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Sample records for aspergillus terreus accessory

  1. (+)-Geodin from Aspergillus terreus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, Mads Holger; Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Leber, Blanka

    2011-01-01

    The fungal metabolite (+)-geodin [systematic name: (2R)-methyl 5,7-dichloro-4-hydroxy-6'-methoxy-6-methyl-3,4'-dioxospiro[benzofuran-2,1'-cyclohexa-2',5'-diene]-2'-carboxylate], C(17)H(12)Cl(2)O(7), was isolated from Aspergillus terreus. The crystal structure contains two independent molecules...

  2. Antagonism of Aspergillus terreus to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, Itamar S.; Faull, Jane L.; Nascimento, Rosely S.

    2006-01-01

    An Aspergillus terreus strain showed in vitro antagonistic activity against the plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary. The interaction between A. terreus and sclerotia revealed that the mycoparasite sporulated abundantly on the sclerotial surface. Cell breakdown due to host cell wall disruption was observed in inner rind cells, by a scanning electron microscopy.Uma linhagem de Aspergillus terreus mostrou forte atividade parasítica contra Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Interações e...

  3. A prospective international Aspergillus terreus survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risslegger, B; Zoran, T; Lackner, M

    2017-01-01

    of A. terreus species complex among the investigated patients with mould-positive cultures was 5.2% (370/7116). Amphotericin B MICs ranged from 0.125 to 32 mg/L, (median 8 mg/L). CONCLUSIONS: Aspergillus terreus species complex infections cause a wide spectrum of aspergillosis and the majority...

  4. Antagonism of Aspergillus terreus to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Antagonismo de Aspergillus terreus contra Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itamar S. Melo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An Aspergillus terreus strain showed in vitro antagonistic activity against the plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib. de Bary. The interaction between A. terreus and sclerotia revealed that the mycoparasite sporulated abundantly on the sclerotial surface. Cell breakdown due to host cell wall disruption was observed in inner rind cells, by a scanning electron microscopy.Uma linhagem de Aspergillus terreus mostrou forte atividade parasítica contra Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Interações entre o patógeno e o antagonista revelaram que A. terreus esporulou profusamente sobre os escleródios. Quando visto em microscopia eletrônica de varredura, o antagonista mostra-se rompendo e lisando a parede celular e penetrando o interior do escleródio, onde se estabelece no tecido medular.

  5. Invasive Aspergillus terreus morphological transitions and immunoadaptations mediating antifungal resistance

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    Bengyella L

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Louis Bengyella,1–3 Elsie Laban Yekwa,4 Muhammad Nasir Subhani,5 Ernest Tambo,6,7 Kiran Nawaz,5 Bakoena Ashton Hetsa,2 Sehrish Iftikhar,5 Sayanika Devi Waikhom,1 Pranab Roy8 1Department of Biomedical Science, The School of Basic and Biomedical Sciences, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana; 2Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied and Computer Sciences, Vaal University of Technology, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa; 3Department of Biotechnology, University of Burdwan, Bardhaman, India; 4Division of Medical Virology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa; 5Department of Plant Pathology, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan; 6Department of Biochemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Université des Montagnes, Bangangté, 7Department of Communications, Africa Disease Intelligence and Surveillance, Communication and Response Institute, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 8Department of Biotechnology, Haldia Institute of Technology, Haldia, India Background and aims: Aspergillus terreus Thom is a pathogen of public health and agricultural importance for its seamless abilities to expand its ecological niche. The aim of this study was holistically to investigate A. terreus morphological and immunoadaptations and their implication in antifungal resistance and proliferation during infection.Materials and methods: In-depth unstructured mining of relevant peer-reviewed literature was performed for A. terreus morphological, immune, resistance, and genetic diversity based on the sequenced calmodulin-like gene.Results: Accessory conidia and phialidic conidia produced by A. terreus confer discrete antifungal resistance that ensures survivability during therapies. Interestingly, by producing unique metabolites such as Asp–melanin and terretonin, A. terreus is capable of hijacking macrophages and scavenging iron, respectively. As such, A. terreus has established a rare mechanism to mitigate

  6. Bilateral pulmonary aspergilloma caused by an atypical isolate of Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Z U; Kortom, M; Marouf, R; Chandy, R; Rinaldi, M G; Sutton, D A

    2000-05-01

    A case of bilateral pulmonary aspergilloma caused by an atypical isolate of Aspergillus terreus is described. The diagnosis was established by the presence of septate, dichotomously branched fungal elements in freshly collected bronchoalveolar lavage and sputum specimens and by repeated isolation of the fungus in culture. Specific precipitating antibodies against the A. terreus isolate were demonstrated in the patient's serum. The isolate was atypical as it failed to produce fruiting structures on routine mycological media, but it did so on extended incubation on potato flake agar and produced globose, relatively heavy-walled, hyaline accessory conidia (formerly termed aleurioconidia) on both vegetative and aerial mycelia. Also, it produced an intense yellow diffusing pigment in the medium. The report underscores the increasing importance of A. terreus in the etiology of pulmonary aspergillosis. It is suggested that A. terreus antigen be included in the battery of serodiagnostic reagents to facilitate the early diagnosis of infections caused by this species.

  7. Invasion of Solanum tuberosum L. by Aspergillus terreus: a microscopic and proteomics insight on pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Bengyella; Waikhom, Sayanika Devi; Roy, Pranab; Bhardwaj, Pardeep Kumar; Singh, Mohendro Wakambam; Chandradev, Sharma K; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra

    2014-06-10

    Aspergillus terreus is one of the most harmful filamentous fungal pathogen of humans, animals and plants. Recently, researchers have discovered that A. terreus can cause foliar blight disease in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). We used light and scanning electron microscopy, and performed proteomics analysis in an attempt to dissect the invasion process of A. terreus in this important crop. Microscopic study revealed that invasion of leaf tissue is marked by rapid germination of A. terreus phialidic conidia (PC) by 4 h after inoculation. By 8 h after inoculation, primary germ tubes from PC differentiated into irregular protuberance, often displayed stomata atropism, and failed to penetrate via the epidermal cells. Colonization of leaf tissues was associated with high rate of production of accessory conidia (AC). These analyses showed the occurrence of a unique opposing pattern of AC, tissue-specific and produced on melanized colonizing hyphae during the infection of leaf tissue. A significant proteome change hallmarked by differential expression of class I patatin, lipoxygenase, catalase-peroxidase complex, and cysteine proteinase inhibitor were observed during tuber colonization. These proteins are often involved in signal transduction pathways and crosstalk in pathogenic responses. A. terreus abundantly produced AC and multipolar germinating PC to invade potato leaf tissue. Additionally, A. terreus differentially induced enzymes in potato tuber during colonization which facilitates rapid disease development.

  8. Lovastatin production by Aspergillus terreus in solid state and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    and Biotechnology, Vol. 85, pp. 869-883. Bizukojc M. and Ledakowicz S. 2009. Physiological, morphological and kinetic aspects of lovastatin biosynthesis by. Aspergillus terreus. Journal of Biotechnology, Vol. 4, pp. 647–664. Casas Lopez J. L., Sanchez Perez J.A., Fernandez Sevilla J.M., Acien Fernandez F. G. et al. 2003.

  9. Fermentatative production of itaconic acid by Aspergillus terreus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fermentation process for the production of itaconic acid was carried out using jatropha seed cake. Itaconic acid is commercially produced by the cultivation of Aspergillus terreus with molasses. Jatropha seed cake is one of the best carbon sources among various carbohydrates, because it is pure, inexpensive and available ...

  10. Expression of the Aspergillus terreus itaconic acid biosynthesis cluster in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straat, van der L.; Vernooij, M.; Lammers, M.; Berg, van den W.A.M.; Schonewille, T.; Cordewener, J.; Meer, van der I.; Koops, A.J.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aspergillus terreus is a natural producer of itaconic acid and is currently used to produce itaconic acid on an industrial scale. The metabolic process for itaconic acid biosynthesis is very similar to the production of citric acid in Aspergillus niger. However, a key enzyme in A. niger,

  11. Geographically predominant genotypes of Aspergillus terreus species complex in Austria: s microsatellite typing study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lackner, M.; Coassin, S.; Haun, M.; Binder, U.; Kronenberg, F.; Haas, H. de; Jank, M.; Maurer, E.; Meis, J.F.; Hagen, F.; Lass-Florl, C.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus terreus species complex is recognized as a frequent agent of invasive aspergillosis in Tyrol. The reason for this specific epidemiological situation is unclear. Aspergillus terreus strains isolated from environmental and clinical sources were genotyped using a novel panel of short tandem

  12. Periprosthetic hip joint infection with Aspergillus terreus: A clinical case and a review of the literature

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    Rachel Bartash

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal periprosthetic joint infections due to Aspergillus species are rare but are associated with significant cost and morbidity. We present a case of Asperigillus terreus prosthetic joint infection of the hip. The patient was successfully treated with a prolonged course of systemic antifungals along with surgical management. Keywords: Fungal prosthetic joint infection, Aspergillus terreus

  13. Lumazine Peptides from the Marine-Derived Fungus Aspergillus terreus

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    Minjung You

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Terrelumamides A (1 and B (2, two new lumazine-containing peptides, were isolated from the culture broth of the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus terreus. From the results of combined spectroscopic and chemical analyses, the structures of these compounds were determined to be linear assemblies of 1-methyllumazine-6-carboxylic acid, an amino acid residue and anthranilic acid methyl ester connected by peptide bonds. These new compounds exhibited pharmacological activity by improving insulin sensitivity, which was evaluated in an adipogenesis model using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, the compounds exhibited fluorescence changes upon binding to DNA, demonstrating their potential applications to DNA sequence recognition.

  14. Lumazine peptides from the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Minjung; Liao, Lijuan; Hong, Soo Hyun; Park, Wanki; Kwon, Dah In; Lee, Jeeyeon; Noh, Minsoo; Oh, Dong-Chan; Oh, Ki-Bong; Shin, Jongheon

    2015-03-12

    Terrelumamides A (1) and B (2), two new lumazine-containing peptides, were isolated from the culture broth of the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus terreus. From the results of combined spectroscopic and chemical analyses, the structures of these compounds were determined to be linear assemblies of 1-methyllumazine-6-carboxylic acid, an amino acid residue and anthranilic acid methyl ester connected by peptide bonds. These new compounds exhibited pharmacological activity by improving insulin sensitivity, which was evaluated in an adipogenesis model using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, the compounds exhibited fluorescence changes upon binding to DNA, demonstrating their potential applications to DNA sequence recognition.

  15. Aspergillus terreus endogenous endophthalmitis: Report of a case and review of literature

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    Pradeep Kumar Panigrahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of Aspergillus terreus endogenous endophthalmitis in an immunocompetent patient with subretinal abscess and also review the reported cases. A 50-year-old healthy male presented with sudden painful loss of vision in right eye. He was diagnosed with endogenous endophthalmitis and underwent urgent vitrectomy. Aspergillus terreus growth was obtained in culture. At final follow-up, there was complete resolution of the infection but visual acuity was poor due to macular scar. Aspergillus terreus is a rare cause of endophthalmitis with usually poor outcomes. Newer antifungals like Voriconazole can be sometimes associated with better prognosis.

  16. Expression of the Aspergillus terreus itaconic acid biosynthesis cluster in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Straat, Laura; Vernooij, Marloes; Lammers, Marieke; van den Berg, Willy; Schonewille, Tom; Cordewener, Jan; van der Meer, Ingrid; Koops, Andries; de Graaff, Leo H

    2014-01-17

    Aspergillus terreus is a natural producer of itaconic acid and is currently used to produce itaconic acid on an industrial scale. The metabolic process for itaconic acid biosynthesis is very similar to the production of citric acid in Aspergillus niger. However, a key enzyme in A. niger, cis-aconitate decarboxylase, is missing. The introduction of the A. terreus cadA gene in A. niger exploits the high level of citric acid production (over 200 g per liter) and theoretically can lead to production levels of over 135 g per liter of itaconic acid in A. niger. Given the potential for higher production levels in A. niger, production of itaconic acid in this host was investigated. Expression of Aspergillus terreus cis-aconitate decarboxylase in Aspergillus niger resulted in the production of a low concentration (0.05 g/L) of itaconic acid. Overexpression of codon-optimized genes for cis-aconitate decarboxylase, a mitochondrial transporter and a plasma membrane transporter in an oxaloacetate hydrolase and glucose oxidase deficient A. niger strain led to highly increased yields and itaconic acid production titers. At these higher production titers, the effect of the mitochondrial and plasma membrane transporters was much more pronounced, with levels being 5-8 times higher than previously described. Itaconic acid can be produced in A. niger by the introduction of the A. terreus cis-aconitate decarboxylase encoding cadA gene. This results in a low itaconic acid production level, which can be increased by codon-optimization of the cadA gene for A. niger. A second crucial requirement for efficient production of itaconic acid is the expression of the A. terreus mttA gene, encoding a putative mitochondrial transporter. Expression of this transporter results in a twenty-fold increase in the secretion of itaconic acid. Expression of the A. terreus itaconic acid cluster consisting of the cadA gene, the mttA gene and the mfsA gene results in A. niger strains that produce over

  17. Production and Preliminary Characterization of Alkaline Protease from Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus

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    P. Chellapandi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteases are being an industrial candidate, which are widely used in food, bakery, and beverage and detergent industry. In leather industry, alkaline proteases are exhibiting a prominent role in unhairing and bating processes. An extensive use of filamentous fungi, especially Aspergillus species has been studied elaborately. Although, the significant application of alkaline protease produced from these strains in leather industry is being limited. Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus found as the potential strains for production of tannery protease in submerged fermentation. To improve the productivity of this enzyme in liquid broth, various media ingredients have been optimized. The crude and partially purified proteases preliminarily characterized and used for unhairing processes at lab scale in tannery. The protease obtained from these strains showed the good activity in wide alkaline condition at 50 °C suggesting the possibility of using in leather and detergent industry.

  18. Aspernolides A and B, butenolides from a marine-derived fungus Aspergillus terreus

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvatkar, R.R.; DeSouza, C.; Tripathi, A.; Naik, C.G.

    reported as the product of its reaction with ethanolic HCl (Kiriyama et al., 1977). In the present investigation, the same reaction in methanolic HCl yielded besides 1, two additional products 2 and 8. Co-metabolite 3 used in the above reaction... (cdk) from A. terreus. When tested, aspernolide A (1) exhibited mild cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines. Keywords: Aspergillus terreus, Marine natural products, Butenolides, Butyrolactone I, Aspernolides. 3 1. Introduction Marine...

  19. Bilateral Pulmonary Aspergilloma Caused by an Atypical Isolate of Aspergillus terreus

    OpenAIRE

    Z. U. Khan; Kortom, M; Marouf, R.; Chandy, R; Rinaldi, M G; Sutton, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    A case of bilateral pulmonary aspergilloma caused by an atypical isolate of Aspergillus terreus is described. The diagnosis was established by the presence of septate, dichotomously branched fungal elements in freshly collected bronchoalveolar lavage and sputum specimens and by repeated isolation of the fungus in culture. Specific precipitating antibodies against the A. terreus isolate were demonstrated in the patient's serum. The isolate was atypical as it failed to produce fruiting structur...

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies to Hyphal Exoantigens Derived from the Opportunistic Pathogen Aspergillus terreus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus terreus has been difficult to identify in cases of aspergillosis, and clinical identification has been restricted to the broad identification of aspergillosis lesions in affected organs or the detection of fungal carbohydrates. As a result, there is a clinical need to...

  1. Successful renal transplantation following treatment of Aspergillus terreus peritonitis in a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, S; Mathews, M S; Tamilarasi, V

    2011-07-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) related peritonitis caused by fungi is a potentially life-threatening complication. It diminishes prospects of continuing PD. We report a patient with Aspergillus terreus peritonitis treated successfully with catheter removal and antifungal therapy and subsequently had a live-related renal transplantation. There was no recurrence of the infection in 3 years of follow-up.

  2. Biodegradación de compuestos fenólicos del alpechín con Aspergillus terreus

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    García Paeja, María P.

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available Olive mill wastewater degradation by Aspergillus terreus and under aerobic conditions at 28°C, was measured by the parameter of phenol content. We have explored the effect of different concentrations of olive mill wastewater upon the activity of Aspergillus terreus. Through HPLC, 10 phenol compounds (90% of the total phenolic content of the olive mill wastewater were identified.Se estudia la degradación de alpechines con Aspergillus terreus en condiciones de aerobiosis y temperatura de 28°C, utilizando como parámetro el contenido fenólico. Se analiza el efecto de la concentración de alpechín con Aspergillus terreus utilizando el mismo parámetro. Se han identificado por cromatografía líquida de alta eficacia (CLAE 10 compuestos fenólicos que suponen el 90% del total del alpechín.

  3. Lovastatin Production by Aspergillus terreus Using Agro-Biomass as Substrate in Solid State Fermentation

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    Mohammad Faseleh Jahromi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ability of two strains of Aspergillus terreus (ATCC 74135 and ATCC 20542 for production of lovastatin in solid state fermentation (SSF using rice straw (RS and oil palm frond (OPF was investigated. Results showed that RS is a better substrate for production of lovastatin in SSF. Maximum production of lovastatin has been obtained using A. terreus ATCC 74135 and RS as substrate without additional nitrogen source (157.07 mg/kg dry matter (DM. Although additional nitrogen source has no benefit effect on enhancing the lovastatin production using RS substrate, it improved the lovastatin production using OPF with maximum production of 70.17 and 63.76 mg/kg DM for A. terreus ATCC 20542 and A. terreus ATCC 74135, respectively (soybean meal as nitrogen source. Incubation temperature, moisture content, and particle size had shown significant effect on lovastatin production (P0.05. Results also have shown that pH 6, 25°C incubation temperature, 1.4 to 2 mm particle size, 50% initial moisture content, and 8 days fermentation time are the best conditions for lovastatin production in SSF. Maximum production of lovastatin using optimized condition was 175.85 and 260.85 mg/kg DM for A. terreus ATCC 20542 and ATCC 74135, respectively, using RS as substrate.

  4. Lovastatin Production by Aspergillus terreus Using Agro-Biomass as Substrate in Solid State Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Liang, Juan Boo; Ho, Yin Wan; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Goh, Yong Meng; Shokryazdan, Parisa

    2012-01-01

    Ability of two strains of Aspergillus terreus (ATCC 74135 and ATCC 20542) for production of lovastatin in solid state fermentation (SSF) using rice straw (RS) and oil palm frond (OPF) was investigated. Results showed that RS is a better substrate for production of lovastatin in SSF. Maximum production of lovastatin has been obtained using A. terreus ATCC 74135 and RS as substrate without additional nitrogen source (157.07 mg/kg dry matter (DM)). Although additional nitrogen source has no benefit effect on enhancing the lovastatin production using RS substrate, it improved the lovastatin production using OPF with maximum production of 70.17 and 63.76 mg/kg DM for A. terreus ATCC 20542 and A. terreus ATCC 74135, respectively (soybean meal as nitrogen source). Incubation temperature, moisture content, and particle size had shown significant effect on lovastatin production (P 0.05). Results also have shown that pH 6, 25°C incubation temperature, 1.4 to 2 mm particle size, 50% initial moisture content, and 8 days fermentation time are the best conditions for lovastatin production in SSF. Maximum production of lovastatin using optimized condition was 175.85 and 260.85 mg/kg DM for A. terreus ATCC 20542 and ATCC 74135, respectively, using RS as substrate. PMID:23118499

  5. A Non-canonical Melanin Biosynthesis Pathway Protects Aspergillus terreus Conidia from Environmental Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Elena; Gressler, Markus; Viediernikova, Iuliia; Hillmann, Falk; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hertweck, Christian; Brock, Matthias

    2016-05-19

    Melanins are ubiquitous pigments found in all kingdoms of life. Most organisms use them for protection from environmental stress, although some fungi employ melanins as virulence determinants. The human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and related Ascomycetes produce dihydroxynaphthalene- (DHN) melanin in their spores, the conidia, and use it to inhibit phagolysosome acidification. However, biosynthetic origin of melanin in a related fungus, Aspergillus terreus, has remained a mystery because A. terreus lacks genes for synthesis of DHN-melanin. Here we identify genes coding for an unusual NRPS-like enzyme (MelA) and a tyrosinase (TyrP) that A. terreus expressed under conidiation conditions. We demonstrate that MelA produces aspulvinone E, which is activated for polymerization by TyrP. Functional studies reveal that this new pigment, Asp-melanin, confers resistance against UV light and hampers phagocytosis by soil amoeba. Unexpectedly, Asp-melanin does not inhibit acidification of phagolysosomes, thus likely contributing specifically to survival of A. terreus conidia in acidic environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular and biochemical evaluation of genetic effect of Calotropis procera (Ait.) latex on Aspergillus terreus (Thom).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qari, Sameer H

    2008-10-01

    The present study was conducted to observe the genotoxic effect of latex of Calotropis procera. Dense conidial suspensions of Aspergillus terreus Thorn were treated with different concentrations of Calotropis latex and assayed for percentage survival, auxotrophic mutants, DNA and total protein contents and further subjected to RAPD and SDS-PAGE tests. It was found that latex of Calotropis procera had potent lethal and mutagenic activities. Percentage survival decreased as concentration or time of exposure increased. Frequency of auxotrophic mutants increased with increase in concentration or exposure time. Most auxotrophic mutants were amino acid requiring mutants. DNA and total protein contents of each mutant was significantly lower than wild type of Aspergillus terreus. RAPD demonstrated polymorphic genetic bands which were the electrophoretic products of PCR for all mutants compared with the wild type strain. SDS-PAGE results expressed a polymorphism of protein bands as well. All these results indicated the mutagenicity of latex of Calotropis procera.

  7. Fungus-Mediated Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Aspergillus terreus

    OpenAIRE

    Koji Yokoyama; Li Wang; Yan Cui; Song Gao; Yongqing Qian; Guangquan Li; Buyuan Guan; Dan He,

    2011-01-01

    The biosynthesis of nanoparticles has received increasing attention due to the growing need to develop safe, cost-effective and environmentally friendly technologies for nano-materials synthesis. In this report, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using a reduction of aqueous Ag+ ion with the culture supernatants of Aspergillus terreus. The reaction occurred at ambient temperature and in a few hours. The bioreduction of AgNPs was monitored by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and th...

  8. Gentamicin removal in submerged fermentation using the novel fungal strain Aspergillus terreus FZC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanwang; Chang, Huiqing; Li, Zhaojun; Zhang, Cheng; Feng, Yao; Cheng, Dengmiao

    2016-10-01

    Social concern and awareness of the potential risk posed by environmental residues of antibiotics such as gentamicin in the development of antibiotic resistance genes have increased. The present study used laboratory-scale experiments to develop methods for gentamicin removal from the environment. A fungus, strain FZC3, which could remove gentamicin in submerged fermentation, was isolated from solid waste and sewage water from a gentamicin production factory. The fungus was identified as Aspergillus terreus by sequencing the PCR-amplified ITS fragments of its rRNA-coding genes and by its morphology. The gentamicin removal efficiency exceeded 95% by day 7 under optimized culture conditions. The results showed that both biosorption and biodegradation were involved. We speculated that Aspergillus terreus FZC3 absorbed gentamicin and subsequently degraded it. We also found that Aspergillus terreus FZC3 survived and maintained a high bioremediation efficiency over a wide pH range, indicating its potential for future use in the large-scale bioremediation of gentamicin.

  9. Optimization of a Culture Medium for Increased Mevinolin Production by Aspergillus terreus Strain

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    Atalla, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are important sources for the production of some pharmaceutical compounds. e.g. lovastatin, mevinolin and monacolin K. These are competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis pathway. Four fungal strains of Aspergillus terreus and one Penicillium patulum were tested for their potential to produce mevinolin. The fungal strains were cultivated in four different semi-synthetic media to select a fermentation medium and a fungal strain that has the ability to secret mevinolin in high yield. The fermentation followed by TLC screening. Positive results were evaluated by confirmatory HPLC. A. terreus J9 was the best strain for producing mevinolin with a level of 148.66 mg/L of Dox-rice medium. Cultivation a 7.5 L in fermenter, A. terreus J9 produced 932.15 mg/L after 96 h using Dox-rice medium at 6.5 pH. Rise in acidity or alkalinity decrease mevinolin producing ability. Ammonium sulphate in the medium as sulphur and nitrogen sources influenced greatly mevinolin production as well as incubation period. Maximum production was obtained after 36 h incubation. The maximum value of the mevinolin concentratiom (1761.6 mg/L was attained at 400rpm after 60 h fermentation at 28 ºC. The optimized medium resulted in a significant increase of mevinolin cocentration, as compared with that obtained by the fermentation of many other A. terreus species.

  10. In vivo emergence of Aspergillus terreus with reduced azole susceptibility and a Cyp51a M217I alteration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken C; Jensen, Rasmus; Grif, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Azole resistance in Aspergillus terreus isolates was explored. Twenty related (MB) and 6 unrelated A. terreus isolates were included. CYP51A sequencing and RAPD genotyping was performed. Five MB isolates were itraconazole susceptible, whereas the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for 15 MB...... isolates were elevated (1-2 mg/L). Voriconazole and posaconazole MICs were 0.5-4 and 0.06-0.5 mg/L, respectively, for MB isolates but 0.25-0.5 and...

  11. Purification, characterization and antimicrobial activity of chitinase from marine-derived Aspergillus terreus

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    Aida M. Farag

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chitinase (EC 3.2.1.14 was produced from the culture filtrate of marine-derived Aspergillus terreus and purified by 65% ammonium sulphate precipitation, followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 and DEAE-Sephadex A-50 ion exchange chromatography, with 5.16-fold of purification and specific activity of 182.08 U/mg protein. The molecular weight of the purified chitinase was 60 kDa, determined by a sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum pH and temperature of purified chitinase were 5.6 and 50 °C, respectively. The chitinase enzyme was stable from pH 5 to 7.5 and stable up to 70 °C. The effect of activators and inhibitors was studied, Hg+, pb, EDTA, ethanol, methanol and acetone strongly inhibited the enzyme activity, while, metal ions such as Ca2+, Mn2+ and Na2+ highly increased chitinase activity. The purified chitinase produced by A. terreus inhibited the growth of Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus oryzae, Penicillum oxysporium, Rhizocotonia solani, Candida albicans and Fusarium solani, while did not inhibit the growth of Rhizopus oryzae. Moreover, the purified enzyme had antibacterial effects against some pathogenic bacteria such as; Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while, it had not any activity against Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila and Photobacterium damsela.

  12. Recent advances in genome mining of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus terreus

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    Clay Chia Chun Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous fungi are rich resources of secondary metabolites (SMs with a variety of interesting biological activities. Recent advances in genome sequencing and techniques in genetic manipulation have enabled researchers to study the biosynthetic genes of these SMs. Aspergillus terreus is the well-known producer of lovastatin, a cholesterol-lowering drug. This fungus also produces other SMs, including acetylaranotin, butyrolactones and territram, with interesting bioactivities. This review will cover recent progress in genome mining of SMs identified in this fungus. The identification and characterization of the gene cluster for these SMs, as well as the proposed biosynthetic pathways, will be discussed in depth.

  13. Removal of Lead from Wastewater Contaminated with Chemical Synthetic Dye by Aspergillus terreus

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    Lamyai Neeratanaphan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Novel isolated microorganisms have been demonstrated to efficiently remove lead from wastewater contaminated with chemical synthetic dye. In this study, the physical and chemical parameters of wastewater samples (including Pb concentrations were analyzed before and after treatment with microorganisms. The highest Pb concentration detected in wastewater was 0.788 mg/l. Investigations of the Pb tolerance and removal capacities of microorganism strains isolated from the wastewater sediment resulted in the selection of three fungal isolates (F102, F203 and F302. Interestingly, isolate F203 had a Pb tolerance of up to 100 mg/l. Using DNA barcoding and morphological characteristics, fungal isolate F203 was identified as Aspergillus terreus. Wastewater characteristics before treatment included a grayish black color with pH, TDS, BOD, COD and Pb concentrations higher than the Thailand standard values. Wastewater qualities after treatment with A. terreus showed definite improvement; however, the values of certain parameters were still higher than the allowed values based on the Thailand standard. The only improvement that fell within the allowed standard was the Pb concentration. Next, A. terreus was used for Pb adsorption in wastewater with an initial Pb concentration of 0.788 mg/l at time points corresponding to 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 h of incubation. The results showed that A. terreus could adsorb and remove higher amounts of Pb from wastewater than the other fungal isolates. Time course adsorption analysis showed the remaining Pb concentrations as 0.788, 0.213, 0.162, 0.117, 0.100, 0.066, 0.042 and 0.032 mg/l, respectively; the percentage of Pb removal could be estimated as 0, 72.97, 79.44, 85.15, 87.31, 91.62, 94.67 and 95.94%, respectively. In conclusion, A. terreus possessed the ability to adsorb up to 96% of Pb from chemical synthetic dye within 168 h. Thus, A. terreus might be suitable for adaptation and use in Pb treatment.

  14. Improving itaconic acid production through genetic engineering of an industrial Aspergillus terreus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuenian; Lu, Xuefeng; Li, Yueming; Li, Xia; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-11

    Itaconic acid, which has been declared to be one of the most promising and flexible building blocks, is currently used as monomer or co-monomer in the polymer industry, and produced commercially by Aspergillus terreus. However, the production level of itaconic acid hasn't been improved in the past 40 years, and mutagenesis is still the main strategy to improve itaconate productivity. The genetic engineering approach hasn't been applied in industrial A. terreus strains to increase itaconic acid production. In this study, the genes closely related to itaconic acid production, including cadA, mfsA, mttA, ATEG_09969, gpdA, ATEG_01954, acoA, mt-pfkA and citA, were identified and overexpressed in an industrial A. terreus strain respectively. Overexpression of the genes cadA (cis-aconitate decarboxylase) and mfsA (Major Facilitator Superfamily Transporter) enhanced the itaconate production level by 9.4% and 5.1% in shake flasks respectively. Overexpression of other genes showed varied effects on itaconate production. The titers of other organic acids were affected by the introduced genes to different extent. Itaconic acid production could be improved through genetic engineering of the industrially used A. terreus strain. We have identified some important genes such as cadA and mfsA, whose overexpression led to the increased itaconate productivity, and successfully developed a strategy to establish a highly efficient microbial cell factory for itaconate protuction. Our results will provide a guide for further enhancement of the itaconic acid production level through genetic engineering in future.

  15. New butenolide derivatives from the marine sponge-derived fungus Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yating; Liu, Jingtang; Li, Lei; Gong, Chi; Wang, Shuping; Yang, Fan; Hua, Huiming; Lin, Houwen

    2017-12-22

    Two new butenolide derivatives (±)-asperteretal D ((±)-1) and asperteretal E (2) containing rare 2-benzyl-3-phenyl substituted lactone core, together with nine known analogues (3-11) were obtained from a fungus Aspergillus terreus derived from the marine sponge Phakellia fusca. All the structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive NMR spectroscopic data. The chiral chromatography analyses allowed the separation of the (±)-asperteretal D, of which the absolute configurations were determined by comparing the experimental to calculated electronic circular dichroic (ECD) spectra. Compounds (±)-1, 2-5, and 7 exhibited potent inhibitory activities against α-glucosidase with IC 50 values ranging from 8.65 to 20.3 µM (positive control acarbose with an IC 50 value of 320 µM). In addition, derivatives 5-8 also showed moderate antioxidant activities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Biosynthetic Pathway for the Epipolythiodioxopiperazine Acetylaranotin in Aspergillus terreus Revealed by Genome-based Deletion Analysis

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    Guo, Chun-Jun; Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chiang, Yi Ming; Sanchez, James F.; Chang, ShuLin; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2013-04-15

    Abstract Epipolythiodioxopiperazines (ETPs) are a class of fungal secondary metabolites derived from cyclic peptides. Acetylaranotin belongs to one structural subgroup of ETPs characterized by the presence of a seven-membered dihydrooxepine ring. Defining the genes involved in acetylaranotin biosynthesis should provide a means to increase production of these compounds and facilitate the engineering of second-generation molecules. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus terreus produces acetylaranotin and related natural products. Using targeted gene deletions, we have identified a cluster of 9 genes including one nonribosomal peptide synthase gene, ataP, that is required for acetylaranotin biosynthesis. Chemical analysis of the wild type and mutant strains enabled us to isolate seventeen natural products that are either intermediates in the normal biosynthetic pathway or shunt products that are produced when the pathway is interrupted through mutation. Nine of the compounds identified in this study are novel natural products. Our data allow us to propose a complete biosynthetic pathway for acetylaranotin and related natural products.

  17. Structures and antiviral activities of butyrolactone derivatives isolated from Aspergillus terreus MXH-23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinhua; Zhu, Tianjiao; Gu, Qianqun; Xi, Rui; Wang, Wei; Li, Dehai

    2014-12-01

    A new butyrolactone derivative, namely butyrolactone VIII ( 1), and six known butyrolactones ( 2-7) were separated from the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract of the fermentation broth of a fungus, Aspergillus terreus MXH-23. The chemical structures of these metabolites were identified by analyzing their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). Known butyrolactone derivatives contain an α, β-unsaturated γ-lactone ring with α-hydroxyl and γ-benzyl, and butyrolactone VIII ( 1) was the first butyrolactones contains α-benzyl and γ-hydroxyl on α, β-unsaturated lactone ring. All of the butyrolactone derivatives were tested for their anti-influenza (H1N1) effects. Derivatives 4 and 7 showed moderate antiviral activities while the newly-identified, derivative 1, did not.

  18. Biodegradation of imidacloprid in liquid media by an isolated wastewater fungus Aspergillus terreus YESM3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Youssef M M; Badawy, Mohammed E I

    2017-10-03

    In the present study, a new fungal strain capable of imidacloprid degradation was isolated from agricultural wastewater drain. The fungal strain of YESM3 was identified as Aspergillus terreus based on ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 gene sequence by PCR amplification of a 500 bp sequence. Screening of A. terreus YESM3 to the insecticide imidacloprid tolerance was achieved by growing fungus in Czapek Dox agar for 6 days at 28°C. High values (1.13 and 0.94 cm cm-1) of tolerance index (TI) were recorded at 25 and 50 mg L-1 of imidacloprid, respectively in the presence and absence of sucrose. However, at 400 mg L-1 the fungus did not grow. Effects of the imidacloprid concentration, pH, and inoculum size on the biodegradation percentage were tested using Box-Behnken statistical design and the biodegradation was monitored by HPLC analysis at different time intervals. Box-Behnken results indicated that optimal conditions for biodegradation were at pH 4 and two fungal discs (10 mm diameter) in the presence of 61.2 mg L-1 of imidacloprid. A. terreus YESM3 strain was capable of degrading 85% of imidacloprid 25 mg L-1 in Czapek Dox broth medium at pH 4 and 28°C for 6 days under static conditions. In addition, after 20 days of inoculation, biodegradation recorded 96.23% of 25 mg L-1 imidacloprid. Degradation kinetics showed that the imidacloprid followed the first order kinetics with half-life (t50) of 1.532 day. Intermediate product identified as 6-chloronicotinic acid (6CNA) as one of the major metabolites during degradation of imidacloprid by using HPLC. Thus, A. terreus YESM3 showed a potential to reduce pollution by pesticides and toxicity in the effected environment. However, further studies should be conducted to understand the biodegradation mechanism of this pesticide in liquid media.

  19. Accessory enzymes from Aspergillus involved in xylan and pectin degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.P.

    1999-01-01

    The xylanolytic and pectinolytic enzyme systems from Aspergillus have been the subject of study for many years. Although the main chain cleaving enzymes and their encoding genes have been studied in detail, little information is available about most of the accessory

  20. Utilisation of vegetable oils in the production of lovastatin by Aspergillus terreus ATCC 20542 in submerged cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    Pattana Sripalakit

    2011-01-01

    The effect of vegetable oils as a supplementary carbon source during the production of lovastatin by Aspergillus terreus ATCC 20542 in submerged culture was investigated. The six vegetable oils tested were sesame oil, sunflower oil, soya bean oil, corn oil, palm oil and olive oil. Lovastatin concentration and biomass were measured. Lovastatin production was higher in several oil-containing media compared to control medium. In particular, palm oil and soya bean oil significantly improved lovas...

  1. Butyrolactone I Quantification from Lovastatin Producing Aspergillus terreus Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry—Evidence of Signalling Functions

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    Elina K. Palonen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus terreus is an industrially important filamentous fungus producing a wide spectrum of secondary metabolites, including lovastatin and itaconic acid. It also produces butyrolactone I which has shown potential as an antitumour agent. Additionally, butyrolactone I has been implicated to have a regulating role in the secondary metabolism and morphology of A. terreus. In this study, a quantitative time-course liquid chromatography—electrospray ionisation—tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS analysis of butyrolactone I is reported for the first time in nine-day long submerged cultures of A. terreus. Butyrolactone I was fragmented in the mass analysis producing a reproducible fragmentation pattern of four main daughter ions (m/z 307, 331, 363 and 393 in all the samples tested. Supplementing the cultures with 100 nM butyrolactone I caused a statistically significant increase (up to two-fold in its production, regardless of the growth stage but was constitutive when butyrolactone I was added at high cell density during the stationary phase. Furthermore, the extracellular butyrolactone I concentration peaked at 48 h post inoculation, showing a similar profile as has been reported for bacterial quorum sensing molecules. Taken together, the results support the idea of butyrolactone I as a quorum sensing molecule in A. terreus.

  2. Glycoside hydrolase production by Aspergillus terreus CM20 using mixture design approach for enhanced enzymatic saccharification of alkali pretreated paddy straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritha, M; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Singh, Surender; Nain, Pawan K S; Rana, Sarika; Adak, Anurup; Arora, Anju; Nain, Lata

    2016-08-01

    A successful lignocellulosic ethanol production process needs to address the technological impediments such as cost-competitiveness and sustainability of the process. Effective biomass utilization requires a repertoire of enzymes including various accessory enzymes. Developing an enzyme preparation with defined hydrolytic activities can circumvent the need for supplementing cellulases with accessory enzymes for enhanced hydrolysis. With this objective, mixture design approach was used in the present study to enhance glycoside hydrolase production of a fungal isolate, Aspergillus terreus CM20, by determining the proportion of different lignocellulosic components as enzyme inducers in the culture medium. A mixture of paddy straw and wheat straw (1.42:1.58) resulted in improved cellulolytic activities. The precipitated crude enzyme showed higher CMCase (365.03 18 IU g-1), FPase (161.48 IU g-1), avicelase (15.46 IU g-1), β-glucosidase (920.92 IU g-1) and xylanase (9627.79 IU g-1) activities. The potential of the crude enzyme for saccharification of alkali pretreated paddy straw was also tested. Under optimum conditions, saccharification released 25.0 g L-1 of fermentable sugars. This indicates the superiority of the crude enzyme produced with respect to its hydrolytic enzyme components.

  3. NAD deamidation "a new reaction" by an enzyme from Aspergillus terreus DSM 826.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzainy, Tahany A; Ali, Thanaa H

    2005-02-01

    NAD deamidation is a non-previously recognized reaction. This reaction has been found to be catalyzed by extracts of Aspergillus terreus DSM 826. Conversion of NAD to the biosynthetic intermediate, deamido NAD, by these extracts, at the optimum pH and temperature did not exceed about 55 of the amount of the substrate added. Completion of the reaction was achieved when the extracts were pre-heated at 50 degrees C for 15 min in absence of the substrate. In a very similar manner, the extracts catalyzed hydrolytic cleavage of the amide linkages of different biomolecules such as nicotinamide, nicotinamide riboside, nicotinamide mononucleotide, L-glutamine, L-asparagine and acetamide. Polyacrylamide was also deamidated under the same conditions. In addition, complete dephosphorylation of the dinucleotide molecule was also effected by the same extracts. Separation of the NAD deamidating enzyme from the NAD dephosphorylating enzyme was achieved on using either DEAE - Sephadex A-25 or Sephadex G-200 column chromatography. The obtained phosphohydrolase-free-deamidase showed optimum activity at pH 8 of 0.1 M phosphate buffer and 50 degrees C. It exhibited broad substrate specificity and hyperbolic substrate saturation kinetics. It was isosterically inhibited by the product of its activity and this inhibition was prevented by heating the extracts at 50 degrees C for 15 min. Its activity was not affected in presence of sodium fluoride, partially inhibited in presence of magnesium chloride and was retained in the freezer for some months.

  4. Microbial transformation of the sesquiterpene lactone tagitinin C by the fungus Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Bruno Alves; Pupo, Mônica Tallarico; Antonucci, Gilmara Ausech; Sampaio, Suely Vilela; de Melo Alves Paiva, Raquel; Said, Suraia; Gobbo-Neto, Leonardo; Da Costa, Fernando Batista

    2012-11-01

    The biotransformation of the sesquiterpene lactone tagitinin C by the fungus Aspergillus terreus MT 5.3 yielded a rare derivative that was elucidated by spectrometric methods. The fungus led to the formation of a different product through an unusual epoxidation reaction between C4 and C5, formation of a C3,C10 ether bridge, and a methoxylation of the C1 of tagitinin C. The chemical structure of the product, namely 1β-methoxy-3α-hydroxy-3,10β-4,5α-diepoxy-8β-isobutyroyloxygermacr-11(13)-en-6α,12-olide, is the same as that of a derivative that was recently isolated from the flowers of a Brazilian population of Mexican sunflower (Tithonia diversifolia), which is the source of the substrate tagitinin C. The in vitro cytotoxic activity of the substrate and the biotransformed product were evaluated in HL-60 cells using an MTT assay, and both compounds were found to be cytotoxic. We show that soil fungi may be useful in the biotransformation of sesquiterpene lactones, thereby leading to unusual changes in their chemical structures that may preserve or alter their biological activities, and may also mimic plant biosynthetic pathways for production of secondary metabolites.

  5. Crystal structure of an (R-selective ω-transaminase from Aspergillus terreus.

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    Andrzej Łyskowski

    Full Text Available Chiral amines are important building blocks for the synthesis of pharmaceutical products, fine chemicals, and agrochemicals. ω-Transaminases are able to directly synthesize enantiopure chiral amines by catalysing the transfer of an amino group from a primary amino donor to a carbonyl acceptor with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP as cofactor. In nature, (S-selective amine transaminases are more abundant than the (R-selective enzymes, and therefore more information concerning their structures is available. Here, we present the crystal structure of an (R-ω-transaminase from Aspergillus terreus determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 1.6 Å. The structure of the protein is a homodimer that displays the typical class IV fold of PLP-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP-cofactor observed in the structure is present in two states (i covalently bound to the active site lysine (the internal aldimine form and (ii as substrate/product adduct (the external aldimine form and free lysine. Docking studies revealed that (R-transaminases follow a dual binding mode, in which the large binding pocket can harbour the bulky substituent of the amine or ketone substrate and the α-carboxylate of pyruvate or amino acids, and the small binding pocket accommodates the smaller substituent.

  6. Bioprospecting Chemical Diversity and Bioactivity in a Marine Derived Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adpressa, Donovon A; Loesgen, Sandra

    2016-02-01

    A comparative metabolomic study of a marine derived fungus (Aspergillus terreus) grown under various culture conditions is presented. The fungus was grown in eleven different culture conditions using solid agar, broth cultures, or grain based media (OSMAC). Multivariate analysis of LC/MS data from the organic extracts revealed drastic differences in the metabolic profiles and guided our subsequent isolation efforts. The compound 7-desmethylcitreoviridin was isolated and identified, and is fully described for the first time. In addition, 16 known fungal metabolites were also isolated and identified. All compounds were elucidated by detailed spectroscopic analysis and tested for antibacterial activities against five human pathogens and tested for cytotoxicity. This study demonstrates that LC/MS based multivariate analysis provides a simple yet powerful tool to analyze the metabolome of a single fungal strain grown under various conditions. This approach allows environmentally-induced changes in metabolite expression to be rapidly visualized, and uses these differences to guide the discovery of new bioactive molecules. Copyright © 2016 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  7. Production of Itaconic Acid from Jatropha curcas Seed Cake by Aspergillus terreus

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    Amina M. AHMED EL-IMAM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Submerged substrate fermentation of Jatropha seed cake, a by-product of oil extraction from Jatropha curcas seed was carried out using Aspergillus terreus for the production of itaconic acid. The Jatropha seed cake was initially converted into fermentable sugars by dilute acid hydrolysis using 50% sulphuric acid. The rate of hydrolysis was 1.04 gL-1. The fermentation process was carried out at room temperature, agitation of 400 rpm and three physico-chemical parameters (pH, inoculum size and substrate concentration were varied. Itaconic acid and glucose assays were carried out by spectrophotometry and Dinitrosalicylic acid methods respectively daily. Maximum yield of itaconic acid was 48.70 gL-1 at 5 ml of inoculum size, 50 g substrate concentration and pH 1.5. The residual glucose concentration increased for the first two days of fermentation after which it began to decrease as the itaconic acid concentration increased. The least concentration of itaconic acid observed was 6.00 gL-1, obtained after 24 hours of fermentation with 4 ml inoculum size, 50 g substrate concentration and at pH 1.5. The findings of this work indicate that Jatropha curcas seed cake is a suitable substrate for itaconic acid production.

  8. Molecular characterization and expression of a novel alcohol oxidase from Aspergillus terreus MTCC6324.

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    Mitun Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The alcohol oxidase (AOx cDNA from Aspergillus terreus MTCC6324 with an open reading frame (ORF of 2001 bp was constructed from n-hexadecane induced cells and expressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of ∼4.2 mg protein g-1 wet cell. The deduced amino acid sequences of recombinant rAOx showed maximum structural homology with the chain B of aryl AOx from Pleurotus eryngii. A functionally active AOx was achieved by incubating the apo-AOx with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD for ∼80 h at 16°C and pH 9.0. The isoelectric point and mass of the apo-AOx were found to be 6.5±0.1 and ∼74 kDa, respectively. Circular dichroism data of the rAOx confirmed its ordered structure. Docking studies with an ab-initio protein model demonstrated the presence of a conserved FAD binding domain with an active substrate binding site. The rAOx was specific for aryl alcohols and the order of its substrate preference was 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol >3-methoxybenzyl alcohol>3, 4-dimethoxybenzyl alcohol > benzyl alcohol. A significantly high aggregation to ∼1000 nm (diameter and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km of 7829.5 min-1 mM-1 for 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol was also demonstrated for rAOx. The results infer the novelty of the AOx and its potential biocatalytic application.

  9. Fungus-Mediated Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Aspergillus terreus

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    Koji Yokoyama

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis of nanoparticles has received increasing attention due to the growing need to develop safe, cost-effective and environmentally friendly technologies for nano-materials synthesis. In this report, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs were synthesized using a reduction of aqueous Ag+ ion with the culture supernatants of Aspergillus terreus. The reaction occurred at ambient temperature and in a few hours. The bioreduction of AgNPs was monitored by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and the AgNPs obtained were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The synthesized AgNPs were polydispersed spherical particles ranging in size from 1 to 20 nm and stabilized in the solution. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH was found to be an important reducing agent for the biosynthesis, and the formation of AgNPs might be an enzyme-mediated extracellular reaction process. Furthermore, the antimicrobial potential of AgNPs was systematically evaluated. The synthesized AgNPs could efficiently inhibit various pathogenic organisms, including bacteria and fungi. The current research opens a new avenue for the green synthesis of nano-materials.

  10. Crystal Structure of an (R)-Selective ω-Transaminase from Aspergillus terreus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łyskowski, Andrzej; Gruber, Christian; Steinkellner, Georg; Schürmann, Martin; Schwab, Helmut; Gruber, Karl; Steiner, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    Chiral amines are important building blocks for the synthesis of pharmaceutical products, fine chemicals, and agrochemicals. ω-Transaminases are able to directly synthesize enantiopure chiral amines by catalysing the transfer of an amino group from a primary amino donor to a carbonyl acceptor with pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor. In nature, (S)-selective amine transaminases are more abundant than the (R)-selective enzymes, and therefore more information concerning their structures is available. Here, we present the crystal structure of an (R)-ω-transaminase from Aspergillus terreus determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 1.6 Å. The structure of the protein is a homodimer that displays the typical class IV fold of PLP-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP-cofactor observed in the structure is present in two states (i) covalently bound to the active site lysine (the internal aldimine form) and (ii) as substrate/product adduct (the external aldimine form) and free lysine. Docking studies revealed that (R)-transaminases follow a dual binding mode, in which the large binding pocket can harbour the bulky substituent of the amine or ketone substrate and the α-carboxylate of pyruvate or amino acids, and the small binding pocket accommodates the smaller substituent. PMID:24498081

  11. Bioactive compounds of Aspergillus terreus-F7, an endophytic fungus from Hyptis suaveolens (L.) Poit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Igor Pereira; Brissow, Elson; Kellner Filho, Luis Claudio; Senabio, Jaqueline; de Siqueira, Kátia Aparecida; Vandresen Filho, Samuel; Damasceno, Jaqueline Lopes; Mendes, Suzana Amorim; Tavares, Denise Crispim; Magalhães, Lizandra Guidi; Junior, Policarpo Ademar Sales; Januário, Ana Helena; Soares, Marcos Antônio

    2017-03-01

    The compounds terrein (1), butyrolactone I (2), and butyrolactone V (3) were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract (EtOAc) of the endophytic fungus Aspergillus terreus-F7 obtained from Hyptis suaveolens (L.) Poit. The extract and the compounds presented schistosomicidal activity against Schistosoma mansoni; at 100 µg/mL for EtOAc extract, 1297.3 µM for compound 1, 235.6 µM for compound 2, and 454.1 µM for compound 3, they killed 100% of the parasites after 72 h of treatment. Compounds 1, 2, and 3 exerted moderate leishmanicidal activity against Leishmania amazonensis (IC50 ranged from 23.7 to 78.6 µM). At 235.6 and 227.0 µM, compounds 2 and 3, respectively, scavenged 95.92 and 95.12% of the DPPH radical (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl), respectively. Regarding the cytotoxicity against the breast tumor cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, compound 2 gave IC50 of 34.4 and 17.4 µM, respectively, while compound 3 afforded IC50 of 22.2 and 31.9 µM, respectively. At 117.6 µM, compound 2 inhibited the growth of and killed the pathogen Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922). Compounds 1, 2, and 3 displayed low toxicity against the normal line of human lung fibroblasts (GM07492A cells), with IC50 of 15.3 × 103, 3.4 × 103, and 5.8 × 103 µM, respectively. This is the first report on (i) the in vitro schistosomicidal and leishmanicidal activities of the EtOAc extract of A. terreus-F7 and compounds 1, 2, and 3; and (ii) the antitumor activity of compounds 2 and 3 against MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells.

