.092; P = 0.001). Patients with CKD were older and more frequently female. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that the correlation was independent of age (R = -0.314; R(2) = 0.082; P = 0.002) and gender (R = -0.305; R(2) = 0.077; P = 0.006). Renal function is correlated with pharmacodynamic response to

  2. Drug Resistance and Pseudoresistance: An Unintended Consequence of Enteric Coating Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosser, Tilo; Fries, Susanne; Lawson, John A.; Kapoor, Shiv C.; Grant, Gregory R.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low dose aspirin reduces the secondary incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke. Drug resistance to aspirin might result in treatment failure. Despite this concern, no clear definition of “aspirin resistance” has emerged and estimates of its incidence have varied remarkably. We aimed to determine the commonality of a mechanistically consistent, stable and specific phenotype of true pharmacological resistance to aspirin – such as might be explained by genetic causes. Methods and Results Healthy volunteers (n=400) were screened for their response to a single oral dose of 325 mg immediate release or enteric coated aspirin. Response parameters reflected the activity of aspirin's molecular target, cyclooxygenase-1. Individuals who appeared “aspirin resistant” on one occasion underwent repeat testing and if still “resistant” were exposed to low dose enteric coated aspirin (81 mg) and clopidogrel (75 mg) for one week each. Variable absorption caused a high frequency of apparent resistance to a single dose of 325 mg enteric coated aspirin (up to 49%) but not to immediate release aspirin (0%). All individuals responded to aspirin upon repeated exposure, extension of the post dosing interval or addition of aspirin to their platelets ex vivo. Conclusions Pharmacological resistance to aspirin is rare; this study failed to identify a single case of true drug resistance. Pseudoresistance, reflecting delayed and reduced drug absorption, complicates enteric coated but not immediate release aspirin administration. Clinical Trial Registration Information clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00948987. PMID:23212718

  3. 'Aspirin resistance' or treatment non-compliance: Which is to blame for cardiovascular complications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantsila Eduard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aspirin is one of the 'cornerstone' drugs in our current management of cardiovascular disorders. However, despite the prescription of aspirin recurrent vascular events still occur in 10–20% of patients. These, data together with the observations of diminished antiaggregatory response to aspirin in some subjects have provided the basis of the current debate on the existence of so-called "aspirin resistance". Unfortunately, many of the tests employed to define 'aspirin resistance' lack sufficient sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility. The prevalence of 'aspirin resistance' as defined by each test varies widely, and furthermore, the value of a single point estimate measure of aspirin resistance is questionable. The rate of 'aspirin resistance' is law if patients observed to ingest aspirin, with large proportion of patients to be pseudo-'aspirin resistant', due to non-compliance. What are the implications for clinical practice? Possible non-adherence to aspirin prescription should also be carefully considered before changing to higher aspirin doses, other antiplatelet drugs (e.g. clopidogrel or even combination antiplatelet drug therapy. Given the multifactorial nature of atherothrombotic disease, it is not surprising that only about 25% of all cardiovascular complications can usually be prevented by any single medication. We would advocate against routine testing of platelet sensitivity to aspirin (as an attempt to look for 'aspirin resistance' but rather, to highlight the importance of clinicians and public attention to the problem of treatment non-compliance.

  4. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Pignone, Michael; Williams, Craig D.

    2010-01-01

    Aspirin is effective for the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with a history of vascular disease, as so-called secondary prevention. In general populations with no history of previous myocardial infarction or stroke, aspirin also seems useful for primary prevention of cardiovascular events, although the absolute benefits are smaller than those seen in patients with previous cardiovascular disease. Patients with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk of cardiovascular events...

  5. An Efficient Microscale Procedure for the Synthesis of Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandita, Sangeeta; Goyal, Samta

    1998-06-01

    The synthesis of aspirin is a part of many undergraduate organic synthesis labs and is frequently used in qualitative organic analysis laboratory for the identification of salicylic acid. We have found that aspirin can be synthesized on microscale by a simple and efficient procedure that eliminates the heating step employed in literature procedures and gives a pure, ferric-negative product (no purple color with alcoholic ferric chloride solution).

