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Sample records for asphaltite

  1. Characterization and design of asphalt mixtures with asphaltites from Boyacá for use in low traffic volume roads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique-Espindola, R.

    2013-11-01

    The high availability of asphaltites in Boyacá and their low cost make this material a viable alternative for low traffic road paving; nevertheless, the traditional way in which this material is used generates, in cases, pavements with deficient behavior. This investigation, presents the results of the mixture design using asphaltites from the municipality of Pesca-Boyacá as well as coarse and fine aggregates produced in the region, 70-80 asphalt cement and slow-break asphalt emulsion. Working formulas for dense mixing in hot and cold and particularly MDF-2 and MDC-2 are presented from the characterization information; as benchmarks to define technical viability for use in low- traffic volume roads, according to NT1 regulation from INVIAS. The mixture design was performed according to the procedures defined in the RAMCODES and MARSHALL methodologies.

  2. Evaluación de las propiedades mecánicas de una mezcla densa en caliente modificada con asfaltita/Mechanical Properties Evaluation of a hot Asphalt Mixture Modified with Asphaltite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Alexander Rondón Quintana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo evaluó en laboratorio la resistencia mecánica bajo carga monotónica, el módulo resiliente y la resistencia a la deformación permanente que experimenta una mezcla asfáltica cuando se modifica con una asfaltita. Adicionalmente, fue evaluada durante dos años, la influencia del medio ambiente de la ciudad de Bogotá D.C., sobre las propiedades mecánicas de la mezcla modificada. Se concluye que la resistencia mecánica de la mezcla asfáltica modificada incrementa en comparación con la convencional. La tendencia general de las mezclas con el tiempo de exposición al medio ambiente de Bogotá D.C., es experimentar un aumento en los valores de rigidez debido principalmente a procesos de endurecimiento por envejecimiento del ligante asfáltico. Sin embargo, para el caso de las mezclas modificadas y fabricadas con CA 60-70 en los primeros cinco meses de exposición, la rigidez disminuye.The strength under monotonic load, resilient modulus and rutting were evaluated on a hot-mix asphalt (HMAmodified with a natural sphaltite. Additionally, the influence of the environmental conditions of BogotáD.C., was evaluated during two years on the mechanical properties of a modified asphalt mixture. The results show that the mechanical properties evaluated were better for the HMA mixes modified in compared with those with neat asphalts. The asphaltite produces higher mechanical resistance in HMA. The general tendency of the mixtures is increase the modulus with time due to aging of the asphalt cement. However, modified mixtures with AC 60- 70, decrease in stiffness during the first months.

  3. Comportamiento de una Mezcla Densa en Caliente Elaborada con Asfaltos Modificados con Asfaltita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo A. Rondón-Quintana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory tests were used to evaluate the effect on the mechanical properties of a hot asphalt mix (MDC-2 as per INVIAS, 2007 specifications due to the addition by wet way of a natural asphaltite from the San Alberto Mine (Santander, Colombia. The strength under monotonic load, resilient modulus and rutting were evaluated. Two asphalt cements (CA were used, CA 80-100 from the Barrancabermeja refinery (Colombia and CA 60-70 from Apiay (Colombia. The results show that the mechanical properties evaluated were higher for the MDC2 mixes modified with asphaltite compared with mixtures with asphalts without additives. Additionally penetration tests at different temperatures and softening points were conducted on asphalt cementswith and without additive. The asphaltite produces higher penetration resistance and lower thermal flow susceptibility.