  12. Hydrolysis of galacto-oligosaccharides in soy molasses by α -galactosidases and invertase from Aspergillus terreus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Pataro Reis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Two α -galactosidase (P1 and P2 and one invertase present in the culture of Aspergillus terreus grown on wheat straw for 168 h at 28ºC were partially purified by gel filtration and hydrophobic interaction chromatographies. Optimum pH and temperatures for P1, P2 and invertase preparations were 4.5-5.0, 5.5 and 4.0 and 60, 55 and 65ºC, respectively. The K M app for Ï� -nitrophenyl-α -D-galactopyranoside were 1.32 mM and 0.72 mM for P1 and P2, respectively, while the K M app value for invertase, using sacarose as a substrate was 15.66 mM. Enzyme preparations P1 and P2 maintained their activities after pre-incubation for 3 h at 50ºC and invertase maintained about 90% after 6 h at 55 ºC. P1 and P2 presented different inhibition sensitivities by Ag+, D-galactose, and SDS. All enzyme preparations hydrolyzed galacto-ologosaccharides present in soymolasses.Duas α-galactosidases (P1 e P2 e uma invertase produzidas no sobrenadante da cultura do fungo Aspergillus terreus quando crescido por 168 h a 28ºC com farelo de trigo como fonte de carbono foram parcialmente purificadas por cromatografias de gel filtração e interação hidrofóbica. O pH e temperatura ótimos para as preparações P1, P2 e invertase foram entre 4,5-5,0, 5,5 e 4,0 e 60, 55 e 65ºC, respectivamente. O K M app para Ï�-nitrofenil-α-D-galactopiranosideo foi 1.32 mM e 0.72 mM para P1 e P2, respectivamente. O valor de K M app para invertase usando sacarose como substrato foi de 15,66 mM. As preparações enzimáticas P1 e P2 mantiveram suas atividades após 3 h de pré-incubação a 50 ºC e a invertase manteve cerca de 90% após 6 h a 55 ºC. P1 e P2 foram diferentemente sensíveis à inibição por Ag+, D-galactose e SDS. As preparações enzimáticas hidrolisaram os galactooligossacarídeos presentes em melaço de soja.

  13. IMMOBILIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A THERMOSTABLE β-GLUCOSIDASE FROM ASPERGILLUS TERREUS NRRL 265

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    Dina H. El-Ghonemy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Partially purified β-glucosidase from Aspergillus terreus NRRL 265 was immobilized by entrapment in calcium-alginate beads. The activity of the free and immobilized enzymes as a function of pH, temperature, and periodic use were compared. Whey permeate, a by-product of cheese industry, was served as an inexpensive medium, which made the process economical and reduced the cost of enzyme production and also reduced the environmental pollution. The results indicated that, the immobilized β-glucosidase was retained about 73 % of the original activity exhibited by the free enzyme. The optimum temperature for the enzyme activity was improved by 5ºC after immobilization. Immobilized β-glucosidase was exhibited great thermal stability, whereas, at 70ºC, the free enzyme lost its activity after 30 min of incubation, while the immobilized enzyme showed more stability in comparison to the free form as it retained about 13.4 % of its initial activity under the same conditions. Moreover, the pH stability was improved following immobilization, whereas, the immobilized enzyme was stable in pH ranging from 4.0 to 7.0 with no change in activity, while its stability slightly decreases for more alkaline or acidic conditions (retaining 82.4 % and 67.4 % of the initial activity at pH 8.0 and 3.5, after 1 h of incubation. The results also indicated the possibility of reusing Ca alginate-immobilized β-glucosidase in industrial applications for 10 cycles with 53.7 % retained activity.

  14. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preety Vatsyayan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 105 U mg−1 protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/Km of 4.7 × 108 M−1 s−1 within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t1/2 at pH 12~15 months of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t1/2 of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS.

  15. Galleria mellonella as a host model to study Aspergillus terreus virulence and amphotericin B resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Elisabeth; Browne, Niall; Surlis, Carla; Jukic, Emina; Moser, Patrizia; Kavanagh, Kevin; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Binder, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the alternative in vivo model Galleria mellonella can be used (i) to determine differences in pathogenicity of amphotericin B (AMB) resistant and susceptible A. terreus isolates, (ii) to evaluate AMB efficacy in vivo (iii) and to correlate outcome to in vitro susceptibility data. Larvae were infected with 2 A. terreus AMB resistant (ATR) and 3 AMB susceptible (ATS) isolates and survival rates were correlated to physiological attributes and killing ability of larval haemocytes. Additionally, infected larvae were treated with different concentrations of L-AMB. Haemocyte density were ascertained to evaluate the influence of L-AMB on the larval immune cells. Larvae were sensitive to A. terreus infection in an inoculum-size and temperature dependent manner. In vitro susceptibility to L-AMB correlated with in vivo outcome of antifungal treatment, defining an AMB susceptible strain cluster of A. terreus. Susceptibility to L-AMB increased virulence potential in the larval model, but this increase was also in accordance with faster growth and less damage caused by larval haemocytes. L-AMB treatment primed the larval immune response by increasing haemocyte density. G. mellonella provides a convenient model for the in vivo screening of A. terreus virulence and treatment options, contributing to the generation of a hypothesis that can be further tested in refined experiments in mammalian models.

  16. Rapid determination of lovastatin in the fermentation broth of Aspergillus terreus using dual-wavelength UV spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Weng; Song, Hong-Ping; Leng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Lovastatin, a hypocholesterolemic drug, is produced by submerged fermentation of Aspergillus terreus Thom (Trichocomaceae). High performance liquid chromatography is usually used to determine lovastatin in samples of the fermentation broth. However, this method is inconvenient and costly, especially in the context of high-throughput sample analysis. A direct and simple dual-wavelength ultraviolet spectrophotometric method for quantifying lovastatin in the fermentation broth of A. terreus was developed. A. terreus Z15-7 was used for all experiments. The liquid fermentation was conducted at 30 °C in a rotary shaker at 150 rpm for 15 d. Silica gel and neutral alumina column chromatography were used for the separation and purification of lovastatin from the fermentation broth. The limits of detection of lovastatin were 0.320 μg/ml in the lovastatin standard solution and 0.490 μg/ml in the fermentation broth sample and the limits of quantification of lovastatin were 1.265 μg/ml in the lovastatin standard solution and 3.955 μg/ml in the fermentation broth sample. The amounts of lovastatin in the fermentation broth ranged from 876.614 to 911.967 μg/ml, with relative standard deviations from 1.203 to 1.709%. The mean recoveries of lovastatin using silica gel and neutral alumina column chromatography were 84.2 ± 0.82 and 87.2 ± 0.21%, respectively. Dual-wavelength UV spectrophotometry is a rapid, sensitive, accurate, and convenient method for quantifying lovastatin in fermentation broth. Neutral alumina column chromatography is more efficient than silica gel column chromatography for the purification and determination lovastatin using the developed dual-wavelength UV spectrophotometry method.

  17. Single-step production of the simvastatin precursor monacolin J by engineering of an industrial strain of Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuenian; Liang, Yajing; Yang, Yong; Lu, Xuefeng

    2017-07-01

    Monacolin J is a key precursor for the synthesis of simvastatin (Zocor), an important drug for treating hypercholesterolemia. Industrially, monacolin J is manufactured through alkaline hydrolysis of lovastatin, a fungal polyketide produced by Aspergillus terreus. Multistep chemical processes for the conversion of lovastatin to simvastatin are laborious, cost expensive and environmentally unfriendly. A biocatalysis process for monacolin J conversion to simvastatin has been developed. However, direct bioproduction of monacolin J has not yet been achieved. Here, we identified a lovastatin hydrolase from Penicillium chrysogenum, which displays a 232-fold higher catalytic efficiency for the in vitro hydrolysis of lovastatin compared to a previously patented hydrolase, but no activity for simvastatin. Furthermore, we showed that an industrial A. terreus strain heterologously expressing this lovastatin hydrolase can produce monacolin J through single-step fermentation with high efficiency, approximately 95% of the biosynthesized lovastatin was hydrolyzed to monacolin J. Our results demonstrate a simple and green technical route for the production of monacolin J, which makes complete bioproduction of the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin feasible and promising. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction by Aspergillus terreus isolated from the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Fuchs-Ocklenburg, Silvia; Kamp, Anja

    2014-01-01

    on the anaerobic nitrate metabolism of the fungus Aspergillus terreus (isolate An-4) that was obtained from sediment in the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea, a globally important site of oceanic nitrogen loss and nitrous oxide emission. Results: Axenic incubations of An-4 in the presence and absence...... of dissimilatory nitrate reduction were ammonium (83%), nitrous oxide (15.5%), and nitrite (1.5%), while dinitrogen production was not observed. The process led to substantial cellular ATP production and biomass growth and also occurred when ammonium was added to suppress nitrate assimilation, stressing...... reduction when oxygen is absent. In the currently spreading oxygen-deficient zones in the ocean, an as yet unexplored diversity of fungi may recycle nitrate to ammonium and nitrite, the substrates of the major nitrogen loss process anaerobic ammonium oxidation, and the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide....

  19. Comparative study of toxicity of azo dye Procion Red MX-5B following biosorption and biodegradation treatments with the fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, E J R; Corso, C R

    2014-10-01

    Azo dyes are an important class of environmental contaminants and are characterized by the presence of one or more azo bonds (-N=N-) in their molecular structure. Effluents containing these compounds resist many types of treatments due to their molecular complexity. Therefore, alternative treatments, such as biosorption and biodegradation, have been widely studied to solve the problems caused by these substances, such as their harmful effects on the environment and organisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate biosorption and biodegradation of the azo dye Procion Red MX-5B in solutions with the filamentous fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus. Decolorization tests were performed, followed by acute toxicity tests using Lactuca sativa seeds and Artemia salina larvae. Thirty percent dye removal of the solutions was achieved after 3 h of biosorption. UV-Vis spectroscopy revealed that removal of the dye molecules occurred without major molecular changes. The acute toxicity tests confirmed lack of molecular degradation following biosorption with A. niger, as toxicity to L. sativa seed reduced from 5% to 0%. For A. salina larvae, the solutions were nontoxic before and after treatment. In the biodegradation study with the fungus A. terreus, UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy revealed molecular degradation and the formation of secondary metabolites, such as primary and secondary amines. The biodegradation of the dye molecules was evaluated after 24, 240 and 336 h of treatment. The fungal biomass demonstrated considerable affinity for Procion Red MX-5B, achieving approximately 100% decolorization of the solutions by the end of treatment. However, the solutions resulting from this treatment exhibited a significant increase in toxicity, inhibiting the growth of L. sativa seeds by 43% and leading to a 100% mortality rate among the A. salina larvae. Based on the present findings, biodegradation was effective in the decolorization of the samples, but generated

  20. Production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes by monoculture and co-culture of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus under SSF of banana peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Shazia; Aslam, Hina; Ahmad, Aqeel; Khan, Shakeel Ahmed; Sohail, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are considered to be the most important group of microorganisms for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE), in solid state fermentations. In this study, two fungal strains Aspergillus niger MS23 and Aspergillus terreus MS105 were screened for plant CWDE such as amylase, pectinase, xylanase and cellulases (β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and filterpaperase) using a novel substrate, Banana Peels (BP) for SSF process. This is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to use BP as SSF substrate for plant CWDE production by co-culture of fungal strains. The titers of pectinase were significantly improved in co-culture compared to mono-culture. Furthermore, the enzyme preparations obtained from monoculture and co-culture were used to study the hydrolysis of BP along with some crude and purified substrates. It was observed that the enzymatic hydrolysis of different crude and purified substrates accomplished after 26 h of incubation, where pectin was maximally hydrolyzed by the enzyme preparations of mono and co-culture. Along with purified substrates, crude materials were also proved to be efficiently degraded by the cocktail of the CWDE. These results demonstrated that banana peels may be a potential substrate in solid-state fermentation for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes to be used for improving various biotechnological and industrial processes.

  1. Production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes by monoculture and co-culture of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus under SSF of banana peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Rehman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous fungi are considered to be the most important group of microorganisms for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE, in solid state fermentations. In this study, two fungal strains Aspergillus niger MS23 and Aspergillus terreus MS105 were screened for plant CWDE such as amylase, pectinase, xylanase and cellulases (β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and filterpaperase using a novel substrate, Banana Peels (BP for SSF process. This is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to use BP as SSF substrate for plant CWDE production by co-culture of fungal strains. The titers of pectinase were significantly improved in co-culture compared to mono-culture. Furthermore, the enzyme preparations obtained from monoculture and co-culture were used to study the hydrolysis of BP along with some crude and purified substrates. It was observed that the enzymatic hydrolysis of different crude and purified substrates accomplished after 26 h of incubation, where pectin was maximally hydrolyzed by the enzyme preparations of mono and co-culture. Along with purified substrates, crude materials were also proved to be efficiently degraded by the cocktail of the CWDE. These results demonstrated that banana peels may be a potential substrate in solid-state fermentation for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes to be used for improving various biotechnological and industrial processes.

  2. The functional properties of a xyloglucanase (GH12) of Aspergillus terreus expressed in Aspergillus nidulans may increase performance of biomass degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitcosque, Gabriela Leal; Ribeiro, Liliane Fraga Costa; de Lucas, Rosymar Coutinho; da Silva, Tony Marcio; Ribeiro, Lucas Ferreira; de Lima Damasio, André Ricardo; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez; Gonçalves, Aline Zorzetto Lopes; Segato, Fernando; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Jorge, João Atilio; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes T M

    2016-11-01

    Filamentous fungi are attractive hosts for heterologous protein expression due to their capacity to secrete large amounts of enzymes into the extracellular medium. Xyloglucanases, which specifically hydrolyze xyloglucan, have been recently applied in lignocellulosic biomass degradation and conversion in many other industrial processes. In this context, this work aimed to clone, express, and determine the functional properties of a recombinant xyloglucanase (AtXEG12) from Aspergillus terreus, and also its solid-state (SSF) and submerged (SmF) fermentation in bioreactors. The purified AtXEG12 showed optimum pH and temperature of 5.5 and 65 °C, respectively, demonstrating to be 90 % stable after 24 h of incubation at 50 °C. AtXEG12 activity increased in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol (65 %) and Zn(+2) (45 %), while Cu(+2) and Ag(+) ions drastically decreased its activity. A substrate assay showed, for the first time for this enzyme's family, xylanase activity. The enzyme exhibited high specificity for tamarind xyloglucan (K M 1.2 mg mL(-1)) and V max of 17.4 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) of protein. The capillary zone electrophoresis analysis revealed that AtXEG12 is an endo-xyloglucanase. The heterologous xyloglucanase secretion was greater than the production by wild-type A. terreus cultivated in SmF. On the other hand, AtXEG12 activity reached by SSF was sevenfold higher than values achieved by SmF, showing that the expression of recombinant enzymes can be significantly improved by cultivation under SSF.

  3. Comment on: "Melanisation of Aspergillus terreus-Is Butyrolactone I Involved in the Regulation of Both DOPA and DHN Types of Pigments in Submerged Culture? Microorganisms 2017, 5, 22".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Elena; Brock, Matthias

    2017-06-21

    A recent article by Palonen et al. describes the effect of butyrolactone I on the expression of a secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene cluster from Aspergillus terreus that shows similarities to fusarubin biosynthesis gene clusters from Fusarium species. The authors claim that two different types of pigments are formed in Aspergillus terreus conidia, whereby one pigment is termed a DOPA-type melanin and the second a DHN-type melanin. Unfortunately, the terminology of the classification of melanin-types requires revision as Asp-melanin present in A. terreus conidia is clearly distinct from DOPA-melanins. In addition, some hypotheses in this manuscript are based on questionable data published previously, resulting in incorrect conclusions. Finally, as biochemical data are lacking and metabolite production is only deduced from bioinformatics and transcriptomic data, the production of a second pigment type in A. terreus conidia appears highly speculative.

  4. A deficiency of manganese ions in the presence of high sugar concentrations is the critical parameter for achieving high yields of itaconic acid by Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaffa, Levente; Díaz, Rafael; Papp, Benedek; Fekete, Erzsébet; Sándor, Erzsébet; Kubicek, Christian P

    2015-10-01

    Itaconic acid (IA), an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid with a high potential as a platform for chemicals derived from sugars, is industrially produced by large-scale submerged fermentation by Aspergillus terreus. Although the biochemical pathway and the physiology leading to IA is almost the same as that leading to citric acid production in Aspergillus niger, published data for the volumetric (g L(-1)) and the specific yield (mol/mol carbon source) of IA are significantly lower than for citric acid. Citric acid is known to accumulate to high levels only when a number of nutritional parameters are carefully adjusted, of which the concentration of the carbon source and that of manganese ions in the medium are particularly important. We have therefore investigated whether a variation in these two parameters may enhance IA production and yield by A. terreus. We show that manganese ion concentrations parameters are varied in citric acid production by A. niger, thus showing that the physiology of both processes is widely identical. Consequently, applying the fermentation technology established for citric acid production by A. niger citric acid production to A. terreus should lead to high yields of IA, too.

  5. Production of α-amylase by Aspergillus terreus NCFT 4269.10 using pearl millet and its structural characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIJAY KUMAR eSETHI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, Aspergillus terreus NCFT4269.10 was employed in liquid static surface (LSSF and solid state (SSF fermentation to assess the optimal conditions for α-amylase biosynthesis. One-variable-at-a-time approach (quasi-optimum protocol was primarily used to investigate the effect of each parameter on production of amylase. The maximum amylase production was achieved using pearl millet (PM as substrate by SSF (19.19± 0.9 Ug-1 and also in presence of 1mM magnesium sulphate, 0.025% (w/v gibberellic acid and 30 mg/100ml (w/v of vitamin E (~ 60 fold higher production of amylase with the initial medium pH of 7.0 and incubation at 30 ºC for 96 h. In addition, maltose, gelatin and isoleucine also influenced the α-amylase production. Amylase was purified to homogeneity with molecular mass around 15.3 kDa. The enzyme comprised of a typical secondary structure containing α-helix (12.2%, β-pleated sheet (23.6% and β-turn (27.4%. Exploitation of PM for α-amylase production with better downstream makes it the unique enzyme for various biotechnological applications.

  6. Cloning, heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of a non-specific endoglucanase family 12 from Aspergillus terreus NIH2624.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segato, Fernando; Dias, Bruno; Berto, Gabriela L; de Oliveira, Dyoni M; De Souza, Flávio H M; Citadini, Ana Paula; Murakami, Mario T; Damásio, André R L; Squina, Fábio Márcio; Polikarpov, Igor

    2017-04-01

    The cellulases from Glycoside Hydrolyses family 12 (GH12) play an important role in cellulose degradation and plant cell wall deconstruction being widely used in a number of bioindustrial processes. Aiming to contribute toward better comprehension of these class of the enzymes, here we describe a high-yield secretion of a endoglucanase GH12 from Aspegillus terreus (AtGH12), which was cloned and expressed in Aspergillus nidulans strain A773. The purified protein was used for complete biochemical and functional characterization. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were 55°C and 5.0 respectively, which has high activity against β-glucan and xyloglucan and also is active toward glucomannan and CMC. The enzyme retained activity up to 60°C. AtGH12 is strongly inhibited by Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Cd(2+), Mn(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+) and EDTA, whereas K(+), Tween, Cs(+), DMSO, Triton X-100 and Mg(2+) enhanced the enzyme activity. Furthermore, SAXS data reveal that the enzyme has a globular shape and CD analysis demonstrated a prevalence of a β-strand structure corroborating with typical β-sheets fold commonly found for other endoglucanases from GH12 family. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of viscosity, friction, and sonication on the morphology and metabolite production from Aspergillus terreus ATCC 20542.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Muhamad Hafiz Abd; Hasan, Hanan; Harith, Hanis H; Abbas, Ali

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the effects of viscosity, friction, and sonication on the morphology and the production of lovastatin, (+)-geodin, and sulochrin by Aspergillus terreus ATCC 20542. Sodium alginate and gelatine were used to protect the fungal pellet from mechanical force by increasing the media viscosity. Sodium alginate stimulated the production of lovastatin by up to 329.0% and sulochrin by 128.7%, with inhibitory effect on (+)-geodin production at all concentrations used. However, the use of gelatine to increase viscosity significantly suppressed lovastatin, (+)-geodin, and sulochrin's production (maximum reduction at day 9 of 42.7, 60.8, and 68.3%, respectively), which indicated that the types of chemical play a major role in metabolite production. Higher viscosity increased both pellet biomass and size in all conditions. Friction significantly increased (+)-geodin's titre by 1527.5%, lovastatin by 511.1%, and sulochrin by 784.4% while reducing pellet biomass and size. Conversely, sonication produced disperse filamentous morphology with significantly lower metabolites. Sodium alginate-induced lovastatin and sulochrin production suggest that these metabolites are not affected by viscosity; rather, their production is affected by the specific action of certain chemicals. In contrast, low viscosity adversely affected (+)-geodin's production, while pellet disintegration can cause a significant production of (+)-geodin.

  8. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Aspergillus terreus endo-β-1,4-glucanase from glycoside hydrolase family 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segato, Fernando; Berto, Gabriela L; Ares de Araújo, Evandro; Muniz, João Renato; Polikarpov, Igor

    2014-02-01

    Endoglucanases are important enzymes that are involved in the modification and degradation of cellulose. Filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus terreus are effective biomass degraders in nature owing to their capacity to produce an enzymatic arsenal of glycoside hydrolases, including endoglucanase from glycoside hydrolase family 12 (GH12). The A. terreus GH12 endoglucanase was cloned and overexpressed in A. nidulans, purified and crystallized. A single crystal was obtained from a solution consisting of 2 M ammonium sulfate, 5%(v/v) 2-propanol. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.85 Å using synchrotron radiation and a preliminary molecular-replacement solution was obtained in the trigonal space group P3(2)21. The unit-cell parameters were a = b = 103.24, c = 48.96 Å.

  9. Characterization of purified α-amylase produced by Aspergillus terreus NCFT 4269.10 using pearl millet as substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijay Kumar Sethi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available α-amylase was produced by Aspergillus terreus NCFT 4269.10 using both liquid static surface (LSSF and solid-state fermentation using pearl millet residues as substrate. The maximum production of α-amylase was noticed at 30°C incubated for 96h. The crude α-amylase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized. Characterization of amylase confirmed that the purified α-amylase was found to be most stable at pH 5.0, 60°C temperature, and a substrate concentration of 1.25%. The enzyme was active for 40 min at 70°C with an optimum enzyme–substrate reaction time of 60 min. Amylase was compatible with all detergents tested having highest activity with Surf excel followed by Henko and Ariel. SDS and Tween 20 reduced the activity. Among the metal ions tested, the maximum α-amylase activity was attained in the presence of Ca2+, followed by Mg2+ and Mn2+. The activity of α-amylase was not considerably affected in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and Triton X-100. Amylase activity was accelerated in the presence of sodium lauryl sulfate and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride did not significantly (or slightly affect the activity and stability. Tween 20, urea (5%, and the reducing agent, β-mercaptoethanol significantly inhibited the activity of α-amylase. Owing to its noteworthy stability in the presence of detergents, additives, inhibitors, and metal ions, this α-amylase could be an impending enzyme for significant industrial exploitations.

  10. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction by Aspergillus terreus isolated from the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, Peter; Fuchs-Ocklenburg, Silvia; Kamp, Anja; Manohar, Cathrine-Sumathi; Houbraken, Jos; Boekhout, Teun; de Beer, Dirk; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2014-02-11

    A wealth of microbial eukaryotes is adapted to life in oxygen-deficient marine environments. Evidence is accumulating that some of these eukaryotes survive anoxia by employing dissimilatory nitrate reduction, a strategy that otherwise is widespread in prokaryotes. Here, we report on the anaerobic nitrate metabolism of the fungus Aspergillus terreus (isolate An-4) that was obtained from sediment in the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea, a globally important site of oceanic nitrogen loss and nitrous oxide emission. Axenic incubations of An-4 in the presence and absence of oxygen and nitrate revealed that this fungal isolate is capable of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium under anoxic conditions. A ¹⁵N-labeling experiment proved that An-4 produced and excreted ammonium through nitrate reduction at a rate of up to 175 nmol ¹⁵NH₄⁺ g⁻¹ protein h⁻¹. The products of dissimilatory nitrate reduction were ammonium (83%), nitrous oxide (15.5%), and nitrite (1.5%), while dinitrogen production was not observed. The process led to substantial cellular ATP production and biomass growth and also occurred when ammonium was added to suppress nitrate assimilation, stressing the dissimilatory nature of nitrate reduction. Interestingly, An-4 used intracellular nitrate stores (up to 6-8 μmol NO₃⁻ g⁻¹ protein) for dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Our findings expand the short list of microbial eukaryotes that store nitrate intracellularly and carry out dissimilatory nitrate reduction when oxygen is absent. In the currently spreading oxygen-deficient zones in the ocean, an as yet unexplored diversity of fungi may recycle nitrate to ammonium and nitrite, the substrates of the major nitrogen loss process anaerobic ammonium oxidation, and the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide.

  11. Diversity of clinical isolates of Aspergillus terreus in antifungal susceptibilities, genotypes and virulence in Galleria mellonella model: Comparison between respiratory and ear isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Eun Jeong; Choi, Min Ji; Shin, Jong Hee; Park, Yeon-Jun; Byun, Seung A; Jung, Jee Seung; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon-Pal

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the antifungal susceptibility profiles, genotypes, and virulence of clinical Aspergillus terreus isolates from six university hospitals in South Korea. Thirty one isolates of A. terreus, comprising 15 respiratory and 16 ear isolates were assessed. Microsatellite genotyping was performed, and genetic similarity was assessed by calculating the Jaccard index. Virulence was evaluated by Galleria mellonella survival assay. All 31 isolates were susceptible to itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole, while 23 (74.2%) and 6 (19.4%) showed amphotericin B (AMB) minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ≤ 1 mg/L and > 4 mg/L, respectively. Notably, respiratory isolates showed significantly higher geometric mean MICs than ear isolates to AMB (2.41 vs. 0.48 mg/L), itraconazole (0.40 vs. 0.19 mg/L), posaconazole (0.16 vs. 0.08 mg/L), and voriconazole (0.76 vs. 0.31 mg/L) (all, P mellonella after 72 h, but virulence did not show significant differences according to source (ear or respiratory tract), genotype, or antifungal susceptibility. The current study shows the marked diversity of clinical isolates of A. terreus in terms of antifungal susceptibilities, genotypes and virulence in the G. mellonella model, and ear isolates from Korean hospitals may have lower AMB or triazole MICs than respiratory isolates.

  12. Melanisation of Aspergillus terreus-Is Butyrolactone I Involved in the Regulation of Both DOPA and DHN Types of Pigments in Submerged Culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palonen, Elina K; Raina, Sheetal; Brandt, Annika; Meriluoto, Jussi; Keshavarz, Tajalli; Soini, Juhani T

    2017-05-04

    Pigments and melanins of fungal spores have been investigated for decades, revealing important roles in the survival of the fungus in hostile environments. The key genes and the encoded enzymes for pigment and melanin biosynthesis have recently been found in Ascomycota, including Aspergillus spp. In Aspergillus terreus, the pigmentation has remained mysterious with only one class of melanin biogenesis being found. In this study, we examined an intriguing, partially annotated gene cluster of A. terreus strain NIH2624, utilizing previously sequenced transcriptome and improved gene expression data of strain MUCL 38669, under the influence of a suggested quorum sensing inducing metabolite, butyrolactone I. The core polyketide synthase (PKS) gene of the cluster was predicted to be significantly longer on the basis of the obtained transcriptional data, and the surrounding cluster was positively regulated by butyrolactone I at the late growth phase of submerged culture, presumably during sporulation. Phylogenetic analysis of the extended PKS revealed remarkable similarity with a group of known pigments of Fusarium spp., indicating a similar function for this PKS. We present a hypothesis of this PKS cluster to biosynthesise a 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-type of pigment during sporulation with the influence of butyrolactone I under submerged culture.

  13. Stimulation with lysates of Aspergillus terreus, Candida krusei and Rhizopus oryzae maximizes cross-reactivity of anti-fungal T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Shivashni S; Virassamy, Balaji; Halliday, Catriona; Clancy, Leighton; Chen, Sharon; Meyer, Wieland; Sorrell, Tania C; Gottlieb, David J

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases caused by filamentous fungi and yeasts are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in immunosuppressed hematology patients. We previously published a method to expand Aspergillus fumigatus-specific T cells for clinical cell therapy. In the present study, we investigated expansion of T cells specific for other fungal pathogens and creation of a broadly reactive panfungal T-cell product. Fungal strains selected were those frequently observed in the clinical hematology setting and included Aspergillus, Candida, Fusarium, Rhizopus and Lomentospora/Scedosporium. Four T-cell cultures specific to each fungus were established. We selected lysates of Aspergillus terreus, Candida krusei and Rhizopus oryzae to expand panfungal T cells. Allelic restriction of anti-fungal activity was determined through the use of specific major histocompatibility complex class II-blocking antibodies. Individual T-cell cultures specific to each fungus could be expanded in vitro, generating predominantly CD4(+) T cells of which 8% to 20% were fungus-specific. We successfully expanded panfungal T cells from the peripheral blood (n = 8) and granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-primed stem cell products (n = 3) of normal donors by using a combination of lysates from Aspergillus terreus, Candida krusei and Rhizopus oryzae. Anti-fungal activity was mediated through human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR alleles and was maintained when antigen-presenting cells from partially HLA-DRB1-matched donors were used to stimulate T cells. We demonstrate a method to manufacture panfungal T-cell products with specificity against a range of clinical fungal pathogens by use of the blood and stem cells of healthy donors as the starting material. The safety and efficacy of these products will need to be tested clinically. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of the co-purified invertase and β-glucosidase of a multifunctional extract from Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Marielle Aleixo; Gonçalves, Heloísa Bressan; Furriel, Rosa Dos Prazeres Melo; Jorge, João Atílio; Guimarães, Luis Henrique Souza

    2014-05-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus terreus secretes both invertase and β-glucosidase when grown under submerged fermentation containing rye flour as the carbon source. The aim of this study was to characterize the co-purified fraction, especially the invertase activity. An invertase and a β-glucosidase were co-purified by two chromatographic steps, and the isolated enzymatic fraction was 139-fold enriched in invertase activity. SDS-PAGE analysis of the co-purified enzymes suggests that the protein fraction with invertase activity was heterodimeric, with subunits of 47 and 27 kDa. Maximal invertase activity, which was determined by response surface methodology, occurred in pH and temperature ranges of 4.0-6.0 and 55-65 °C, respectively. The invertase in co-purified enzymes was stable for 1 h at pH 3.0-10.0 and maintained full activity for up to 1 h at 55 °C when diluted in water. Invertase activity was stimulated by 1 mM concentrations of Mn²⁺ (161 %), Co²⁺ (68 %) and Mg²⁺ (61 %) and was inhibited by Al³⁺, Ag⁺, Fe²⁺ and Fe³⁺. In addition to sucrose, the co-purified enzymes hydrolyzed cellobiose, inulin and raffinose, and the apparent affinities for sucrose and cellobiose were quite similar (K(M) = 22 mM). However, in the presence of Mn²⁺, the apparent affinity and V(max) for sucrose hydrolysis increased approximately 2- and 2.9-fold, respectively, while for cellobiose, a 2.6-fold increase in V(max) was observed, but the apparent affinity decreased 5.5-fold. Thus, it is possible to propose an application of this multifunctional extract containing both invertase and β-glucosidase to degrade plant biomass, thus increasing the concentration of monosaccharides obtained from sucrose and cellobiose.

  15. Diversity of clinical isolates of Aspergillus terreus in antifungal susceptibilities, genotypes and virulence in Galleria mellonella model: Comparison between respiratory and ear isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jeong Won

    Full Text Available We analyzed the antifungal susceptibility profiles, genotypes, and virulence of clinical Aspergillus terreus isolates from six university hospitals in South Korea. Thirty one isolates of A. terreus, comprising 15 respiratory and 16 ear isolates were assessed. Microsatellite genotyping was performed, and genetic similarity was assessed by calculating the Jaccard index. Virulence was evaluated by Galleria mellonella survival assay. All 31 isolates were susceptible to itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole, while 23 (74.2% and 6 (19.4% showed amphotericin B (AMB minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of ≤ 1 mg/L and > 4 mg/L, respectively. Notably, respiratory isolates showed significantly higher geometric mean MICs than ear isolates to AMB (2.41 vs. 0.48 mg/L, itraconazole (0.40 vs. 0.19 mg/L, posaconazole (0.16 vs. 0.08 mg/L, and voriconazole (0.76 vs. 0.31 mg/L (all, P <0.05. Microsatellite genotyping separated the 31 isolates into 27 types, but the dendrogram demonstrated a closer genotypic relatedness among isolates from the same body site (ear or respiratory tract; in particular, the majority of ear isolates clustered together. Individual isolates varied markedly in their ability to kill infected G. mellonella after 72 h, but virulence did not show significant differences according to source (ear or respiratory tract, genotype, or antifungal susceptibility. The current study shows the marked diversity of clinical isolates of A. terreus in terms of antifungal susceptibilities, genotypes and virulence in the G. mellonella model, and ear isolates from Korean hospitals may have lower AMB or triazole MICs than respiratory isolates.

  16. Enhanced alkaline cellulases production by the thermohalophilic Aspergillus terreus AUMC 10138 mutated by physical and chemical mutagens using corn stover as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, George Saad; Abu-Tahon, Medhat Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A thermohalophilic fungus, Aspergillus terreus AUMC 10138, isolated from the Wadi El-Natrun soda lakes in northern Egypt was exposed successively to gamma and UV-radiation (physical mutagens) and ethyl methan-sulfonate (EMS; chemical mutagen) to enhance alkaline cellulase production under solid state fermentation (SSF) conditions. The effects of different carbon sources, initial moisture, incubation temperature, initial pH, incubation period, inoculum levels and different concentrations of NaCl on production of alkaline filter paper activity (FPase), carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) and β-glucosidase by the wild-type and mutant strains of A. terreus were evaluated under SSF. The optimum conditions for maximum production of FPase, CMCase and β-glucosidase were found to be the corn stover: moisture ratio of 1:3(w/v), temperature 45 °C, pH range, 9.0-11.0, and fermentation for 4, 4 and 7 day, respectively. Inoculum levels of 30% for β-glucosidase and 40% for FPase, CMCase gave the higher cellulase production by the wild-type and mutant strains, respectively. Higher production of all three enzymes was obtained at a 5% NaCl. Under the optimized conditions, the mutant strain A. terreus M-17 produced FPase (729 U/g), CMCase (1,783 U/g), and β-glucosidase (342 U/g), which is, 1.85, 1.97 and 2.31-fold higher than the wild-type strain. Our results confirmed that mutant strain M-17 could be a promising alkaline cellulase enzyme producer employing lignocellulosics especially corn stover.

  17. Enhanced alkaline cellulases production by the thermohalophilic Aspergillus terreus AUMC 10138 mutated by physical and chemical mutagens using corn stover as substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Saad Isaac

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A thermohalophilic fungus, Aspergillus terreus AUMC 10138, isolated from the Wadi El-Natrun soda lakes in northern Egypt was exposed successively to gamma and UV-radiation (physical mutagens and ethyl methan-sulfonate (EMS; chemical mutagen to enhance alkaline cellulase production under solid state fermentation (SSF conditions. The effects of different carbon sources, initial moisture, incubation temperature, initial pH, incubation period, inoculum levels and different concentrations of NaCl on production of alkaline filter paper activity (FPase, carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase and β-glucosidase by the wild-type and mutant strains of A. terreus were evaluated under SSF. The optimum conditions for maximum production of FPase, CMCase and β-glucosidase were found to be the corn stover: moisture ratio of 1:3(w/v, temperature 45 °C, pH range, 9.0–11.0, and fermentation for 4, 4 and 7 day, respectively. Inoculum levels of 30% for β-glucosidase and 40% for FPase, CMCase gave the higher cellulase production by the wild-type and mutant strains, respectively. Higher production of all three enzymes was obtained at a 5% NaCl. Under the optimized conditions, the mutant strain A. terreus M-17 produced FPase (729 U/g, CMCase (1,783 U/g, and β-glucosidase (342 U/g, which is, 1.85, 1.97 and 2.31-fold higher than the wild-type strain. Our results confirmed that mutant strain M-17 could be a promising alkaline cellulase enzyme producer employing lignocellulosics especially corn stover.

  18. Application of an Efficient Gene Targeting System Linking Secondary Metabolites to their Biosynthetic Genes in Aspergillus terreus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Knox, Benjamin P.; Sanchez, James F.; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2013-07-19

    Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) are natural products biosynthesized by NRP synthetases. A kusA-, pyrG- mutant strain of Aspergillusterreus NIH 2624 was developed that greatly facilitated the gene targeting efficiency in this organism. Application of this tool allowed us to link four major types of NRP related secondary metabolites to their responsible genes in A. terreus. In addition, an NRP related melanin synthetase was also identified in this species.

  19. Optimization of temperature, moisture content and inoculum size in solid state fermentation to enhance mannanase production by Aspergillus terreus SUK-1 using RSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Jahwarhar Izuan Abdul; Samat, Noraini; Mohtar, Wan; Yusoff, Wan

    2011-05-01

    Optimization of three parameters, temperature (25-35 degrees C), moisture content (40% (w/v)-60% (w/v) and inoculum sizes (5% (w/v)-15% (w/v) were investigated and optimized by Response Surface Methodology (RSM) for optimal mannanase production by Aspergillus terreus SUK-1. A second order polynomial equation was fitted and the optimum condition was established. The result showed that the moisture content was a critical factor in terms of its effect on mannanase. The optimum condition for mannanase production was predicted at 42.86% (w/v) initial moisture (31 C) temperature and 5.5% (w/v) inoculum size. The predicted optimal parameter were tested in the laboratory and the mannanase activity 45.12 IU mL-1 were recorded to be closed to the predicted value (44.80 IU mL-1). Under the optimized SSF condition (31 degrees C, 42.86% moisture content (w/v) and 5.5% inoculum size (w/v)), the maximum mannanase production was to prevail about 45.12 IU mL-1 compare to before optimized (30 degrees C, 50% moisture content (w/v) and 10% inoculum size (w/v)) was only 34.42 IU mL-1.

  20. X-ray Crystal Structure of Aristolochene Synthase from Aspergillus terreus and Evolution of Templates for the Cyclization of Farnesyl Diphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishova,E.; Di Costanzo, L.; Cane, D.; Christianson, D.

    2007-01-01

    Aristolochene synthase from Aspergillus terreus catalyzes the cyclization of the universal sesquiterpene precursor, farnesyl diphosphate, to form the bicyclic hydrocarbon aristolochene. The 2.2 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of aristolochene synthase reveals a tetrameric quaternary structure in which each subunit adopts the {alpha}-helical class I terpene synthase fold with the active site in the 'open', solvent-exposed conformation. Intriguingly, the 2.15 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the complex with Mg{sup 2+}{sub 3}-pyrophosphate reveals ligand binding only to tetramer subunit D, which is stabilized in the 'closed' conformation required for catalysis. Tetramer assembly may hinder conformational changes required for the transition from the inactive open conformation to the active closed conformation, thereby accounting for the attenuation of catalytic activity with an increase in enzyme concentration. In both conformations, but especially in the closed conformation, the active site contour is highly complementary in shape to that of aristolochene, and a catalytic function is proposed for the pyrophosphate anion based on its orientation with regard to the presumed binding mode of aristolochene. A similar active site contour is conserved in aristolochene synthase from Penicillium roqueforti despite the substantial divergent evolution of these two enzymes, while strikingly different active site contours are found in the sesquiterpene cyclases 5-epi-aristolochene synthase and trichodiene synthase. Thus, the terpenoid cyclase active site plays a critical role as a template in binding the flexible polyisoprenoid substrate in the proper conformation for catalysis. Across the greater family of terpenoid cyclases, this template is highly evolvable within a conserved {alpha}-helical fold for the synthesis of terpene natural products of diverse structure and stereochemistry.

  1. New species in Aspergillus section Terrei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, R. A.; Peterson, S. W.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2011-01-01

    Section Terrei of Aspergillus was studied using a polyphasic approach including sequence analysis of parts of the beta-tubulin and calmodulin genes and the ITS region, macro- and micromorphological analyses and examination of extrolite profiles to describe three new species in this section. Based...... on phylogenetic analysis of calmodulin and beta-tubulin sequences seven lineages were observed among isolates that have previously been treated as A. terreus and its subspecies by Raper & Fennell (1965) and others. Aspergillus alabamensis, A. terreus var. floccosus, A. terreus var. africanus, A. terreus var....... floccosus, A. terreus var. africanus, A. terreus var. aureus, while Aspergillus hortai is recognised at species level. Aspergillus terreus NRRL 4017 is described as the new species A. pseudoterreus. Also included in section Terrei are some species formerly placed in sections Flavipedes and Versicolores. A...

  2. Production of α-amylase from some thermophilic Aspergillus species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Subsequently, the α-amylase activity of the microorganism was researched. In the measurements made on the 7th day of production on respectively Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus terreus cultures produced at mycological, ...

  3. 'A' by Aspergillus terreus through mutation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... been recommended as a mutagen of first choice. The ratio of mutation to lethality is usually high and is a relatively safe mutagen. The intrastrand cyclobutan pyri- midine dimer is the predominant DNA lesion reported to be produced by UV radiation. EMS is an alkylating agent and is known to produce ...

  4. 'A' by Aspergillus terreus through mutation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highest drug yielding isolate FCBP-58 was subjected to both physical and chemical mutation to increase the biosynthetic capabilities of Cyclosporin 'A'. In this study, mutation was carried out by ultraviolet radiation (254 nm) and alkylating agent ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS). UV 5 min time treatment was proved to be ...

  5. Revision of Aspergillus section Flavipedes: seven new species and proposal of section Jani sect. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubka, Vit; Nováková, Alena; Kolařík, Miroslav; Jurjević, Željko; Peterson, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus section Flavipedes contains species found worldwide in soils and rhizospheres, indoor and cave environments, as endophytes, food contaminants and occasionally as human pathogens. They produce many extensively studied bioactive secondary metabolites and biotechnologically relevant enzymes. The taxa were revised based on phylogenetic analysis of sequences from four loci (β-tubulin, calmodulin, RPB2, ITS rDNA), two PCR fingerprinting methods, micro- and macromorphology and physiology. Section Flavipedes includes three known and seven new species: A. ardalensis, A. frequens, A. luppii, A. mangaliensis, A. movilensis, A. polyporicola and A. spelaeus. The name A. neoflavipes was proposed for Fennellia flavipes a distinct species from its supposed asexual state A. flavipes. Aspergillus iizukae, A. frequens and A. mangaliensis are the most common and widely distributed species, whereas A. flavipes s. str. is rare. A dichotomous key based on the combination of morphology and physiology is provided for all recognized species. Aspergillus section Jani is established to contain A. janus and A. brevijanus, species previously classified as members of sect. Versicolores, Terrei or Flavipedes. This new section is strongly supported by phylogenetic data and morphology. Section Jani species produce three types of conidiophores and conidia, and colonies have green and white sectors making them distinctive. Accessory conidia found in pathogenic A. terreus were found in all members of sects. Flavipedes and Jani. Our data indicated that A. frequens is a clinically relevant and produces accessory conidia during infection. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  6. A colorimetric and spectrophotometric method for in vitro susceptibility testing of Aspergillus species against caspofungin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorsthorst, D.T.A. te; Zwaaftink, R.B.; Rijs, A.J.M.M.; Meletiadis, J.; Verweij, P.E.

    2007-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of 45 Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus isolates against caspofungin (CAS) was assessed by the CLSI reference method with spectrophotometric reading and by a colorimetric method that employed the dye MTT. Perfect agreement was found between

  7. Reduced by-product formation and modified oxygen availability improve itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, A.; Pfelzer, N.; Zuijderwijk, R.; Brickwedde, A.; Zeijl, C. van; Punt, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus niger has an extraordinary potential to produce organic acids as proven by its application in industrial citric acid production. Previously, it was shown that expression of the cis-aconitate decarboxylase gene (cadA) from Aspergillus terreus converted A. niger into an itaconic acid

  8. Enhanced itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger using genetic modification and medium optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, A.; Pfelzer, N.; Zuijderwijk, R.; Punt, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aspergillus niger was selected as a host for producing itaconic acid due to its versatile and tolerant character in various growth environments, and its extremely high capacity of accumulating the precursor of itaconic acid: citric acid. Expressing the CAD gene from Aspergillus terreus

  9. Aspergillus arachnoiditis post intrathecal baclofen pump insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek, V; Kavar, B; Hogg, M; Eisen, D P; Butzkueven, H

    2013-08-01

    This report describes an unusual fungal infection of an intrathecal baclofen pump which, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. We describe a 39-year-old man with severe lower limb spasticity due to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis that was managed with insertion of an intrathecal baclofen pump. He subsequently presented with distinct neurological decline secondary to an intrathecal baclofen pump infection with Aspergillus terreus. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A clone-based transcriptomics approach for the identification of genes relevant for itaconic acid production in Aspergillus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, A.; Luijk, N. van; Beek, M. ter; Caspers, M.; Punt, P.; Werf, M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Several Aspergillus species are well-known for the production of a variety of organic acids. In this study, a cloned based transcriptomics approach was used to identify genes crucial in the biosynthesis pathway for one of these acids, itaconic acid. From a number of different Aspergillus terreus

  11. Detection of Aspergillus in lung and other tissue samples using the MycAssay Aspergillus real-time PCR kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass-Flörl, C; Follett, S A; Moody, A; Denning, D W

    2011-09-01

    The MycAssay™ Aspergillus real-time PCR kit was tested on tissues from patients with invasive fungal infections. Tissue samples from nine organ transplant recipients and 33 patients with haematological malignancy were from lung (n = 30), skin (n = 4), and others. Samples were preprocessed with proteinase K and lyticase, followed by DNA extraction and real-time PCR. For all samples, the sensitivity of the MycAssay Aspergillus test was 82% and specificity 79% relative to microscopy and 90% and 64%, respectively, compared with Aspergillus culture. The positive predictive value and negative predictive values compared with culture were 69% and 88% and were 88% and 69% compared with microscopy, respectively. The MycAssay Aspergillus test detected tissue invasive infections with Aspergillus fumigatus , Aspergillus flavus , and Aspergillus terreus.

  12. Enhanced itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger using genetic modification and medium optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Li An; Pfelzer Nina; Zuijderwijk Robbert; Punt Peter

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Aspergillus niger was selected as a host for producing itaconic acid due to its versatile and tolerant character in various growth environments, and its extremely high capacity of accumulating the precursor of itaconic acid: citric acid. Expressing the CAD gene from Aspergillus terreus opened the metabolic pathway towards itaconic acid in A. niger. In order to increase the production level, we continued by modifying its genome and optimizing cultivation media. Results Base...

  13. Aspergillus triggers phenazine production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    Aspergillus species. Methods: A suspension of fungal spores was streaked onto WATM agar plates. After 24 hours incubation at 37 °C, a P. aeruginosa overnight culture was streaked out perpendicular to the fungal streak. The plates were incubated at 37 °C for five days, examined and plugs were extracted...... for HPLC-DAD and HPLC-DAD-MS analysis. Results: P. aeruginosa PAO1 suppressed growth of A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, A. terreus and Emericella nidulans. HPLC and HPLC-DAD-MS results showed an increase in phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide production by P. aeruginosa...

  14. Suppression of Aspergillus by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    culture plates. After 24 hours incubation at 37 °C, a P. aeruginosa overnight culture diluted to 108 CFU/ml was streaked out perpendicular to the fungal streak. The plates were incubated at 37 °C for 5 days, examined and plugs were extracted for HPLC and LC-DAD-MS analysis. Results: P. aeruginosa PAO1...... suppressed growth of A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, A. terreus and E. nidulans. HPLC and LC-DAD-MS results showed an increase in phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide production by P. aeruginosa in the contact area of Aspergillus. Different quinolones were also identified...

  15. Accessory Lobes, Accessory Fissures and Prominent Papillary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Often unreported hepatic variations include accessory fissures, lobes and processes. Variant hepatic fissures further show variations in location and depth. Accessory lobes of the liver have different size, shape, situation, connection with maternal organ. These abnormalities in the anatomy of human liver have the ...

  16. ASPERGILLUS NIGER ASPERGILLUS NIGER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Additives such as low molecular weight alcohols, trace metals, phytate, lipids etc have been reported to stimulate citric acid production. Hence the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of stimulating the metabolic activity of activity of Aspergillus niger for the purpose of improved citric acid production from ...

  17. Aspergillus: introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species in the genus Aspergillus possess versatile metabolic activities that impact our daily life both positively and negatively. Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus oryzae are closely related fungi. While the former is able to produce carcinogenic aflatoxins and is an etiological agent of aspergill...

  18. Small Engine & Accessory Test Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Small Engine and Accessories Test Area (SEATA) facilitates testaircraft starting and auxiliary power systems, small engines and accessories. The SEATA consists...