  6. A Review on the Relationship between Aspirin and Bone Health

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Kok-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin is a cyclooxygenase inhibitor commonly used in primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Its users are elderly population susceptible to osteoporosis. It also inhibits the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 essential in bone remodeling. This prompts the question whether it can influence bone health among users. This review aimed to summarize the current literature on the use of aspirin on bone health. A literature search on experimental and clinical evidence on the effects...

  7. Aspirin Use and Mortality in Two Contemporary US Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Yi; Daugherty, Sarah E; Shiels, Meredith S; Purdue, Mark P; Freedman, Neal D; Abnet, Christian C; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Hayes, Richard B; Silverman, Debra T; Berndt, Sonja I

    2018-01-01

    Daily aspirin use has been recommended for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, but its use for primary prevention remains controversial. We followed 440,277 men and women from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study (ages 50-71) and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (ages 55-74) for mortality for 13 years on average. Frequency of aspirin use was ascertained through self-report, and cause of death by death certificates. We calculated multivariate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for mortality using Cox proportional hazards models for each cohort and combined by meta-analysis. We found a consistent U-shaped relationship between aspirin use and mortality in both studies, with differential risk patterns for cardiovascular mortality by disease history. Among individuals with a history of cardiovascular disease, daily aspirin use was associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality [HR = 0.78 (95% CI, 0.74, 0.82)]. However, among those without a previous history, we observed no protection for daily aspirin users [HR = 1.06 (1.02, 1.11)], and elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality for those taking aspirin twice daily or more [HR = 1.29 (1.19, 1.39)]. Elevated risk persisted even among participants who lived beyond 5 years of follow-up and used aspirin without other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs [HR = 1.31 (1.17, 1.47)]. Results from these 2 large population-based US cohorts confirm the utility of daily aspirin use for secondary prevention of cardiovascular mortality; however, our data suggest that caution should be exercised in more frequent use, particularly among individuals without a history of cardiovascular disease.

  8. Genetic Mechanisms in Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha Palikhe, Nami; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Jin, Hyun Jung; Hwang, Eui-Kyung; Nam, Young Hee; Park, Hae-Sim

    2012-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) refers to the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatics following the exposure to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The key pathogenic mechanisms associated with AERD are the overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) and increased CysLTR1 expression in the airway mucosa and decreased lipoxin and PGE2 synthesis. Genetic studies have suggested a role for variability of genes in disease susceptibility and the resp...

  9. Effect of Aspirin on Fractalkine in Rats with Pulmonary Embolism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The serum levels of FKN, IL-8, TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly decreased by treatment with aspirin compared with the PE group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, mRNA expressions of lung FKN, TNF- α and IL-1β in PE group were markedly decreased by treatment with aspirin compared with that in PE group. PE-induced ...

  10. Mechanistic Insights into a Classic Wonder Drug?Aspirin

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Jinping; Zhou, Yanzi; Xie, Daiqian; Zhang, Yingkai

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin, one of the oldest and most common anti-inflammatory agents, has recently been shown to reduce cancer risks. The principal pharmacological effects of aspirin are known to arise from its covalent modification of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) through acetylation of Ser530, but the detailed mechanism of its biochemical action and specificity remains to be elucidated. In this work, we have filled this gap by employing a state-of-the-art computational approach, Born?Oppenheimer molecular dynami...

  11. Management options for patients with aspirin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Sandra R; Drucker, Aaron M; Weber, Elizabeth A; Shear, Neil H

