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Sample records for aspergillus flavus growth

  1. Inhibiting Aspergillus flavus growth and degrading aflatoxin B1 by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a type of toxin produced by Aspergillus flavus, which has a negative effect on animal production and economic profits. In order to inhibit A. flavus growth and degrade aflatoxin, the optimal proportion of beneficial microbes such as Lactobacillus casei, Bacillus subtilis and Pichia anomala were selected.

  2. Biological control of Aspergillus flavus growth and subsequent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... This study, therefore explored the potential use of certain biocontrol agents for the reduction of growth of toxigenic Aspergillus flavus and subsequent aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) production in sorghum. Among all the biocontrol agents tested, culture filtrate of Rhodococcus erythropolis completely inhibited the A.

  3. Biological control of Aspergillus flavus growth and subsequent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... constraint of grain quality and sorghum production. Various ... respectively. Key words: Sorghum, Aspergillus flavus, AFB1, biological control. ..... J. Appl. Microbiol. 2: 297-306. Mishra HN, Chitrangada D (2003). A review on biological control and metabolism of aflatoxin. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 43(3): ...

  4. Inhibiting Aspergillus flavus growth and degrading aflatoxin B1 by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl2

    2012-08-14

    Aug 14, 2012 ... of this study was to select the most effective method and products for inhibiting A. flavus growth and ... The supernatants were filtered to remove microbes with 0.20 μm Minisart High-flow filter (Sartorius Stedim .... pseudoplanturum 371 could inhibit mold growth and aflatoxin production, and the inhibitory ...

  5. Control of Aspergillus flavus Growth in Tomato Paste by Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Origanum vulgare L. Essential Oils

    OpenAIRE

    F. Kalantari; M. Barzegar; Z. Hamidi-Esfahani

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antifungal activities of Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Origanum vulgare L. essential oil against Aspergillus flavus in culture media and tomato paste. 200 ppm of cinnamon and 500 ppm of oregano completely inhibited A. flavus growth in culture media, while in tomato paste 300 ppm of cinnamon and 200 ppm of oregano had the same effect. Test panel evaluations revealed that samples with 100 and 200 ppm cinnamon were acceptable. The results...

  6. The plant growth regulator methyl jasmonate inhibits aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich-Tanrikulu, M; Mahoney, N E; Rodriguez, S B

    1995-11-01

    Aflatoxins are highly toxic and carcinogenic compounds produced by certain Aspergillus species on agricultural commodities. The presence of fatty acid hydroperoxides, which can form in plant material either preharvest under stress or postharvest under improper storage conditions, correlates with high levels of aflatoxin production. Effects on fungal growth and aflatoxin production are known for only a few of the numerous plant metabolites of fatty acid hydroperoxides. Jasmonic acid (JA), a plant growth regulator, is a metabolite of 13-hydroperoxylinolenic acid, derived from alpha-linolenic acid. The volatile methyl ester of JA, methyl jasmonate (MeJA), is also a plant growth regulator. In this study we report the effect of MeJA on aflatoxin production and growth of Aspergillus flavus. MeJA at concentrations of 10(-3)-10(-8) M in the growth medium inhibited aflatoxin production, by as much as 96%. Exposure of cultures to MeJA vapour similarly inhibited aflatoxin production. The amount of aflatoxin produced depended on the timing of the exposure. MeJA treatment also delayed spore germination and inhibited the production of a mycelial pigment. These fungal responses resemble plant jasmonate responses.

  7. The inhibitory effects of Curcuma longa L. essential oil and curcumin on Aspergillus flavus link growth and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias Ferreira, Flávio; Mossini, Simone Aparecida Galerani; Dias Ferreira, Francine Maery; Arrotéia, Carla Cristina; da Costa, Christiane Luciana; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Machinski, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The essential oil from Curcuma longa L. was analysed by GC/MS. The major components of the oil were ar-turmerone (33.2%), α -turmerone (23.5%) and β -turmerone (22.7%). The antifungal activities of the oil were studied with regard to Aspergillus flavus growth inhibition and altered morphology, as preliminary studies indicated that the essential oil from C. longa inhibited Aspergillus flavus Link aflatoxin production. The concentration of essential oil in the culture media ranged from 0.01% to 5.0% v/v, and the concentration of curcumin was 0.01-0.5% v/v. The effects on sporulation, spore viability, and fungal morphology were determined. The essential oil exhibited stronger antifungal activity than curcumin on A. flavus. The essential oil reduced the fungal growth in a concentration-dependent manner. A. flavus growth rate was reduced by C. longa essential oil at 0.10%, and this inhibition effect was more efficient in concentrations above 0.50%. Germination and sporulation were 100% inhibited in 0.5% oil. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of A. flavus exposed to oil showed damage to hyphae membranes and conidiophores. Because the fungus is a plant pathogen and aflatoxin producer, C. longa essential oil may be used in the management of host plants.

  8. The Inhibitory Effects of Curcuma longa L. Essential Oil and Curcumin on Aspergillus flavus Link Growth and Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Dias Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil from Curcuma longa L. was analysed by GC/MS. The major components of the oil were ar-turmerone (33.2%, α-turmerone (23.5% and β-turmerone (22.7%. The antifungal activities of the oil were studied with regard to Aspergillus flavus growth inhibition and altered morphology, as preliminary studies indicated that the essential oil from C. longa inhibited Aspergillus flavus Link aflatoxin production. The concentration of essential oil in the culture media ranged from 0.01% to 5.0% v/v, and the concentration of curcumin was 0.01–0.5% v/v. The effects on sporulation, spore viability, and fungal morphology were determined. The essential oil exhibited stronger antifungal activity than curcumin on A. flavus. The essential oil reduced the fungal growth in a concentration-dependent manner. A. flavus growth rate was reduced by C. longa essential oil at 0.10%, and this inhibition effect was more efficient in concentrations above 0.50%. Germination and sporulation were 100% inhibited in 0.5% oil. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM of A. flavus exposed to oil showed damage to hyphae membranes and conidiophores. Because the fungus is a plant pathogen and aflatoxin producer, C. longa essential oil may be used in the management of host plants.

  9. The Inhibitory Effects of Curcuma longa L. Essential Oil and Curcumin on Aspergillus flavus Link Growth and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossini, Simone Aparecida Galerani; Ferreira, Francine Maery Dias; Arrotéia, Carla Cristina; da Costa, Christiane Luciana; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Machinski Junior, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The essential oil from Curcuma longa L. was analysed by GC/MS. The major components of the oil were ar-turmerone (33.2%), α-turmerone (23.5%) and β-turmerone (22.7%). The antifungal activities of the oil were studied with regard to Aspergillus flavus growth inhibition and altered morphology, as preliminary studies indicated that the essential oil from C. longa inhibited Aspergillus flavus Link aflatoxin production. The concentration of essential oil in the culture media ranged from 0.01% to 5.0% v/v, and the concentration of curcumin was 0.01–0.5% v/v. The effects on sporulation, spore viability, and fungal morphology were determined. The essential oil exhibited stronger antifungal activity than curcumin on A. flavus. The essential oil reduced the fungal growth in a concentration-dependent manner. A. flavus growth rate was reduced by C. longa essential oil at 0.10%, and this inhibition effect was more efficient in concentrations above 0.50%. Germination and sporulation were 100% inhibited in 0.5% oil. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of A. flavus exposed to oil showed damage to hyphae membranes and conidiophores. Because the fungus is a plant pathogen and aflatoxin producer, C. longa essential oil may be used in the management of host plants. PMID:24367241

  10. Effect of Plectranthus glandulosus and Ocimum gratissimum Essential Oils on Growth of Aspergillus flavus and Aflatoxin B1 Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbofung, CMF.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils of Ocimum gratissimum and Plectranthus glandulosus leaves were extracted by steam distillation and analysed by GC-MS, and their effects on growth and aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus were tested at five levels (i.e 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 mg/l using SMKY agar medium. The main components of O. gratissimum were thymol (47.7% and -terpinene (14.3% whereas those of P. glandulosus were represented by -terpinene (30.8% and terpinolene (25.2%. After 8 days of incubation on essential oil-supplemented medium, growth of A. flavus was totally inhibited by 800 mg/l of O. gratissimum essential oil and by 1000 mg/l of P. glandulosus essential oil. The effect of essential oils on aflatoxin B1 synthesis was evaluated in SMKY broth. The medium supplemented with different essential oil concentrations, was inoculated with A. flavus mycelium and incubated at 25 °C. At 2, 4, 6 and 8 days, aflatoxin B1 concentrations in the supernatant were estimated using Enzyme Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA. Results showed that aflatoxin B1 synthesis was inhibited by 1000 mg/l of both essential oils of O. gratissimum and P. glandulosus after 8 days of incubation. Results obtained in the present study indicate the possibility of exploiting O. gratissimum and P. glandulosus essential oils in the fight against strains of A. flavus responsible for biodeterioration of stored food products.

  11. Effects of Cymbopogon citratus L. essential oil on the growth, morphogenesis and aflatoxin production of Aspergillus flavus ML2-strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, G A; Sarhan, M M; Abu Shahla, A N K; Abou El-Khair, E K

    2007-02-01

    The mycelial growth of Aspergillus flavus Link was completely inhibited using 1.5 (microl/ml or 2.0 (microl/ml of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil applied by fumigation or contact method in Czapek's liquid medium, respectively. This oil was found also to be fungicidal at the same concentrations. The sublethal doses 1.0 and 1.5 (microl/ml inhibited about 65% of fungal growth after five days of incubation and delayed conidiation as compared with the control. Microscopic observations using Light Microscope (LM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) were carried out to determine the ultra structural modifications of A. flavus hyphae after treatment with C. citratus essential oil. The hyphal diameter decreased and hyphal wall appeared as precipitates and disappeared in some regions. This oil also caused plasma membrane disruption and mitochondrial structure disorganization. Moreover, Ca(+2), K(+) and Mg(+2) leakages increased from the fumigated mycelium and its total lipid content decreased, while the saturated and unsaturated fatty acids increased. One of the most important results obtained during this study was the ability of C. citratus essential oil at its sublethal dose to completely inhibit aflatoxin B(1) production from A. flavus. These findings increase the possibility of exploiting C. citratus essential oil as an effective inhibitor of biodegradation and storage contaminating fungi and also in fruit juice preservation.

  12. Chemoprevention by essential oil of turmeric leaves (Curcuma longa L.) on the growth of Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu, S; Chempakam, B; Leela, N K; Suseela Bhai, R

    2011-05-01

    Turmeric is well known for a wide range of medicinal properties. Essential oil of turmeric leaves (Curcuma longa L.) were evaluated at varying concentrations of 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5% (v/v) in Yeast Extract Sucrose (YES) broth inoculated with spore suspension of Aspergillus flavus of 10(6)conidia/ml. These were evaluated for their potential in the control of aflatoxigenic fungus A. flavus and aflatoxin production. Turmeric leaf oil exhibited 95.3% and 100% inhibition of toxin production respectively at 1.0% and 1.5%. The extent of inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production was dependent on the concentration of essential oil used. The oil exhibited significant inhibition of fungal growth as well as aflatoxins B(1) and G(1) production. The LD(50) and LD(90) were also determined. GC-MS analysis of the oil showed α-phellandrene, p-cymene and terpinolene as the major components in turmeric leaf oil. The possibility of using these phytochemical components as bio-preservatives for storage of spices is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mycotoxin production and predictive modelling kinetics on the growth of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus isolates in whole black peppercorns (Piper nigrum L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogendrarajah, Pratheeba; Vermeulen, An; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Mavromichali, Evangelia; De Saeger, Sarah; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Devlieghere, Frank

    2016-07-02

    The growth and mycotoxin production of three Aspergillus flavus isolates and an Aspergillus parasiticus isolate were studied in whole black peppercorns (Piper nigrum L.) using a full factorial design with seven water activity (aw) (0.826-0.984) levels and three temperatures (22, 30 and 37°C). Growth rates and lag phases were estimated using linear regression. Diverse secondary models were assessed for their ability to describe the radial growth rate as a function of individual and combined effect of aw and temperature. Optimum radial growth rate ranged from 0.75±0.04 to 2.65±0.02mm/day for A. flavus and 1.77±0.10 to 2.50±0.10mm/day for A. parasiticus based on the Rosso cardinal estimations. Despite the growth failure of some isolates at marginal conditions, all the studied models showed good performance to predict the growth rates. Validation of the models was performed on independently derived data. The bias factors (0.73-1.03), accuracy factors (0.97-1.36) and root mean square error (0.050-0.278) show that the examined models are conservative predictors of the colony growth rate of both fungal species in black peppers. The Rosso cardinal model can be recommended to describe the individual aw effect while the extended Gibson model was the best model for describing the combined effect of aw and temperature on the growth rate of both fungal species in peppercorns. Temperature optimum ranged from 30 to 33°C, while aw optimum was 0.87-0.92 as estimated by multi-factorial cardinal model for both species. The estimated minimum temperature and aw for A. flavus and A. parasiticus for growth were 11-16°C and 0.73-0.76, respectively, hence, achieving these conditions should be considered during storage to prevent the growth of these mycotoxigenic fungal species in black peppercorns. Following the growth study, production of mycotoxins (aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, sterigmatocystin and O-methyl sterigmatocystin (OMST)) was quantified using LC-MS/MS. Very small

  14. Effect of Citrus reticulata and Cymbopogon citratus essential oils on Aspergillus flavus growth and aflatoxin production on Asparagus racemosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyanka; Shukla, Ravindra; Kumar, Ashok; Prakash, Bhanu; Singh, Shubhra; Dubey, Nawal Kishore

    2010-09-01

    Essential oils extracted from Citrus reticulata and Cymbopogon citratus were tested in vitro against the toxigenic strain of Aspergillus flavus, isolated from the tuberous roots of Asparagus racemosus, used in preparation of herbal drugs. The essential oils completely inhibited the growth of A. flavus at 750 ppm and also exhibited a broad fungitoxic spectrum against nine additional fungi isolated from the roots. Citrus reticulata and Cymbopogon citratus essential oils completely inhibited aflatoxin B(1) production at 750 and 500 ppm, respectively. During in vivo investigation, the incidence of fungi and aflatoxin B(1) production decreased considerably in essential oil-treated root samples. The findings thus indicate possible exploitation of the essential oils as effective inhibitor of aflatoxin B(1) production and as post-harvest fungitoxicant of traditionally used plant origin for the control of storage fungi. These essential oils may be recommended as plant-based antifungals as well as aflatoxin B(1) suppressors in post-harvest processing of herbal samples.

  15. The potential inhibitory effect of cuminum cyminum, ziziphora clinopodioides and nigella sativa essential oils on the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R Khosravi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The goals of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of Cuminum cyminum, Ziziphora clinopodioides and Nigella sativa essential oils to inhibit the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus and to evoke ultrastructural changes. The fungi were cultured into RPMI 1640 media in the presence of oils at concentrations of 8, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.5, 1.25, 1, 0.75 and 0.5 mg/ml in broth microdilution and 2, 1.5, 1 and 0.5 mg/ml in broth macrodilution methods with shaking for 48 h at 28ºC. Conidial and mycelial samples exposed to 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 mg essential oils/ml for 5 days in 2% yeast extract granulated plus 15% Saccharose media were processed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Based on broth dilution methods, C. cyminum and to a lesser extent Z. clinopodioides oils exhibited the strongest activity against A. fumigatus and A. flavus with MIC90 ranging from 0.25 to 1.5 mg/ml, while the oil from N. sativa exhibited relatively moderate activity against two above fungi with MIC90 ranging from 1.5 to 2 mg/ml. The main changes observed by TEM were in the cell wall, plasma membrane and membranous organelles; in particular, in the nuclei and mitochondria. These modifications in fungal structure were associated with the interference of the essential oils with the enzymes responsible for cell wall synthesis, which disturbed normal growth. Moreover, the essential oils caused high vacuolation of the cytoplasm, detachment of fibrillar layer of cell wall, plasma membrane disruption and disorganization of the nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus growth inhibition induced by these oils were found to be well-correlated with subsequent morphological changes of the fungi exposed to different fungistatic concentrations of the oils. Our results show the anti-Aspergillus activities of C. cyminum, Z. clinopodioides and N. sativa essential oils, which strengthens the potential use of these substances as anti

  16. Inhibition of the Aspergillus flavus Growth and Aflatoxin B1 Contamination on Pistachio Nut by Fengycin and Surfactin-Producing Bacillus subtilis UTBSP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Farzaneh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the treatment of pistachio nuts by Bacillus subtilis UTBSP1, a promising isolate to degrade aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, caused to reduce the growth of Aspergillus flavus R5 and AFB1 content on pistachio nuts. Fluorescence probes revealed that the cell free supernatant fluid from UTBSP1 affects spore viability considerably. Using high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC method, 10 fractions were separated and collected from methanol extract of cell free supernatant fluid. Two fractions showed inhibition zones against A. flavus. Mass spectrometric analysis of the both antifungal fractions revealed a high similarity between these anti-A. flavus compounds and cyclic-lipopeptides of surfactin, and fengycin families. Coproduction of surfactin and fengycin acted in a synergistic manner and consequently caused a strong antifungal activity against A. flavus R5. There was a positive significant correlation between the reduction of A. flavus growth and the reduction of AFB1 contamination on pistachio nut by UTBSP1. The results indicated that fengycin and surfactin-producing B. subtilis UTBSP1 can potentially reduce A. flavus growth and AFB1 content in pistachio nut.

  17. Effect of Capsicum carotenoids on growth and aflatoxins production by Aspergillus flavus isolated from paprika and chilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, L; Kasper, R; Sardiñas, N; Marín, S; Sanchis, V; Ramos, A J

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a carotenoid mixture (Capsantal FS-30-NT), containing capsanthin and capsorubin, on growth and aflatoxins (AF) production of AF-producing Aspergillus flavus isolates. Each isolate, previously isolated from paprika and chilli, was inoculated on Czapek Yeast extract Agar (CYA) medium supplemented with different amounts of capsantal (0-1%) and incubated at 10, 15 and 25 °C during 21 days. Growth rates and lag phases were obtained, and AF production was determined at 7, 14 and 21 days. None of the isolates grew at 10 °C and one isolate (UdLTA 3.193) hardly grew at 15 °C. Capsantal addition had no effect over lag phases and growth rates at 15 °C. At 25 °C capsantal reduced growth rates and increased lag phases. However, the effect of capsantal on AF production was inconclusive, because it depended on temperature or time, and most of the times it was not significant. Low temperature has been a crucial factor in AF production, regardless of the capsantal concentration tested. Industrial storage temperature for paprika and chilli use to be approximately 10 °C, so if this temperature is maintained mould growth and AF production should be prevented. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) is an indole-tetramic acid neurotoxin produced by some of the same strains of A. flavus that produce aflatoxins and by some Aspergillus oryzae strains. Despite its discovery 40 years ago, few reviews of its toxicity and biosynthesis have been reported. This review examines w...

  19. Genotypic and Phenotypic Versatility of Aspergillus flavus during Maize Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverberi, Massimo; Punelli, Marta; Scala, Valeria; Scarpari, Marzia; Uva, Paolo; Mentzen, Wieslawa I.; Dolezal, Andrea L.; Woloshuk, Charles; Pinzari, Flavia; Fabbri, Anna A.; Fanelli, Corrado; Payne, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a cosmopolitan fungus able to respond to external stimuli and to shift both its trophic behaviour and the production of secondary metabolites, including that of the carcinogen aflatoxin (AF). To better understand the adaptability of this fungus, we examined genetic and phenotypic responses within the fungus when grown under four conditions that mimic different ecological niches ranging from saprophytic growth to parasitism. Global transcription changes were observed in both primary and secondary metabolism in response to these conditions, particularly in secondary metabolism where transcription of nearly half of the predicted secondary metabolite clusters changed in response to the trophic states of the fungus. The greatest transcriptional change was found between saprophytic and parasitic growth, which resulted in expression changes in over 800 genes in A. flavus. The fungus also responded to growth conditions, putatively by adaptive changes in conidia, resulting in differences in their ability to utilize carbon sources. We also examined tolerance of A. flavus to oxidative stress and found that growth and secondary metabolism were altered in a superoxide dismutase (sod) mutant and an alkyl-hydroperoxide reductase (ahp) mutant of A. flavus. Data presented in this study show a multifaceted response of A. flavus to its environment and suggest that oxidative stress and secondary metabolism are important in the ecology of this fungus, notably in its interaction with host plant and in relation to changes in its lifestyle (i.e. saprobic to pathogenic). PMID:23894339

  20. Orbital tuberculosis with coexisting fungal (Aspergillus flavus) infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sunkara Srikanth Reddy; Devi Chendira Penmmaiah; Alugolu Rajesh; Madhusudan Patil

    2014-01-01

    Background: A coexisting invasive fungal and tubercular involvement of the skull base is a rare event. Co-infection has been reported with involvement of paranasal sinuses and middle ear cleft. Case Description: We herein report a case of an elderly male diabetic patient who presented with gradually progressive visual loss, which on imaging showed an orbital lesion. Surgical decompression and microbiological evaluation showed growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Aspergillus flavus. ...

  1. Effects of temperature, water activity and incubation time on fungal growth and aflatoxin B1 production by toxinogenic Aspergillus flavus isolates on sorghum seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahouar, Amani; Marin, Sonia; Crespo-Sempere, Ana; Saïd, Salem; Sanchis, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Sorghum, which is consumed in Tunisia as human food, suffers from severe colonization by several toxigenic fungi and contamination by mycotoxins. The Tunisian climate is characterized by high temperature and humidity that stimulates mold proliferation and mycotoxin accumulation in foodstuffs. This study investigated the effects of temperature (15, 25 and 37°C), water activity (aw, between 0.85 and 0.99) and incubation time (7, 14, 21 and 28 d) on fungal growth and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) production by three Aspergillus flavus isolates (8, 10 and 14) inoculated on sorghum grains. The Baranyi model was applied to identify the limits of growth and mycotoxin production. Maximum diameter growth rates were observed at 0.99 a(w) at 37°C for two of the isolates. The minimum aw needed for mycelial growth was 0.91 at 25 and 37°C. At 15°C, only isolate 8 grew at 0.99 a(w). Aflatoxin B1 accumulation could be avoided by storing sorghum at low water activity levels (≤0.91 a(w)). Aflatoxin production was not observed at 15°C. This is the first work on the effects of water activity and temperature on A. flavus growth and AFB1 production by A. flavus isolates on sorghum grains. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear heterogeneity in conidial populations of Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus is a major producer of aflatoxin and an opportunistic pathogen for a wide range of hosts. Understanding genotypic and phenotypic variations within strains of A. flavus is important for controlling disease and reducing aflatoxin contamination. A. flavus is multinucleate and predomi...

  3. Transcriptomic responses of the biocontrol yeast Pichia anomala to aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichia anomala (Wickerhamomyces anomalus) WRL-076 is a biocontrol yeast which has been shown to inhibit growth and aflatoxin production of Aspergillus flavus. The molecular mechanism of biological control was further characterized by the temporal transcriptome response of P. anomala to A. flavus in...

  4. Modeling growth rate and assessing aflatoxins production by Aspergillus flavus as a function of water activity and temperature on polished and brown rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Wael; Ghazali, Farinazleen Mohd; Jinap, Selamat; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd; Radu, Son

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to model the radial growth rate and to assess aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus as a function of water activity (a(w) 0.82 to 0.92) and temperature (12 to 42 °C) on polished and brown rice. The growth of the fungi, expressed as colony diameter (mm) was measured daily, and the aflatoxins were analyzed using HPLC with a fluorescence detector. The growth rates were estimated using the primary model of Baranyi, which describes the change in colony radius as a function of time. Total of 2 secondary models were used to describe the combined effects of a(w) and temperature on the growth rates. The models were validated using independent experimental data. Linear Arrhenius-Davey model proved to be the best predictor of A. flavus growth rates on polished and brown rice followed by polynomial model. The estimated optimal growth temperature was around 30 °C. A. flavus growth and aflatoxins were not detected at 0.82 a(w) on polished rice while growth and aflatoxins were detected at this a(w) between 25 and 35 °C on brown rice. The highest amounts of toxins were formed at the highest a(w) values (0.90 to 0.92) at a temperature of 20 °C after 21 d of incubation on both types of rice. Nevertheless, the consistencies of toxin production within a wider range of a(w) values occurred between 25 to 30 °C. Brown rice seems to support A. flavus growth and aflatoxin production more than the polished rice. The developed models can be used to estimate to what extent the change in grain ecosystem conditions affect the storage stability and safety of grains without the need for running long-standing storage study. By monitoring the intergranular relative humidity and temperature at different locations in the storage facility and inputting these data into the models, it is directly possible to assess either the conditions are conductive for the growth of A. flavus or aflatoxin production. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Assessment of azole fungicides as a tool to control growth of Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin B1and B2production in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Eva M; Gómez, José Vicente; Gimeno-Adelantado, José Vicente; Romera, David; Mateo-Castro, Rufino; Jiménez, Misericordia

    2017-06-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a highly aflatoxin (AF)-producing species infecting maize and other crops. It is dominant in tropical regions, but it is also considered an emerging problem associated with climate change in Europe. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of azole fungicides (prochloraz, tebuconazole and a 2:1 (w/w) mixture of prochloraz plus tebuconazole) to control the growth of A. flavus and AF production in yeast-extract-sucrose (YES) agar and in maize kernels under different water activities (a w ) and temperatures. Aflatoxins B 1 and B 2 were determined by LC with fluorescence detection and post-column derivatisation of AFB 1 . In YES medium and maize grains inoculated with conidia of A. flavus, the growth rate (GR) of the fungus and AFB 1 and AFB 2 production were significantly influenced by temperature and treatment. In YES medium and maize kernels, optimal temperatures for GR and AF production were 37 and 25°C, respectively. In maize kernels, spore germination was not detected at the combination 37ºC/0.95 a w ; however, under these conditions germination was found in YES medium. All fungicides were more effective at 0.99 than 0.95 a w , and at 37 than 25ºC. Fungicides effectiveness was prochloraz > prochloraz plus tebuconazole (2:1) > tebuconazole. AFs were not detected in cultures containing the highest fungicide doses, and only very low AF levels were found in cultures containing 0.1 mg l - 1 prochloraz or 5.0 mg l - 1 tebuconazole. Azoles proved to be highly efficient in reducing A. flavus growth and AF production, although stimulation of AF production was found under particular conditions and low-dosage treatments. Maize kernels were a more favourable substrate for AF biosynthesis than YES medium. This paper is the first comparative study on the effects of different azole formulations against A. flavus and AF production in a semi-synthetic medium and in maize grain under different environmental conditions.

  6. Aqueous extracts of Tulbaghia violacea inhibit germination of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus conidia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somai, Benesh Munilal; Belewa, Vuyokazi

    2011-06-01

    Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus are important plant pathogens and causal agents of pre- and postharvest rots of corn, peanuts, and tree nuts. These fungal pathogens cause significant crop losses and produce aflatoxins, which contaminate many food products and contribute to liver cancer worldwide. Aqueous preparations of Tulbaghia violacea (wild garlic) were antifungal and at 10 mg/ml resulted in sustained growth inhibition of greater than 50% for both A. flavus and A. parasiticus. Light microscopy revealed that the plant extract inhibited conidial germination in a dose-dependent manner. When exposed to T. violacea extract concentrations of 10 mg/ml and above, A. parasiticus conidia began germinating earlier and germination was completed before that of A. flavus, indicating that A. parasiticus conidia were more resistant to the antifungal effects of T. violacea than were A. flavus conidia. At a subinhibitory extract dose of 15 mg/ml, hyphae of both fungal species exhibited increased granulation and vesicle formation, possibly due to increased reactivity between hyphal cellular components and T. violacea extract. These hyphal changes were not seen when hyphae were formed in the absence of the extract. Transmission electron microscopy revealed thickening of conidial cell walls in both fungal species when grown in the presence of the plant extract. Cell walls of A. flavus also became considerably thicker than those of A. parasiticus, indicating differential response to the extract. Aqueous preparations of T. violacea can be used as antifungal treatments for the control of A. flavus and A. parasiticus. Because the extract exhibited a more pronounced effect on A. flavus than on A. parasiticus, higher doses may be needed for control of A. parasiticus infections.

  7. Orbital tuberculosis with coexisting fungal (Aspergillus flavus) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sunkara Srikanth; Penmmaiah, Devi Chendira; Rajesh, Alugolu; Patil, Madhusudan

    2014-01-01

    A coexisting invasive fungal and tubercular involvement of the skull base is a rare event. Co-infection has been reported with involvement of paranasal sinuses and middle ear cleft. We herein report a case of an elderly male diabetic patient who presented with gradually progressive visual loss, which on imaging showed an orbital lesion. Surgical decompression and microbiological evaluation showed growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Aspergillus flavus. Rare combinations of such infections do exist and should be treated aggressively to achieve good outcomes in a losing battle with fastidious organisms in the backdrop of compromised immunity.

  8. Activity of the aqueous extract from Polymnia sonchifolia leaves on growth and production of aflatoxin B1 by Aspergillus flavus Atividade do extrato aquoso de folhas de Polymnia sonchifolia no crescimento e produção de aflatoxina B1 por Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina M. Pinto

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous extract from Polymnia sonchifolia leaves (AE was tested for inhibitory activity on aflatoxin B1(AFB1 production and growth of Aspergillus flavus. The cytotoxicity of AE on Vero cells was also performed. Suspensions of A. flavus spores were inoculated into 50 mL of YES medium together with different concentrations of the AE. The aflatoxin B1 was extracted, analyzed by thin layer chromatography and quantified by photodensitometry. All the concentrations of AE induced inhibition of AFB1 production. The aqueous extract showed in vitro cytotoxicity to Vero cells only at concentrations above 500 µg/mL.Neste trabalho verificou-se a atividade do extrato aquoso de folhas de Polymnia sonchifolia no crescimento e na produção de aflatoxinas B1 por Aspergillus flavus. Suspensões de esporos de A. flavus foram inoculadas em 50 mL de meio de YES com diferentes concentrações do extrato aquoso. A aflatoxina B1 foi extraída e analisada por cromatografia de camada delgada e quantificada por fotodensitometria. Todas as concentrações testadas inibiram a produção de aflatoxina B1. O extrato aquoso apresentou citotoxicidade em células Vero somente em concentrações acima de 500 µg/mL.