  19. Molecular Identification and Amphotericin B Susceptibility Testing of Clinical Isolates of Aspergillus From 11 Hospitals in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Min Seok; Choi, Min Ji; Park, Yeon-Joon; Lee, Hye Soo; Koo, Sun Hoe; Lee, Won Gil; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung-Geun; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated the species distribution and amphotericin B (AMB) susceptibility of Korean clinical Aspergillus isolates by using two Etests and the CLSI broth microdilution method. Methods A total of 136 Aspergillus isolates obtained from 11 university hospitals were identified by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and β-tubulin genomic regions. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of AMB were determined in Etests using Mueller-Hinton agar (Etest-MH) and RPMI agar (Etest-RPG), and categorical agreement with the CLSI method was assessed by using epidemiological cutoff values. Results ITS sequencing identified the following six Aspergillus species complexes: Aspergillus fumigatus (42.6% of the isolates), A. niger (23.5%), A. flavus (17.6%), A. terreus (11.0%), A. versicolor (4.4%), and A. ustus (0.7%). Cryptic species identifiable by β-tubulin sequencing accounted for 25.7% (35/136) of the isolates. Of all 136 isolates, 36 (26.5%) had AMB MICs of ≥2 µg/mL by the CLSI method. The categorical agreement of Etest-RPG with the CLSI method was 98% for the A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. versicolor complexes, 87% for the A. terreus complex, and 37.5% for the A. flavus complex. That of Etest-MH was ≤75% for the A. niger, A. flavus, A. terreus, and A. versicolor complexes but was higher for the A. fumigatus complex (98.3%). Conclusions Aspergillus species other than A. fumigatus constitute about 60% of clinical Aspergillus isolates, and reduced AMB susceptibility is common among clinical isolates of Aspergillus in Korea. Molecular identification and AMB susceptibility testing by Etest-RPG may be useful for characterizing Aspergillus isolates of clinical relevance. PMID:26354348

  20. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals Specific Novel Tetrapeptide and Potential Anti-Inflammatory Metabolites in Pathogenic Aspergillus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim-Chung Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Infections related to Aspergillus species have emerged to become an important focus in infectious diseases, as a result of the increasing use of immunosuppressive agents and high fatality associated with invasive aspergillosis. However, laboratory diagnosis of Aspergillus infections remains difficult. In this study, by comparing the metabolomic profiles of the culture supernatants of 30 strains of six pathogenic Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. terreus, A. nomius and A. tamarii and 31 strains of 10 non-Aspergillus fungi, eight compounds present in all strains of the six Aspergillus species but not in any strain of the non-Aspergillus fungi were observed. One of the eight compounds, Leu–Glu–Leu–Glu, is a novel tetrapeptide and represents the first linear tetrapeptide observed in Aspergillus species, which we propose to be named aspergitide. Two other closely related Aspergillus-specific compounds, hydroxy-(sulfooxybenzoic acid and (sulfooxybenzoic acid, may possess anti-inflammatory properties, as 2-(sulfooxybenzoic acid possesses a structure similar to those of aspirin [2-(acetoxybenzoic acid] and salicylic acid (2-hydroxybenzoic acid. Further studies to examine the potentials of these Aspergillus-specific compounds for laboratory diagnosis of aspergillosis are warranted and further experiments will reveal whether Leu–Glu–Leu–Glu, hydroxy-(sulfooxybenzoic acid and (sulfooxybenzoic acid are virulent factors of the pathogenic Aspergillus species.

  1. Aspergillus otitis in small animals--a retrospective study of 17 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, Elizabeth C; Outerbridge, Catherine A; White, Stephen D

    2016-02-01

    Aspergillus spp. are saprophytic opportunistic fungal organisms and are a common cause of otomycosis in humans. Although there have been case reports of Aspergillus otitis externa in dogs, to the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first retrospective case series describing Aspergillus otitis in dogs and cats. To characterize signalment, putative risk factors, treatments and outcomes of a case series of dogs and cats with Aspergillus otitis. Eight dogs and nine cats diagnosed with Aspergillus otitis. A retrospective review of medical records from 1989 to 2014 identified animals diagnosed with Aspergillus otitis based on culture. All dogs weighed greater than 23 kg. The most common putative risk factors identified in this study were concurrent diseases, therapy causing immunosuppression or a history of an otic foreign body. Aspergillus otitis was unilateral in all study dogs and most cats. Concurrent otitis media was confirmed in three dogs and one cat, and suspected in two additional cats. Aspergillus fumigatus was the most common isolate overall and was the dominant isolate in cats. Aspergillus niger and A. terreus were more commonly isolated from dogs. Animals received various topical and systemic antifungal medications; however, otic lavage under anaesthesia and/or surgical intervention increased the likelihood of resolution of the fungal infection. Aspergillus otitis is uncommon, typically seen as unilateral otitis externa in cats and larger breed dogs with possible risk factors that include immunosuppression and otic foreign bodies; previous antibiotic usage was common. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  2. A Comparison of Microsatellites in Phytopathogenic Aspergillus Species in Order to Develop Markers for the Assessment of Genetic Diversity among Its Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfooz, Sahil; Singh, Satyendra P; Mishra, Nishtha; Mishra, Aradhana

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of Microsatellites (SSRs) has been witnessed in most of the fungal genomes however its abundance varies across species. In the present study, we analyzed the frequency of SSRs in the whole genome and transcripts of two phyto-pathogenic (Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus) and compared them with two non-pathogenic (Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus oryzae) Aspergillus. Higher relative abundance and relative density of SSRs were observed in the whole genome and transcript sequences of the pathogenic Aspergillus when compared to the non-pathogenic. The relative abundance and density of SSRs were positively correlated with the G+C content of transcripts. Among the different classes of SSR, the percentage of tetra-nucleotide SSRs were maximum in A. niger (36.7%) and A. oryzae (35.9%) whereas A. nidulans and A. terreus preferred tri-nucleotide SSRs (38.2 and 42.1%) in whole genome sequences. In transcripts, tri-nucleotide SSRs were the most abundant whereas di-nucleotide SSRs were the least favored. Motif conservation study among the transcripts revealed conservation of only 27% motif within Aspergillus species. Furthermore, a similar relationship among the Ascomycetes was obtained on the basis of motif conservation and conserved genes (rDNA). To analyze the diversity present within the Indian isolates of Aspergillus, primers were successfully designed for 692 motifs in A. niger and A. terreus of which 20 were selected for diversity analysis. Among all the markers amplified, 10 markers (83.3%) were polymorphic, whereas remaining two markers (16.6%) were monomorphic. Ten polymorphic markers acquired in this investigation showed the utility of recently created SSR markers in the assessment of genetic diversity among various isolates of Aspergillus.

  3. Painful accessory navicular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, J.P.; Ogden, J.A.; Sella, E.; Barwick, K.W.

    1984-11-01

    The accessory navicular is usually considered a normal anatomic and roentgenographic variant. The term may refer to two distinct patterns. First, a sesamoid bone may be present within the posterior tibial tendon (Type 1); this is anatomically separate from the navicular. Second, an accessory ossification center may be medial to the navicular (Type 2). During postnatal development this is within a cartilaginous mass that is continuous with the cartilage of the navicular. At skeletal maturity the accessory center usually fuses with the navicular to form a curvilinear bone. The Type 2 pattern may be associated with a painful foot, particularly in the athletic adolescent, and should not be arbitrarily dismissed as a roentgenologic variant in the symptomatic patient. The clinical, radiologic, pathologic, and surgical findings in ten cases are reviewed. Roentgenographically the ossicle is triangular or heartshaped. sup(99m)Tc MDP imaging may be of value when the significance of the ossicle is uncertain. Even when the roentgenographic variant is bilateral, increased radionuclide activity occurs only on the symptomatic side. Histologic examination of surgically excised specimens reveals inflammatory chondro-osseous changes in the navicular-accessory navicular synchondrosis compatible with chronic trauma and stress fracture. Nonsurgical treatment with orthotics or cast immobilization produces variable results and resection of the accessory navicular may be the treatment of choice.

  4. Itaconic acid production using sago starch hydrolysate by Aspergillus terreus TN484-M1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiarti, Lies; Otsuka, Megumi; Miura, Shigenobu; Yaguchi, Masaaki; Okabe, Mitsuyasu

    2007-12-01

    Sago starch was hydrolyzed using either chemical agents, or enzymes at various pH and concentrations. Hydrolysis using 5000 AUN/ml (0.5%, w/v) glucoamylase exhibited the highest itaconic acid yield up to 0.36 g/g sago starch, whereas hydrolysis using nitric acid at pH 2.0 yielded 0.35 g/g sago starch. The medium was optimized and the composition was (g/l) 140 sago starch, 1.8 corn steep liquor, 1.2 MgSO(4).7H(2)O and 2.9 NH(4)NO(3). When the optimal conditions of hydrolysis and medium composition were applied to itaconic acid production in a 3-l jar fermentor, the itaconic acid production was 48.2 g/l with a yield of 0.34 g/g sago starch. This was filtered from the cultured broth and 37.1g of itaconic acid was recovered with a purity of 97.2%. This result showed that sago starch could be converted to a value-added product with only a simple pretreatment.

  5. Biotechnological production of itaconic acid and its biosynthesis in Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Mitsuyasu; Lies, Dwiarti; Kanamasa, Shin; Park, Enoch Y

    2009-09-01

    More than 80,000 tons of itaconic acid (IA) is produced worldwide each year and is sold at a price of around US$ 2/kg. The IA production yield from sugar is higher than 80 g/l. The widespread use of IA in synthetic resins, synthetic fibers, plastics, rubbers, surfactants, and oil additives has resulted in an increased demand for this product. However, at present, the IA production capacity exceeds the demand because this product has a restricted range of applications. Studies have been actively conducted in different biomedical fields--dental, ophthalmic, and drug delivery--to extend the range of applications of IA. Recently, many researchers have attempted to replace the carbon source used for microbial production of IA with cheaper alternative substrates. However, there is still a need for new biotechnology innovations that would help to reduce the production costs, such as innovative process development and strain improvement to allow the use of a low-quality carbon source. In this short review, we discuss the following aspects of IA production: strain improvement, process development, identification of the key enzyme cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (CAD) in the IA metabolic pathway, metabolic importance of CAD, and new applications of IA.

  6. In Vitro Activity of a Novel Broad-Spectrum Antifungal, E1210, Tested against Aspergillus spp. Determined by CLSI and EUCAST Broth Microdilution Methods ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A.; Duncanson, Frederick; Messer, Shawn A.; Moet, Gary J.; Jones, Ronald N.; Castanheira, Mariana

    2011-01-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class broad-spectrum antifungal that suppresses hyphal growth by inhibiting fungal glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. In the present study, we extend these findings by examining the activity of E1210 and comparator antifungal agents against Aspergillus spp. by using the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) to test wild-type (WT) as well as amphotericin B (AMB)-resistant (-R) and azole-R strains (as determined by CLSI methods). Seventy-eight clinical isolates of Aspergillus were tested including 20 isolates of Aspergillus flavus species complex (SC), 22 of A. fumigatus SC, 13 of A. niger SC, and 23 of A. terreus SC. The collection included 15 AMB-R (MIC, ≥2 μg/ml) isolates of A. terreus SC and 10 itraconazole-R (MIC, ≥4 μg/ml) isolates of A. fumigatus SC (7 isolates), A. niger SC (2 isolates), and A. terreus SC (1 isolate). Comparator antifungal agents included anidulafungin, caspofungin, amphotericin B, itraconazole, posaconzole, and voriconazole. Both CLSI and EUCAST methods were highly concordant for E1210 and all comparators. The essential agreement (EA; ±2 log2 dilution steps) was 100% for all comparisons with the exception of posaconazole versus A. terreus SC (EA = 91.3%). The minimum effective concentration (MEC)/MIC90 values (μg/ml) for E1210, anidulafungin, caspofungin, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole, respectively, were as follows for each species: for A. flavus SC, 0.03, ≤0.008, 0.12, 1, 1, and 1; for A. fumigatus SC, 0.06, 0.015, 0.12, >8, 1, and 4; for A. niger SC, 0.015, 0.03, 0.12, 4, 1, and 2; and for A. terreus SC, 0.06, 0.015, 0.12, 1, 0.5, and 1. E1210 was very active against AMB-R strains of A. terreus SC (MEC range, 0.015 to 0.06 μg/ml) and itraconazole-R strains of A. fumigatus SC (MEC range, 0.03 to 0.12 μg/ml), A. niger SC (MEC, 0.008 μg/ml), and A. terreus SC (MEC, 0.015

  7. In vitro activity of a novel broad-spectrum antifungal, E1210, tested against Aspergillus spp. determined by CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Duncanson, Frederick; Messer, Shawn A; Moet, Gary J; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2011-11-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class broad-spectrum antifungal that suppresses hyphal growth by inhibiting fungal glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. In the present study, we extend these findings by examining the activity of E1210 and comparator antifungal agents against Aspergillus spp. by using the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) to test wild-type (WT) as well as amphotericin B (AMB)-resistant (-R) and azole-R strains (as determined by CLSI methods). Seventy-eight clinical isolates of Aspergillus were tested including 20 isolates of Aspergillus flavus species complex (SC), 22 of A. fumigatus SC, 13 of A. niger SC, and 23 of A. terreus SC. The collection included 15 AMB-R (MIC, ≥ 2 μg/ml) isolates of A. terreus SC and 10 itraconazole-R (MIC, ≥ 4 μg/ml) isolates of A. fumigatus SC (7 isolates), A. niger SC (2 isolates), and A. terreus SC (1 isolate). Comparator antifungal agents included anidulafungin, caspofungin, amphotericin B, itraconazole, posaconzole, and voriconazole. Both CLSI and EUCAST methods were highly concordant for E1210 and all comparators. The essential agreement (EA; ± 2 log(2) dilution steps) was 100% for all comparisons with the exception of posaconazole versus A. terreus SC (EA = 91.3%). The minimum effective concentration (MEC)/MIC(90) values (μg/ml) for E1210, anidulafungin, caspofungin, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole, respectively, were as follows for each species: for A. flavus SC, 0.03, ≤ 0.008, 0.12, 1, 1, and 1; for A. fumigatus SC, 0.06, 0.015, 0.12, >8, 1, and 4; for A. niger SC, 0.015, 0.03, 0.12, 4, 1, and 2; and for A. terreus SC, 0.06, 0.015, 0.12, 1, 0.5, and 1. E1210 was very active against AMB-R strains of A. terreus SC (MEC range, 0.015 to 0.06 μg/ml) and itraconazole-R strains of A. fumigatus SC (MEC range, 0.03 to 0.12 μg/ml), A. niger SC (MEC, 0.008 μg/ml), and A. terreus SC (MEC, 0.015

  8. Aspergillus species isolated from mangrove forests in Borneo Island, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S.S. Seelan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A study on the occurrence of Aspergillus spp. on selected mangrove forests in Sarawak was conducted to find out their diversity and distribution. Samples were obtained from mangrove soils and leaf litters at different locations, i.e. Sematan, Lundu, Kampung Bako, Bako in Sarawak. Soil and leaf litter samples were taken randomly at different locations with five replicates from each area. A total of 138 isolates of Aspergillus species were obtained from the soil and leaf litter samples by using direct plating and Warcup method. Based on both macroscopic and microscopic observations, using an identification key, individual isolates were classified within the genus Aspergillus, belonging to three subgenera, four sections and five species. The fungi isolates were identified as A. terreus, A. flavipes, A. carneus, A. fumigatus and A. clavatus. The most frequent isolated species was A. flavipes (63.04%, followed by A. fumigatus (16.7%, A. terreus (13.04%, A. carneus (5.8% and A. clavatus (1.44%. All of the isolated Aspergillus species grew well on MEA and CYA at 25°C. A. carneus produced reddish sclerotia on MEA after seven days and this could be used as an important characteristic in this species identification. A. clavatus from mangrove soil in Kampung Bako has shown long conidiophores (ranging from 3-5 cm with swollen hyphal structures, while A. clavatus from Sematan area has shorter conidiophores (ranging from 2.5-3.5 cm on MEA.

  9. Molecular Genetic Characterization of a Cluster in A. terreus for Biosynthesis of the Meroterpenoid Terretonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Knox, Benjamin P.; Chiang, Yi Ming; Lo, Hsien-Chun; Sanchez, James F.; Lee, Kuan-Han; Oakley, Berl R.; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2012-11-01

    Meroterpenoids are natural products produced from polyketide and terpenoid precursors. A gene targeting system for A. terreus NIH2624 was developed, and a gene cluster for terretonin biosynthesis was characterized. The intermediates and shunt products were isolated from the mutant strains, and a pathway for terretonin biosynthesis is proposed. Analysis of two meroterpenoid pathways corresponding to terretonin in A. terreus and austinol in A. nidulans reveals that they are closely related evolutionarily.

  10. [Aspergillus species in hospital environments with pediatric patients in critical condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Mariana; Cattana, María; Rojas, Florencia; Sosa, María de Los Ángeles; Aguirre, Clarisa; Vergara, Marta; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus is a group of opportunistic fungi that cause infections, with high morbimortality in immunosuppressed patients. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most frequent species in these infections, although the incidence of other species has increased in the last few years. To evaluate the air fungal load and the diversity of Aspergillus species in hospitals with pediatric patients in critical condition. The Intensive Care Unit and Burns Unit of a pediatric hospital were sampled every 15 days during the autumn and spring seasons. The air samples were collected with SAS Super 100(®) and the surface samples were collected by swab method. The UFC/m(3) counts found exceeded the acceptable levels. The UFC/m(3) and the diversity of Aspergillus species found in the Intensive Care Unit were higher than those found in the Burns Unit. The fungal load and the diversity of species within the units were higher than those in control environments. The use of both methods -SAS and swab- allowed the detection of a higher diversity of species, with 96 strains of Aspergillus being isolated and 12 species identified. The outstanding findings were Aspergillus sydowii, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus parasiticus, due to their high frequency. Aspergillus fumigatus, considered unacceptable in indoor environments, was isolated in both units. Aspergillus was present with high frequency in these units. Several species are of interest in public health for being potential pathogenic agents. Air control and monitoring are essential in the prevention of these infections. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Accessory Proteins at ERES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkenberg, Rafael David

    proteins. Together these components co‐operate in cargo‐selection as well as forming, loading and releasing budding vesicles from specific regions on the membrane surface of the ER. Coat components furthermore convey vesicle targeting towards the Golgi. However, not much is known about the mechanisms...... that regulate the COPII assembly at the vesicle bud site. This thesis provides the first regulatory mechanism of COPII assembly in relation to ER‐membrane lipid‐signal recognition by the accessory protein p125A (Sec23IP). The aim of the project was to characterize p125A function by dissecting two main domains...... in the protein; a putative lipid‐associating domain termed the DDHD domain that is defined by the four amino acid motif that gives the domain its name; and a ubiquitously found domain termed Sterile α‐motif (SAM), which is mostly associated with oligomerization and polymerization. We first show, that the DDHD...

  12. Assessment of Ribosomal Large-Subunit D1-D2, Internal Transcribed Spacer 1, and Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 Regions as Targets for Molecular Identification of Medically Important Aspergillus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrikson, Hans P.; Hurst, Steven F.; Lott, Timothy J.; Warnock, David W.; Morrison, Christine J.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular approaches are now being developed to provide a more rapid and objective identification of fungi compared to traditional phenotypic methods. Ribosomal targets, especially the large-subunit RNA gene (D1-D2 region) and internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2 regions), have shown particular promise for the molecular identification of some fungi. We therefore conducted an assessment of these regions for the identification of 13 medically important Aspergillus species: Aspergillus candidus, Aspergillus (Eurotium) chevalieri, Aspergillus (Fennellia) flavipes, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus granulosus, Aspergillus (Emericella) nidulans, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus restrictus, Aspergillus sydowii, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus ustus, and Aspergillus versicolor. The length of ribosomal regions could not be reliably used to differentiate among all Aspergillus species examined. DNA alignment and pairwise nucleotide comparisons demonstrated 91.9 to 99.6% interspecies sequence identities in the D1-D2 region, 57.4 to 98.1% in the ITS1 region, and 75.6 to 98.3% in the ITS2 region. Comparative analysis using GenBank reference data showed that 10 of the 13 species examined exhibited a ≤1-nucleotide divergence in the D1-D2 region from closely related but different species. In contrast, only 5 of the species examined exhibited a ≤1-nucleotide divergence from sibling species in their ITS1 or ITS2 sequences. Although the GenBank database currently lacks ITS sequence entries for some species, and major improvement in the quality and accuracy of GenBank entries is needed, current identification of medically important Aspergillus species using GenBank reference data seems more reliable using ITS query sequences than D1-D2 sequences, especially for the identification of closely related species. PMID:15872227

  13. Notable fibrolytic enzyme production by Aspergillus spp. isolates from the gastrointestinal tract of beef cattle fed in lignified pastures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Oliveira Abrão

    Full Text Available Fungi have the ability to degrade vegetal cell wall carbohydrates, and their presence in the digestive tract of ruminants can minimize the effects of lignified forage on ruminal fermentation. Here, we evaluated enzyme production by Aspergillus spp. isolates from the digestive tracts of cattle grazed in tropical pastures during the dry season. Filamentous fungi were isolated from rumen and feces by culture in cellulose-based medium. Ninety fungal strains were isolated and identified by rDNA sequence analysis, microculture, or both. Aspergillus terreus was the most frequently isolated species, followed by Aspergillus fumigatus. The isolates were characterized with respect to their cellulolytic, xylanolytic, and lignolytic activity through qualitative evaluation in culture medium containing a specific corresponding carbon source. Carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase activity was quantified by the reducing sugar method. In the avicel and xilan degradation test, the enzyme activity (EA at 48 h was significantly higher other periods (P < 0.05. Intra- and inter-specific differences in EA were verified, and high levels of phenoloxidases, which are crucial for lignin degradation, were observed in 28.9% of the isolates. Aspergillus terreus showed significantly higher EA for avicelase (3.96 ±1.77 and xylanase (3.13 ±.091 than the other Aspergillus species at 48 h of incubation. Isolates AT13 and AF69 showed the highest CMCase specific activity (54.84 and 33.03 U mg-1 protein, respectively. Selected Aspergillus spp. isolates produced remarkable levels of enzymes involved in vegetal cell wall degradation, suggesting their potential as antimicrobial additives or probiotics in ruminant diets.

  14. Automobile accessories: Assessment and improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, M. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1995-11-01

    With mandates and regulatory policies to meet both the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), designing vehicles of the future will become a difficult task. As we look into the use of electric and hybrid vehicles, reduction of the required power demand by influential automobile components is necessary in order to obtain performance and range goals. Among those automobile components are accessories. Accessories have a profound impact on the range and mileage of future vehicles with limited amounts of energy or without power generating capabilities such as conventional vehicles. Careful assessment of major power consuming accessories helps us focus on those that need improvement and contributes to attainment of mileage and range goals for electric and hybrid vehicles.

  15. Determination of Isavuconazole Susceptibility of Aspergillus and Candida Species by the EUCAST Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Susan J.; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a novel expanded-spectrum triazole, which has recently been approved by the FDA as an orphan drug to treat invasive aspergillosis and is currently being studied in phase III clinical trials for invasive candidiasis. The susceptibility of relatively few clinical isolates has been reported. In this study, the isavuconazole susceptibilities of 1,237 Aspergillus and 2,010 Candida geographically diverse clinical isolates were determined by EUCAST methodology at four European mycology laboratories, producing the largest multicenter data set thus far for this compound. In addition, a blinded collection of 30 cyp51A mutant Aspergillus fumigatus clinical isolates and 10 wild-type isolates was tested. From these two data sets, the following preliminary epidemiological cutoff (ECOFF) values were suggested: 2 mg/liter for Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, and Aspergillus flavus; 4 mg/liter for Aspergillus niger; 0.25 mg/liter for Aspergillus nidulans; and 0.03 mg/liter for Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis. Unfortunately, ECOFFs could not be determined for Candida glabrata or Candida krusei due to an unexplained interlaboratory MIC variation. For the blinded collection of A. fumigatus isolates, all MICs were ≤2 mg/liter for wild-type isolates. Differential isavuconazole MICs were observed for triazole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates with different cyp51A alterations: TR34/L98H mutants had elevated isavuconazole MICs, whereas isolates with G54 and M220 alterations had MICs in the wild-type range, suggesting that the efficacy of isavuconazole may not be affected by these alterations. This study will be an aid in interpreting isavuconazole MICs for clinical care and an important step in the future process of setting official clinical breakpoints. PMID:23959309

  16. 14 CFR 25.1167 - Accessory gearboxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accessory gearboxes. 25.1167 Section 25... Accessory gearboxes. For airplanes equipped with an accessory gearbox that is not certificated as part of an engine— (a) The engine with gearbox and connecting transmissions and shafts attached must be subjected to...

  17. Molecular Detection and Species-Specific Identification of Medically Important Aspergillus Species by Real-Time PCR in Experimental Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Thomas J.; Wissel, Mark C.; Grantham, Kevin J.; Petraitiene, Ruta; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Kasai, Miki; Francesconi, Andrea; Cotton, Margaret P.; Hughes, Johanna E.; Greene, Lora; Bacher, John D.; Manna, Pradip; Salomoni, Martin; Kleiboeker, Steven B.; Reddy, Sushruth K.

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) remains a major challenge to clinical microbiology laboratories. We developed rapid and sensitive quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for genus- and species-specific identification of Aspergillus infections by use of TaqMan technology. In order to validate these assays and understand their potential diagnostic utility, we then performed a blinded study of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid specimens from well-characterized models of IPA with the four medically important species. A set of real-time qPCR primers and probes was developed by utilizing unique ITS1 regions for genus- and species-specific detection of the four most common medically important Aspergillus species (Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, and A. terreus). Pan-Aspergillus and species-specific qPCRs with BAL fluid were more sensitive than culture for detection of IPA caused by A. fumigatus in untreated (P PCR amplification from BAL fluid yielded similar sensitivities for untreated and treated animals. Pan-Aspergillus PCR was more sensitive than culture for detection of A. flavus in treated animals (P = 0.002). BAL fluid pan-Aspergillus and species-specific PCRs were comparable in sensitivity to BAL fluid galactomannan (GM) assay. The copy numbers from the qPCR assays correlated with quantitative cultures to determine the pulmonary residual fungal burdens in lung tissue. Pan-Aspergillus and species-specific qPCR assays may improve the rapid and accurate identification of IPA in immunocompromised patients. PMID:21976757

  18. Building iPhone OS Accessories

    CERN Document Server

    Maskrey, Ken

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a serious, in-depth look at Apple's External Accessory Framework and the iPhone Accessories API. You'll learn how to create new, integrated solutions that combine iPhone apps with dedicated hardware. The iPhone OS Accessories API expands the opportunities for innovative iPhone developers, allowing you to control and monitor external devices, whether you've built them yourself or obtained them from a third party. What you'll learn * Develop accessories and apps for the iPhone and iPod touch. * Use Apple's External Accessory Framework to create hardware/software interaction. *

  19. Metabolomics of Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Rank, Christian; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important species in Aspergillus causing infective lung diseases. This species has been reported to produce a large number of extrolites, including secondary metabolites, acids, and proteins such as hydrophobins and extracellular enzymes. At least 226 potentially...

  20. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction by Aspergillus terreus isolated from the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Stief, P.; Fuchs-Ocklenburg, S.; Kamp, A.; Manohar, C.S.; Houbraken, J.; Boekhout, T.; deBeer, D.; Stoeck, T.

    that An-4 produced and excreted ammonium through nitrate reduction at a rate of up to 175 nmol 15NH4+ g-1protein h-1. The products of dissimilatory nitrate reduction were ammonium (83%), nitrous oxide (15.5%), and nitrite (1...

  1. Environmental cues that induce the physiology of solid medium: a study on lovastatin production by Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, N; Tarragó-Castellanos, M R; Barrios-González, J

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the main environmental factors that induce the special physiology displayed by fungi growing in solid culture-that is, higher secondary metabolite (SM) production-compared with those in submerged culture. Lovastatin-specific production (SP) was used as an indicator of the physiological status, and different model culture systems were used to evaluate the impact of potential solid-state fermentation (SSF) environmental stimuli. Direct contact with air was identified as an important stimulus. Cultures with two or more hours of exposure to air showed typical SSF lovastatin SP (1462% higher than cultures exposed for 0·08 h). Intermediate times of exposure generated intermediate physiological states. Support-related stimuli also induced higher lovastatin SP, even in a liquid environment (679% increase). Direct contact with air, as well as support-related stimuli, are major environmental cues that induce the physiology of solid medium. This knowledge is the starting point to investigate how these environmental cues are sensed and transduced, impacting SM and enzyme production. These results have important applied potential in new strategies to generate overproducing strains, as well as application in the design of novel production systems. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction by Aspergillus terreus isolated from the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stief, Peter; Fuchs-Ocklenburg, Silvia; Kamp, Anja; Manohar, Cathrine-Sumathi; Houbraken, Jos; Boekhout, Teun; de Beer, Dirk; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A wealth of microbial eukaryotes is adapted to life in oxygen-deficient marine environments. Evidence is accumulating that some of these eukaryotes survive anoxia by employing dissimilatory nitrate reduction, a strategy that otherwise is widespread in prokaryotes. Here, we report on the

  3. Accessory nerve palsy following thoracotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, S; Roberson, J R; Rooks, M D

    1989-01-01

    A previously unreported cause of 11th cranial nerve palsy is described in a 53-year-old man. Dysfunction of the trapezius branch of the spinal accessory nerve occurred following median sternotomy and was documented by electromyography. This injury resulted in dysfunction of the trapezius muscle with loss of support of the shoulder girdle and pain. The injury may have been due to stretching from sternal retraction or injury secondary to internal jugular venous cannulation.

  4. In vitro activity of a new oral glucan synthase inhibitor (MK-3118) tested against Aspergillus spp. by CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Motyl, Mary R; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-02-01

    MK-3118, a glucan synthase inhibitor derived from enfumafungin, and comparator agents were tested against 71 Aspergillus spp., including itraconazole-resistant strains (MIC, ≥ 4 μg/ml), using CLSI and EUCAST reference broth microdilution methods. The CLSI 90% minimum effective concentration (MEC(90))/MIC(90) values (μg/ml) for MK-3118, amphotericin B, and caspofungin, respectively, were as follows: 0.12, 2, and 0.03 for Aspergillus flavus species complex (SC); 0.25, 2, and 0.06 for Aspergillus fumigatus SC; 0.12, 2, and 0.06 for Aspergillus terreus SC; and 0.06, 1, and 0.03 for Aspergillus niger SC. Essential agreement between the values found by CLSI and EUCAST (± 2 log(2) dilution steps) was 94.3%. MK-3118 was determined to be a potent agent regardless of the in vitro method applied, with excellent activity against contemporary wild-type and itraconazole-resistant strains of Aspergillus spp.

  5. Studies of the Production of Fungal Polyketides in Aspergillus nidulans by Using Systems Biology Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Grotkjær, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    that overexpression of xpkA does not directly improve 6-MSA production on glucose, but it is possible, if the metabolic flux through the lower part of glycolysis is reduced, to obtain quite high yields for conversion of sugar to 6-MSA. Systems biology tools were employed for in-depth analysis of the metabolic...... processes. Transcriptome analysis of 6-MSA-producing strains grown on glucose and xylose in the presence and absence of xpkA overexpression, combined with flux and physiology data, enabled us to propose an xpkA-msaS interaction model describing the competition between biomass formation and 6-MSA production......Many filamentous fungi produce polyketide molecules with great significance as human pharmaceuticals; these molecules include the cholesterol-lowering compound lovastatin, which was originally isolated from Aspergillus terreus. The chemical diversity and potential uses of these compounds...

  6. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis of voriconazole against Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. in children, adolescents and adults by Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gaoqi; Zhu, Liqin; Ge, Tingyue; Liao, Shasha; Li, Na; Qi, Fang

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cumulative fraction of response of various voriconazole dosing regimens against six Candida and six Aspergillus spp. in immunocompromised children, immunocompromised adolescents, and adults. Using pharmacokinetic parameters and pharmacodynamic data, 5000-subject Monte Carlo simulations (MCSs) were conducted to evaluate the ability of simulated dosing strategies in terms of fAUC/MIC targets of voriconazole. According to the results of the MCSs, current voriconazole dosage regimens were all effective for children, adolescents and adults against Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Candida orthopsilosis. For adults, dosing regimens of 4 mg/kg intravenous every 12 h (q12h) and 300 mg orally q12h were sufficient to treat fungal infections by six Candida spp. (C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei and C. orthopsilosis) and five Aspergillus spp. (Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans). However, high doses should be recommended for children and adolescents in order to achieve better clinical efficacy against A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. The current voriconazole dosage regimens were all ineffective against A. niger for children and adolescents. All voriconazole dosage regimens were not optimal against Aspergillus versicolor. This is the first study to evaluate clinical therapy of various voriconazole dosing regimens against Candida and Aspergillus spp. infections in children, adolescents and adults using MCS. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic-based dosing strategy provided a theoretical rationale for identifying optimal voriconazole dosage regimens in children, adolescents and adults in order to maximise clinical response and minimise the probability of exposure-related toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  7. In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Voriconazole Activity against Aspergillus Species in a New In Vitro Dynamic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saigh, R.; Elefanti, A.; Velegraki, A.; Zerva, L.

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacodynamics (PD) of voriconazole activity against Aspergillus spp. were studied using a new in vitro dynamic model simulating voriconazole human pharmacokinetics (PK), and the PK-PD data were bridged with human drug exposure to assess the percent target (near-maximum activity) attainment of different voriconazole dosages. Three Aspergillus clinical isolates (1 A. fumigatus, 1 A. flavus, and 1 A. terreus isolate) with CLSI MICs of 0.5 mg/liter were tested in an in vitro model simulating voriconazole PK in human plasma with Cmax values of 7, 3.5, and 1.75 mg/liter and a t1/2 of 6 h. The area under the galactomannan index-time curve (AUCGI) was used as the PD parameter. In vitro PK-PD data were bridged with population human PK of voriconazole exposure, and the percent target attainment was calculated. The in vitro PK-PD relationship of fAUC0-24-AUCGI followed a sigmoid pattern (global R2 = 0.97), with near-maximum activities (10% fungal growth) observed at an fAUC0-24 (95% confidence interval [CI]) of 18.9 (14.4 to 23.1) mg · h/liter against A. fumigatus, 26.6 (21.1 to 32.9) mg · h/liter against A. flavus, and 36.2 (27.8 to 45.7) mg · h/liter against A. terreus (F test; P voriconazole dosages was 24% (11 to 45%), 80% (32 to 97%), and 93% (86 to 97%) for A. fumigatus, 12% (5 to 26%), 63% (17 to 93%), and 86% (73 to 94%) for A. flavus, and 4% (2 to 11%), 36% (6 to 83%), and 68% (47 to 83%) for A. terreus. Based on the in vitro exposure-effect relationships, a standard dosage of voriconazole may be adequate for most patients with A. fumigatus but not A. flavus and A. terreus infections, for which a higher drug exposure may be required. This could be achieved using a higher voriconazole dosage, thus highlighting the usefulness of therapeutic drug monitoring in patients receiving a standard dosage. PMID:22869563

  8. Enhanced itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger using genetic modification and medium optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li An

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus niger was selected as a host for producing itaconic acid due to its versatile and tolerant character in various growth environments, and its extremely high capacity of accumulating the precursor of itaconic acid: citric acid. Expressing the CAD gene from Aspergillus terreus opened the metabolic pathway towards itaconic acid in A. niger. In order to increase the production level, we continued by modifying its genome and optimizing cultivation media. Results Based on the results of previous transcriptomics studies and research from other groups, two genes : gpdA encoding the glyceraldehyde −3-dehydrogenase (GPD and hbd1 encoding a flavohemoglobin domain (HBD were overexpressed in A. niger. Besides, new media were designed based on a reference medium for A. terreus. To analyze large numbers of cultures, we developed an approach for screening both fungal transformants and various media in 96-well micro-titer plates. The hbd1 transformants (HBD 2.2/2.5 did not improve itaconic acid titer while the gpdA transformant (GPD 4.3 decreased the itaconic acid production. Using 20 different media, copper was discovered to have a positive influence on itaconic acid production. Effects observed in the micro-titer plate screening were confirmed in controlled batch fermentation. Conclusions The performance of gpdA and hbd1 transformants was found not to be beneficial for itaconic acid production using the tested cultivation conditions. Medium optimization showed that, copper was positively correlated with improved itaconic acid production. Interestingly, the optimal conditions for itaconic acid clearly differ from conditions optimal for citric- and oxalic acid production.

  9. Enhanced itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger using genetic modification and medium optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An; Pfelzer, Nina; Zuijderwijk, Robbert; Punt, Peter

    2012-08-27

    Aspergillus niger was selected as a host for producing itaconic acid due to its versatile and tolerant character in various growth environments, and its extremely high capacity of accumulating the precursor of itaconic acid: citric acid. Expressing the CAD gene from Aspergillus terreus opened the metabolic pathway towards itaconic acid in A. niger. In order to increase the production level, we continued by modifying its genome and optimizing cultivation media. Based on the results of previous transcriptomics studies and research from other groups, two genes : gpdA encoding the glyceraldehyde -3-dehydrogenase (GPD) and hbd1 encoding a flavohemoglobin domain (HBD) were overexpressed in A. niger. Besides, new media were designed based on a reference medium for A. terreus. To analyze large numbers of cultures, we developed an approach for screening both fungal transformants and various media in 96-well micro-titer plates. The hbd1 transformants (HBD 2.2/2.5) did not improve itaconic acid titer while the gpdA transformant (GPD 4.3) decreased the itaconic acid production. Using 20 different media, copper was discovered to have a positive influence on itaconic acid production. Effects observed in the micro-titer plate screening were confirmed in controlled batch fermentation. The performance of gpdA and hbd1 transformants was found not to be beneficial for itaconic acid production using the tested cultivation conditions. Medium optimization showed that, copper was positively correlated with improved itaconic acid production. Interestingly, the optimal conditions for itaconic acid clearly differ from conditions optimal for citric- and oxalic acid production.

  10. Enhanced itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger using genetic modification and medium optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Aspergillus niger was selected as a host for producing itaconic acid due to its versatile and tolerant character in various growth environments, and its extremely high capacity of accumulating the precursor of itaconic acid: citric acid. Expressing the CAD gene from Aspergillus terreus opened the metabolic pathway towards itaconic acid in A. niger. In order to increase the production level, we continued by modifying its genome and optimizing cultivation media. Results Based on the results of previous transcriptomics studies and research from other groups, two genes : gpdA encoding the glyceraldehyde −3-dehydrogenase (GPD) and hbd1 encoding a flavohemoglobin domain (HBD) were overexpressed in A. niger. Besides, new media were designed based on a reference medium for A. terreus. To analyze large numbers of cultures, we developed an approach for screening both fungal transformants and various media in 96-well micro-titer plates. The hbd1 transformants (HBD 2.2/2.5) did not improve itaconic acid titer while the gpdA transformant (GPD 4.3) decreased the itaconic acid production. Using 20 different media, copper was discovered to have a positive influence on itaconic acid production. Effects observed in the micro-titer plate screening were confirmed in controlled batch fermentation. Conclusions The performance of gpdA and hbd1 transformants was found not to be beneficial for itaconic acid production using the tested cultivation conditions. Medium optimization showed that, copper was positively correlated with improved itaconic acid production. Interestingly, the optimal conditions for itaconic acid clearly differ from conditions optimal for citric- and oxalic acid production. PMID:22925689

  11. The accessory fallopian tube: A rare anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusum R Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a rare anatomical variation in the form of accessory fallopian tube on right side. The duplication of fallopian tube was observed in a 34-year-old female during routine undergraduate dissection in our department. Fallopian tube is the part of uterus that carries the ovum from the ovary to the uterus. Accessory fallopian tube is the congenital anomaly attached to the ampullary part of main tube. This accessory tube is common site of pyosalpinx, hydrosalpinx, cystic swelling and torsion. The ovum released by the ovary may also be captured by the blind accessory tube leading to infertility or ectopic pregnancy. Hence, all patients of infertility or pelvic inflammatory disease should be screened to rule out the presence of accessory fallopian tube and if encountered should be removed.

  12. A case report: accessory right renal artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patasi B

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical variations in the origin of the arteries in the abdominal area are very common. The arteries that show frequent variations include the celiac trunk, renal and gonadal arteries. During a routine dissection of a male cadaver, one main and one inferior accessory renal artery were found in the abdominal region. We discovered that the inferior accessory renal artery that originated from the right anterolateral aspect of abdominal aorta was running into the lower pole of the right kidney. The origin of the main right renal artery and the inferior accessory right renal artery were 19.8 mm and 53 mm below the superior mesenteric artery, respectively. The inferior accessory right renal artery ran directly into the inferior pole of the right kidney, in the area where the accessory right renal vein was leaving the right kidney. These anatomical variations and anomalies are important to know before any therapeutic or diagnostic procedures are performed in the abdominal area.

  13. Evaluation of the in vitro activity of isavuconazole and comparator voriconazole against 2635 contemporary clinical Candida and Aspergillus isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astvad, K. M.T.; Hare, R. K.; Arendrup, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The in vitro activity of isavuconazole was determined for 1677 Candida and 958 Aspergillus isolates from 2012 to 2014 with voriconazole as comparator. Methods Aspergillus isolates were screened for resistance using azole-agar. Aspergillus isolates that screened positive and all Candida.......03 (≤0.03–4), Candida krusei: 0.06 (≤0.03–0.5), Candida parapsilosis: ≤0.03 (≤0.03–0.06), Candida tropicalis: ≤0.03 (≤0.03 to >4), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (anamorph: Candida robusta): ≤0.03 (≤0.03–0.5). Non-wt isavuconazole/voriconazole MICs were found for C. albicans: 0.8/1.0%, C. dubliniensis: 0...... flavus: 1 (0.5–2), Aspergillus nidulans: ≤0.125 (≤0.125–0.25). Non-wt isavuconazole/voriconazole MICs were found for 13.7/15.2% A. fumigatus, 4.9/0% A. niger and 48.2/22.2% A. terreus. Conclusion Isavuconazole displayed broad in vitro activity, similar to that of voriconazole. Up to 15% of C. glabrata, C...

  14. The potential of Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungi isolated included Aspergillus candidus, A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. tamarii, Mucor rouxii, Penicillium notatum and Rhizopus sp. Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger were selected for heavy metals bioaccumulation studies on PDB-amended with lagoon water in ratios of 1:1, 1:3 and 1:5 respectively for 3 weeks.

  15. Melanisation of Aspergillus terreus—Is Butyrolactone I Involved in the Regulation of Both DOPA and DHN Types of Pigments in Submerged Culture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina K. Palonen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pigments and melanins of fungal spores have been investigated for decades, revealing important roles in the survival of the fungus in hostile environments. The key genes and the encoded enzymes for pigment and melanin biosynthesis have recently been found in Ascomycota, including Aspergillus spp. In Aspergillus terreus, the pigmentation has remained mysterious with only one class of melanin biogenesis being found. In this study, we examined an intriguing, partially annotated gene cluster of A. terreus strain NIH2624, utilizing previously sequenced transcriptome and improved gene expression data of strain MUCL 38669, under the influence of a suggested quorum sensing inducing metabolite, butyrolactone I. The core polyketide synthase (PKS gene of the cluster was predicted to be significantly longer on the basis of the obtained transcriptional data, and the surrounding cluster was positively regulated by butyrolactone I at the late growth phase of submerged culture, presumably during sporulation. Phylogenetic analysis of the extended PKS revealed remarkable similarity with a group of known pigments of Fusarium spp., indicating a similar function for this PKS. We present a hypothesis of this PKS cluster to biosynthesise a 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN-type of pigment during sporulation with the influence of butyrolactone I under submerged culture.

  16. Wild-type MIC distributions and epidemiological cutoff values for amphotericin B and Aspergillus spp. for the CLSI broth microdilution method (M38-A2 document).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Fothergill, A; Fuller, J; Ghannoum, M; Johnson, E; Pelaez, T; Pfaller, M A; Turnidge, J

    2011-11-01

    Although clinical breakpoints have not been established for mold testing, epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) are available for Aspergillus spp. versus the triazoles and caspofungin. Wild-type (WT) MIC distributions (organisms in a species-drug combination with no acquired resistance mechanisms) were defined in order to establish ECVs for six Aspergillus spp. and amphotericin B. Two sets (CLSI/EUCAST broth microdilution) of available MICs were evaluated: those for A. fumigatus (3,988/833), A. flavus (793/194), A. nidulans (184/69), A. niger (673/140), A. terreus (545/266), and A. versicolor (135/22). Three sets of data were analyzed: (i) CLSI data gathered in eight independent laboratories in Canada, Europe, and the United States; (ii) EUCAST data from a single laboratory; and (iii) the combined CLSI and EUCAST data. ECVs, expressed in μg/ml, that captured 95%, 97.5%, and 99% of the modeled wild-type population (CLSI and combined data) were as follows: for A. fumigatus, 2, 2, and 4; for A. flavus, 2, 4, and 4; for A. nidulans, 4, 4, and 4; for A. niger, 2, 2, and 2; for A. terreus, 4, 4, and 8; and for A. versicolor, 2, 2, and 2. Similar to the case for the triazoles and caspofungin, amphotericin B ECVs may aid in the detection of strains with acquired mechanisms of resistance to this agent.

  17. Wild-Type MIC Distributions and Epidemiological Cutoff Values for Amphotericin B and Aspergillus spp. for the CLSI Broth Microdilution Method (M38-A2 Document)▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinel-Ingroff, A.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Fothergill, A.; Fuller, J.; Ghannoum, M.; Johnson, E.; Pelaez, T.; Pfaller, M. A.; Turnidge, J.

    2011-01-01

    Although clinical breakpoints have not been established for mold testing, epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) are available for Aspergillus spp. versus the triazoles and caspofungin. Wild-type (WT) MIC distributions (organisms in a species-drug combination with no acquired resistance mechanisms) were defined in order to establish ECVs for six Aspergillus spp. and amphotericin B. Two sets (CLSI/EUCAST broth microdilution) of available MICs were evaluated: those for A. fumigatus (3,988/833), A. flavus (793/194), A. nidulans (184/69), A. niger (673/140), A. terreus (545/266), and A. versicolor (135/22). Three sets of data were analyzed: (i) CLSI data gathered in eight independent laboratories in Canada, Europe, and the United States; (ii) EUCAST data from a single laboratory; and (iii) the combined CLSI and EUCAST data. ECVs, expressed in μg/ml, that captured 95%, 97.5%, and 99% of the modeled wild-type population (CLSI and combined data) were as follows: for A. fumigatus, 2, 2, and 4; for A. flavus, 2, 4, and 4; for A. nidulans, 4, 4, and 4; for A. niger, 2, 2, and 2; for A. terreus, 4, 4, and 8; and for A. versicolor, 2, 2, and 2. Similar to the case for the triazoles and caspofungin, amphotericin B ECVs may aid in the detection of strains with acquired mechanisms of resistance to this agent. PMID:21876047

  18. A case of an accessory auricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunali S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available During the embryological development of the ear, certain malformations may occur. Accessory auricle is one of these developmental anomalies, which has a wide range from a small elevation of skin to a large size to resemble an additional auricle, where the latter called polyotia. Here, we present a case of an accessory auricle in a young female adult. The occurence was unilateral; the subject did not have any audiological disorder. We compared our findings with different cases of accessory auricle in the literature. The clinical importance and genetic association are also discussed.

  19. 19 CFR 10.456 - Accessories, spare parts or tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts or tools. 10.456 Section... Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.456 Accessories, spare parts or tools. Accessories, spare parts or tools that form part of the good's standard accessories, spare parts or tools and are delivered with the...

  20. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Parahisian Accessory Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korodi Szilamér

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency catheter ablation of parahisian accessory pathways in pre-excitation syndrome is a challenging task, due to the extremely high risk of complete atrioventricular block. In this brief report we describe the case of a 32 year-old man presenting a parahisian accessory pathway, who has been successfully treated by radiofrequency ablation. Radiofrequency catheter ablation using low-power radiofrequency current is considered to be the most appropiate method of ablation in adult patients.

  1. DNA Barcoding Coupled with High Resolution Melting Analysis Enables Rapid and Accurate Distinction of Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Gabor; Kocsube, Sandor; Leiter, Eva; Biro, Sandor; Paholcsek, Melinda

    2017-08-01

    We describe a high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis method that is rapid, reproducible, and able to identify reference strains and further 40 clinical isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus (14), A. lentulus (3), A. terreus (7), A. flavus (8), A. niger (2), A. welwitschiae (4), and A. tubingensis (2). Asp1 and Asp2 primer sets were designed to amplify partial sequences of the Aspergillus benA (beta-tubulin) genes in a closed-, single-tube system. Human placenta DNA, further Aspergillus (3), Candida (9), Fusarium (6), and Scedosporium (2) nucleic acids from type strains and clinical isolates were also included in this study to evaluate cross reactivity with other relevant pathogens causing invasive fungal infections. The barcoding capacity of this method proved to be 100% providing distinctive binomial scores; 14, 34, 36, 35, 25, 15, 26 when tested among species, while the within-species distinction capacity of the assay proved to be 0% based on the aligned thermodynamic profiles of the Asp1, Asp2 melting clusters allowing accurate species delimitation of all tested clinical isolates. The identification limit of this HRM assay was also estimated on Aspergillus reference gDNA panels where it proved to be 10-102 genomic equivalents (GE) except the A. fumigatus panel where it was 103 only. Furthermore, misidentification was not detected with human genomic DNA or with Candida, Fusarium, and Scedosporium strains. Our DNA barcoding assay introduced here provides results within a few hours, and it may possess further diagnostic utility when analyzing standard cultures supporting adequate therapeutic decisions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. New taxa in Aspergillus section Usti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, R. A.; Varga, J.; Meijer, M.

    2011-01-01

    Based on phylogenetic analysis of sequence data, Aspergillus section Usti includes 21 species, inducing two teleomorphic species Aspergillus heterothallicus (=Emericella heterothallica) and Fennellia monodii. Aspergillus germanicus sp. nov. was isolated from indoor air in Germany. This species ha...