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate and provide management strategies for patients with aspirin or nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) sensitivity. Literature retrieval was accessed through MEDLINE (1966-March 2007) using the terms acetaminophen, aspirin, antiinflammatory agents nonsteroidal, urticaria, angioedema, asthma, leukotriene antagonists, desensitization, and tacrolimus. Article references retrieved were hand-searched for other relevant articles. All studies published in English were evaluated. Studies, review articles, and commentaries on aspirin-induced asthma and aspirin- or NSAID-induced urticaria/angioedema were included in the review. Aspirin sensitivity is most often manifested as respiratory reactions (eg, bronchospasm, profuse rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection) or urticaria/angioedema. The primary mechanism is believed to be inhibition of the cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) enzyme; as such, patients with aspirin sensitivity often display cross-reactions to nonselective NSAIDs that inhibit the COX-1 enzyme. Management strategies include avoidance of aspirin and cross-reacting nonselective NSAIDs. However, desensitization to aspirin is a viable option for patients with aspirin-induced respiratory reactions, especially for those who require aspirin for thromboembolic prophylaxis. Aspirin desensitization is maintained indefinitely with a daily aspirin dose. There is limited evidence of the use of leukotriene modifiers in preventing aspirin-induced asthma. COX-2 selective NSAIDs, especially in patients with aspirin-induced asthma, have not been found to cross-react. However, approximately 4% of patients with a history of aspirin-induced skin reactions may experience a cutaneous reaction following a challenge to a COX-2 selective NSAID. Since acetaminophen is a weak inhibitor of the COX-1 enzyme, patients with aspirin-induced asthma should not take more than 1000 mg of acetaminophen in a single dose. Management of patients with aspirin/NSAID sensitivity includes

  12. Interaction of aspirin and vitamin C with bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Bagheri Sadeghi, Golshan; PanahYab, Ataollah

    2011-12-02

    Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) has a major biological role as a natural antioxidant. Aspirin belongs to the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and functions as an antioxidant via its ability to scavenge-OH radicals. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is the major soluble protein constituent of the circulatory system and has many physiological functions including transport of a variety of compounds. In this report, the competitive binding of vitamin C and aspirin to bovine serum albumin has been studied using constant protein concentration and various drug concentrations at pH 7.2. FTIR and UV-Vis spectroscopic methods were used to analyze vitamin C and aspirin binding modes, the binding constants and the effects of drug complexation on BSA stability and conformation. Spectroscopic evidence showed that vitamin C and aspirin bind BSA via hydrophilic interactions (polypeptide and amine polar groups) with overall binding constants of K(vitamin C-BSA)=1.57×10(4)M(-1) and K(aspirin-BSA)=1.15×10(4)M(-1); assuming that there is one drug molecule per protein. The BSA secondary structure was altered with major decrease of α-helix from 64% (free protein) to 57% (BSA-vitamin C) and 54% (BSA-aspirin) and β-sheet from 15% (free protein) to 6-7% upon drug complexation, inducing a partial protein destabilization. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szakaly, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low ( i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

  14. European guidelines on perioperative venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Pabinger, Ingrid; Samama, Charles Marc

    2018-02-01

    : There is a good rationale for the use of aspirin in venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in some orthopaedic procedures, as already proposed by the 9th American College of Chest Physicians' guidelines (Grade 1C). We recommend using aspirin, considering that it may be less effective than or as effective as low molecular weight heparin for prevention of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty and hip fracture surgery (Grade 1C). Aspirin may be less effective than or as effective as low molecular weight heparins for prevention of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after other orthopaedic procedures (Grade 2C). Aspirin may be associated with a low rate of bleeding after total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty and hip fracture surgery (Grade 1B). Aspirin may be associated with less bleeding after total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty and hip fracture surgery than other pharmacological agents (Grade 1B). No data are available for other orthopaedic procedures. We do not recommend aspirin as thromboprophylaxis in general surgery (Grade 1C). However, this type of prophylaxis could be interesting especially in low-income countries (Grade 2C) and adequate large-scale trials with proper study designs should be carried out (Grade 1C).

  15. TRIAL OF ASPIRIN AND CALCIUM ON PREVENTION OF PREECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALI AKBA TAHERIAN