  4. Briquetting of Istanbul-Kemerburgaz lignite of Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beker, U.G.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1996-05-01

    A lignite sample from the Kemerburgaz-Istanbul area was briquetted with or without binder material. Molasses and Sirnak (Turkey) asphaltite were used as binder materials at different ratios. The effects of the moisture content of the lignite and the concentration of the binder on briquette strength were examined at two different briquetting pressures, 150 and 200 MPa. Briquetting of lignite samples without binder material gave products with low strength and low water resistance. The maximum briquette strength was achieved with a lignite moisture content of 13% and an asphaltite concentration of 12% at a briquetting pressure of 200 MPa. The strongest briquettes obtained with lignite-molasses blends were achieved with a molasses concentration of 12% and a lignite moisture content of 8% at a briquetting pressure of 200 MPa. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The hydrocarbon sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandev, P.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrocarbon sphere is understood to be the area in which hydrocarbon compounds are available. It is believed that the lower boundary on the hydrocarbon sphere is most probably located at a depth where the predominant temperatures aid in the destruction of hydrocarbons (300 to 400 degrees centigrade). The upper limit on the hydrocarbon sphere obviously occurs at the earth's surface, where hydrocarbons oxidize to H20 and CO2. Within these ranges, the occurrence of the hydrocarbon sphere may vary from the first few hundred meters to 15 kilometers or more. The hydrocarbon sphere is divided into the external (mantle) sphere in which the primary gas, oil and solid hydrocarbon fields are located, and the internal (metamorphic) sphere containing primarily noncommercial accumulations of hydrocarbon gases and solid carbon containing compounds (anthraxilite, shungite, graphite, etc.) based on the nature and scale of hydrocarbon compound concentrations (natural gas, oil, maltha, asphalt, asphaltite, etc.).

  6. Observations and morphological analysis of supermolecular structure of natural bitumens by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yevgeny A. Golubev; Olga V. Kovaleva; Nikolay P. Yushkin [Institute of Geology of RAS, Syktyvkar (Russian Federation)

    2008-01-15

    The supermolecular structures of natural bitumens of the thermal consequent row asphaltites lower kerites (albertites), higher kerites (impsonites), anthraxolites from the Timan-Pechora petroleum province and Karelian shungite rocks, Russia, were studied in details. The experimental technique used was atomic force microscopy (AFM), following fracture preparation. The element distribution of the sample surfaces was analyzed by an X-ray microanalyser 'Link ISIS', combined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In this work, we characterized the supermolecular evolution of natural solid bitumens in the carbonization sequence by quantitative parameters. We showed that supermolecular structure can be important in defining to which classification group solid bitumens belong. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Ardmore NTMS Quadrangle, Oklahoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Ardmore Quadrangle, Oklahoma are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 745 groundwater samples and 782 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwater data indicate that the most promising areas for potential uranium mineralization occur in the western half of the quadrangle. Geologic units in this area include the Oscar Group of Pennsylvanian age, the Hennessey and El Reno Groups, Garber Sandstone, and Wellington Formations of Permian Age. Several high values of uranium occur in groundwater near known asphaltite deposits in the folded Paleozoic rocks of the Arbuckle Mountains. Stream sediment data indicate that high values of uranium are associated with the folded and faulted Paleozoic rocks in the Arbuckle Mountains, the Pennsylvanian-Permian rocks in the western third of the quadrangle, and the Lower Cretaceous rocks in the southeastern part of the quadrangle. Most of the high-uranium values occurring in these rocks appear to be associated with heavy and resistate minerals

  8. Preparation, Characterization and Hot Storage Stability of Asphalt Modified by Waste Polyethylene Packaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changqing Fang; Ying Zhang; Qian yu; Xing Zhou; Dagang Guo; Ruien Yu; Min Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Waste polyethylene packaging (WPE) was used to modify asphalt,and hot storage stability of the modified asphalt was studied in this paper.The morphological change and component loss of WPE modified asphalt were characterized by fluorescence microscopy,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR),differential scanning calorimetry (DSC),thermogravimetry (TG) and isolation testing.In addition,the mechanism of the hot storage stability of WPE modified asphalt was discussed.The results showed that the modification of asphalt with WPE was a physical process.It was found that the filament or partly network-like structure formed in the modified asphalt system was beneficial to improving the hot storage stability.Moreover,the addition of WPE resulted in a decrease in both the light components volatilization and the macromolecules decomposition of asphalt.It was demonstrated that when the content of WPE in matrix asphalt was less than 10 wt%,the service performances of modified asphalt could be better.