  9. Aflatoxin B 1 producing potential of Aspergillus flavus strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aflatoxin B 1 (AFB1) producing potential of different strains of Aspergillus flavus, isolated from 1,200 stored rice grains collected from 43 locations in 20 rice growing states in India was investigated. Eighty-five strains of A. flavus were isolated from the discolored rice grains and tested for their AFB1 producing potential on ...

  10. Population dynamics of Aspergillus flavus following biocontrol treatment of corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal pathogen of many agronomically important crops worldwide. We sampled A. flavus strains from a cornfield in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, over a period of two years. The field was planted in 2010 and plots were inoculated at tasselling with either AF36 or NRRL 21882 (=Af...

  11. The maize rachis affects Aspergillus flavus movement during ear development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to follow infection in ears of maize hybrids resistant and susceptible to the fungus. Developing ears were needle-inoculated with GFP-transformed A. flavus 20 days after silk emergence, and GFP fluorescence in the pith was evalu...

  12. Influence of sub-lethal antioxidant doses, water potential and temperature on growth, sclerotia, aflatoxins and aflD (=nor-1) expression by Aspergillus flavus RCP08108.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passone, María Alejandra; Rosso, Laura Cristina; Etcheverry, Miriam

    2012-09-06

    Effects of interacting conditions of sub-lethal levels of antioxidants, water potential (Ψ) and temperature were evaluated on growth, sclerotial characteristics, aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) production and aflD (=nor-1) gene expression by Aspergillus flavus strain RCP08108. These studies were carried out on peanut meal extract agar osmotically modified to -2.8,-7.1, -9.9 and -16.0 MPa and incubated at 28 and 20°C. The food grade antioxidants added were butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) at (1+1 mM-M1) and (5+5 mM-M2). To relate the aflD expression after toxigenic A. flavus grew under interacting stress conditions, real-time PCR was used. Antioxidant mixtures caused a higher and significant (pM2 treatment. These results showed that it is necessary to apply food-grade antioxidants into the peanut storage system at levels higher than 5 mM. This is an important tool to avoid sub-lethal antioxidant doses that can lead to fungal growth, increase resistance structures, and stimulate aflD gene expression and AFB(1) accumulation in this substrate. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. What can Aspergillus flavus genome offer for mycotoxin research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genomic study of filamentous fungi has made significant advances in recent years, and the genomes of several species in the genus Aspergillus have been sequenced, including Aspergillus flavus. This ubiquitous mold is present as a saprobe in a wide range of agricultural and natural habits, and c...

  14. Rhizospheric Aspergillus flavus as a Possible Contaminant of Maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemist

    2012-04-26

    Apr 26, 2012 ... Horn BW, Dorner JW, Greene RL, Blankenship PD, Cole RJ (1994). Effect of Aspergillus parasiticus soil inoculum on invasion of peanut seeds. Mycopathology, 125: 179-191. Jeffrey D, Palumbo, Teresa L, O'Keeffe, Ali K, Hamed KA, Bobbie JJ. (2010). Inhibition of Aspergillus flavus in Soil by Antagonistic.

  15. Characterization of the Far Transcription Factor Family in Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyu Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism of fatty acids is a critical requirement for the pathogenesis of oil seed pathogens including the fungus Aspergillus flavus. Previous studies have correlated decreased ability to grow on fatty acids with reduced virulence of this fungus on host seed. Two fatty acid metabolism regulatory transcription factors, FarA and FarB, have been described in other filamentous fungi. Unexpectedly, we find A. flavus possesses three Far homologs, FarA, FarB, and FarC, with FarA and FarC showing a greater protein similarity to each other than FarB. farA and farB are located in regions of colinearity in all Aspergillus spp. sequenced to date, whereas farC is limited to a subset of species where it is inserted in an otherwise colinear region in Aspergillus genomes. Deletion and overexpression (OE of farA and farB, but not farC, yielded mutants with aberrant growth patterns on specific fatty acids as well as altered expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism. Marked differences included significant growth defects of both ∆farA and ∆farB on medium-chain fatty acids and decreased growth of OE::farA on unsaturated fatty acids. Loss of farA diminished expression of mitochondrial β-oxidation genes whereas OE::farA inhibited expression of genes involved in unsaturated fatty acid catabolism. FarA also positively regulated the desaturase genes required to generate polyunsaturated fatty acids. Aflatoxin production on toxin-inducing media was significantly decreased in the ∆farB mutant and increased in the OE::farB mutant, with gene expression data supporting a role for FarB in tying β-oxidation processes with aflatoxin accumulation.

  16. Characterization of the Far Transcription Factor Family in Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xingyu; Affeldt, Katharyn J; Keller, Nancy P

    2016-10-13

    Metabolism of fatty acids is a critical requirement for the pathogenesis of oil seed pathogens including the fungus Aspergillus flavus Previous studies have correlated decreased ability to grow on fatty acids with reduced virulence of this fungus on host seed. Two fatty acid metabolism regulatory transcription factors, FarA and FarB, have been described in other filamentous fungi. Unexpectedly, we find A. flavus possesses three Far homologs, FarA, FarB, and FarC, with FarA and FarC showing a greater protein similarity to each other than FarB. farA and farB are located in regions of colinearity in all Aspergillus spp. sequenced to date, whereas farC is limited to a subset of species where it is inserted in an otherwise colinear region in Aspergillus genomes. Deletion and overexpression (OE) of farA and farB, but not farC, yielded mutants with aberrant growth patterns on specific fatty acids as well as altered expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism. Marked differences included significant growth defects of both ∆farA and ∆farB on medium-chain fatty acids and decreased growth of OE::farA on unsaturated fatty acids. Loss of farA diminished expression of mitochondrial β-oxidation genes whereas OE::farA inhibited expression of genes involved in unsaturated fatty acid catabolism. FarA also positively regulated the desaturase genes required to generate polyunsaturated fatty acids. Aflatoxin production on toxin-inducing media was significantly decreased in the ∆farB mutant and increased in the OE::farB mutant, with gene expression data supporting a role for FarB in tying β-oxidation processes with aflatoxin accumulation. Copyright © 2016 Luo et al.

  17. [Medium optimization for antagonistic Streptomyces S24 and its inhibition on Aspergillus flavus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qisheng; Liu, Xunli; Zhang, Nan; Song, Zhen; Qiu, Nianquan; Zhang, Benfeng; Guo, Hui; Lü, Changxu; Yu, Jian

    2011-02-01

    Streptomyces S24 has broad spectrum against Aspergillus spp. in food and feed, such as Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger and Asperegillus alutacells. The objective of this study was to improve the production of antifungal substances produced by S24 and to test their inhibitory effects on Aspergillus flavus. By using one-factor-at-a-time experiment and orthogonal design method, we optimized the fermentation medium. The composition of an optimized medium for the production of antifungal substances contained (g/L): starch soluble, 10; Glucose, 40; yeast extract, 8; soybean powder, 24; KH2PO4 4; and CaCO3 0.8. As a result, the productivity of antifungal substances could reach to 10 235.45 microg/mL, and this value was 2.81 times higher than that of initial medium before optimization. Additionally, inhibitory effects of the products on Aspergillus flavus were analyzed. Antagonistic tests indicated that the antifungal substances greatly inhibited mycelium growth and spores germination of Aspergillus flavus. We observed through microscope that the mycelia grew abnormally, such as contorting, bulging, vacuole increasing and the cytoplasmic contents inside effusing and the spores appeared unusual, such as gathering, deforming, cytoplasmic contents inside effusing and fracturing.

  18. What Does Genetic Diversity of Aspergillus flavus Tell Us About Aspergillus oryzae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus oryzae belong to Aspergillus section Flavi. They are closely related and are of significant economic importance. The former species has the ability to produce harmful aflatoxins while the latter is widely used in food fermentation and industrial enzyme production. ...

  19. Description of Aspergillus flavus growth under the influence of different factors (water activity, incubation temperature, protein and fat concentration, pH, and cinnamon essential oil concentration) by kinetic, probability of growth, and time-to-detection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosegarten, Carlos E; Ramírez-Corona, Nelly; Mani-López, Emma; Palou, Enrique; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2017-01-02

    A Box-Behnken design was used to determine the effect of protein concentration (0, 5, or 10g of casein/100g), fat (0, 3, or 6g of corn oil/100g), aw (0.900, 0.945, or 0.990), pH (3.5, 5.0, or 6.5), concentration of cinnamon essential oil (CEO, 0, 200, or 400μL/kg) and incubation temperature (15, 25, or 35°C) on the growth of Aspergillus flavus during 50days of incubation. Mold response under the evaluated conditions was modeled by the modified Gompertz equation, logistic regression, and time-to-detection model. The obtained polynomial regression models allow the significant coefficients (p0.967) the studied mold responses. After 50days of incubation, every tested model system was classified according to the observed response as 1 (growth) or 0 (no growth), then a binary logistic regression was utilized to model A. flavus growth interface, allowing to predict the probability of mold growth under selected combinations of tested factors. The time-to-detection model was utilized to estimate the time at which A. flavus visible growth begins. Water activity, temperature, and CEO concentration were the most important factors affecting fungal growth. It was observed that there is a range of possible combinations that may induce growth, such that incubation conditions and the amount of essential oil necessary for fungal growth inhibition strongly depend on protein and fat concentrations as well as on the pH of studied model systems. The probabilistic model and the time-to-detection models constitute another option to determine appropriate storage/processing conditions and accurately predict the probability and/or the time at which A. flavus growth occurs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Local isolate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as biocompetitive agent of Aspergillus flavus

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    Eni Kusumaningtyas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus is a toxigenic fungus that contaminates feed and influences the animal health. Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used as a biocompetitive agent to control the contamination. The ability of local isolate of S. cerevisiae as a biocompetitive agent for A. flavus was evaluated. A. flavus (30ml was swept on Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA, while S. cerevisiae was swept on its left and right. Plates were incubated at 28oC for nine days. Lytic activity of S. cerevisiae was detected by pouring its suspension on the centre of the cross streaks of A. flavus. Plates were incubated at 28oC for five days. Growth inhibition of A. flavus by S. cerevisiae was determined by mixing the two fungi on Potato dextrose broth and incubated at 28oC for 24 hours. Total colony of A. flavus were then observed at incubation time of 2, 4, 6 and 24 hours by pour plates method on the SDA plates and incubated on 28oC for two days. Growth of hyphae of A. flavus sweep were inhibited with the swept of S. cerevisiae. The width of A. flavus colony treated with S. cerevisiae is narrower (3,02 cm than that of control ( 4,60 cm. The growth of A. flavus was also inhibited on the centre of cross streak where the S. cerevisiae poured. S. cerevisiae gradually reduced the colony number of A. flavus in the mixed culture of broth fungi ie. 14 x 103 CFU/ml while colony number of control is 80 x 103 CFU/ml. Results showed that S. cerevisiae could be used as biocompetitive agent of A. flavus.

  1. Lactic acid bacteria as functional probiotic isolates for inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus, A. niger and Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, S; Tavakoli, R; Sharifzadeh, A; Shokri, H

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) such as Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, L. casei, L. paracasei and Bifidobacterium bifidum to inhibit the outgrowth of some common food-spoiling fungi including Aspergillus niger, A. flavus, A. parasiticus and Penicillium chrysogenum. Bacterial isolates were cultured on Mann Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth and liquid cultures and supernatants were prepared. The antifungal activity was tested using the agar well diffusion method. Both liquid culture and supernatant of L. casei isolate exhibited high antifungal activity, followed by L. acidophilus and L. paracasei isolates. The least activity was recorded for the isolates B. bifidum, while the isolate L. rhamnosus was moderately active against tested fungi. The antifungal activity of the supernatants obtained from all probiotic isolates against fungi was significantly less than that of liquid cultures (Pprobiotic bacteria, followed by P. chrysogenum, A. niger and A. parasiticus. These results suggest that probiotic bacteria strains have the ability to prevent the growth of pathogenic and mycotoxigenic fungi as antifungal agents for various biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of rhizospheric Aspergillus flavus in standing maize crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil and un-husked maize samples were collected from 29 different locations belonging to three distinct ecological zones (Swat, Hazara and Peshawar) of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The samples were evaluated for the incidence of aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus. The soil samples collected from Peshawar ...

  3. Induction, characterization and genetic analysis of Aspergillus flavus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Aspergillus flavus infection of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) results in the accumulation of aflatoxins in seeds, which are very harmful to humans and animals. Mutation breeding programs are an effective way of inducing resistant mutants. In this study, we induced a genetic variation by using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) ...

  4. Cellulase Production by Aspergillus flavus Linn Isolate NSPR 101 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bagasse, corncob and sawdust were used as lignocellulosic substrates for the production of cellulase enzyme using Aspergillus flavus after ballmilling and pretreatment with caustic soda. From the fermentation studies, sawdust gave the best result with an enzyme activity value of 0.0743IU/ml while bagasse and corncob ...

  5. RNA interference-mediated control of Aspergillus flavus in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus is a frequent contaminant of agricultural commodities such as corn, peanut, tree nuts and cottonseed. Ingestion of foods, especially corn, contaminated with aflatoxins has been implicated in acute toxicoses while chronic, low-level exposure can lead to...

  6. Aspergillus flavus infection on preserved Eel (Thysoidea macrurus)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, R.; Samuel, C.T.

    The fungus Aspergillus flavus was observed growing on a 2.1 m long specimen of eel (Thyrsoidea macrurus). Half of the eel was submerged in 5% formalin in a loosely covered specimen jar. The fungus grew on the eel skin as yellowish-green, heavily...

  7. Rhizospheric Aspergillus flavus as a Possible Contaminant of Maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemist

    2012-04-26

    Apr 26, 2012 ... Soil and un-husked maize samples were collected from 29 different locations belonging to three distinct ecological zones (Swat, Hazara and Peshawar) of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The samples were evaluated for the incidence of aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus. The soil samples collected.

  8. Aflatoxin B1 producing potential of Aspergillus flavus strains isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... rice cultivars tested. Key words: Rice, Aspergillus flavus, AFB1. INTRODUCTION. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is the most important staple food crop in India and the bulk of rice is grown in ... storehouse was a mixture of 10 sub-samples (200 g each). Such ..... estimated in 11 cultivars of rice and 6 cultivars of wheat.

  9. Purification and Characterization of Lipase from Aspergillus flavus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    application. Key words: Lipase, purification, Aspergillus flavus PW2961, magnetic nanoparticles.______. Correspondence: sharafkareem@yahoo.co.uk ..... in solid state fermentation. Process Biochem. 38(5): 715-721. Okoli, C., Boutonnet, M., Mariey, L., Jaras, S. And Rajarao, G. (2011). Application of magnetic iron oxide ...

  10. Oxidant and solvent stable alkaline protease from Aspergillus flavus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increase in agricultural practices has necessitated the judicious use of agricultural wastes into value added products. In this study, an extracellular, organic solvent and oxidant stable, serine protease was produced by Aspergillus flavus MTCC 9952 under solid state fermentation. Maximum protease yield was obtained ...

  11. Identification of resistance to Aspergillus flavus infection in cotton germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural resistance of in cottonseed to Aspergillus flavus infection has not been explored to date. A green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing -70 strain was used to assess the resistance of seed from thirty five35 cotton varieties including representatives from Gossypium arboreum, G. barbadense, a...

  12. Inorganic composition determination and evaluation of the biological activity of Peperomia pellucida in the Aspergillus flavus growth; Estudo da composicao inorganica e avaliacao da atividade biologica de Peperomia pellucida no crescimento de Aspergillus flavus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussa, Fabio Vitorio

    2011-07-01

    oil, ethanolic and hexane extracts of Peperomia pellucida were tested for antifungal activity against Aspergillus flavus in vitro on Petri plates. The antifungal activity was based on the inhibition zone and IC{sub 50} values against the pathogen on Petri plates assays. Also, the essential oil chemical composition was determined by GC-MS. (author)

  13. Functional Analysis of the Nitrogen Metabolite Repression Regulator Gene nmrA in Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Han

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In Aspergillus nidulans, the nitrogen metabolite repression regulator NmrA plays a major role in regulating the activity of the GATA transcription factor AreA during nitrogen metabolism. However, the function of nmrA in Aspergillus flavus has notbeen previously studied. Here, we report the identification and functional analysis of nmrA in A. flavus. Our work showed that the amino acid sequences of NmrA are highly conserved among Aspergillus species and that A. flavus NmrA protein contains a canonical Rossmann fold motif. Deletion of nmrA slowed the growth of A. flavus but significantly increased conidiation and sclerotia production. Moreover, seed infection experiments indicated that nmrA is required for the invasive virulence of A. flavus. In addition, the ΔnmrA mutant showed increased sensitivity to rapamycin and methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting that nmrA could be responsive to target of rapamycin signaling and DNA damage. Furthermore, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis suggested that nmrA might interact with other nitrogen regulatory and catabolic genes. Our study provides a better understanding of nitrogen metabolite repression and the nitrogen metabolism network in fungi.

  14. Occurrence of toxigenic Aspergillus flavus in commercial Bulgur wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bertechini FARIA

    Full Text Available Abstract Aflatoxins are mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic mycotoxins. The objective of this work was to study the presence of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus in commercial Bulgur wheat in the city of Maringá, Paraná, Brazil. Thirty samples of commercial Bulgur wheat, acquired in the period of August 2011 to January 2012, were evaluated. The enumeration analysis showed that samples had up to 273.3 CFU of molds and 133.3 CFU of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus per gram of wheat. Forty-two monosporic isolates were obtained and identified as Aspergillus flavus. The isolates were analyzed regarding their aflatoxigenic potential by culture in coconut milk agar; hydroxide vapor exposure; chromatography; and polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting genes that code enzymes of the aflatoxins synthesis pathway. Some of the isolates were confirmed to be aflatoxin producers and several of them presented a genetic profile of aflatoxin synthesis. The obtained results demonstrated that Bulgur wheat A. flavus contamination is concerning.

  15. Potential involvement of Aspergillus flavus laccases in peanut invasion at low water potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus (Link) accumulates aflatoxins in peanuts, mainly affecting immature kernels during drought. Peanut invasion by A. flavus induces synthesis of phytoalexins, mostly stilbenoids, as a plant defense mechanism. Fungal laccases are often related to pathogenicity, and among other subst...

  16. Lipids in Aspergillus flavus-maize interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo eReverberi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In sSome filamentous fungi, the pathways related to the oxidative stress and oxylipins production are involved both in the process of host-recognition of the host that and in the pathogenic phase. In fact, recent studies have shown that the production of oxylipins in filamentous fungi, yeasts and chromists is also related to the development of the organism itself and to mechanisms of communication with the host at the cellular level. The oxylipins, also involved produced in by the host during defense reactions, are able to induce sporulation and to modulate regulate the biosynthesis of mycotoxins in numerous several pathogenic fungi, apparently replacing the endogenous ones. In A. flavus, the oxylipins play a crucial role as signals for the regulation regulatingof the biosynthesis of aflatoxins, the conidiogenesis and the formation of sclerotia.To investigate the involvement of the an oxylipins based cross-talk into Z. mays and A. flavus interaction, we analyzed the oxylipins profile of the wild type strain and of three mutants of A. flavus that are deleted at the Aflox1 gene level also during maize kernel invasion; Aflox1 encodes for a manganese lipoxygenase.A lipidomic approach has been addressed through the use of LC-ToF-MS, followed by a statistical analysis of the principal components (PCA. The results showed the existence of a difference between the oxylipins profile generated by the WT and the mutants onto challenged maize. In relation to this, aflatoxin synthesis which is largely hampered in vitro, is intriguingly restored. These results highlight the important role of maize oxylipin in driving secondary metabolism in A. flavus.

  17. Antifungal Effects of Thyme, Agastache and Satureja Essential Oils on Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Mardani

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Growth inhibition of Aspergillus fumigatus,Aspergillus flavus and Fusarum solani exposed to the essential oils including Thyme, Agastache and Satureja were studied. Disc Diffusion Method was used to evaluate the fungal growth inhibitory effects of the essential oils. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC of the oils were determined and compared with each other. The results showed that all three essential oils examined, had antifungal effects against three fungi species. The MIC data revealed that Thyme oil was the most effective essential oil with the MIC of 62.5 μl ml-1.

  18. Purification and Characterization of Lipase from Aspergillus flavus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipase from Aspergillus flavus was purified in a single step purification using MnFeO4 magnetic nano particles to achieve a 20.53- fold purification with specific activity of 11.29 U/mg and a 59% recovery yield. SDS-PAGE of lipase showed a single pure band with corresponding molecular weight of 35 kDa. The optimal ...

  19. Effect of gamma radiation on the growth of Aspergillus Flavus aflatoxins producer and on the use of polymerase chain reaction technique (PCR) in samples of maize grains artificially inoculated; Efeitos da radiacao gama no crescimento de Aspergillus flavus produtor de aflatoxinas e no emprego da tecnica da Reacao em Cadeia da Polimerase (RCP) em amostras de graos de milho inoculadas artificialmente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, Simone

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this present study was to verify the effects of gamma radiation on the growth of Aspergillus flavus Link aflatoxins producer; to demonstrate the application of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique in the diagnostic of A. Flavus, as well to verify the effect of radiation in the profile of DNA bands. Twenty samples of grains maize with 200 g each were individually irradiated with 20 kGy, to eliminate the microbial contamination. In following, the samples were inoculated with an toxigenic A. flavus (1x10{sup 6} spores/ml), incubated for 15 days at 25 deg C with a relative humidity of around 97,5% and irradiated with 0, 2; 5 and 10 kGy. The samples, 5 to each dose of irradiation, were individually analyzed for the number of fungal cells, water activity, viability test (fluorescein diacetate and ethidium bromide), PCR and aflatoxins (AFB) detection. The results showed that the doses used were effective in reducing the number of Colony Forming Units (CFU/g) mainly the doses of 5 and 10 kGy. In addition, the viability test showed a decrease of viable cells with increase of irradiation doses. The reduction of AFB{sub 1} and AFB-2, was more efficient with the use of 2 kGy in comparison with the dose of 5 kGy, while the dose of 10 kGy, degraded the aflatoxins. Thereby, it was observed that AFB2 showed to be more radiosensitive. The use of PCR technique showed the presence of DNA bands, in all samples. (author)

  20. Evaluation of antifungal activity of essential oils against potentially mycotoxigenic Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C. da Silva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The antifungal activity of essential oils of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Apiaceae, ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Zingiberaceae, mint (Mentha piperita L., Lamiaceae and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., Lamiaceae was evaluated against mycotoxin producers Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. High Resolution Gas Chromatography was applied to analyze chemical constituents of essential oils. The effect of different concentrations of essential oils was determined by solid medium diffusion assay. Mycelial growth and sporulation were determined for each essential oil at the concentrations established by solid medium diffusion assay. At the fifth, seventh and ninth days the mycelial diameter (Ø mm and spore production were also determined. FUN-1 staining was performed to assess cell viability after broth macrodilution assay. Trans-anethole, zingiberene, menthol and thymol are the major component of essential oils of fennel, ginger, mint and thyme, respectively. The effective concentrations for fennel, ginger, mint and thyme were 50, 80, 50 and 50% (oil/DMSO; v/v, respectively. The four essential oils analysed in this study showed antifungal effect. Additionally, FUN-1 staining showed to be a suitable method to evaluate cell viability of potential mycotoxigenic fungi A. flavus and A. parasiticus after treatment with essential oils.

  1. Evaluation of antifungal activity of essential oils against potentially mycotoxigenic Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C. da Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The antifungal activity of essential oils of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Apiaceae, ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Zingiberaceae, mint (Mentha piperita L., Lamiaceae and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., Lamiaceae was evaluated against mycotoxin producers Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. High Resolution Gas Chromatography was applied to analyze chemical constituents of essential oils. The effect of different concentrations of essential oils was determined by solid medium diffusion assay. Mycelial growth and sporulation were determined for each essential oil at the concentrations established by solid medium diffusion assay. At the fifth, seventh and ninth days the mycelial diameter (Ø mm and spore production were also determined. FUN-1 staining was performed to assess cell viability after broth macrodilution assay. Trans-anethole, zingiberene, menthol and thymol are the major component of essential oils of fennel, ginger, mint and thyme, respectively. The effective concentrations for fennel, ginger, mint and thyme were 50, 80, 50 and 50% (oil/DMSO; v/v, respectively. The four essential oils analysed in this study showed antifungal effect. Additionally, FUN-1 staining showed to be a suitable method to evaluate cell viability of potential mycotoxigenic fungi A. flavus and A. parasiticus after treatment with essential oils.

  2. Recurrent Fungal Keratitis and Blepharitis Caused by Aspergillus flavus.

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    Lee, Chia-Yi; Ho, Yi-Ju; Sun, Chi-Chin; Lin, Hsin-Chiung; Hsiao, Ching-Hsi; Ma, David Hui-Kang; Lai, Chi-Chun; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2016-11-02

    Aspergillus species produces a wide spectrum of fungal diseases like endophthalmitis and fungal keratitis ophthalmologically, but there has been no report about blepharitis caused by Aspergilus flavus to date. Herein, we report a 61-year-old ethnic Han Taiwanese male who had suffered from pain with burning and foreign body sensation after an insect bite on his left eye. Specimens from bilateral eyelids suggested infection of A. flavus, whereas corneal scraping showed the presence of Gram-negative bacteria. He was admitted for treatment of infectious keratitis with topical antibiotic and antifungal eye drops. Two weeks after discharge, recurrent blepharitis and keratitis of A. flavus was diagnosed microbiologically. Another treatment course of antifungal agent was resumed in the following 6 months, without further significant symptoms in the following 2 years. Collectively, it is possible for A. flavus to induce concurrent keratitis and blepharitis, and combined treatment of keratitis as well as blepharitis is advocated for as long as 6 months to ensure no recurrence. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  3. Atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus endemic to Italy for biocontrol of aflatoxins in maize

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    Effective biological control of aflatoxin­producing Aspergillus flavus with atoxigenic members of that species requires suitable A. flavus well adapted to and resident in target agroecosystems. Eighteen atoxigenic isolates of A. flavus endemic in Italy were compared for ability to reduce aflatoxin c...

  4. Effect of gamma radiation on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure and mycotoxin production

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    Ribeiro, J.; Cavaglieri, L.; Vital, H.; Cristofolini, A.; Merkis, C.; Astoreca, A.; Orlando, J.; Carú, M.; Dalcero, A.; Rosa, C. A. R.

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of gamma radiation (2 kGy) on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure. Moreover, the influence on aflatoxin B 1 and ochratoxin A production was also observed. Irradiated A. flavus strain showed a dull orangish colony while control strain showed the typical green color. Minor differences were observed on stipes, metulae and conidia size between control and irradiated A. flavus and A. ochraceus strains. Irradiated fungi showed ultrastructural changes on cell wall, plasmalema and cytoplasm levels. The levels of mycotoxins produced by irradiated strains were two times greater than those produced by control strains. Successive transferences of irradiated strains on malt extract agar allowed the fungus to recuperate morphological characteristics. Although minor changes in the fungal morphology were observed, ultrastructural changes at cell wall level and the increase of mycotoxin production ability were observed. Inappropriate storage of irradiated food and feed would allow the development of potentially more toxicogenic fungal propagules.

  5. How peroxisomes affect aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus.

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    Massimo Reverberi

    Full Text Available In filamentous fungi, peroxisomes are crucial for the primary metabolism and play a pivotal role in the formation of some secondary metabolites. Further, peroxisomes are important site for fatty acids β-oxidation, the formation of reactive oxygen species and for their scavenging through a complex of antioxidant activities. Oxidative stress is involved in different metabolic events in all organisms and it occurs during oxidative processes within the cell, including peroxisomal β-oxidation of fatty acids. In Aspergillus flavus, an unbalance towards an hyper-oxidant status into the cell is a prerequisite for the onset of aflatoxin biosynthesis. In our preliminary results, the use of bezafibrate, inducer of both peroxisomal β-oxidation and peroxisome proliferation in mammals, significantly enhanced the expression of pex11 and foxA and stimulated aflatoxin synthesis in A. flavus. This suggests the existence of a correlation among peroxisome proliferation, fatty acids β-oxidation and aflatoxin biosynthesis. To investigate this correlation, A. flavus was transformed with a vector containing P33, a gene from Cymbidium ringspot virus able to induce peroxisome proliferation, under the control of the promoter of the Cu,Zn-sod gene of A. flavus. This transcriptional control closely relates the onset of the antioxidant response to ROS increase, with the proliferation of peroxisomes in A. flavus. The AfP33 transformant strain show an up-regulation of lipid metabolism and an higher content of both intracellular ROS and some oxylipins. The combined presence of a higher amount of substrates (fatty acids-derived, an hyper-oxidant cell environment and of hormone-like signals (oxylipins enhances the synthesis of aflatoxins in the AfP33 strain. The results obtained demonstrated a close link between peroxisome metabolism and aflatoxin synthesis.

  6. Investigations on the Antifungal Effect of Nerol against Aspergillus flavus Causing Food Spoilage

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    Jun Tian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The antifungal efficacy of nerol (NEL has been proved against Aspergillus flavus by using in vitro and in vivo tests. The mycelial growth of A. flavus was completely inhibited at concentrations of 0.8 μL/mL and 0.1 μL/mL NEL in the air at contact and vapor conditions, respectively. The NEL also had an evident inhibitory effect on spore germination in A. flavus along with NEL concentration as well as time-dependent kinetic inhibition. The NEL presented noticeable inhibition on dry mycelium weight and synthesis of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 by A. flavus, totally restraining AFB1 production at 0.6 μL/mL. In real food system, the efficacy of the NEL on resistance to decay development in cherry tomatoes was investigated in vivo by exposing inoculated and control fruit groups to NEL vapor at different concentration. NEL vapors at 0.1 μL/mL air concentration significantly reduced artificially contaminated A. flavus and a broad spectrum of fungal microbiota. Results obtained from presented study showed that the NEL had a great antifungal activity and could be considered as a benefit and safe tool to control food spoilage.

  7. Loss of msnA, a Putative Stress Regulatory Gene, in Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus Increased Production of Conidia, Aflatoxins and Kojic Acid

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    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Scharfenstein, Leslie L.; Luo, Meng; Mahoney, Noreen; Molyneux, Russell J.; Yu, Jiujiang; Brown, Robert L.; Campbell, Bruce C.