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction. Preelampsia is a common and serious complication of pregnancy that affects both mother and newborn. This study designed to determine whether low-dose aspirin or calcium supplements taken throughout pregnancy reduce the incidence of preeclampsia. Methods. The present study was a randomized controlled clinical trial. 990 healthy nulliparous women, who were pregnant for 13 to 20 weeks were chosen to receive daily treatment with low dose of aspirin 75 mg (330 patients, aspirin group, calcium D 500 mg (330 Patients, calcium group and no medication (330 patients, control group for remainder of theirs pregnancies. Data included demographic, obstetric, prenatal care, hospital records and final diagnosis were collected. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-Squre, ANOVA and Duncan test at significance level of 0.05. Results. Preeclampsia occurred in 15 of 330 women in the aspirin group (4.6%, 13 of 330 women in the calcium group (4% and in 33 of 330 women in control group (10.1%. There were significant differences between aspirin and control groups (4.6% vs. 10.1% P < 0.05 also between calcium and control group (4% vs. 10.1% P < 0.05. Discussion. These results suggest that low dose of aspirin or calcium D during pregnancy in healthy nulliparous women is effective to reduce the prevalence of preeclampsia.

  16. Mechanistic and Pharmacological Issues of Aspirin as an Anticancer Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Patrignani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings have shown that aspirin, taken for several years, reduces the long-term risk of some cancers, particularly colorectal cancer. The result that aspirin benefit is detectable at daily low-doses (at least 75mg, the same used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, positions the antiplatelet action of aspirin at the center of its antitumor efficacy. At low-doses given every 24 h, aspirin is acting by a complete and persistent inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX-1 in platelets (in the pre-systemic circulation while causing a limited and rapidly reversible inhibitory effect on COX-2 and/or COX-1 expressed in nucleated cells. Aspirin has a short half-life in human circulation (approximately 20 min; nucleated cells have the ability to resynthesize the acetylated COX-isozymes within a few hours, while platelets do not. COX-independent mechanisms of aspirin, such as the inhibition of Wnt/ b-catenin and NF-kB signaling and the acetylation of extra-COX proteins, have been suggested to play a role in its chemo-preventive effects, but their relevance remains to be demonstrated in vivo at clinical doses. In conclusion, the results of clinical pharmacology and the analysis of randomized and epidemiological studies suggest that colorectal cancer and atherothrombosis share a common mechanism of disease, i.e. enhanced platelet activation in response to injury at distinct sites.

  17. Effect of lipid-based dry eye supplements on the tear film in wearers of eye cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael T M; Cho, Irene Sung Hee; Jung, Soo Hee; Craig, Jennifer P

    2017-08-01

    To compare the effects on tear film parameters and contamination in cosmetic eyeliner wearers, after single application of two lipid-based dry eye treatments: a lipid-containing lubricant eye drop and a phospholipid liposomal spray. Fifty participants were enrolled in a prospective, randomised, paired-eye, investigator-masked trial. Pencil eyeliner (Body Shop ® Crayon Eye Definer) was applied to the upper eyelid periocular skin of both eyes, anterior to the lash line. Baseline tear film quality was assessed fifteen minutes after eyeliner application. A lubricant drop (Systane ® Balance) was then applied to one eye (randomised), and liposomal spray (Tears Again ® ) to the contralateral eye. Tear film contamination, lipid layer grade, non-invasive tear film break-up time and tear evaporation rate were evaluated fifteen minutes post-treatment and compared to pre-treatment values. Pre-treatment measurements did not differ between eyes assigned to lubricant drop and liposomal spray. Tear film contamination was observed in a greater proportion of eyes following both treatments (both pfilm break-up time or tear evaporation rate (all p>0.05). Changes in tear film parameters did not differ between treatments (all p>0.05). Both the lipid-containing lubricant eye drop and phospholipid liposomal spray result in clinically apparent tear film contamination in eyeliner cosmetic wearers. Although both treatments effected an increase in lipid layer thickness, neither displayed clinical efficacy in improving tear film stability. Copyright © 2017 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Symptoms Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué ... Your Eyelid Nov 29, 2017 New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear-Jerker Jul 21, 2017 Three ...

  19. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye ... Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? Written By: Kierstan ...

  20. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes ...

  1. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A- ... Get ophthalmologist-reviewed tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy ... Choosing Wisely When It Comes to Eye Care, Part 5 Mar 19, 2013 Eye Makeup Safety ...

  2. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A-Z Symptoms Glasses & Contacts Tips & Prevention News Ask ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? ...