  3. Rewiring a secondary metabolite pathway towards itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Abeer H; Li, An; Brickwedde, Anja; Wilms, Lars; Caspers, Martien; Overkamp, Karin; Punt, Peter J

    2016-07-28

    The industrially relevant filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is widely used in industry for its secretion capabilities of enzymes and organic acids. Biotechnologically produced organic acids promise to be an attractive alternative for the chemical industry to replace petrochemicals. Itaconic acid (IA) has been identified as one of the top twelve building block chemicals which have high potential to be produced by biotechnological means. The IA biosynthesis cluster (cadA, mttA and mfsA) has been elucidated in its natural producer Aspergillus terreus and transferred to A. niger to enable IA production. Here we report the rewiring of a secondary metabolite pathway towards further improved IA production through the overexpression of a putative cytosolic citrate synthase citB in a A. niger strain carrying the IA biosynthesis cluster. We have previously shown that expression of cadA from A. terreus results in itaconic acid production in A. niger AB1.13, albeit at low levels. This low-level production is boosted fivefold by the overexpression of mttA and mfsA in itaconic acid producing AB1.13 CAD background strains. Controlled batch cultivations with AB1.13 CAD + MFS + MTT strains showed increased production of itaconic acid compared with AB1.13 CAD strain. Moreover, preliminary RNA-Seq analysis of an itaconic acid producing AB1.13 CAD strain has led to the identification of the putative cytosolic citrate synthase citB which was induced in an IA producing strain. We have overexpressed citB in a AB1.13 CAD + MFS + MTT strain and by doing so hypothesize to have targeted itaconic acid production to the cytosolic compartment. By overexpressing citB in AB1.13 CAD + MFS + MTT strains in controlled batch cultivations we have achieved highly increased titers of up to 26.2 g/L IA with a productivity of 0.35 g/L/h while no CA was produced. Expression of the IA biosynthesis cluster in Aspergillus niger AB1.13 strain enables IA production. Moreover, in the AB1.13 CAD

  4. Discovery of McrA, a master regulator of Aspergillus secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, C Elizabeth; Ahuja, Manmeet; Sun, Wei-Wen; Entwistle, Ruth; Akashi, Tomohiro; Yaegashi, Junko; Guo, Chun-Jun; Cerqueira, Gustavo C; Russo Wortman, Jennifer; Wang, Clay C C; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Oakley, Berl R

    2017-01-01

    Fungal secondary metabolites (SMs) are extremely important in medicine and agriculture, but regulation of their biosynthesis is incompletely understood. We have developed a genetic screen in Aspergillus nidulans for negative regulators of fungal SM gene clusters and we have used this screen to isolate mutations that upregulate transcription of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene required for nidulanin A biosynthesis. Several of these mutations are allelic and we have identified the mutant gene by genome sequencing. The gene, which we designate mcrA, is conserved but uncharacterized, and it encodes a putative transcription factor. Metabolite profiles of mcrA deletant, mcrA overexpressing, and parental strains reveal that mcrA regulates at least ten SM gene clusters. Deletion of mcrA stimulates SM production even in strains carrying a deletion of the SM regulator laeA, and deletion of mcrA homologs in Aspergillus terreus and Penicillum canescens alters the secondary metabolite profile of these organisms. Deleting mcrA in a genetic dereplication strain has allowed us to discover two novel compounds as well as an antibiotic not known to be produced by A. nidulans. Deletion of mcrA upregulates transcription of hundreds of genes including many that are involved in secondary metabolism, while downregulating a smaller number of genes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Comparative studies on pectinases obtained from Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative studies on pectinases obtained from Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger in submerged fermentation system using pectin extracted from mango, orange and pineapple peels as carbon sources.

  6. A trispecies Aspergillus microarray: Comparative transcriptomics of three Aspergillus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2008-01-01

    The full-genome sequencing of the filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus oryzae has opened possibilities for studying the cellular physiology of these fungi on a systemic level. As a tool to explore this, we are making available an Affymetrix GeneChip developed...... data identified 23 genes to be a conserved response across Aspergillus sp., including the xylose transcriptional activator XlnR. A promoter analysis of the up-regulated genes in all three species indicates the conserved XInR-binding site to be 5'-GGNTAAA-3'. The composition of the conserved gene......-set suggests that xylose acts as a molecule, indicating the presence of complex carbohydrates such as hemicellulose, and triggers an array of degrading enzymes. With this case example, we present a validated tool for transcriptome analysis of three Aspergillus species and a methodology for conducting cross...

  7. Salivary duct carcinoma of accessory parotid

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Hashim, Mohammed A.; Al-Jazan, Nasser A.

    2017-01-01

    Accessory parotid gland (APG) is seen in around 21%?56% of individuals. Tumors of accessory parotid are uncommon with an incidence rate of 1%?8% of all parotid tumors. Ductal carcinoma of APG is rare, so no reported incidence was seen in the literature. However, salivary gland ductal carcinoma is reported to be 1% of all salivary gland neoplasms. We report here a case of salivary duct carcinoma of APG. Clinical presentation, investigation, and management are discussed. A 69-year-old female pr...

  8. Multicenter Study of Method-Dependent Epidemiological Cutoff Values for Detection of Resistance in Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. to Amphotericin B and Echinocandins for the Etest Agar Diffusion Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Arendrup, M; Cantón, E; Cordoba, S; Dannaoui, E; García-Rodríguez, J; Gonzalez, G M; Govender, N P; Martin-Mazuelos, E; Lackner, M; Lass-Flörl, C; Linares Sicilia, M J; Rodriguez-Iglesias, M A; Pelaez, T; Shields, R K; Garcia-Effron, G; Guinea, J; Sanguinetti, M; Turnidge, J

    2017-01-01

    Method-dependent Etest epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) are not available for susceptibility testing of either Candida or Aspergillus species with amphotericin B or echinocandins. In addition, reference caspofungin MICs for Candida spp. are unreliable. Candida and Aspergillus species wild-type (WT) Etest MIC distributions (microorganisms in a species-drug combination with no detectable phenotypic resistance) were established for 4,341 Candida albicans, 113 C. dubliniensis, 1,683 C. glabrata species complex (SC), 709 C. krusei, 767 C. parapsilosis SC, 796 C. tropicalis, 1,637 Aspergillus fumigatus SC, 238 A. flavus SC, 321 A. niger SC, and 247 A. terreus SC isolates. Etest MICs from 15 laboratories (in Argentina, Europe, Mexico, South Africa, and the United States) were pooled to establish Etest ECVs. Anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, and amphotericin B ECVs (in micrograms per milliliter) encompassing ≥97.5% of the statistically modeled population were 0.016, 0.5, 0.03, and 1 for C. albicans; 0.03, 1, 0.03, and 2 for C. glabrata SC; 0.06, 1, 0.25, and 4 for C. krusei; 8, 4, 2, and 2 for C. parapsilosis SC; and 0.03, 1, 0.12, and 2 for C. tropicalis The amphotericin B ECV was 0.25 μg/ml for C. dubliniensis and 2, 8, 2, and 16 μg/ml for the complexes of A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, and A. terreus, respectively. While anidulafungin Etest ECVs classified 92% of the Candida fks mutants evaluated as non-WT, the performance was lower for caspofungin (75%) and micafungin (84%) cutoffs. Finally, although anidulafungin (as an echinocandin surrogate susceptibility marker) and amphotericin B ECVs should identify Candida and Aspergillus isolates with reduced susceptibility to these agents using the Etest, these ECVs will not categorize a fungal isolate as susceptible or resistant, as breakpoints do. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872.6640... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6640 Dental operative unit and accessories. (a) Identification. A dental operative unit and accessories is an AC-powered device that is...

  10. 21 CFR 884.6120 - Assisted reproduction accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction accessories. 884.6120... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6120 Assisted reproduction accessories. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction accessories are a group of...

  11. 21 CFR 878.4700 - Surgical microscope and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgical microscope and accessories. 878.4700 Section 878.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... microscope and accessories. (a) Identification. A surgical microscope and accessories is an AC-powered device...

  12. 19 CFR 10.600 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.600 Section...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.600 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories, spare parts, or tools that are delivered with a good and that form part...

  13. 19 CFR 10.537 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.537 Section... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.537 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. Accessories, spare..., spare parts, or tools will be treated as originating goods if the good is an originating good, and will...

  14. 21 CFR 876.5820 - Hemodialysis system and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemodialysis system and accessories. 876.5820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5820 Hemodialysis system and accessories. (a) Identification. A hemodialysis system and accessories is a device that is...

  15. 21 CFR 876.5900 - Ostomy pouch and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ostomy pouch and accessories. 876.5900 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5900 Ostomy pouch and accessories. (a) Identification. An ostomy pouch and accessories is a device that consists of a bag that is...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4200 - Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment. (a) Identification. Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment is a device that has no contact with blood and that is used in the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit to support...

  17. 21 CFR 878.4160 - Surgical camera and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgical camera and accessories. 878.4160 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4160 Surgical camera and accessories. (a) Identification. A surgical camera and accessories is a device intended to be used...

  18. 21 CFR 872.4120 - Bone cutting instrument and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bone cutting instrument and accessories. 872.4120... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4120 Bone cutting instrument and accessories. (a) Identification. A bone cutting instrument and accessories is a metal device intended for use...

  19. 21 CFR 878.3925 - Plastic surgery kit and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plastic surgery kit and accessories. 878.3925... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3925 Plastic surgery kit and accessories. (a) Identification. A plastic surgery kit and accessories is a device intended to...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices intended...

  1. AN ACCESSORY FLEXOR OF THE FIFTH TOE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The presence of accessory muscles and other organs on the lower limbs of some individuals have variously been reperted in the literature. We report an unusual muscle located on the plantar surface of the left foot of a cadaver. which had not been previously described. This muscle originated from the tendon ...

  2. Biting palsy of the accessory nerve.

    OpenAIRE

    Paljärvi, L; Partanen, J.

    1980-01-01

    A young man was bitten by his girl friend at the anterior border of the left trapezius muscle. Weakness of the trapezius resulted and a longstanding ache in the shoulder developed. Clinically and neurophysiologically, an axonotmesis type crush injury of the accessory nerve was verified.

  3. 14 CFR 23.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... continued operation of the engine must be provided. (e) Each accessory driven by a gearbox that is not approved as part of the powerplant driving the gearbox must— (1) Have torque limiting means to prevent the... gearbox for mounting; and (3) Be sealed to prevent contamination of the gearbox oil system and the...

  4. The glossopharyngeal, vagus and spinal accessory nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Cheng Kang [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Health System, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (Singapore)], E-mail: ongck22@hotmail.com; Chong, Vincent Fook Hin [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Health System, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-05-15

    The glossopharyngeal, vagus and spinal accessory nerves are closely related anatomically, and to a certain extent, functionally. We present an overview of their anatomy, highlighting the important clinical and imaging implications. The main pathologic lesions arising from these nerves are also discussed and the imaging features reviewed.

  5. The potential of Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae essential oil in inhibiting the growth of some food-related Aspergillus species Potencial do óleo essencial de Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae em inibir o crescimento de algumas cepas de Aspergillus de interesse em alimentos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egberto Santos Carmo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae has been currently known for their interesting antimicrobial activity being regarded as alternative antimicrobial for use is food conservation systems. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of O. vulgare essential oil in inhibiting the growth of some food-related Aspergillus species (A. flavus, A. parasiticus, A. terreus, A. ochraceus, A. fumigatus and A. niger. The essential oil revealed a strong anti-Aspergillus property providing an inhibition of all assayed mould strains. MIC values were between 80 and 20 µL/mL being found a MIC50 of 40 µL/mL. The essential oil at concentration of 80 and 40 µL/mL provided a fungicidal effect on A. flavus, A. fumigatus and A. niger noted by a total inhibition of the radial mycelial growth along 14 days of interaction. In addition, the essential oil was able to inhibit the mould spores germination when assayed at concentrations of 80 and 40 µL/mL. Our results showed the interesting anti-Aspergillus activity of O. vulgare essential oil supporting their possible use as anti-mould compound in food conservation.Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae tem sido atualmente reconhecido por sua intensa atividade antimicrobiana sendo considerado como fonte de compostos antimicrobianos alternativos para uso em sistemas de conservação de alimentos. Este estudo objetivou avaliar a efetividade do óleo essencial de O. vulgare em inibir o crescimento de algumas espécies de Aspergillus (A. flavus, A. parasiticus, A. terreus and A. fumigatus de interesse em alimentos. O óleo essencial revelou uma forte atividade atni-Aspergillus provocando a inibição de todas as cepas fúngicas ensaiadas. Os valores de MIC estiveram entre 80 e 20 µL/mL sendo encontrado uma MIC50 de 40 µL/mL. O óleo essencial nas concentrações de 80 e 40 µL/mL causou um efeito fungicida sobre A. flavus, A. fumigatus e A. niger notado por uma total inibição do crescimento micelial radial ao longo de 14 dias de

  6. Aspergillus saccharolyticus sp. nov., a new black Aspergillus species isolated in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette; Lübeck, Peter S.; Lübeck, Mette

    2011-01-01

    A novel species, Aspergillus saccharolyticus sp. nov., belonging to the Aspergillus section Nigri group is described. This species was isolated in Denmark from treated hardwood. Its taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach including phenotypic (morphology and extrolite...... Aspergillus species that is morphologically similar to Aspergillus japonicus and Aspergillus aculeatus, but has a totally different extrolite profile compared to any known Aspergillus species. The type strain of A. saccharolyticus sp. nov. is CBS 127449T ( = IBT 28509T)....

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Sensititre YeastOne and CLSI M38-A2 Reference Method for Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Aspergillus spp. against Echinocandins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siopi, Maria; Pournaras, Spyros; Meletiadis, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    Sensititre YeastOne (YO) panels were assessed for in vitro susceptibility testing of echinocandins against 39 isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, and A. terreus, including two echinocandin-resistant A. fumigatus strains, using different inocula (103, 104, and 105 CFU/ml), incubation times (16 to 48 h), and endpoints (first blue or purple well) and compared to CLSI M38-A2. The best agreement was found with an inoculum of 104 CFU/ml, incubation times of 20 h for A. flavus and of 30 h for A. fumigatus and A. terreus, and reading the first purple well. The reproducibility within ±1 2-fold dilutions was 100% for all three echinocandins. YO color endpoints were 2 to 3 2-fold dilutions lower than CLSI minimum effective concentrations (MECs) of caspofungin and 1 to 2 2-fold dilutions higher than CLSI MECs of micafungin. For anidulafungin, off-scale YO color endpoints were observed. Nevertheless, A. fumigatus echinocandin-resistant isolates were detected after 24 h of incubation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Aspergillus-Related Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia Al-Alawi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus is a ubiquitous dimorphic fungus that causes a variety of human diseases ranging in severity from trivial to life-threatening, depending on the host response. An intact host defence is important to prevent disease, but individuals with pre-existing structural lung disease, atopy, occupational exposure or impaired immunity are susceptible. Three distinctive patterns of aspergillus-related lung disease are recognized: saprophytic infestation of airways, cavities and necrotic tissue; allergic disease including extrinsic allergic alveolitis, asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, bronchocentric granulomatosis and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia; and airway and tissue invasive disease -- pseudomembranous tracheobronchitis, acute bronchopneumonia, angioinvasive aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing aspergillosis and invasive pleural disease. A broad knowledge of these clinical presentations and a high index of suspicion are required to ensure timely diagnosis and treatment of the potentially lethal manifestations of aspergillus-related pulmonary disease. In the present report, the clinical, radiographic and pathological aspects of the various aspergillus-related lung diseases are briefly reviewed.

  9. Aspergillus bronchitis without significant immunocompromise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chrdle, Ales; Mustakim, Sahlawati; Bright‐Thomas, Rowland J; Baxter, Caroline G; Felton, Timothy; Denning, David W

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus bronchitis is poorly understood and described. We extracted clinical data from more than 400 referred patients with persistent chest symptoms who did not fulfill criteria for allergic, chronic, or invasive aspergillosis...

  10. Tremorgenic Mycotoxins from Aspergillus Caespitosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, H. W.; Cole, R. J.; Hein, H.; Kirksey, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Two tremorgenic mycotoxins were isolated from Aspergillus caespitosus, and identified as verruculogen and fumitremorgin B. They were produced at the rate of 172 and 325 mg per kg, respectively, on autoclaved cracked field corn. PMID:1155935

  11. Aspergillus niger contains the cryptic phylogenetic species A. awamori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrone, Giancarlo; Stea, Gaetano; Epifani, Filomena

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus section Nigri is an important group of species for food and medical mycology, and biotechnology. The Aspergillus niger ‘aggregate’ represents its most complicated taxonomic subgroup containing eight morphologically indistinguishable taxa: A. niger, Aspergillus tubingensis, Aspergillus...

  12. Accessory Renal Arteries: A Cadaveric Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bina.K.Katariya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Renal arteries normally arise from the abdominal aorta at the level L1 vertebra. Accessory renal arteries were arising from abdominal aorta below the normal renal artery. Understanding anatomy of the vascular variation of kidney is essential for the clinician to perform procedures such as renal transplantation, interventional radiological procedures and renal vascular operations more safely and efficiently. No medical history of the cadaver was available to corroborate the clinical findings. The aim of the study was to establish the incidence and characteristics of accessory arteries in human kidneys. Methods: The present study was conducted on formalin fixed thirty two cadavers (irrespective of sex during routine dissection of abdomen by the undergraduate medical students from the department of anatomy, B.J.Medical College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat. Results: In present study we found accessory arteries were seen in three kidneys .All were arising from the abdominal aorta below the normal renal artery. These were more common on the left side and at the lower pole. The artery cranial to the normal renal artery entered the anterior aspect of the kidney 4 cm below the upper pole. Two accessory arteries were seen in one kidney on right side which is cranial & caudal to normal renal artery at the distance of 1.6 cm &3.9 cm from lower part of hilum respectively. Conclusion: Knowledge of the variations in the renal arteries is important for urologists, radiologists and surgeons in general. It is of great importance in performing operations like segmental resections, partial nephrectomy, and renal transplantation

  13. Activity of a long-acting echinocandin, CD101, determined using CLSI and EUCAST reference methods, against Candida and Aspergillus spp., including echinocandin- and azole-resistant isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Rhomberg, Paul R; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of CD101, a novel echinocandin with a long serum elimination half-life, and comparator (anidulafungin and caspofungin) antifungal agents against a collection of Candida and Aspergillus spp. isolates. CD101 and comparator agents were tested against 106 Candida spp. and 67 Aspergillus spp. isolates, including 27 isolates of Candida harbouring fks hotspot mutations and 12 itraconazole non-WT Aspergillus, using CLSI and EUCAST reference susceptibility broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Against WT and fks mutant Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis, the activity of CD101 [MIC90 = 0.06, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively (CLSI method values)] was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC90 = 0.03, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively) and caspofungin (MIC90 = 0.12, 0.25 and 0.12 mg/L, respectively). WT Candida krusei isolates were very susceptible to CD101 (MIC = 0.06 mg/L). CD101 activity (MIC50/90 = 1/2 mg/L) was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC50/90 = 2/2 mg/L) against Candida parapsilosis. CD101 (MIC mode = 0.06 mg/L for C. glabrata) was 2- to 4-fold more active against fks hotspot mutants than caspofungin (MIC mode = 0.5 mg/L). CD101 was active against Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus (MEC90 range = ≤0.008-0.03 mg/L). The essential agreement between CLSI and EUCAST methods for CD101 was 92.0%-100.0% among Candida spp. and 95.0%-100.0% among Aspergillus spp. The activity of CD101 is comparable to that of other members of the echinocandin class for the prevention and treatment of serious fungal infections. Similar results for CD101 activity versus Candida and Aspergillus spp. may be obtained with either CLSI or EUCAST BMD methods. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  14. Synergistic action of recombinant accessory hemicellulolytic and pectinolytic enzymes to Trichoderma reesei cellulase on rice straw degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laothanachareon, Thanaporn; Bunterngsook, Benjarat; Suwannarangsee, Surisa; Eurwilaichitr, Lily; Champreda, Verawat

    2015-12-01

    Synergism between core cellulases and accessory hydrolytic/non-hydrolytic enzymes is the basis of efficient hydrolysis of lignocelluloses. In this study, the synergistic action of three recombinant accessory enzymes, namely GH62 α-l-arabinofuranosidase (ARA), CE8 pectin esterase (PET), and GH10 endo-1,4-beta-xylanase (XYL) from Aspergillus aculeatus expressed in Pichia pastoris to a commercial Trichoderma reesei cellulase (Accellerase® 1500; ACR) on hydrolysis of alkaline pretreated rice straw was studied using a mixture design approach. Applying the full cubic model, the optimal ratio of quaternary enzyme mixture was predicted to be ACR:ARA:PET:XYL of 0.171:0.079:0.100:0.150, which showed a glucose releasing efficiency of 0.173 gglc/FPU, higher than the binary ACR:XYL mixture (0.122 gglc/FPU) and ACR alone (0.081 gglc/FPU) leading to a 47.3% increase in glucose yield compared with that from ACR at the same cellulase dosage. The result demonstrates the varying degree of synergism of accessory enzymes to cellulases useful for developing tailor-made enzyme systems for bio-industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Isolated spinal accessory neuropathy and intracisternal schwannomas of the spinal accessory nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Al-Ajmi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a 40-year-old female patient presenting with isolated left spinal accessory neuropathy that developed insidiously over 6 years. She complained of ill-defined deep neck and shoulder pain. On examination, prominent sternocleidomastoid and trapezoid muscle weakness and atrophy, shoulder instability, and lateral scapular winging were observed. MRI identified a small mass of the cisternal portion of the spinal accessory nerve. Its appearance was typical of schwannoma. Surgical treatment was not offered because of the small tumor size, lack of mass effect and the questionable functional recovery in the presence of muscular atrophy.

  16. Study on reduction of accessory horsepower requirements. Program summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefferts, C.H.

    1977-06-15

    The objective of this program was to define, evaluate and develop automotive accessory systems to minimize engine power consumption and significantly improve fuel economy. All tasks have been completed and the program objectives have been accomplished. Information is presented on each phase of the program which involved: conceptual design to recommended component improvement and accessory drive systems; performance and sizing analyses; detail design and specifications; fabrication, and performance testing; evaluation of integrated hybrid drive, improved accessories; and an advanced air conditioning concept.

  17. Tracheobronchial Manifestations of Aspergillus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Krenke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human lungs are constantly exposed to a large number of Aspergillus spores which are present in ambient air. These spores are usually harmless to immunocompetent subjects but can produce a symptomatic disease in patients with impaired antifungal defense. In a small percentage of patients, the trachea and bronchi may be the main or even the sole site of Aspergillus infection. The clinical entities that may develop in tracheobronchial location include saprophytic, allergic and invasive diseases. Although this review is focused on invasive Aspergillus tracheobronchial infections, some aspects of allergic and saprophytic tracheobronchial diseases are also discussed in order to present the whole spectrum of tracheobronchial aspergillosis. To be consistent with clinical practice, an approach basing on specific conditions predisposing to invasive Aspergillus tracheobronchial infections is used to present the differences in the clinical course and prognosis of these infections. Thus, invasive or potentially invasive Aspergillus airway diseases are discussed separately in three groups of patients: (1 lung transplant recipients, (2 highly immunocompromised patients with hematologic malignancies and/or patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and (3 the remaining, less severely immunocompromised patients or even immunocompetent subjects.

  18. Accessories for Enhancement of the Semi-Automatic Welding Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wheeler, Douglas M; Sawhill, James M

    2000-01-01

    .... The development of these accessories for work normally performed by the semi-automatic welding operator should significantly reduce operator hand-to-eye coordination requirements thereby enhancing...

  19. Inflammatory breast cancer in accessory abdominal breast tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy C. Miles, MD, MPH

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Accessory breast tissue results from failure of the embryologic mammary ridge, also known as the milk line, to involute. As a result, ectopic breast tissue can develop anywhere along this ridge, which extends from the axilla—the most common location—to the groin. Primary breast cancer in accessory breast tissue is uncommon but has been reported in multiple prior studies. We present a rare case of inflammatory breast cancer presenting in upper abdominal accessory breast tissue in women with a personal history of ipsilateral breast cancer, and highlight the challenges of both diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in accessory breast tissue.

  20. Unusual biotransformation products of the sesquiterpene lactone budlein A by Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Nilton Syogo; Gobbo-Neto, Leonardo; Ambrosio, Sérgio Ricardo; Antonucci, Gilmara Ausech; Sampaio, Suely Vilela; Pupo, Mônica Tallarico; Said, Suraia; Schmidt, Thomas J; Da Costa, Fernando Batista

    2013-12-01

    Biotransformation of chemicals by microorganisms can be effective in increasing chemical diversity. Some fungi have been described to be useful for the biotransformation of sesquiterpene lactones. Nevertheless, in most cases, only minor or simple transformations of functional groups have been observed. Budlein A is a sesquiterpene lactone found in high amounts in American sunflower-like species of the genus Viguiera (Asteraceae). It shows important biological effects like in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity, as well as cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines. With the aim to obtain potentially bioactive derivatives of budlein A and taking into account that obtaining semi-synthetic analogues is a very complex task, the capability of soil fungi to promote biotransformation was investigated. In this work, the biotransformation of budlein A by the soil fungi Aspergillus terreus and A. niger affording three unusual sesquiterpenoid derivatives with carbon skeletons is reported. The chemical structures of the compounds were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectrometry and HR-ESI-MS. The stereochemistry and molecular conformation of one derivative was assessed by molecular modeling techniques. The fungal metabolites displayed a reduced cytotoxicity against HL-60 cells when compared to the original natural product. The results show the versatility of microbial-catalyzed biotransformations leading to unusual derivatives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The melanocortin receptors and their accessory proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwetha eRamachandrappa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The five melanocortin receptors named MC1R-MC5R have diverse physiological roles encompassing pigmentation, steroidogenesis, energy homeostasis and feeding behaviour as well as exocrine function. Since their identification almost 20 years ago much has been learnt about these receptors. As well as interacting with their endogenous ligands the melanocortin peptides, there is now a growing list of important peptides that can modulate the way these receptors signal, acting as agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The discovery of MRAPs as a novel accessory factor to the melanocortin receptors provides further insight into the regulation of these important GPCRs.

  2. Conidial Dihydroxynaphthalene Melanin of the Human Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus Interferes with the Host Endocytosis Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thywißen, Andreas; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Schmaler-Ripcke, Jeannette; Nietzsche, Sandor; Zipfel, Peter F.; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important air-borne fungal pathogen of humans. The interaction of the pathogen with the host's immune system represents a key process to understand pathogenicity. For elimination of invading microorganisms, they need to be efficiently phagocytosed and located in acidified phagolysosomes. However, as shown previously, A. fumigatus is able to manipulate the formation of functional phagolysosomes. Here, we demonstrate that in contrast to pigmentless pksP mutant conidia of A. fumigatus, the gray-green wild-type conidia inhibit the acidification of phagolysosomes of alveolar macrophages, monocyte-derived macrophages, and human neutrophil granulocytes. Therefore, this inhibition is independent of the cell type and applies to the major immune effector cells required for defense against A. fumigatus. Studies with melanin ghosts indicate that the inhibitory effect of wild-type conidia is due to their dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin covering the conidia, whereas the hydrophobin RodA rodlet layer plays no role in this process. This is also supported by the observation that pksP conidia still exhibit the RodA hydrophobin layer, as shown by scanning electron microscopy. Mutants defective in different steps of the DHN-melanin biosynthesis showed stronger inhibition than pksP mutant conidia but lower inhibition than wild-type conidia. Moreover, A. fumigatus and A. flavus led to a stronger inhibition of phagolysosomal acidification than A. nidulans and A. terreus. These data indicate that a certain type of DHN-melanin that is different in the various Aspergillus species, is required for maximal inhibition of phagolysosomal acidification. Finally, we identified the vacuolar ATPase (vATPase) as potential target for A. fumigatus based on the finding that addition of bafilomycin which inhibits vATPase, led to complete inhibition of the acidification whereas the fusion of phagosomes containing wild-type conidia and lysosomes was not affected. PMID

  3. Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) is an indole-tetramic acid neurotoxin produced by some of the same strains of A. flavus that produce aflatoxins and by some Aspergillus oryzae strains. Despite its discovery 40 years ago, few reviews of its toxicity and biosynthesis have been reported. This review examines w...

  4. Reviewing prescription spending and accessory usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenham, Julie

    This article aims to explore the role of the stoma nurse specialist in the community and how recent initiatives within the NHS have impacted on the roles in stoma care to react to the rising prescription costs in the specialty. The article will explore how the stoma care nurse conducted her prescription reviews within her own clinical commissioning group (CCG). The findings of the reviews will be highlighted by a small case history and a mini audit that reveals that some stoma patients may be using their stoma care accessories inappropriately, which may contribute to the rise in stoma prescription spending. To prevent the incorrect use of stoma appliances it may necessitate an annual review of ostomates (individuals who have a stoma), as the author's reviews revealed that inappropriate usage was particularly commonplace when a patient may have not been reviewed by a stoma care specialist for some considerable amount of time. Initial education of the ostomate and ongoing education of how stoma products work is essential to prevent the misuse of stoma appliances, particularly accessories, as the reviews revealed that often patients were not always aware of how their products worked in practice.

  5. 21 CFR 872.6300 - Rubber dam and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6300 Rubber dam and accessories. (a) Identification. A rubber dam and accessories is a device composed of a thin sheet of latex with a hole in the... cavity preparation. The device is stretched around a tooth by inserting a tooth through a hole in the...

  6. 21 CFR 864.3600 - Microscopes and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microscopes and accessories. 864.3600 Section 864.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Pathology Instrumentation and Accessories § 864.3600...

  7. 21 CFR 884.5350 - Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories. 884.5350 Section 884.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Devices § 884.5350 Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories. (a) Identification. A contraceptive diaphragm...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1437 - Accessories for multiengine airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accessories for multiengine airplanes. 23... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1437 Accessories for multiengine airplanes. For multiengine airplanes...

  9. 21 CFR 884.1690 - Hysteroscope and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hysteroscope and accessories. 884.1690 Section 884.1690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... portals for electrosurgical, laser, or other power sources. Such hysteroscope accessory instruments...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5630 - Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. 876... Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. (a) Identification. (1) A peritoneal dialysis system and... peritoneal dialysis, a source of dialysate, and, in some cases, a water purification mechanism. After the...

  11. 21 CFR 884.1175 - Endometrial suction curette and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endometrial suction curette and accessories. 884.1175 Section 884.1175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Diagnostic Devices § 884.1175 Endometrial suction curette and accessories. (a) Identification. An endometrial...

  12. KNOW-BLADE Task-2 report: Aerodynamic accessories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik

    2004-01-01

    In the EC project KNOW-BLADE a work package has been defined to investigate the possibility to numerically model aerodynamic accessories in existing Navier-Stokes solvers. Four different aerodynamic accessories have been investigated. Firstly, thepotential of applying active flow control by means...

  13. High association between accessory soleus muscle and achilles tendonopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, Michael D.; Gordon, Andrew G.; Blebea, Judy S.; Dalinka, Murray K. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-12-15

    This study investigated the association between accessory soleus muscle and abnormalities of the Achilles tendon. The authors reviewed 15 consecutive cases with a diagnosis of accessory soleus muscle from a computerized database of ankle magnetic resonance (MR) examinations reported between January 1998 and January 2007. On review, two cases were eliminated because of an incorrect initial diagnosis: One patient had a low lying soleus attachment to the Achilles tendon, while the other had a prominent flexor hallucis longus tendon partially obliterating Kager's fat. The remaining 13 cases with accessory soleus muscles were evaluated for Achilles tendon abnormalities. There were 13 cases of accessory soleus muscles in 11 patients; two patients had bilateral accessory soleus muscles (the only study patients with bilateral MR examinations in our sample). There were five male and six female patients ranging from 15 to 81 years of age (mean 48). There were nine cases (69.2%) in which Achilles tendonopathy was associated with accessory soleus muscle, including tendonopathy of each Achilles tendon in the two patients with bilateral accessory muscles. In our small patient population, there was a high association between accessory soleus muscle and Achilles tendonopathy. (orig.)

  14. 21 CFR 884.1600 - Transabdominal amnioscope (fetoscope) and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A transabdominal amnioscope is a device designed to permit direct visual examination of the fetus... following accessories: trocar and cannula, instruments used through an operating channel or through a... transabdominal amnioscope (fetoscope) and accessories that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976, or...

  15. Selection arena in Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeman, J.; Debets, A.J.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2004-01-01

    The selection arena hypothesis states that overproduction of zygotes-a widespread phenomenon in animals and plants-can be explained as a mechanism of progeny choice. As a similar mechanism, the ascomycetous fungus Aspergillus nidulans may overproduce dikaryotic fruit initials, hereafter called

  16. The Aspergillus Mine - publishing bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo; Theobald, Sebastian

    with the Joint Genome Institute. The Aspergillus Mine is not intended as a genomic data sharing service but instead focuses on creating an environment where the results of bioinformatic analysis is made available for inspection. The data and code is public upon request and figures can be obtained directly from...

  17. Prevalence and mechanism of triazole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus in a referral chest hospital in Delhi, India and an update of the situation in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha eChowdhary

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus causes varied clinical syndromes ranging from colonization to deep infections. The mainstay of therapy of Aspergillus diseases is triazoles but several studies globally highlighted variable prevalence of triazole resistance, which hampers the management of aspergillosis. We studied the prevalence of resistance in clinical A. fumigatus isolates during 4 years in a referral Chest Hospital in Delhi, India and reviewed the scenario in Asia and the Middle East. Aspergillus species (n=2117 were screened with selective plates for azole resistance. The isolates included 45.4% A. flavus, followed by 32.4% A. fumigatus, 15.6% Aspergillus species and 6.6% A. terreus. Azole resistance was found in only 12 (1.7% A. fumigatus isolates.These triazole resistant A. fumigatus (TRAF isolates were subjected to (a calmodulin and β tubulin gene sequencing (b in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing against triazoles using CLSI M38-A2 (c sequencing of cyp51A gene and real-time PCR assay for detection of mutations and (d microsatellite typing of the resistant isolates. TRAF harbored TR34/L98H mutation in 10 (83.3% isolates with a pan-azole resistant phenotype. Among the remaining 2 TRAF isolates, one had G54E and the other had three non-synonymous point mutations. The majority of patients were diagnosed as invasive aspergillosis followed by allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis. The Indian TR34/L98H isolates had a unique genotype and were distinct from the Chinese, Middle East and European TR34/L98H strains. This resistance mechanism has been linked to the use of fungicide azoles in agricultural practices in Europe as it has been mainly reported from azole naïve patients. Reports published from Asia demonstrate the same environmental resistance mechanism in A. fumigatus isolates from two highly populated countries in Asia i.e., China and India and also from the neighboring Middle East.

  18. The scolopidial accessory organ in the Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauß, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Multiple mechanosensory organs form the subgenual organ complex in orthopteroid insects, located in the proximal tibia. In several Ensifera (Orthoptera), a small chordotonal organ, the so-called accessory organ, is the most posterior part of this sensory complex. In order to document the presence of this accessory organ among the Ensifera, the chordotonal sensilla and their innervation in the posterior tibia of two species of Jerusalem crickets (Stenopelmatidae: Stenopelmatus) is described. The sensory structures were stained by axonal tracing. Scolopidial sensilla occur in the posterior subgenual organ and the accessory organ in all leg pairs. The accessory organ contains 10-17 scolopidial sensilla. Both groups of sensilla are commonly spatially separated. However, in few cases neuronal fibres occurred between both organs. The two sensillum groups are considered as separate organs by the general spatial separation and innervation by different nerve branches. A functional role for mechanoreception is considered: since the accessory organ is located closely under the cuticle, sensilla may be suited to detect vibrations transferred over the leg's surface. This study extends the known taxa with an accessory organ, which occurs in several taxa of Ensifera. Comparative neuroanatomy thus suggests that the accessory organ may be conserved at least in Tettigoniidea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of thermostable beta-xylosidase activities produced by Aspergillus brasiliensis and Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Lauritzen, H.K.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    Twenty Aspergillus strains were evaluated for production of extracellular cellulolytic and xylanolytic activities. Aspergillus brasiliensis, A. niger and A. japonicus produced the highest xylanase activities with the A. brasiliensis and A. niger strains producing thermostable beta...

  20. Identification of thermostable β-xylosidase activities produced by Aspergillus brasiliensis and Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Lauritzen, Henrik Klitgaard; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    Twenty Aspergillus strains were evaluated for production of extracellular cellulolytic and xylanolytic activities. Aspergillus brasiliensis, A. niger and A. japonicus produced the highest xylanase activities with the A. brasiliensis and A. niger strains producing thermostable beta...

  1. Antifungal Activities of Posaconazole, Ravuconazole, and Voriconazole Compared to Those of Itraconazole and Amphotericin B against 239 Clinical Isolates of Aspergillus spp. and Other Filamentous Fungi: Report from SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, M. A.; Messer, S. A.; Hollis, R. J.; Jones, R. N.

    2002-01-01

    Posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole are new triazole derivatives that possess potent, broad-spectrum antifungal activity. We evaluated the in vitro activity of these investigational triazoles compared with that of itraconazole and amphotericin B against 239 clinical isolates of filamentous fungi from the SENTRY Program, including Aspergillus spp. (198 isolates), Fusarium spp. (7 isolates), Penicillium spp. (19 isolates), Rhizopus spp. (4 isolates), Mucor spp. (2 isolates), and miscellaneous species (9 isolates). The isolates were obtained from 16 different medical centers in the United States and Canada between January and December 2000. In vitro susceptibility testing was performed using the microdilution broth method outlined in the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M38-P document. Overall, posaconazole was the most active compound, inhibiting 94% of isolates at a MIC of ≤1 μg/ml, followed by voriconazole (91%), amphotericin B (89%), ravuconazole (88%), and itraconazole (70%). All three new triazoles demonstrated excellent activity (MIC, ≤1 μg/ml) against Aspergillus spp. (114 Aspergillus fumigatus, 22 Aspergillus niger, 13 Aspergillus flavus, 9 Aspergillus versicolor, 8 Aspergillus terreus, and 32 Aspergillus spp.): posaconazole (98%), voriconazole (98%), ravuconazole (92%), amphotericin B (89%), and itraconazole (72%). None of the triazoles were active against Fusarium spp. (MIC at which 50% of the isolates tested were inhibited [MIC50], >8 μg/ml) or Mucor spp. (MIC50, >8 μg/ml). Posaconazole and ravuconazole were more active than voriconazole against Rhizopus spp. (MIC50, 1 to 2 μg/ml versus >8 μg/ml, respectively). Based on these results, all three new triazoles exhibited promising activity against Aspergillus spp. and other less commonly encountered isolates of filamentous fungi. The clinical value of these in vitro data remains to be seen, and in vitro-in vivo correlation is needed for both new and established

  2. Involvement of the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus tubingensis in osteomyelitis of the maxillary bone: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bathoorn, E.; Escobar Salazar, N.; Sepehrkhouy, S.; Meijer, M.; de Cock, H.; Haas, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aspergillus tubingensis is a black Aspergillus belonging to the Aspergillus section Nigri, which includes species that morphologically resemble Aspergillus niger. Recent developments in species determination have resulted in clinical isolates presumed to be Aspergillus niger being

  3. What Does Genetic Diversity of Aspergillus flavus Tell Us About Aspergillus oryzae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus oryzae belong to Aspergillus section Flavi. They are closely related and are of significant economic importance. The former species has the ability to produce harmful aflatoxins while the latter is widely used in food fermentation and industrial enzyme production. ...

  4. Atypical Aspergillus parasiticus isolates from pistachio with aflR gene nucleotide insertion identical to Aspergillus sojae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxins are the most toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites produced primarily by the filamentous fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. The toxins cause devastating economic losses because of strict regulations on distribution of contaminated products. Aspergillus sojae are...

  5. Shedding light on Aspergillus niger volatile exometabolome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Costa, Carina Pedrosa; Gonçalves Silva, Diogo; Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Almeida, Adelaide; Rocha, Sílvia M

    2016-01-01

    An in-depth exploration of the headspace content of Aspergillus niger cultures was performed upon different growth conditions, using a methodology based on advanced multidimensional gas chromatography...

  6. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Accessory Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Accessory Pathways James Kulig , Bruce ... rate, which can be dangerous. What is Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome? Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) is ...

  7. Design of a marine sediment trap and accessories

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Janakiraman, G.; Fernando, V.; Venkatesan, R.; Rajaraman, V.S.

    The marine sediment trap and the mooring accessories were developed indigenously and were used successfully for the collection of settling sediments in the Arabian Sea The experience gained in using sediment trap and further improvements...

  8. ISO and EIGA standards for cryogenic vessels and accessories

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The EIGA/WG 6’s scope is cryogenic vessels and accessories, including their design, material compatibility, operational requirements and periodical inspection. The specific responsibilities include monitoring international standardization (ISO, CEN) and regulations (UN, TPED, PED...

  9. Incidence Of The Mandibular Accessory Foramina In Brazilian Population

    OpenAIRE

    Freire, A. R.; Rossi, A. C.; Prado, F. B.; Caria, P. H F; Botacin, Paulo Roberto [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    In adults, the mandibular accessory foramina are variables and are located on the medial surface of the mandible in positions above or below of the mandibular foramen. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of the mandibular accessory foramina in Brazilians human mandibles and discuss the clinical aspects related to the presence of these foramina. Were evaluated 222 mandibles, adults, irrespective of gender. Was observed that 27.93% and 43.24% of the mandibles presented at least ...

  10. Invasive lobular carcinoma arising in accessory breast tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Devine, Catriona; Courtney, Carol-Ann; Deb, Rahul; Agrawal, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lobular carcinoma in accessory breast tissue is a rare occurrence. We present such a case in a 61-year-old woman. \\ud \\ud Case presentation: A skin nodule in the axillary skin on excision biopsy revealed invasive lobular carcinoma.\\ud \\ud Conclusions: Carcinoma in accessory breast tissue is uncommon especially invasive lobular type. A high index of suspicion may avoid late diagnosis.

  11. Cryoablation of accessory pathways in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzcu, Volkan

    2007-09-01

    Cryoablation is utilized for septal tachycardia substrates due its safety. Considering the recent studies which reveal coronary artery stenosis related to radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in children, cryoablation may offer advantages for nonseptal accessory pathways (APs) as well. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of cryoablation of APs in children. A total of 39 patients (median age = 9.3 years, range 4.8 to 17.2 years) underwent cryoablation of APs. A three-dimensional, surface electrode-based navigation system (EnSite NavX, St. Jude Medical Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) is used to decrease the fluoroscopy exposure. A total of 45 APs were identified. Of these APs, 23 were septal (anteroseptal, midseptal, posteroseptal) and 22 were nonseptal. Acute success rate with cryoablation was 73%. RFA was used when cryoablation failed and overall acute success rate was 84%. To assess for the effect of institutional experience, the initial 23 APs were compared to the recent 22 APs and acute success rate revealed significant improvement (57% vs. 91%). Recurrence rate was 24% during a median follow-up of 282 days. Cryoablation of APs is safe and yields to high acute success rates in children. It can potentially be used as the first ablation option for all APs in children. However, recurrence rate is higher compared to the RFA and there is a need for prospective comparative studies.

  12. Ecophysiological characterization of Aspergillus carbonarius, Aspergillus tubingensis and Aspergillus niger isolated from grapes in Spanish vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cela, E; Crespo-Sempere, A; Ramos, A J; Sanchis, V; Marin, S

    2014-03-03

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diversity of black aspergilli isolated from berries from different agroclimatic regions of Spain. Growth characterization (in terms of temperature and water activity requirements) of Aspergillus carbonarius, Aspergillus tubingensis and Aspergillus niger was carried out on synthetic grape medium. A. tubingensis and A. niger showed higher maximum temperatures for growth (>45 °C versus 40-42 °C), and lower minimum aw requirements (0.83 aw versus 0.87 aw) than A. carbonarius. No differences in growth boundaries due to their geographical origin were found within A. niger aggregate isolates. Conversely, A. carbonarius isolates from the hotter and drier region grew and produced OTA at lower aw than other isolates. However, little genetic diversity in A. carbonarius was observed for the microsatellites tested and the same sequence of β-tubulin gene was observed; therefore intraspecific variability did not correlate with the geographical origin of the isolates or with their ability to produce OTA. Climatic change prediction points to drier and hotter climatic scenarios where A. tubingensis and A. niger could be even more prevalent over A. carbonarius, since they are better adapted to extreme high temperature and drier conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Infectious keratitis caused by Aspergillus tubingensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kredics, L.; Varga, J.; Kocsube, S.; Rajaraman, R.; Raghavan, A.; Doczi, I.; Bhaskar, M.; Nemeth, T.M.; Antal, Z.; Venkatapathy, N.; Vagvolgyi, C.; Samson, R.A.; Chockaiya, M.; Palanisamy, M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report 2 cases of keratomycosis caused by Aspergillus tubingensis. METHODS: The therapeutic courses were recorded for 2 male patients, 52 and 78 years old, with fungal keratitis caused by black Aspergillus strains. Morphological examination of the isolates was carried out on malt extract

  14. Sporulation inhibited secretion in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijgsheld, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is abundantly found in nature. It degrades dead material of plants and animals but can also be a pathogen of these organisms. Aspergillus niger is also important for mankind because it is one of the main organisms used for the industrial production of enzymes. These enzymes are

  15. Aspergillus species intrinsically resistant to antifungal agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, J.W. van der; Warris, A.; Verweij, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Polyphasic taxonomy has had a major impact on the species concept of the genus Aspergillus. New sibling species have been described that exhibit in vitro susceptibility profiles that differ significantly from that of Aspergillus fumigatus. While acquired resistance is an emerging problem in A.

  16. GLUCOSIDASE GENE FROM ASPERGILLUS NIGER F321

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Richard Auta

    One of the cellulases produced in this fashion by species of Aspergillus is β- glucosidase. .... the crude enzyme (sample) or nutrient broth (Control) was placed and incubated for 2 .... 7: Multiple sequence alignment of β-glucosidases amino acids from Aspergillus niger AnBg11, ANRA12.6 and ANRA12.9. [Symbols: Catalytic ...

  17. Conserved secondary structures in Aspergillus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Manson McGuire

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that the number and variety of functional RNAs (ncRNAs as well as cis-acting RNA elements within mRNAs is much higher than previously thought; thus, the ability to computationally predict and analyze RNAs has taken on new importance. We have computationally studied the secondary structures in an alignment of six Aspergillus genomes. Little is known about the RNAs present in this set of fungi, and this diverse set of genomes has an optimal level of sequence conservation for observing the correlated evolution of base-pairs seen in RNAs.We report the results of a whole-genome search for evolutionarily conserved secondary structures, as well as the results of clustering these predicted secondary structures by structural similarity. We find a total of 7450 predicted secondary structures, including a new predicted approximately 60 bp long hairpin motif found primarily inside introns. We find no evidence for microRNAs. Different types of genomic regions are over-represented in different classes of predicted secondary structures. Exons contain the longest motifs (primarily long, branched hairpins, 5' UTRs primarily contain groupings of short hairpins located near the start codon, and 3' UTRs contain very little secondary structure compared to other regions. There is a large concentration of short hairpins just inside the boundaries of exons. The density of predicted intronic RNAs increases with the length of introns, and the density of predicted secondary structures within mRNA coding regions increases with the number of introns in a gene.There are many conserved, high-confidence RNAs of unknown function in these Aspergillus genomes, as well as interesting spatial distributions of predicted secondary structures. This study increases our knowledge of secondary structure in these aspergillus organisms.

  18. Accessory bones of the feet: Radiological analysis of frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiljević Vladica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Accessory bones are most commonly found on the feet and they represent an anatomic variant. They occur when there is a failure in the formation of a unique bone from separated centre of ossification. The aim of this study was to establish their frequency and medical significance. Methods. Anteroposterior and lateral foot radiography was performed in 270 patients aged of 20-80 years with a history of trauma (180 and rheumatology disease (90. The presence and distribution of accessory bones was analysed in relation to the total number of patients and their gender. The results are expressed in numeric values and in terms of percentage. Results. Accessory bones were identified in 62 (22.96% patients: 29 (10.74% of them were found in female patients and 33 (12.22% in males. The most common accessory bones were as follows: os tibiale externum 50%, os peroneum 29.03%, ostrigonum 11.29%, os vaselianum 9.68%. Conclusion. Accessory bones found in 23% of patients with trauma and some of rheumatological diseases. Their significance is demonstrated in the differential diagnosis among degenerative diseases, avulsion fractures, muscle and tendon trauma and other types of injuries which can cause painful affection of the foot, as well as in forensic practice.

  19. Deciphering the signaling mechanisms of the plant cell wall degradation machinery in Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udatha, D. B. R. K. Gupta; Topakas, Evangelos; Salazar, Margarita Pena

    2015-01-01

    is required to rationally engineer filamentous fungi for more efficient bioconversion of different types of biomass. Results: In this study we focused on ten chemically defined inducers to drive expression of cellulases, hemicellulases and accessory enzymes in the model filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae....... oryzae genome were only partially explained by the chemical similarity of the enzyme inducers. Genes encoding enzymes that have attracted considerable interest such as cellobiose dehydrogenases and copper-dependent polysaccharide mono-oxygenases presented a substrate-specific induction. Several homology...... in 2360 reactions in the genome scale metabolic network of A. oryzae, was performed through a two-step molecular docking against the binding pockets of the transcription factors AoXlnR and AoAmyR. A total of six metabolites viz., sulfite (H2SO3), sulfate (SLF), uroporphyrinogen III (UPGIII), ethanolamine...

  20. Aspergillus uvarum sp. nov., an uniseriate black Aspergillus species isolated from grapes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrone, Giancarlo; Varga, János; Susca, Antonia

    2008-01-01

    A novel species, Aspergillus uvarum sp. nov., is described within Aspergillus section Nigri. This species can be distinguished from other black aspergilli based on internal transcribed spacers (ITS), beta-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences, by AFLP analysis and by extrolite profiles. Aspergillus...... uvarum sp. nov. isolates produced secalonic acid, common to other Aspergillus japonicus-related taxa, and geodin, erdin and dihydrogeodin, which are not produced by any other black aspergilli. None of the isolates were found to produce ochratoxin A. The novel species is most closely related to two...... atypical strains of Aspergillus aculeatus, CBS 114.80 and CBS 620.78, and was isolated from grape berries in Portugal, Italy, France, Israel, Greece and Spain. The type strain of Aspergillus uvarum sp. nov. is IMI 388523(T)=CBS 127591(T)= ITEM 4834(T)= IBT26606(T)....

  1. Accessory liver lobe in the left thoracic cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Serdar; Soylu, Lutfi

    2009-06-01

    Accessory liver of the thoracic cavity is usually asymptomatic, and its incidental detection is extremely rare. In this study, an unusual case of an accessory liver lobe of the thoracic cavity in a 26-year-old woman is described. A chest roentgenogram and thoracic computed tomographic scan revealed a mass in the left thoracic cavity. Left posterolateral thoracotomy was performed by removing a 10 x 8 x 5 cm(3) mass separated from lung. The arterial and venous supply of the mass originated from the abdomen. The diaphragm was found to be intact. The pathologist reported a normal hepatic tissue. This report presented a very rare occurrence of accessory liver in the thoracic cavity.