    2011-01-01

    Production of the harmful carcinogenic aflatoxins by Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus has been postulated to be a mechanism to relieve oxidative stress. The msnA gene of A. parasiticus and A. flavus is the ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MSN2 that is associated with multi-stress response. Compared to wild type strains, the msnA deletion (∆msnA) strains of A. parasiticus and A. flavus exhibited retarded colony growth with increased conidiation. The ∆msnA strains also produced slightly higher amounts of aflatoxins and elevated amounts of kojic acid on mixed cereal medium. Microarray assays showed that expression of genes encoding oxidative stress defense enzymes, i.e., superoxide dismutase, catalase, and cytochrome c peroxidase in A. parasiticus ∆msnA, and the catalase A gene in A. flavus ∆msnA, was up-regulated. Both A. parasiticus and A. flavus ∆msnA strains produced higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and ROS production of A. flavus msnA addback strains was decreased to levels comparable to that of the wild type A. flavus. The msnA gene appears to be required for the maintenance of the normal oxidative state. The impairment of msnA resulted in the aforementioned changes, which might be used to combat the increased oxidative stress in the cells. PMID:22069691

  8. Effects of Nutrients in Substrates of Different Grains on Aflatoxin B1 Production by Aspergillus flavus

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    Jie Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study was to better understand the potential factors affecting aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 accumulation varies between different grains. The nutrient composition and contents of defatted substrates were determined; additionally, according to the nutrient content of the substrates, the effects of starch, soluble sugars, amino acids, and trace elements on AFB1 production and mycelial growth in Czapek-Dox medium were examined. These results verified that removal of lipids from ground substrates significantly reduced the substrate’s potential for AFB1 production by Aspergillus flavus. Maltose, glucose, sucrose, arginine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and zinc significantly induced AFB1 production up to 1.7- to 26.6-fold. And stachyose more significantly promoted A. flavus growth than the other nutrients. Thus, this study demonstrated that, combined with the nutrients content of grains, in addition to lipids, sucrose, stachyose, glutamic acid, and zinc might play key roles in various grains that are differentially infected by A. flavus. Particularly, two new nutrients (arginine and stachyose of the grains we found significantly stimulate AFB1 production and A. flavus growth, respectively. The results provide new concepts for antifungal methods to protect food and animal feed from AFB1 contamination.

  9. Effects of Nutrients in Substrates of Different Grains on Aflatoxin B1 Production by Aspergillus flavus

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    Liu, Jie; Sun, Lvhui; Zhang, Niya; Zhang, Jiacai; Guo, Jiao; Li, Chong; Rajput, Shahid Ali; Qi, Desheng

    2016-01-01

    The current study was to better understand the potential factors affecting aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) accumulation varies between different grains. The nutrient composition and contents of defatted substrates were determined; additionally, according to the nutrient content of the substrates, the effects of starch, soluble sugars, amino acids, and trace elements on AFB1 production and mycelial growth in Czapek-Dox medium were examined. These results verified that removal of lipids from ground substrates significantly reduced the substrate's potential for AFB1 production by Aspergillus flavus. Maltose, glucose, sucrose, arginine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and zinc significantly induced AFB1 production up to 1.7- to 26.6-fold. And stachyose more significantly promoted A. flavus growth than the other nutrients. Thus, this study demonstrated that, combined with the nutrients content of grains, in addition to lipids, sucrose, stachyose, glutamic acid, and zinc might play key roles in various grains that are differentially infected by A. flavus. Particularly, two new nutrients (arginine and stachyose) of the grains we found significantly stimulate AFB1 production and A. flavus growth, respectively. The results provide new concepts for antifungal methods to protect food and animal feed from AFB1 contamination. PMID:27294129

  10. In vitro impact on growth, fumonisins and aflatoxins production by Fusarium verticillioides and Aspergillus flavus using anti-fungal compounds and a biological control agent

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    Silvia FORMENTI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The temporal efficacy of three different chemical fungicides (Folicur®, Proline®, Sportak 45EW® and a biocontrol bacterium (Serenade, B. subtilis in reducing growth and toxin production by isolates of F. verticillioides and A. flavus was studied in vitro under different water activity regimes (0.99, 0.98 and 0.95. All the fungicides significantly inhibited mycelial growth compared with the control; the most effective treatment, both against F. verticillioides and A. flavus, was Sportak 45EW® (approx. 99%. The inhibitory effect of all fungicides generally improved with increasing concentration. Serenade always decreased fungal growth, with optimal results at concentrations of 104 and 106 (70‒75% reduction. All the fungicide treatments resulted in a significant reduction in both FB1+FB2 and AFB1 production when compared to the control, at the end of the incubation period and with the 2 concentrations used (approx. 99%. A threshold concentration inoculum of at least 104 CFUs of B. subtilis per g was required to achieve a significant control of mycotoxin production. Sportak 45EW® and Serenade gave the best control of mycotoxin production with a reduction of 95% compared to the controls. Use of Serenade in the field should include due consideration to its sensitivity to low water activities, when compared to the target pathogens.

  11. Comparative Chemistry of Aspergillus oryzae (RIB40) and A. flavus (NRRL 3357)

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    Rank, Christian; Klejnstrup, Marie Louise; Petersen, Lene Maj; Kildgaard, Sara; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Gotfredsen, Charlotte Held; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae and A. flavus are important species in industrial biotechnology and food safety and have been some of the first aspergilli to be fully genome sequenced. Bioinformatic analysis has revealed 99.5% gene homology between the two species pointing towards a large coherence in the secondary metabolite production. In this study we report on the first comparison of secondary metabolite production between the full genome sequenced strains of A. oryzae (RIB40) and A. flavus (NRRL 3357). Surprisingly, the overall chemical profiles of the two strains were mostly very different across 15 growth conditions. Contrary to previous studies we found the aflatrem precursor 13-desoxypaxilline to be a major metabolite from A. oryzae under certain growth conditions. For the first time, we additionally report A. oryzae to produce parasiticolide A and two new analogues hereof, along with four new alkaloids related to the A. flavus metabolites ditryptophenalines and miyakamides. Generally the secondary metabolite capability of A. oryzae presents several novel end products likely to result from the domestication process from A. flavus. PMID:24957367

  12. A novel glass fiber disc culture system for testing of small amounts of compounds on growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, R A

    1995-01-01

    A new method for growing Aspergillus flavus for experimental studies is presented. The system consists of a humidified vial with a thick septum pierced by a pin on which a glass fiber disc is affixed. The disc contains the test solution and inoculum plus medium. The method has been used to assess the effect of variations in culture conditions on production of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). The AFB1 level was affected by the amount of medium placed on the disc and type of disc material. The results for different types of glass fiber and quartz discs were compared with AFB1 produced by fungus grown in liquid medium or on paper discs. When compared to a liquid medium culture there was a 15 to 20-fold increase in AFB1 for one type of disc. Incubations with less than 14 microliters of medium gave satisfactory results. A crude phosphatidylcholine preparation at a concentration of 0.7% of the medium resulted in a 4-fold increase in AFB1.

  13. Large crystal growth by thermal control allows combined X-ray and neutron crystallographic studies to elucidate the protonation states in Aspergillus flavus urate oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksanen, E; Blakeley, M P; Bonneté, F; Dauvergne, M T; Dauvergne, F; Budayova-Spano, M

    2009-10-06

    Urate oxidase (Uox) catalyses the oxidation of urate to allantoin and is used to reduce toxic urate accumulation during chemotherapy. X-ray structures of Uox with various inhibitors have been determined and yet the detailed catalytic mechanism remains unclear. Neutron crystallography can provide complementary information to that from X-ray studies and allows direct determination of the protonation states of the active-site residues and substrate analogues, provided that large, well-ordered deuterated crystals can be grown. Here, we describe a method and apparatus used to grow large crystals of Uox (Aspergillus flavus) with its substrate analogues 8-azaxanthine and 9-methyl urate, and with the natural substrate urate, in the presence and absence of cyanide. High-resolution X-ray (1.05-1.20 A) and neutron diffraction data (1.9-2.5 A) have been collected for the Uox complexes at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and the Institut Laue-Langevin, respectively. In addition, room temperature X-ray data were also collected in preparation for joint X-ray and neutron refinement. Preliminary results indicate no major structural differences between crystals grown in H(2)O and D(2)O even though the crystallization process is affected. Moreover, initial nuclear scattering density maps reveal the proton positions clearly, eventually providing important information towards unravelling the mechanism of catalysis.

  14. Antibiotic Extraction as a Recent Biocontrol Method for Aspergillus Niger andAspergillus Flavus Fungi in Ancient Egyptian mural paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemdan, R. Elmitwalli; Fatma, Helmi M.; Rizk, Mohammed A.; Hagrassy, Abeer F.

    Biodeterioration of mural paintings by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus Fungi has been proved in different mural paintings in Egypt nowadays. Several researches have studied the effect of fungi on mural paintings, the mechanism of interaction and methods of control. But none of these researches gives us the solution without causing a side effect. In this paper, for the first time, a recent treatment by antibiotic "6 penthyl α pyrone phenol" was applied as a successful technique for elimination of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. On the other hand, it is favorable for cleaning Surfaces of Murals executed by tembera technique from the fungi metabolism which caused a black pigments on surfaces.

  15. Evaluation of intraspecific competition (Aspergillus flavus Link) and aflatoxin formation in suspended disc culture and preharvest maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    The abilities of non-aflatoxin producing strains of Aspergillus flavus NRRL 32354; 18543; 21882; 21368 as well as domesticated koji strains Aspergillus oryzae (syn. A. flavus var. oryzae) NRRL 451; 1911; 5592; 6271; 30038 to interfere with aflatoxin formation by A. flavus NRRL 3357; 32355 were exami...

  16. Characterization and anti-Aspergillus flavus impact of nanoparticles synthesized by Penicillium citrinum

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    Mohamed A. Yassin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work was conducted to evaluate the ability of grape molding fungus; Penicillium citrinum to synthesize silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs. The potency of biosynthesized Ag NPs was checked against the aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris, isolated from sorghum grains. Biosynthesized Ag NPs were characterized and confirmed in different ways. X ray diffraction (XRD, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and optical absorption measurements confirmed the bio-synthesis of Ag NPs. The in vitro antifungal investigation showed that biosynthesized Ag NPs were capable of inhibiting the growth of aflatoxigenic A. flavus var. columnaris. Utilization of plant pathogenic fungi in the Ag NPs biosynthesis as well as the use of bio-Ag NPs to control fungal plant diseases instead of chemicals is promising. Further work is needed to confirm the efficacy of the bio-Ag NPs against different mycotoxigenic fungi and to determine the potent applicable doses.

  17. Keratitis by Aspergillus flavus infection after cataract surgery

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    João Luiz Pacini Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We report a case of keratis infection after cataract phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in a 65-year-old female patient. The patient initially underwent cataract surgery on the right eye. Intraocular inflammation appeared on the second post-operative day and was initially treated as Toxic Anterior Segment Syndrome (TASS. The inflammation was reduced and vision improved initially but very aggressive and progressive keratitis destroyed the cornea due to the delay in correct diagnosis. Aspergillus flavus was isolated from a biopsy.The infection was treated with antifungal agents and loss of the eye was avoided by total corneal transplantation associated with Gundersen conjunctiva cover. To restore the lost vision, a second penetrating corneal graft with removal of the conjunctiva cover was performed 17 months later. The final best-corrected vision was 20/40 but prognosis for long-term graft survival is poor.

  18. Toxicidade de óleos essenciais de alho e casca de canela contra fungos do grupo Aspergillus flavus Evaluation of essential oils from Allium sativum and Cinnamomum zeilanicum and their toxicity against fungi of the Aspergillus flavus group

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    Elson de C. Viegas

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Diante da propriedade inibitória de óleos essenciais vegetais sobre o desenvolvimento micelial de fungos e da importância das espécies do grupo Aspergillus flavus, que apresentam potencial para síntese de aflatoxina, este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar in vitro a toxicidade de óleos essenciais vegetais contra fungos do grupo A. flavus, isolados a partir da cultura do amendoim. Inicialmente, foi avaliada a toxicidade de oito óleos essenciais vegetais no desenvolvimento micelial de dois isolados do grupo A. flavus, em comparação ao fungicida sintético benomyl. Em seguida, foi avaliada a toxicidade dos óleos de casca de canela (Cinnamomum zeilanicum Breym. e de bulbilho de alho (Allium sativum L. contra 37 isolados do grupo A. flavus, durante 12 meses. A maior inibição do desenvolvimento micelial de A. flavus foi obtida com o emprego dos óleos essenciais de casca de canela e de bulbilho de alho, e o efeito inibitório variou com o isolado testado.Considering the inhibitory property of essential plant oils on the mycelial development of fungi, and the importance of Aspergillus flavus-like fungi which may produce aflatoxins, this research was designed to evaluate the toxicity of essential oils against fungi belonging to the group A. flavus isolated from peanut crops. The toxicity of eight essential oils against two isolates of A. Flavuslike fungi was evaluated in comparison to the synthetic fungicide benomyl. The toxicity of Cinnamomum zeilanicum Breym. and Allium sativum L. essential oils was also evaluated against 37 fungal isolates for a period of 12 months. The highest inhibition of the mycelial development of A. flavus was obtained with cinnamon and garlic essential oils. The inhibitory effect on growth was variable according to the fungal isolate.

  19. Comparative histological and transcriptional analysis of maize kernels infected with Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides infect maize kernels and contaminate them with the mycotoxins aflatoxin and fumonisin, respectively. Combined histological examination of fungal colonization and transcriptional changes in maize kernels at 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours post inoculation (...

  20. Genetic Diversity and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of 200 Clinical and Environmental Aspergillus flavus Isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taghizadeh-Armaki, M.; Hedayati, M.T.; Ansari, S.; Omran, S.M.; Saber, S.; Rafati, H.; Zoll, J.; Lee, H.A.L. van der; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.; Seyedmousavi, S.

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus has been frequently reported as the leading cause of invasive aspergillosis in certain tropical and subtropical countries. Two hundred A. flavus strains originating from clinical and environmental sources and collected between 2008 and 2015 were phylogenetically identified at the

  1. Toxicity, analgesic and sedative potential of crude extract of soil-borne phytopathogenic fungi Aspergillus flavus

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    Bashir Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aspergillus flavus is one of the most abundant mold present around the world. The present study was conducted to investigate the acute toxicity, analgesic and sedative effect of the crude extract obtained from soil borne fungi A. flavus. Methods: The fungi was isolated from soil samples and identified morphologically and microscopically. The growth condition i.e. media, temperature, pH, and incubation period were optimized. In these optimized growth condition, A. flavus was grown in batch culture in shaking incubator. Crude contents were extracted by using ethyl acetate solvent. Crude secondary metabolites were screened for acute toxicity, analgesic and sedative effect. Results: Upon completion of the experiment, blood was collected from the tail vein of albino mice, and different haematological tests were conducted. White blood cells counts displayed a slight increase (10.6× 109/L above their normal range (0.8–6.8 × 109/L, which may be due to the increment in the number of lymphocytes or granulocytes. However, the percentage of lymphocytes was much lower (17.7%, while the percentage of the granulocytes was higher (61.4% than its normal range (8.6–38.9%. A reduction in the mean number of writhing in the different test groups was caused by the application of the crude ethyl acetate extract through the i.p. route at different doses (50, 100, and 150 mg/kg body weight. The results of our investigation showed the EtOAc extract of A. flavus can cause a significant sedative effect in open field. Conclusion: It was concluded from the present study that the A. flavus has the potential to produce bioactive metabolites which have analgesic and sedative effect.

  2. Production and Preliminary Characterization of Alkaline Protease from Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus

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    P. Chellapandi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteases are being an industrial candidate, which are widely used in food, bakery, and beverage and detergent industry. In leather industry, alkaline proteases are exhibiting a prominent role in unhairing and bating processes. An extensive use of filamentous fungi, especially Aspergillus species has been studied elaborately. Although, the significant application of alkaline protease produced from these strains in leather industry is being limited. Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus found as the potential strains for production of tannery protease in submerged fermentation. To improve the productivity of this enzyme in liquid broth, various media ingredients have been optimized. The crude and partially purified proteases preliminarily characterized and used for unhairing processes at lab scale in tannery. The protease obtained from these strains showed the good activity in wide alkaline condition at 50 °C suggesting the possibility of using in leather and detergent industry.

  3. Effect of gamma radiation on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure and mycotoxin production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, J. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia Veterinaria, Universidad Federal Rural de Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ) (Brazil); Cavaglieri, L., E-mail: lcavaglieri@arnet.com.a [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto (UNRC), Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Member of Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CIC-CONICET) (Argentina); Vital, H. [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Secao de Defesa Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Cristofolini, A.; Merkis, C. [Departamento de Microscopia Electronica, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto. Ruta 36 km 601 (5800) Rio Cuarto (Argentina); Astoreca, A. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto (UNRC), Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Member of Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CIC-CONICET) (Argentina); Orlando, J.; Caru, M. [Departamento de Ciencias Ecologicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Dalcero, A. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto (UNRC), Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Member of Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CIC-CONICET) (Argentina); Rosa, C.A.R. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia Veterinaria, Universidad Federal Rural de Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ) (Brazil); Member of Consejo Nacional de Pesquisas (CNPq) (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of gamma radiation (2 kGy) on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure. Moreover, the influence on aflatoxin B{sub 1} and ochratoxin A production was also observed. Irradiated A. flavus strain showed a dull orangish colony while control strain showed the typical green color. Minor differences were observed on stipes, metulae and conidia size between control and irradiated A. flavus and A. ochraceus strains. Irradiated fungi showed ultrastructural changes on cell wall, plasmalema and cytoplasm levels. The levels of mycotoxins produced by irradiated strains were two times greater than those produced by control strains. Successive transferences of irradiated strains on malt extract agar allowed the fungus to recuperate morphological characteristics. Although minor changes in the fungal morphology were observed, ultrastructural changes at cell wall level and the increase of mycotoxin production ability were observed. Inappropriate storage of irradiated food and feed would allow the development of potentially more toxicogenic fungal propagules.

  4. Effect of intraspecific competition by Aspergillus flavus on aflatoxin formation in suspended disc culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklow, Donald T; Bobell, John R; Palmquist, Debra E

    2003-05-01

    The ability of two non-aflatoxin producing strains of Aspergillus flavus to interfere with aflatoxin production by a toxigenic A. flavus strain was examined using a replacement series with suspended disc culture method. Individual glass fiber discs, affixed to a pin suspended from the caps of scintillation vials, were inoculated with medium containing A. flavus conidial mixtures in different proportions (aflatoxin producer:non-producer = 100:0, 80:20, 60:40, 20:80 and 0:100 by vol) at a constant total density (1 x 10(5) spores ml(-1)). Reductions in the total conidial density of these strains when grown alone, had little effect on fungal growth (mycelium dry weight) or aflatoxin production. Significant (P < 0.0001) reductions in aflatoxin B1 were recorded when non-toxigenic strains represented any proportion of the inoculum mixture. Aflatoxin yield values were less than (P < 0.0001) expected from the input ratios for toxigenic vs. non-toxigenic conidial inoculum within the replacement series. Aflatoxin yields were also reduced (P < 0.001), with a corresponding increase in fungal growth (P < 0.001), when conidia from aflatoxin producing strains were mixed in equal proportions. This suggests that the substantial inhibition of aflatoxin yield for inoculum mixtures results from the failure of spore germlings to establish a cooperative mycelial network.

  5. RNA interference reduces aflatoxin accumulation by Aspergillus flavus in peanut seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxins are among the most powerful carcinogens in nature. They are produced by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus Link and other Aspergillus species. Aflatoxins accumulate in many crops, including rice, wheat, oats, pecans, pistachios, soybean, cassava, almonds, peanuts, beans, corn and cot...

  6. NsdC and NsdD affect Aspergillus flavus morphogenesis and aflatoxin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transcription factors NsdC and NsdD have been shown to be necessary for sexual development in Aspergillus nidulans. Herein we examine the role of these proteins in development and aflatoxin production of the agriculturally important, aflatoxin-producing fungus, Aspergillus flavus. We found tha...

  7. Population genetics as a tool for understanding toxigenesis in Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species in Aspergillus section Flavi commonly infect agricultural staples such as corn, peanuts, cottonseed, and tree nuts and produce an array of mycotoxins, the most potent of which is aflatoxin. Aspergillus flavus is the dominant aflatoxin-producing species in the majority of crops. Populations...

  8. Antifungal properties and inhibitory effects upon aflatoxin production of Thymus vulgaris L. by Aspergillus flavus Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohiyama, Cássia Yumie; Yamamoto Ribeiro, Milene Mayumi; Mossini, Simone Aparecida Galerani; Bando, Erika; Bomfim, Natália da Silva; Nerilo, Samuel Botião; Rocha, Gustavo Henrique Oliveira; Grespan, Renata; Mikcha, Jane Martha Graton; Machinski, Miguel

    2015-04-15

    The antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic properties of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) were evaluated upon Aspergillus flavus "in vitro". Suspension containing 10(6) of A. flavus were cultivated with TEO in concentrations ranging from 50 to 500 μg/mL. TEO reached minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) at 250 μg/mL. Inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis was detected at a concentration of 100 μg/mL of TEO. Morphological evaluation performed by both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that antifungal activity of TEO could be detected starting at a concentration of 50 μg/mL and the fungicide effect at a concentration of 250 μg/mL. TEO completely inhibited production of both B1 and B2 aflatoxins (AFB1 and AFB2) at a concentration of 150 μg/mL. This way, fungal biomass development and aflatoxin production were dependent on TEO concentration. Therefore, TEO was capable of controlling the growth of A. flavus and its production of aflatoxins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hexane neem leaf extract more potent than ethanol extract against Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Hidayat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Aspergillus flavus is one of the causes of aspergillosis, with a high virulence and resistance to standard antifungals, resulting in a high mortality rate. Medicinal plants are increasingly used as they are relatively safer with minimal side effects. Previously we found that the ethanol extract of neem (Azadirachta indica A Juss leaves inhibits A. flavus growth in vitro. However, most chemical compounds with antifungal effect are nonpolar. The purpose of this research was to compare the antifungal effect of neem leaves extracted in a nonpolar solvent to that of leaves extracted in a polar solvent. METHODS An in vitro experimental research was conducted between October 2013 and January 2014. Neem leaves were extracted in ethanol or hexane at various concentrations. A macrodilution test with 48-hour incubation time was done in triplicate on 8 groups of samples. These comprised the neem leaf ethanol extract (NLEE at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/dL, neem leaf hexane extract (NLHE at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/dL, positive control, and negative control groups. Fungal growth was detected on Sabouroud dextrose agar. Statistical analysis used Chi square and Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS NLHE had a higher, but statistically non-significant, inhibitory effect on A. flavus than NLEE (p=0.996. At higher concentrations, the antifungal effect of NLHE is better than that of NLEE. CONCLUSION There is no significant difference in in-vitro inhibitory effectivity on A. flavus of neem leaves between extracts in polar and nonpolar solvents.

  10. Sinusite invasiva por Aspergillus flavus : relato de um caso associado a leucemia aguda bifenotípica

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski; Oliveira, Flávio de Mattos; Almeida, Valdir de; Prolla, Gabriel; Severo, Luiz Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Here we report a case of invasive pansinusitis with proptosis of the right eye caused by Aspergillus flavus in an immunocompromised patient with acute biphenotypic leukemia without aggressive therapy response.Descreve-se um caso de pansinusite invasiva com proptose do globo ocular direito causado por Aspergillus flavus em um paciente imunossuprimido com leucemia aguda bifenotípica sem resposta a terapia agressiva.

  11. The chemical heritage of Aspergillus flavus in A. oryzae RIB 40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Christian; Klejnstrup, Marie Louise; Petersen, Lene Maj

    Aspergillus oryzae is a very important species in biotechnology and has been used for centuries in traditional Asian fermentation. The RIB40 strain is particularly interesting as it was one of the first genome sequenced Aspergilli together with A. flavus, a prominent food and feed contaminant...... with indications to specific genetic changes. Several new metabolites and changes in biosynthetic routes have been found in A. oryzae, indicating subtle changes in the genomic heritage from A. flavus....

  12. ROS Involves the Fungicidal Actions of Thymol against Spores of Aspergillus flavus via the Induction of Nitric Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Qingshan Shen; Wei Zhou; Hongbo Li; Liangbin Hu; Haizhen Mo

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a well-known pathogenic fungus for both crops and human beings. The acquisition of resistance to azoles by A. flavus is leading to more failures occurring in the prevention of infection by A. flavus. In this study, we found that thymol, one of the major chemical constituents of the essential oil of Monarda punctate, had efficient fungicidal activity against A. flavus and led to sporular lysis. Further studies indicated that thymol treatment induced the generation of both...

  13. Aflatoxin B1 producing potential of Aspergillus flavus strains isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... Extraction of AFB1 from A. flavus strains grown on agar media. Eighty five strains of A. flavus isolated from rice grain samples were grown on sterilized different agar media (AFPA, Czapeks agar, PDA and YES agar) for 5 days at 25 ± 2°C. Three replications were maintained for each isolate for each media.

  14. INHIBITION OF AFLATOXIN PRODUTION BY ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS USING LOW LEVEL Y - IRRADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F

    1981-05-01

    Full Text Available Effects o f s e l ected l ow l evel doses of y - Rad iation (100-400 K rad on t he abi l ity o f toxin strain o f Asperg i l l us flavus t o survive and pr oduce a f latox in in c ul t ure med ium and p is tachio nuts hav e been s tudied . A reduction of 60 per c e nt in growth and spore production by Asperg i l l us flavus in c u l ture me di um was observed after treatment wi th 100 K rad of y - Radiation ."nIn spore inoculated pistachio nuts , 100 K rad o f y Radi a tion reduced the a f la toxin B l and G l nroduction by 75% aft er e i ght week s s t orage per iod . The afla toxin prod~ ction ability by Aspergillus f lavus on pistachio nuts was affectively eliminated by t he treatment o f spore inoculated pist achio nuts wi th 200 K rad of y-Radiation , although very l itt le growth coul d be detected after eight weeks ' storage of 40 0 K rad y-irradiated pistachio nuts.  

  15. In vitro comparative analysis of monocrotophos degrading potential of Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rachna; Garg, Veena; Yadav, Deepak

    2014-06-01

    Fungal degradation is emerging as a new powerful tool for the removal of potent neurotoxin pesticide, monocrotophos. Therefore, the present study is aimed at comparative characterization of monocrotophos degrading ability of three different fungal strains. Fungal strains were isolated from local agricultural soil by enrichment culture method, screened by gradient culture and identified as Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp. Growth kinetics revealed a direct positive influence of monocrotophos on the viability of fungal isolates. Fungal degradation was studied in phosphorus free liquid culture medium supplemented with 150 mg L(-1) concentration of monocrotophos for a period of 15 days under optimized culture conditions. Degradation of MCP followed first order kinetics with kdeg of 0.007, 0.002 and 0.005 day(-1) and half life (t1/2) of 4.21, 12.64 and 6.32 days for A. flavus, F. pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp. respectively. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report signifying the potential of monocrotophos degradation by Fusarium and Macrophomina sp. The results were further confirmed by HPTLC and FTIR which indicates disappearance of monocrotophos by hydrolytic cleavage of vinyl phosphate bond. Degradation of monocrotophos by fungal isolates was accompanied by the release of extracellular alkaline phosphatases, inorganic phosphates and ammonia. The overall comparative analysis followed the order of A. flavus > Macrophomina sp. > F. pallidoroseum. Therefore, it could be concluded from the study that these three different fungal strains could be effectively used as a potential candidate for the removal of monocrotophos from contaminated sites.

  16. Bisulfite sequencing reveals that Aspergillus flavus holds a hollow in DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yang Liu

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus first gained scientific attention for its production of aflatoxin. The underlying regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis has been serving as a theoretical model for biosynthesis of other microbial secondary metabolites. Nevertheless, for several decades, the DNA methylation status, one of the important epigenomic modifications involved in gene regulation, in A. flavus remains to be controversial. Here, we applied bisulfite sequencing in conjunction with a biological replicate strategy to investigate the DNA methylation profiling of A. flavus genome. Both the bisulfite sequencing data and the methylome comparisons with other fungi confirm that the DNA methylation level of this fungus is negligible. Further investigation into the DNA methyltransferase of Aspergillus uncovers its close relationship with RID-like enzymes as well as its divergence with the methyltransferase of species with validated DNA methylation. The lack of repeat contents of the A. flavus' genome and the high RIP-index of the small amount of remanent repeat potentially support our speculation that DNA methylation may be absent in A. flavus or that it may possess de novo DNA methylation which occurs very transiently during the obscure sexual stage of this fungal species. This work contributes to our understanding on the DNA methylation status of A. flavus, as well as reinforces our views on the DNA methylation in fungal species. In addition, our strategy of applying bisulfite sequencing to DNA methylation detection in species with low DNA methylation may serve as a reference for later scientific investigations in other hypomethylated species.

  17. WetA bridges cellular and chemical development in Aspergillus flavus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yueh Wu

    Full Text Available Bridging cellular reproduction and survival is essential for all life forms. Aspergillus fungi primarily reproduce by forming asexual spores called conidia, whose formation and maturation is governed by the central genetic regulatory circuit BrlA→AbaA→WetA. Here, we report that WetA is a multi-functional regulator that couples spore differentiation and survival, and governs proper chemical development in Aspergillus flavus. The deletion of wetA results in the formation of conidia with defective cell walls and no intra-cellular trehalose, leading to reduced stress tolerance, a rapid loss of viability, and disintegration of spores. WetA is also required for normal vegetative growth, hyphal branching, and production of aflatoxins. Targeted and genome-wide expression analyses reveal that WetA exerts feedback control of brlA and that 5,700 genes show altered mRNA levels in the mutant conidia. Functional category analyses of differentially expressed genes in ΔwetA RNA-seq data indicate that WetA contributes to spore integrity and maturity by properly regulating the metabolic pathways of trehalose, chitin, α-(1,3-glucan, β-(1,3-glucan, melanin, hydrophobins, and secondary metabolism more generally. Moreover, 160 genes predicted to encode transcription factors are differentially expressed by the absence of wetA, suggesting that WetA may play a global regulatory role in conidial development. Collectively, we present a comprehensive model for developmental control that bridges spore differentiation and survival in A. flavus.