  3. Aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage: prevention by enteric-coating and relation to prostaglandin synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hawthorne, A B; Mahida, Y R; Cole, A T; Hawkey, C J

    1991-01-01

    1. Gastric damage induced by low-dose aspirin and the protective effect of enteric-coating was assessed in healthy volunteers in a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial using Latin square design. Each was administered placebo, plain aspirin 300 mg daily, plain aspirin 600 mg four times daily, enteric-coated aspirin 300 mg daily, or enteric-coated aspirin 600 mg four times daily for 5 days. Gastric damage was assessed endoscopically, and gastric mucosal bleeding measured. 2. Aspirin...

  4. Aspirin and omeprazole for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients at risk for aspirin-associated gastric ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rayado, Guillermo; Sostres, Carlos; Lanas, Angel

    2017-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in the world and low-dose aspirin is considered the cornerstone of the cardiovascular disease prevention. However, low-dose aspirin use is associated with gastrointestinal adverse effects in the whole gastrointestinal tract. In this setting, co-therapy with a proton pump inhibitor is the most accepted strategy to reduce aspirin related upper gastrointestinal damage. In addition, some adverse effects have been described with proton pump inhibitors long term use. Areas covered: Low-dose aspirin related beneficial and adverse effects in cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract are reviewed. In addition, this manuscript summarizes current data on upper gastrointestinal damage prevention and adverse events with proton pump inhibition. Finally, we discuss the benefit/risk ratio of proton pump inhibitor use in patients at risk of gastrointestinal damage taking low-dose aspirin. Expert commentary: Nowadays, with the current available evidence, the combination of low-dose aspirin with proton pump inhibitor is the most effective therapy for cardiovascular prevention in patients at high gastrointestinal risk. However, further studies are needed to discover new effective strategies with less related adverse events.

  5. Evaluation of aspirin use in patients with diabetes receiving care in community health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosmire Rundgren, Elaine W; Anderson, Sarah L; Marrs, Joel C

    2015-02-01

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends low-dose aspirin therapy as a primary prevention strategy in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) at increased cardiovascular risk. However, not all patients who are indicated are taking aspirin therapy, and it is not routinely documented in the electronic health record (EHR). To determine frequencies of appropriate aspirin use and documentation in the EHR in adult patients with DM. Adult patients with DM were randomized and contacted for participation in a telephonic survey between January and October 2013. Patients who consented were administered a standardized oral telephone survey regarding aspirin use. Patient demographics, current medications, allergies, past medical history, and pertinent laboratory values were collected. Patients were then stratified by the ADA-defined indication for aspirin. The primary outcomes were rates of appropriate aspirin use and documentation of aspirin therapy in the EHR. Investigators contacted 276 patients for inclusion. Of the 81 patients surveyed, 74% were indicated for aspirin therapy. Nearly all (92.3%) patients reporting aspirin use were indicated for aspirin therapy compared with only 57.1% of patients who did not report aspirin but were indicated (P = 0.0003). Alternatively, 96.7% of patients with aspirin use documented in their EHR were indicated for aspirin therapy compared with only 60.8% of patients who did not have aspirin use documented in the EHR but had an indication (P = 0.0002). Approximately 20% of the patients indicated for and reporting aspirin use did not have aspirin documented in their EHR. Aspirin use in patients with DM who are indicated for therapy is significantly underutilized and underdocumented. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made ... of the macula, where your vision is sharpest. Optic nerve (OP-tic nurv) is the bundle of ...

  7. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and ... National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education ...

  8. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision ... to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many different ...

  9. About the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision ... to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many different ...

  10. Eyes, Bulging (Proptosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapy for Kids With Rare Eye Disease (Video) Ocular Implant (Video) Glaucoma Additional Content Medical News Eyes, ... has other eye symptoms, such as dryness, increased tear formation, double vision, loss of vision, irritation, or ...

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... vision? May 27, 2017 Is stopping Restasis dangerous? Mar 06, 2017 Why are my eyes bloodshot when ... When It Comes to Eye Care, Part 5 Mar 19, 2013 Eye Makeup Safety Tips Sep 25, ...