  2. Accessory tragus: a possible sign of Goldenhar syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, James S; Schwartz, Robert A

    2011-08-01

    The accessory tragus is a relatively common benign congenital anomaly. The tragus is a cartilaginous projection that normally occurs anterior to the external auditory meatus. Although aberrancy of the tragus may occur in isolation and is exclusively derived from the first branchial arch, it may occasionally signal a defect in the first or second branchial arches. Thus it may be a sign of other syndromes, such as oculoauricularvertebral dysplasia (Goldenhar syndrome). In fact, accessory tragus is a constant feature of this syndrome and may be associated with other syndromes. Accessory tragi are polypoid and should be distinguished from acrochordon (skin tags), as the shave excision commonly employed for skin tags may expose cartilage and cause slow healing or chondrodermatitis nodularis chronica helicis.

  3. Interaction of Wild Strains of Aspergilla with Aspergillus parasiticus ATCC15517 and Aflatoxin Production †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, H. Marina; Almeida, Inês; Marques, Marta; Bernardo, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by some competent mould strains of Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. These compounds have been extensively studied with regards to their toxicity for animals and humans; they are able to induce liver cancer and may cause a wide range of adverse effects in living organisms. Aflatoxins are found as natural contaminants of food and feed; the main line of the strategy to control them is based on the prevention of the mould growth in raw vegetable or during its storage and monitoring of each crop batch. Mould growth is conditioned by many ecological factors, including biotic ones. Hazard characterization models for aflatoxins in crops must take into consideration biotic interactions between moulds and their potential effects on growth development. The aim of this work is to study the effect of the biotic interaction of 14 different wild strains of Aspergilla (different species), with a competent strain (Aspergillus parasiticus ATCC 15517) using an in vitro production model. The laboratory model used was a natural matrix (humidified cracked corn), on which each wild strain challenged the aflatoxin production of a producer strain. Cultures were incubated at 28°C for 12 days and sampled at the 8th and 12th. Aflatoxin detection and quantification was performed by HPLC using a procedure with a MRPL = 1 μg/kg. Results of those interactive cultures revealed both synergic and antagonistic effects on aflatoxin biosynthesis. Productivity increases were particularly evident on the 8th day of incubation with wild strains of A. flavipes (+ 70.4 %), A. versicolor (+ 54.9 %) and A. flavus 3 (+ 62.6 %). Antagonistic effects were found with A. niger (− 69.5%), A. fumigatus (− 47.6 %) and A. terreus (− 47.6 %) on the 12th day. The increased effects were more evident on the 8th of incubation and the decreases were more patent on the 12th day. Results show that the development of Aspergilla strains concomitantly with

  4. Aplasia of the parotid glands with accessory parotid tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, Meghan J.; Walkiewicz, Thomas W.; Miller, Jeffrey H.; Curran, John G.; Towbin, Richard B. [Phoenix Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Congenital absence of the parotid gland is a rare entity. Absence is most commonly unilateral, and is not associated with accessory glandular tissue. In the majority of reported cases, parotid gland aplasia is seen with craniofacial abnormalities or hypoplasia of other ectodermal structures, particularly the lacrimal glands. We present a 14-year-old male with bilateral parotid gland aplasia detected incidentally on MRI of the brain and then confirmed on neck CT. The studies also revealed accessory parotid tissue superficial to the left masseter muscle. There were no associated craniofacial abnormalities. The lacrimal glands and submandibular glands were normal. (orig.)

  5. Accessory carpal bone luxation in two gray wolves (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Dominique L; Ellison, Michelle; Clyde, Victoria L; Wallace, Roberta S

    2012-09-01

    Two sibling male castrated gray wolves (Canis lupus) developed acute onset right forelimb lameness, one at 8 and the other at 11 yr of age. In both cases, the right carpus was swollen, carpal hyperextension was notable, and the wolves exhibited significant intermittent lameness of the affected limb. Radiographs revealed right accessory carpal bone luxation in both cases, with type III fracture of the accessory carpal bone in one wolf. Although carpal bone luxation in domestic dogs is frequently treated surgically, conservative medical management resolved the lameness in both wolves with no further complications.

  6. Metabolites from marine fungus Aspergillus sp.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.; Rajmanickam, R.; DeSouza, L.

    Chemical examination of a methanolic extract of the marine fungus, Aspergillus sp., isolated from marine grass environment, yielded a steroid, ergosterol peroxide (1), and a mixture of known glyceride esters (2,3) of unsaturated fatty acids...

  7. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of gametes...

  8. Post-genomic insights into the plant polysaccharide degradation potential of Aspergillus nidulans and comparison to Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coutinho, Pedro M; Andersen, Mikael R; Kolenova, Katarina; vanKuyk, Patricia A; Benoit, Isabelle; Gruben, Birgit S; Trejo-Aguilar, Blanca; Visser, Hans; van Solingen, Piet; Pakula, Tiina; Seiboth, Bernard; Battaglia, Evy; Aguilar-Osorio, Guillermo; de Jong, Jan F; Ohm, Robin A; Aguilar, Mariana; Henrissat, Bernard; Nielsen, Jens; Stålbrand, Henrik; de Vries, Ronald P

    The plant polysaccharide degradative potential of Aspergillus nidulans was analysed in detail and compared to that of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae using a combination of bioinformatics, physiology and transcriptomics. Manual verification indicated that 28.4% of the A. nidulans ORFs

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of the accessory genome of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk C den Bakker

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne bacterial pathogen, is comprised of four phylogenetic lineages that vary with regard to their serotypes and distribution among sources. In order to characterize lineage-specific genomic diversity within L. monocytogenes, we sequenced the genomes of eight strains from several lineages and serotypes, and characterized the accessory genome, which was hypothesized to contribute to phenotypic differences across lineages. The eight L. monocytogenes genomes sequenced range in size from 2.85-3.14 Mb, encode 2,822-3,187 genes, and include the first publicly available sequenced representatives of serotypes 1/2c, 3a and 4c. Mapping of the distribution of accessory genes revealed two distinct regions of the L. monocytogenes chromosome: an accessory-rich region in the first 65° adjacent to the origin of replication and a more stable region in the remaining 295°. This pattern of genome organization is distinct from that of related bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus. The accessory genome of all lineages is enriched for cell surface-related genes and phosphotransferase systems, and transcriptional regulators, highlighting the selective pressures faced by contemporary strains from their hosts, other microbes, and their environment. Phylogenetic analysis of O-antigen genes and gene clusters predicts that serotype 4 was ancestral in L. monocytogenes and serotype 1/2 associated gene clusters were putatively introduced through horizontal gene transfer in the ancestral population of L. monocytogenes lineage I and II.

  10. Congenital sialoblastoma of the accessory parotid gland | Parag ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sialoblastomas are rare, locally aggressive, perinatal or congenital salivary gland tumours that mostly originate in the parotid gland. Significant variability in histological range and clinical course exists. This report is of a case of congenital sialoblastoma of the accessory parotid gland.

  11. Congenital sialoblastoma of the accessory parotid gland: case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tumours generally originate in the parotid gland but may arise in the submandibular or minor salivary gland. This report presents a case of congenital sialoblastoma of the accessory parotid gland. Case report. A 3-day-old male neonate was referred with a large left facial mass with a provisional diagnosis of a teratoma.

  12. An Accessory Flexor Of The Thumb | Chukwuanukwu | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of accessory muscles, nerves and other tissues/organs in the upper limb and other parts of the body of some individuals have been previously reported. We report the case of a cadaver with an accesort flexor muscle of the left thumb. This muscle is located on the volar aspect of the left forearm. It originates ...

  13. Accessory proteins of SARS-CoV and other coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ding Xiang; Fung, To Sing; Chong, Kelvin Kian-Long; Shukla, Aditi; Hilgenfeld, Rolf

    2014-09-01

    The huge RNA genome of SARS coronavirus comprises a number of open reading frames that code for a total of eight accessory proteins. Although none of these are essential for virus replication, some appear to have a role in virus pathogenesis. Notably, some SARS-CoV accessory proteins have been shown to modulate the interferon signaling pathways and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The structural information on these proteins is also limited, with only two (p7a and p9b) having their structures determined by X-ray crystallography. This review makes an attempt to summarize the published knowledge on SARS-CoV accessory proteins, with an emphasis on their involvement in virus-host interaction. The accessory proteins of other coronaviruses are also briefly discussed. This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10 years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses" (see Introduction by Hilgenfeld and Peiris (2013)). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The sea lamprey has a primordial accessory olfactory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A dual olfactory system, represented by two anatomically distinct but spatially proximate chemosensory epithelia that project to separate areas of the forebrain, is known in several classes of tetrapods. Lungfish are the earliest evolving vertebrates known to have this dual system, comprising a main olfactory and a vomeronasal system (VNO). Lampreys, a group of jawless vertebrates, have a single nasal capsule containing two anatomically distinct epithelia, the main (MOE) and the accessory olfactory epithelia (AOE). We speculated that lamprey AOE projects to specific telencephalic regions as a precursor to the tetrapod vomeronasal system. Results To test this hypothesis, we characterized the neural circuits and molecular profiles of the accessory olfactory epithelium in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). Neural tract-tracing revealed direct and reciprocal connections with the dorsomedial telencephalic neuropil (DTN) which in turn projects directly to the dorsal pallium and the rostral hypothalamus. High-throughput sequencing demonstrated that the main and the accessory olfactory epithelia have virtually identical profiles of expressed genes. Real time quantitative PCR confirmed expression of representatives of all 3 chemoreceptor gene families identified in the sea lamprey genome. Conclusion Anatomical and molecular evidence shows that the sea lamprey has a primordial accessory olfactory system that may serve a chemosensory function. PMID:23957559

  15. Lesions of the accessory parotid gland in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currarino, Guido [Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Votteler, Theodore P. [Children' s Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The accessory parotid gland, a little-known and seldom-mentioned anatomical variant, is a nodule of normal salivary tissue separate from the main parotid gland, located on the masseter muscle and connected to the Stensen duct at that level. It can be the site of both congenital and acquired lesions. (orig.)

  16. Fractionation of plasma globulin for prothrombin, thrombokinase, and accessory thromboplastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILSTONE, J H

    1951-09-01

    1. Crude globulin from more than 1,000 liters of citrated bovine plasma has been used in developing a procedure for moderately large scale separation of clotting factors. Fraction A, prothrombin, kinase, and thrombin fractions were prepared. Fraction A contained both kinase and accessory thromboplastin, the latter predominating when fraction A was diluted. 2. When prothrombin was activated by kinase, the rate of thrombin production was enhanced by the addition of platelets, or brain lipid, or dilute fraction A. These accessory thromboplastins caused this acceleration only when calcium chloride was added. Even with calcium, they were not effective unless kinase was present. 3. In contrast, the action of kinase was not entirely dependent on either ionic calcium or accessory thromboplastin. The concentrated kinase fraction activated prothrombin in the presence of excess oxalate. Although kinase often contaminates highly purified thrombins, it is probably distinct from thrombin. The ratio of kinase to thrombin was 100 times as great in the kinase fraction as in the thrombin fraction. 4. The kinase fraction, diluted 45,000-fold, to protein-nitrogen concentrations as low as 0.02 microgram per ml., accelerated the conversion of crude prokinase in three-stage tests. 5. The findings are consistent with the following concept of the basic enzymatic mechanism: See PDF for Structure It is now added that calcium and accessory thromboplastin exert their effects by impinging on the basic mechanism, in a chemically secondary or indirect manner.

  17. The benefits of using bluetooth accessories with hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pauline; Davis, Adrian

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the benefits in reported outcomes after providing bluetooth accessories for established hearing aid users. Prospective observational study using validated quantitative outcome measures and detailed patient narrative before and two months after patients were provided with bluetooth accessories. Twelve patients with bilateral NHS hearing aids participated. They had a wide range of ages and hearing loss. After two months, 10 patients reported substantial additional benefit and kept the accessories; two returned them for various reasons. Statistically significant changes were seen in two validated outcome measures: the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile and the International Outcome Inventory - Hearing Aids, but not in the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale. Two notable benefits were reported: some described hearing the emotion and mood in a voice for the first time; others were amazed to report an improved ability to hear film or to hold conversations over the telephone. The provision of bluetooth accessories can give additional reported benefit for some patients - we need better knowledge about who benefits, and whether further support/training to individuals would make a difference.

  18. Male accessory gland secretory protein polymorphism in natural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Male accessory gland secretory protein polymorphism was analysed in natural populations of Drosophila nasuta nasuta and. D. sulfurigaster neonasuta for the first time, using SDS-PAGE to score polymorphism of these proteins in 2788 individuals of D. n. nasuta and 2232 individuals of D. s. neonasuta from 12 different ...

  19. Colonization, Infection, and the Accessory Genome of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rebekah M.; Bachman, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen that has a large accessory genome of plasmids and chromosomal gene loci. This accessory genome divides K. pneumoniae strains into opportunistic, hypervirulent, and multidrug-resistant groups and separates K. pneumoniae from two closely related species, Klebsiella variicola and Klebsiella quasipneumoniae. Some strains of K. pneumoniae act as opportunistic pathogens, infecting critically ill and immunocompromised patients. These K. pneumoniae are a common cause of health-care associated infections including pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs), and bloodstream infections. K. variicola and K. quasipneumoniae are often clinically indistinguishable from opportunistic K. pneumoniae. Other strains of K. pneumoniae are hypervirulent, infecting healthy people in community settings and causing severe infections including pyogenic liver abscess, endophthalmitis, and meningitis. A third group of K. pneumoniae encode carbapenemases, making them highly antibiotic-resistant. These strains act as opportunists but are exceedingly difficult to treat. All of these groups of K. pneumoniae and related species can colonize the gastrointestinal tract, and the accessory genome may determine if a colonizing strain remains asymptomatic or progresses to cause disease. This review will explore the associations between colonization and infection with opportunistic, antibiotic-resistant, and hypervirulent K. pneumoniae strains and the role of the accessory genome in distinguishing these groups and related species. As K. pneumoniae infections become progressively more difficult to treat in the face of antibiotic resistance and hypervirulent strains, an increased understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of these bacteria is vital. PMID:29404282

  20. Quantitative analysis of solid samples using modified specular reflectance accessory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Tomasz; Mazurek, Sylwester; Szostak, Roman

    2016-12-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) is a fast, reliable and cost effective analytical method, requiring minimal or no sample preparation. It is commonly used in the course of qualitative and quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical ingredients and food. We demonstrate that simpler and cheaper specular reflectance (SR) accessory working in a DRIFTS like mode (SR-DL) can be an alternative for DIRFTS attachment. An application of a modified SR accessory for quantitative analysis of solids samples is presented. As a case study the concentration of cinnarizine in commercial tablets has been determined from DRIFTS and SR-DL infrared (IR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectra recorded using DTGS (deuterated triglicine sulphate) detector in the IR and NIR regions and InGaAs (indium-gallium arsenide) detector in the NIR range. Based on these spectra Partial Least Squares (PLS) models were constructed and relative standard errors of prediction (RSEP) were calculated for the calibration, validation and analysed data sets. They amounted to 2.4-2.5%, 2.1-2.7% and 2.0-2.6% for the DRIFTS attachment while 2.1-2.2%, 2.0-2.3% and 1.9-2.6%, respectively, for the modified SR accessory. Obtained error values indicate that modified SR accessory can be effectively used for quantification of solid pharmaceutical samples in the mid- and near-infrared regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Colonization, Infection, and the Accessory Genome of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah M. Martin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen that has a large accessory genome of plasmids and chromosomal gene loci. This accessory genome divides K. pneumoniae strains into opportunistic, hypervirulent, and multidrug-resistant groups and separates K. pneumoniae from two closely related species, Klebsiella variicola and Klebsiella quasipneumoniae. Some strains of K. pneumoniae act as opportunistic pathogens, infecting critically ill and immunocompromised patients. These K. pneumoniae are a common cause of health-care associated infections including pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs, and bloodstream infections. K. variicola and K. quasipneumoniae are often clinically indistinguishable from opportunistic K. pneumoniae. Other strains of K. pneumoniae are hypervirulent, infecting healthy people in community settings and causing severe infections including pyogenic liver abscess, endophthalmitis, and meningitis. A third group of K. pneumoniae encode carbapenemases, making them highly antibiotic-resistant. These strains act as opportunists but are exceedingly difficult to treat. All of these groups of K. pneumoniae and related species can colonize the gastrointestinal tract, and the accessory genome may determine if a colonizing strain remains asymptomatic or progresses to cause disease. This review will explore the associations between colonization and infection with opportunistic, antibiotic-resistant, and hypervirulent K. pneumoniae strains and the role of the accessory genome in distinguishing these groups and related species. As K. pneumoniae infections become progressively more difficult to treat in the face of antibiotic resistance and hypervirulent strains, an increased understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of these bacteria is vital.

  2. Termination pattern of the main and accessory pancreatic ducts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pancreas has the main and occasionally a patent accessory pancreatic ducts that carry secretions to the duodenum. Anatomical studies on these ducts are limited. The present study observed the anatomy of the two ducts in eighty six Tanzanians' autopsy subjects to find out if the pattern is similar to those reported from ...

  3. 21 CFR 878.4370 - Surgical drape and drape accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... site of surgical incision from microbial and other contamination. The device includes a plastic wound protector that may adhere to the skin around a surgical incision or be placed in a wound to cover its... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgical drape and drape accessories. 878.4370...

  4. Modeling and Simulation of Two Wheelchair Accessories for Pushing Doors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Soran Jalal; Shaikh Mohammed, Javeed

    2017-03-27

    Independent mobility is vital to individuals of all ages, and wheelchairs have proven to be great personal mobility devices. The tasks of opening and navigating through a door are trivial for healthy people, while the same tasks could be difficult for some wheelchair users. A wide range of intelligent wheelchair controllers and systems, robotic arms, or manipulator attachments integrated with wheelchairs have been developed for various applications, including manipulating door knobs. Unfortunately, the intelligent wheelchairs and robotic attachments are not widely available as commercial products. Therefore, the current manuscript presents the modeling and simulation of a novel but simple technology in the form of a passive wheelchair accessory (straight, arm-like with a single wheel, and arc-shaped with multiple wheels) for pushing doors open from a wheelchair. From the simulations using different wheel shapes and sizes, it was found that the arc-shaped accessory could push open the doors faster and with almost half the required force as compared to the arm-like accessory. Also, smaller spherical wheels were found to be best in terms of reaction forces on the wheels. Prototypes based on the arc-shaped accessory design will be manufactured and evaluated for pushing doors open and dodging or gliding other obstacles.

  5. Complete Spinal Accessory Nerve Palsy From Carrying Climbing Gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Jess M; Warme, Winston J

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of spinal accessory nerve palsy sustained while transporting climbing gear. Spinal accessory nerve injury is commonly a result of iatrogenic surgical trauma during lymph node excision. This particular nerve is less frequently injured by blunt trauma. The case reported here results from compression of the spinal accessory nerve for a sustained period-that is, carrying a load over the shoulder using a single nylon rope for 2.5 hours. This highlights the importance of using proper load-carrying equipment to distribute weight over a greater surface area to avoid nerve compression in the posterior triangle of the neck. The signs and symptoms of spinal accessory nerve palsy and its etiology are discussed. This report is particularly relevant to individuals involved in mountaineering and rock climbing but can be extended to anyone carrying a load with a strap over one shoulder and across the body. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mycotoxin production by fungi isolated from stored grains | Amadi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mycotoxin production by isolated fungi was subsequently evaluated using the thin layer chromatography technique. Eight different fungi were isolated altogether namely Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus oryzae, Penicillium italicum, Penicillium spinulosum, Rhizopus stolonifer and ...

  7. A molecular analysis of L-arabinan degradation in Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipphi, M.J.A.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes a molecular study of the genetics ofL-arabinan degradation in Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans. These saprophytic hyphal fungi produce an extracellular hydrolytic enzyme system to

  8. Identification and toxigenic potential of the industrially important fungi, Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus sojae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas R

    2007-01-01

    Mold strains belonging to the species Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus sojae are highly valued as koji molds in the traditional preparation of fermented foods, such as miso, sake, and shoyu, and as protein production hosts in modern industrial processes. A. oryzae and A. sojae are relatives...

  9. Aspergillus tubingensis and Aspergillus niger as the dominant black Aspergillus, use of simple PCR-RFLP for preliminary differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhendi, H; Zarei, F; Motamedi, M; Nouripour-Sisakht, S

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to identify the species distribution of common clinical and environmental isolates of black Aspergilli based on simple restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the β-tubulin gene. A total of 149 clinical and environmental strains of black Aspergilli were collected and subjected to preliminary morphological examination. Total genomic DNAs were extracted, and PCR was performed to amplify part of the β-tubulin gene. At first, 52 randomly selected samples were species-delineated by sequence analysis. In order to distinguish the most common species, PCR amplicons of 117 black Aspergillus strains were identified by simple PCR-RFLP analysis using the enzyme TasI. Among 52 sequenced isolates, 28 were Aspergillus tubingensis, 21 Aspergillus niger, and the three remaining isolates included Aspergillus uvarum, Aspergillus awamori, and Aspergillus acidus. All 100 environmental and 17 BAL samples subjected to TasI-RFLP analysis of the β-tubulin gene, fell into two groups, consisting of about 59% (n=69) A. tubingensis and 41% (n=48) A. niger. Therefore, the method successfully and rapidly distinguished A. tubingensis and A. niger as the most common species among the clinical and environmental isolates. Although tardy, the Ehrlich test was also able to differentiate A. tubingensis and A. niger according to the yellow color reaction specific to A. niger. A. tubingensis and A. niger are the most common black Aspergillus in both clinical and environmental isolates in Iran. PCR-RFLP using TasI digestion of β-tubulin DNA enables rapid screening for these common species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Aspergillus-associated hypersensitivity respiratory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    The mould Aspergillus is responsible for a gamut of respiratory diseases ranging from saprobic colonisation to rapidly invasive disseminated disease. The clinical spectrum of Aspergillus-associated hypersensitivity respiratory disorders includes Aspergillus induced asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), allergic Aspergillus sinusitis (AAS) and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Inhalant allergens, in patients with allergic asthma, play a key role in bringing about the inflammation present in the airways, and fungi are increasingly being recognised as important inhalant allergens. Aspergillus is linked to asthma in more ways than one. In the asthmatic subjects, the fungal spores are trapped in the thick and viscid secretions that are usually present in the airways. This generally develops in atopic subjects and is sustained by continuous inhalation of Aspergillus antigens, triggering asthma that may be more severe in form. Aspergillus induced asthma is yet to receive the recognition that it deserves. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is the best known form of allergic aspergillosis and is an emerging disease in India. An immunologically mediated lung disease, ABPA occurs predominantly in patients with asthma. A set of diagnostic criteria is required as there is no single test that establishes the diagnosis apart from demonstration of central bronchiectasis with normal tapering bronchi, a feature considered to be pathognomonic of ABPA. Radiologically, ABPA is characterised by 'transient pulmonary infiltrates' or 'fleeting shadows', often confused with pulmonary tuberculosis. A comparatively more recently recognised clinical entity, AAS is characterised by mucoid impaction in the paranasal sinuses which is akin to that in ABPA. Although it appears that the patient with ABPA provides a favourable milieu for the occurrence of AAS, it is perhaps surprising that in spite of similar histopathological features the co-existence of both these diseases has

  11. Aspergillus luchuensis, an industrially important black Aspergillus in East Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Beom Hong

    Full Text Available Aspergilli known as black- and white-koji molds which are used for awamori, shochu, makgeolli and other food and beverage fermentations, are reported in the literature as A. luchuensis, A. awamori, A. kawachii, or A. acidus. In order to elucidate the taxonomic position of these species, available ex-type cultures were compared based on morphology and molecular characters. A. luchuensis, A. kawachii and A. acidus showed the same banding patterns in RAPD, and the three species had the same rDNA-ITS, β-tubulin and calmodulin sequences and these differed from those of the closely related A. niger and A. tubingensis. Morphologically, the three species are not significantly different from each other or from A. niger and A. tubingensis. It is concluded that A. luchuensis, A. kawachii and A. acidus are the same species, and A. luchuensis is selected as the correct name based on priority. Strains of A. awamori which are stored in National Research Institute of Brewing in Japan, represent A. niger (n = 14 and A. luchuensis (n = 6. The neotype of A. awamori (CBS 557.65 =  NRRL 4948 does not originate from awamori fermentation and it is shown to be identical with the unknown taxon Aspergillus welwitschiae. Extrolite analysis of strains of A. luchuensis showed that they do not produce mycotoxins and therefore can be considered safe for food and beverage fermentations. A. luchuensis is also frequently isolated from meju and nuruk in Korea and Puerh tea in China and the species is probably common in the fermentation environment of East Asia. A re-description of A. luchuensis is provided because the incomplete data in the original literature.

  12. [Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis in a patient with a biventricular pacemaker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, José M; Fariñas, María C; Rodilla, Irene G; Salesa, Ricardo; de Berrazueta, José R

    2005-05-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis is one of the rarest and severest complications in cardiological patients. We describe a patient with an intracardial pacemaker who was diagnosed as having Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis. Postmortem examination showed a large, Aspergillus-infected thrombus encased in the right ventricle, pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary branches.

  13. Replacement of two amino acids of 9R-dioxygenase-allene oxide synthase of Aspergillus niger inverts the chirality of the hydroperoxide and the allene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooman, Linda; Wennman, Anneli; Hamberg, Mats; Hoffmann, Inga; Oliw, Ernst H

    2016-02-01

    The genome of Aspergillus niger codes for a fusion protein (EHA25900), which can be aligned with ~50% sequence identity to 9S-dioxygenase (DOX)-allene oxide synthase (AOS) of Fusarium oxysporum, homologues of the Fusarium and Colletotrichum complexes and with over 62% sequence identity to homologues of Aspergilli, including (DOX)-9R-AOS of Aspergillus terreus. The aims were to characterize the enzymatic activities of EHA25900 and to identify crucial amino acids for the stereospecificity. Recombinant EHA25900 oxidized 18:2n-6 sequentially to 9R-hydroperoxy-10(E),12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid (9R-HPODE) and to a 9R(10)-allene oxide. 9S- and 9R-DOX-AOS catalyze abstraction of the pro-R hydrogen at C-11, but the direction of oxygen insertion differs. A comparison between twelve 9-DOX domains of 9S- and 9R-DOX-AOS revealed conserved amino acid differences, which could contribute to the chirality of products. The Gly616Ile replacement of 9R-DOX-AOS (A. niger) increased the biosynthesis of 9S-HPODE and the 9S(10)-allene oxide, whereas the Phe627Leu replacement led to biosynthesis of 9S-HPODE and the 9S(10)-allene oxide as main products. The double mutant (Gly616Ile, Phe627Leu) formed over 90% of the 9S stereoisomer of HPODE. 9S-HPODE was formed by antarafacial hydrogen abstraction and oxygen insertion, i.e., the original H-abstraction was retained but the product chirality was altered. We conclude that 9R-DOX-AOS can be altered to 9S-DOX-AOS by replacement of two amino acids (Gly616Ile, Phe627Leu) in the DOX domain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Antifungal Profile of a Novel and Long-Acting Inhaled Azole, PC945, on Aspergillus fumigatus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Thomas; Alanio, Alexandre; Kelly, Steven L.; Sehra, Gurpreet; Kizawa, Yasuo; Warrilow, Andrew G. S.; Parker, Josie E.; Kelly, Diane E.; Kimura, Genki; Anderson-Dring, Lauren; Nakaoki, Takahiro; Sunose, Mihiro; Onions, Stuart; Crepin, Damien; Lagasse, Franz; Crittall, Matthew; Shannon, Jonathan; Cooke, Michael; Bretagne, Stéphane; King-Underwood, John; Murray, John; Strong, Pete; Rapeport, Garth

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The profile of PC945, a novel triazole antifungal designed for administration via inhalation, was assessed in a range of in vitro and in vivo studies. PC945 was characterized as a potent, tightly binding inhibitor of Aspergillus fumigatus sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51A and CYP51B) activity (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC50s], 0.23 μM and 0.22 μM, respectively) with characteristic type II azole binding spectra. Against 96 clinically isolated A. fumigatus strains, the MIC values of PC945 ranged from 0.032 to >8 μg/ml, while those of voriconazole ranged from 0.064 to 4 μg/ml. Spectrophotometric analysis of the effects of PC945 against itraconazole-susceptible and -resistant A. fumigatus growth yielded IC50 (determined based on optical density [OD]) values of 0.0012 to 0.034 μg/ml, whereas voriconazole (0.019 to >1 μg/ml) was less effective than PC945. PC945 was effective against a broad spectrum of pathogenic fungi (with MICs ranging from 0.0078 to 2 μg/ml), including Aspergillus terreus, Trichophyton rubrum, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus gattii, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Rhizopus oryzae (1 or 2 isolates each). In addition, when A. fumigatus hyphae or human bronchial cells were treated with PC945 and then washed, PC945 was found to be absorbed quickly into both target and nontarget cells and to produce persistent antifungal effects. Among temporarily neutropenic immunocompromised mice infected with A. fumigatus intranasally, 50% of the animals survived until day 7 when treated intranasally with PC945 at 0.56 μg/mouse, while posaconazole showed similar effects (44%) at 14 μg/mouse. This profile affirms that topical treatment with PC945 should provide potent antifungal activity in the lung. PMID:28223388

  15. Caudate haemorrhage caused by pseudoaneurysm of accessory middle cerebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Shinichiro; Tokugawa, Joji; Nakao, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Takuji

    2015-12-30

    A 68-year-old man experienced a right caudate haemorrhage with intraventricular haemorrhage. Although a subarachnoid haemorrhage was not shown clearly, our investigation demonstrated an aneurysm-like vascular pouch located in the anomalous vessel arising from the A2 segment of the right anterior cerebral artery. Rupture of the vascular pouch was considered to be the cause of the caudate haemorrhage. Neck clipping was performed. In intraoperative observation, the anomalous vessel was diagnosed as a right accessory middle cerebral artery. Histopathology of the saccular wall showed only an adventitia and a fibrin layer, indicating a pseudoaneurysm. We routinely perform detailed vascular evaluation for any cerebrovascular disease. A meticulous vascular survey makes it possible to obtain valuable clues in cases such as caudate haemorrhage due to pseudoaneurysm of the accessory middle cerebral artery, leading to prevention of rebleeding. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. A rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Gupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus endophthalmitis is a devastating inflammatory condition of the intraocular cavities that may result in irreparable loss of vision and rapid destruction of the eye. Almost all cases in the literature have shown an identified source causing aspergillus endophthalmitis as a result of direct extension of disease. We present a rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis. A 72-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus, congenital Hirschsprung disease, and recent culture-positive candida pyelonephritis with hydronephrosis status post-surgical stent placement presented with difficulty opening her eyes. She complained of decreased vision (20/200 with pain and redness in both eyes – right worse then left. Examination demonstrated multiple white fungal balls in both retinas consistent with bilateral fungal endophthalmitis. Bilateral vitreous taps for cultures and staining were performed. Patient was given intravitreal injections of amphotericin B, vancomycin, ceftazidime, and started on oral fluconazole. Patient was scheduled for vitrectomy to decrease organism burden and to remove loculated areas of infection that would not respond to systemic antifungal agents. Four weeks after initial presentation, the fungal cultures revealed mold growth consistent with aspergillus. Patient was subsequently started on voriconazole and fluconazole was discontinued due to poor efficacy against aspergillus. Further workup was conducted to evaluate for the source of infection and seeding. Transthoracic cardiogram was unremarkable for any vegetation or valvular abnormalities. MRI of the orbits and sinuses did not reveal any mass lesions or bony destruction. CT of the chest was unremarkable for infection. Aspergillus endophthalmitis may occur because of one of these several mechanisms: hematogenous dissemination, direct inoculation by trauma, and contamination during surgery. Our patient's cause of bilateral endophthalmitis was through an

  17. Headgear Accessories Classification Using an Overhead Depth Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Luna

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address the generation of semantic labels describing the headgear accessories carried out by people in a scene under surveillance, only using depth information obtained from a Time-of-Flight (ToF camera placed in an overhead position. We propose a new method for headgear accessories classification based on the design of a robust processing strategy that includes the estimation of a meaningful feature vector that provides the relevant information about the people’s head and shoulder areas. This paper includes a detailed description of the proposed algorithmic approach, and the results obtained in tests with persons with and without headgear accessories, and with different types of hats and caps. In order to evaluate the proposal, a wide experimental validation has been carried out on a fully labeled database (that has been made available to the scientific community, including a broad variety of people and headgear accessories. For the validation, three different levels of detail have been defined, considering a different number of classes: the first level only includes two classes (hat/cap, and no hat/cap, the second one considers three classes (hat, cap and no hat/cap, and the last one includes the full class set with the five classes (no hat/cap, cap, small size hat, medium size hat, and large size hat. The achieved performance is satisfactory in every case: the average classification rates for the first level reaches 95.25%, for the second one is 92.34%, and for the full class set equals 84.60%. In addition, the online stage processing time is 5.75 ms per frame in a standard PC, thus allowing for real-time operation.

  18. Headgear Accessories Classification Using an Overhead Depth Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Carlos A; Macias-Guarasa, Javier; Losada-Gutierrez, Cristina; Marron-Romera, Marta; Mazo, Manuel; Luengo-Sanchez, Sara; Macho-Pedroso, Roberto

    2017-08-10

    In this paper, we address the generation of semantic labels describing the headgear accessories carried out by people in a scene under surveillance, only using depth information obtained from a Time-of-Flight (ToF) camera placed in an overhead position. We propose a new method for headgear accessories classification based on the design of a robust processing strategy that includes the estimation of a meaningful feature vector that provides the relevant information about the people's head and shoulder areas. This paper includes a detailed description of the proposed algorithmic approach, and the results obtained in tests with persons with and without headgear accessories, and with different types of hats and caps. In order to evaluate the proposal, a wide experimental validation has been carried out on a fully labeled database (that has been made available to the scientific community), including a broad variety of people and headgear accessories. For the validation, three different levels of detail have been defined, considering a different number of classes: the first level only includes two classes (hat/cap, and no hat/cap), the second one considers three classes (hat, cap and no hat/cap), and the last one includes the full class set with the five classes (no hat/cap, cap, small size hat, medium size hat, and large size hat). The achieved performance is satisfactory in every case: the average classification rates for the first level reaches 95.25%, for the second one is 92.34%, and for the full class set equals 84.60%. In addition, the online stage processing time is 5.75 ms per frame in a standard PC, thus allowing for real-time operation.

  19. Dynamic expression pattern of kinesin accessory protein in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    We have identified the Drosophila homologue of the non-motor accessory subunit of kinesin-II motor complex. It is homologous to the SpKAP115 of the sea urchin, KAP3A and KAP3B of the mouse, and SMAP protein in humans. In situ hybridization using a DmKAP specific cRNA probe has revealed a dynamic pattern of ...

  20. Species tropism of HIV-1 modulated by viral accessory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Masako eNomaguchi; Naoya eDoi; Yui eMatsumoto; Yosuke eSakai; Sachi eFujiwara; Akio eAdachi

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is tropic and pathogenic only for humans, and does not replicate in macaque monkeys routinely used for experimental infections. This specially narrow host range (species tropism) has impeded much the progress of HIV-1/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) basic research. Extensive studies on the underlying mechanism have revealed that Vif, one of viral accessory proteins, is critical for the HIV-1 species tropism in addition to Gag-capsid protei...

  1. Headgear Accessories Classification Using an Overhead Depth Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Carlos A.; Marron-Romera, Marta; Mazo, Manuel; Luengo-Sanchez, Sara; Macho-Pedroso, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we address the generation of semantic labels describing the headgear accessories carried out by people in a scene under surveillance, only using depth information obtained from a Time-of-Flight (ToF) camera placed in an overhead position. We propose a new method for headgear accessories classification based on the design of a robust processing strategy that includes the estimation of a meaningful feature vector that provides the relevant information about the people’s head and shoulder areas. This paper includes a detailed description of the proposed algorithmic approach, and the results obtained in tests with persons with and without headgear accessories, and with different types of hats and caps. In order to evaluate the proposal, a wide experimental validation has been carried out on a fully labeled database (that has been made available to the scientific community), including a broad variety of people and headgear accessories. For the validation, three different levels of detail have been defined, considering a different number of classes: the first level only includes two classes (hat/cap, and no hat/cap), the second one considers three classes (hat, cap and no hat/cap), and the last one includes the full class set with the five classes (no hat/cap, cap, small size hat, medium size hat, and large size hat). The achieved performance is satisfactory in every case: the average classification rates for the first level reaches 95.25%, for the second one is 92.34%, and for the full class set equals 84.60%. In addition, the online stage processing time is 5.75 ms per frame in a standard PC, thus allowing for real-time operation. PMID:28796177

  2. Unusual insidious spinal accessory nerve palsy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou Nikolaos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated spinal accessory nerve dysfunction has a major detrimental impact on the functional performance of the shoulder girdle, and is a well-documented complication of surgical procedures in the posterior triangle of the neck. To the best of our knowledge, the natural course and the most effective way of handling spontaneous spinal accessory nerve palsy has been described in only a few instances in the literature. Case presentation We report the case of a 36-year-old Caucasian, Greek man with spontaneous unilateral trapezius palsy with an insidious course. To the best of our knowledge, few such cases have been documented in the literature. The unusual clinical presentation and functional performance mismatch with the imaging findings were also observed. Our patient showed a deterioration that was different from the usual course of this pathology, with an early onset of irreversible trapezius muscle dysfunction two months after the first clinical signs started to manifest. A surgical reconstruction was proposed as the most efficient treatment, but our patient declined this. Although he failed to recover fully after conservative treatment for eight months, he regained moderate function and is currently virtually pain-free. Conclusion Clinicians have to be aware that due to anatomical variation and the potential for compensation by the levator scapulae, the clinical consequences of any injury to the spinal accessory nerve may vary.

  3. [Survival Strategies of Aspergillus in the Human Body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Masato; Izumikawa, Koichi

    2017-01-01

     The human body is a hostile environment for Aspergillus species, which originally live outside the human body. There are lots of elimination mechanisms against Aspergillus inhaled into the human body, such as high body temperature, soluble lung components, mucociliary clearance mechanism, or responses of phagocytes. Aspergillus fumigatus, which is the primary causative agent of human infections among the human pathogenic species of Aspergillus, defend itself from the hostile human body environment by various mechanisms, such as thermotolerance, mycotoxin production, and characteristic morphological features. Here we review mechanisms of defense in Aspergillus against elimination from the human body.

  4. Aspergillus brasiliensis sp. nov., a biseriate black Aspergillus species with world-wide distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, János; Kocsubé, Sándor; Tóth, Beáta

    2007-01-01

    A novel species, Aspergillus brasiliensis sp. nov., is described within Aspergillus section Nigri. This species can be distinguished from other black aspergilli based on intergenic transcribed region, beta-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences, by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis...... and by extrolite profiles. A. brasiliensis isolates produced naphtho-gamma-pyrones, tensidol A and B and pyrophen in common with Aspergiflus niger and Aspergillus tubingensis, but also several unique compounds, justifying their treatment as representing a separate species. None of the isolates were found...... to produce ochratoxin A, kotanins, funalenone or pyranonigrins. The novel species was most closely related to A. niger, and was isolated from soil from Brazil, Australia, USA and The Netherlands, and from grape berries from Portugal. The type strain of Aspergillus brasiliensis sp. nov. is CBS 101740(T) (=IM...

  5. AcCNET (Accessory Genome Constellation Network): comparative genomics software for accessory genome analysis using bipartite networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Val F; Baquero, Fernando; de la Cruz, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M

    2017-01-15

    AcCNET (Accessory genome Constellation Network) is a Perl application that aims to compare accessory genomes of a large number of genomic units, both at qualitative and quantitative levels. Using the proteomes extracted from the analysed genomes, AcCNET creates a bipartite network compatible with standard network analysis platforms. AcCNET allows merging phylogenetic and functional information about the concerned genomes, thus improving the capability of current methods of network analysis. The AcCNET bipartite network opens a new perspective to explore the pangenome of bacterial species, focusing on the accessory genome behind the idiosyncrasy of a particular strain and/or population. AcCNET is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 (GPLv3) from http://sourceforge.net/projects/accnet CONTACT: : valfernandez.vf@gmail.comSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Two novel aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus species from Argentinean peanuts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pildain, M.B.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Vaamonde, G.

    2008-01-01

    Two novel species from Aspergillus section Flavi from different species of Arachis (peanuts) in Argentina are described as Aspergillus arachidicola sp. nov. and Aspergillus minisclerotigenes sp. nov. Their novel taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach with phenotypic...... (morphology and extrolite profiles) and molecular (beta-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences) characters. A. minisclerotigenes resembles Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parvisclerotigenus in producing aflatoxins B-1 and B-2, cyclopiazonic acid, kojic acid and aspergillic acid, but in addition it produces...... and parasiticolide, and some strains produce aspergillic acid. The type strain of A. arachidicola is CBS 117610(T) =IBT 25020(T) and that of A. minisclerotigenes is CBS 117635(T) =IBT 27196(T). The Mycobank accession numbers for Aspergillus minisclerotigenes sp. nov. and Aspergillus arachidicola sp. nov...

  7. Taxonomic Characterization and Secondary Metabolite Profiling of Aspergillus Section Aspergillus Contaminating Feeds and Feedstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Greco

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Xerophilic fungal species of the genus Aspergillus are economically highly relevant due to their ability to grow on low water activity substrates causing spoilage of stored goods and animal feeds. These fungi can synthesize a variety of secondary metabolites, many of which show animal toxicity, creating a health risk for food production animals and to humans as final consumers, respectively. Animal feeds used for rabbit, chinchilla and rainbow trout production in Argentina were analysed for the presence of xerophilic Aspergillus section Aspergillus species. High isolation frequencies (>60% were detected in all the studied rabbit and chinchilla feeds, while the rainbow trout feeds showed lower fungal charge (25%. These section Aspergillus contaminations comprised predominantly five taxa. Twenty isolates were subjected to taxonomic characterization using both ascospore SEM micromorphology and two independent DNA loci sequencing. The secondary metabolite profiles of the isolates were determined qualitatively by HPLC-MS. All the isolates produced neoechinulin A, 17 isolates were positive for cladosporin and echinulin, and 18 were positive for neoechinulin B. Physcion and preechinulin were detected in a minor proportion of the isolates. This is the first report describing the detailed species composition and the secondary metabolite profiles of Aspergillus section Aspergillus contaminating animal feeds.

  8. Post-genomic insights into the plant polysaccharide degradation potential of Aspergillus nidulans and comparison to Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Pedro M.; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Kolenova, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    The plant polysaccharide degradative potential of Aspergillus nidulans was analysed in detail and compared to that of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae using a combination of bioinformatics, physiology and transcriptomics. Manual verification indicated that 28.4% of the A. nidulans ORFs...... on polysaccharides. Growth differences were observed between the Aspergilli and Podospora anserina, which has a more different genomic potential for polysaccharide degradation, suggesting that large genomic differences are required to cause growth differences oil polysaccharides, Differences were also detected...

  9. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles synthesized by Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and its antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities were investigated. Silver nanoparticles were extracellularly synthesized using Aspergillus flavus and the formation of nanoparticles was observed after 72 h of incubation. The results recorded from colour ...

  10. Genome sequence of Aspergillus luchuensis NBRC 4314

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Osamu; Machida, Masayuki; Hosoyama, Akira; Goto, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Toru; Futagami, Taiki; Yamagata, Youhei; Takeuchi, Michio; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Koike, Hideaki; Abe, Keietsu; Asai, Kiyoshi; Arita, Masanori; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Fukuda, Kazuro; Higa, Ken-ichi; Horikawa, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Takeaki; Jinno, Koji; Kato, Yumiko; Kirimura, Kohtaro; Mizutani, Osamu; Nakasone, Kaoru; Sano, Motoaki; Shiraishi, Yohei; Tsukahara, Masatoshi; Gomi, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    Awamori is a traditional distilled beverage made from steamed Thai-Indica rice in Okinawa, Japan. For brewing the liquor, two microbes, local kuro (black) koji mold Aspergillus luchuensis and awamori yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are involved. In contrast, that yeasts are used for ethanol fermentation throughout the world, a characteristic of Japanese fermentation industries is the use of Aspergillus molds as a source of enzymes for the maceration and saccharification of raw materials. Here we report the draft genome of a kuro (black) koji mold, A. luchuensis NBRC 4314 (RIB 2604). The total length of nonredundant sequences was nearly 34.7 Mb, comprising approximately 2,300 contigs with 16 telomere-like sequences. In total, 11,691 genes were predicted to encode proteins. Most of the housekeeping genes, such as transcription factors and N-and O-glycosylation system, were conserved with respect to Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae. An alternative oxidase and acid-stable α-amylase regarding citric acid production and fermentation at a low pH as well as a unique glutamic peptidase were also found in the genome. Furthermore, key biosynthetic gene clusters of ochratoxin A and fumonisin B were absent when compared with A. niger genome, showing the safety of A. luchuensis for food and beverage production. This genome information will facilitate not only comparative genomics with industrial kuro-koji molds, but also molecular breeding of the molds in improvements of awamori fermentation. PMID:27651094

  11. Enhanced lipase production by mutation induced Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the HNO2 mutant (AHN3) and 217% higher than the UV mutant (AUV3) and 276% higher lipase activity than the parent strain. The results indicated that UV, HNO2 and NTG treatment were effective physical and chemical mutagenic agents for strain improvement of Aspergillus japonicus for enhanced lipase productivity.

  12. Mycotic keratitis due to Aspergillus nomius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manikandan, P.; Varga, J.; Kocsube, S.; Samson, R.A.; Anita, R.; Revathi, R.; Doczi, I.; Nemeth, T.M.; Narendran, V.; Vagvolgyi, C.; Manoharan, C.; Kredics, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first known case of fungal keratitis caused by Aspergillus nomius. Ocular injury was known as a predisposing factor. The patient was treated with natamycin and econazole eye drops, itraconazole eye ointment, and oral ketoconazole. A therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was performed 16

  13. Characterization of Aspergillus species associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results also reveal that only A. flavus showed amplification with all the three aflatoxigenic primers apa-2, ver-1 and omt-1, which means that only A. flavus was identified as aflatoxigenic and other Aspergillus species as non-toxigenic after PCR analysis. Hence, morphological, microscopic and molecular methods are ...

  14. Aspergillus PCR: one step closer to standardization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, P.L.; Bretagne, S.; Klingspor, L.; Melchers, W.J.G.; McCulloch, E.; Schulz, B.; Finnstrom, N.; Mengoli, C.; Barnes, R.A.; Donnelly, J.P.; Loeffler, J.

    2010-01-01

    PCR has been used as an aid in the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis for almost 2 decades. A lack of standardization has limited both its acceptance as a diagnostic tool and multicenter clinical evaluations, preventing its inclusion in disease-defining criteria. In 2006, the European Aspergillus

  15. Global Population Genetic Analysis of Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashu, E.E.; Hagen, F.; Chowdhary, A.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Xu, J.

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a ubiquitous opportunistic fungal pathogen capable of causing invasive aspergillosis, a globally distributed disease with a mortality rate of up to 90% in high-risk populations. Effective control and prevention of this disease require a thorough understanding of its

  16. Morphogenesis and protein production in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwon, Min Jin

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis aims to get more fundamental insights in the molecular mechanisms used by Aspergillus niger in relation to control morphology and protein secretion. Knowledge on these two aspects is highly relevant to further optimization of A.niger as a cell factory

  17. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles synthesized by Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    agents. Keywords. Aspergillus flavus; silver nanoparticles; antimicrobial; antioxidant; cytotoxicity. 1. Introduction. Nanoparticles with controlled size and composition are of fundamental and technological interest as they provide solu- tions to technological and environmental challenges in the areas of solar energy conversion ...

  18. Overexpression, purification and characterization of the Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cellulases are industrially important hydrolytic enzymes applicable in the bioconversion of cellulosic biomass to simple sugars. In this work, an endoglucanase from Aspergillus niger ATCC 10574, EglA, was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris and the properties of the recombinant protein were ...

  19. Aspergillus DNA contamination in blood collection tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Stalhberger, Thomas; Whelan, Ruth; Sugrue, Michele; Wingard, John R; Alexander, Barbara D; Follett, Sarah A; Bowyer, Paul; Denning, David W

    2010-08-01

    Fungal polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostic methods are at risk for contamination. Sample collection containers were investigated for fungal DNA contamination using real-time PCR assays. Up to 18% of blood collection tubes were contaminated with fungal DNA, probably Aspergillus fumigatus. Lower proportions of contamination in other vessels were observed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Rare Cause of Headache: Aspergillus Sinusitis

    OpenAIRE

    Şehnaz Arıcı; Özge Özen Gökmuharremoğlu; Behiye Özer

    2015-01-01

    Fungal sinusitis are mostly seen in immunosuppressive individuals and somtimes which can be mortal. Most frequently species of Aspergillus were isolated from, clinical forms of mycotic sinonasal disease.Surgical debridement,sinus ventilation and medical therapy in treatment of fungal sinusitis, are recommended. In this article, a case of healthy immune patient with fungal sinusitis who peresent with headache was repoted.

  1. Phylogeny and subgeneric taxonomy of Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, S.W.; Varga, Janos; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2008-01-01

    The phylogeny of the genus Aspergillus and its teleomorphs is discussed based on multilocus sequence data. DNA sequence analysis was used to formulate a nucleotide sequence framework of the genus and to analyze character changes in relationship to the phylogeny hypothesized from the DNA sequence ...

  2. Avirulent mutants of Macrophomina phaseolina and Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 25; Issue 1. Avirulent mutants of Macrophomina phaseolina and Aspergillus fumigatus initiate infection in Phaseolus mungo in the presence of phaseo-linone; levamisole gives protection. Suchandra Sett Santosh K Mishra Kazia I Siddiqui. Articles Volume 25 Issue 1 March ...