  18. Managing and Monitoring of Aspergillus flavus in Corn Using Bioplastic-based Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of bioplastic-based formulations for delivering a non-aflatoxigenic strain of Aspergillus flavus and for monitoring Aspergilli with the final objective of controlling aflatoxin contamination in corn. Field application of inoculated bioplastic granules show...

  19. Aspergillus flavus Keratitis: Experience of a Tertiary Eye Clinic in Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdem, E.; Yagmur, M.; Boral, H.; Ilkit, M.; Ersoz, R.; Seyedmousavi, S.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the clinical and mycological characteristics of four cases of mycotic keratitis caused by Aspergillus flavus that occurred from July 2014 to May 2015 at Cukurova University Hospital, Adana, Turkey. In a 10-month period, a total of 64 corneal smear/scrapings were examined from

  20. Seventeen years of subcutaneous infection by Aspergillus flavus; eumycetoma confirmed by immunohistochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Sarah A; Abbas, Manal A; Jouvion, Gregory; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; de Hoog, G Sybren; Kolecka, Anna; Mahgoub, El Sheikh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subcutaneous infections caused by Aspergillus species are considered to be extremely rare. Because these fungi are among the most common laboratory contaminants, their role as eumycetoma causative agents is difficult to ascertain. Here, we report the first case of A. flavus eumycetoma

  1. Genome-Wide Association Mapping of and Aspergillus flavus Aflatoxin Accumulation Resistance in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marilyn L. Warburton; Juliet D. Tang; Gary L. Windham; Leigh K. Hawkins; Seth C. Murray; Wenwei Xu; Debbie Boykin; Andy Perkins; W. Paul Williams

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of maize (Zea mays L.) with aflatoxin, produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus Link, has severe health and economic consequences. Efforts to reduce aflatoxin accumulation in maize have focused on identifying and selecting germplasm with natural host resistance factors, and several maize lines with significantly...

  2. Aspergillus flavus whole genome and EST sequence releases and construction of homologous gene search blast server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites. These compounds, produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, contaminate pre-harvest agricultural crops in the field and post-harvest grains during storage. In order to reduce and eliminate aflatoxin contamination of food and feed...

  3. Isolation and structural elucidation of acidic terpenoid phytoalexins in maize and their interactions with Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plants use a variety of physical and chemical defenses in response to herbivory and pathogen attack. Infection of maize by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus results in the accumulation of aflatoxins, which are among the most detrimental biogenic substances known to man. The majority of maize de...

  4. Resistance to Aspergillus flavus in maize and peanut: Molecular biology, breeding, environmental stress and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    The colonization of maize (Zea mays L.) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus results in the contamination with carcinogenic mycotoxins known as aflatoxins leading to economic losses as well as a potential health threat to human. The interactio...

  5. Potential roles of WRKY transcription factors in resistance to Aspergillus flavus colonization of immature maize kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance to Aspergillus flavus by maize (Zea mays L.) is mediated by several defense proteins; however the mechanism regulating the expression of these defenses is poorly understood. This study examined the potential roles of six maize WRKY transcription factors, ZmWRKY19, ZmWRKY21, ZmWRKY53, ZmW...

  6. POTENTIAL OF ESSENTIAL OILS FOR PROTECTION OF GRAINS CONTAMINATED BY AFLATOXIN PRODUCED BY Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Hadad Esper

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 is a highly toxic and carcinogenic metabolite produced by Aspergillus species on food and agricultural commodities. Inhibitory effects of essential oils of Ageratum conyzoides (mentrasto and Origanum vulgare (oregano on the mycelial growth and aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus have been studied previously in culture medium. The aim of this study was to evaluate aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus in real food systems (corn and soybean treated with Ageratum conyzoides (mentrasto and Origanum vulgare (oregano essential oils. Samples with 60 g of the grains were treated with different volumes of essential oils, 200, 100, 50, and 10 μL for oregano and 50, 30, 15, and 10μL for mentrasto. Fungal growth was evaluated by disk diffusion method. Aflatoxin B1 production was evaluated inoculating suspensions of A. flavus containing 1.3×105 spores/ mL in 60 g of grains (corn and soybeans after adjusting the water activity at 0.94. Aflatoxin was quantified by photodensitometry. Fungal growth and aflatoxin production were inhibited by essential oils, but the mentrasto oil was more effective in soybeans than that of oregano. On the other hand, in corn samples, the oregano essential oil was more effective than that of mentrasto. Chemical compositions of the essential oils were also investigated. The GC/MS oils analysis showed that the main component of mentrasto essential oil is precocene I and of the main component of oregano essential oil is 4-terpineol. The results indicate that both essential oils can become an alternative for the control of aflatoxins in corn and soybeans.

  7. Toxigenic potentiality of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus strains isolated from black pepper assessed by an LC-MS/MS based multi-mycotoxin method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogendrarajah, Pratheeba; Devlieghere, Frank; Njumbe Ediage, Emmanuel; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; De Meulenaer, Bruno; De Saeger, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    A liquid chromatography triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated to determine mycotoxins, produced by fungal isolates grown on malt extract agar (MEA). All twenty metabolites produced by different fungal species were extracted using acetonitrile/1% formic acid. The developed method was applied to assess the toxigenic potentiality of Aspergillus flavus (n = 11) and Aspergillus parasiticus (n = 6) strains isolated from black peppers (Piper nigrum L.) following their growth at 22, 30 and 37 °C. Highest mean radial colony growth rates were observed at 30 °C for A. flavus (5.21 ± 0.68 mm/day) and A. parasiticus (4.97 ± 0.33 mm/day). All of the A. flavus isolates produced aflatoxin B1 and O-methyl sterigmatocystin (OMST) while 91% produced aflatoxin B2 (AFB2) and 82% of them produced sterigmatocystin (STERIG) at 30 °C. Except one, all the A. parasiticus isolates produced all the four aflatoxins, STERIG and OMST at 30 °C. Remarkably high AFB1 was produced by some A. flavus isolates at 22 °C (max 16-40 mg/kg). Production of mycotoxins followed a different trend than that of growth rate of both species. Notable correlations were found between different secondary metabolites of both species; R(2) 0.87 between AFB1 and AFB2 production. Occurrence of OMST could be used as a predictor for AFB1 production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Preliminary studies of inhibitions in Aspergillus flavus with extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    1995). The genus is widely distributed, and A. flavus spores are found in the air and in the soil (Alexopoulos, 1962). They thrive on any organic substance with little moisture. Products with moisture levels above 16% are capable of supporting the.

  9. Invasive Aspergillus flavus sinusitis: case report in a patient with biphenotypic acute leukemia Sinusite invasiva por Aspergillus flavus: relato de um caso associado a leucemia aguda bifenotípica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Orzechowski Xavier

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Here we report a case of invasive pansinusitis with proptosis of the right eye caused by Aspergillus flavus in an immunocompromised patient with acute biphenotypic leukemia without aggressive therapy response.Descreve-se um caso de pansinusite invasiva com proptose do globo ocular direito causado por Aspergillus flavus em um paciente imunossuprimido com leucemia aguda bifenotípica sem resposta a terapia agressiva.

  10. Comparative chemistry of Aspergillus oryzae (RIB40) and A. flavus (NRRL 3357)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Christian; Klejnstrup, Marie Louise; Petersen, Lene Maj

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae and A. flavus are important species in industrial biotechnology and food safety and have been some of the first aspergilli to be fully genome sequenced. Bioinformatic analysis has revealed 99.5% gene homology between the two species pointing towards a large coherence...... in the secondary metabolite production. In this study we report on the first comparison of secondary metabolite production between the full genome sequenced strains of A. oryzae (RIB40) and A. flavus (NRRL 3357). Surprisingly, the overall chemical profiles of the two strains were mostly very different across 15...

  11. Optimal pcr primers for rapid and accurate detection of Aspergillus flavus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shuhaib, Mohammed Baqur S; Albakri, Ali H; Alwan, Sabah H; Almandil, Noor B; AbdulAzeez, Sayed; Borgio, J Francis

    2018-02-07

    Aspergillus flavus is among the most devastating opportunistic pathogens of several food crops including rice, due to its high production of carcinogenic aflatoxins. The presence of these organisms in economically important rice strip farming is a serious food safety concern. Several polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers have been designed to detect this species; however, a comparative assessment of their accuracy has not been conducted. This study aims to identify the optimal diagnostic PCR primers for the identification of A. flavus, among widely available primers. We isolated 122 A. flavus native isolates from randomly collected rice strips (N = 300). We identified 109 isolates to the genus level using universal fungal PCR primer pairs. Nine pairs of primers were examined for their PCR diagnostic specificity on the 109 isolates. FLA PCR was found to be the optimal PCR primer pair for specific identification of the native isolates, over aflP(1), aflM, aflA, aflD, aflP(3), aflP(2), and aflR. The PEP primer pair was found to be the most unsuitable for A. flavus identification. In conclusion, the present study indicates the powerful specificity of the FLA PCR primer over other commonly available diagnostic primers for accurate, rapid, and large-scale identification of A. flavus native isolates. This study provides the first simple, practical comparative guide to PCR-based screening of A. flavus infection in rice strips. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Aspergillus flavus and Fusariumverticillioides Induce Tissue Specific Gene Expression of PRms and UGT in Maize Seed before Fungal Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus and Fusariumverticillioides are fungal pathogens that colonize maize seeds and contaminate them with mycotoxins. To investigate the plant microbe interactions, we conducted histological and molecular studies to characterize the internal colonization of maize seed by the two fungal...

  13. Evaluation of resistance to aflatoxin contamination in kernels of maize genotypes using a GFP-expressing Aspergillus flavus strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of resistance or susceptibility of corn inbreds to infection by Aspergillus flavus was evaluated by a kernel screening assay. A GFP-expressing strain of A. flavus was used to accomplish this study to measure fungal spread and aflatoxin levels in real time. Among the four inbreds tested, ...

  14. Unravelling the diversity of the cyclopiazonic acid family of mycotoxins in Aspergillus flavus by UHPLC Triple-TOF HRMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyclopiazonic acid (a-cyclopiazonic acid, a-CPA) is an indole-hydrindane-tetramic acid neurotoxin produced by various fungal species, including the notorious food and feed contaminant Aspergillus flavus. Despite its discovery in A. flavus cultures, approximately 40 years ago, its contribution to the...

  15. Enhanced aflatoxin production by aspergillus parasiticus and aspergillus flavus after low dose gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hitoshi (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment)

    1992-09-01

    Spores of Aspergillus parasiticus IFO 30179 and A. flavus var. columnaris S46 were irradiated at 0.05, 0.2 and 0.4 kGy in the synthetic low salts (SL) broth, and the effect on aflatoxin production was examined after 10 days incubation at 30 or 25degC. In these two strains, irradiation of spores at 0.05 kGy resulted in higher B1 or G1 production than the non-irradiated controles. However, spores of the both strains irradiated at 0.2 or 0.4 kGy produced less aflatoxins than non-irradiated controles. In the SL broth, apparent stimulation by low dose irradiation was slight, and these enhanced effects were not observed after reinfection to fresh SL broth. In the case of food samples, the levels of aflatoxin B[sub 1] and G[sub 1] with A. parasiticus were increased from 15 to 90% by incubation of irradiated spores at 1 kGy in autoclaved polished rice, black pepper, white pepper and red pepper. These enhancement would be induced by change of composition in each substrates. Mutations of fungi induced by irradiation is not effective for enhancement of aflatoxin production. (author).

  16. Biocontrol Activity of Volatile-Producing Bacillus megaterium and Pseudomonas protegens against Aspergillus flavus and Aflatoxin Production on Stored Rice Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannaa, Mohamed; Oh, Ji Yeon

    2017-01-01

    In our previous study, three bacterial strains, Bacillus megaterium KU143, Microbacterium testaceum KU313, and Pseudomonas protegens AS15, were selected as effective biocontrol agents against Aspergillus flavus on stored rice grains. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of the volatiles produced by the strains on A. flavus growth and aflatoxin production on stored rice grains. The three strains significantly reduced mycelial growth of A. flavus in dual-culture assays compared with the negative control strain, Sphingomonas aquatilis KU408, and an untreated control. Of these tested strains, volatiles produced by B. megaterium KU143 and P. protegens AS15 markedly inhibited mycelial growth, sporulation, and conidial germination of A. flavus on agar medium and suppressed the fungal populations in rice grains. Moreover, volatiles produced by these two strains significantly reduced aflatoxin production in the rice grains by A. flavus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the suppression of A. flavus aflatoxin production in rice grains using B. megaterium and P. protegens volatiles. PMID:29138628

  17. Effect of climate change on Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin B1 production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel eMedina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This review considers the available information on the potential impact of key environmental factors and their interactions on the molecular ecology, growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus in vitro and in maize grain. The recent studies which have been carried out to examine the impact of water activity x temperature on aflatoxin biosynthesis and phenotypic aflatoxin production are examined. These have shown that there is a direct relationship between the relative expression of key regulatory and structural genes under different environmental conditions which correlate directly with aflatoxin B1 production. A model has been developed to integrate the relative expression of 10 biosynthetic genes in the pathway, growth and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 production which was validated under elevated temperature and water stress conditions. The effect of interacting conditions of aw x temperature x elevated CO2 (2x and 3x existing levels are detailed for the first time. This suggests that while such interacting environmental conditions have little effect on growth they do have a significant impact on aflatoxin biosynthetic gene expression (structural aflD and regulatory aflR genes and can significantly stimulate the production of AFB1. While the individual factors alone have an impact, it is the combined effect of these three abiotic factors which have an impact on mycotoxin production. This approach provides data which is necessary to help predict the real impacts of climate change on mycotoxigenic fungi.

  18. Antifungal activity of extracts of Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris against Aspergillus flavus and A. ochraceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, S; Calvo, M A; Adelantado, C; Figueroa, S

    2010-05-01

    The antifungal activity of ethanolic extracts of Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris were tested against strains of Aspergillus flavus and A. ochraceus, since these two species are common contaminants of cereals and grains and are able to produce and accumulate mycotoxins. The methodology used is based on measuring the inhibition halos produced by discs impregnated with the extracts and establishing their Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) as well as the Minimum Fungicide Concentration (MFC). The results obtained suggest that the assayed extracts affect the proper development of A. flavus and A. ochraceus; leading to a lower MIC (1200 ppm) and MFC (2400 ppm) for T. vulgaris extract against A. ochraceus than against A. flavus. The results show, that the extracts of Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris used at low concentrations could have significant potential for the biological control of fungi in foodstuffs.

  19. Milk kefir: ultrastructure, antimicrobial activity and efficacy on aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaiel, Ahmed A; Ghaly, Mohamed F; El-Naggar, Ayman K

    2011-05-01

    The association of kefir microbiota was observed by electron microscopic examination. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations revealed that kefir grain surface is very rough and the inner portions had scattered irregular holes on its surface. The interior of the grain comprised fibrillar materials which were interpreted as protein, lipid and a soluble polysaccharide, the kefiran complex that surrounds yeast and bacteria in the grain. Yeast was observed more clearly than bacteria on the outer portion of the grain. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observations of kefir revealed that the grain comprised a mixed culture of yeast and bacteria growing in close association with each other. Microbiota is dominated by budded and long-flattened yeast cells growing together with lactobacilli and lactococci bacteria. Bacterial cells with rounded ends were also observed in this mixed culture. Kefir grains, kefir suspensions, and kefiran were tested for antimicrobial activities against several bacterial and fungal species. The highest activity was obtained against Streptococcus faecalis KR6 and Fusarium graminearum CZ1. Growth of Aspergillus flavus AH3 producing for aflatoxin B1 for 10 days in broth medium supplemented with varying concentrations of kefir filtrate (%, v/v) showed that sporulation was completely inhibited at the higher concentrations of kefir filtrate (7-10%, v/v). The average values of both mycelial dry weights and aflatoxin B1 were completely inhibited at 10% (v/v). This is the first in vitro study about the antifungal characteristics of kefir against filamentous fungi which was manifested by applying its inhibitory effect on the productivity of aflatoxin B1 by A. flavus AH3.

  20. Resistance to Aspergillus flavus in maize and peanut: Molecular biology, breeding, environmental stress, and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake C. Fountain

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The colonization of maize (Zea mays L. and peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus results in the contamination of kernels with carcinogenic mycotoxins known as aflatoxins leading to economic losses and potential health threats to humans. The regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis in various Aspergillus spp. has been extensively studied, and has been shown to be related to oxidative stress responses. Given that environmental stresses such as drought and heat stress result in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS within host plant tissues, host-derived ROS may play an important role in cross-kingdom communication between host plants and A. flavus. Recent technological advances in plant breeding have provided the tools necessary to study and apply knowledge derived from metabolomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic studies in the context of productive breeding populations. Here, we review the current understanding of the potential roles of environmental stress, ROS, and aflatoxin in the interaction between A. flavus and its host plants, and the current status in molecular breeding and marker discovery for resistance to A. flavus colonization and aflatoxin contamination in maize and peanut. We will also propose future directions and a working model for continuing research efforts linking environmental stress tolerance and aflatoxin contamination resistance in maize and peanut.

  1. The Mechanism of Antifungal Action of Essential Oil from Dill (Anethum graveolens L.) on Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Ban, Xiaoquan; Zeng, Hong; He, Jingsheng; Chen, Yuxin; Wang, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    The essential oil extracted from the seeds of dill (Anethum graveolens L.) was demonstrated in this study as a potential source of an eco-friendly antifungal agent. To elucidate the mechanism of the antifungal action further, the effect of the essential oil on the plasma membrane and mitochondria of Aspergillus flavus was investigated. The lesion in the plasma membrane was detected through flow cytometry and further verified through the inhibition of ergosterol synthesis. The essential oil caused morphological changes in the cells of A. flavus and a reduction in the ergosterol quantity. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), acidification of external medium, and mitochondrial ATPase and dehydrogenase activities were detected. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation was also examined through fluorometric assay. Exposure to dill oil resulted in an elevation of MMP, and in the suppression of the glucose-induced decrease in external pH at 4 µl/ml. Decreased ATPase and dehydrogenase activities in A. flavus cells were also observed in a dose-dependent manner. The above dysfunctions of the mitochondria caused ROS accumulation in A. flavus. A reduction in cell viability was prevented through the addition of L-cysteine, which indicates that ROS is an important mediator of the antifungal action of dill oil. In summary, the antifungal activity of dill oil results from its ability to disrupt the permeability barrier of the plasma membrane and from the mitochondrial dysfunction-induced ROS accumulation in A. flavus. PMID:22272289

  2. Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination of peanut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Under certain conditions Aspergillus plants and produce aflatoxin, one of the most highly carcinogenic natural substances known. An ongoing project seeks to reduce aflatoxin contamination of peanut (Arachis hypogae L.). This paper describes new research tools, which have been developed to reach this goal.

  3. Use of a granular bioplastic formulation for carrying conidia of a non-aflatoxigenic strain of Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accinelli, Cesare; Saccà, M Ludovica; Abbas, Hamed K; Zablotowicz, Robert M; Wilkinson, Jeffery R

    2009-09-01

    Previous research demonstrated that aflatoxin contamination in corn is reduced by field application of wheat grains pre-inoculated with the non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus strain NRRL 30797. To facilitate field applications of this biocontrol isolate, a series of laboratory studies were conducted on the reliability and efficiency of replacing wheat grains with the novel bioplastic formulation Mater-Bi to serve as a carrier matrix to formulate this fungus. Mater-Bi granules were inoculated with a conidial suspension of NRRL 30797 to achieve a final cell density of approximately log 7 conidia/granule. Incubation of 20-g soil samples receiving a single Mater-Bi granule for 60-days resulted in log 4.2-5.3 propagules of A. flavus/g soil in microbiologically active and sterilized soil, respectively. Increasing the number of granules had no effect on the degree of soil colonization by the biocontrol fungus. In addition to the maintenance of rapid vegetative growth and colonization of soil samples, the bioplastic formulation was highly stable, indicating that Mater-Bi is a suitable substitute for biocontrol applications of A. flavus NRRL 30797.

  4. Volatile metabolites associated with one aflatoxigenic and one nontoxigenic Aspergillus flavus strain grown on two different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jurjevic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxigenic and non-toxigenic Aspergillus flavus strains were grown on corn and on peanut substrates. Microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCS were collected by trapping headspace volatiles using thermal desorption tubes (TDT packed with Tenax® TA and Carbotrap™ B. Samples were collected at various fungal growth stages. Trapped compounds were thermally desorbed from the adsorbent tubes, separated by gas chromatography, and identified by mass spectrometry. The fungal stage did not have many differences in the MVOCs but the concentrations of some volatiles changed over time depending on the substrate. Volatiles that were associated with both the aflatoxigenic A. flavus strain and the nontoxigenic strain on both substrates included: ethanol, 1-propanol, butanal, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methylfuran, ethyl acetate, 1-butanol, 3-methylbutanal, 3-methyl-1-butanol, propanoic acid-2-methyl-ethyl-ester, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 2-pentanol, 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, benzaldehyde, 3-octanone, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and octane. Volatiles that were associated only with the aflatoxigenic A. flavus strain included: dimethyl disulfide and nonanal. Volatiles that were associated only with the nontoxigenic A. fl avus strain included: hexanal, 1-hexanol, 1-octene-3-ol, 1-octen-3-one and 2-pentyl furan.

  5. Chemical Composition and Antifungal Effect of Echinophora platyloba Essential Oil against Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium expansum and Fusarium graminearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashemi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Molds are one of the most important causes of food spoilage that produce toxic substances called mycotoxins, which endanger the consumer health. The adverse effects of synthetic food preservatives consumption made researches to focus on application of natural preservatives in order to increase shelf life of food as well as prevention of harmful effects of chemical preservatives. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of Echinophora platyloba essential oil on spore growth of Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium expansum and Fusarium graminearum. The essential oil composition of E. platyloba was analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS and its antifungal effect was evaluated by disk diffusion and micro dilution methods. Results revealed that the MIC values of essential oil for A. flavus, P. expansum and F. graminearum were 0.625 mg.mL-1, 0.625 mg.mL-1 and 0.3125 mg.mL-1 and the MFC values were 0.625 mg.mL-1, 1.250 mg.mL-1 and 0.625 mg.mL-1. The essential oil had the highest and the lowest anti-fungal effect on F. graminearum and A. flavus respectively. In conclusion, due to notable antifungal effects of E. platyloba essential oil, it can be practically applied as a natural alternative to chemical preservatives in food industry.

  6. Molecular Detection of Aflatoxin Producing Strains of Aspergillus Flavus from Peanut (Arachis Hypogaea

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    Adeela Hussain

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are the potential carcinogens produced as secondary metabolites by Aspergillus flavus. They have the ability to contaminate large number of food which ultimately affect the human population. Malt extract agar was selected for the growth of control stains of fungus. The aim of the study was to develop a reliable and quick method for the detection of aflatoxin producing strains in peanuts by using molecular approaches. Total 80 samples of infected peanuts were collected from four different cities of Punjab and checked for their aflatoxin contamination. For aflatoxin detection, three target genes nor1, ver1 and aflR were selected which was involved in the aflatoxin biosynthesis. In all examined cases, 24 out of 80 (30% samples successfully amplified all three genes indicating aflatoxigenic activity. Discrimination between aflatoxigenic and non-aflatoxigenic strains were also determined on the basis of amplification of these three target DNA fragments. In this study, it was also demonstrated that only specific strains were able to produce the aflatoxin contamination in peanuts.

  7. Herbicidal activity of pure compound isolated from rhizosphere inhabiting Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Saeed Ullah; Lutfullah, Ghosia; Iqbal, Zafar; Rehman, Irshad Ur; Ahmad, Jamshaid; Khan, Abid Ali

    2017-05-11

    In the quest for bioactive natural products of fungal origin, Aspergillus flavus was isolated from rhizosphere of Mentha piperita using Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA) and Czapec Yeast Broth (CYB) nutrient media for metabolites production. In total, three different metabolites were purified using HPLC/LCMS and the structures were established using 500 Varian NMR experiments. Further the isolated metabolites in different concentrations (10, 100, 1000 μg/mL) were tested for herbicidal activity using Completely Randomized design (CRD) against the seeds of Silybum marianum and Avena fatua which are major threats to wheat crop in Pakistan. Among the isolated metabolites, one compound was found active against the test weed species whose activity is reported in the present work. The chemical name of the compound is 2-(1, 4-dihydroxybutan-2-yl)-1, 3-dihydroxy-6, 8-dimethoxyanthracene-9, 10(4aH, 9aH)-dione with mass of 388. Results showed that all seeds germinated in control treatment; however, with the metabolite treated, the growth was retarded to different levels in all parts of the weeds. At a dose of 1000 μg/mL of the pure compound, 100% seeds of S. marianum and 60% seeds of A. fatua were inhibited. Interestingly, the pure compound exhibited less inhibition of 10% towards the seeds of common wheat (Triticum aestivum).

  8. Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility profile of Aspergillus flavus isolates recovered from clinical specimens in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Within the genus Aspergillus, A. flavus is the second most important species of clinical significance. It is predominantly associated with infections involving sinuses, eye and skin, mostly in geographic regions with hot and arid climate, including the Middle East. Recent reports on emergence of resistance to triazoles among Aspergillus spp. is a cause of concern for treatment of patients with invasive aspergillosis. In this study we present data on genetic characterization and antifungal susceptibility profile of clinical and environmental isolates of A. flavus. Methods Ninety-nine Aspergillus section Flavi isolates, originating from clinical (n=92) and environmental (n=7) sources, initially identified by morphological characteristics, were analyzed by partial sequencing of β-tubulin and calmodulin gene fragments and their susceptibilities to six antifungal agents was determined by Etest on RPMI1640 and Muller-Hinton agar media. Etest minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amphotericin B and voriconazole were also compared with zone of inhibition diameters obtained by disc diffusion test on RPMI agar medium. Results The identity of all clinical and environmental isolates was confirmed as A. flavus species by combined analysis of β-tubulin and calmodulin genes. The mean MIC90 (μg/ml) values on RPMI medium for amphotericin B, voriconazole, posaconazole, anidulafungin, micafungin and caspofungin were 3, 0.25, 0.25, 0.002, 0.002 and 0.032, respectively. No environmental isolate exhibited MIC value of >2 μg/ml for amphotericin B. For clinical isolates, the zone of inhibition diameters for amphotericin B and voriconazole ranged from 7–16 mm and 24–34 mm, respectively. Linear regression analysis between Etest MIC values and disk diffusion diameters revealed a significant inverse correlation with amphotericin B (p Triazoles and echinocandins showed very good in vitro activity against the A. flavus, however, 10% clinical isolates showed MICs of >2

  9. Evaluation of viability of Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxins degradation in irradiated samples of maize Avaliação da viabilidade de Aspergillus flavus e degradação de aflatoxinas em amostras de milho irradiadas

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    Simone Aquino

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the currently most important fungi in stored grains is Aspergillus flavus, which produce aflatoxins. This fungus can grow on diverse substrates and represents a serious public health and animal nutritional problem. Therefore, the study of techniques that can be applied to the control of aflatoxins is of great importance. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of gamma radiation on the growth of Aspergillus flavus Link and on degradation of aflatoxin B1 and B2 (AFB1 and AFB2 at a relative humidity of 97 99% and a water activity (Aw of 0.88-0.94. Samples of corn grains were irradiated using a cobalt 60 source emitting gamma rays at doses of 2, 5 and 10 kGy. Irradiation was found to be effective in reducing the number colony-forming units of A. flavus, per gram, in the corn samples analyzed. In addition, the fluorescent viability test (fluorescein diacetate and ethidium bromide revealed a decrease in the number of viable cells with increasing irradiation doses and three different fluorescence patterns. Furthermore, irradiation induced a partial reduction in AFB1 and AFB2 levels at the doses of 2 and 5 kGy, whereas complete degradation of aflatoxins was observed in the assay employing 10 kGy.Um dos fungos mais importantes atualmente em grãos armazenados é o Aspergillus flavus, o qual produz aflatoxinas. Este fungo pode crescer em diversos substratos e representa uma séria preocupação em saúde pública e nutrição animal. Portanto, o estudo de técnicas que possam ser aplicadas no controle das aflatoxinas é de grande importância. Assim sendo, o objetivo do presente trabalho foi estudar os efeitos da radiação gama no crescimento de Aspergillus flavus Link e na degradação das aflatoxinas B1 e B2, (AFB1 e AFB2 em umidade relativa (UR de 97-99% e atividade de água (Aa de 0,88-0,94. Amostras de grãos de milho foram irradiadas, utilizando-se uma fonte de Cobalto 60, emissora de raios gama, com as doses de 2; 5

  10. Aspergillus flavus Keratitis: Experience of a Tertiary Eye Clinic in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Elif; Yagmur, Meltem; Boral, Hazal; Ilkit, Macit; Ersoz, Reha; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the clinical and mycological characteristics of four cases of mycotic keratitis caused by Aspergillus flavus that occurred from July 2014 to May 2015 at Çukurova University Hospital, Adana, Turkey. In a 10-month period, a total of 64 corneal smear/scrapings were examined from patients with suspected mycotic keratitis. Fungal cultures were positive in six of these patients, indicating a 9.4% incidence of mycotic keratitis in this region, including four cases of A. flavus and two cases of Fusarium spp. The predisposing factors, clinical presentation, and success of the therapeutic approaches were further evaluated. For all cases, topical voriconazole was the first choice of treatment. Surgical procedures were required to control infection in 3 of the 4 cases, including intrastromal voriconazole injection for two cases and keratoplasty for one case. Predisposing factors included trauma (two cases, 50%), contact lens use (one case, 25%), and previous ocular surgery (one case, 25%). The clinical presentations also differed, including a well-limited ulcer (one case), an ulcer with an irregular feathery margin (one case), and ulcers with satellite lesions (two cases). The mean duration between the time of presentation and definitive diagnosis by culture was 14 days (8-25 days). We observed that A. flavus keratitis can present with different underlying factors and clinical conditions. A combination of antifungal therapy and supportive surgical intervention may resolve infections caused by A. flavus in the cornea.