  9. Ion irradiation of the Murchison meteorite: Visible to mid-infrared spectroscopic results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, C.; Brunetto, R.; Barucci, M. A.; Dartois, E.; Duprat, J.; Engrand, C.; Godard, M.; Ledu, D.; Quirico, E.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: The goal of this study is to simulate space weathering processes on primitive bodies. We use ion implantation as a simulation of solar wind irradiation, which has been suggested by several authors to be the major component of space weathering on main belt asteroids. The laboratory analogs we irradiate and analyze are carbonaceous chondrites; we started the study with the Allende CV meteorite and in this companion paper we present results on the Murchison CM meteorite. Methods: We performed irradiations on pressed pellets of Murchison with 40 keV He+ and Ar+ ions using fluences up to 3 × 1016 ions/cm2. Reflectance spectra were acquired ex situ before and after irradiation in the visible to mid-infrared range (0.4-16 μm). A Raman analysis was also performed to investigate the modifications of the aromatic carbonaceous component. Results: Our results indicate that spectral variations after irradiation within the visible range are smaller than spectral variations due to sample grain size or viewing geometry of the Murchison meteorite. The aqueous alteration band profile near 3 μm changes after irradiation, as adsorbed water is removed, and phyllosilicates are affected. Raman spectroscopy highlights the insoluble organic matter (IOM) modification under irradiation. We observe a shift of the silicates band at 9.9 μm, probably due to a preferential loss of Mg (compared to Fe, the lighter Mg is more easily sputtered backward) and/or amorphization of Mg-rich materials. We compare our results to previous experiments on organic-rich materials (like asphaltite or carbonaceous chondrites), and on ordinary chondrites and olivine grains. We find that the reddening/darkening trend observed on silicate-rich surfaces is not valid for all carbonaceous chondrites, and that the spectral modifications after irradiation are a function of the initial albedo.

  10. Site investigation SFR. Fracture mineralogy and geochemistry of borehole sections sampled for groundwater chemistry and Eh. Results from boreholes KFR01, KFR08, KFR10, KFR19, KFR7A and KFR105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern (WSP Sverige AB (Sweden)); Tullborg, Eva-Lena (Terralogica AB, Grabo (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    This report is part of the complementary site investigations for the future expansion of SFR. The report presents the results obtained during a detailed mineralogical and geochemical study of fracture minerals in drill cores from borehole section sampled for groundwater chemistry and where downhole Eh measurements have been performed. The groundwater redox system comprises not only the water, but also the bedrock/fracture mineral system in contact with this water. It is thus important to gain knowledge of the solid phases in contact with the groundwater, i.e. the fracture minerals. The samples studied for mineralogy and geochemistry, here reported, were selected to represent the fracture surfaces in contact with the groundwater in the sampled borehole sections and will give input to the hydrogeochemical model (SFR SDM). The mineralogy was determined using SEM-EDS and XRD and the geochemistry of fracture filling material was analysed by ICP-AES and ICP-QMS. The most common fracture minerals in the samples are mixed layer clay (smectite-illite), illite, chlorite, calcite, quartz, adularia and albite. Other minerals identified in the borehole sections include laumontite, pyrite, barite, chalcopyrite, hematite, Fe-oxyhydroxide, muscovite, REE-carbonate, allanite, biotite, asphaltite, galena, sphalerite, arsenopyrite, uranium phosphate, uranium silicate, Y-Ca silicate, monazite, xenotime, harmotome and fluorite. There are no major differences between the fracture mineralogy of the investigated borehole sections from SFR and the fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site investigation area. The four fracture mineral generations distinguished within the Forsmark site investigation are also found at SFR. However, some differences have been observed: 1) Barite and uranium minerals are more common in the SFR fractures, 2) clay minerals like mixed layer illite-smectite and illite dominates in contrast to Forsmark where corrensite is by far the most common clay mineral and, 3