  3. Biotransformation of Stypotriol triacetate by Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areche, Carlos; Vaca, Inmaculada; Labbe, Pamela; Soto-Delgado, Jorge; Astudillo, Luis; Silva, Mario; Rovirosa, Juana; San-Martin, Aurelio

    2011-07-01

    Biological transformation of the meroditerpenoid, stypotriol triacetate ( 1) by the fungi Aspergillus niger, Cunninghamella elegans, Gibberella fujikuroi and Mucor plumbeus was studied. The incubation of 1 with A. niger yielded the new compound 6',14-diacetoxy-stypol-4,5-dione ( 2) whose structure was established by 1H, 13C and 2D NMR and supported by DFT/GIAO.

  4. Mycotic Keratitis Due to Aspergillus nomius▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Palanisamy; Varga, János; Kocsubé, Sándor; Samson, Robert A.; Anita, Raghavan; Revathi, Rajaraman; Dóczi, Ilona; Németh, Tibor Mihály; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Manoharan, Chockaiya; Kredics, László

    2009-01-01

    We report the first known case of fungal keratitis caused by Aspergillus nomius. Ocular injury was known as a predisposing factor. The patient was treated with natamycin and econazole eye drops, itraconazole eye ointment, and oral ketoconazole. A therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was performed 16 days after presentation. A sequence-based approach was used to assign the isolate to a species. PMID:19710265

  5. Comparative Studies on Pectinases obtained from Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    Abstract. Pectinase was produced from Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, and A. niger) in a submerged fermentation system after 4 and 5 days of fermentation, respectively using pectin extracted from different agro-wastes (mango, orange and pineapple peels) as the carbon sources. The pectin was extracted from mango, ...

  6. Characterisation of Aspergillus niger prolyl aminopeptidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, E.J.W.; Moers, A.P.H.A.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.; Schaap, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have cloned a gene (papA) that encodes a prolyl aminopeptidase from Aspergillus niger. Homologous genes are present in the genomes of the Eurotiales A. nidulans, A. fumigatus and Talaromyces emersonii, but the gene is not present in the genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cell extracts

  7. Genomic Diversity in the Genus of Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo

    , and scientific model organisms. The phenotypic diversity in this genus is extraordinary and identifying the genetic basis for this diversity has great potential for academia and industry. When the genomic era began for Aspergillus in 2005 with the genome sequences of A. nidulans, A. oryzae and A. fumigatus...

  8. Clinical implications of environmental sources for Aspergillus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warris, A.; Verweij, P.E.

    2005-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis presents a formidable problem for both diagnosis and therapy. Therefore, prevention is a very important strategy in controlling this disease. Preventing invasive aspergillosis demands a clear understanding of the environmental sources of Aspergillus spp. and how this mould is

  9. Torsion of the accessory spleen with infarction : CT features in a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Jung Kyung; Lee, Jun Sik; Kim, Mee Eun; Pyun, Hae Wook; Lee, Il Gi; Lee, Jong Gil; Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Ik Su [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    Torsion of the accessory spleen is a rare entity that can have variable clinical presentations. We report case involving an 11-year-old boy with severe abdominal pain and a mass that was found to be due to infarction of the accessory spleen, which was twisted on its pedicle. CT revealed a low-attenuating mass with peripheral inflammatory changes in the left upper abdomen. The mass was pathologically confirmed as torsion of the accessory spleen with infarction. (author)

  10. Incomplete and accessory fissures of the lung evaluated by high-resolution computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heřmanová, Zuzana, E-mail: zuzana.hermanova2@fnol.cz; Čtvrtlík, Filip, E-mail: filip.ctvrtlik@fnol.cz; Heřman, Miroslav, E-mail: herman@fnol.cz

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to assess incomplete and accessory interlobar fissures using volumetric thin-section high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Materials and methods: Retrospective assessment of HRCT examinations of 250 patients was performed. We assessed the localization, extension, and type of the incompleteness of fissures as well as the presence and localization of accessory fissures. We searched for possible correlation among the localization of interlobar fissures, the presence of incompleteness, and accessory fissures. Results: On the left side, an incomplete oblique fissure was found in 24%. The discontinuity was present in the parahilar region and the area of the incompleteness was most frequently between 21% and 40%. The right oblique fissure was incomplete in 35%, mostly parahilarly, with the most frequent discontinuity below 20%. An incomplete horizontal fissure was found in 74%. Accessory fissures were identified in 16% of patients, with the same frequency on both sides. The most frequent finding was accessory horizontal fissure with 8.0% on the left side, superior accessory fissure (7.2%) and inferior accessory fissure (5.2%) on the right side. No correlation was found among the localization of interlobar fissures, the presence of incompleteness, and accessory fissures. Conclusion: Incomplete and accessory fissures are frequent anatomic variations of interlobar fissures.

  11. Aspergillus niger contains the cryptic phylogenetic species A. awamori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Giancarlo; Stea, Gaetano; Epifani, Filomena; Varga, János; Frisvad, Jens C; Samson, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    Aspergillus section Nigri is an important group of species for food and medical mycology, and biotechnology. The Aspergillus niger 'aggregate' represents its most complicated taxonomic subgroup containing eight morphologically indistinguishable taxa: A. niger, Aspergillus tubingensis, Aspergillus acidus, Aspergillus brasiliensis, Aspergillus costaricaensis, Aspergillus lacticoffeatus, Aspergillus piperis, and Aspergillus vadensis. Aspergillus awamori, first described by Nakazawa, has been compared taxonomically with other black aspergilli and recently it has been treated as a synonym of A. niger. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences generated from portions of three genes coding for the proteins β-tubulin (benA), calmodulin (CaM), and the translation elongation factor-1 alpha (TEF-1α) of a population of A. niger strains isolated from grapes in Europe revealed the presence of a cryptic phylogenetic species within this population, A. awamori. Morphological, physiological, ecological and chemical data overlap occurred between A. niger and the cryptic A. awamori, however the splitting of these two species was also supported by AFLP analysis of the full genome. Isolates in both phylospecies can produce the mycotoxins ochratoxin A and fumonisin B₂, and they also share the production of pyranonigrin A, tensidol B, funalenone, malformins, and naphtho-γ-pyrones. In addition, sequence analysis of four putative A. awamori strains from Japan, used in the koji industrial fermentation, revealed that none of these strains belong to the A. awamori phylospecies. Copyright © 2011 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. GSM accessories now available from the CERN Stores

    CERN Multimedia

    Labo Telecom

    2001-01-01

    As of 1st October you can order and receive GSM accessories from the CERN stores like any other article. The CERN stores also manage GSM telephones but, for technical reasons, only the Labo Telecom shop (Building 31, Room S026) is able to make the standard sales, repairs and exchanges for authorised persons with a CERN subscription. Labo Telecom will thus become a specialist shop, open from 11 a.m. to 12 a.m., and will apply the usual rules and authorisation procedures of the stores. The paper form for requests for GSM subscriptions is being computerized and will be available on EDH in the near future.

  13. Molecular population genetics of male accessory gland proteins in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Begun, D J; Whitley, P; Todd, B L; Waldrip-Dail, H M; Clark, A G

    2000-01-01

    Drosophila seminal proteins have an unusually high rate of molecular sequence evolution, suggesting either a high rate of neutral substitution or rapid adaptive evolution. To further quantify patterns of polymorphism and divergence in genes encoding seminal proteins, also called accessory gland proteins (Acp's), we conducted a sequencing survey of 10 Acp genes in samples of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans (Acp29AB, Acp32CD, Acp33A, Acp36DE, Acp53Ea, Acp62F, Acp63F, Acp76A, Acp95EF, an...

  14. Accessory breast tissue in axilla masquerading as breast cancer recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Shikha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic or accessory breast tissue is most commonly located in the axilla, though it may be present anywhere along the milk line. Development is hormone dependent, similar to normal breast tissue. These lesions do not warrant any intervention unless they produce discomfort, thus their identification and distinction from other breast pathologies, both benign and malignant, is essential. We report a case with locally advanced breast cancer who presented with an ipsilateral axillary mass following surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Subsequent evaluation with excision biopsy showed duct ectasia in axillary breast tissue and the patient was continued on hormone therapy with tamoxifen.

  15. Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noonim, Paramee; Mahakarnchanakul, Warapa; Varga, Janos

    2008-01-01

    Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans are described as Aspergillus aculeatinus sp. nov. and Aspergillus sclerotiicarbonarius sp. nov. Their taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach with phenotypic (morphology and extrolite profiles...

  16. 21 CFR 173.120 - Carbohydrase and cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger. Carbohydrase and cellulase enzyme preparation derived from Aspergillus niger may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Aspergillus niger is classified as follows: Class, Deuteromycetes; order, Moniliales; family, Moniliaceae...

  17. Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanakul, W.; Varga, J.; Frisvad, J.C.; Samson, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans are described as Aspergillus aculeatinus sp. nov. and Aspergillus sclerotiicarbonarius sp. nov. Their taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach with phenotypic (morphology and extrolite profiles) and

  18. Iatrogenic injury of the spinal accessory nerve. Results of repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, K; Tachibana, S

    1998-11-01

    We reviewed the results of repair of the spinal accessory nerve in seven patients seen between September 1994 and January 1996. The nerve had been injured during biopsy of a cervical lymph node in six patients and during removal of a bullet in one. The average interval between the time of the injury and the repair of the nerve was eight months (range, three to fourteen months). An end-to-end repair of the nerve was performed in six patients, and a neurolysis was done in one. The average duration of follow-up was thirty-two months (range, twenty-four to thirty-nine months). Postoperatively, all seven patients had relief of pain and stiffness in the shoulder girdle. Manual muscle-testing revealed normal strength of the trapezius, which was comparable with that on the unaffected side. Four patients regained normal function of the shoulder. Three patients reported a stretching sensation or discomfort in the neck, periscapular discomfort, and fatigue of the extremity when lifting heavy objects or performing overhead activities. However, these residual symptoms were mild and tolerable and thus were different in nature from the preoperative pain and stiffness. Iatrogenic injury of the spinal accessory nerve should be suspected if a patient has pain or stiffness in the shoulder girdle and a history of a recent operation on the neck. The nerve should be explored if spontaneous recovery does not occur.

  19. The accessory coracobrachialis muscle: ultrasound and MR features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauones, Salem [Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Department of Radiology, Hopital Saint-Luc, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Moraux, Antoine [Imagerie Medicale Jacquemars Gielee, Lille (France)

    2015-09-15

    To present the prevalence, clinical relevance, and ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of the accessory coracobrachialis (ACB) muscle. We present an US prospective study of the ACB muscle over a 2-year period. Five of the eight patients with suspected ACB on US were subsequently examined by MRI. An ACB muscle was demonstrated by US in eight patients (eight shoulders), including seven females, one male, with mean age 39 years, over 770 (664 patients) consecutive shoulder US examinations referred to our institution yielding a prevalence of 1.04 %. In dynamic US assessment, one case of subcoracoid impingement secondary to a bulky ACB was diagnosed. No thoracic outlet syndrome was encountered in the remaining cases. MRI confirmed the presence of the accessory muscle in five cases. ACB muscle is a rarely reported yet not uncommon anatomic variation of the shoulder musculature encountered only in eight of 664 patients referred for shoulder US study. Its US and MRI appearance is described. One of our patients presented with subcoracoid impingement related to the presence of an ACB. (orig.)

  20. Accessory subscapularis muscle - A forgotten variation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, L A S; Souza, C F C; Teixeira, A R; Leite, T F O; Babinski, M A; Chagas, C A A

    2017-06-01

    The quadrangular space is a space in the axilla bounded by the inferior margin of the teres minor muscle, the superior margin of the teres major muscle, the lateral margin of the long head of the triceps brachii muscle and the surgical neck of the humerus, medially. The axillary nerve (C5-C6) and the posterior circumflex humeral artery and veins pass through this space in order to supply their territories. The subscapularis muscle is situated into the scapular fossa and inserts itself into the lesser tubercle of the humerus, thus helping stabilize the shoulder joint. A supernumerary muscle known as accessory subscapularis muscle originates from the anterior surface of the muscle and usually inserts itself into the shoulder joint. It is a rare variation with few reports of its existence and incidence. We present a case of the accessory subscapularis muscle in a male cadaver fixated with a 10% formalin solution. The muscle passed anteriorly to the axillary nerve, thus, predisposing an individual to quadrangular space compression syndrome. We perform a review of the literature and address its clinical, anthropological and anatomical significance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Aspergillus bertholletius sp. nov. from Brazil nuts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta H Taniwaki

    Full Text Available During a study on the mycobiota of brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa in Brazil, a new Aspergillus species, A. bertholletius, was found, and is described here. A polyphasic approach was applied using morphological characters, extrolite data as well as partial β-tubulin, calmodulin and ITS sequences to characterize this taxon. A. bertholletius is represented by nineteen isolates from samples of brazil nuts at various stages of production and soil close to Bertholletia excelsa trees. The following extrolites were produced by this species: aflavinin, cyclopiazonic acid, kojic acid, tenuazonic acid and ustilaginoidin C. Phylogenetic analysis using partial β-tubulin and camodulin gene sequences showed that A. bertholletius represents a new phylogenetic clade in Aspergillus section Flavi. The type strain of A. bertholletius is CCT 7615 ( = ITAL 270/06 = IBT 29228.

  2. Aspergillus bertholletius sp. nov. from Brazil Nuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniwaki, Marta H.; Pitt, John I.; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.; Sartori, Daniele; Copetti, Marina V.; Balajee, Arun; Fungaro, Maria Helena P.; Frisvad, Jens C.

    2012-01-01

    During a study on the mycobiota of brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) in Brazil, a new Aspergillus species, A. bertholletius, was found, and is described here. A polyphasic approach was applied using morphological characters, extrolite data as well as partial β-tubulin, calmodulin and ITS sequences to characterize this taxon. A. bertholletius is represented by nineteen isolates from samples of brazil nuts at various stages of production and soil close to Bertholletia excelsa trees. The following extrolites were produced by this species: aflavinin, cyclopiazonic acid, kojic acid, tenuazonic acid and ustilaginoidin C. Phylogenetic analysis using partial β-tubulin and camodulin gene sequences showed that A. bertholletius represents a new phylogenetic clade in Aspergillus section Flavi. The type strain of A. bertholletius is CCT 7615 ( = ITAL 270/06 = IBT 29228). PMID:22952594

  3. Polyphasic taxonomy of Aspergillus section Cervini

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, A.J.; Varga, J.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2016-01-01

    Species belonging to Aspergillus section Cervini are characterised by radiate or short columnar, fawn coloured, uniseriate conidial heads. The morphology of the taxa in this section is very similar and isolates assigned to these species are frequently misidentified. In this study, a polyphasic ap....... christenseniae, A. novoguineensis, A. subnutans, A. transcarpathicus and A. wisconsinensis. A dichotomous key for the identification is provided....

  4. Aspergillus species: An emerging pathogen in onychomycosis among diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T M Wijesuriya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Approximately, 33% patients with diabetes are afflicted with onychomycosis. In the past, nondermatophyte molds have been regarded as opportunistic pathogens; recently, Aspergillus species are considered as emerging pathogens of toenail infections. In Sri Lanka, the prevalence of Aspergillus species in onychomycosis among diabetics is not well documented. Objective: To determine the proportion of Aspergillus onychomycosis, risk factors and knowledge among diabetics. Materials and Methods: This was descriptive cross-sectional study. Three hundred diabetic patients were included. Clinical examinations of patients' toenails were performed by a clinical microbiologist. Laboratory identification was done, and pathogens were identified to the species level by morpho-physiological methods. All inferential statistics were tested at P age group. In men, Aspergillus onycomycosis was seen in 82%. Among patients who had Aspergillus nail infection, 114 (63% had diabetes for a period of > years. Among patients who were engaged in agricultural activities, 77% were confirmed to have infected nails due to Aspergillus species. Conclusion: Aspergillus niger was the most common pathogen isolated from toenail infection. Aspergillus species should be considered as an important pathogen in toenail onychomycosis in diabetic patients. Risk factors associated with Aspergillus onychomycosis were age, gender, duration of diabetes, length of exposure to fungi, and occupation.

  5. Comparative Reannotation of 21 Aspergillus Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamov, Asaf; Riley, Robert; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-03-08

    We used comparative gene modeling to reannotate 21 Aspergillus genomes. Initial automatic annotation of individual genomes may contain some errors of different nature, e.g. missing genes, incorrect exon-intron structures, 'chimeras', which fuse 2 or more real genes or alternatively splitting some real genes into 2 or more models. The main premise behind the comparative modeling approach is that for closely related genomes most orthologous families have the same conserved gene structure. The algorithm maps all gene models predicted in each individual Aspergillus genome to the other genomes and, for each locus, selects from potentially many competing models, the one which most closely resembles the orthologous genes from other genomes. This procedure is iterated until no further change in gene models is observed. For Aspergillus genomes we predicted in total 4503 new gene models ( ~;;2percent per genome), supported by comparative analysis, additionally correcting ~;;18percent of old gene models. This resulted in a total of 4065 more genes with annotated PFAM domains (~;;3percent increase per genome). Analysis of a few genomes with EST/transcriptomics data shows that the new annotation sets also have a higher number of EST-supported splice sites at exon-intron boundaries.

  6. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... appliances and accessories. 888.3030 Section 888.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3030 Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories. (a) Identification...

  7. 77 FR 15390 - Certain Handbags, Luggage, Accessories, and Packaging Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... COMMISSION Certain Handbags, Luggage, Accessories, and Packaging Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements on... covering handbags, luggage, accessories, and packaging thereof that infringe U.S. Trademark Registration... impact consumers in the United States. Written submissions must be filed no later than by close of...

  8. Origin of left accessory hepatic artery from the left gastric artery in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of accessory hepatic artery that arose from the left gastric artery, entered the liver at an independent site from the porta hepatis to supply the left lobe of the liver. Transplantation of such livers with multi vascular pedicles may pose a challenge during anastomosis of these accessory hepatic arteries of the ...

  9. 14 CFR 221.52 - Airport to airport application, accessorial services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport to airport application, accessorial... Charges § 221.52 Airport to airport application, accessorial services. Tariffs shall specify whether or not the fares therein include services in addition to airport-to-airport transportation. ...

  10. An epidermoid cyst of accessory spleen simulating tumors of the tail of pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Sinha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An epidermoid cyst of accessory spleen, a rare condition may present as pseudocyst of pancreas and other cystic tumors of the pancreas. This case report along with the review of literature attributes some clinical features and investigative pattern to differentiate between epidermoid cyst of accessory spleen and other cystic tumor of pancreas.

  11. Design of Fashion Accessories Using Akwa-Ocha Motifs and Symbols

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The exploration of Akwa-Ocha motifs and symbols for the design of fashion accessories for obvious reasons include creating an identity, checking the emphasis already placed on foreign fashion accessories, creating awareness and projecting one of Nigeria's rich cultural heritages. Key Words: Akwa-Ocha, motifs, symbols, ...

  12. 21 CFR 878.4400 - Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and....4400 Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories. (a) Identification. An electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories is a device intended to remove tissue and control...

  13. 77 FR 5420 - Airworthiness Directives; Aeronautical Accessories Inc. High Landing Gear Aft Crosstube Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Accessories Inc. High Landing Gear Aft Crosstube Assembly AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... (AD) for the Aeronautical Accessories Inc. (AAI) High Landing Gear Aft Crosstube Assembly (aft... aft crosstube assembly, removing paint and sealant, and fluorescent penetrant inspecting each aft...

  14. 77 FR 37768 - Airworthiness Directives; Aeronautical Accessories, Inc., High Landing Gear Aft Crosstube Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... Accessories, Inc., High Landing Gear Aft Crosstube Assembly AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... Accessories, Inc. (AAI), High Landing Gear Aft Crosstube Assembly (aft crosstube) installed on certain Bell...) Applicability This AD applies to High Landing Gear Aft Crosstube Assembly (aft crosstube) part number (P/N) 412...

  15. Accessory mental foramina, incisive nerve plexus and lingual canals with unusual emergence paths: Report of two rare cases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haghanifar, Sina; Poorsattar Bejeh Mir, Arash

    2015-01-01

    .... The first case was 62 years old and was found to have two accessory mental foramina with buccal emergence on the left side and two accessory mental foramina with buccal and lingual emergence paths on the right side...

  16. Chloroquine inhibits accessory cell presentation of soluble natural and synthetic protein antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the in vitro effect of the lysosomotrophic agent, chloroquine, on the presentation of soluble protein antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. Chloroquine inhibited the capacity of antigen-pulsed accessory cells to stimulate proliferation in appropriately primed T cells. The effect...... acts on an early event in the antigen handling by accessory cells. Chloroquine is a well known inhibitor of lysosomal proteolysis, and it is likely that its effect on antigen presentation is caused by an inhibition of antigen degradation....... was time- and dose-dependent. A brief treatment solely of the accessory cells with the drug compromised their ability to stimulate primed T cells in a subsequent culture provided the accessory cells were treated with chloroquine before their exposure to the antigen. These results suggest that chloroquine...

  17. Intra and extracellular nuclease production by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Adlane V. B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra and extracellular nuclease production by strains of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans was estimated using a modified DNAse test agar and cell-free extract assays. Differences in the production of nucleases by A. niger and A. nidulans were observed. These observations suggest that the DNAse test agar can be helpful for a quick screening for some types of nucleases in filamentous fungi. The assays using cell-free extracts can also be useful for initial characterization of other types of nucleases.

  18. Antibiotic Extraction as a Recent Biocontrol Method for Aspergillus Niger andAspergillus Flavus Fungi in Ancient Egyptian mural paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemdan, R. Elmitwalli; Fatma, Helmi M.; Rizk, Mohammed A.; Hagrassy, Abeer F.

    Biodeterioration of mural paintings by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus Fungi has been proved in different mural paintings in Egypt nowadays. Several researches have studied the effect of fungi on mural paintings, the mechanism of interaction and methods of control. But none of these researches gives us the solution without causing a side effect. In this paper, for the first time, a recent treatment by antibiotic "6 penthyl α pyrone phenol" was applied as a successful technique for elimination of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. On the other hand, it is favorable for cleaning Surfaces of Murals executed by tembera technique from the fungi metabolism which caused a black pigments on surfaces.

  19. Successful catheter ablation of a left anterior accessory pathway from the non-coronary cusp of the aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjo, Sérgio; Oliveira, Mário; Trigo, Conceição

    2015-08-01

    Left anterior accessory pathways are considered to be rare findings. Catheter ablation of accessory pathways in this location remains a challenging target, and few reports about successful ablation of these accessory pathways are available. We describe our experience regarding a case of a manifest left anterior accessory pathway ablation using radiofrequency energy at the junction of the left coronary cusp with the non-coronary cusp.

  20. Anatomical study of spinal accessory nerve using ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canella, Clarissa [Service de Radiologie et d’Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultations et d’Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU, 59037, Lille (France); Serviço de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem, Universitadade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de janeiro (Brazil); Demondion, Xavier [Service de Radiologie et d’Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultations et d’Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU, 59037, Lille (France); Laboratoire d’Anatomie, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, 59037, Lille (France); Abreu, Evandro [Service de Radiologie et d’Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultations et d’Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU, 59037, Lille (France); Marchiori, Edson [Serviço de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem, Universitadade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de janeiro (Brazil); Cotten, Hervé [Anatomie et cytologie pathologiques, Bd de la Liberté, 59000, Lille (France); Cotten, Anne, E-mail: anne.cotten@chru-lille.fr [Service de Radiologie et d’Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultations et d’Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU, 59037, Lille (France)

    2013-01-15

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to demonstrate that ultrasonography may allow a precise assessment of the course and relationships of the spinal accessory nerve (SAN). Material and methods: This study, initially undertaken in 7 cadavers, was followed by high-resolution ultrasonographic study in 15 volunteers (30 nerves) by two radiologists in consensus. The location, course and relations to the adjacent anatomic structures of the SAN were analyzed. Results: The precise course of the SAN between the lateroposterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the anterior border of the trapezius muscle could be identified by high-resolution ultrasonography. In contrast, clinical bone landmarks were not found helpful for the identification of the nerve. Conclusion: The SAN can be clearly depicted by means of ultrasonography. Knowledge of the nerve's precise location, which may evidence individual variations, may have useful clinical applications.

  1. Multicopper manganese oxidase accessory proteins bind Cu and heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Cristina N; Tao, Lizhi; Chacón, Kelly N; Spiro, Thomas G; Blackburn, Ninian J; Casey, William H; Britt, R David; Tebo, Bradley M

    2015-12-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) catalyze the oxidation of a diverse group of metal ions and organic substrates by successive single-electron transfers to O2 via four bound Cu ions. MnxG, which catalyzes MnO2 mineralization by oxidizing both Mn(II) and Mn(III), is unique among multicopper oxidases in that it carries out two energetically distinct electron transfers and is tightly bound to accessory proteins. There are two of these, MnxE and MnxF, both approximately 12kDa. Although their sequences are similar to those found in the genomes of several Mn-oxidizing Bacillus species, they are dissimilar to those of proteins with known function. Here, MnxE and MnxF are co-expressed independent of MnxG and are found to oligomerize into a higher order stoichiometry, likely a hexamer. They bind copper and heme, which have been characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and UV-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry. Cu is found in two distinct type 2 (T2) copper centers, one of which appears to be novel; heme is bound as a low-spin species, implying coordination by two axial ligands. MnxE and MnxF do not oxidize Mn in the absence of MnxG and are the first accessory proteins to be required by an MCO. This may indicate that Cu and heme play roles in electron transfer and/or Cu trafficking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Male accessory gland proteins induce female monogamy in anopheline mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutt, B; Stables, L; Aboagye-Antwi, F; Moran, J; Tripet, F

    2010-03-01

    The role of male accessory gland (MAG) secretions in inducing refractoriness to further mating in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) was established in the late 1960s. In a set of simple experiments, MAG extract was injected intra-thoraxically into the hemocoel of virgin Aedes aegypti (L.), Culex pipiens pipiens (L.) and Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say females. This subsequently caused most females to remain unmated when exposed to males. For anophelines these findings were later challenged by a study involving intra-abdominal injections of MAG extracts into Anopheles gambiae Giles s.l. and Anopheles albimanus Wiedmann females, which failed to induce refractoriness to further mating. These findings led to controversy about the respective role of sperm and accessory gland peptides in inducing female monogamy in Anopheles and are at odds with our current understanding of the mating process in Drosophila spp. (Diptera: Drosophillidae) and other dipterans. Here we confirm the function of MAG secretions in anophelines experimentally by showing that intra-thoracic injections in Anopheles stephensi Liston and in the M and S molecular forms of An. gambiae s.s. result in the expected female monogamy. Cross-injections of MAG extracts between the M and S molecular forms of An. gambiae, two cryptic taxa within An. gambiae s.s. which are thought to be undergoing incipient speciation, also elicited effective refractoriness, suggesting that the two sub-taxa have not diverged with regard to sex peptides responsible for female monogamy. Importantly, this also suggests that the rare cases of re-mating following cross-mating observed in this species may not be a form of reproductive barrier between molecular forms.

  3. Aspergillus tanneri sp. nov, a new pathogenic Aspergillus that causes invasive disease refractory to antifungal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the first report documenting fatal invasive aspergillosis caused by a new pathogenic Aspergillus species that is inherently resistant to antifungal drugs. Phenotypic characteristics of A. tanneri combined with the molecular approach enabled diagnosis of this new pathogen. This study undersco...

  4. Aspergillus pragensis sp nov discovered during molecular reidentification of clinical isolates belonging to Aspergillus section Candidi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyskova, Pavlina; Hubka, Vit; Kolarik, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    The identity of nine clinical isolates recovered from Czech patients and presumptively identified as Aspergillus sp. section Candidi based on colony morphology was revised using sequences of beta-tubulin, calmodulin gene sequence, and internal transcribed spacer rDNA. Six isolates were from suspe...

  5. Species of Aspergillus section Aspergillus from clinical samples in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, João P Z; Sutton, Deanna A; Gené, Josepa; García, Dania; Wiederhold, Nathan; Guarro, Josep

    2017-10-09

    The diversity of Aspergillus species in clinical samples is continuously increasing. Species under the former name Eurotium, currently accommodated in section Aspergillus of the genus Aspergillus, are xerophilic fungi widely found in the human environment and able to grow on substrates with low water activity. However, their prevalence in the clinical setting is poorly known. We have studied the presence of these species in a set of clinical samples from the United States using a multilocus sequence analysis based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the rRNA, and fragments of the genes β-tubulin (BenA), calmodulin (CaM), and polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2). A total of 25 isolates were studied and identified as follows: A. montevidensis (44%), A. chevalieri (36%), A. pseudoglaucus (8%), and A. costiformis (4%). A new species Aspergillus microperforatus is also proposed, which represented 8% of the isolates studied and is characterized by uniseriate conidial heads, subglobose to pyriform vesicles, rough conidia, globose to subglobose cleistothecia, and lenticular and smooth ascospores. The in vitro antifungal activity of eight clinically available antifungals was also determined against these isolates, with the echinocandins and posaconazole having the most potent activity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Evaluation of Aspergillus PCR Protocols for Testing Serum Specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, P.L.; Mengoli, C.; Bretagne, S.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Finnstrom, N.; Klingspor, L.; Melchers, W.J.G.; McCulloch, E.; Barnes, R.A.; Donnelly, J.P.; Loeffler, J.

    2011-01-01

    A panel of human serum samples spiked with various amounts of Aspergillus fumigatus genomic DNA was distributed to 23 centers within the European Aspergillus PCR Initiative to determine analytical performance of PCR. Information regarding specific methodological components and PCR performance was

  7. Genetic diversity of ochratoxigenic Aspergillus section Nigri , using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates the genetic diversity of ochratoxigenic Aspergillus section Nigri using RAPD and VCG techniques. Results obtained revealed OPX 07 as the most informative of the tested RAPD markers generating 12 polymorphic bands while the least bands were generated by OPR 19. Of the 40 Aspergillus section ...

  8. Assessment of Aspergillus niger biofilm growth kinetics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... assessed by evaluating the CO2 released during the fermentation in minibioreactors. Key words: Aspergillus niger, biofilm, mathematical modeling, endogenous respiration, Cryo-SEM. INTRODUCTION. Aspergillus niger is currently one of the microbial species of main biotechnological importance because ...

  9. screening and improvement of local isolates of aspergillus niger for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The study involved the screening of fourteen isolates of Aspergillus niger for citric acid production from glucose. The study was aimed at screening and improving local strains of Aspergillus niger with potential for citric acid production. All the isolates screened produced varying amounts of citric acid, the highest ...

  10. Aspergillus Monitoring Project in a Large Educational Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All specimens were transported to Medical Mycology Center for the detection and identification of Aspergillus species using morphological methods. Also molecular method, PCR-RFLP using single restriction enzyme as a rapid and available method was performed to investigate environmental sources of Aspergillus ...

  11. What can Aspergillus flavus genome offer for mycotoxin research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genomic study of filamentous fungi has made significant advances in recent years, and the genomes of several species in the genus Aspergillus have been sequenced, including Aspergillus flavus. This ubiquitous mold is present as a saprobe in a wide range of agricultural and natural habits, and c...

  12. Fatal coinfection with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 8 and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillouzouic, Aurélie; Bemer, Pascale; Gay-Andrieu, Françoise; Bretonnière, Cédric; Lepelletier, Didier; Mahé, Pierre-Joachim; Villers, Daniel; Jarraud, Sophie; Reynaud, Alain; Corvec, Stéphane

    2008-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. We report on a patient who simultaneously developed L. pneumophila serogroup 8 pneumonia and Aspergillus fumigatus lung abscesses. Despite appropriate treatments, Aspergillus disease progressed with metastasis. Coinfections caused by L. pneumophila and A. fumigatus remain exceptional. In apparently immunocompetent patients, corticosteroid therapy is a key risk factor for aspergillosis.

  13. Specific detection of Aspergillus fumigatus in sputum sample of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We developed a two-step PCR assay that specifically amplifies a region of the 18S rRNA gene that is highly conserved in Aspergillus fumigatus. This assay allows direct and rapid detection of down to 10 fg of Aspergillus fumigatus DNA corresponding to 1 to 5 colony forming unit (CFU) per ml of sputum sample of pulmonary ...

  14. The Inhibition of aflatoxin production from Aspergillus parasiticus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inhibition of Aflatoxin production from Aspergillus parasiticus strain NRRL 2999 was investigated using ethanol extracts of Aframommon danielli flower at concentrations of 250ìg/g, 500ìg/g, 750ìg/g and 1000ìg/g with whole wheat bread as a substrate. Aspergillus parasiticus grew abundantly on whole wheat bread; ...

  15. Rhizospheric Aspergillus flavus as a Possible Contaminant of Maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemist

    2012-04-26

    Apr 26, 2012 ... Horn BW, Dorner JW, Greene RL, Blankenship PD, Cole RJ (1994). Effect of Aspergillus parasiticus soil inoculum on invasion of peanut seeds. Mycopathology, 125: 179-191. Jeffrey D, Palumbo, Teresa L, O'Keeffe, Ali K, Hamed KA, Bobbie JJ. (2010). Inhibition of Aspergillus flavus in Soil by Antagonistic.

  16. Aspergillus fumigatus conidial melanin modulates host cytokine response.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, L.; Netea, M.G.; Sugui, J.; Vonk, A.G.; Sande, W.W. van de; Warris, A.; Kwon-Chung, K.J.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Melanin biopigments have been linked to fungal virulence. Aspergillus fumigatus conidia are melanised and are weakly immunogenic. We show that melanin pigments on the surface of resting Aspergillus fumigatus conidia may serve to mask pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs)-induced cytokine

  17. Aspergillus fumigatus conidial melanin modulates host cytokine response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y.A. Chai (Louis); M.G. Netea (Mihai); J. Sugui (Janyce); A.G. Vonk (Alieke); W.W.J. van de Sande (Wendy); A. Warris (Adilia); K.J. Kwon-Chung (Kyung); B. Jan Kullberg (Bart)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMelanin biopigments have been linked to fungal virulence. Aspergillus fumigatus conidia are melanised and are weakly immunogenic. We show that melanin pigments on the surface of resting Aspergillus fumigatus conidia may serve to mask pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs)-induced

  18. Spectrophotometric reading of EUCAST antifungal susceptibility testing of Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meletiadis, J.; Mortensen, K.L.; Verweij, P.E.; Mouton, J.W.; Arendrup, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Given the increasing number of antifungal drugs and the emergence of resistant Aspergillus isolates, objective, automated and high-throughput antifungal susceptibility testing is important. The EUCAST E.Def 9.3 reference method for MIC determination of Aspergillus species relies on

  19. New and revisited species in Aspergillus section Nigri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, J.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Kocsube, S.

    2011-01-01

    aurasperone B and pyranonigrin A. Aspergillus fijiensis is a uniseriate species related to A. aculeatinus, and was isolated from soil in Fiji, and from Lactuca saliva in Indonesia. This species is able to grow at 37 degrees C, and produces asperparalines and okaramins. Aspergillus indologenus was isolated...

  20. Effect of Environmental Factors on the Growth of Aspergillus Species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mycotoxins of public health importance (Ehrlich,. 2007). As such, the occurrence of Aspergillus secondary metabolites in food stuffs such as millet grains is becoming an increasing environmental concern. The presence of Aspergillus species in stored millet may pose a threat to the health of both humans and livestock.

  1. Density and Molecular Epidemiology of Aspergillus in Air and Relationship to Outbreaks of Aspergillus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Alexander C. A. P.; van Belkum, Alex; Behrendt, Myra; Luijendijk, Ad; Verbrugh, Henri A.

    1999-01-01

    After five patients were diagnosed with nosocomial invasive aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus, a 14-month surveillance program for pathogenic and nonpathogenic fungal conidia in the air within and outside the University Hospital in Rotterdam (The Netherlands) was begun. A. fumigatus isolates obtained from the Department of Hematology were studied for genetic relatedness by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. This was repeated with A. fumigatus isolates contaminating culture media in the microbiology laboratory. The density of the conidia of nonpathogenic fungi in the outside air showed a seasonal variation: higher densities were measured during the summer, while lower densities were determined during the fall and winter. Hardly any variation was found in the numbers of Aspergillus conidia. We found decreasing numbers of conidia when comparing air from outside the hospital to that inside the hospital and when comparing open areas within the hospital to the closed department of hematology. The increase in the number of patients with invasive aspergillosis could not be explained by an increase in the number of Aspergillus conidia in the outside air. The short-term presence of A. flavus can only be explained by the presence of a point source, which was probably patient related. Genotyping A. fumigatus isolates from the department of hematology showed that clonally related isolates were persistently present for more than 1 year. Clinical isolates of A. fumigatus obtained during the outbreak period were different from these persistent clones. A. fumigatus isolates contaminating culture media were all genotypically identical, indicating a causative point source. Knowledge of the epidemiology of Aspergillus species is necessary for the development of strategies to prevent invasive aspergillosis. RAPD fingerprinting of Aspergillus isolates can help to determine the cause of an outbreak of invasive aspergillosis. PMID:10325319

  2. Expression of Aspergillus hemoglobin domain activities in Aspergillus oryzae grown on solid substrates improves growth rate and enzyme production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesebeke, te R.; Boussier, A.; Biezen van, N.; Braaksma, M.; Hondel, van den C.A.M.J.J.; Vos, de W.M.; Punt, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    DNA fragments coding for hemoglobin domains (HBD) were isolated from Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus niger. The HBD activities were expressed in A. oryzae by introduction of HBD gene fragments under the control of the promoter of the constitutively expressed gpdA gene. In the transformants,

  3. Human T-cell responses to Aspergillus fumigatus : In healthy individuals and patients with Aspergillus-related disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jolink, H.

    2017-01-01

    The T-cell mediated immune response to Aspergillus fumigatus was studied in healthy individuals and in several patient groups. In peripheral blood of healthy individuals low frequencies of Aspergillus-specific CD4+ T-cells with a Thelper 1 profile were present. In patients with invasive

  4. Aspergillus Sydowi Infection of Human Finger Nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Barde

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Aspergillus sydowi infection of left middle finger nail is described ′ The presence of fungal hypae with phialids and spores on direct microscopy as well as in culture, the colour of the sub-ungual mass of the nail resembling the colour of the fungus in, culture′ repeated isolations of A sydowi from the diseased tissue along with the absence of any established pathogenic species in the specimen are taken as evidences that this fungus was invading the nail tissue.

  5. Aspergillus bertholletius sp. nov. from Brazil Nuts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taniwaki, Marta H.; Pitt, John I.; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.

    2012-01-01

    During a study on the mycobiota of brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) in Brazil, a new Aspergillus species, A. bertholletius, was found, and is described here. A polyphasic approach was applied using morphological characters, extrolite data as well as partial beta-tubulin, calmodulin and ITS...... sequences to characterize this taxon. A. bertholletius is represented by nineteen isolates from samples of brazil nuts at various stages of production and soil close to Bertholletia excelsa trees. The following extrolites were produced by this species: aflavinin, cyclopiazonic acid, kojic acid, tenuazonic...

  6. Characterization of the core and accessory genomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using bioinformatic tools Spine and AGEnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Egon A; Allen, Jonathan P; Hauser, Alan R

    2014-08-29

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen responsible for many infections in hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. Previous reports estimated that approximately 10% of its 6.6 Mbp genome varies from strain to strain and is therefore referred to as "accessory genome". Elements within the accessory genome of P. aeruginosa have been associated with differences in virulence and antibiotic resistance. As whole genome sequencing of bacterial strains becomes more widespread and cost-effective, methods to quickly and reliably identify accessory genomic elements in newly sequenced P. aeruginosa genomes will be needed. We developed a bioinformatic method for identifying the accessory genome of P. aeruginosa. First, the core genome was determined based on sequence conserved among the completed genomes of twelve reference strains using Spine, a software program developed for this purpose. The core genome was 5.84 Mbp in size and contained 5,316 coding sequences. We then developed an in silico genome subtraction program named AGEnt to filter out core genomic sequences from P. aeruginosa whole genomes to identify accessory genomic sequences of these reference strains. This analysis determined that the accessory genome of P. aeruginosa ranged from 6.9-18.0% of the total genome, was enriched for genes associated with mobile elements, and was comprised of a majority of genes with unknown or unclear function. Using these genomes, we showed that AGEnt performed well compared to other publically available programs designed to detect accessory genomic elements. We then demonstrated the utility of the AGEnt program by applying it to the draft genomes of two previously unsequenced P. aeruginosa strains, PA99 and PA103. The P. aeruginosa genome is rich in accessory genetic material. The AGEnt program accurately identified the accessory genomes of newly sequenced P. aeruginosa strains, even when draft genomes were used. As P. aeruginosa genomes become available

  7. Identificação de Aspergillus spp: toxigênico em arroz Identification of toxigenic Aspergillus spp: in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ívina Catarina de Oliveira Guimarães

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A composição química e o modo de cultivo do arroz o tornam susceptível à contaminação fúngica e, consequentemente, por micotoxinas. Considerando-se o expressivo consumo de arroz e a possibilidade de ser potencial fonte de micotoxinas, especial atenção deve ser dispensada quanto à qualidade do produto adquirido. Assim, o presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar espécies do gênero Aspergillus quanto à capacidade toxigênica, em diferentes subgrupos de arroz. As amostras constituíram-se de 31 marcas de arroz referentes aos subgrupos branco polido (21 e parboilizado (10, mais comumente comercializadas na cidade de Lavras - MG. Ao contrário dos outros subgrupos, a incidência de Aspergillus flavus e Aspergillus niger em amostras de arroz branco polido aumentou significativamente após a desinfecção. Pôde-se observar que, 50% dos Aspergillus flavus e 50% dos Aspergillus niger encontrados, foram considerados toxigênicos para o subgrupo branco polido. Na amostra de arroz parboilizado, 67% dos Aspergillus flavus eram potenciais produtores. O Aspergillus ochraceus não se revelou como toxigênico. Este estudo permitiu concluir que, apesar de trabalhos isolados, a presença de fungos toxigênicos em arroz é verídico, o que se torna relevante por se tratar de um cereal importante no cenário mundial.The chemical composition and its methods of cultivation, make rice plants susceptible to fungi and consequently to mycotoxins contamination. Considering the expressive rice consumption and given the possibility that it maybe a potential source of mycotoxins, special attention should be devoted to its quality. Thus, this study was carried out to evaluate the Aspergillus species as to its toxigenic capacities in different rice subgroups. Thirty one and rice brands among the most popular brands sold in the city of Lavras - MG, were collected as samples, (21 polished white and (10 parboiled, respectively. Unlike other subgroups, the

  8. A prospective survey of Aspergillus spp. in respiratory tract samples: prevalence, clinical impact and antifungal susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K L; Johansen, H K; Fuursted, K

    2011-01-01

    . Azole MICs were elevated for five isolates as follows (itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole MICs [mg/L]): two A. fumigatus isolates (>4; >4; 2 and >4; 0.125; 1), one A. lentulus isolate (2; 2; 0.5) and two A. terreus isolates (2; 2; 2 and 2; 0.125; 1). For four isolates the amphotericin B MIC was >1...

  9. Accessory Mineral Geochronology and Trace Element Fingerprinting of Metamorphic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, A.

    2009-05-01

    Zircon and monazite are the most versatile tools for geochronological studies in magmatic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. New trace element techniques are now used to link growth and modification to pressure and temperature evolution of magmatic and metamorphic rocks and to coexisting minerals. Studies on the distribution of rare earth elements (REE) have mainly focused on garnet and zircon relationships and which distribution patterns constitute equilibrium under different metamorphic conditions. But a more detailed understanding of the growth and modification processes of accessory phases is needed to provide better constraints for genetic models and multiple method datasets (U-Pb, REE, trace element thermometry, imaging) is essential. We use this approach on examples from high-temperature low-pressure granulites of Rogaland (SW Norway) and UHT medium pressure granulites from the Labwor Hills (Uganda) to illustrate the influence of major and accessory mineral reactions on the trace element signature of zircon and monazite. Relatively flat zircon HREE patterns, often associated with coexisting garnet, can also be found in orthopyroxene-bearing, garnet free assemblages. The zircon-opx distribution patterns are similar to zircon-garnet pairs from UHT leucosomes and granulites. Some garnet-bearing granulites are characterized by zircon overgrowths with xenotime inclusions and elevated Y- and HREE-contents, interpreted to reflect garnet breakdown at high T. Zircon and monazite in Labwor Hills metasedimentary granulites both have modified domains. Monazite has low Th rims that yield erroneous high chemical ages, interpreted to be due to loss of Th, while remnants of radiogenic Pb remain during the recrystallization process. Zircon in contrast has high Th rims and domains along sealed cracks that are characterized by anomalously high Th/U ratios (not previously associated with metamorphic growth or modification) and unusual REE patterns. These features are

  10. Competition of chemically related antigens for presentation by accessory cells to T cells requires expenditure of metabolic energy by the accessory cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, O; Buus, S

    1983-01-01

    antigens for presentation by accessory cells. Furthermore, the two antigens do not compete for presentation when the accessory cells are exposed to them at 1 degree C, suggesting that endocytosis and/or other energy-requiring cellular events are necessary for the competition....... incapable of presenting DNP-PLL to responsive T cells in assays for proliferation, by in vitro exposure of the cells to GL before and during their exposure to DNP-PLL. We demonstrate here that the presence of anti-Ia antibody in the cultures does not interfere with the apparent competition of the two......The immune responsiveness of guinea pigs both to dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine (DNP-PLL) and to the lysine-rich random copolymer of L-glutamic acid and L-lysine (GL) is controlled by the 'poly-L-lysine gene'. We have previously demonstrated that accessory cells of responder strains can be made...

  11. 21 CFR 878.4200 - Introduction/drainage catheter and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... body cavities other than blood vessels, drain fluids from body cavities, or evaluate certain... accessory is intended to aid in the manipulation of or insertion of the device into the body. Examples of...

  12. The Online Marketing Research on the Factors of Competitiveness of Enterprises in the Computer Accessory Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashkina Oksana I.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at identifyng the factors of competitiveness of enterprises in the market for computer accessories (on the example of the «ZONA51» store and suggesting certain actions as to creating and strengthening competitive advantages. The main competitors of the enterprise, which offer computer accessories, as well as the basic preferences of consumers in choosing the game-oriented computer accessories, have been explored. The study has found that price and active Internet communications are the main factors in the competitiveness of enterprises in the market for computer accessories. It is also important to use communicative channels such as «word-of-mouth marketing» for specific types of goods. The target audience of the products analyzed is young people, so it is also important to advertise resources near the places of youth gatherings to provide active communications. Further studies should consider the factors of competitiveness of Internet shops with different orientation.

  13. Hidden female physiological resistance to male accessory gland substances in a simultaneous hermaphrodite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodi, Monica; Koene, Joris M

    2017-01-01

    To increase fertilization chances compared with rivals, males are favoured to transfer accessory gland proteins to females during mating. These substances, by influencing female physiology, cause alteration of her sperm usage and remating rate. Simultaneously hermaphroditic land snails with

  14. Self-Image Enhancement through Branded Accessories among Youths: A Phenomenological Study in India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anitha Acharya; Manish Gupta

    2016-01-01

    .... The center of the debate appears to be that branded fashion accessories involvement is likely to be associated with differences in sensitivity to one's social surroundings (Auty & Elliott, 1998). The question...

  15. Expression of accessory molecules and cytokines in acute EAE in marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laman, J.D.; Meurs, M. van; Schellekens, M.M.; Boer, M. de; Melchers, B.; Massacesi, L.; Lassmann, H.; Claassen, E.; Hart, B.A. 't

    1998-01-01

    Accessory molecules and cytokines are involved in the immunopathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rodent models, and are potential targets for immunotherapy. Evaluation of such experimental therapies requires appropriate animal models.

  16. Centrifugal telencephalic afferent connections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; de Moya-Pinilla, Miguel; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2012-01-01

    Parallel to the olfactory system, most mammals possess an accessory olfactory or vomeronasal system. The olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, which in turn project to adjacent areas of the telencephalon, respectively. New data indicate that projections arising from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs partially converge in the rostral telencephalon and are non-overlapping at caudal telencephalic levels. Therefore, the basal telencephalon should be reclassified in olfactory, vomeronasal, and mixed areas. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that virtually all olfactory- and vomeronasal-recipient structures send reciprocal projections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively. Further, non-chemosensory recipient structures also projects centrifugally to the olfactory bulbs. These feed-back projections appear to be essential modulating processing of chemosensory information. The present work aims at characterizing centrifugal projections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs arising from olfactory, vomeronasal, mixed, and non-chemosensory recipient telencephalic areas. This issue has been addressed by using tracer injections in the rat and mouse brain. Tracer injections were delivered into the main and accessory olfactory bulbs as well as in olfactory, vomeronasal, mixed, and non-chemosensory recipient telencephalic structures. The results confirm that olfactory- and vomeronasal-recipient structures project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively. Interestingly, olfactory (e.g., piriform cortex), vomeronasal (e.g., posteromedial cortical amygdala), mixed (e.g., the anterior medial amygdaloid nucleus), and non-chemosensory-recipient (e.g., the nucleus of the diagonal band) structures project to the main and to the accessory olfactory bulbs thus providing the possibility of simultaneous modulation and interaction of both systems at different stages of chemosensory processing

  17. Anastomosis between accessory middle cerebral artery and middle cerebral artery diagnosed by magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masao; Uchino, Akira; Suzuki, Chihiro

    2017-06-01

    The accessory middle cerebral artery (MCA) is a common variation of the MCA that arises from the anterior cerebral artery. We report a patient with anastomosis of the accessory MCA with the main MCA, an extremely rare variant that we diagnosed by magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. Both partial maximum-intensity-projection and partial volume-rendering MR angiographic images obtained at 3 T are useful to identify such rare vascular variation.

  18. Hidden female physiological resistance to male accessory gland substances in a simultaneous hermaphrodite

    OpenAIRE

    Lodi, Monica; Joris M Koene

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To increase fertilization chances compared with rivals, males are favoured to transfer accessory gland proteins to females during mating. These substances, by influencing female physiology, cause alteration of her sperm usage and remating rate. Simultaneously hermaphroditic land snails with love-darts are a case in point. During courtship, a love-dart is pierced through the partner's body wall, thereby introducing accessory mucous gland products. This mucus physiologically increases ...