  11. Inactivation of Aspergillus flavus in drinking water after treatment with UV irradiation followed by chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gabr, Hamid Mohammad; Zheng, Tianling; Yu, Xin

    2013-10-01

    The disinfection process for inactivating microorganisms at drinking water treatment plants is aimed for safety of drinking water for humans from a microorganism, such as bacteria, viruses, algae, fungi by using chlorination, ozonation, UV irradiation, etc. In the present study, a combination of two disinfectants, UV irradiation followed by chlorination, was evaluated for inactivating Aspergillus flavus under low contact time and low dosage of UV irradiation. The results indicated an inverse correlation between the inactivation of A. flavus by using UV irradiation only or chlorination alone. By using UV radiation, the 2 log10 control of A. flavus was achieved after 30 s of irradiation, while chlorination was observed to be more effective than UV, where the 2 log was achieved at chlorine concentration of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mg/l, in contact time of 60, 5, 1 and 1 min, respectively. However, combined use (UV irradiation followed by chlorination) was more effective than using either UV or chlorination alone; 5 s UV irradiation followed by chlorination produced 4 log10 reduction of A. flavus at chlorine concentrations of 2 and 3 mg/l under a contact time of 15 min. The results indicated that efficiency of UV irradiation improves when followed by chlorination at low concentrations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Data set for the mass spectrometry based exoproteome analysis of Aspergillus flavus isolates

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    Ramu Muthu Selvam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus is one of the predominant causative organisms of mycotic keratitis in tropical parts of the world. Extracellular proteins are the earliest proteins that come in contact with the host and have a role in the infection process. Exoproteins of A. flavus isolated from infected cornea, sputum and a saprophyte were pooled and identified using high resolution mass spectrometry in order to get the total exoproteome from cultures isolated from different sources. A total of 637 proteins was identified from the pooled A. flavus exoproteome. Analysis based on GO annotations of the 637 identified proteins revealed that hydrolases form the predominant class of proteins in the exoproteome. Interestingly, a greater proportion of the exoproteins seem to be secreted through the non-classical pathways. This data represent the first in-depth analysis of the representative A. flavus exoproteome of a large set of isolates from distinct sources. This data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001296.

  13. Evaluation of antifungal activity of aqueous extracts of some medicinal plants against Aspergillus flavus, pistachio aflatoxin producing fungus in vitro

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    Sahar Omidpanah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contamination with aflatoxin, by Aspergillus flavus, is one the major challenges in agriculture and food industry. Preparation of organic products using natural components is widely considered these days. Aims: In this study, effects of aqueous extracts of five medicinal herbs, including thyme, senna, mentha, basil, and safflower on the growth of the A. flavus were investigated. Mterials and Methods: The extracts with different concentrations (200-800 µg/mL and polyethylene glycol with the equal osmotic potential of plant extracts were added to the potato dextrose agar medium to evaluate fungus growth after 7 days using agar dilution method. Benomyl, a fungicide, was used as a positive standard. The tests were performed in triplicate, and the mean diameters of fungus growth were calculated as well. Results and Conclusion: All concentrations of the plants extracts significantly inhibited the fungus growth in comparison with each other and control treatments, while the extracts of thyme and safflower manifested the most effective prohibition compared to benomyl with minimum inhibitory concentration of 200 and 400 µg/mL, respectively.

  14. Contamination by Aspergillus flavus and A. fumigatus in sunflower seeds used in psittacine bird food

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    Alexsandro Machado Conceição

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Widely distributed in food for psittacine birds due its low price, high palatability, and cultural reasons, the Helianthus annuus, called sunflower, is proving important in clinical influenza as a result of excess calories and high incidence of contamination by some fungi, particularly Aspergillus, specifically A. flavus and A. fumigatus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contamination by Aspergillus spp sunflower seeds for feeding psittacine birds, sold in Aracaju, Sergipe state. The tests were performed in the Laboratory of Microbiology of the Dr. Vicente Borreli Veterinary Hospital in Pio Décimo College. We evaluated four samples of sunflower seeds, soldin a municipal market and in three different supermarkets in bulk and under three bottled trademarks, processed according to Forsythe (2002. Our survey revealed a high development of A. flavus and A. fumigatus sunflower seeds. This contamination may be related to several factors such as inadequate harvest stages of drying, processing and storage of grain. Furthermore, it is important to highlight the need of a better grain storage, with controlled temperature and humidity, to reduce the possibility of contamination by Aspergillus spp. that causes injury in the feeding of psittacine birds and other animal species.

  15. 75 FR 9596 - Notice of Filing of a Pesticide Petition for Residues of a Aspergillus flavus AF36 on Corn Food...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Notice of Filing of a Pesticide Petition for Residues of a Aspergillus flavus AF36 on Corn Food... residues of the antifungal ] agent, Aspergillus flavus AF36, in or on corn food and feed commodities. The...

  16. Nanocapsular Dispersion of Cinnamaldehyde for Enhanced Inhibitory Activity against Aflatoxin Production by Aspergillus flavus

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    Hongbo Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamaldehyde (CA is marginally soluble in water, making it challenging to evenly disperse it in foods, and resulting in lowered anti-A. flavus efficacy. In the present study, nano-dispersed CA (nano-CA was prepared to increase its aqueous solubility. Free and nano-dispersed CA were compared in terms of their inhibitory activity against fungal growth and aflatoxin production of A. flavus both in Sabouraud Dextrose (SD culture and in peanut butter. Our results indicated that free CA inhibited the mycelia growth and aflatoxin production of A. flavus with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC value of 1.0 mM, but promoted the aflatoxin production at some concentrations lower than the MIC. Nano-CA had a lower MIC value of 0.8 mM against A. flavus, and also showed improved activity against aflatoxin production without the promotion at lower dose. The solidity of peanut butter had an adverse impact on the antifungal activity of free CA, whereas nano-dispersed CA showed more than 2-fold improved activity against the growth of A. flavus. Free CA still promoted AFB1 production at the concentration of 0.25 mM, whereas nano-CA showed more efficient inhibition of AFB1 production in the butter.

  17. Biotransformation of sucrose into 5-hydroxy-2-hydroxymethyl-γ-pirone by Aspergillus flavus

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    Nelson R. Ferreira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The sucrose hydrolysis and the preference of consumption of glucose instead of fructose were investigated for the production of 5-hydroxy-2-hydroxymethyl-γ-pyrone (HHMP in the presence of Aspergillus flavus IOC 3974 cultivated in liquid Czapeck medium. Standardized 0.5g of pellets were transferred as inoculum into twelve conical flasks of 250 ml containing 100 ml of medium with different sucrose concentration, which was kept at 120 rpm and 28"C for 16 days without pH adjustment. Aliquots of 500μl of the broth culture were withdrawn at 24 h intervals and analyzed. The major yield of HHMP was 26g l-1 in 120g l-1 of sucrose. At these conditions, A. flavus produced an invertase capable of hydrolyzing 65% of total sucrose concentration in 24h, and an isomerase capable of converting fructose into glucose. In this work, it focused the preference for glucose and, then, of fructose by A. flavus and the strategy used to produce HHMP.Foram investigadas a hidrólise da sacarose e a preferência pela glicose frente à frutose no processo de produção do 5-hidroxi-2-hidroximetil-γ-pirona (HHMP na presença de Aspergillus flavus IOC 3974 cultivado em meio líquido Czapeck. Quantidades de 0,5g de pelletes foram utilizadas como inóculo. Doze frascos cônicos de 250 ml contendo 100 ml de meio de culturacom diferentes concentrações de sacarose foram utilizados.Os microrganismos foram cultivados a 120 rpm e 28"C por 16 dias sem ajuste do pH. O maior rendimento do HHMP foi 26g l-1em 120g l-1de sacarose. Nestas condições, A. flavus, foi capaz de produzir uma invertase possibilitando a hidrólise de 65% da concentração total de sacarose em 24 horas, conjuntamente com a produção de uma isomerase que foi capaz de converter a frutose em glicose. Este trabalho está focalizado preferencialmente no consumo da glicose frente à frutose por A. flavus e na estratégia de produção do HHMP.

  18. Genetic Diversity and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of 200 Clinical and Environmental Aspergillus flavus Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh-Armaki, Mojtaba; Hedayati, Mohammad Taghi; Ansari, Saham; Omran, Saeed Mahdavi; Saber, Sasan; Rafati, Haleh; Zoll, Jan; van der Lee, Henrich A; Melchers, Willem J G; Verweij, Paul E; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba

    2017-05-01

    Aspergillus flavus has been frequently reported as the leading cause of invasive aspergillosis in certain tropical and subtropical countries. Two hundred A. flavus strains originating from clinical and environmental sources and collected between 2008 and 2015 were phylogenetically identified at the species level by analyzing partial β-tubulin and calmodulin genes. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing was performed against antifungals using the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution method. In addition, genotyping was performed using a short-tandem-repeat (STR) assay of a panel of six microsatellite markers (A. flavus 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, and 3C), in order to determine the genetic variation and the potential relationship between clinical and environmental isolates. The geometric means of the minimum inhibitory concentrations/minimum effective concentrations (MICs/MECs) of the antifungals across all isolates were (in increasing order): posaconazole, 0.13 mg/liter; anidulafungin, 0.16 mg/liter; itraconazole, 0.29 mg/liter; caspofungin, 0.42 mg/liter; voriconazole, 0.64 mg/liter; isavuconazole, 1.10 mg/liter; amphotericin B, 3.35 mg/liter; and flucytosine, 62.97 mg/liter. All of the clinical isolates were genetically different. However, an identical microsatellite genotype was found between a clinical isolate and two environmental strains. In conclusion, posaconazole and anidulafungin showed the greatest in vitro activity among systemic azoles and echinocandins, respectively. However, the majority of the A. flavus isolates showed reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B. Antifungal susceptibility of A. flavus was not linked with the clinical or environmental source of isolation. Microsatellite genotyping may suggest an association between clinical and environmental strains, although this requires further investigation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. ZnS semiconductor quantum dots production by an endophytic fungus Aspergillus flavus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddandarao, Priyanka, E-mail: uddandaraopriyanka@gmail.com; B, Raj Mohan, E-mail: rajmohanbala@gmail.com

    2016-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Endophytic fungus Aspergillus flavus isolated from a medicinal plant Nothapodytes foetida was used for the synthesis of quantum dots. • Morris-Weber kinetic model and Lagergren's pseudo-first-order rate equation were used to study the biosorption kinetics. • Polycrystalline ZnS quantum dots of 18 nm and 58.9 nm from TEM and DLS, respectively. - Abstract: The development of reliable and eco-friendly processes for the synthesis of metal sulphide quantum dots has been considered as a major challenge in the field of nanotechnology. In the present study, polycrystalline ZnS quantum dots were synthesized from an endophytic fungus Aspergillus flavus. It is noteworthy that apart from being rich sources of bioactive compounds, endophytic fungus also has the ability to mediate the synthesis of nanoparticles. TEM and DLS revealed the formation of spherical particles with an average diameter of about 18 nm and 58.9 nm, respectively. The ZnS quantum dots were further characterized using SEM, EDAX, XRD, UV–visible spectroscopy and FTIR. The obtained results confirmed the synthesis of polycrystalline ZnS quantum dots and these quantum dots are used for studying ROS activity. In addition this paper explains kinetics of metal sorption to study the role of biosorption in synthesis of quantum dots by applying Morris-Weber kinetic model. Since Aspergillus flavus is isolated from a medicinal plant Nothapodytes foetida, quantum dots synthesized from this fungus may have great potential in broad environmental and medical applications.

  20. Biotransformation of chalcones by the endophytic fungus Aspergillus flavus isolated from Paspalum maritimum trin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Marivaldo J.C.; Nunes, Fatima M.; Bitencourt, Heriberto R.; Borges, Fabio C.; Guilhon, Giselle M.S.P.; Arruda, Mara S.P.; Marinho, Andrey M. R.; Santos, Alberdan S.; Alves, Claudio N.; Santos, Lourivaldo S., E-mail: lss@ufpa.b [Universidade Federal do Para (IQ/FEQ/UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Inst. de Tecnologia. Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica; Brasil, Davi S.B. [Universidade Federal do Para (PPGQ/IQ/UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Quimica

    2011-07-01

    The fungus Aspergillus flavus isolated as endophytic of the plant Paspalum maritimum Trin. was evaluated for its potential application in biotransformation reactions. The compounds chalcone (1), 3,4,5-trimethoxychalcone (2) and 2,3,4,4'-tetramethoxy chalcone (3) were biotransformed, respectively, in dihydrochalcone (4), 3,4,5-trimethoxydihydrochalcone (5) and 2,3,4,4'-tetramethoxydihydrochalcone (6). The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR techniques, and MS analysis. The dihydrochalcones 5 and 6 are new compounds. (author)

  1. Comparison of Aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus under various conditions of temperature, light and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Fani makk

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Aflatoxins are a large group of mycotoxins. The aim of the present study was the comparison of Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 production by Aspergillus flavus (IR 111 and Aspergillus parasiticus (NRRL 2999 under various conditions of temperature, light, and pH. Methods: In this experimental study, twenty-four flasks were assigned for incubation of each of the fungi A. Flavus and parasiticus at 18, 24, 32 °C. Both flasks were maintained under conditions of light and darkness. The rate of (AFB1 produced by each groups, was measured by thin layer chromatography. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis (SPSS, version 16. Results: The lowest yield of (AFB1 produced by A. Flavus and parasiticus belonged to 32 °C and pH 6.5, respectively. On the other hand, the highest yield of toxin was observed at 24 °C and pH 6. The lighting effects were considerable. According to the studies on the adverse effects of light and the fermentation process, aflatoxin production increased in dark conditions. Conclusion: The results of study showed that A. Parasiticus (NRRL 2999 produced more aflatoxin than A. Flavus (IR 111. Key words: Aflatoxin B1, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus

  2. Antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic activities of coumarinyl thiosemicarbazides against Aspergillus flavus NRRL 3251.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovač, Tihomir; Kovač, Marija; Strelec, Ivica; Nevistić, Ante; Molnar, Maja

    2017-03-01

    The antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic effects of two series of coumarinyl thiosemicarbazides on Aspergillus flavus NRRL 3251 were studied. Fungi were grown in YES medium for 72 h at 29 °C in the presence of 0, 0.1, 1, and 10 μg mL-1 of coumarinyl thiosemicarbazides: one series with substitution in position 7 and another with substitution in position 4 of the coumarin core. Dry mycelia weight determination was used for antifungal activity estimation, while the aflatoxin B1 content in YES media, determined by the dilute and shoot LC-MS/MS technique, was used for the antiaflatoxigenic effect estimation. Standard biochemical assays were used for oxidative status marker (TBARS, SOD, CAT, and GPX) determination in A. flavus NRRL 3251 mycelia. Results show that 7-substituted-coumarinyl thiosemicarbazides possess a better antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic activity than 4-substituted ones. The most prominent substituted compound was the compound 3, N-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(2-((4-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl)oxy)acetyl)hydrazine-1-carbothioamide, which completely inhibited aflatoxin production at the concentration of 10 μg mL-1. Oxidative stress response of A. flavus exposed to the selected compounds points to the modulation of oxidative stress as a possible reason of aflatoxin production inhibition.

  3. Simple and highly discriminatory VNTR-based multiplex PCR for tracing sources of Aspergillus flavus isolates.

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    Dong Ying Wang

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus is second only to A. fumigatus in causing invasive aspergillosis and it is the major agent responsible for fungal sinusitis, keratitis and endophthalmitis in many countries in the Middle East, Africa and Southeast Asia. Despite the growing challenge due to A. flavus, data on the molecular epidemiology of this fungus remain scarce. The objective of the present study was to develop a new typing method based on the detection of VNTR (Variable number tandem repeat markers. Eight VNTR markers located on 6 different chromosomes (1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 8 of A. flavus were selected, combined by pairs for multiplex amplifications and tested on 30 unrelated isolates and six reference strains. The Simpson index for individual markers ranged from 0.398 to 0.818. A combined loci index calculated with all the markers yielded an index of 0.998. The MLVA (Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis technique proved to be specific and reproducible. In a second time, a total of 55 isolates from Chinese avian farms and from a Tunisian hospital have been evaluated. One major cluster of genotypes could be defined by using the graphing algorithm termed Minimum Spanning Tree. This cluster comprised most of the isolates collected in an avian farm in southern China. The MLVA technique should be considered as an excellent and cost-effective typing method that could be used in many laboratories without the need for sophisticated equipment.

  4. Frequent shifts in Aspergillus flavus populations associated with maize production in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Beltran, Alejandro; Cotty, Peter

    2017-10-13

    Aspergillus flavus frequently contaminates maize, a critical staple of billions, with aflatoxins. Diversity among A. flavus L morphotype populations associated with maize in Sonora, Mexico was assessed and a total of 869 isolates from 83 fields were placed into 136 vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) using nitrate-nonutilizing mutants. VCG diversity indices did not differ in four agroecosystems (AES) but diversity significantly differed among years. Frequencies of certain VCGs changed manyfold over single years in both multiple fields and multiple AES. Certain VCGs were highly frequenct (>1%) in 2006, but frequencies declined repeatedly in each of the two subsequent years. Other VCGs that had low frequencies in 2006 increased in 2007 and subsequently declined. None of the VCGs were consistently associated with any AES. Fourteen VCGs were considered dominant in at least a single year. However, frequencies often varied significantly among years. Only 9% of VCGs were detected all three years while 66% were detected in only one year. Results suggest that the most realistic measurements of both genetic diversity and the frequency of A. flavus VCGs are obtained by sampling multiple locations in multiple years. Single season sampling in many locations should not be substituted for sampling over multiple years.

  5. Purification and characterization of pectin lyase secreted by Aspergillus flavus MTCC 10938.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, S; Dubey, A K; Anand, G; Yadav, D

    2013-01-01

    An indigenously isolated fungal strain Aspergillus flavus MTCC 10938 was subjected to pectin lyase (PNL) production under submerged fermentation conditions. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity from the culture filtrate of the fungus involving concentration by ultrafiltration, anion exchange chromatography on DEAE cellulose and gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-100. The purified PNL gave a single protein band in SDS-PAGE analysis with a relative molecular mass corresponding to 50 kDa. Using citrus pectin as the substrate the K(m) and k(cat) values of the enzyme lyase were obtained as 1.7 mg/mL and 66 s(-1), respectively. The optimum pH of the purified PNL from A. flavus MTCC 10938 was 8.0 and up to 90% of its activity retained in the pH range from 3.0 to 11.0 after 24 h incubation. The optimum temperature of the purified enzyme was revealed at 55 degrees C and it was completely stable up to 40 degrees C when exposed for 30 min. The purified A. flavus MTCC 10938 PNL showed efficient retting of Crotalaria juncea fibres.

  6. Utilization of waste fruit-peels to inhibit aflatoxins synthesis by Aspergillus flavus: a biotreatment of rice for safer storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseer, R; Sultana, Bushra; Khan, M Z; Naseer, D; Nigam, Poonam

    2014-11-01

    Antifungal activity in lemon and pomegranate peels was considerable against Aspergillus flavus, higher in pomegranate (DIZ 37mm; MIC 135μg/mL). Powdered peels (5, 10, 20% w/w) were mixed in inoculated rice. The inhibitory effect on fungal-growth and production of aflatoxins by A. flavus was investigated at storage conditions - temperature (25, 30°C) and moisture (18%, 21%) for 9months. The maximum total aflatoxins accumulated at 30°C, 21% moisture and at 25°C, 18% moisture were 265.09 and 163.45ng/g, respectively in control. Addition of pomegranate-peels inhibited aflatoxins production to 100% during four month-storage of rice at 25°C and 18% moisture, while lemon-peels showed similar inhibitory effect for 3months at same conditions. However a linear correlation was observed in aflatoxins level with temperature and moisture. Studies showed that both fruit-wastes are potent preventer of aflatoxin production in rice, useful for a safer and longer storage of rice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CEMARAN ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS DAN AFLATOKSIN PADA RANTAI DISTRIBUSI PRODUK PANGAN BERBASIS JAGUNG DAN FAKTOR YANG MEMPENGARUHINYA [Contamination of Aspergillus flavus and Aflatoxin at Distribution Chain of Maize Based Food Product and its Influencing Factors

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    Harsi D. Kusumaningrum*

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin is a human carcinogen, produced by fungus Aspergillus flavus that frequently contaminates maize. Analysis of A. flavus by plate counting and aflatoxin by Thin Layer Chromatography were performed on 104 samples and 25 samples, respectively, of maize grain and maize based food products from different places in Bogor-West Java, Boyolali-Central Java and Bojonegoro-East Java. These regions support significant number of maize production in Java. Forty percent of the samples were contaminated by A. flavus, whereas aflatoxin level of higher than 20 ppb was found in 4 of 25 samples. The highest contamination level of A. flavus was found at the collector trader that often stored the maize grain in average of 15 days, at room temperature. There was a significant correlation between the length of storage as well as relative humidity with the contamination levels of A. flavus. Significant correlation was also found between the contamination levels of A. flavus with the level of aflatoxin in maize grain. However, no significant correlation was found between the aflatoxin level and the contamination levels of A. flavus in the processed maize based food products.

  8. Effects of gamma radiation and electron beam on samples of the Brazil nuts artificially inoculated with Aspergillus flavus; Efeitos da radiacao gama e feixe de eletrons sobre amostras de castanhas-do-Brasil inoculadas artificialmente com Aspergillus flavus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Ednei Assuncao Antunes

    2012-07-01

    The high level of contamination by aflatoxin produced by fungi in lots of Brazil nuts and the strict control by importing countries in relation to the levels of toxins in food, European Union countries decided in 2003 by the return of these lots products from Brazil. Despite the economic loss represented by contamination by toxigenic fungi in Brazil nuts, a major product of extractive Northern of Brazil, studies are still preliminary as the control of contamination aflatoxigenic fungal using methods such as gamma radiation (G.R) and mainly, electron beam (E.B). These facts motivated this research, which aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation and application of electron beam in samples of Brazil nut artificially inoculated with Aspergillus flavus. This goal, we were studied 50 samples of the Brazil nut previously inoculated with spores of A. flavus and subsequently incubated at 30 °C in relative humidity controlled at 93%. After incubation, period of 15 days, the average water activity of the samples was 0.80, the samples were divided into 5 groups that received the following doses of radiation: control (0 kGy), 5 and 10 kGy 5 E.B and G.R. The mycobiota was performed by serial dilution, plated on surface using potato dextrose agar. The results demonstrated that treatment with E.B using a dose of 5 kGy and 10 kGy resulted in reduced growth of A. flavus in 74% (37/50) and 94% (47/50) of samples. The samples treated with G.R at the dose of 5 kGy and 10 kGy no fungal growth occurred in 92% (46/50) 100% (50/50) of. The study of aflatoxins showed that doses of E.B of 5 kGy and 10 kGy reduced levels of AFB1 at 53.32% and 65.66% respectively. The application of gamma rays at doses of 5 and 10 kGy reduced levels of toxins in 70.61% and 84.15% respectively. This result may be attributed to higher penetrability of gamma radiation. Sensory analysis showed greater acceptance of the judges for the samples irradiated with E.B and G.R at the dose of 10 kGy. We concluded

  9. Efficacy of a coating composed of chitosan from Mucor circinelloides and carvacrol to control Aspergillus flavus and the quality of cherry tomato fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Evandro L; Sales, Camila V; de Oliveira, Carlos E V; Lopes, Laênia A A; da Conceição, Maria L; Berger, Lúcia R R; Stamford, Thayza C M

    2015-01-01

    Cherry tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) fruits are susceptible to contamination by Aspergillus flavus, which may cause the development of fruit rot and significant postharvest losses. Currently there are significant drawbacks for the use of synthetic fungicides to control pathogenic fungi in tomato fruits, and it has increased the interest in exploring new alternatives to control the occurrence of fungal infections in these fruits. This study evaluated the efficacy of chitosan (CHI) from Mucor circinelloides in combination with carvacrol (CAR) in inhibiting A. flavus in laboratory media and as a coating on cherry tomato fruits (25°C, 12 days and 12°C, 24 days). During a period of storage, the effect of coatings composed of CHI and CAR on autochthonous microflora, as well as on some quality characteristics of the fruits such as weight loss, color, firmness, soluble solids, and titratable acidity was evaluated. CHI and CAR displayed MIC valuesof 7.5 mg/mL and 10 μL/mL, respectively, against A. flavus. The combined application of CHI (7.5 or 3.75 mg/mL) and CAR (5 or 2.5 μL/mL) strongly inhibited the mycelial growth and spore germination of A. flavus. The coating composed of CHI (3.75 mg/mL) and CAR (2.5 or 1.25 μL/mL) inhibited the growth of A. flavus in artificially contaminated fruits, as well as the native fungal microflora of the fruits stored at room or low temperature. The application of the tested coatings preserved the quality of cherry tomato fruits as measured by some physicochemical attributes. From this, composite coatings containing CHI and CAR offer a promising alternative to control postharvest infection caused by A. flavus or native fungal microflora in fresh cherry tomato fruits without negatively affecting their quality over storage.

  10. Distribution and incidence of atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus VCG in tree crop orchards in California: a strategy for identifying potential antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    To identify predominant isolates for potential use as biocontrol agents, Aspergillus flavus isolates collected soils of almond, pistachio and fig orchard in the Central Valley of California were tested for their membership to 16 atoxigenic vegetative compatibility groups(VCGs), including YV36, the V...

  11. The pathogenesis-related maize seed (PRms) gene plays a role in resistance to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus is an opportunistic plant pathogen that colonizes and produces the toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites, aflatoxins, in oil-rich crops such as maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.). Pathogenesis-related proteins serve as a first line of defense against invading pathogens by confer...

  12. 77 FR 14287 - Aspergillus flavus AF36; Amendment to an Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... runoff) that are intended for eventual human consumption and directed to wastewater treatment systems or..._treatment.html . 7. U.S. EPA. 2004. Primer for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Systems. EPA 832-R-04-001... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the microbial pesticide, Aspergillus flavus...

  13. Evaluation of recycled bioplastic pellets and a sprayable formulation for application of an Aspergillus flavus biocontrol strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biocontrol of Aspergillus flavus using inoculated bioplastic granules has been proven to be effective under laboratory and field conditions. In the present study, the use of low-density pellets from recycled bioplastic as a biocontrol strain carrier was evaluated. Applying recycled bioplastic pell...

  14. Menadione-Induced Oxidative Stress Re-Shapes the Oxylipin Profile of Aspergillus flavus and Its Lifestyle

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    Marco Zaccaria

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus is an efficient producer of mycotoxins, particularly aflatoxin B1, probably the most hepatocarcinogenic naturally-occurring compound. Although the inducing agents of toxin synthesis are not unanimously identified, there is evidence that oxidative stress is one of the main actors in play. In our study, we use menadione, a quinone extensively implemented in studies on ROS response in animal cells, for causing stress to A. flavus. For uncovering the molecular determinants that drive A. flavus in challenging oxidative stress conditions, we have evaluated a wide spectrum of several different parameters, ranging from metabolic (ROS and oxylipin profile to transcriptional analysis (RNA-seq. There emerges a scenario in which A. flavus activates several metabolic processes under oxidative stress conditions for limiting the ROS-associated detrimental effects, as well as for triggering adaptive and escape strategies.

  15. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Different Toxigenic and Atoxigenic Isolates of Aspergillus flavus

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    Jake C. Fountain

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress in the field has been shown to exacerbate aflatoxin contamination of maize and peanut. Drought and heat stress also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS in plant tissues. Given the potential correlation between ROS and exacerbated aflatoxin production under drought and heat stress, the objectives of this study were to examine the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced oxidative stress on the growth of different toxigenic (+ and atoxigenic (− isolates of Aspergillus flavus and to test whether aflatoxin production affects the H2O2 concentrations that the isolates could survive. Ten isolates were tested: NRRL3357 (+, A9 (+, AF13 (+, Tox4 (+, A1 (−, K49 (−, K54A (−, AF36 (−, and Aflaguard (−; and one A. parasiticus isolate, NRRL2999 (+. These isolates were cultured under a H2O2 gradient ranging from 0 to 50 mM in two different media, aflatoxin-conducive yeast extract-sucrose (YES and non-conducive yeast extract-peptone (YEP. Fungal growth was inhibited at a high H2O2 concentration, but specific isolates grew well at different H2O2 concentrations. Generally the toxigenic isolates tolerated higher concentrations than did atoxigenic isolates. Increasing H2O2 concentrations in the media resulted in elevated aflatoxin production in toxigenic isolates. In YEP media, the higher concentration of peptone (15% partially inactivated the H2O2 in the media. In the 1% peptone media, YEP did not affect the H2O2 concentrations that the isolates could survive in comparison with YES media, without aflatoxin production. It is interesting to note that the commercial biocontrol isolates, AF36 (−, and Aflaguard (−, survived at higher levels of stress than other atoxigenic isolates, suggesting that this testing method could potentially be of use in the selection of biocontrol isolates. Further studies will be needed to investigate the mechanisms behind the variability among isolates with regard to their degree of oxidative stress

  16. Optimization of laccase production from Aspergillus flavus by design of experiment technique: Partial purification and characterization

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    Rajesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes isolation of laccase producing fungal strain and optimization of the process parameters by design of experiment (DOE technique to achieve the maximum production of extracellular laccases by Aspergillus flavus obtained from natural habitat. Bromophenol blue dye and ABTS (2,2′-azinobis 3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonate were used as substrates for the screening of laccase activity. Design expert 8.0.7.1 software was used to optimize culture conditions such as carbon source, nitrogen source, temperature and pH. Subsequently, optimization for inoculums size was also carried out. The optimization studies revealed that the laccase yield was highest when operated at the following conditions: carbon source – cellulose (8%, nitrogen source – peptone (2%, temperature – 35 °C, pH – 7 and inoculum of size 1.5 cm.