  11. Site investigation SFR. Fracture mineralogy including identification of uranium phases and hydrochemical characterisation of groundwater in borehole KFR106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the fracture mineralogy and hydrochemistry of borehole KFR106. The most abundant fracture minerals in the examined drill core samples are clay minerals, calcite, quartz and adularia; chlorite is also common but is mostly altered and found interlayered with corrensite. The most common clay mineral is a mixed layer clay consisting of illite-smectite. Pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite, barite (-celestine) and hematite are also commonly found in the fractures, but usually in trace amounts. Other minerals identified in the examined fractures are U-phosphate, pitchblende, U(Ca)-silicate, asphaltite, biotite, monazite, fluorite, titanite, sericite, xenotime, rutile and (Ca, REEs)-carbonate. Uranium has been introduced, mobilised and reprecipitated during at least four different episodes: 1) Originally, during emplacement of U-rich pegmatites, probably as uraninite. 2) At a second event, uranium was mobilised under brittle conditions during formation of breccia/cataclasite. Uraninite was altered to pitchblende and partly coffinitised. Mobilised uranium precipitated as pitchblende closely associated with hematite and chlorite in cataclasite and fracture sealings prior to 1,000 Ma. 3) During the Palaeozoic U was remobilised and precipitated as U-phosphate on open fracture surfaces. 4) An amorphous U-silicate has also been found in open fractures; the age of this precipitation is not known but it is inferred to be Palaeozoic or younger. Groundwater was sampled in two sections in borehole KFR106 with pumping sequences of about 6 days for each section. The samples from sections KFR106:1 and KFR106:2 (260-300 m and 143-259 m borehole length, i.e. -261 and -187 m.a.s.l. mid elevation of the section, respectively) were taken in November 2009 and yielded groundwater chemistry data in accordance with SKB chemistry class 3 and 5. In section KFR106:1 and KFR106:2, the chloride contents were 850 and 1,150 mg/L and the drilling water content 6 and 4%, respectively

  12. Site investigation SFR. Fracture mineralogy including identification of uranium phases and hydrochemical characterisation of groundwater in borehole KFR106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern [WSP Sverige AB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Nilsson, Kersti [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    This report presents the fracture mineralogy and hydrochemistry of borehole KFR106. The most abundant fracture minerals in the examined drill core samples are clay minerals, calcite, quartz and adularia; chlorite is also common but is mostly altered and found interlayered with corrensite. The most common clay mineral is a mixed layer clay consisting of illite-smectite. Pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite, barite (-celestine) and hematite are also commonly found in the fractures, but usually in trace amounts. Other minerals identified in the examined fractures are U-phosphate, pitchblende, U(Ca)-silicate, asphaltite, biotite, monazite, fluorite, titanite, sericite, xenotime, rutile and (Ca, REEs)-carbonate. Uranium has been introduced, mobilised and reprecipitated during at least four different episodes: 1) Originally, during emplacement of U-rich pegmatites, probably as uraninite. 2) At a second event, uranium was mobilised under brittle conditions during formation of breccia/cataclasite. Uraninite was altered to pitchblende and partly coffinitised. Mobilised uranium precipitated as pitchblende closely associated with hematite and chlorite in cataclasite and fracture sealings prior to 1,000 Ma. 3) During the Palaeozoic U was remobilised and precipitated as U-phosphate on open fracture surfaces. 4) An amorphous U-silicate has also been found in open fractures; the age of this precipitation is not known but it is inferred to be Palaeozoic or younger. Groundwater was sampled in two sections in borehole KFR106 with pumping sequences of about 6 days for each section. The samples from sections KFR106:1 and KFR106:2 (260-300 m and 143-259 m borehole length, i.e. -261 and -187 m.a.s.l. mid elevation of the section, respectively) were taken in November 2009 and yielded groundwater chemistry data in accordance with SKB chemistry class 3 and 5. In section KFR106:1 and KFR106:2, the chloride contents were 850 and 1,150 mg/L and the drilling water content 6 and 4%, respectively