  19. CT demonstration of accessory nasal turbinates: secondary middle turbinate and bifid inferior turbinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksungur, Erol H. [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Cukurova University, Balcali Hospital, Adana, 01330 (Turkey); Bicakci, Kenan [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Cukurova University, Balcali Hospital, Adana, 01330 (Turkey); Inal, Mehmet [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Cukurova University, Balcali Hospital, Adana, 01330 (Turkey); Akguel, Erol [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Cukurova University, Balcali Hospital, Adana, 01330 (Turkey); Binokay, Figen [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Cukurova University, Balcali Hospital, Adana, 01330 (Turkey); Aydogan, Barlas [Department of ENT, Cukurova University, Balcali Hospital, Adana, 01330 (Turkey); Oguz, Mahmut [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Cukurova University, Balcali Hospital, Adana, 01330 (Turkey)

    1999-09-01

    Normally, there are three pairs of nasal turbinates in the nasal cavity. Coronal computed tomographies of 253 cases of sinusitis were examined for the presence of additional turbinates and bilateral secondary middle turbinates were detected in two cases. Also, we describe another accessory turbinate, 'bifid inferior turbinate', in one of these cases. Existence of these accessory turbinates may occur during embryologic development of lateral nasal wall.

  20. Accessory Lesser Metatarsal Sesamoids in All of the Metatarsophalangeal JointsA Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Selim; Saygı, Baransel; Arslan, İlyas; Yıldırım, Yakup

    2017-05-01

    Lesser metatarsal sesamoids are one of the most common accessory bones of the foot and are most commonly seen at the fifth metatarsophalangeal joint. They are rarely seen in other metatarsophalangeal joints. In the literature, there are reports of solitary accessory sesamoid bones seen at lesser metatarsophalangeal joints. We report the case of a 68-year-old woman with lesser metatarsal sesamoids accompanying all of the metatarsophalangeal joints.

  1. Cummins MD & HD Accessory Hybridization CRADA -Annual Report FY15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deter, Dean D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    There are many areas of MD and HD vehicles that can be improved by new technologies and optimized control strategies. Component optimization and idle reduction need to be addressed, this is best done by a two part approach that includes selecting the best component technology, and/or architecture, and optimized controls that are vehicle focused. While this is a common focus in the light duty industry it has been gaining momentum in the MD and HD market as the market gets more competitive and the regulations become more stringent. When looking into systems optimization and idle reduction technologies, affected vehicle systems must first be considered, and if possible included in the new architecture to get the most benefit out of these new capabilities. Typically, when looking into idle reduction or component optimization for MD/HD, the vehicle s accessories become a prime candidate for electrification or hybridization. While this has already been studied on light duty vehicles (especially on hybrids and electric vehicles) it has not made any head way or market penetration in most MD and HD applications. If hybrids and electric MD and HD vehicles begin to break into the market this would be a necessary step into the ability to make those vehicles successful by allowing for independent, optimized operation separate from the engine.

  2. Accessory cardiac bronchus: Proposed imaging classification on multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Min; Kim, Young Tong; Han, Jong Kyu; Jou, Sung Shick [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    To propose the classification of accessory cardiac bronchus (ACB) based on imaging using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), and evaluate follow-up changes of ACB. This study included 58 patients diagnosed as ACB since 9 years, using MDCT. We analyzed the types, division locations and division directions of ACB, and also evaluated changes on follow-up. We identified two main types of ACB: blind-end (51.7%) and lobule (48.3%). The blind-end ACB was further classified into three subtypes: blunt (70%), pointy (23.3%) and saccular (6.7%). The lobule ACB was also further classified into three subtypes: complete (46.4%), incomplete (28.6%) and rudimentary (25%). Division location to the upper half bronchus intermedius (79.3%) and medial direction (60.3%) were the most common in all patients. The difference in division direction was statistically significant between the blind-end and lobule types (p = 0.019). Peribronchial soft tissue was found in five cases. One calcification case was identified in the lobule type. During follow-up, ACB had disappeared in two cases of the blind-end type and in one case of the rudimentary subtype. The proposed classification of ACB based on imaging, and the follow-up CT, helped us to understand the various imaging features of ACB.

  3. Protein Tunnels: The Case of Urease Accessory Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiani, Francesco; Gioia, Dario; Masetti, Matteo; Falchi, Federico; Cavalli, Andrea; Recanatini, Maurizio; Ciurli, Stefano

    2017-05-09

    Transition metals are both essential micronutrients and limited in environmental availability. The Ni(II)-dependent urease protein, the most efficient enzyme known to date, is a paradigm for studying the strategies that cells use to handle an essential, yet toxic, metal ion. Urease is a virulence factor of several human pathogens, in addition to decreasing the efficiency of soil organic nitrogen fertilization. Ni(II) insertion in the urease active site is performed through the action of three essential accessory proteins: UreD, UreF, and UreG. The crystal structure of the UreD-UreF-UreG complex from the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori (HpUreDFG) revealed the presence of tunnels that cross the entire length of both UreF and UreD, potentially able to deliver Ni(II) ions from UreG to apo-urease. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations performed on the HpUreDFG complex in explicit solvent and at physiological ionic conditions demonstrate the stability of these protein tunnels in solution and provide insights on the trafficking of water molecules inside the tunnels. The presence of different alternative routes across the identified tunnels for Ni(II) ions, water molecules, and carbonate ions, all involved in urease activation, is highlighted here, and their potential role in the urease activation mechanism is discussed.

  4. PENGARUH RHIZOPUS ORYZAE DAN ASPERGILLUS ORYZAE TERHADAP KUALITAS KECAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Sabita Slamet

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Telah diteliti pengganti fermentasi mikroorganisme Aspergillus oryzae Rhyzopus oryzae dan campuran Aspergillus dan Rhyzopus oryzae, dengan perendaman dalam larutan garam 20% dalam waktu yang berbeda terhadap kualitas kecap.Lamanya perendaman dalam larutan garam 20% yang berbeda menghasilkan kadar protein kecap yang berbeda. Aspergillus oryzae lebih baik dalam menghasilkan enzima protease dari pada Rhyzopus oryzae.Uji organoleptik menunjukkan perbedaan tidak bermakna dalam hal rasa maupun aroma antar kecap yang dibuat dengan strain jamur yang berlainan serta waktu perendaman yang berbeda. Untuk membuat kecap, sebaiknya dilakukan perendaman dalam larutan garam 20% selama 14 hari.

  5. Effect of gamma radiation on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure and mycotoxin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, J.; Cavaglieri, L.; Vital, H.; Cristofolini, A.; Merkis, C.; Astoreca, A.; Orlando, J.; Carú, M.; Dalcero, A.; Rosa, C. A. R.

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of gamma radiation (2 kGy) on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure. Moreover, the influence on aflatoxin B 1 and ochratoxin A production was also observed. Irradiated A. flavus strain showed a dull orangish colony while control strain showed the typical green color. Minor differences were observed on stipes, metulae and conidia size between control and irradiated A. flavus and A. ochraceus strains. Irradiated fungi showed ultrastructural changes on cell wall, plasmalema and cytoplasm levels. The levels of mycotoxins produced by irradiated strains were two times greater than those produced by control strains. Successive transferences of irradiated strains on malt extract agar allowed the fungus to recuperate morphological characteristics. Although minor changes in the fungal morphology were observed, ultrastructural changes at cell wall level and the increase of mycotoxin production ability were observed. Inappropriate storage of irradiated food and feed would allow the development of potentially more toxicogenic fungal propagules.

  6. Incidence of accessory canals in Japanese anterior maxillary teeth following root canal filling ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, C G; Yoshioka, T; Suda, H

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the vertical and horizontal distribution and the incidence of accessory canals in Japanese maxillary anterior teeth following root filling. The study included maxillary teeth; 69 central incisors, 61 lateral incisors and 31 canines. After the canal systems had been dyed and root canal instrumentation had been carried out, all prepared canals were filled with gutta-percha without using sealer. Transparent specimens were then obtained and examined with a digital microscope for horizontal and vertical distributions of accessory canals. The incidence of teeth with accessory canals in the apical 3 mm was 46%, 29% and 38% for the maxillary central incisors, lateral incisors and canines, respectively. The horizontal distribution was mainly buccal for central incisors, palatal for lateral incisors and distal and palatal for canines. There was a significant difference (P < 0.05) between the apical 3 mm and the rest of the root (16%, 20% and 19% for the maxillary central incisors, lateral incisors and canines, respectively) in terms of the presence of accessory canals. A high percentage of accessory canals can be found in apical 3 mm of the root. The horizontal distribution of accessory canals differed amongst the tooth types studied.

  7. Postsplenectomy recurrence of idiopathic thrombocitopenic purpura: role of laparoscopic splenectomy in the treatment of accessory spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, C A; Pravisani, R; Bidinost, S; Baccarani, U; Bresadola, V; Risaliti, A; Terrosu, G

    2015-01-01

    Idiopatic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is the most common indication for splenectomy. The failure rate of surgery is about 8% and the failure rate after splenectomy is approximately 28% for all patients. When the presence of an accessory spleen is diagnosed, splenectomy is recommended. Laparoscopic approach is considered the first choice. At our Department, between July and November 2011 two patients underwent laparoscopic accessory splenectomy for recurrence of ITP. Both patients had a previously laparoscopic splenectomy. Preoperative Magnetic Resonance (MR) was performed in both the cases revealing the presence of an accessory spleen. The operative time was 105 and 100 minutes respectively. No perioperative complications occured. Hospital stay was four days in both cases. The first patient had a disease free period of two months; the second one of one month. Both patients restarted immunosuppressive therapy. The relapse of thrombocytopenia post-splenectomy can be associated with the presence of an accessory spleen. The laparoscopic accessory splenectomy should be considered the first choice approach. Surgical accessory splenectomy allows a transitory remission of the disease.

  8. Use-dependent properties of flecainide acetate in accessory atrioventricular pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger, J; Helmy, I; Katzung, B; Scheinman, M

    1994-01-01

    Flecainide acetate has been shown to have use-dependent properties. The use-dependent properties of flecainide were evaluated in 20 patients (13 men and 7 women, mean age 32 +/- 11 years) with accessory atrioventricular connections. Twenty to 30 stimulus drive trains were introduced in either the atrium or ventricle at progressively faster rates. The range of cycle lengths over which anterograde and retrograde conduction block occurred in the accessory pathway was assessed in the drug-free state and after oral loading with flecainide acetate. The block cycle length index was defined as the shortest cycle length during which 1:1 conduction was maintained in the accessory pathway minus the longest cycle length during which block in the accessory pathway occurred on the second paced beat. In the drug-free state, the (mean +/- SD) anterograde and retrograde block cycle length indexes were 20 +/- 12 and 20 +/- 9 ms, respectively. After flecainide therapy, the anterograde and retrograde block cycle length indexes increased to 80 +/- 33 and 65 +/- 29 ms, respectively (p = 0.002 compared with the drug-free state). The block cycle length index did not correlate with serum flecainide levels, but did correlate with other electrophysiologic markers of drug effect on accessory pathway conduction. The change in the block cycle length index demonstrates that flecainide has a progressive effect on accessory pathway conduction at more rapid rates, consistent with its in vitro use-dependent properties. This index is an excellent marker of drug efficacy.

  9. A novel fungal fruiting structure formed by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus carbonarius in grape berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Cristina; Nguyen, Trang Thoaivan; Gubler, Walter Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Sour rot, is a pre-harvest disease that affects many grape varieties. Sour rot symptoms include initial berry cracking and breakdown of berry tissue. This is a disease complex with many filamentous fungi and bacteria involved, but is usually initiated by Aspergillus niger or Aspergillus carbonarius. Usually, by the time one sees the rot there are many other organisms involved and it is difficult to attribute the disease to one species. In this study two species of Aspergillus were shown to produce a previously unknown fruiting structure in infected berries. The nodulous morphology, bearing conidia, suggests them to be an 'everted polymorphic stroma'. This structure forms freely inside the berry pulp and assumes multiple shapes and sizes, sometimes sclerotium-like in form. It is composed of a mass of vegetative hyphae with or without tissue of the host containing spores or fruiting bodies bearing spores. Artificially inoculated berries placed in soil in winter showed the possible overwintering function of the fruiting body. Inoculated berry clusters on standing vines produced fruiting structures within 21 d post inoculation when wounds were made at veraison or after (July-September). Histological studies confirmed that the fruiting structure was indeed fungal tissue. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A survey of xerophilic Aspergillus from indoor environment, including descriptions of two new section Aspergillus species producing eurotium-like sexual states

    OpenAIRE

    Visagie,Cobus; Yilmaz,Neriman; Renaud,Justin; Sumarah,Mark; Hubka,Vit; Frisvad,Jens; Chen,Amanda; Meijer,Martin; Seifert,Keith

    2017-01-01

    Xerophilic fungi grow at low water activity or low equilibrium relative humidity and are an important part of the indoor fungal community, of which Aspergillus is one of the dominant genera. A survey of xerophilic fungi isolated from Canadian and Hawaiian house dust resulted in the isolation of 1039 strains; 296 strains belong to Aspergillus and represented 37 species. Reference sequences were generated for all species and deposited in GenBank. Aspergillus sect. Aspergillus (formerly called E...

  11. Polyphasic taxonomy of Aspergillus section Cervini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Species belonging to Aspergillus section Cervini are characterised by radiate or short columnar, fawn coloured, uniseriate conidial heads. The morphology of the taxa in this section is very similar and isolates assigned to these species are frequently misidentified. In this study, a polyphasic approach was applied using morphological characters, extrolite data, temperature profiles and partial BenA, CaM and RPB2 sequences to examine the relationships within this section. Based on this taxonomic approach the section Cervini is resolved in ten species including six new species: A. acidohumus, A. christenseniae, A. novoguineensis, A. subnutans, A. transcarpathicus and A. wisconsinensis. A dichotomous key for the identification is provided.

  12. Genetics of Polyketide Metabolism in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klejnstrup, Marie L.; Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand; Holm, Dorte Koefoed

    2012-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are small molecules that show large structural diversity and a broad range of bioactivities. Some metabolites are attractive as drugs or pigments while others act as harmful mycotoxins. Filamentous fungi have the capacity to produce a wide array of secondary metabolites...... including polyketides. The majority of genes required for production of these metabolites are mostly organized in gene clusters, which often are silent or barely expressed under laboratory conditions, making discovery and analysis difficult. Fortunately, the genome sequences of several filamentous fungi...... are publicly available, greatly facilitating the establishment of links between genes and metabolites. This review covers the attempts being made to trigger the activation of polyketide metabolism in the fungal model organism Aspergillus nidulans. Moreover, it will provide an overview of the pathways where ten...

  13. Effect of simulated microgravity on Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Jeffrey J.

    2005-08-01

    A rotating bioreactor was developed to simulate microgravity and its influence was studied on fungal growth. The reactor was designed to simulate microgravity using 'free fall' principle, which creates an apparent weightlessness for a brief period of time. In this experiment, a sealed vertically rotating tube is the reactor in which the cells are grown. For the first time vertically rotating tubes were used to obtain 'free fall' thereby simulating microgravity. Simulated microgravity served significant in the alteration of growth and productivity of Aspergillus niger, a common soil fungi. Two other sets of similar cultures were maintained as still and shake control cultures to compare with the growth and productivity of cells in rotating culture. It was found increased growth and productivity occurred in simulated microgravity. Since this experiment involves growth of cells in a liquid medium, the fluidic effects must also be studied which is a limitation.

  14. Aspergillus subgenus Polypaecilum from the built environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Tanney

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Xerophilic fungi, especially Aspergillus species, are prevalent in the built environment. In this study, we employed a combined culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing and culture-dependent (dilution-to-extinction approach to investigate the mycobiota of indoor dust collected from 93 buildings in 12 countries worldwide. High and low water activity (aw media were used to capture mesophile and xerophile biodiversity, resulting in the isolation of approximately 9 000 strains. Among these, 340 strains representing seven putative species in Aspergillus subgenus Polypaecilum were isolated, mostly from lowered aw media, and tentatively identified based on colony morphology and internal transcribed spacer rDNA region (ITS barcodes. Further morphological study and phylogenetic analyses using sequences of ITS, β-tubulin (BenA, calmodulin (CaM, RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2, DNA topoisomerase 1 (TOP1, and a pre-mRNA processing protein homolog (TSR1 confirmed the isolation of seven species of subgenus Polypaecilum, including five novel species: A. baarnensis, A. keratitidis, A. kalimae sp. nov., A. noonimiae sp. nov., A. thailandensis sp. nov., A. waynelawii sp. nov., and A. whitfieldii sp. nov. Pyrosequencing detected six of the seven species isolated from house dust, as well as one additional species absent from the cultures isolated, and three clades representing potentially undescribed species. Species were typically found in house dust from subtropical and tropical climates, often in close proximity to the ocean or sea. The presence of subgenus Polypaecilum, a recently described clade of xerophilic/xerotolerant, halotolerant/halophilic, and potentially zoopathogenic species, within the built environment is noteworthy.

  15. Self-affine fractal growth front of Aspergillus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Shu; Miyazima, Sasuke

    1992-12-01

    Aspergillus oryzae have been grown in various environmental conditions and analyzed from the viewpoint of self-affinity. The growth behavior can be described by the Eden model in favorable conditions, and by DLA in unfavorable conditions.

  16. Growth pattern of the surface of fungus Aspergillus colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Shu; Miyazima, Sasuke

    1992-05-01

    Aspergillus oryzae colonies were grown under various glucose concentrations, temperatures, and agar concentrations, and the effects on the pattern were investigated. Patterns of colony were found to vary from uniform to diffusion-limited aggregation type.

  17. Ortholog prediction of the Aspergillus genus applicable for synthetic biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo; Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Theobald, Sebastian

    The Aspergillus genus contains leading industrial microorganisms, excelling in producing bioactive compounds and enzymes. Using synthetic biology and bioinformatics, we aim to re-engineer these organisms for applications within human health, pharmaceuticals, environmental engineering, and food...

  18. Reconstruction of the central carbon metabolism of Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Helga; Åkesson, Mats Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    The topology of central carbon metabolism of Aspergillus niger was identified and the metabolic network reconstructed, by integrating genomic, biochemical and physiological information available for this microorganism and other related fungi. The reconstructed network may serve as a valuable...

  19. Septic arthritis due to tubercular and Aspergillus co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus septic arthritis is a rare and serious medical and surgical problem. It occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common causative organism followed by Aspergillus flavus. The most common site affected is knee followed by shoulder, ankle, wrist, hip and sacroiliac joint. Debridement and voriconazole are primary treatment of articular aspergilosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of co-infection of tuberculosis (TB and Aspergillus infecting joints. We report a case of co-infection of TB and A. flavus of hip and knee of a 60-year-old male, with type 2 diabetes mellitus. He was treated with debridement, intravenous voriconazole, and antitubercular drugs.

  20. Characterization of Aspergillus species based on fatty acid profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Marcelo E; Santana, Djalva Maria N; Gatti, Mario Jorge; Direito, Gloria Maria; Cavaglieri, Lilia R; Rosa, Carlos Alberto R

    2008-09-01

    Cellular fatty acid (FA) composition was utilized as a taxonomic tool to discriminate between different Aspergillus species. Several of the tested species had the same FA composition and different relative FA concentrations. The most important FAs were palmitic acid (C16:0), estearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2), which represented 95% of Aspergillus FAs. Multivariate data analysis demonstrated that FA analysis is a useful tool for differentiating species belonging to genus Aspergillus. All the species analyzed showed significantly FA acid profiles (p < 0.001). Furthermore, it will be possible to distinguish among Aspergillus spp. in the Flavi Section. FA composition can serve as a useful tool for the identification of filamentous fungi.

  1. Pectinolytic complex production by Aspergillus niger URM 4645 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -PG), pectin lyase (PL), and pectin methylesterase (PE), produced by Aspergillus niger URM 4645, were studied in solid state fermentation (SSF) using yellow passion fruit peels as substrate. The effect of substrate amount, initial moisture ...

  2. The het-c heterokaryon incompatibility gene in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Pal, K.; Lee, T.; Hoekstra, R.F.; Debets, A.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Heterokaryon incompatibility among Aspergillus niger strains is a widespread phenomenon that is observed as the inability to form stable heterokaryons. The genetic basis of heterokaryon incompatibility reactions is well established in some sexual filamentous fungi but largely unknown in presumed

  3. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by Aspergillus niger , Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results indicate the synthesis of silver nanoparticles in the reaction mixture. The synthesis of nanoparticles would be suitable for developing a microbial nanotechnology biosynthesis process for mass scale production. Keywords: Silver nanoparticles, biosynthesis, fungi, Aspergillus.

  4. Accessory renal arteries: Prevalence in resistant hypertension and an important role in nonresponse to radiofrequency renal denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VonAchen, Paige [Minneapolis Heart Institute and Foundation at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hamann, Jason [Boston Scientific Corporation, Maple Grove, MN (United States); Houghland, Thomas; Lesser, John R.; Wang, Yale; Caye, David; Rosenthal, Kristi; Garberich, Ross F. [Minneapolis Heart Institute and Foundation at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Daniels, Mary [Vital Images/Toshiba, Minnetonka, MN (United States); Schwartz, Robert S., E-mail: rss@rsschwartz.com [Minneapolis Heart Institute and Foundation at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to understand the role of accessory renal arteries in resistant hypertension, and to establish their role in nonresponse to radiofrequency renal denervation (RDN) procedures. Background: Prior studies suggest a role for accessory renal arteries in hypertensive syndromes, and recent clinical trials of renal denervation report that these anomalies are highly prevalent in resistant hypertension. This study evaluated the relationships among resistant hypertension, accessory renal arteries, and the response to radiofrequency (RF) renal denervation. Methods: Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans from 58 patients with resistant hypertension undergoing RF renal denervation (RDN) were evaluated. Results were compared with CT scans in 57 healthy, normotensive subjects undergoing screening as possible renal transplant donors. All scans were carefully studied for accessory renal arteries, and were correlated with long term blood pressure reduction. Results: Accessory renal arteries were markedly more prevalent in the hypertensive patients than normotensive renal donors (59% vs 32% respectively, p = 0.004). RDN had an overall nonresponse rate of 29% (response rate 71%). Patients without accessory vessels had a borderline higher response rate to RDN than those with at least one accessory vessel (83% vs 62% respectively, p = 0.076) and a higher RDN response than patients with untreated accessory arteries (83% vs 55%; p = 0.040). For accessory renal arteries and nonresponse, the sensitivity was 76%, specificity 49%, with positive and negative predictive values 38% and 83% respectively. Conclusions: Accessory renal arteries were markedly over-represented in resistant hypertensives compared with healthy controls. While not all patients with accessory arteries were nonresponders, nonresponse was related to both the presence and non-treatment of accessory arteries. Addressing accessory renal arteries in

  5. Identification, classification and phylogeny of the Aspergillus section Nigri inferred from mitochondrial cytochrome b gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, K; Wang, L; Miyaji, M; Nishimura, K

    2001-06-25

    The partial mitochondrial cytochrome b gene from 32 strains of 12 species belonging to Aspergillus section Nigri was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced directly. Using 402 nucleotide characters, nucleotide-based and amino acid-based phylogenetic trees were inferred and the genetic divergence among the species was evaluated. Based on analyses of the 402-bp nucleotide and 133-amino acid sequences, strains were divided into 11 DNA types and five amino acid types. Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus awamori showed different amino acid sequences. A. niger clade included A. niger var. niger and Aspergillus ficuum. A. awamori clade included A. awamori, Aspergillus phoenicis, Aspergillus pulverulentus, Aspergillus tubingensis, Aspergillus foetidus, and two varieties of A. niger, var. nanus and var. intermedius. Two varieties of A. niger will be reclassified. One strain of A. phoenicis and one strain of Aspergillus carbonarius were reidentified.

  6. Production and Purification of Peroxidase from Aspergillus niger.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed A. Jebor

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted in the laboratories of Biology Department, College of Science, which deals with isolation and purification of peroxidase and optimization of process parameters to achieve maximum yield of peroxidase by Aspergillus niger. Solid-state fermentation of Aspergillus niger was carried out for enhanced production of peroxidase using hydrogen peroxide as the substrate of enzyme maximum activity of the enzyme was achieved under optimum growth conditions. The optimum conditi...

  7. Aspergillus Mycoviruses Are Targets and Suppressors of RNA Silencing▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, T. M.; Andrewski, M. D.; Roossinck, M. J.; Keller, N P

    2007-01-01

    RNA silencing can function as a virus defense mechanism in a diverse range of eukaryotes, and many viruses are capable of suppressing the silencing machinery targeting them. However, the extent to which this occurs between fungal RNA silencing and mycoviruses is unclear. Here, three Aspergillus dsRNA mycoviruses were partially characterized, and their relationship to RNA silencing was investigated. Aspergillus virus 1816 is related to Agaricus bisporus white button mushroom virus 1 and suppre...

  8. SPECIES OF GENUS ASPERGILLUS ON GRAPE SLOVAK ORIGIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Tančinová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to detect species of genus Aspergillus from wine grapes (berries, surface sterilized berries - endogenous mycobiota, from damaged berries and grape juice of Slovak origin. We analyzed 20 samples of grapes, harvested in 2011 from various wine-growing regions. For the isolation of species we used the method of direct plating berries, surface-sterilized berries (using 0.4% freshly pre-pared chlorine, and damaged berries on DRBC (Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphenicol agar. For the determination of fungal contamination of grape juice, we used plate-dilution method and DRBC as medium. The cultivation in all modes of inoculation was carried at 25±1°C, for 5 to 7 days. After incubation Aspergillus isolates were inoculated on the identification media. Representatives of the genus Aspergillus were isolated from 13 samples berries, 7 samples of surface-sterilized berries, 4 samples of damaged berries and 9 samples of grape juice. Overall, representatives of aspergilli were detected in 90% of samples (75 isolates. In this work we focused on the detection of potential producers of ochratoxin A belonging to the genus Aspergillus. Isolates, potential producers of ochratoxin A (Aspergillus niger aggregate and Aspergillus westerdijkiae, were after their identification inoculated on YES medium (Yeast Extract Sucrose Agar and after 14 days of incubation at 25±1°C, in the dark, we tested them for their ability to produce ochratoxin A using thin layer chromatography. Out of the 16 isolates from isolated potential producers of ochratoxin A none of the isolates of Aspergillus niger aggregate (13 tested produced ochratoxin A. The isolate of Aspergillus westerdijkiae (1, isolated from the surface-sterilized berries, produced ochratoxin A.

  9. VPAC receptors: structure, molecular pharmacology and interaction with accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvineau, Alain; Laburthe, Marc

    2012-05-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a neuropeptide with wide distribution in both central and peripheral nervous systems, where it plays important regulatory role in many physiological processes. VIP displays a large biological functions including regulation of exocrine secretions, hormone release, fetal development, immune responses, etc. VIP appears to exert beneficial effect in neuro-degenerative and inflammatory diseases. The mechanism of action of VIP implicates two subtypes of receptors (VPAC1 and VPAC2), which are members of class B receptors belonging to the super-family of GPCR. This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the structure and molecular pharmacology of VPAC receptors. The structure-function relationship of VPAC1 receptor has been extensively studied, allowing to understand the molecular basis for receptor affinity, specificity, desensitization and coupling to adenylyl cyclase. Those studies have clearly demonstrated the crucial role of the N-terminal ectodomain (N-ted) of VPAC1 receptor in VIP recognition. By using different approaches including directed mutagenesis, photoaffinity labelling, NMR, molecular modelling and molecular dynamic simulation, it has been shown that the VIP molecule interacts with the N-ted of VPAC1 receptor, which is itself structured as a 'Sushi' domain. VPAC1 receptor also interacts with a few accessory proteins that play a role in cell signalling of receptors. Recent advances in the structural characterization of VPAC receptor and more generally of class B GPCRs will lead to the design of new molecules, which could have considerable interest for the treatment of inflammatory and neuro-degenerative diseases. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Cryoablation of septal accessory pathways in children: midterm results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadeniz, Cem; Akdeniz, Celal; Turan, Ozlem; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2014-09-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation in the septal arrhythmia substrates has an increased risk of irreversible atrioventricular block. Despite its safety profile, several studies reported a lower acute success rate and a higher recurrence rate with cryoablation of septal accessory pathways (APs) when compared to RF ablation. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of cryoablation of right septal APs using an electroanatomical mapping system guidance. A total of 43 consecutive patients (13.2 ± 5.5 years) underwent cryoablation for right septal APs. The EnSite system (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) was used in all procedures. No fluoroscopy was used in 90% of patients (39/43). The mean fluoroscopy time in the remaining four patients was 3.7 ± 0.7 minutes. An electrophysiology catheter with 2-mm distal spacing was used to determine the precise AP location. The majority of the patients (20/43) had anteroseptal, and remaining of the patients had posteroseptal (15/43) and midseptal (8/43) APs. A 6-mm-tip catheter was used in 33 patients and 8-mm-tip catheter was used in nine patients (both catheters were used in one patient). The mean procedure duration and number of complete cryoablation lesions were 181.5 ± 60.6 minutes and 6.1 ± 3.1 minutes, respectively. Acute success was achieved in 40 of 43 patients (93%). No complications were noted. During a mean follow-up of 8.8 ± 4.8 months, five patients (12.5%) experienced recurrence. Our data suggest that cryoablation of septal APs can be performed safely with comparable efficacy to the reported RF ablation results using a limited fluoroscopy approach. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Aspergillus mycoviruses are targets and suppressors of RNA silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, T M; Andrewski, M D; Roossinck, M J; Keller, N P

    2008-02-01

    RNA silencing can function as a virus defense mechanism in a diverse range of eukaryotes, and many viruses are capable of suppressing the silencing machinery targeting them. However, the extent to which this occurs between fungal RNA silencing and mycoviruses is unclear. Here, three Aspergillus dsRNA mycoviruses were partially characterized, and their relationship to RNA silencing was investigated. Aspergillus virus 1816 is related to Agaricus bisporus white button mushroom virus 1 and suppresses RNA silencing through a mechanism that alters the level of small interfering RNA. Aspergillus virus 178 is related to RNA virus L1 of Gremmeniella abietina and does not appear to affect RNA silencing. The third virus investigated, Aspergillus virus 341, is distantly related to Sphaeropsis sapinea RNA virus 2. Detection of mycovirus-derived siRNA from this mycovirus demonstrates that it is targeted for degradation by the Aspergillus RNA silencing machinery. Thus, our results indicate that Aspergillus mycoviruses are both targets and suppressors of RNA silencing. In addition, they suggest that the morphological and physiological changes associated with some mycoviruses could be a result of their antagonistic relationship with RNA silencing.

  12. MERS-CoV Accessory ORFs Play Key Role for Infection and Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menachery, Vineet D.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Cockrell, Adam S.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Yount, Boyd L.; Graham, Rachel L.; McAnarney, Eileen T.; Douglas, Madeline G.; Scobey, Trevor; Beall, Anne; Dinnon, Kenneth; Kocher, Jacob F.; Hale, Andrew E.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Waters, Katrina M.; Baric, Ralph S.; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    2017-08-22

    ABSTRACT

    While dispensable for viral replication, coronavirus (CoV) accessory open reading frame (ORF) proteins often play critical roles during infection and pathogenesis. Utilizing a previously generated mutant, we demonstrate that the absence of all four Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV) accessory ORFs (deletion of ORF3, -4a, -4b, and -5 [dORF3-5]) has major implications for viral replication and pathogenesis. Importantly, attenuation of the dORF3-5 mutant is primarily driven by dysregulated host responses, including disrupted cell processes, augmented interferon (IFN) pathway activation, and robust inflammation.In vitroreplication attenuation also extends toin vivomodels, allowing use of dORF3-5 as a live attenuated vaccine platform. Finally, examination of ORF5 implicates a partial role in modulation of NF-κB-mediated inflammation. Together, the results demonstrate the importance of MERS-CoV accessory ORFs for pathogenesis and highlight them as potential targets for surveillance and therapeutic treatments moving forward.

    IMPORTANCEThe initial emergence and periodic outbreaks of MERS-CoV highlight a continuing threat posed by zoonotic pathogens to global public health. In these studies, mutant virus generation demonstrates the necessity of accessory ORFs in regard to MERS-CoV infection and pathogenesis. With this in mind, accessory ORF functions can be targeted for both therapeutic and vaccine treatments in response to MERS-CoV and related group 2C coronaviruses. In addition, disruption of accessory ORFs in parallel may offer a rapid response platform to attenuation of future emergent strains based on both SARS- and MERS-CoV accessory ORF mutants.

  13. Hypersensitivity testing for Aspergillus fumigatus IgE is significantly more sensitive than testing for Aspergillus niger IgE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaggi, Thomas A; Walco, Jeremy P; Parikh, Sujal; Walco, Gary A

    2012-02-01

    We sought to determine if sufficient redundancy exists between specific IgE testing for Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger to eliminate one of the assays in determining Aspergillus hypersensitivity. We reviewed regional laboratory results comparing A fumigatus-specific IgE with A niger-specific IgE using the Pharmacia UniCAP system (Pharmacia, Kalamazoo, MI). By using the Fisher exact test as an index of concordance among paired results, we showed a significant difference between 109 paired samples for the presence of specific IgE to A fumigatus and A niger (P niger; no specimen was positive for A niger and negative for A fumigatus. We conclude that A fumigatus-specific IgE is sufficient to detect Aspergillus hypersensitivity. The assay for A niger-specific IgE is redundant, less sensitive, and unnecessary if the assay for specific IgE for A fumigatus is performed.

  14. Phytase Production by Aspergillus niger CFR 335 and Aspergillus ficuum SGA 01 through Submerged and Solid-State Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Shivanna, Gunashree B.; Govindarajulu Venkateswaran

    2014-01-01

    Fermentation is one of the industrially important processes for the development of microbial metabolites that has immense applications in various fields. This has prompted to employ fermentation as a major technique in the production of phytase from microbial source. In this study, a comparison was made between submerged (SmF) and solid-state fermentations (SSF) for the production of phytase from Aspergillus niger CFR 335 and Aspergillus ficuum SGA 01. It was found that both the fungi were ca...

  15. Common and distant structural characteristics of feruloyl esterase families from Aspergillus oryzae.

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    D B R K Gupta Udatha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Feruloyl esterases (FAEs are important biomass degrading accessory enzymes due to their capability of cleaving the ester links between hemicellulose and pectin to aromatic compounds of lignin, thus enhancing the accessibility of plant tissues to cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes. FAEs have gained increased attention in the area of biocatalytic transformations for the synthesis of value added compounds with medicinal and nutritional applications. Following the increasing attention on these enzymes, a novel descriptor based classification system has been proposed for FAEs resulting into 12 distinct families and pharmacophore models for three FAE sub-families have been developed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The feruloylome of Aspergillus oryzae contains 13 predicted FAEs belonging to six sub-families based on our recently developed descriptor-based classification system. The three-dimensional structures of the 13 FAEs were modeled for structural analysis of the feruloylome. The three genes coding for three enzymes, viz., A.O.2, A.O.8 and A.O.10 from the feruloylome of A. oryzae, representing sub-families with unknown functional features, were heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris, characterized for substrate specificity and structural characterization through CD spectroscopy. Common feature-based pharamacophore models were developed according to substrate specificity characteristics of the three enzymes. The active site residues were identified for the three expressed FAEs by determining the titration curves of amino acid residues as a function of the pH by applying molecular simulations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings on the structure-function relationships and substrate specificity of the FAEs of A. oryzae will be instrumental for further understanding of the FAE families in the novel classification system. The developed pharmacophore models could be applied for virtual screening of compound databases for

  16. Reversible Isolated Accessory Nerve Palsy due to a Large Thrombosed Vertebral Aneurysm

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    Hisayasu Saito

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Isolated accessory nerve palsy due to intracranial disorders is uncommon because intracranial accessory nerve injury usually occurs in case of a skull base tumor or trauma, resulting in one of multiple cranial nerve palsies. We report a very rare case of isolated accessory nerve palsy due to a large thrombosed aneurysm of the intracranial vertebral artery. Full recovery was achieved after surgery. Case Report: A patient complaining of transient numbness in the right side was referred to our hospital. An MRI indicated a large thrombosed aneurysm of the right vertebral artery. The aneurysm severely compressed the medulla oblongata. First, the proximal vertebral artery (VA was clipped with an aneurysm clip to reduce the pressure inside the aneurysm. However, cerebral angiography revealed a partial recanalization of the right VA. The patient then underwent coil embolization of the right VA just proximal to the aneurysm clip. Subsequently, the right VA was completely obliterated. The patient was discharged without any neurological deficit. Two weeks later, however, she complained of right shoulder pain. Physical and neurological examinations demonstrated atrophy of the right trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscle, leading to a deepening of the right supraclavicular fossa. The symptoms were considered to result from the right isolated accessory nerve palsy. Follow-up MRI showed that the VA aneurysm gradually decreased in size over a period of several months. At the same time, her symptoms disappeared completely. Conclusion: We should keep in mind that isolated accessory nerve palsy can be caused by a large or giant vertebral aneurysm.

  17. Polyphasic taxonomy of Aspergillus section Aspergillus (formerly Eurotium, and its occurrence in indoor environments and food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus section Aspergillus (formerly the genus Eurotium includes xerophilic species with uniseriate conidiophores, globose to subglobose vesicles, green conidia and yellow, thin walled eurotium-like ascomata with hyaline, lenticular ascospores. In the present study, a polyphasic approach using morphological characters, extrolites, physiological characters and phylogeny was applied to investigate the taxonomy of this section. Over 500 strains from various culture collections and new isolates obtained from indoor environments and a wide range of substrates all over the world were identified using calmodulin gene sequencing. Of these, 163 isolates were subjected to molecular phylogenetic analyses using sequences of ITS rDNA, partial β-tubulin (BenA, calmodulin (CaM and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2 genes. Colony characteristics were documented on eight cultivation media, growth parameters at three incubation temperatures were recorded and micromorphology was examined using light microscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy to illustrate and characterize each species. Many specific extrolites were extracted and identified from cultures, including echinulins, epiheveadrides, auroglaucins and anthraquinone bisanthrons, and to be consistent in strains of nearly all species. Other extrolites are species-specific, and thus valuable for identification. Several extrolites show antioxidant effects, which may be nutritionally beneficial in food and beverages. Important mycotoxins in the strict sense, such as sterigmatocystin, aflatoxins, ochratoxins, citrinin were not detected despite previous reports on their production in this section. Adopting a polyphasic approach, 31 species are recognized, including nine new species. ITS is highly conserved in this section and does not distinguish species. All species can be differentiated using CaM or RPB2 sequences. For BenA, Aspergillus brunneus and A. niveoglaucus share identical

  18. Polyphasic taxonomy of Aspergillus section Aspergillus (formerly Eurotium), and its occurrence in indoor environments and food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A J; Hubka, V; Frisvad, J C; Visagie, C M; Houbraken, J; Meijer, M; Varga, J; Demirel, R; Jurjević, Ž; Kubátová, A; Sklenář, F; Zhou, Y G; Samson, R A

    2017-09-01

    Aspergillus section Aspergillus (formerly the genus Eurotium) includes xerophilic species with uniseriate conidiophores, globose to subglobose vesicles, green conidia and yellow, thin walled eurotium-like ascomata with hyaline, lenticular ascospores. In the present study, a polyphasic approach using morphological characters, extrolites, physiological characters and phylogeny was applied to investigate the taxonomy of this section. Over 500 strains from various culture collections and new isolates obtained from indoor environments and a wide range of substrates all over the world were identified using calmodulin gene sequencing. Of these, 163 isolates were subjected to molecular phylogenetic analyses using sequences of ITS rDNA, partial β-tubulin (BenA), calmodulin (CaM) and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2) genes. Colony characteristics were documented on eight cultivation media, growth parameters at three incubation temperatures were recorded and micromorphology was examined using light microscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy to illustrate and characterize each species. Many specific extrolites were extracted and identified from cultures, including echinulins, epiheveadrides, auroglaucins and anthraquinone bisanthrons, and to be consistent in strains of nearly all species. Other extrolites are species-specific, and thus valuable for identification. Several extrolites show antioxidant effects, which may be nutritionally beneficial in food and beverages. Important mycotoxins in the strict sense, such as sterigmatocystin, aflatoxins, ochratoxins, citrinin were not detected despite previous reports on their production in this section. Adopting a polyphasic approach, 31 species are recognized, including nine new species. ITS is highly conserved in this section and does not distinguish species. All species can be differentiated using CaM or RPB2 sequences. For BenA, Aspergillus brunneus and A. niveoglaucus share identical sequences. Ascospores

  19. Aspergillus Osteomyelitis: Epidemiology, Clinical Manifestations, Management, and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaletsou, Maria N.; Rammaert, Blandine; Bueno, Marimelle A.; Moriyama, Brad; Sipsas, Nikolaos V.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Roilides, Emmanuel; Zeller, Valerie; Prinapori, Roberta; Tajaldeen, Saad Jaber; Brause, Barry; Lortholary, Olivier; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of Aspergillus osteomyelitis are not well understood. Methods Protocol-defined cases of Aspergillus osteomyelitis published in the English literature were reviewed for comorbidities, microbiology, mechanisms of infection, clinical manifestations, radiological findings, inflammatory biomarkers, antifungal therapy, and outcome. Results Among 180 evaluable patients, 127 (71%) were males. Possible predisposing medical conditions in 103 (57%) included pharmacological immunosuppression, primary immunodeficiency, and neutropenia. Seventy-three others (41%) had prior open fracture, trauma or surgery. Eighty (44%) followed a hematogenous mechanism, 58 (32%) contiguous infections, and 42 (23%) direct inoculation. Aspergillus osteomyelitis was the first manifestation of aspergillosis in 77%. Pain and tenderness were present in 80%. The most frequently infected sites were vertebrae (46%), cranium (23%), ribs (16%), and long bones (13%). Patients with vertebral Aspergillus osteomyelitis had more previous orthopedic surgery (19% vs 0%; P=0.02), while those with cranial osteomyelitis had more diabetes mellitus (32% vs 8%; P=0.002) and prior head/neck surgery (12% vs 0%; P=0.02). Radiologic findings included osteolysis, soft-tissue extension, and uptake on T2-weighted images. Vertebral body Aspergillus osteomyelitis was complicated by spinal-cord compression in 47% and neurological deficits in 41%. Forty-four patients (24%) received only antifungal therapy, while 121(67%) were managed with surgery and antifungal therapy. Overall mortality was 25%. Median duration of therapy was 90 days (range, 10–772 days). There were fewer relapses in patients managed with surgery plus antifungal therapy in comparison to those managed with antifungal therapy alone (8% vs 30%; P=0.006). Conclusions Aspergillus osteomyelitis is a debilitating infection affecting both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The most

  20. Arthroscopic Bankart Repair: Accessory Posterior Portal With Slotted Cannula for Lowest Capsulolabral Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvieli, Oren; Atoun, Ehud; Amar, Eyal; Levy, Ofer; Rath, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel technique for safe establishment of the accessory posterior portal using a slotted cannula. Arthroscopic Bankart repair is a common procedure. A variety of arthroscopic techniques have been described in the literature, commonly using the posterior portal for visualization and the anterior portal with a working cannula. The accessory posterior portal enables elegant access to the lower part of the capsulolabral junction, a firmer grasp and mobilization of the tissue, quick and easy tool exchange using a slotted cannula, and clearer suture placement because of the flat, direct working angle. The skin incision is made small without the need for an arthroscopic cannula, and the portal location is in a relatively safe zone. The use of the accessory posterior portal along with a slotted cannula shortens the duration of the operative procedure and improves safety and performance. PMID:25126512

  1. An exploration study to find important factors influencing on brand in car accessory market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Supplying car accessory is one of the most important growing industries in the world. Every year, millions of cars are produced and people need to have the access to necessary car accessory. In this paper, we present an exploration study to detect important factors influencing car accessory market. The proposed study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale consists of 16 questions, distributes it among 200 experts and analyses it using factor analysis. Cronbach alpha and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy are calculated as 0.823 and 0.863, which validate the overall questionnaire. The results indicate that there are three influencing factors including brand capability, brand characteristics and consumers’ believe.

  2. Congenital salivary fistula of an accessory parotid gland in Goldenhar syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z; Sun, L; Zhang, Z; Ma, X

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of congenital salivary fistula of an accessory parotid gland, and we discuss its occurrence in Goldenhar syndrome. Two teenagers complained of a congenital cheek fistula with constant salivary discharge. Computed tomography fistulography and sialography were performed. The diagnosis of Goldenhar syndrome was established based on clinical and imaging findings. Previously reported cases are reviewed and the clinical and radiological features summarised. In these two patients, a salivary fistula of an accessory parotid gland was demonstrated on computed tomography fistulography, and did not communicate with Stensen's duct. Deformity of Stensen's duct and hypoplasia of the ipsilateral mandibular ramus were present. Tragal appendices have frequently been reported in such cases. A congenital cheek salivary fistula of an accessory parotid gland should be considered indicative of Goldenhar syndrome.

  3. Successful cryoablation of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia and coexisting accessory pathways without fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Enes Elvin; Ugur, Fatma Seyma; Akdeniz, Celal; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old boy patient admitted to our outpatient clinic with palpitations and documented supraventricular tachycardia. Electrophysiological study and ablation were planned. In the electrophysiological study, two tachycardias with different cycle lengths and morphologies were induced. After elimination of the slow pathway, left posterior accessory pathway was detected and successfully ablated. Another pathway was detected following that ablation. Due to the slow retrograde conduction of this pathway, diltiazem infusion was started to uncover the accessory pathway. The second accessory pathway was at the left posteroseptal region and was successfully ablated. After a 30-minute waiting period, no tachycardia was induced. In addition, no fluoroscopy was used during the procedure. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Linking secondary metabolites to gene clusters through genome sequencing of six diverse Aspergillus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbølling, Inge; Vesth, Tammi C.; Frisvad, Jens C.

    2018-01-01

    The fungal genus of Aspergillus is highly interesting, containing everything from industrial cell factories, model organisms, and human pathogens. In particular, this group has a prolific production of bioactive secondary metabolites (SMs). In this work, four diverse Aspergillus species (A...

  5. Aspergillus section Flavi community structure in Zambia influences aflatoxin contamination of Maize and Groundnut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxins are cancer-causing, immuno-suppressive mycotoxins that frequently contaminate important staples in Zambia including maize and groundnut. Several species within Aspergillus section Flavi have been implicated as causal agents of aflatoxin contamination in Africa. However, Aspergillus popula...

  6. Neopetromyces gen. nov and an overview of teleomorphs of Aspergillus subgenus Circumdati

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Samson, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Species in the anamorph genus Aspergillus are associated with several teleomorphic genera in the Eurotiales and the most important mycotoxin producers are concentrated in Aspergillus subgenus Circumdati. A new genus, Neopetromyces, is proposed for the recently described Petromyces muricatus, beca...

  7. Molecular characterization of Aspergillus infections in an Iranian educational hospital using RAPD-PCR method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Diba

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The hospital sources for the Aspergillus clinical isolates included air condition and walls. RAPD-PCR analysis can play a trivial role to find the hospital sources of Aspergillus clinical isolates.

  8. A reductive aminase from Aspergillus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleku, Godwin A.; France, Scott P.; Man, Henry; Mangas-Sanchez, Juan; Montgomery, Sarah L.; Sharma, Mahima; Leipold, Friedemann; Hussain, Shahed; Grogan, Gideon; Turner, Nicholas J.

    2017-10-01

    Reductive amination is one of the most important methods for the synthesis of chiral amines. Here we report the discovery of an NADP(H)-dependent reductive aminase from Aspergillus oryzae (AspRedAm, Uniprot code Q2TW47) that can catalyse the reductive coupling of a broad set of carbonyl compounds with a variety of primary and secondary amines with up to >98% conversion and with up to >98% enantiomeric excess. In cases where both carbonyl and amine show high reactivity, it is possible to employ a 1:1 ratio of the substrates, forming amine products with up to 94% conversion. Steady-state kinetic studies establish that the enzyme is capable of catalysing imine formation as well as reduction. Crystal structures of AspRedAm in complex with NADP(H) and also with both NADP(H) and the pharmaceutical ingredient (R)-rasagiline are reported. We also demonstrate preparative scale reductive aminations with wild-type and Q240A variant biocatalysts displaying total turnover numbers of up to 32,000 and space time yields up to 3.73 g l-1 d-1.

  9. Bioconversion of Capsaicin by Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minji; Cho, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Yu Geon; Lee, Hyoung Jae; Lim, Seong-Il; Park, So-Lim; Moon, Jae-Hak

    2015-07-08

    This study identified metabolites of capsaicin bioconverted by Aspergillus oryzae, which is generally used for mass production of gochujang prepared by fermenting red pepper powder in Korea. A. oryzae was incubated with capsaicin in potato dextrose broth. Capsaicin decreased depending on the incubation period, but new metabolites increased. Five capsaicin metabolites purified from the ethyl acetate fraction of the capsaicin culture were identified as N-vanillylcarbamoylbutyric acid, N-vanillyl-9-hydroxy-8-methyloctanamide, ω-hydroxycapsaicin, 8-methyl-N-vanillylcarbamoyl-6(E)-octenoic acid, and 2-methyl-N-vanillylcarbamoyl-6(Z)-octenoic acid by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). The capsaicin metabolites in gochujang were confirmed and quantitated by selective multiple reaction monitoring detection after liquid chromatography electrospray ionization MS using the isolated compounds as external standards. On the basis of the structures of the capsaicin metabolites, it is proposed that capsaicin metabolites were converted by A. oryzae by ω-hydroxylation, alcohol oxidation, hydrogenation, isomerization, and α- and/or β-oxidation.

  10. Purification and characterization of Aspergillus ficuum endoinulinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, T B; Chung, M S; Lee, S H; Gourronc, F; Housen, I; Kim, J H; Van Beeumen, J; Haye, B; Vandenhaute, J

    1999-01-01

    Endoinulinase from Aspergillus ficuum, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of inulin via an endo-cleavage mode, was purified by chromatography from Novozym 230 as a starting commercial enzyme mixture on CM-Sephadex and DEAE-Sepharose, and by preparative electrophoresis under native conditions. The enzyme was estimated to be pure on the basis of its I/S ratio, whose value was infinite in our assay conditions. Two forms separated by using this method. SDS gel electrophoresis showed the two purified forms to respectively exhibit molecular weights of 64,000 +/- 500 and 66,000 +/- 1,000. The results of deglycosylation indicated that the two forms were originally the same protein but with different sugar contents. A molecular weight of 54,800 +/- 1,500 was found by gel filtration of the native enzyme, indicating the native functional protein to be a monomer. The enzyme showed nearly absolute substrate specificity towards inulin and inulooligosaccharides, and acted via an endo-attack to produce mainly inulotriose during the late stage of the reaction. The apparent Km and Vmax values for inulin hydrolysis were 8.1 +/- 1.0 mM and 773 +/- 60 U/mg, respectively. The internal peptides of the enzyme showed sequence homology to the endoinulinase of Penicillium purpurogenum.