  17. Implications of European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, infestation in an Aspergillus flavus-biocontrolled corn agroecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencarelli, Mariangela; Accinelli, Cesare; Vicari, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    A novel biocontrol strategy consisting of field application of bioplastic-based granules inoculated with a non-toxigenic Aspergillus flavus L. strain has recently been shown to be effective for reducing aflatoxin contamination in corn. This study focused on other factors that may affect the feasibility of this biocontrol technique, and more specifically the role of the European corn borer (ECB), Ostrinia nubilalis H., in the dispersal and infestation of A. flavus in corn and its impact on crop yield. In spite of the high percentage of corn ears showing larval feeding damage, ECB-bored kernels accounted for only 3 and 4% in 2009 and 2010 respectively. Most of the damaged kernels were localised in the ear tip or immediately below. More precisely, the average incidence of ECB-bored kernels in the upper end of the ear was 32%. However, less than 5% of kernels from the central body of the ear, which includes the majority of kernels, were injured by ECB. Although ECB larvae showed a high tolerance to aflatoxin B1 and thus had the potential to serve as vectors of the mould, fungal infection of kernels was poorly associated with insect damage. ECB infestation resulted in grain yield losses not exceeding 2.5%. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Aspergillus flavus infection induces transcriptional and physical changes in developing maize kernels

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    Andrea L Dolezal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Maize kernels are susceptible to infection by the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus flavus. Infection results in reduction of grain quality and contamination of kernels with the highly carcinogenic mycotoxin, aflatoxin. To understanding host response to infection by the fungus, transcription of approximately 9,000 maize genes were monitored during the host-pathogen interaction with a custom designed Affymetrix GeneChip® DNA array. More than 1,000 maize genes were found differentially expressed at a fold change of 2 or greater. This included the up regulation of defense related genes and signaling pathways. Transcriptional changes also were observed in primary metabolism genes. Starch biosynthetic genes were down regulated during infection, while genes encoding maize hydrolytic enzymes, presumably involved in the degradation of host reserves, were up regulated. These data indicate that infection of the maize kernel by A. flavus induced metabolic changes in the kernel, including the production of a defense response, as well as a disruption in kernel development.

  19. A Cellular Fusion Cascade Regulated by LaeA Is Required for Sclerotial Development in Aspergillus flavus.

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    Zhao, Xixi; Spraker, Joseph E; Bok, Jin Woo; Velk, Thomas; He, Zhu-Mei; Keller, Nancy P

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a saprophytic soil fungus that poses a serious threat worldwide as it contaminates many food and feed crops with the carcinogenic mycotoxin called aflatoxin. This pathogen persists as sclerotia in the soil which enables fungal survival in harsh environmental conditions. Sclerotia formation by A. flavus depends on successful cell communication and hyphal fusion events. Loss of LaeA, a conserved developmental regulator in fungi, abolishes sclerotia formation in this species whereas overexpression (OE) of laeA results in enhanced sclerotia production. Here we demonstrate that sclerotia loss and inability to form heterokaryons in A. flavusΔlaeA is mediated by homologs of the Neurospora crassa ham (hyphal anastomosis) genes termed hamE-I in A. flavus. LaeA positively regulates ham gene expression and deletion of hamF, G, H, or I phenocopies ΔlaeA as demonstrated by heterokaryon and sclerotia loss and reduced aflatoxin synthesis and virulence of these mutants. Deletion of hamE showed a less severe phenotype. hamE-I homologs are positively regulated by the clock controlled transcription factor ADV-1 in N. crassa. Similarly, the ADV-1 homolog NosA regulates hamE-I expression in A. flavus, is required for sclerotial development and is itself positively regulated by LaeA. We speculate that a putative LaeA>NosA>fusion cascade underlies the previously described circadian clock regulation of sclerotia production in A. flavus.

  20. A Cellular Fusion Cascade Regulated by LaeA Is Required for Sclerotial Development in Aspergillus flavus

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    Xixi Zhao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus is a saprophytic soil fungus that poses a serious threat worldwide as it contaminates many food and feed crops with the carcinogenic mycotoxin called aflatoxin. This pathogen persists as sclerotia in the soil which enables fungal survival in harsh environmental conditions. Sclerotia formation by A. flavus depends on successful cell communication and hyphal fusion events. Loss of LaeA, a conserved developmental regulator in fungi, abolishes sclerotia formation in this species whereas overexpression (OE of laeA results in enhanced sclerotia production. Here we demonstrate that sclerotia loss and inability to form heterokaryons in A. flavusΔlaeA is mediated by homologs of the Neurospora crassa ham (hyphal anastomosis genes termed hamE-I in A. flavus. LaeA positively regulates ham gene expression and deletion of hamF, G, H, or I phenocopies ΔlaeA as demonstrated by heterokaryon and sclerotia loss and reduced aflatoxin synthesis and virulence of these mutants. Deletion of hamE showed a less severe phenotype. hamE-I homologs are positively regulated by the clock controlled transcription factor ADV-1 in N. crassa. Similarly, the ADV-1 homolog NosA regulates hamE-I expression in A. flavus, is required for sclerotial development and is itself positively regulated by LaeA. We speculate that a putative LaeA>NosA>fusion cascade underlies the previously described circadian clock regulation of sclerotia production in A. flavus.

  1. Analysis of an nsdC mutant in Aspergillus flavus reveals an extensive role in the regulation of several secondary metabolic gene clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus is a saprophytic fungus that can invade and contaminate agronomically important crops. The fungus produces a number of toxic secondary metabolites, such as aflatoxin, which are synthesized from genes located in close proximity with each other on the chromosome. A. flavus has appro...

  2. Non-aflatoxigenicity of commercial Aspergillus oryzae strains due to genetic defects compared to aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lin; Chung, Soo Hyun

    2014-08-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is generally recognized as safe, but it is closely related to A. flavus in morphology and genetic characteristics. In this study, we tested the aflatoxigenicity and genetic analysis of nine commercial A. oryzae strains that were used in Korean soybean fermented products. Cultural and HPLC analyses showed that none of the commercial strains produced detectable amount of aflatoxins. According to the molecular analysis of 17 genes in the aflatoxin (AF) biosynthetic pathway, the commercial strains could be classified into three groups. The group I strains contained all the 17 AF biosynthetic genes tested in this study; the group II strains deleted nine AF biosynthetic genes and possessed eight genes, including aflG, aflI, aflK, aflL, aflM, aflO, aflP, and aflQ; the group III strains only had six AF biosynthetic genes, including aflG, aflI, aflK, aflO, aflP, and aflQ. With the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, the group I A. oryzae strains showed no expression of aflG, aflQ and/or aflM genes, which resulted in the lack of AF-producing ability. Group II and group III strains could not produce AF owing to the deletion of more than half of the AF biosynthetic genes. In addition, the sequence data of polyketide synthase A (pksA) of group I strains of A. oryzae showed that there were three point mutations (two silent mutations and one missense mutation) compared with aflatoxigenic A. flavus used as the positive control in this study.

  3. Nutritional changes in powdered red pepper upon in vitro infection of Aspergillus flavus Alterações nutricionais em pimenta vermelha em pó após infecção in vitro com Aspergillus flavus

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    Smita Tripathi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative losses in various biochemical constituents like capsaicin, carotenes, ascorbic acid, polyphenols, mineral matter, sugars (soluble and insoluble, protein and fat were estimated after the successful growth of Aspergillus flavus for 30 days on powdered red pepper. The fungal biomass was measured by ergosterol content and Aflatoxin B1 by HPLC. Amongst the various nutritional constituents evaluated for nutritional losses and changes the highest nutritional loss was reported in total carotenoids (88.55% followed by total sugars (85.5%. The protein content of the infected sample increased from 18.01% to 23%. The nutritional profile of chilli powder (Capsicum annum var. sannam L. shows highest share of total soluble sugars (32.89% and fiber content (21.05%, followed by protein (18.01% and fat (13.32% making it an ideal solid - substrate for mould growth. At the end of incubation the fungal biomass was 192. 25 mg / 100 gram powder, total plate count 17.5 X 10 4 CFU/g and Aflatoxin B1 content was 30.06 µg / kg.Foram avaliadas as perdas de vários constituintes bioquímicos como capsaicina, carotenos, acido ascórbico, polifenóis, matéria orgânica, açucares (solúveis e insolúveis, proteína e gordura em pimenta vermelha em pó após a multiplicação de Aspergillus flavus por 30 dias. A biomassa fúngica foi mensurada pelo conteúdo de ergosterol e aflatoxina por HPLC. Entre os vários constituintes avaliados, a maior perda foi a de carotenóides totais (88,55%, seguido de açucares totais (85,5%. O conteúdo protéico da amostra infectada aumentou de 18,01% para 23%. O perfil nutricional da pimenta em pó (Capsicum annum var. sannam L. indica alto teor de açucares totais (32,89% e fibras (21,05%, seguido de proteína (18,01% e gordura (13,32%, tornando-a um substrato ideal para crescimento de fungos. Ao final dos 30 dias, a biomassa fúngica foi 192,25 mg/100g, a contagem total em placas foi 17,5 x 10(4 CFU/g e o conteúdo de

  4. Biosynthesis of extracellular and intracellular gold nanoparticles by Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saurabh; Bector, Shruti

    2013-05-01

    Green chemistry is a boon for the development of safe, stable and ecofriendly nanostructures using biological tools. The present study was carried out to explore the potential of selected fungal strains for biosynthesis of intra- and extracellular gold nanostructures. Out of the seven cultures, two fungal strains (SBS-3 and SBS-7) were selected on the basis of development of dark pink colour in cell free supernatant and fungal beads, respectively indicative of extra- and intracellular gold nanoparticles production. Both biomass associated and cell free gold nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffractogram (XRD) analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD analysis confirmed crystalline, face-centered cubic lattice of metallic gold nanoparticles along with average crystallite size. A marginal difference in average crystallite size of extracellular (17.76 nm) and intracellular (26 and 22 nm) Au-nanostructures was observed using Scherrer equation. In TEM, a variety of shapes (triangles, spherical, hexagonal) were observed in both extra- and intracellular nanoparticles. 18S rRNA gene sequence analysis by multiple sequence alignment (BLAST) indicated 99 % homology of SBS-3 to Aspergillus fumigatus with 99 % alignment coverage and 98 % homology of SBS-7 to Aspergillus flavus with 98 % alignment coverage respectively. Native-PAGE and activity staining further confirmed enzyme linked synthesis of gold nanoparticles.

  5. Comparison of expression of secondary metabolite biosynthesis cluster genes in Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus, and A. oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Kenneth C; Mack, Brian M

    2014-06-23

    Fifty six secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters are predicted to be in the Aspergillus flavus genome. In spite of this, the biosyntheses of only seven metabolites, including the aflatoxins, kojic acid, cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem, have been assigned to a particular gene cluster. We used RNA-seq to compare expression of secondary metabolite genes in gene clusters for the closely related fungi A. parasiticus, A. oryzae, and A. flavus S and L sclerotial morphotypes. The data help to refine the identification of probable functional gene clusters within these species. Our results suggest that A. flavus, a prevalent contaminant of maize, cottonseed, peanuts and tree nuts, is capable of producing metabolites which, besides aflatoxin, could be an underappreciated contributor to its toxicity.

  6. Assessment of the antifungal activity of Spirulina platensis phenolic extract against Aspergillus flavus Avaliação da atividade antifúngica de extrato fenólico de Spirulina platensis contra Aspergillus flavus

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    Michele Moraes de Souza

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of safe food has stimulated the search for natural substances that possess antifungal activity. The indirect methods of estimating fungal biomass are based on the measurement of glucosamine, ergosterol and protein - typical compounds produced during the development of biomass. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of the phenolic extract from Spirulina platensis on the production of structural compounds in Aspergillus flavus, in order to identify its action on fungal inhibition. The Spirulina platensis methanolic extracts presented 1.15 mg phenolic compound/g Spirulina platensis, which showed an antifungal effect against Aspergillus flavus, inhibiting the glucosamine production up to 56%. Therefore, it may be employed as natural defense when food protection is necessary.A produção de alimentos seguros tem estimulado a busca por substâncias naturais que possuem atividade antifúngica. Os métodos indiretos de estimativa de biomassa fúngica são baseados na medição de glucosamina, ergosterol e proteína - compostos típicos produzidos durante o desenvolvimento da biomassa. Neste estudo, objetivou-se avaliar o efeito do extrato fenólico de Spirulina platensis na produção de componentes estruturais em Aspergillus flavus, a fim de identificar seu mecanismo de ação dos fenóis na inibição fúngica. O extrato metanólico de Spirulina platensis apresentou 1,15 mg de compostos fenólicos/g Spirulina platensis, apresentando um efeito antifúngico contra Aspergillus flavus, inibindo a produção de glucosamina em até 56%. Portanto, pode ser empregado como antifúngico natural quando for necessária a proteção de alimentos.

  7. Identification of Aspergillus (A. flavus and A. niger) Allergens and Heterogeneity of Allergic Patients' IgE Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermani, Maansi; Vijayan, Vannan Kandi; Agarwal, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Aspergillus species (A. flavus and A. niger) are important sources of inhalant allergens. Current diagnostic modalities employ crude Aspergillus extracts which only indicate the source to which the patient has been sensitized, without identifying the number and type of allergens in crude extracts. We report a study on the identification of major and minor allergens of the two common airborne Aspergillus species and heterogeneity of patients' IgE response to them. Skin prick tests were performed on 300 patients of bronchial asthma and/or allergic rhinitis and 20 healthy volunteers. Allergen specific IgE in patients' sera was estimated by enzyme allergosorbent test (EAST). Immunoblots were performed to identify major/minor allergens of Aspergillus extracts and to study heterogeneity of patients'IgE response to them. Positive cutaneous responses were observed in 17% and 14.7% of patients with A. flavus and A. niger extracts, respectively. Corresponding EAST positivity was 69.2% and 68.7%. In immunoblots, 5 allergenic proteins were identified in A. niger extract, major allergens being 49, 55.4 and 81.5 kDa. Twelve proteins bound patients' IgE in A. flavus extract, three being major allergens (13.3, 34 and 37 kDa). The position and slopes of EAST binding and inhibition curves obtained with individual sera varied from patient to patient. The number and molecular weight of IgE-binding proteins in both the Aspergillus extracts varied among patients. These results gave evidence of heterogeneity of patients' IgE response to major/minor Aspergillus allergens. This approach will be helpful to identify disease eliciting molecules in the individual patients (component resolved diagnosis) and may improve allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  8. Cloning and characterization of F3PYC gene encoding pyruvate carboxylase in Aspergillus flavus strain (F3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Sadia; Khan, Ibrar; Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmad; Peng, Changsheng

    2017-08-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase is a major enzyme for biosynthesis of organic acids like; citric acid, fumeric acid, and L-malic acid. These organic acids play very important role for biological remediation of heavy metals. In this study, gene walking method was used to clone and characterize pyruvate carboxylase gene (F3PYC) from heavy metal resistant indigenous fungal isolate Aspergillus flavus (F3). 3579 bp of an open reading frame which encodes 1193 amino acid protein (isoelectric point: 6.10) with a calculated molecular weight of 131.2008 kDa was characterized. Deduced protein showed 90-95% similarity to those deduced from PYC gene from different fungal strains including; Aspergillus parasiticus, Neosartorya fischeri, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus clavatus, and Aspergillus niger. Protein generated from the PYC gene was a homotetramer (α4) and having four potential N-linked glycosylation sites and had no signal peptide. Amongst most possible N-glycosylation sites were -N-S-S-I- at 36 amino acid, -N-G-T-V- at 237 amino acid, N-G-S-S- at 517 amino acid, and N-T-S-R- at 1111 amino acid, with several functions have been proposed for the carbohydrate moiety such as thermal stability, pH, and temperature optima for activity and stabilization of the three-dimensional structure. Hence, cloning of F3PYC gene from A. flavus has important biotechnological applications.

  9. ROS Involves the Fungicidal Actions of Thymol against Spores of Aspergillus flavus via the Induction of Nitric Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qingshan; Zhou, Wei; Li, Hongbo; Hu, Liangbin; Mo, Haizhen

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a well-known pathogenic fungus for both crops and human beings. The acquisition of resistance to azoles by A. flavus is leading to more failures occurring in the prevention of infection by A. flavus. In this study, we found that thymol, one of the major chemical constituents of the essential oil of Monarda punctate, had efficient fungicidal activity against A. flavus and led to sporular lysis. Further studies indicated that thymol treatment induced the generation of both ROS and NO in spores, whereas NO accumulation was far later than ROS accumulation in response to thymol. By blocking ROS production with the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, NO generation was also significantly inhibited in the presence of thymol, which indicated that ROS induced NO generation in A. flavus in response to thymol treatment. Moreover, the removal of either ROS or NO attenuated lysis and death of spores exposed to thymol. The addition of SNP (exogenous NO donor) eliminated the protective effects of the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase on thymol-induced lysis and death of spores. Taken together, it could be concluded that ROS is involved in spore death induced by thymol via the induction of NO.

  10. Leaf application of a sprayable bioplastic-based formulation of biocontrol Aspergillus flavus strains for reduction of aflatoxins in corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accinelli, Cesare; Abbas, Hamed K; Vicari, Alberto; Shier, W Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Applying non-aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus flavus isolates to the soil has been shown to be effective in reducing aflatoxin levels in harvested crops, including peanuts, cotton and corn. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of controlling aflatoxin contamination using a novel sprayable formulation consisting of a partially gelatinized starch-based bioplastic dispersion embedded with spores of biocontrol A. flavus strains, which is applied to the leaf surfaces of corn plants. The formulation was shown to be adherent, resulting in colonization of leaf surfaces with the biocontrol strain of A. flavus, and to reduce aflatoxin contamination of harvested kernels by up to 80% in Northern Italy and by up to 89% in the Mississippi Delta. The percentage of aflatoxin-producing isolates in the soil reservoir under leaf-treated corn was not significantly changed, even when the soil was amended with additional A. flavus as a model of changes to the soil reservoir that occur in no-till agriculture. This study indicated that it is not necessary to treat the soil reservoir in order to achieve effective biocontrol of aflatoxin contamination in kernel corn. Spraying this novel bioplastic-based formulation to leaves can be an effective alternative in the biocontrol of A. flavus in corn. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. The Pathogenesis-Related Maize Seed (PRms) Gene Plays a Role in Resistance to Aspergillus flavus Infection and Aflatoxin Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Rajtilak; Rajasekaran, Kanniah; Sickler, Christine; Lebar, Matthew; Musungu, Bryan M.; Fakhoury, Ahmad M.; Payne, Gary A.; Geisler, Matt; Carter-Wientjes, Carol; Wei, Qijian; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cary, Jeffrey W.

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is an opportunistic plant pathogen that colonizes and produces the toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites, aflatoxins, in oil-rich crops such as maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.). Pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins serve as an important defense mechanism against invading pathogens by conferring systemic acquired resistance in plants. Among these, production of the PR maize seed protein, ZmPRms (AC205274.3_FG001), has been speculated to be involved in resistance to infection by A. flavus and other pathogens. To better understand the relative contribution of ZmPRms to A. flavus resistance and aflatoxin production, a seed-specific RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene silencing approach was used to develop transgenic maize lines expressing hairpin RNAs to target ZmPRms. Downregulation of ZmPRms in transgenic kernels resulted in a ∼250–350% increase in A. flavus infection accompanied by a ∼4.5–7.5-fold higher accumulation of aflatoxins than control plants. Gene co-expression network analysis of RNA-seq data during the A. flavus-maize interaction identified ZmPRms as a network hub possibly responsible for regulating several downstream candidate genes associated with disease resistance and other biochemical functions. Expression analysis of these candidate genes in the ZmPRms–RNAi lines demonstrated downregulation (vs. control) of a majority of these ZmPRms-regulated genes during A. flavus infection. These results are consistent with a key role of ZmPRms in resistance to A. flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation in maize kernels. PMID:29089952

  12. The Pathogenesis-Related Maize Seed (PRms Gene Plays a Role in Resistance to Aspergillus flavus Infection and Aflatoxin Contamination

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    Rajtilak Majumdar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus is an opportunistic plant pathogen that colonizes and produces the toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites, aflatoxins, in oil-rich crops such as maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.. Pathogenesis-related (PR proteins serve as an important defense mechanism against invading pathogens by conferring systemic acquired resistance in plants. Among these, production of the PR maize seed protein, ZmPRms (AC205274.3_FG001, has been speculated to be involved in resistance to infection by A. flavus and other pathogens. To better understand the relative contribution of ZmPRms to A. flavus resistance and aflatoxin production, a seed-specific RNA interference (RNAi-based gene silencing approach was used to develop transgenic maize lines expressing hairpin RNAs to target ZmPRms. Downregulation of ZmPRms in transgenic kernels resulted in a ∼250–350% increase in A. flavus infection accompanied by a ∼4.5–7.5-fold higher accumulation of aflatoxins than control plants. Gene co-expression network analysis of RNA-seq data during the A. flavus-maize interaction identified ZmPRms as a network hub possibly responsible for regulating several downstream candidate genes associated with disease resistance and other biochemical functions. Expression analysis of these candidate genes in the ZmPRms–RNAi lines demonstrated downregulation (vs. control of a majority of these ZmPRms-regulated genes during A. flavus infection. These results are consistent with a key role of ZmPRms in resistance to A. flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation in maize kernels.

  13. Pre-harvest aflatoxins and Aspergillus flavus contamination in variable germplasms of red chillies from Kunri, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhund, Shaista; Akram, Abida; Hanif, Nafeesa Qudsia; Qureshi, Rahmatullah; Naz, Farah; Nayyar, Brian Gagosh

    2017-05-01

    Various cultivars of red chilli were collected from a small town named Kunri, located in the province Sindh, Pakistan. This town is a hub of red chilli production in Asia. A total of 69 samples belonging to 6 cultivars were obtained and analysed for the occurrence of aflatoxins and Aspergillus flavus, to explore the potential of resistant and susceptible germplasm. Aflatoxins were detected by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), while A. flavus was isolated and identified using agar plate, blotter paper, deep freezing and dilution techniques. Molecular characterization using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1/4 and A. flavus specific FL1-F/R primers confirmed the identity of A. flavus. The data revealed that 67 and 75% samples contaminated with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and with A. flavus, respectively. A highly susceptible chilli cultivar was 'Nagina', showing 78.8% frequency of total aflatoxins (1.2-600 μg/kg) and a mean of 87.7 μg/kg for AFB1 and 121.9 μg/kg for total aflatoxins. A. flavus was detected with 93% frequency and 2.14 × 10(4) colony forming units. In contrast, cultivars 'Kunri' and 'Drooping Type' were found to be resistant, with low levels of aflatoxins and fungal counts. The study was conducted for the first time to explore two potential cultivars that were less susceptible towards A. flavus and aflatoxin contamination. These cultivars could be preferably cultivated and thereby boost Pakistan's chilli production.

  14. Mechanisms of antifungal and anti-aflatoxigenic properties of essential oil derived from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) on Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yichen; Zhang, Jinming; Kong, Weijun; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Meihua

    2017-04-01

    The antifungal activity and potential mechanisms in vitro as well as anti-aflatoxigenic efficiency in vivo of natural essential oil (EO) derived from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) against Aspergillus flavus was intensively investigated. Based on the previous chemical characterization of turmeric EO by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, the substantially antifungal activities of turmeric EO on the mycelial growth, spore germination and aflatoxin production were observed in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, these antifungal effects were related to the disruption of fungal cell endomembrane system including the plasma membrane and mitochondria, specifically i.e. the inhibition of ergosterol synthesis, mitochondrial ATPase, malate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase activities. Moreover, the down-regulation profiles of turmeric EO on the relative expression of mycotoxin genes in aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway revealed its anti-aflatoxigenic mechanism. Finally, the suppression effect of fungal contamination in maize indicated that turmeric EO has potential as an eco-friendly antifungal agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of the Anti-Aflatoxinogenic Activity of Micromeria graeca and Elucidation of Its Molecular Mechanism in Aspergillus flavus

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    Rhoda El Khoury

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Of all the food-contaminating mycotoxins, aflatoxins, and most notably aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, are found to be the most toxic and economically costly. Green farming is striving to replace fungicides and develop natural preventive strategies to minimize crop contamination by these toxic fungal metabolites. In this study, we demonstrated that an aqueous extract of the medicinal plant Micromeria graeca—known as hyssop—completely inhibits aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus without reducing fungal growth. The molecular inhibitory mechanism was explored by analyzing the expression of 61 genes, including 27 aflatoxin biosynthesis cluster genes and 34 secondary metabolism regulatory genes. This analysis revealed a three-fold down-regulation of aflR and aflS encoding the two internal cluster co-activators, resulting in a drastic repression of all aflatoxin biosynthesis genes. Hyssop also targeted fifteen regulatory genes, including veA and mtfA, two major global-regulating transcription factors. The effect of this extract is also linked to a transcriptomic variation of several genes required for the response to oxidative stress such as msnA, srrA, catA, cat2, sod1, mnsod, and stuA. In conclusion, hyssop inhibits AFB1 synthesis at the transcriptomic level. This aqueous extract is a promising natural-based solution to control AFB1 contamination.

  16. Black gill disease of Pacific white leg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei by Aspergillus flavus

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    Naresh Kumar Dewangan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the epidemiology of black gill disease in white leg shrimp which is a major problem being faced by the commercial shrimp farmers who are culturing Litopenaeus vannamei (L. vannamei in India. Methods: The normal and infected shrimps were collected from shrimp pond and the gill was preserved in appropriate preservative for histopathological examination and scanning electron microscope analysis. Pathogenic fungus was isolated from black gill of L. vannamei in potato dextrose agar medium. Morphological study and fungal strain identification were done by using light microscopy and scanning electron microscope. Fungal DNA was amplified by ITS4 and ITS5 primers and gene sequencing was done by Macrogen Inc., Korea. Phylogenetic tree was prepared by using MEGA 6 software. Results: Fungal spores and hyphae were observed both in internal and external gill surface of infected shrimps. Fungal spores were round in shape and mature sporangium was observed. The histopathology study showed clearly that infected gill was damaged by the fungi. Scanning electron microscopic study showed adherence of fungi in infected gill. Internal transcribed spacer gene sequencing revealed that it was caused by Aspergillus flavus. Conclusions: The outcome of the present study would help to know the cause of black gill disease and to understand the effect of pathogenic fungi in shrimp culture. This study will initiate researchers for work in field of treatment or prevention of black gill disease in commercial L. vannamei culture.

  17. Characterization of the Maize Chitinase Genes and Their Effect on Aspergillus flavus and Aflatoxin Accumulation Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Leigh K.; Mylroie, J. Erik; Oliveira, Dafne A.; Smith, J. Spencer; Ozkan, Seval; Windham, Gary L.; Williams, W. Paul; Warburton, Marilyn L.

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a crop of global importance, but prone to contamination by aflatoxins produced by fungi in the genus Aspergillus. The development of resistant germplasm and the identification of genes contributing to resistance would aid in the reduction of the problem with a minimal need for intervention by farmers. Chitinolytic enzymes respond to attack by potential pathogens and have been demonstrated to increase insect and fungal resistance in plants. Here, all chitinase genes in the maize genome were characterized via sequence diversity and expression patterns. Recent evolution within this gene family was noted. Markers from within each gene were developed and used to map the phenotypic effect on resistance of each gene in up to four QTL mapping populations and one association panel. Seven chitinase genes were identified that had alleles associated with increased resistance to aflatoxin accumulation and A. flavus infection in field grown maize. The chitinase in bin 1.05 identified a new and highly significant QTL, while chitinase genes in bins 2.04 and 5.03 fell directly beneath the peaks of previously published QTL. The expression patterns of these genes corroborate possible grain resistance mechanisms. Markers from within the gene sequences or very closely linked to them are presented to aid in the use of marker assisted selection to improve this trait. PMID:26090679

  18. Effect of Environmental Factors on the Growth of Aspergillus Species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    12.0. 100. Table 2: Effect of Total Darkness Regime on the Linear Growth of Aspergillus Species Isolated from. Stored Millet Grains. (. )2. O E E. -. DAYS. (. )2. O E. E. -. ∑. A. species. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 17.62. A. candidus. 0.01. 1.61. 1.04. 0.47. 0.05. 0.66. 1.17. A flavus. 0.016. 0.001 0.027 0.302 0.123 0.017 0.252. A fumigatus.

  19. Sexual Reproduction in Aspergillus flavus Sclerotia: Acquisition of Novel Alleles from Soil Populations and Uniparental Mitochondrial Inheritance.

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    Bruce W Horn

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. flavus is heterothallic and laboratory crosses between strains of the opposite mating type produce progeny showing genetic recombination. Sclerotia formed in crops are dispersed onto the soil surface at harvest and are predominantly produced by single strains of one mating type. Less commonly, sclerotia may be fertilized during co-infection of crops with sexually compatible strains. In this study, laboratory and field experiments were performed to examine sexual reproduction in single-strain and fertilized sclerotia following exposure of sclerotia to natural fungal populations in soil. Female and male roles and mitochondrial inheritance in A. flavus were also examined through reciprocal crosses between sclerotia and conidia. Single-strain sclerotia produced ascospores on soil and progeny showed biparental inheritance that included novel alleles originating from fertilization by native soil strains. Sclerotia fertilized in the laboratory and applied to soil before ascocarp formation also produced ascospores with evidence of recombination in progeny, but only known parental alleles were detected. In reciprocal crosses, sclerotia and conidia from both strains functioned as female and male, respectively, indicating A. flavus is hermaphroditic, although the degree of fertility depended upon the parental sources of sclerotia and conidia. All progeny showed maternal inheritance of mitochondria from the sclerotia. Compared to A. flavus populations in crops, soil populations would provide a higher likelihood of exposure of sclerotia to sexually compatible strains and a more diverse source of genetic material for outcrossing.

  20. Improved production of kojic acid by mutagenesis of Aspergillus flavus HAk1 and Aspergillus oryzae HAk2 and their potential antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Hala A M; Ezzat, Saeid M; Houseny, Asmaa M

    2017-10-01

    Two wild-type (WT) Aspergillus strains, A. flavus HAk1 and A. oryzae HAk2, were selected for kojic acid (KA) biosynthesis. Malt extract sucrose culture medium (MES) was the best culture medium for maximum production of KA. The maximum production of KA has been estimated at pH 4 after 7 days of incubation at 30 °C. Overproduction of KA was attained by mutagenesis of both A. flavus HAk1 and A. oryzae HAk2 through their exposer to different doses of gamma irradiation. The mutant strains (MT) A. flavus HAk1-M2 and A. oryzae HAk2-M26 were the most stable mutants for maximum production of KA through four generations. Yield of KA by A. oryzae HAk2-M26 and A. flavus HAk1-M2 has been 2.03-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively, higher than their wild-type strains. All WT and MT strains were used for KA production from different agricultural raw materials. Apple peel was the best waste for KA production by WT strains of A. flavus and A. oryzae, while orange peel and rice stalk are best material for KA production by MT strains, A. flavus HAk1-M2 and A. oryzae HAk2-M26, respectively. All experimental strains have the ability to produce considerable amounts of KA from sugarcane molasse (SCM) and sugar-beet molasse (SBM). SBM was better than SCM for KA production by all strains. The antioxidant activity of biosynthesizing KA was strongly affected with production conditions, where the highest antioxidant activity of all strains was recorded at the optimum environmental and nutritional conditions for KA production.