  12. LASIK eye surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to correct a very nearsighted eye may prevent amblyopia (lazy eye). Your eyes must be healthy and ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  13. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of ... National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education ...

  14. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  15. EyeGENE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The eyeGENE® Biorepository and corresponding Database contain family history and clinical eye exam data from subjects enrolled in eyeGENE® Program coupled to...

  16. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... also when your eyes do not make the right type of tears or tear film. How do ... information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related New Dry Eye Treatment is a ...

  17. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member ... Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A- ...

  18. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Get ophthalmologist-reviewed tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy ... Choosing Wisely When It Comes to Eye Care, Part 5 Mar 19, 2013 Eye Makeup Safety ...

  19. Dancing drops over vibrating substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, Rodica; Borcia, Ion Dan; Helbig, Markus; Meier, Martin; Egbers, Christoph; Bestehorn, Michael

    2017-04-01

    We study the motion of a liquid drop on a solid plate simultaneously submitted to horizontal and vertical harmonic vibrations. The investigation is done via a phase field model earlier developed for describing static and dynamic contact angles. The density field is nearly constant in every bulk region (ρ = 1 in the liquid phase, ρ ≈ 0 in the vapor phase) and varies continuously from one phase to the other with a rapid but smooth variation across the interfaces. Complicated explicit boundary conditions along the interface are avoided and captured implicitly by gradient terms of ρ in the hydrodynamic basic equations. The contact angle θ is controlled through the density at the solid substrate ρ S , a free parameter varying between 0 and 1 [R. Borcia, I.D. Borcia, M. Bestehorn, Phys. Rev. E 78, 066307 (2008)]. We emphasize the swaying and the spreading modes, earlier theoretically identified by Benilov and Billingham via a shallow-water model for drops climbing uphill along an inclined plane oscillating vertically [E.S. Benilov, J. Billingham, J. Fluid Mech. 674, 93 (2011)]. The numerical phase field simulations will be completed by experiments. Some ways to prevent the release of the dancing drops along a hydrophobic surface into the gas atmosphere are also discussed in this paper.

  20. Clopidogrel and Aspirin versus Aspirin Alone for Stroke Prevention: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Tan

    Full Text Available Antiplatelet therapy is widely used for the primary or secondary prevention of stroke. Drugs like clopidogrel have emerged as alternatives for traditional antiplatelet therapy, and dual therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin is of particular interest. We conducted this meta-analysis to systematically review studies about dual therapy comparing monotherapy with aspirin alone.Randomized controlled trials were searched in PubMed (1966-May, 2015, EMBASE (1947-May, 2015, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (1948-May, 2015, WHO International Clinical Trial (ICTRP (2004-May, 2015, China Biology Medicine disc (CBM disc (1978-May, 2015 and were included into the final analysis according to the definite inclusion criteria mentioned in the study selection section. Risk ratio (RR was pooled with 95% confidence interval (CI for dichotomous data. The heterogeneity was considered significant if the χ2 test was significant (P value 50.00%. Subgroup analyses were carried out on the long and short time periods, the race and region.We included 5 studies involving 24,084 patients. A pooled analysis showed that dual therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin had a lower stroke incidence than monotherapy in both the short term and long term (RR = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.59-0.82, P <0.05; RR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.72-0.98, P = 0.03, respectively. With regard to safety, dual therapy had a higher risk of bleeding than monotherapy for both periods (RR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.03-2.23, P = 0.04; RR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.32-1.79, P<0.05, respectively.Dual therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin could be a preferable choice to prevent stroke in patients who have had a previous stroke or transient ischemic attack, as well as those who are at high risk for stroke. And the effect of dual therapy seems to be more obvious for short-term. However, it is associated with a higher risk of bleeding.