  11. [Induced synthesis of hydroxyapatite by Aspergillus niger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Lian, Bin; Liu, Shirong; Gong, Guohong

    2011-03-01

    The research objective is to induce hydroxyapatite (HAP) synthesis by using fungus. We used the PDA (Potato Dextrose Agar Medium) liquid medium containing different concentrations of Na2HPO4 and CaCO3 to study the way Aspergillus niger synthesize HAP, to observe the induced mineral crystal structure and to analyze the induced mineral type with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The main results are as follows: (1) A. niger can induce HAP synthesis in PDA liquid medium with the proper concentration of Na2HPO4 and CaCO3. (2) The reaction of A. niger inducing HAP synthesis depends on the time of the response system. Longer time is more advantageous in producing HAP. The main reason for A. niger inducing HAP crystals formation are as follows: fungal metabolism produces the acidic substances to dissolve CaCO, and the growth mycelia absorbing Ca2+ lead to Ca2+ enriched on the surface, to promote the production of secondary mineral apatite and further transform into HAP in the mycelia spheres. A. niger can inducing HAP crystals formation in PDA liquid medium containing Na2HPO4 and CaCO3. Considering the importance of HAP in bio-medicine materials and its costly prices, our method for HAP bio-induction is of the temperate response condition, simple preparation craft, and lower cost, which has the potential application prospect.

  12. A Case Report on Aspergillus lentulus Pneumonia

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    Muharrem Cidem

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aspergillus lentulus was described as a new species in 2005 but it was isolated from Turkey for the first time. Case report: A. lentulus was isolated as the cause of pneumonia from a patient who had renal transplantation 4 months ago. The patient received immunosuppressive treatment after transplantation. A. lentulus was isolated from his sputum as an agent in pneumonia developed 4 months after the transplantation. Leukocytes, blastospores, and hyphae were seen in both Gram- and Giemsa-stained smears of the sputum. The isolate was identified by using the Maren A. Klich algorithm and molecular methods and confirmed by the reference laboratory of the CBS Fungal Biodiversity Centre (The Netherlands. In the susceptibility tests of the isolate, minimal inhibitory concentrations for amphotericin B, voriconazole, posaconazole, and caspofungin were found to be 0.5 µg/mL, 0.25 µg/mL, 0.125 µg/mL, and 0.25 µg/mL, respectively. The patient recovered with voriconazole treatment (2x200 mg/day. Conclusion: The use of the molecular tests is important for identification of A. lentulus strains because they are very easily confused with A.fumigatus strains according to phenotypic characteristics.

  13. Accessory left atrial diverticulae: contractile properties depicted with 64-slice cine-cardiac CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Ronan P

    2012-02-01

    To assess the contractility of accessory left atrial appendages (LAAs) using multiphasic cardiac CT. We retrospectively analyzed the presence, location, size and contractile properties of accessory LAAs using multiphasic cardiac 64-slice CT in 102 consecutive patients (63 males, 39 females, mean age 57). Multiplanar reformats were used to create image planes in axial oblique, sagittal oblique and coronal oblique planes. For all appendages with an orifice diameter >or= 10 mm, axial and sagittal diameters and appendage volumes were recorded in atrial diastole and systole. Regression analysis was performed to assess which imaging appearances best predicted accessory appendage contractility. Twenty-three (23%) patients demonstrated an accessory LAA, all identified along the anterior LA wall. Dimensions for axial oblique (AOD) and sagittal oblique (SOD) diameters and sagittal oblique length (SOL) were 6.3-19, 3.4-20 and 5-21 mm, respectively. All appendages (>or=10 mm) demonstrated significant contraction during atrial systole (greatest diameter reduction was AOD [3.8 mm, 27%]). Significant correlations were noted between AOD-contraction and AOD (R = 0.57, P < 0.05) and SOD-contraction and AOD, SOD and SOL (R = 0.6, P < 0.05). Mean diverticulum volume in atrial diastole was 468.4 +\\/- 493 mm(3) and in systole was 171.2 +\\/- 122 mm(3), indicating a mean change in volume of 297.2 +\\/- 390 mm(3), P < 0.0001. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed SOL to be the strongest independent predictor of appendage contractility (R(2) = 0.86, P < 0.0001) followed by SOD (R(2) = 0.91, P < 0.0001). Accessory LAAs show significant contractile properties on cardiac CT. Those accessory LAAs with a large sagittal height or depth should be evaluated for contractile properties, and if present should be examined for ectopic activity during electrophysiological studies.

  14. Relative contribution of expectancy and immediate arousal to the facilitatory effect of an auditory accessory stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Del-Fava

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available An auditory stimulus speeds up a digital response to a subsequent visual stimulus. This facilitatory effect has been related to the expectancy and the immediate arousal that would be caused by the accessory stimulus. The present study examined the relative contribution of these two influences. In a first and a third experiment a simple reaction time task was used. In a second and fourth experiment a go/no-go reaction time task was used. In each of these experiments, the accessory stimulus preceded the target stimulus by 200 ms for one group of male and female volunteers (G Fix. For another group of similar volunteers (G Var the accessory stimulus preceded the target stimulus by 200 ms in 25% of the trials, by 1000 ms in 25% of the trials and was not followed by the target stimulus in 50% of the trials (Experiments 1a and 1b or preceded the target stimulus by 200 ms in 6% of the trials and by 1000 ms in 94% of the trials (Experiments 2a and 2b. There was a facilitatory effect of the accessory stimulus for G Fix in the four experiments. There was also a facilitatory effect of the accessory stimulus at the 200-ms stimulus onset asynchrony for G Var in Experiments 1a and 1b but not in Experiments 2a and 2b. The facilitatory effects observed were larger in the go/no-go task than in the simple task. Taken together, these results suggest that expectancy is much more important than immediate arousal for the improvement of performance caused by an accessory stimulus.

  15. Cross-allergenicity between Aspergillus restrictus, Aspergillus fumigatus and Alternaria alternata determined by radioallergosorbent test inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Sakamoto

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus restrictus, an osmophilic fungus, is abundant in house dust. We have shown previously that the incidence of immediate hypersensitivity to A. restrictus is comparable to that for Aspergillus fumigatus and Alternaria alternata in asthmatic children. Radioallergosorbent test (RAST inhibition was used to determine whether A. restrictus shares similar allergenic components with A. fumigatus and A. alternata. Mycelial mats of the three species cultivated on completely synthetic media were used for extract preparation. IgE antibodies to each fungus were measured with RAST using a polyvinyl chloride microplate as a solid phase. Analysis of a serum pool obtained from nine asthmatic children with a positive RAST to A. restrictus showed that A. restrictus inhibited the RAST to A. restrictus, A. fumigatus and A. alternata by more than 80%. Similar results were observed with A. fumigatus and A. alternata. Additionally, when 13 serum samples with a positive RAST to A. restrictus were tested separately, A. restrictus substantially inhibited the A. restrictus RAST in all subjects tested. A. fumigatus and A. alternata inhibited the A. restrictus RAST in 10 and 8 of the samples studied, respectively. These findings indicate that A. restrictus shares allergenic components with A. fumigatus and A. alternata. The allergenic cross-reactivity between A. fumigatus and A. alternata was also demonstrated.

  16. Effect of gamma radiation on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure and mycotoxin production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, J. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia Veterinaria, Universidad Federal Rural de Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ) (Brazil); Cavaglieri, L., E-mail: lcavaglieri@arnet.com.a [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto (UNRC), Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Member of Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CIC-CONICET) (Argentina); Vital, H. [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Secao de Defesa Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Cristofolini, A.; Merkis, C. [Departamento de Microscopia Electronica, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto. Ruta 36 km 601 (5800) Rio Cuarto (Argentina); Astoreca, A. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto (UNRC), Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Member of Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CIC-CONICET) (Argentina); Orlando, J.; Caru, M. [Departamento de Ciencias Ecologicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Dalcero, A. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto (UNRC), Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Member of Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CIC-CONICET) (Argentina); Rosa, C.A.R. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia Veterinaria, Universidad Federal Rural de Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ) (Brazil); Member of Consejo Nacional de Pesquisas (CNPq) (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of gamma radiation (2 kGy) on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure. Moreover, the influence on aflatoxin B{sub 1} and ochratoxin A production was also observed. Irradiated A. flavus strain showed a dull orangish colony while control strain showed the typical green color. Minor differences were observed on stipes, metulae and conidia size between control and irradiated A. flavus and A. ochraceus strains. Irradiated fungi showed ultrastructural changes on cell wall, plasmalema and cytoplasm levels. The levels of mycotoxins produced by irradiated strains were two times greater than those produced by control strains. Successive transferences of irradiated strains on malt extract agar allowed the fungus to recuperate morphological characteristics. Although minor changes in the fungal morphology were observed, ultrastructural changes at cell wall level and the increase of mycotoxin production ability were observed. Inappropriate storage of irradiated food and feed would allow the development of potentially more toxicogenic fungal propagules.

  17. Imaging diagnosis of accessory and cavitated uterine mass, a rare mullerian anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishchint Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accessory and Cavitated Uterine Mass (ACUM is a rare form of developmental Mullerian anomaly seen in young females, which presents as chronic recurrent pelvic pain and severe dysmenorrhea. It is an accessory cavity lying within an otherwise normal uterus. It is lined by functional endometrium and surrounded by myometrium-like smooth muscle cells; hence, it bears striking macroscopic and microscopic resemblance to the uterus. Hysterosalpingography (HSG, Ultrasonography (USG, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI form the mainstay of diagnostic imaging. The entity is often under diagnosed; therefore, a high index of suspicion combined with HSG and MRI imaging can help in making an accurate diagnosis.

  18. Ablation of an atriofascicular accessory pathway with a zero-fluoroscopy procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Proietti, MD, PhD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old patient with recurrent palpitations and documented left bundle branch block superior axis wide complex tachycardia underwent an electrophysiological study and ablation with a zero-fluoroscopy procedure. The electrophysiological study showed a decremental antegrade conducting atriofascicular pathway. Three-dimensional CARTO-guided mapping of the tricuspid annulus in sinus rhythm was performed, and a distinct signal corresponding to the accessory pathway potential of the atriofascicular pathway was found in the posterolateral region. By using an SR0 sheath and a 4-mm-tip catheter, radiofrequency application was delivered at this point on the annulus and successfully eliminated conduction through the accessory pathway.

  19. [Ulnar nerve compression in Guyon's canal by an accessory abductor digiti minimi brevis muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löw, S; Schoonhoven, J van

    2010-08-01

    Compression syndromes of the ulnar nerve are more often located proximally in the cubital tunnel than distally in Guyon's canal. In many cases anatomic structures can be found that induce compression. These may be ganglia, tumours, vascular abnormalities, crossing fibrous bands or accessory muscles. The ulnar nerve has therefore to be revised all along its passage through Guyon's canal. When other causes are excluded, it might be necessary to excise an accessory muscle to decompress the ulnar nerve sufficiently. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  20. Reactive Hypertrophy of an Accessory Spleen Mimicking Tumour Recurrence of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Tjaden

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available De novo occurrence of an accessory spleen after splenectomy is worth noting for two reasons. First, it is known that splenectomy can cause reactive hypertrophy of initially inactive and macroscopically invisible splenic tissue. Second, it can mimic tumour recurrence in situations in which splenectomy has been performed for oncological reasons. This might cause difficulties in differential diagnosis and the clinical decision for reoperation. We report the case of a patient with suspected recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after total pancreatectomy and splenectomy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, which finally revealed an accessory spleen as the morphological correlate of the newly diagnosed mass in the left retroperitoneum.

  1. FeetUp: A Playful Accessory to Practice Social Skills through Free-Play Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Rosales, Andrea; Arroyo, Ernesto; Blat, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Part 1: Long and Short Papers; International audience; In this paper we describe the design process of an interactive accessory to play anywhere and anytime while encouraging free-play and practice social skills. We explain the design process, the resulting conceptual design of FeetUp and the preliminary user’s evaluation. FeetUp is a playful accessory that takes advantage of children’s interest to jump, or perform body stunts. These activities generally include lifting both feet, and FeetUp ...

  2. Ongoing pain and deformity after an excision of the accessory navicular.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Philip; Singh, Dishan

    2014-09-01

    Although a painful accessory navicula and a pes planus often coexist, they are not necessarily causally related, and each condition should be assessed and treated individually. A child or adolescent will notice the rubbing of an accessory navicula against footwear as the foot and boney swelling grows. The cause of persistent local pain such as inadequate bony resection, scar pain, irritation of the tibialis posterior tendon, and so forth should be sought and addressed; management will depend on the specific presentation and previous procedure performed. The cause of the ongoing pain should be investigated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis and substrate specificity of GH2 beta-mannosidases from Aspergillus species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, S.K.; Rosengren, A.; Klaubauf, S.; Kulkarni, T.; Karlsson, E.N.; de Vries, R.P.; Stalbrand, H.

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of glycoside hydrolase family 2 including Aspergillus sequences and characterised beta-mannosidases from other organisms, clusters putative Aspergillus beta-mannosidases in two distinct clades (A and B). Aspergillus species have at least one paralog in each of the two clades.

  4. Phylogeny of xerophilic aspergilli (subgenus Aspergillus and taxonomic revision of section Restricti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sklenář

    2017-09-01

    The vast majority of species in sect. Restricti produce asperglaucide, asperphenamate or both in contrast to species in sect. Aspergillus. Mycophenolic acid was detected for the first time in at least six members of the section. The ascomata of A. halophilicus do not contain auroglaucin, epiheveadride or flavoglaucin which are common in sect. Aspergillus, but shares the echinulins with sect. Aspergillus.

  5. Ultrasonographic findings of aspergillus bursitis in a patient with a renal transplantation: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Byeong Seong; Yang, Myeon Jun; Kim, Young Min; Youm, Yoon Seok; Choi, Seong Hoon; Park, Sung Bin; Jeong, Ae Kyung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Aspergillus bursitis is an uncommon condition demonstrated as a nonspecific soft tissue mass. To our knowledge, the ultrasonographic findings of aspergillus bursitis in immunocompromised patients have not been previously reported. Here, we report a case of aspergillus bursitis in a renal transplant recipient, accompanied by the associated ultrasonographic findings.

  6. Phylogeny of osmophillic aspergilli (subgenus Aspergillus) and taxonomic revision of section Restricti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus section Restricti together with sister sect. Aspergillus (formerly Eurotium) comprises osmophilic species, that are able to grow on substrates with low water activity and in extreme environments. We addressed the monophyly of both sections within subgenus Aspergillus and applied multidis...

  7. [Hypersensitivity pneumonitis induced by Aspergillus niger--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Hiroo; Gemma, Hitoshi; Uemura, Keiichi; Ono, Takahisa; Masuda, Masafumi; Sano, Takehisa; Sato, Masaki; Koshimizu, Naoki; Suda, Takafumi; Chida, Kingo

    2004-07-01

    A 52-year-old woman was hospitalized because of severe cough in August 1994. She had engaged in culturing roses in greenhouses since 1968, and had developed a cough during the summer of 1990. Chest radiography showed diffuse ground-glass opacity in both lung fields, and she suffered from hypoxemia (PaO2 = 45.6 torr) while breathing room air. The lymphocyte count in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was increased, and transbronchial lung biopsy specimens showed lymphocyte alveolitis in the alveolar spaces. After admission, the patient's symptoms improved rapidly without medication. However, on her return to work, the cough and hypoxemia reappeared. In her rose culture, she had used Rockwool, and Aspergillus niger was detected predominantly in the Rockwool. Precipitins against the extracts of Aspergillus niger were detected with the double immunodiffusion test and the inhalation provocation test yielded clinical symptoms. Our diagnosis was hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by Aspergillus niger.

  8. Colonization of an intralobar pulmonary sequestration by Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambudio, Ríos A; Calvo, Roca M J; García, Polo L A; Lanzas, J Torres; Paricio, P Panilla

    2003-01-01

    Aspergillus is an opportunistic fungus that usually colonizes preexisting lung cavities, especially tuberculous ones. Colonization of a pulmonary sequestration by this germ is exceptional, with just 14 cases reported in the world literature, most of them in Asia. A case is presented of a 48-year-old woman with pleuritic thoracic pain. Simple chest radiology revealed a lower right pulmonary tumor with clear margins and a calcium-type density. CT showed it to correspond to a 6 x 5-cm hypodense mass, which was enhanced at the periphery with intravenous contrast. Aspiration puncture yielded a greenish-yellow pus and the microscopic study strongly suggested Aspergillus, confirmed by culture as Aspergillus fumigatus. Surgery revealed an infected pulmonary sequestration at the lower right lobe, and a lobectomy was performed.

  9. Emerging pathogen Aspergillus calidoustus colonizes water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageskal, Gunhild; Kristensen, Ralf; Fristad, Rosa F; Skaar, Ida

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies have changed the taxonomy of Aspergillus section Usti, and a novel species, Aspergillus calidoustus, has been erected. It was also demonstrated that clinical isolates previously identified as A. ustus actually belong to the emerging pathogen A. calidoustus. Aspergillus ustus were frequently isolated from Norwegian water systems, and due to the taxonomical progress, these waterborne strains could be identified more precisely. A MLST study including ITS, calmodulin, β-tubulin and actin sequences was conducted on 32 strains previously identified as A. ustus. All strains were identified as A. calidoustus, which was verified by physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic analyses. This is the first report of that A. calidoustus is able to colonize water distribution systems. In respect to the potential role of water systems as a source of nosocomial infections in patients with immunodeficiency, attention should be given to water systems in hospitals and other healthcare units, especially the heated-water installations. © 2011 ISHAM

  10. Electrochemical monitoring of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutyła-Olesiuk, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Urszula E.; Ciosek, Patrycja; Wróblewski, Wojciech, E-mail: wuwu@ch.pw.edu.pl

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Citric acid fermentation process (production) by Aspergillus niger. • Qualitative/quantitative monitoring of standard culture and culture infected with yeast. • Electronic tongue based on potentiometric and voltammetric sensors. • Evaluation of the progress and the correctness of the fermentation process. • The highest classification abilities of the hybrid electronic tongue. - Abstract: Hybrid electronic tongue was developed for the monitoring of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger. The system based on various potentiometric/voltammetric sensors and appropriate chemometric techniques provided correct qualitative and quantitative classification of the samples collected during standard Aspergillus niger culture and culture infected with yeast. The performance of the proposed approach was compared with the monitoring of the fermentation process carried out using classical methods. The results obtained proved, that the designed hybrid electronic tongue was able to evaluate the progress and correctness of the fermentation process.

  11. Phosphate solubilizing ability of two Arctic Aspergillus niger strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv Mohan Singh,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Many filamentous fungi were isolated from the soils of Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen, Svalbard, and were screened in vitro for their phosphate solubilizing ability. Two strains of Aspergillus niger showed good tricalcium phosphate (TCP solubilizing ability in Pikovskaya's medium. The TCP solubilization index was calculated at varying levels of pH and temperatures. The ability of Aspergillus niger strain-1 to solubilize and release inorganic-P was 285 µg ml–1, while Aspergillus niger strain-2 solubilized 262 µg ml–1 from 0.5% TCP after seven days. This is the first report of TCP solubilization by Arctic strains that may serve as very good phosphate solubilizers in the form of biofertilizer.

  12. Occurrence of toxigenic Aspergillus flavus in commercial Bulgur wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bertechini FARIA

    Full Text Available Abstract Aflatoxins are mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic mycotoxins. The objective of this work was to study the presence of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus in commercial Bulgur wheat in the city of Maringá, Paraná, Brazil. Thirty samples of commercial Bulgur wheat, acquired in the period of August 2011 to January 2012, were evaluated. The enumeration analysis showed that samples had up to 273.3 CFU of molds and 133.3 CFU of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus per gram of wheat. Forty-two monosporic isolates were obtained and identified as Aspergillus flavus. The isolates were analyzed regarding their aflatoxigenic potential by culture in coconut milk agar; hydroxide vapor exposure; chromatography; and polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting genes that code enzymes of the aflatoxins synthesis pathway. Some of the isolates were confirmed to be aflatoxin producers and several of them presented a genetic profile of aflatoxin synthesis. The obtained results demonstrated that Bulgur wheat A. flavus contamination is concerning.

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-05-0051 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-05-0051 ref|XP_001211187.1| hypothetical protein ATEG_02009 [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU36971.1| hypothetical protein ATEG_02009 [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001211187.1 1.8 27% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ETEL-01-0740 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ETEL-01-0740 ref|XP_001217896.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU30411.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001217896.1 0.82 29% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-01-0109 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-01-0109 ref|XP_001218166.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU29735.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001218166.1 0.007 31% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0394 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0394 ref|XP_001213282.1| predicted protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH262...4] gb|EAU35906.1| predicted protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001213282.1 3e-23 33% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-02-0085 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-02-0085 ref|XP_001215520.1| acyl-CoA desaturase [Aspergillus terreus NIH2...624] gb|EAU32886.1| acyl-CoA desaturase [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001215520.1 1e-132 56% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ETEL-01-0761 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ETEL-01-0761 ref|XP_001208938.1| predicted protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH262...4] gb|EAU38330.1| predicted protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001208938.1 0.001 32% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-EEUR-01-1199 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-EEUR-01-1199 ref|XP_001211631.1| hypothetical protein ATEG_02453 [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU37415.1| hypothetical protein ATEG_02453 [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001211631.1 0.72 25% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-03-0039 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-03-0039 ref|XP_001209647.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU32345.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001209647.1 2e-30 37% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-1000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-1000 ref|XP_001215926.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU33292.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001215926.1 0.54 32% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-1470 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-1470 ref|XP_001212800.1| hypothetical protein ATEG_03622 [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU35424.1| hypothetical protein ATEG_03622 [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001212800.1 1.4 28% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-1406 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-1406 ref|XP_001213293.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU35917.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001213293.1 0.97 28% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0231 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0231 ref|XP_001209722.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU32420.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001209722.1 0.48 31% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-04-0082 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-04-0082 ref|XP_001218098.1| hypothetical protein ATEG_09476 [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU30613.1| hypothetical protein ATEG_09476 [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001218098.1 0.0 40% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ETEL-01-1421 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ETEL-01-1421 ref|XP_001212579.1| carboxypeptidase Y precursor [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU36675.1| carboxypeptidase Y precursor [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001212579.1 1.5 28% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OSAT-09-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OSAT-09-0002 ref|XP_001213410.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU36034.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001213410.1 0.20 26% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-10-0011 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-10-0011 ref|XP_001210139.1| nucleolar protein 12 [Aspergillus terreus NIH...2624] gb|EAU38699.1| nucleolar protein 12 [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001210139.1 5.9 30% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0164 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0164 ref|XP_001209232.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU38624.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001209232.1 1.5 24% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-03-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GACU-03-0029 ref|XP_001216777.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU31329.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001216777.1 3.1 39% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OSAT-04-0037 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OSAT-04-0037 ref|XP_001215089.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU33672.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001215089.1 0.019 28% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-2657 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-2657 ref|XP_001214433.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terre...us NIH2624] gb|EAU34324.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Aspergillus terreus NIH2624] XP_001214433.1 0.46 34% ...

  13. Fungal Contamination Of Meat And Its Environment With Special ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most commonly isolated fungi belonged to the genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Candida and Rhodotorula. Aspergillus niger was by far the most common, followed by Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus terreus. The most common Penicillium species were Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium ...

  14. Biodegradation of polyester polyurethane by Aspergillus tubingensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sehroon; Nadir, Sadia; Shah, Zia Ullah; Shah, Aamer Ali; Karunarathna, Samantha C; Xu, Jianchu; Khan, Afsar; Munir, Shahzad; Hasan, Fariha

    2017-06-01

    The xenobiotic nature and lack of degradability of polymeric materials has resulted in vast levels of environmental pollution and numerous health hazards. Different strategies have been developed and still more research is being in progress to reduce the impact of these polymeric materials. This work aimed to isolate and characterize polyester polyurethane (PU) degrading fungi from the soil of a general city waste disposal site in Islamabad, Pakistan. A novel PU degrading fungus was isolated from soil and identified as Aspergillus tubingensis on the basis of colony morphology, macro- and micro-morphology, molecular and phylogenetic analyses. The PU degrading ability of the fungus was tested in three different ways in the presence of 2% glucose: (a) on SDA agar plate, (b) in liquid MSM, and (c) after burial in soil. Our results indicated that this strain of A. tubingensis was capable of degrading PU. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we were able to visually confirm that the mycelium of A. tubingensis colonized the PU material, causing surface degradation and scarring. The formation or breakage of chemical bonds during the biodegradation process of PU was confirmed using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The biodegradation of PU was higher when plate culture method was employed, followed by the liquid culture method and soil burial technique. Notably, after two months in liquid medium, the PU film was totally degraded into smaller pieces. Based on a comprehensive literature search, it can be stated that this is the first report showing A. tubingensis capable of degrading PU. This work provides insight into the role of A. tubingensis towards solving the dilemma of PU wastes through biodegradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of Glucose Transporters in Aspergillus nidulans

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Menino, João Filipe; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Brown, Neil Andrew; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; Savoldi, Marcela; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Rodrigues, Fernando; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the mechanisms involved in glucose transport, in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, we have identified four glucose transporter encoding genes hxtB-E. We evaluated the ability of hxtB-E to functionally complement the Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY.VW4000 strain that is unable to grow on glucose, fructose, mannose or galactose as single carbon source. In S. cerevisiae HxtB-E were targeted to the plasma membrane. The expression of HxtB, HxtC and HxtE was able to restore growth on glucose, fructose, mannose or galactose, indicating that these transporters accept multiple sugars as a substrate through an energy dependent process. A tenfold excess of unlabeled maltose, galactose, fructose, and mannose were able to inhibit glucose uptake to different levels (50 to 80 %) in these s. cerevisiae complemented strains. Moreover, experiments with cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), strongly suggest that hxtB, -C, and –E mediate glucose transport via active proton symport. The A. nidulans ΔhxtB, ΔhxtC or ΔhxtE null mutants showed ~2.5-fold reduction in the affinity for glucose, while ΔhxtB and -C also showed a 2-fold reduction in the capacity for glucose uptake. The ΔhxtD mutant had a 7.8-fold reduction in affinity, but a 3-fold increase in the capacity for glucose uptake. However, only the ΔhxtB mutant strain showed a detectable decreased rate of glucose consumption at low concentrations and an increased resistance to 2-deoxyglucose. PMID:24282591

  16. Tools for retargeting proteins within Aspergillus nidulans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbulakshmi Suresh

    Full Text Available Endogenously tagging proteins with green fluorescent protein (GFP enables the visualization of the tagged protein using live cell microscopy. GFP-tagging is widely utilized to study biological processes in model experimental organisms including filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus nidulans. Many strains of A. nidulans have therefore been generated with different proteins endogenously tagged with GFP. To further enhance experimental approaches based upon GFP-tagging, we have adapted the GFP Binding Protein (GBP system for A. nidulans. GBP is a genetically encoded Llama single chain antibody against GFP which binds GFP with high affinity. Using gene replacement approaches, it is therefore possible to link GBP to anchor proteins, which will then retarget GFP-tagged proteins away from their normal location to the location of the anchor-GBP protein. To facilitate this approach in A. nidulans, we made four base plasmid cassettes that can be used to generate gene replacement GBP-tagging constructs by utilizing fusion PCR. Using these base cassettes, fusion PCR, and gene targeting approaches, we generated strains with SPA10-GBP and Tom20-GBP gene replacements. These strains enabled test targeting of GFP-tagged proteins to septa or to the surface of mitochondria respectively. SPA10-GBP is shown to effectively target GFP-tagged proteins to both forming and mature septa. Tom20-GBP has a higher capacity to retarget GFP-tagged proteins being able to relocate all Nup49-GFP from its location within nuclear pore complexes (NPCs to the cytoplasm in association with mitochondria. Notably, removal of Nup49-GFP from NPCs causes cold sensitivity as does deletion of the nup49 gene. The cassette constructs described facilitate experimental approaches to generate precise protein-protein linkages in fungi. The A. nidulans SPA10-GBP and Tom20-GBP strains can be utilized to modulate other GFP-tagged proteins of interest.

  17. Recombinant bacterial hemoglobin alters metabolism of Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, Gerald; Diano, Audrey; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is used extensively for the production of enzymes and organic acids. A major problem in industrial fermentations with this fungus is to ensure sufficient supply of oxygen required for respiratory metabolism of the fungus. In case of oxygen limitation...... behind the strong gpdA promoter from Aspergillus nidulans. Analysis of secreted metabolites, oxygen uptake, CO2 evolution and biomass formation points towards a relief of stress in the mutant expressing VHB when it is exposed to oxygen limitation. Our findings therefore point to an interesting strategy...

  18. Modern taxonomy of biotechnologically important Aspergillus and Penicillium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houbraken, Jos; de Vries, Ronald P; Samson, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Taxonomy is a dynamic discipline and name changes of fungi with biotechnological, industrial, or medical importance are often difficult to understand for researchers in the applied field. Species belonging to the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium are commonly used or isolated, and inadequate taxonomy or uncertain nomenclature of these genera can therefore lead to tremendous confusion. Misidentification of strains used in biotechnology can be traced back to (1) recent changes in nomenclature, (2) new taxonomic insights, including description of new species, and/or (3) incorrect identifications. Changes in the recent published International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi and Plants will lead to numerous name changes of existing Aspergillus and Penicillium species and an overview of the current names of biotechnological important species is given. Furthermore, in (biotechnological) literature old and invalid names are still used, such as Aspergillus awamori, A. foetidus, A. kawachii, Talaromyces emersonii, Acremonium cellulolyticus, and Penicillium funiculosum. An overview of these and other species with their correct names is presented. Furthermore, the biotechnologically important species Talaromyces thermophilus is here combined in Thermomyces as Th. dupontii. The importance of Aspergillus, Penicillium, and related genera is also illustrated by the high number of undertaken genome sequencing projects. A number of these strains are incorrectly identified or atypical strains are selected for these projects. Recommendations for correct strain selection are given here. Phylogenetic analysis shows a close relationship between the genome-sequenced strains of Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Monascus. Talaromyces stipitatus and T. marneffei (syn. Penicillium marneffei) are closely related to Thermomyces lanuginosus and Th. dupontii (syn. Talaromyces thermophilus), and these species appear to be distantly related to Aspergillus and Penicillium. In the last part of

  19. Electrochemical monitoring of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyła-Olesiuk, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Urszula E; Ciosek, Patrycja; Wróblewski, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    Hybrid electronic tongue was developed for the monitoring of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger. The system based on various potentiometric/voltammetric sensors and appropriate chemometric techniques provided correct qualitative and quantitative classification of the samples collected during standard Aspergillus niger culture and culture infected with yeast. The performance of the proposed approach was compared with the monitoring of the fermentation process carried out using classical methods. The results obtained proved, that the designed hybrid electronic tongue was able to evaluate the progress and correctness of the fermentation process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fumonisins in Aspergillus niger: Industrial and food aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Mogensen, Jesper

    Introduction: Fumonisins are toxic seconday metabolites from Fusarium verticillioides and other Fusaria, from Tolypocladium and Aspergillus niger 1,2. Being a generalist Aspergillus niger is the workhorse in a very large number of industrial applications, and is also a common contaminant in foods...... of approximately 6% of the strains. None of the other species in the black Aspergilli produced fumonisins. One strain (NRRL 337), called the “food fungus”, because it is used for single cell protein based on cheap growth substrates, produced both fumonisins and ochratoxin A. Industrial citric acid producers...

  1. Emergence of hand contamination with Aspergillus during demolition work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunat, Lisiane; Ahmed-Lecheheb, Djihane; Hartemann, Philippe; Hunter, Paul R; Hautemanière, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Hand rubbing with hydro-alcoholic solutions prevent the exogenous nosocomial infection, but the hydro-alcoholic solutions were not sporicidal. A major program of demolition was organized on the area of the University Hospital of Nancy (France) between 2007 and 2010, and this period is often considered as a possible source of suspending Aspergillus spores. This study shows the emergence of Aspergillus on the hands of the medical students during demolition period despite the same quality of hand hygiene. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 76 FR 24522 - In the Matter of Certain Handbags, Luggage, Accessories, and Packaging Thereof; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... handbags, luggage, accessories, and packaging thereof by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S. Trademark Registration Nos. 297,594; 1,643,625; 1,653,663; 1,875,198; 2,773,107; 2,177,828; 2,181,753; and 1...

  3. A peptide from the male accessory glands of the Colorado potato beetle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, H.M.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the male accessory glands of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say). These glands add various substances to the ejaculate. On mating, the ejaculate is transferred to the female, together with the substances from the

  4. 77 FR 46633 - Parts and Accessories Necessary for Safe Operation: Brakes; Adjustment Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... risk and removed from revenue service until the brake adjustment problems are resolved. With respect to... RIN 2126-AB28 Parts and Accessories Necessary for Safe Operation: Brakes; Adjustment Limits AGENCY... the operators . The rule provides improved guidance concerning CMV brake adjustment limits. The...

  5. Melanocortin Receptor Accessory Proteins (MRAPs): Functions in the melanocortin system and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouault, Alix A J; Srinivasan, Dinesh K; Yin, Terry C; Lee, Abigail A; Sebag, Julien A

    2017-10-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are regulated by numerous proteins including kinases, G-proteins, β-arrestins and accessory proteins. Several families of GPCR accessory proteins like Receptor Activity Modifying Proteins, Receptor Transporting Proteins and Melanocortin Receptor Accessory Proteins (MRAPs) have been identified as regulator of receptor trafficking, signaling and ligand specificity. The MRAP family contains two members, MRAP1 and MRAP2, responsible for the formation of a functional ACTH receptor and for the regulation of energy homeostasis respectively. Like all known GPCR accessory proteins, MRAPs are single transmembrane proteins, however, they form a unique structure since they assemble as an anti-parallel homodimer. Moreover, the accepted idea that MRAPs are specific regulators of melanocortin receptors was recently challenged by the discovery that MRAP2 inhibits the activity of prokineticin receptors. Recent studies are starting to explain the role of the unusual structure of MRAPs and to illustrate the importance of MRAP2 for the maintenance of both energy and glucose homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Melanocortin Receptors - edited by Ya-Xiong Tao. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 22 CFR 121.8 - End-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., parts, firmware, software and systems. 121.8 Section 121.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE...-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems. (a) An end-item is..., operating systems and support software for design, implementation, test, operation, diagnosis and repair. A...

  7. An accessory flexor of the fifth toe | Asomugha | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of accessory muscles and other organs on the lower limbs of some individuals has variously been reported in the literature. We report an unusual muscle located on the plantar surface of the left foot of a cadaver, which had not been previously described. This muscle originated from the tendon of tibialis ...

  8. Effect of B-success herbal supplement on the accessory sex organs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work investigated the effect of B-success herbal supplement on the accessory sex organs of male albino rats. Twenty weights matched male albino rats were divided into four groups of five rats and were given 0.00, 315,630,945 mg/kg of the herbal product orally for 90 days. Animals had access to deionized water and ...

  9. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Assessment of Accessory Infraorbital Foramen and Determination of Infraorbital Foramen Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ibrahim K; Sansare, Kaustubh; Karjodkar, Freny R; Salve, Prashant

    2017-11-09

    There is no evidence about evaluating accessory infraorbital foramen by 3-dimensional analysis like multi slice computed tomography or cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in human subjects. To authors' best knowledge this is a first study to assess the accessory infraorbital foramen and position of infraorbital foramen in relation to crown of maxillary teeth using CBCT. This study primarily aimed to assess the location and number of accessory infraorbital foramen (AIOF), to measure the distance between main infraorbital foramen and AIOF and secondarily to determine the position of infraorbital foramen in relation to crowns of maxillary second premolar, first molar, and second molar. Cone beam computed tomography volumes of 200 patients were retrieved from the digital imaging and communications in medicine archive folder. Accessory infraorbital foramen was recognized in 29% of the patients among whom 46.6% were present on the right side, 31% on the left side, and 22.4% located bilaterally. The most frequent position of infraorbital foramen was found to be in line with crown of second premolar. The presence of AIOF and inability to recognize it in preoperative evaluation could be considered among the other reasons of failure or incomplete anesthesia.

  10. Accessory extensor digiti minimi muscle simulating a soft tissue mass during surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Papathanasiou, Efthymia; Anastasopoulos, Nikolas

    2010-01-01

    During a wrist ganglion excision originating at the tendon sheath of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle, a soft tissue mass was observed just radial and distal to the surgical field. Dissection of the mass revealed an accessory extensor digiti minimi muscle belly which joined the radial extensor digiti minimi tendon. The surgical impact is discussed.

  11. Nodoventricular accessory pathways in PRKAG2-dependent familial preexcitation syndrome reveal a disorder in cardiac development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Hanno L.; van der Wal, Allard C.; Campian, Maria E.; Kruyswijk, Hittjo H.; ten Hove Jansen, Bram; van Doorn, Dirk-Jan; Oskam, Henk J.; Becker, Anton E.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Familial preexcitation syndrome is linked to mutations in PRKAG2. Previous studies on the R302Q mutation have provided evidence for a remarkably high proportion of otherwise rare accessory pathways with atrioventricular (AV) node-like conduction properties (Mahaim fibers). Yet,

  12. 76 FR 9853 - Parts and Accessories Necessary for Safe Operation; Brakes; Application for Exemption From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Parts and Accessories Necessary for Safe Operation; Brakes; Application for Exemption From Innovative Electronics; Correction AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety... before March 14, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Luke W. Loy, Vehicle and Roadside Operations...

  13. 21 CFR 876.4730 - Manual gastroenterology-urology surgical instrument and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual gastroenterology-urology surgical... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4730 Manual gastroenterology-urology surgical instrument and accessories. (a) Identification...

  14. 41 CFR 101-39.304 - Modification or installation of accessory equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.3-Use and Care of GSA Interagency Fleet Management System Vehicles § 101-39.304 Modification or installation of accessory equipment. The modification of a GSA Interagency Fleet Management System (IFMS) vehicle or the permanent installation of...

  15. 21 CFR 888.5850 - Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5850 Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. (a) Identification. A nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus...

  16. Dissociation between Anterograde and Retrograde Conduction during Transvenous Cryoablation of Parahissian Accessory Pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorgente, A.; Paparella, G.; Chierchia, G.B.; Sarkozy, A.; Asmundis, C. de; Muller-Burri, S.A.; Yazaki, Y.; Capulzini, L.; Brugada, P.

    2011-01-01

    Ablation of parahissian accessory pathways (APs) is a challenging procedure because of the high risk to provoke "iatrogenic" atrioventricular (AV) nodal block. The feasibility and safety of cryoablation (CA) have been already demonstrated both in patients with AV nodal reentry tachycardia and in

  17. Combined molecular and biochemical approach identifies Aspergillus japonicus and Aspergillus aculeatus as two species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parenicova, L.; Skouboe, P.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2001-01-01

    of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S rRNA gene could not be used to distinguish between A. japonicus and A. aculeatus but did show that these two taxa are more closely related to each other than to other species of black aspergilli. Aspergillus niger pyruvate kinase (pkiA) and pectin...... lyase A (pelA) and Agaricus bisporus 28S rRNA genes, which were used as probes in the RFLP analysis, revealed clear polymorphism between these two taxa. The A. niger pkiA and pelA probes placed six strains in an A. japonicus group and 12 isolates in an A. aculeatus group, which exhibited intraspecific...

  18. Aqueous extracts of Tulbaghia violacea inhibit germination of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus conidia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somai, Benesh Munilal; Belewa, Vuyokazi

    2011-06-01

    Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus are important plant pathogens and causal agents of pre- and postharvest rots of corn, peanuts, and tree nuts. These fungal pathogens cause significant crop losses and produce aflatoxins, which contaminate many food products and contribute to liver cancer worldwide. Aqueous preparations of Tulbaghia violacea (wild garlic) were antifungal and at 10 mg/ml resulted in sustained growth inhibition of greater than 50% for both A. flavus and A. parasiticus. Light microscopy revealed that the plant extract inhibited conidial germination in a dose-dependent manner. When exposed to T. violacea extract concentrations of 10 mg/ml and above, A. parasiticus conidia began germinating earlier and germination was completed before that of A. flavus, indicating that A. parasiticus conidia were more resistant to the antifungal effects of T. violacea than were A. flavus conidia. At a subinhibitory extract dose of 15 mg/ml, hyphae of both fungal species exhibited increased granulation and vesicle formation, possibly due to increased reactivity between hyphal cellular components and T. violacea extract. These hyphal changes were not seen when hyphae were formed in the absence of the extract. Transmission electron microscopy revealed thickening of conidial cell walls in both fungal species when grown in the presence of the plant extract. Cell walls of A. flavus also became considerably thicker than those of A. parasiticus, indicating differential response to the extract. Aqueous preparations of T. violacea can be used as antifungal treatments for the control of A. flavus and A. parasiticus. Because the extract exhibited a more pronounced effect on A. flavus than on A. parasiticus, higher doses may be needed for control of A. parasiticus infections.

  19. Antifungal Effects of Thyme, Agastache and Satureja Essential Oils on Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Mardani

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Growth inhibition of Aspergillus fumigatus,Aspergillus flavus and Fusarum solani exposed to the essential oils including Thyme, Agastache and Satureja were studied. Disc Diffusion Method was used to evaluate the fungal growth inhibitory effects of the essential oils. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC of the oils were determined and compared with each other. The results showed that all three essential oils examined, had antifungal effects against three fungi species. The MIC data revealed that Thyme oil was the most effective essential oil with the MIC of 62.5 μl ml-1.

  20. Analysis and prediction of gene splice sites in four Aspergillus genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kai; Ussery, David; Brunak, Søren

    2009-01-01

    , splice site prediction program called NetAspGene, for the genus Aspergillus. Gene sequences from Aspergillus fumigatus, the most common mould pathogen, were used to build and test our model. Compared to many animals and plants, Aspergillus contains smaller introns; thus we have applied a larger window...... size on single local networks for training, to cover both donor and acceptor site information. We have applied NetAspGene to other Aspergilli, including Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus oryzae, and Aspergillus niger. Evaluation with independent data sets reveal that NetAspGene performs substantially...... better splice site prediction than other available tools. NetAspGene will be very helpful for the study in Aspergillus splice sites and especially in alternative splicing. A webpage for NetAspGene is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetAspGene....

  1. Metabolic control analysis of Aspergillus niger L-arabinose catabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de M.J.L.; Prathumpai, W.; Visser, J.; Ruijter, G.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model of the L-arabinose/D-xylose catabolic pathway of Aspergillus niger was constructed based on the kinetic properties of the enzymes. For this purpose L-arabinose reductase, L-arabitol dehydrogenase and D-xylose reductase were purified using dye-affinity chromatography, and their

  2. Biosynthesis of phytases and phosphatases by Aspergillus niger 551

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARyw

    2012-02-16

    Feb 16, 2012 ... Key words: Aspergillus niger, phytase, phosphatase, amylase, protease, starch. ... biological production of phytases is of great significance in research. The researchers focus their attention mainly on finding appropriate strains and on their ... substrate, 200 μl of the enzyme extract and 200 μl 25 mMol of.

  3. Nutritional Evaluation of Graded Levels of Aspergillus-treated Rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nine pregnant West African dwarf (WAD) goats were fed untreated (control diet A with 30% inclusion level) and Aspergillus treated diet, B (10%) and diet C (20%) in total mixed rations. The effect of treatment was evaluated on feed intake, digestibility, BW and growth rate. Fungus-treated rice husk appeared to be well ...

  4. Production and partial purification of glucoamylase from Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-21

    May 21, 2014 ... Glucoamylase is an enzyme that hydrolyses 1,4α and 1,6β-glucosidic linkages in polysaccharides yielding glucose. Aspergillus niger strains 1, 2 and 3 were locally isolated from cassava peel dumpsite for the production of glucoamylase enzyme. A. niger strains 1, 2 and 3 were screened for their hyper.

  5. Production and partial purification of glucoamylase from Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glucoamylase is an enzyme that hydrolyses 1,4α and 1,6β-glucosidic linkages in polysaccharides yielding glucose. Aspergillus niger strains 1, 2 and 3 were locally isolated from cassava peel dumpsite for the production of glucoamylase enzyme. A. niger strains 1, 2 and 3 were screened for their hyper producing ability on ...

  6. Biomodification of palm shell activated carbon using Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adsorption of lead ions from aqueous solutions using commercial untreated granular palm shell activated carbon (PSAC) and PSAC biomodified with Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger biomass, respectively, was studied. The adsorption capacity of the three biosorbents was evaluated in batch adsorption experiments at ...

  7. Hydrolysis of raw tuber starches by amylase of Aspergillus niger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrolysis of raw tuber starches by amylase of Aspergillus niger AM07 isolated from the soil. ... The crude amylase preparation of A. niger AM07 had temperature and pH optima activities at 60oC and 4.0 respectively. The optimum substrate concentration was 3 %. The action of the crude amylase of A. niger on raw tuber ...

  8. Phylogeny, identification and nomenclature of the genus Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, R.A.; Visagie, C.M.; Houbraken, J.

    2014-01-01

    . We introduce new combinations for accepted species presently lacking an Aspergillus name and provide an updated accepted species list for the genus, now containing 339 species. To add to the scientific value of the list, we include information about living ex-type culture collection numbers and Gen...

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Sexual Sporulation Mutants of Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, K.; Heemst, van D.; Slakhorst, M.; Debets, A.J.M.; Heyting, C.

    2001-01-01

    For the genetic dissection of sexual sporulation in Aspergillus nidulans, we started a collection of ascosporeless mutants. After mutagenization of conidiospores with high doses of UV, we isolated 20 mutants with defects in ascospore formation. We crossed these mutants in two successive rounds with

  10. Effect Of Laboratory Produced Xylanase From Aspergillus niger On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficacy of laboratory produced xylanase enzyme from Aspergillus niger on highly fibrous feeds and feedstuffs was investigated. Guinea grass (Panicum maximum) from grass hay and rice husk (Oryza sativa) from crop by-product characterised with high fibre content served as substrates (Feeds and Feedstuffs) for the ...

  11. Dynamics of dsRNA mycoviruses in black Aspergillus population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Debets, A.J.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 10% of all examined 668 representatives of black Aspergillus species, independent of worldwide location, were infected with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycoviruses. These isometric viruses (25-40 nm diameter) contained a variety of often multiple segments of different dsRNA sizes

  12. Dynamics of dsRNA mycoviruses in black Aspergillus populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diepeningen, Anne D; Debets, Alfons J M; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    Approximately 10% of all examined 668 representatives of black Aspergillus species, independent of worldwide location, were infected with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycoviruses. These isometric viruses (25-40 nm diameter) contained a variety of often multiple segments of different dsRNA sizes

  13. Biological control of post harvest disease caused by Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biological control of post harvest disease caused by Aspergillus flavus on stored lemon fruits. ... Erwinia chrysanthemi RK-67 and Bacillus subtilis RK-6 treatments reduced disease severity on both lemon cultivars. Furthermore, both the cell suspension and culture filtrates of Burkholderia cepacia strain RK- 277 reduced ...

  14. Control of Aspergillus niger with garlic, onion and leek extracts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-02-19

    Feb 19, 2007 ... Condiments Chemistry,Microbiology ,Technology.Academic Press,. San Fransisco,pp 35-305. Rasooli I, Abyaneh MR (2004).Inhibitory effects of thyme oils on growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus parasiticus. Food Control. 15: 479-483. Rivlin RS (2001). Historical perspective on the use of garlic.

  15. Biological control of Aspergillus flavus growth and subsequent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... constraint of grain quality and sorghum production. Various ... respectively. Key words: Sorghum, Aspergillus flavus, AFB1, biological control. ..... J. Appl. Microbiol. 2: 297-306. Mishra HN, Chitrangada D (2003). A review on biological control and metabolism of aflatoxin. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 43(3): ...

  16. Lipoxygenase activity accelerates programmed spore germination in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory J. Fischer; William Bacon; Jun Yang; Jonathan M. Palmer; Taylor Dagenais; Bruce D. Hammock; Nancy P. Keller

    2017-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus initiates invasive growth through a programmed germination process that progresses from dormant spore to swollen spore (SS) to germling (GL) and ultimately invasive hyphal growth. We find a lipoxygenase with considerable homology to human Alox5 and Alox15, LoxB, that impacts the transitions of...

  17. Comparative study of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium sp. in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The comparative study of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium sp. in the biodegradation of automotive gas oil (AGO) and premium motor spirit (PMS) was carried out to ascertain the effectiveness of using these microorganisms in cleaning and restoring the ecosystem when polluted by petroleum products. These fungi were ...

  18. Cellulase production by wild strains of Aspergillus niger, Penicillium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Waste cellulosic materials (corncob, sawdust and sugarcane pulp) and crystalline cellulose induced cellulase production in wild strains of Aspergillus niger, Penicillium chrysogenum and Trichoderma harzianum isolated from a wood-waste dump in Lagos, Nigeria. Cellulose-supplemented media gave the maximum ...

  19. Cellulase and Pectinase Production Potentials of Aspergillus Niger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of pectinase and cellulase by Aspergillus niger from corn cob was examined. The organism was screened for enzymatic activity using Carboxyl Methyl Cellulose (CMC) and Pectin as substrate. The result revealed a clear zone of inhibition in the agar plates. The organism was subjected to different optimum ...

  20. Biotransformations of (--Myrtenol and (--Nopol by Aspergillus tamarii MRC 72400

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Yılmazer Keskin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The biotransformation of (--myrtenol (1 and (--nopol (2 by Aspergillus tamarii MRC 72400 was described. The biotransformation of (--myrtenol (1 with A. tamarii for 7 days afforded (--p-menth-1-en-7,8-diol (3. The biotransformation of (--nopol (2 by A. tamarii for 7 days afforded (--7-hydroxymethyl-1-p-menthen-8-ol (4.