  1. Cyclopiazonic Acid Is a Pathogenicity Factor for Aspergillus flavus and a Promising Target for Screening Germplasm for Ear Rot Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalivendra, Subbaiah C; DeRobertis, Catherine; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Damann, Kenneth E

    2017-05-01

    Aspergillus flavus, an opportunistic pathogen, contaminates maize and other key crops with carcinogenic aflatoxins (AFs). Besides AFs, A. flavus makes many more secondary metabolites (SMs) whose toxicity in insects or vertebrates has been studied. However, the role of SMs in the invasion of plant hosts by A. flavus remains to be investigated. Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a neurotoxic SM made by A. flavus, is a nanomolar inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (ECAs) and a potent inducer of cell death in plants. We hypothesized that CPA, by virtue of its cytotoxicity, may serve as a key pathogenicity factor that kills plant cells and supports the saprophytic life style of the fungus while compromising the host defense response. This proposal was tested by two complementary approaches. A comparison of CPA levels among A. flavus isolates indicated that CPA may be a determinant of niche adaptation, i.e., isolates that colonize maize make more CPA than those restricted only to the soil. Further, mutants in the CPA biosynthetic pathway are less virulent in causing ear rot than their wild-type parent in field inoculation assays. Additionally, genes encoding ECAs are expressed in developing maize seeds and are induced by A. flavus infection. Building on these results, we developed a seedling assay in which maize roots were exposed to CPA, and cell death was measured as Evans Blue uptake. Among >40 maize inbreds screened for CPA tolerance, inbreds with proven susceptibility to ear rot were also highly CPA sensitive. The publicly available data on resistance to silk colonization or AF contamination for many of the lines was also broadly correlated with their CPA sensitivity. In summary, our studies show that i) CPA serves as a key pathogenicity factor that enables the saprophytic life style of A. flavus and ii) maize inbreds are diverse in their tolerance to CPA. Taking advantage of this natural variation, we are currently pursuing both genome-wide and candidate gene

  2. In vitro interaction of actinomycetes isolates with Aspergillus flavus: impact on aflatoxins B1 and B2 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheecke, C; Liboz, T; Darriet, M; Sabaou, N; Mathieu, F

    2014-06-01

    This work aimed to study the interaction between Actinomycetal isolates and Aspergillus flavus to promote mutual antagonism in contact. Thirty-seven soilborn Streptomyces spp. isolates were chosen as potential candidates. After a 10-day in vitro co-incubation period, 27 isolates respond to the criteria, that is, mutual antagonism in contact. Further aflatoxins B1 and B2 analysis revealed that those 27 isolates reduced aflatoxin B1 residual concentration from 38·6 to 4·4%, depending on the isolate. We selected 12 isolates and tested their capacity to reduce AFB1 in pure culture to start identifying the mechanisms involved in its reduction. AFB1 was reduced by eight isolates. The remaining AFB1 concentration varied between 82·2 and 15·6%. These findings led us to suggest that these eight isolates could be used as biocontrol agents against AFB1 and B2 with low risk of impacting the natural microbial equilibrium. Interaction between Aspergillus flavus and Actinomycetes isolates was conducted in vitro. Actinomycetes isolates having a mutual antagonism in contact with A. flavus were chosen for further aflatoxins production study. This is a new approach based to develop biocontrol against aflatoxins accumulation in maize while respecting natural microbial equilibrium. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Toward elucidation of genetic and functional genetic mechanisms in corn host resistance to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyan eShan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are carcinogenic mycotoxins produced by some species in the Aspergillus genus, such as A. flavus and A. parasiticus. Contamination of aflatoxins in corn profusely happens at pre-harvest stage when heat and drought field conditions favor A. flavus colonization. Commercial corn hybrids are generally susceptible to A. flavus infection. An ideal strategy for preventing aflatoxin contamination is through the enhancement of corn host resistance to Aspergillus infection and aflatoxin production. Constant efforts have been made by corn breeders to develop resistant corn genotypes. Significantly low levels of aflatoxin accumulation have been determined in certain resistant corn inbred lines. A number of reports of quantitative trait loci (QTLs have provided compelling evidence supporting the quantitative trait genetic basis of corn host resistance to aflatoxin accumulation. Important findings have also been obtained from the investigation on candidate resistance genes through transcriptomics approach. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms will provide in-depth understanding of the host-pathogen interactions and hence facilitate the breeding of corn with resistance to A. falvus infection and aflatoxin accumulation.

  4. Efficacy of two chemical coagulants and three different filtration media on removal of Aspergillus flavus from surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gabr, Hamid Mohammad; Zheng, Tianling; Yu, Xin

    2014-02-01

    Aquatic fungi are common in various aqueous environments and play potentially crucial roles in nutrient and carbon cycling as well as interacting with other organisms. Species of Aspergillus are the most common fungi that occur in water. The present study was undertaken to elucidate the efficacy of two coagulants, aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride, used at different concentrations to treat drinking water, in removing Aspergillus flavus, as well as testing three different filtration media: sand, activated carbon, and ceramic granules, for their removal of fungi from water. The results revealed that both coagulants were effective in removing fungi and decreasing the turbidity of drinking water, and turbidity decreased with increasing coagulant concentration. Also, at the highest concentration of the coagulants, A. flavus was decreased by 99.6% in the treated water. Among ceramic granules, activated carbon, and sand used as media for water filtration, the sand and activated carbon filters were more effective in removing A. flavus than ceramic granules while simultaneously decreasing the turbidity levels in the test water samples. Post-treatment total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations in the experimental water did not decrease; on the contrary, TN concentrations increased with the increasing dosage of coagulants. The filtration process had no effect in reducing TOC and TN in tested water.

  5. Morphological Characterization and Determination of Aflatoxin-Production Potentials of Aspergillus flavus Isolated from Maize and Soil in Kenya

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    Matome Gabriel Thathana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at morphologically identifying Aspergillus flavus in soil and maize and at determining their aflatoxin-producing potentials. Five hundred and fourteen isolates obtained from maize and soil in Kenya were cultivated on Czapeck Dox Agar, Malt Extract Agar, Sabouraud Dextrose Agar, Potato Dextrose Agar, and Rose-Bengal Chloramphenicol Agar. Isolates were identified using macro-morphological characteristics. Micromorphological characteristics were determined using slide cultures. Aflatoxin production was determined by direct visual determination of the UV fluorescence of colonies on Coconut Agar Medium, Yeast Extract Sucrose agar, and Yeast Extract Cyclodextrin Sodium Deoxycholate agar and by Thin Layer Chromatography. Forty-three presumptive A. flavus isolates were identified; aflatoxin was detected in 23% of the isolates by UV fluorescence screening and in 30% by Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC. The aflatoxins produced were: aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, aflatoxin B2 (AFB2, and aflatoxin G1 (AFG1; some isolates produced only AFB1, whereas others produced either AFB1 and AFB2 or AFB1 and AFG1. The highest incidence of A. flavus (63% and aflatoxin production (28% was recorded in samples from Makueni District. Isolates from Uasin Gishu (21% and Nyeri (5% were non-aflatoxigenic. Bungoma District recorded 11% positive isolates of which 2% were aflatoxin producers. The occurrence of aflatoxin-producing A. flavus emphasises the need for measures to eliminate their presence in food crops.

  6. Production of aflatoxins by Aspergillus flavus and of fumonisins by Fusarium species isolated from Brazilian sorghum Avaliação da toxigenidade das cepas de Aspergillus flavus e Fusarium spp. isoladas de amostras de sorgo

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    Josefa B. da Silva

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-nine Aspergillus flavus and 35 Fusarium verticillioides strains, isolated from freshly harvested (10 and stored (130 Brazilian sorghum samples, were tested regarding their ability to produce aflatoxins (coconut milk agar and fumonisins (rice culture, respectively. Aflatoxins B1 and B2 were detected by TLC, and fumonisins B1 and B2 were analyzed by HPLC. Thirty-eight (64.4% A. flavus strains produced detectable levels of aflatoxins at concentrations ranging from 12.00 to 3282.50 µg/kg (AFB1 + AFB2, while thirty two (91% F. verticillioides strains produced FB1 at concentrations ranging from 0.12 to 5.38 µg/g. Two F. proliferatum strains produced low fumonisin levels. The toxigenic potential of A. flavus (64.4% and F. verticillioides (91.5% strains observed in sorghum samples indicates that rigorous control should be directed at the storage conditions of these products to minimize contamination with toxigenic deteriorating fungi, preventing further hazard to human and animal health.A produção de aflatoxinas por 59 cepas de Aspergillus flavus e fumonisinas por 35 cepas de Fusarium verticillioides isoladas de amostras de grãos de sorgo recém colhido (10 amostras e armazenado (130 amostras, foram avaliadas. A detecção de aflatoxinas (AFB1 e AFB2 foi efetuada por Cromatografia em Camada Delgada (CCD e fumonisinas (FB1 e FB2 foram analisadas por Cromatografia Líquida de Alta Eficiência (CLAE. Os resultados demonstram a produção de AFB1 e AFB2 em 38 cepas (64,4% de A. flavus cujos níveis variaram de 12,00 a 3282,50 µg/kg. Referente às cepas de F. verticillioides, 32 (91% produziram FB1, nas concentrações de 0,12 a 5,38 µg/g. Baixos níveis de fumonisinas foram detectados em 2 cepas de F. proliferatum. A constatação da potencialidade toxígena das cepas de A. flavus (64,4% e de F. verticillioides (91,5% nesta investigação, revelam a importância da pesquisa de aflatoxinas e fumonisinas nas amostras de sorgo. Diante disto

  7. Evaluation of antifungal activity of Pittosporum undulatum L. essential oil against Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin production Avaliação da atividade antifúngica do óleo essencial de Pittosporum undulatum L. em Aspergillus flavus e produção de aflatoxina

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    Rosane Tamara da Silva Medeiros

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of mycotoxins as a result of fungal attack can occur before, after and during the harvest and storage operations on agricultural crops and food commodities. Considering the inhibitory property of essential plant oils on the mycelial development of fungi and the importance of Aspergillus flavus, the main producer of aflatoxins, this research was designed to evaluate the toxicity of essential oil from Pittosporum undulatum against A. flavus. The essential oils were obtained from P. undulatum leaves, collected in different months and analyzed by GC/MS. The oils were rich in hydrocarbon, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and it was observed a significant variation on the chemical composition of the essential oil of leaves at different months. Besides, the essential oils were tested against fungal growth and the results showed different spectrum of inhibition on A. flavus. However, the essential oils inhibited the aflatoxin B1 production.A presença de micotoxinas como resultado do ataque fúngico pode ocorrer antes, após e durante a colheita e também no armazenamento de grãos e alimentos. Considerando as propriedades inibitórias dos óleos essenciais de plantas no desenvolvimento do micélio dos fungos e a importâncias do Aspergillus flavus, principal produtor de aflatoxinas, relatou-se neste trabalho, a atividade tóxica do óleo essencial do Pittosporum undulatum em cultura de A. flavus. Os óleos essenciais de P. undulatum foram obtidos a partir de folhas coletadas em diferentes meses e analisado por CG/EM. Os óleos se mostraram ricos em hidrocarbonetos, monoterpenos e sesquiterpenos e foi observada uma significante variação na composição química destes óleos nos diferentes meses de coleta. Os óleos essenciais mostraram diferentes espectros de inibição do crescimento de A. flavus, porém todos foram capazes de inibir a produção de aflatoxina B1.

  8. Identification of maize genes associated with host plant resistance or susceptibility to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation.

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    Rowena Y Kelley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination of maize pose negative impacts in agriculture and health. Commercial maize hybrids are generally susceptible to this fungus. Significant levels of host plant resistance have been observed in certain maize inbred lines. This study was conducted to identify maize genes associated with host plant resistance or susceptibility to A. flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation. RESULTS: Genome wide gene expression levels with or without A. flavus inoculation were compared in two resistant maize inbred lines (Mp313E and Mp04:86 in contrast to two susceptible maize inbred lines (Va35 and B73 by microarray analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA was used to find genes contributing to the larger variances associated with the resistant or susceptible maize inbred lines. The significance levels of gene expression were determined by using SAS and LIMMA programs. Fifty candidate genes were selected and further investigated by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR in a time-course study on Mp313E and Va35. Sixteen of the candidate genes were found to be highly expressed in Mp313E and fifteen in Va35. Out of the 31 highly expressed genes, eight were mapped to seven previously identified quantitative trait locus (QTL regions. A gene encoding glycine-rich RNA binding protein 2 was found to be associated with the host hypersensitivity and susceptibility in Va35. A nuclear pore complex protein YUP85-like gene was found to be involved in the host resistance in Mp313E. CONCLUSION: Maize genes associated with host plant resistance or susceptibility were identified by a combination of microarray analysis, qRT-PCR analysis, and QTL mapping methods. Our findings suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in maize host plant defense systems in response to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation. These findings will be important in identification of DNA markers for breeding maize lines

  9. Co-occurrence of aflatoxin B(1) and cyclopiazonic acid in sour lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) during post-harvest pathogenesis by Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Rozy; Sumbali, Geeta

    2005-04-01

    During hot and humid seasons, extensive rot of sour lime was observed to be caused by Aspergillus flavus. In view of this, investigations were undertaken to obtain data on the production of various toxins by A. flavus during post harvest pathogenesis of sour lime. Sixty percent of the pathogenic A. flavus isolates were detected to be aflatoxin B(1) producers in sour lime tissue. It was also noted that thirty three percent of aflatoxigenic A. flavus isolates had the potential to coproduce cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). Such aflatoxigenic isolates produced quantitatively more CPA (ranging from 250.0 to 2501.3 microg/kg) than aflatoxin B(1) (ranging from 141.3 to 811.7 microg/kg) in the affected sour lime. This study demonstrates for the first time that sour lime are a favourable substrate for aflatoxin B(1) and cyclopiazonic acid production by A. flavus isolates. This is of great concern to the health of consumers.

  10. Aflatoxin B1 degradation during co-cultivation of Aspergillus flavus and Pleurotus ostreatus strains on rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arijit; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Palaniswamy, Muthusamy; Angayarkanni, Jayaraman

    2015-06-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) produced by Aspergillus flavus is known to have carcinogenic and teratogenic effects on animal health. Accidental feeding of AFB1-contaminated rice straw may be detrimental to dairy cattle. White-rot basidiomycetous fungus Pleurotus ostreatus can grow on different agronomic wastes by synthesizing different ligninolytic enzymes. These extracellular enzymes are capable of degrading many environmentally hazardous compounds including AFB1. The present study examines the ability of different strains of P. ostreatus to degrade AFB1 in contaminated rice straw. Different strains of A. flavus were inoculated on rice straw for AFB1 production. The moldy straw was then subjected to co-cultivation by different strains of P. ostreatus. The extent of AFB1 degradation was determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Results indicated the presence of AFB1 in the moldy straw samples at levels of 27.95 ± 0.23 and 21.26 ± 0.55 µg/g of dry substrate for A. flavus MTCC 2798 and A. flavus GHBF09, respectively. Co-cultivation of P. ostreatus strains on AFB1-contaminated rice straw revealed their ability to rapidly colonize the substrate by profuse hyphal ramification. Highest degradation of AFB1 (89.41 %) was recorded in the straw containing co-cultures of A. flavus MTCC 2798 and P. ostreatus GHBBF10. Natural isolate P. ostreatus GHBBF10 demonstrated higher AFB1-degradation potential than P.ostreatus MTCC 142. This basidiomycete strain can be further exploited to effectively degrade moderate concentrations of AFB1 in contaminated moldy rice straw.

  11. Corn-Soybean Rotation Systems in the Mississippi Delta: Implications on Mycotoxin Contamination and Soil Populations of Aspergillus flavus

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    Hamed K. Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of corn-soybean rotation on mycotoxin contamination in corn (Zea mays L. and soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill. grains has not been fully evaluated. Therefore, this research investigated the effect of corn-soybean rotation on aflatoxin and fumonisin contamination in respective grains. The results showed that aflatoxin levels in soybean averaged 2.3, <0.5, 0.6, and 6.8 ng/g in 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008, while corn aflatoxin levels were 16.7, 37.1, 2.4, and 54.8 ng/g, respectively. Aspergillus flavus colonization was significantly greater (P≤0.05 in corn (log 1.9, 2.9, and 4.0 cfu/g compared to soybean (<1.3, 2.6, and 2.7 cfu/g in 2005, 2007, and 2008, respectively. Aflatoxigenic A. flavus isolates were more frequent in corn than in soybean in all four years. Higher fumonisin levels were found in corn (0.2 to 3.6 μg/g than in soybean (<0.2 μg/g. Rotating soybean with corn reduces the potential for aflatoxin contamination in corn by reducing A. flavus propagules in soil and grain and reducing aflatoxigenic A. flavus colonization. These results demonstrated that soybean grain is less susceptible to aflatoxin contamination compared to corn due to a lower level of colonization by A. flavus with a greater occurrence of non-aflatoxigenic isolates.

  12. Isolation of Alkaline and Neutral Proteases from Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris, a Soy Sauce Koji Mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impoolsup, Attawut; Bhumiratana, Amaret; Flegel, Timothy W.

    1981-01-01

    Two different extracellular proteases, protease I (P-I), an alkaline protease, and protease II (P-II) a neutral protease, from Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris were partially purified by using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex A-50 chromatography, carboxymethylcellulose CM-52 chromatography, and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. The degree of purity was followed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The activity of P-I was completely inhibited by 0.1 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and that of P-II was completely inhibited by 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetate. By using these inhibitors with extracts of wheat bran koji, the proportions of total activity that could be assigned to P-I and P-II were 80 and 20%, respectively. This compared favorably with activities estimated by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis slices (82 and 18%, respectively). Extracts from factory-run soybean koji gave comparable results. Both enzymes demonstrated maximum activity at 50 to 55°C and only small changes in activity between pH 6 and 11. For P-I, activity was somewhat higher from pH 8.0 to 11.0, whereas for P-II it was somewhat higher from pH 6 to 9. In the presence of 18% NaCl, the activities of both P-I and P-II dropped by approximately 90 and 85%, respectively. P-I was inferred to possess aminopeptidase activity since it could hydrolyze l-leucyl-p-nitroanilide hydrochloride. P-II was devoid of such activity. The ramifications of the results for factory-produced soy sauce koji are discussed. Images PMID:16345858

  13. Efficacy of the combined application of chitosan and Locust Bean Gum with different citrus essential oils to control postharvest spoilage caused by Aspergillus flavus in dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, Hajer; Khwaldia, Khaoula; Licciardello, Fabio; Mazzaglia, Agata; Muratore, Giuseppe; Hamdi, Moktar; Restuccia, Cristina

    2014-01-17

    This study reports the efficacy of the combined application of chitosan (CH) and Locust Bean Gum (LBG) in combination with different citrus essential oils (EOs) to inhibit Aspergillus flavus in vitro and on artificially infected dates for a storage period of 12 days. The effect of these treatments on the fruits' sensory characteristics was evaluated to verify the complete absence of off-odours and off-flavours. Bergamot EO was the most effective in reducing mycelial growth, followed by bitter orange EO. Both bergamot and bitter orange oils significantly reduced conidial germination and a complete inhibition was obtained at concentrations higher than 2%. The mixtures based on CH-2% (v/v) bergamot EO or CH-2% (v/v) bitter orange EO proved to be the most effective coatings to reduce conidial germination resulting in an 87-90% inhibition compared with the control. In fruit decay assays coatings based on CH incorporating citrus oils were able to reduce fungal decay in the range of 52-62% at day 12. The study results and the complete absence of off-flavours and off-odours demonstrate the potential of CH coatings carrying citrus EOs at sub-inhibitory concentrations to control postharvest growth of A. flavus in dates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of two postoperative endophthalmitis cases due to Aspergillus flavus and Scopulariopsis spp. with local and systemic antifungal therapy

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    Uyar Guliz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endophthalmitis is the inflammatory response to invasion of the eye with bacteria or fungi. The incidence of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery varies between 0.072–0.13 percent. Treatment of endophthalmitis with fungal etiology is difficult. Case Presentation Case 1: A 71-year old male diabetic patient developed postoperative endophthalmitis due to Aspergillus flavus. The patient was treated with topical amphotericin B ophthalmic solution, intravenous (IV liposomal amphotericin-B and caspofungin following vitrectomy. Case 2: A 72-year old male cachectic patient developed postoperative endophthalmitis due to Scopulariopsis spp. The patient was treated with topical and IV voriconazole and caspofungin. Conclusion Aspergillus spp. are responsible of postoperative fungal endophthalmitis. Endophthalmitis caused by Scopulariopsis spp. is a very rare condition. The two cases were successfully treated with local and systemic antifungal therapy.

  15. Co-inoculation of aflatoxigenic and non-aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus to study fungal invasion, colonization, and competition in maize kernels

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    Zuzana eHruska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A currently utilized pre-harvest biocontrol method involves field inoculations with non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus strains, a tactic shown to strategically suppress native aflatoxin-producing strains and effectively decrease aflatoxin contamination in corn. The present in situ study focuses on tracking the invasion and colonization of an aflatoxigenic A. flavus strain (AF70, labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP, in the presence of a non-aflatoxigenic A. flavus biocontrol strain (AF36 to better understand the competitive interaction between these two strains in seed tissue of corn (Zea mays. Corn kernels that had been co-inoculated with GFP-labeled AF70 and wild-type AF36 were cross-sectioned and observed under UV and blue light to determine the outcome of competition between these strains. After imaging, all kernels were analyzed for aflatoxin levels. There appeared to be a population difference between the co-inoculated AF70-GFP+AF36 and the individual AF70-GFP tests, both visually and with pixel count analysis. The GFP allowed us to observe that AF70-GFP inside the kernels was suppressed up to 82% when co-inoculated with AF36 indicating that AF36 inhibited progression of AF70-GFP. This was in agreement with images taken of whole kernels where AF36 exhibited a more robust external growth compared to AF70-GFP. The suppressed growth of AF70-GFP was reflected in a corresponding (up to 73% suppression in aflatoxin levels. Our results indicate that the decrease in aflatoxin production correlated with population depression of the aflatoxigenic fungus by the biocontrol strain supporting the theory of competitive exclusion through robust propagation and fast colonization by the non-aflatoxigenic fungus.

  16. New ion-exchanged zeolite derivatives: antifungal and antimycotoxin properties against Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savi, Geovana D.; Cardoso, Willian A.; Furtado, Bianca G.; Bortolotto, Tiago; Da Agostin, Luciana O. V.; Nones, Janaína; Torres Zanoni, Elton; Montedo, Oscar R. K.; Angioletto, Elidio

    2017-08-01

    Zeolites are microporous crystalline hydrated aluminosilicates with absorbent and catalytic properties. This material can be used in many applications in stored-pest management such as: pesticide and fertilizer carriers, animal feed additives, mycotoxin binders and food packaging materials. Herein, four 4A zeolite forms were prepared by ion-exchange and their antifungal effect against Aspergillus flavus was highlighted. Additionally, the antimycotoxin activity and the aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) adsorption capacity of these zeolites as well as their toxic effects on Artemia sp. were investigated. The ion-exchanged zeolites with Li+ and Cu2+ showed the best antifungal activity against A. flavus, including effects on conidia germination and hyphae morphological alterations. Regarding to antimycotoxin activity, all zeolite samples efficiently inhibited the AFB1 production by A. flavus. However, the ion-exchanged zeolites exhibited better results than the 4A zeolite. On the other hand, the AFB1 adsorption capacity was only observed by the 4A zeolite and zeolite-Li+. Lastly, our data showed that all zeolites samples used at effective concentrations for antifungal and antimycotoxin assays (2 mg ml-1) showed no toxic effects towards Artemia sp. Results suggest that some these ion-exchanged zeolites have great potential as an effective fungicide and antimycotoxin agent for agricultural and food safety applications.

  17. Aflatoxin B1 Degradation by Metabolites of Phoma glomerata PG41 Isolated From Natural Substrate Colonized by Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, Larisa; Statsyuk, Natalia; Mikityuk, Oleg; Nazarova, Tatyana; Dzhavakhiya, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), produced by Aspergillus flavus, is one of the most life threatening food contaminants causing significant economic losses worldwide. Biological AFB1 degradation by microorganisms, or preferably microbial enzymes, is considered as one of the most promising approaches. The current work aimed to study the AFB1-degrading metabolites, produced by Phoma glomerata PG41, sharing a natural substrate with aflatoxigenic A. flavus, and the preliminary determination of the nature of these metabolites. The AFB1-degrading potential of PG41 metabolites was determined by a quantitative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of residual AFB1 after 72 hours incubation at 27ºC. The effects of pH, heat, and protease treatment on the AFB1-destroying activity of extracellular metabolites were examined. The AFB1-degrading activity of protein-enriched fractions, isolated from culture liquid filtrate and cell-free extract, is associated with high-molecular-weight components, is time- and pH-dependent, thermolabile, and is significantly reduced by proteinase K treatment. The AFB1 degradation efficiency of these fractions reaches 78% and 66%, respectively. Phoma glomerata PG41 strain sharing natural substrate with toxigenic A. flavus secretes metabolites possessing a significant aflatoxin-degrading activity. The activity is associated mainly with a protein-enriched high-molecular-weight fraction of extracellular metabolites and appears to be of enzymatic origin.

  18. Carbon Dioxide Mediates the Response to Temperature and Water Activity Levels in Aspergillus flavus during Infection of Maize Kernels

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    Matthew K. Gilbert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus is a saprophytic fungus that may colonize several important crops, including cotton, maize, peanuts and tree nuts. Concomitant with A. flavus colonization is its potential to secrete mycotoxins, of which the most prominent is aflatoxin. Temperature, water activity (aw and carbon dioxide (CO2 are three environmental factors shown to influence the fungus-plant interaction, which are predicted to undergo significant changes in the next century. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to better understand the transcriptomic response of the fungus to aw, temperature, and elevated CO2 levels. We demonstrate that aflatoxin (AFB1 production on maize grain was altered by water availability, temperature and CO2. RNA-Sequencing data indicated that several genes, and in particular those involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, exhibit different responses to water availability or temperature stress depending on the atmospheric CO2 content. Other gene categories affected by CO2 levels alone (350 ppm vs. 1000 ppm at 30 °C/0.99 aw, included amino acid metabolism and folate biosynthesis. Finally, we identified two gene networks significantly influenced by changes in CO2 levels that contain several genes related to cellular replication and transcription. These results demonstrate that changes in atmospheric CO2 under climate change scenarios greatly influences the response of A. flavus to water and temperature when colonizing maize grain.

  19. Antifungal and antimycotoxigenic potency of Solanum torvum Swartz. leaf extract: isolation and identification of compound active against mycotoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhishek, R U; Thippeswamy, S; Manjunath, K; Mohana, D C

    2015-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the antifungal effect of Solanum torvum leaves against different field and storage fungi, and to identify its active compound. In addition, to evaluate in vitro and in vivo inhibitory efficacy on toxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides. Leaves of S. torvum were sequentially extracted with petroleum ether, toluene, chloroform, methanol and ethanol. The antifungal compound isolated from chloroform extract was identified as torvoside K based on spectral analysis. The antifungal activity of chloroform extract and torvoside K was determined by broth microdilution and poisoned food techniques. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) and zone of inhibition (ZOI) were recorded. Further, inhibitory effects of chloroform extract and torvoside K on growth of A. flavus and F. verticillioides, and their toxin productions were evaluated using in vitro and in vivo assays. Torvoside K showed the significant activity against tested fungi with ZOIs and MICs ranging from 33·4 to 87·4% and 31·25-250 μg ml(-1) , respectively. Further, torvoside K showed concentration-dependent antimycotoxigenic activity against aflatoxin B1 and fumonisin B1 production by A. flavus and F. verticillioides, respectively. It was observed that the compound torvoside K significantly inhibited the growth of all fungi tested. Growth of A. flavus and F. verticillioides, and aflatoxin B1 and fumonisin B1 productions were completely inhibited in vitro and in vivo by torvoside K with increasing concentration. Control of mycotoxigenic fungi requires compounds that able to inhibit both fungal growth and mycotoxin production. The antimycotoxigenic potential of torvoside K of S. torvum is described in this study for the first time. The results indicate the possible use of S. torvum as source of antifungal agents against postharvest fungal infestation of food commodities and

  20. Occurrence of fungi and cytotoxicity of the species: Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus isolated from the air of hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gniadek, Agnieszka; Krzyściak, Paweł; Twarużek, Magdalena; Macura, Anna B

    2017-03-30

    The basic care requirement for patients with weakened immune systems is to create the environment where the risk of mycosis is reduced to a minimum. Between 2007 and 2013 air samples were collected from various wards of a number of hospitals in Kraków, Poland, by means of the collision method using MAS-100 Iso MH Microbial Air Sampler (Merck Millipore, Germany). The air mycobiota contained several species of fungi, and almost 1/3 of it was made up of the species of the Aspergillus genus. Sixty-one strains of species other than A. fumigatus were selected for the research purposes, namely: 28 strains of A. ochraceus, 22 strains of A. niger and 11 strains of A. flavus species. Selected fungi underwent a cytotoxicity evaluation with the application of the MTT colorimetric assay (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide). The assay assesses cell viability by means of reducing the yellow tetrazolium salt to insoluble formazan. A semi-quantitative scale for cytotoxicity grading was adopted: low cytotoxic effect (+) with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) for values ranging from 31.251 cm2/ml to 7.813 cm2/ml, medium cytotoxic effect (++) for values ranging from 3.906 cm2/ml to 0.977 cm2/ml and the high one (+++) for values ranging from 0.488 cm2/ml to 0.061 cm2/ml. The absence of cytotoxicity was determined when the IC50 values was at ≥ 50. For 48 samples the analyzed fungi displayed the cytotoxic effect with A. ochraceus in 26 out of 28 cases, with 11 strains displaying the high cytotoxic effect. The lowest cytotoxicity was displayed by fungi of A. niger in 13 out of 22 cases, and the major fungi of A. flavus species were toxic (9 out of 11 cases). A half of the fungi displayed the low cytotoxic effect. On the basis of the comparison of average cytotoxicity levels it was determined that there were significant differences in the levels of cytotoxicity of the analyzed fungi. However, such statement may not provide grounds for a definite

  1. Growth inhibition of some Eurotium and Aspergillus species with spice extracts

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    Dimić Gordana R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The antifungal activity of spice extracts obtained from caraway seed, garlic and origanum was tested against antifungal activity of Eurotium herbariorum E. amstelodami, Aspergillus flavus and A. sydowii. Caraway seed extract has been proved to possess the highest inhibitory effect on all investigated mould species. The concentrations of caraway extract, sufficient to inhibit the growth completely were: 0,5% for E. herbariorum, E. amstelodami and A. sydowii, and 1% for A. flavus; of garlic, 1% for Eurotium spp. and 2% for A. sydowii, and of origanum, 1% for E. herbariorum and 2% for E. amstelodami. The results of colonies diameter measuring showed that garlic and origanum extracts have no significant suppressing ability on micellar growth of A. flavus, while garlic was more efficient in other test cultures.