  1. Stability studies of aspirin-magaldrate double layer tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Gohary, O M; al-Kassas, R S

    2000-04-01

    Accelerated stability testing was performed on aspirin-magaldrate double layer tablets as well as aspirin-maalox marketed double layer tablets (Ascriptin) in order to evaluate the effect of the presence of the alkaline moieties of the antacid (magaldrate and maalox) on the chemical stability of aspirin. The results were compared simultaneously with that obtained from the marketed Aspro plain tablets. The results revealed that the presence of the alkaline moieties in the tested tablets has increased the rate of aspirin decomposition and reduced its shelf-life. This effect was more pronounced for aspirin tablets containing magaldrate antacid. Determination of shelf-lives at 25 degrees C for the prepared and the marketed tablets was carried out using Arrhenius plots and the results showed that they were 35, 34.5 and 13.5 months for Aspro, Ascriptin and aspirin-magaldrate double layer tablets, respectively. The effect of storage for 50 days and at different temperatures, on the crushing strength and the disintegration time of the prepared and the marked tablets showed a slight decrease in the disintegration time and the crushing strength of the tablets as the storage temperature increased. Aspro tablets did not produce the same results. The in vitro release data of the prepared aspirin-magaldrate double layer tablets and the marketed Ascriptin tablets stored for 50 days and at different storage temperatures as well as Aspro tablets stored at 70 degrees C were best fitted to the first-order kinetics model. The release data of Aspro tablets stored at 50 and 60 degrees C for 50 days were best fitted to Higuchi's model.

  2. Low prevalence and assay discordance of "aspirin resistance" in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, D L; Dinu, B R; Sun, C W; Edwards, R M; Justino, H; Teruya, J; Bray, P F; Bomgaars, L

    2008-07-01

    Although "aspirin resistance" (AR-inadequate platelet inhibition as suggested by in vitro testing of aspirin-treated patients) has been widely studied in adults and linked to increased risk of adverse outcomes, its prevalence and clinical significance are largely unknown in children. To determine AR prevalence in children and its relationship to assay methodology, we undertook a cross-sectional study of 44 children (1-17 years, 24 male) on aspirin for various indications and considered three published definitions of AR in adults: platelet aggregation >/=70% to 10 microM adenosine diphosphate and >/=20% to 0.5 mg/ml arachidonic acid (AA), normal PFA-100(R) closure time and elevated urinary 11-dehydro thromboxane B(2) (11dhTxB(2)) concentration. Six subjects exhibited AR according to at least one of the criteria (5 by PFA-100(R), 1 by aggregometry and 11dhTxB(2) criteria); nearly all subjects had low levels of 11dhTxB(2) compared with controls. Subjects studied prior to therapy showed pronounced changes in AR parameters after aspirin dosing (e.g., mean aggregation to AA decreased from 82% to 6%, P aspirin effect. Subjects with AR did not differ from aspirin responsive subjects in terms of age, race, platelet count, or aspirin dose, indication or therapy duration. There was minimal correlation between assays. In this initial prevalence study of a clinically diverse group of pediatric patients, frequencies of AR were assay-dependent; however, the prevalence of true AR is likely low in children (2.3%; 95% CI 0.1-10.7%), in agreement with adult studies. To better define the clinical relevance of AR in children, multicenter, prospective cohort studies are imperative. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Laser photocoagulation - eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser coagulation; Laser eye surgery; Photocoagulation; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic eye disease; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic retinopathy; Focal photocoagulation; Scatter (or pan retinal) photocoagulation; Proliferative ...

  4. The influence of protein free calf blood extract eye gel on dry eye after pterygium surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Ni Ji

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the influence of protein free calf blood extract eye gel on dry eye after pterygium surgery. METHODS: Thirty six patients(40 eyeswith primary nasal pterygium were enrolled in this study, which were divided into study group and control group randomly, with 20 eyes in each group. All patients received pterygium excision and limbal stem cell autograft surgery and tobramicin dexamethasone eye drops after surgery. Patients of the study group received protein free calf blood extract eye gel while those of the control group received 0.1% sodium hyaluronate eye drops furthermore. Ocular surface disease index(OSDIquestionnaire, tear film break-up time(BUTand Schirmer's Ⅰ test Ⅰ(SⅠtwere carried before and 3 months after surgery to evaluate the dry eye degree of the patients. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference between the age, gender and size of the pterygium of the study and control groups preoperatively. There was no statistical difference between the OSDI(2.33±1.02 vs 2.32±0.93, BUT(8.80±2.48 vs 8.35±2.28seconds and SⅠt(4.30±2.30 vs 4.40±2.44of the two groups preoperatively. There was statistical difference between the OSDI(1.45±0.47 vs 1.81±0.60, BUT(11.20±2.07 vs 9.50±2.40seconds and SⅠt(8.35±3.13 vs 6.35±2.18of the two groups 3 months postoperatively, which was also different from that of the preoperative data correspondingly. CONCLUSION: Protein free calf blood extract eye gel could reduce the dry eye after pterygium surgery.