  13. Petroleum Gases Market in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    and Europe. Therefore, Turkey is widely called as 'The Energy Bridge between the East and the West'. Turkey's natural energy resources are quite diversified; hard coal, lignite, asphaltite, oil, natural gas, hydro, geothermal, wood, animal and plant wastes, solar and secondary energy resources such as coke and briquettes are produced and consumed. Although Turkey's oil and natural gas reserves are limited, coal reserves are quite abundant. Energy forecasts show that primary energy demand would be 117 million TOE in 2005 and 156 million TOE in 2010. Turkey has a large LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) consumption, which ranks third in Europe and within the top ten in the world. Turkey's LPG market structure depends largely on imports. At the end of 2005, the LPG consumption was around 3.7 billion tonnes and about 80 % of this, which amounts to 2.8 billion tonnes, has been provided through imports.(author)

  14. A gallery of oil components, their metals and Re-Os signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.

    2016-04-01

    Most sediment-hosted metallic ore deposits are one degree of freedom from hydrocarbon. That is, sulfide fluid inclusions may contain vestiges of travel in tandem with hydrocarbon-bearing fluids. For metallic ore deposits of stated metamorphic and magmatic origin, the degrees of freedom are several times more or, in some cases, no relationship exists. Still, the fetish for stereotyping and classifying ore types into hardline ore deposit models (or hybrid models when the data are wildly uncooperative) impedes our ability to move toward a better understanding of source rock. Fluids in the deeper earth, fluids in the crust, and the extraterrestrial rain of metals provide the Re-Os template for oil. So, too, this combination ultimately drives the composition of many metallic ore deposits. The world of crude oil and its complex history of maturation, migration, mixing, metal-rich asphaltene precipitation, and subsequent mobility of lighter and metal-poor components, is an untapped resource for students of ore geology. In the same way that Mississippi Valley-type lead and zinc deposits are described as the outcome of two converging and mixing fluids (metal-bearing and sulfur-bearing fluids), asphaltene precipitation can be an outcome of a lighter oil meeting and mixing with a heavier one. In the petroleum industry, this can spell economic disaster if the pore-space becomes clogged with a non-producible heavy oil or solid bitumen. In ore geology, sulfide precipitation on loss of permeability may create a Pb-Zn deposit. Petroleum systems provide a gallery of successive time-integrated Re-Os results. Heavy or biodegraded oils, if intersected by lighter oil or gas, can generate asphaltite or tar mats, and release a reservoir of still lighter oil (or gas). During this process there are opportunities for separation of metal-enriched aqueous fluids that may retain an imprint of their earlier hydrocarbon history, ultimately trapped in fluid inclusions. Salinity, temperature and p

  15. 温拌橡胶沥青宽路用温度域流变特性%Rheological properties of warm mix asphalt rubber in wide range of pavement temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何亮; 凌天清; 马育; 马涛; 黄晓明

    2015-01-01

    ,its rutting factor at 70 ℃ increases by 79%,but Sasobit has no significant effect on the viscosity-toughness of asphalt rubber.The fatigue performance of asphalt rubber with 3% Sasobit reduces,its fatigue factor at 25 ℃increases by 22%,but its fatigue performance is still better than that of SBS modified asphalt. Under the temperature condition of winter warm zone in Chinese standards for the climate zoning on asphalt pavement performance, as the temperature decreases, the low-temperature performance of Sasobit warm mix asphalt rubber is gradually better than that of SBS modified asphalt,its creep stiffness at -24 ℃ is 45% of creep stiffness of SBS modified asphalt,while Sasobit dosage has no excessive effect on the low-temperature performance of asphalt rubber,and the creep stiffness of asphalt rubber at -24 ℃ increases by 10%.2 tabs,8 figs,21 refs.