  5. Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the-Counter Medicines Safe Daily Use of Aspirin Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and ... State & Local Officials Consumers Health Professionals Science & Research Industry Scroll back to top Popular Content Home Latest ...

  6. Aspirin, but not clopidogrel, reduces collateral conductance in a rabbit model of femoral artery occlusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefer, Imo E.; Grundmann, Sebastian; Schirmer, Stephan; van Royen, Niels; Meder, Benjamin; Bode, Christoph; Piek, Jan J.; Buschmann, Ivo R.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to test the potential of aspirin and clopidogrel to influence collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis). BACKGROUND Aspirin and clopidogrel are antiplatelet agents commonly used in the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular disease. Both inhibit platelet

  7. Aspirin in Patients With Previous Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Michelle M; Sessler, Daniel I; Parlow, Joel L

    2017-01-01

    Background: Uncertainty remains about the effects of aspirin in patients with prior percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) having noncardiac surgery. Objective: To evaluate benefits and harms of perioperative aspirin in patients with prior PCI. Design: Nonprespecified subgroup analysis of a mul...

  8. Purine Pathway Implicated in Mechanism of Resistance to Aspirin Therapy: Pharmacometabolomics-Informed-Pharmacogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Ellero-Simatos, Sandrine; Georgiades, Anastasia; Zhu, Hongjie; Lewis, Joshua; Horenstein, Richard B.; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Dane, Adrie; Reijmers, Theo; Hankemeier, Thomas; Fiehn, Oliver; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima

    2014-01-01

    Though aspirin is a well-established antiplatelet agent, the mechanisms of aspirin resistance remain poorly understood. Metabolomics allows for measurement of hundreds of small molecules in biological samples enabling detailed mapping of pathways involved in drug response. We defined the metabolic signature of aspirin exposure in subjects from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention (HAPI) Heart Study. Many metabolites, including known aspirin catabolites, changed upon exposure to aspirin and pathway enrichment analysis identified purine metabolism as significantly affected by drug exposure. Further, purines were associated with aspirin response and poor responders had higher post-aspirin adenosine and inosine than good responders (N=76;paspirin response. Combining metabolomics and genomics allowed for more comprehensive interrogation of mechanisms of variation in aspirin response - an important step toward personalized treatment approaches for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23839601

  9. Efficacy of tobramycin drops applied to collagen shields for experimental staphylococcal keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegan, M C; Engel, L S; Clinch, T E; Hill, J M; Kaufman, H E; O'Callaghan, R J

    1994-12-01

    Treatment of staphylococcal keratitis includes tobramycin drops at repeated intervals, a prolonged therapy that is disruptive to the patient. To identify a regimen involving less frequent drug application, we compared the efficacy of fortified tobramycin (1.36%) administered by collagen shields or in topical drop form to rabbit corneas intrastromally infected with staphylococci. Eyes were treated with shields hydrated in and supplemented with fortified tobramycin drops (1.36%) applied every 1, 2, 5, or 10 h, from 10 to 20 h postinfection. For topical drop treatment alone, tobramycin was applied following the identical regimen. Untreated corneas contained 10(6) colony forming units. Shields supplemented with tobramycin drops applied every 1, 2, or 5 h sterilized 100% of the corneas. Shields supplemented with tobramycin drops applied at 10 h sterilized 58% of the corneas. Topical delivery of tobramycin every h sterilized all corneas; drops alone applied at longer intervals, such as 2, 5, or 10 h, sterilized 83%, 17%, and 0% of the corneas, respectively. Collagen shield delivery of tobramycin with supplemental topical drops