  2. Drought stress and aflatoxin contamination: Transcriptional responses of Aspergillus flavus to oxidative stress are related to stress tolerance and aflatoxin production capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oilseed crops such as maize and peanut are staple food crops which are vital for global food security. The contamination of these crops with carcinogenic aflatoxins during infection by Aspergillus flavus under drought stress conditions is a serious threat to the safety of these commodities. In order...

  3. The two genome sequence release and blast server construction for aflatoxin-producing L and S strains Aspergillus parasiticus and A. flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites. These compounds, produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, contaminate pre-harvest agricultural crops in the field and post-harvest grains during storage. In order to reduce and eliminate aflatoxin contamination of food and feed...

  4. Bioaktivitas Senyawa Asam Heksadekanoat dan ??-sitosterol Isolat dariHydroid Aglaophenia cupressina Lamoureoux sebagai BahanAntimikroba pada bakteri Staphilococcus aureus dan jamur Aspergillus flavus

    OpenAIRE

    Yohannes, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Saat ini sangat diperlukan sumber antibiotik baru yang lebih efektif untuk mengatasi Multi Drug Resistant (MDR), pada pengobatan penyakit infeksi yang disebabkan oleh mikroorganisme patogen. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui bioaktivitas senyawa asam heksadekanoat dan ??-sitosterol hasil isolat dari hydroid Aglaophenia cupressina Lamoureoux dalam menghambat atau mematikan bakteri Staphyloccocus aureus dan jamur Aspergillus flavus yang sering mencemari bahan pangan. Metode yang digunak...

  5. Transient transmembrane secretion of H2O2: a mechanism for the citral-caused inhibition of aflatoxin production from Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhan; Li, Jialin; Lu, Zhisong; Liu, Yang; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-12-21

    A polydopamine-Fe3O4 nanocomposite-based H2O2 electrochemical sensor is fabricated to real-time monitor the transmembrane release of reactive oxygen species from citral-treated Aspergillus flavus, revealing a mechanism involving transient transmembrane secretion of H2O2 for the citral-caused inhibition of aflatoxin production from a fungus for the first time.

  6. Comparative genomics analysis of field isolates of Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus to explain phenotypic variation in oxidative stress tolerance and host preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxin contamination of peanut and other crops is a major concern for producers globally, and has been shown to be exacerbated by drought stress. Previous transcriptomic and proteomic examination of the responses of isolates of Aspergillus flavus to drought-related oxidative stress in vitro have ...

  7. Inhibitory Effect of Cinnamaldehyde, Citral, and Eugenol on Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Gene Expression and Aflatoxin B1 Biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dandan; Xing, Fuguo; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Limin; Hua, Huijuan; Zhou, Lu; Zhao, Yueju; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    In order to reveal the inhibitory effects of cinnamaldehyde, citral, and eugenol on aflatoxin biosynthesis, the expression levels of 5 key aflatoxin biosynthetic genes were evaluated by real-time PCR. Aspergillus flavus growth and AFB1 production were completely inhibited by 0.80 mmol/L of cinnamaldehyde and 2.80 mmol/L of citral. However, at lower concentration, cinnamaldehyde (0.40 mmol/L), eugenol (0.80 mmol/L), and citral (0.56 mmol/L) significantly reduced AFB1 production with inhibition rate of 68.9%, 95.4%, and 41.8%, respectively, while no effect on fungal growth. Real-time PCR showed that the expressions of aflR, aflT, aflD, aflM, and aflP were down-regulated by cinnamaldehyde (0.40 mmol/L), eugenol (0.80 mmol/L), and citral (0.56 mmol/L). In the presence of cinnamaldehyde, AflM was highly down-regulated (average of 5963 folds), followed by aflP, aflR, aflD, and aflT with the average folds of 55, 18, 6.5, and 5.8, respectively. With 0.80 mmol/L of eugenol, aflP was highly down-regulated (average of 2061-folds), followed by aflM, aflR, aflD, and aflT with average of 138-, 15-, 5.2-, and 4.8-folds reduction, respectively. With 0.56 mmol/L of citral, aflT was completely inhibited, followed by aflM, aflP, aflR, and aflD with average of 257-, 29-, 3.5-, and 2.5-folds reduction, respectively. These results suggest that the reduction in AFB1 production by cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, and citral at low concentration may be due to the down-regulations of the transcription level of aflatoxin biosynthetic genes. Cinnamaldehyde and eugenol may be employed successfully as a good candidate in controlling of toxigenic fungi and subsequently contamination with aflatoxins in practice. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Antifungal activity of silver ion on ultrastructure and production of aflatoxin B1 and patulin by two mycotoxigenic strains, Aspergillus flavus OC1 and Penicillium vulpinum CM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaiel, A A; Tharwat, N A

    2014-09-01

    The antifungal activity of silver ion from silver nitrate solution was tested against two pathogenic and toxigenic fungal strains. The first was Aspergillus flavus OC1, a clinical aflatoxigenic strain that causes fungal keratitis and the second was Penicillium vulpinum CM1, a maize-pathogenic strain that is positive for patulin (PAT) producing ability. Agar well diffusion assays on yeast sucrose (YES) agar were applied for determination of the antifungal activity of silver ions either filter- or autoclaved-sterilized. Transmission electron microscopy was used to analyze the cellular effects of silver ion. The mycotoxins AFB1 and PAT were analyzed in the fungal strains cultures treated with silver ion. Filter-sterilized ions have a greater potential for growth inhibition of both fungal strains than autoclaved-sterilized ions. The minimal inhibitory concentration of the filter-sterilized ions against A. flavus OC1 was 70 μg mL(-1) and against P. vulpinum CM1 was 60 μg mL(-1) and that the minimum fungicidal concentration was 120 μg mL(-1) against the first strain and 80 μg mL(-1) against the second strain. Hyphal cells treated with silver ion showed considerable changes in the nature of cell membranes and cytoplasmic organelles. Silver applied to YES broth inhibited mycelial growth and AFB1 and PAT formation of both strains. Growth and mycotoxin production appeared to be correlated processes. These findings indicate the future possibility to use silver ion as substitute for synthetic fungicides to control the growth of pathogenic fungi and their mycotoxin production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. In silico analysis of β-mannanases and β-mannosidase from Aspergillus flavus and Trichoderma virens UKM1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Chai Sin; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu

    2013-11-01

    A gene encoding an endo-β-1,4-mannanase from Trichoderma virens UKM1 (manTV) and Aspergillus flavus UKM1 (manAF) was analysed with bioinformatic tools. In addition, A. flavus NRRL 3357 genome database was screened for a β-mannosidase gene and analysed (mndA-AF). These three genes were analysed to understand their gene properties. manTV and manAF both consists of 1,332-bp and 1,386-bp nucleotides encoding 443 and 461 amino acid residues, respectively. Both the endo-β-1,4-mannanases belong to the glycosyl hydrolase family 5 and contain a carbohydrate-binding module family 1 (CBM1). On the other hand, mndA-AF which is a 2,745-bp gene encodes a protein sequence of 914 amino acid residues. This β-mannosidase belongs to the glycosyl hydrolase family 2. Predicted molecular weight of manTV, manAF and mndA-AF are 47.74 kDa, 49.71 kDa and 103 kDa, respectively. All three predicted protein sequences possessed signal peptide sequence and are highly conserved among other fungal β-mannanases and β-mannosidases.

  10. Non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus as potential biocontrol agents to reduce aflatoxin contamination in peanuts harvested in Northern Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaniz Zanon, María Silvina; Barros, Germán Gustavo; Chulze, Sofía Noemí

    2016-08-16

    Biological control is one of the most promising strategies for preventing aflatoxin contamination in peanuts at field stage. A population of 46 native Aspergillus flavus nonaflatoxin producers were analysed based on phenotypic, physiological and genetic characteristics. Thirty-three isolates were characterized as L strain morphotype, 3 isolates as S strain morphotype, and 10 isolates did not produce sclerotia. Only 11 of 46 non-aflatoxigenic isolates did not produce cyclopiazonic acid. The vegetative compatibility group (VCG) diversity index for the population was 0.37. For field trials we selected the non-aflatoxigenic A. flavus AR27, AR100G and AFCHG2 strains. The efficacy of single and mixed inocula as potential biocontrol agents in Northern Argentina was evaluated through a 2-year study (2014-2015). During the 2014 peanut growing season, most of the treatments reduced the incidence of aflatoxigenic strains in both soil and peanut kernel samples, and no aflatoxin was detected in kernels. During the 2015 growing season, there was a reduction of aflatoxigenic strains in kernel samples from the plots treated with the potential biocontrol agents. Reductions of aflatoxin contamination between 78.36% and 89.55% were observed in treated plots in comparison with the un-inoculated control plots. This study provides the first data on aflatoxin biocontrol based on competitive exclusion in the peanut growing region of Northern Argentina, and proposes bioproducts with potential use as biocontrol agents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Variabilidade de produção de aflatoxinas por linhagens de Aspergillus flavus em diferentes tempos de manutenção Aflatoxin production variability by Aspergillus flavus strains after different storage times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Taniwaki

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho fui realizado com a finalidade de se estudar a produção de aflatoxinas por linhagens de A. flavus, recém isoladas, em diferentes tempos de manutenção, a fim de contribuir para um melhor entendimento do mecanismo de variação na produção de aflatoxinas. Para isso, foram utilizadas três linhagens de A. flavus produtoras de aflatoxinas, classificadas como: a grande produtora; b média produtora e c baixa produtora. Neste experimento, que se estendeu por 280 dias, os fungos foram estudados em dois métodos de preservação: mantido em óleo mineral, no meio Czapeck, e repicado periodicamente em meio Czapeck modificado. A análise da produção de aflatoxinas foi efetuada de 30 em 30 dias. A quantificação da toxina foi feita por cromatografía em camada delgada, pela técnica de avaliação visual, de diluição até extinção. Foi constatada uma variação na produção de toxina em todas as linhagens, contudo elas não perderam suas características originais.Aflatoxin production by strains recently isolated of Aspergillus flavus was studied, after different storage times understand the mechanisms of possible variations in aflatoxin production. Three A. flavus aflatoxin producing strains were utilized, classified as: a high producer; b medium producer and c low producer. The experiment lasted 280 days and the moulds were studied by two preservation methods: oil covered slants on Czapeck's medium and periodic transfer on Czapeck's modified medium. Quantification of the aflatoxin produced was made at 30 day intervals, on thin-layer chromatography and visual determination by the dilution-to-extinction technique. The production of aflatoxin by all strains varied but they did not lose their initial characteristics. Microscopic examinations revealed thickened zones and hifal enlargements over some globous structures that may be related to aflatoxin production sites.

  12. A Network Approach of Gene Co-expression in the Zea mays/Aspergillus flavus Pathosystem to Map Host/Pathogen Interaction Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musungu, Bryan M; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Brown, Robert L; Payne, Gary A; OBrian, Greg; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Geisler, Matt

    2016-01-01

    A gene co-expression network (GEN) was generated using a dual RNA-seq study with the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus and its plant host Zea mays during the initial 3 days of infection. The analysis deciphered novel pathways and mapped genes of interest in both organisms during the infection. This network revealed a high degree of connectivity in many of the previously recognized pathways in Z. mays such as jasmonic acid, ethylene, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). For the pathogen A. flavus, a link between aflatoxin production and vesicular transport was identified within the network. There was significant interspecies correlation of expression between Z. mays and A. flavus for a subset of 104 Z. mays, and 1942 A. flavus genes. This resulted in an interspecies subnetwork enriched in multiple Z. mays genes involved in the production of ROS. In addition to the ROS from Z. mays, there was enrichment in the vesicular transport pathways and the aflatoxin pathway for A. flavus. Included in these genes, a key aflatoxin cluster regulator, AflS, was found to be co-regulated with multiple Z. mays ROS producing genes within the network, suggesting AflS may be monitoring host ROS levels. The entire GEN for both host and pathogen, and the subset of interspecies correlations, is presented as a tool for hypothesis generation and discovery for events in the early stages of fungal infection of Z. mays by A. flavus.

  13. A Network Approach of Gene Co-expression in the Zea mays/Aspergillus flavus Pathosystem to Map Host/Pathogen Interaction Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musungu, Bryan M.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Brown, Robert L.; Payne, Gary A.; OBrian, Greg; Fakhoury, Ahmad M.; Geisler, Matt

    2016-01-01

    A gene co-expression network (GEN) was generated using a dual RNA-seq study with the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus and its plant host Zea mays during the initial 3 days of infection. The analysis deciphered novel pathways and mapped genes of interest in both organisms during the infection. This network revealed a high degree of connectivity in many of the previously recognized pathways in Z. mays such as jasmonic acid, ethylene, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). For the pathogen A. flavus, a link between aflatoxin production and vesicular transport was identified within the network. There was significant interspecies correlation of expression between Z. mays and A. flavus for a subset of 104 Z. mays, and 1942 A. flavus genes. This resulted in an interspecies subnetwork enriched in multiple Z. mays genes involved in the production of ROS. In addition to the ROS from Z. mays, there was enrichment in the vesicular transport pathways and the aflatoxin pathway for A. flavus. Included in these genes, a key aflatoxin cluster regulator, AflS, was found to be co-regulated with multiple Z. mays ROS producing genes within the network, suggesting AflS may be monitoring host ROS levels. The entire GEN for both host and pathogen, and the subset of interspecies correlations, is presented as a tool for hypothesis generation and discovery for events in the early stages of fungal infection of Z. mays by A. flavus. PMID:27917194

  14. Modelling the effect of ethanol on growth rate of food spoilage moulds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dantigny, P.; Guilmart, A.; Radoi, F.; Bensoussan, M.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of ethanol (E) on the radial growth rate (¿) of food spoilage moulds (Aspergillus candidus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Eurotium herbariorum, Mucor circinelloides, Mucor racemosus, Paecilomyces variotii, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium

  15. The Utilization of RNA Silencing Technology to Mitigate the Voriconazole Resistance of Aspergillus Flavus; Lipofectamine-Based Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanam Nami

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Introducing the effect of RNAi in fungi to downregulate essential genes has made it a powerful tool to investigate gene function, with potential strategies for novel disease treatments. Thus, this study is an endeavor to delve into the silencing potentials of siRNA on cyp51A and MDR1 in voriconazole-resistant Aspergillus flavus as the target genes. Methods: In this study, we designed three cyp51A-specific siRNAs and three MDR1-specific siRNAs and after the co-transfection of siRNA into Aspergillus flavus, using lipofectamine, we investigated the effect of different siRNA concentrations (5, 15, 25, 50nM on cyp51A and MDR1 expressions by qRT-PCR. Finally, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs of voriconazole for isolates were determined by broth dilution method. Results: Cyp51A siRNA induced 9, 22, 33, 40-fold reductions in cyp51A mRNA expres­sion in a voriconazole-resistant strain following the treatment of the cells with concentrations of 5, 15, 25, 50nM siRNA, respectively. Identically, the same procedure was applied to MDR1, even though it induced 2, 3, 4, 10-fold reductions. The results demonstrated a MIC for voriconazole in the untreated group (4µg per ml, when compared to the group treated with cyp51A-specific siRNA and MDR1-specific siRNA, both at concentrations of 25 and 50nM, yielding 2µg per ml and 1µg per ml when 25 nM was applied and 2µg per ml and 0.5µg per ml when the concentration doubled to 50 nM. Conclusion: In this study, we suggested that siRNA-mediated specific inhibition of cyp51A and MDR1 genes play roles in voriconazole-resistant A.flavus strain and these could be apt target genes for inactivation. The current study promises a bright prospect for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis through the effective deployment of RNAi and gene therapy.

  16. The Utilization of RNA Silencing Technology to Mitigate the Voriconazole Resistance of Aspergillus Flavus; Lipofectamine-Based Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nami, Sanam; Baradaran, Behzad; Mansoori, Behzad; Kordbacheh, Parivash; Rezaie, Sasan; Falahati, Mehraban; Mohamed Khosroshahi, Leila; Safara, Mahin; Zaini, Farideh

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: Introducing the effect of RNAi in fungi to downregulate essential genes has made it a powerful tool to investigate gene function, with potential strategies for novel disease treatments. Thus, this study is an endeavor to delve into the silencing potentials of siRNA on cyp51A and MDR1 in voriconazole-resistant Aspergillus flavus as the target genes. Methods: In this study, we designed three cyp51A-specific siRNAs and three MDR1-specific siRNAs and after the co-transfection of siRNA into Aspergillus flavus, using lipofectamine, we investigated the effect of different siRNA concentrations (5, 15, 25, 50nM) on cyp51A and MDR1 expressions by qRT-PCR. Finally, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of voriconazole for isolates were determined by broth dilution method. Results: Cyp51A siRNA induced 9, 22, 33, 40-fold reductions in cyp51A mRNA expres-sion in a voriconazole-resistant strain following the treatment of the cells with concentrations of 5, 15, 25, 50nM siRNA, respectively. Identically, the same procedure was applied to MDR1, even though it induced 2, 3, 4, 10-fold reductions. The results demonstrated a MIC for voriconazole in the untreated group (4µg per ml), when compared to the group treated with cyp51A-specific siRNA and MDR1-specific siRNA, both at concentrations of 25 and 50nM, yielding 2µg per ml and 1µg per ml when 25 nM was applied and 2µg per ml and 0.5µg per ml when the concentration doubled to 50 nM. Conclusion: In this study, we suggested that siRNA-mediated specific inhibition of cyp51A and MDR1 genes play roles in voriconazole-resistant A.flavus strain and these could be apt target genes for inactivation. The current study promises a bright prospect for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis through the effective deployment of RNAi and gene therapy.

  17. Production of cellulase-free xylanase by Aspergillus flavus: Effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xylanase was found to be stable at 45°C with 100% of its original activity remaining after 2 h incubation. At 50°C, xylanase was stable for the first twenty minutes, and had half-life of 50 min. The pH stability for the xylanase from A. flavus was most stable in the range of pH 3.0-8.0 retaining more that 100% activity after 1 h.

  18. Mycotoxin producing potential of some isolates of Aspergillus flavus and Eurotium groups from meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Kady, I; el-Maraghy, S; Zohri, A N

    1994-09-01

    All strains (92) of A. flavus group proved to be positive for production of aflatoxin (45 to 1200 micrograms/50 ml medium) on potato dextrose liquid medium, while 59 strains only proved to be positive (35-310 micrograms/50 ml) on 15% NaCl potato-dextrose liquid medium. Most of the strains tested of A. flavus, A. flavus var. columnaris and A. oryzae produced aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 & G2. All positive strains of A. tamarii produced aflatoxins G1 & G2 while the tested isolate of A. zonatus produced aflatoxins B1 & G1. Of 95 strains tested of Eurotium, aflatoxins B1 & G1 were produced by one strain of each of E. chevalieri var. intermedium, E. repens and E. rubrum. Gliotoxin was detected in the extract of two strains of E. chevalieri and one strain of each of E. chevalieri var. intermedium and E. pseudoglaucum on the salt-free medium, and two strains of each of E. chevalieri, E. chevalieri var. intermedium and one of E. pseudoglaucum on 15% NaCl medium. Sterigmatocystin was produced by some strains of E. chevalieri, E. chevalieri var. intermedium, E. amstelodami, E. pseudoglaucum and E. rubrum on the two experimental media. One strain only of E. repens produced ochratoxin A while citrinin was detected in the extract of one strain of E. pseudoglaucum.

  19. Perillaldehyde, a Promising Antifungal Agent Used in Food Preservation, Triggers Apoptosis through a Metacaspase-Dependent Pathway in Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Wang, Yanzhen; Lu, Zhaoqun; Sun, Chunhui; Zhang, Man; Zhu, Aihua; Peng, Xue

    2016-10-05

    In the present study, we provide detailed insights into perillaldehyde (PAE)'s mechanisms of action on Aspergillus flavus and offer evidence in favor of the induction of an apoptosis-like phenotype. Specifically, PAE's antifungal mode of action was investigated through the detection of mitochondrial membrane potential (MtΔψ) and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, as well as intracellular Ca 2+ level, reactive oxygen species accumulation, and metacaspase activation. This was done by way of fluorometry, measuring DNA fragmentation, and condensation by fluorescent microscopy. Furthermore, we searched for phenotypic changes characteristic of apoptosis by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry, determining the amount of cytochrome c released using Western blotting. Results indicated that cultivation of A. flavus in the presence of PAE caused depolarization of MtΔψ, rapid DNA condensation, large-scale DNA fragmentation, and an elevation of intracellular Ca 2+ level. The percentage of early apoptotic cells with exposure of PS were 27.4% and 48.7%, respectively, after 9 h incubations with 0.25 and 0.5 μL/mL of PAE. The percentage of stained cells with activated intracellular metacaspases exposed to PAE at concentrations of 0.25 and 0.5 μL/mL compared with control subjects were increased by 28.4 ± 3.25% and 37.9 ± 4.24%, respectively. The above results has revealed that PAE induces fungal apoptosis through a caspase-dependent mitochondrial pathway. In all, our findings provide a novel mechanism for exploring a possible antifungal agent used in food preservation.

  20. Effect of gamma radiation in peanuts for inhibition of Aspergillus flavus and nutritional composition; Irradiacao gama em amendoim para controle de Aspergillus flavus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, L.F.; Silva, E.B. da, E-mail: lauryfrancis@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Oliveira, I.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (CAV/UFPE), Vitoria de Santo Antao, PE (Brazil). Centro Academico de Vitoria

    2013-08-15

    Care in food storage, controlling humidity and temperature, prevents fungal diseases in peanuts and the development of filamentous fungi in food and feed, which can result in the production of toxins known as mycotoxins. Ionizing radiation is a preventive method of food security, promoting inhibition of buds, delayed maturation, reduction of microbial load, elimination of pathogenic microorganisms, sterilization and disinfection in grains, cereals, fruits and spices. This work aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation on the growth inhibition of aflatoxigenic fungi and on nutritional composition in peanut. Samples were collected directly from the producer (Petrolandia) and Supply Central of Pernambuco (CEASA-PE), and then grains inside / outside pods were packed and subjected to irradiation at doses of 6, 9, 12 and 15 kGy. Fungal growth and nutritional composition of the samples before and after irradiation were analyzed and statistical analysis using the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon. The results showed that the samples originated from CEASA-PE had the highest rates of contamination. The radiation was effective in the inhibition of aflatoxigenic fungi, achieving to eliminate the action of fungi, regardless of dose. Only one non-irradiated sample, originated from CEASA-PE, showed positive production of aflatoxins in the middle LCA. No significant difference in the values of the nutritional composition, with increasing radiation dose. The irradiation was shown to be an effective process for preserving peanuts, because it prevents the growth of fungi, particularly aflatoxin producer, making it safer for consumption, without changing its nutritional composition. (author)

  1. Effects of microwaves on the reduction of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus on brown rice (Oryza sativa L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Park, Shin Young; Byun, Kye-Hwan; Chun, Hyang Sook; Ha, Sang-Do

    2017-07-01

    Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus are primary pathogen moulds on brown rice and barley. This study investigated the effects of microwave irradiation (MWI) (2450 MHz, 700 W, 10-50 s) on inactivation of A. flavus and A. parasiticus on brown rice and barley and the quality of these samples. The counts of both strains were significantly (p barley were 0.05 and 0.04 after 10 s; 1.06 and 1.05 after 20 s; 1.59 and 1.52 after 30 s; and 3.04 and 2.78 after 40 s. The log reductions of A. parasiticus on brown rice and barley were 0.06 and 0.10 after 10 s; 1.20 and 1.00 after 20 s; 2.04 and 1.61 after 30 s; and 2.89 and 2.90 after 40 s. Moreover, neither strain survived after 50 s of MWI. The Hunter colour 'L' gradually increased with increasing MWI treatment time. However, there were no significant differences in the 'L' of brown rice after 10-40 s of MWI treatment and of barley after 10-30 s of MWI treatment. The Hunter colour 'a' and 'b' gradually increased with increasing microwave time. No significant change was observed in the moisture content of either cereal treated with 10-20 s of MWI. The differences in the sensory quality (colour, appearance, flavour, texture and overall acceptability) after 0-30 s of MWI were not significant. However, values for colour, appearance, texture and overall acceptability were significantly reduced when treated with 40-50 s of MWI. Therefore, with 20 s of MWI at 2450 MHz, 700 W could be effective for > 90% reduction of mould without causing deleterious changes to the colour, moisture content and sensory qualities of these cereals.

  2. Aspergillus flavus aswA, a gene homolog of Aspergillus nidulans oefC, regulates sclerotial development and biosynthesis of sclerotium-associated secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Scharfenstein, Leslie L; Li, Robert W; Arroyo-Manzanares, Natalia; De Saeger, Sarah; Diana Di Mavungu, José

    2017-07-01

    Aspergillus flavus aswA (AFLA_085170) is a gene encoding a Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA-binding domain and a transcriptional activation domain, DUF3468. Disruption of aswA yielded strains that made a truncated gene transcript and generated a fungus that produced a greatly increased number of sclerotia. These sclerotia were odd-shaped and non-pigmented (white) and different from oval and pigmented (dark brown to black) mature sclerotia. Transcriptomic analysis of the ΔaswA strain grown on potato dextrose agar plates and Wickerham agar plates showed that expression of clustering genes involved in the biosynthesis of three sclerotium-associated secondary metabolites was down-regulated. These included gene clusters of asparasone, aflatrem, and aflavarin. In contrast, those of aflatoxin, cyclopiazonic acid and kojic acid were not affected. Metabolite analyses confirmed that the non-pigmented sclerotia contained aflatoxin and cyclopiazonic acid but not other aforementioned metabolites, three asparasone analogs and dihydroxyaflavinine commonly present in mature sclerotia. Impairment in aswA gene function stalls normal sclerotial development, which in turn prevents biosynthesis and accumulation of sclerotium-specific metabolites. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. α--AMYLASES OF Aspergillus flavus var. oryzae AND Bacillus subtilis: THE SUBSTRATE SPECIFICITY AND RESISTANCE TO A NUMBER OF CHEMICALLY ACTIVE SUBSTANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Avdiyuk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Aspergillus flavus var. oryzae 80428 and Bacillus subtilis 147 α-amylases to split different carbohydrate-containing substrates, such as maltose, sucrose, trehalose, dextrin, α- and β-cyclodextrin, amylose, amylopectin, glycogen, pullulan, soluble starch, insoluble starch, corn starch, wheat starch, dextran 500 has been studied. It was shown that investigated enzymes differ by substrate specificity. α-Amylase of A. flavus var. oryzae 80428 rapidly hydrolysed soluble potato and wheat starch, while the α-amylase of B. subtilis 147 — only wheat starch. Both enzymes don’t cleave maltose, α-cyclodextrin and dextran 500. A. flavus var. oryzae 80428 α-amylase display very small ability to hydrolyze pullulan, while α-amylase of B. subtilis 147 it does not act in general. The lowest values of Michaelis constant for both enzymes at splitting of glycogen have been obtained, indicating that enzymes have the greatest affinity to this substrate. The studies of influence of chemically active substances on activity of A. flavus var. oryzae 80428 and B. subtilis 147 ?-amylases show there are resistant to urea, deoxycholic acid, Tween-80, Triton X-100 and hydrogen peroxide. It’s indicate the enzymes tested may be competitive in compare with earlier described in literature enzymes. The obtained results give a possibility to propose in future usage these enzymes in different fields of industry, foremost in detergent industry.

  4. Effects of Medicinal Plant Extracts and Photosensitization on Aflatoxin Producing Aspergillus flavus (Raper and Fennell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loise M. Njoki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken with an aim of exploring the effectiveness of medicinal plant extracts in the control of aflatoxin production. Antifungal properties, photosensitization, and phytochemical composition of aqueous and organic extracts of fruits from Solanum aculeastrum, bark from Syzygium cordatum, and leaves from Prunus africana, Ocimum lamiifolium, Lippia kituiensis, and Spinacia oleracea were tested. Spores from four-day-old cultures of previously identified toxigenic fungi, UONV017 and UONV003, were used. Disc diffusion and broth dilution methods were used to test the antifungal activity. The spores were suspended in 2 ml of each extract separately and treated with visible light (420 nm for varying periods. Organic extracts displayed species and concentration dependent antifungal activity. Solanum aculeastrum had the highest zones of inhibition diameters in both strains: UONV017 (mean = 18.50±0.71 mm and UONV003 (mean = 11.92±0.94 mm at 600 mg/ml. Aqueous extracts had no antifungal activity because all diameters were below 8 mm. Solanum aculeastrum had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration at 25 mg/ml against A. flavus UONV017. All the plant extracts in combination with light reduced the viability of fungal conidia compared with the controls without light, without extracts, and without both extracts and light. Six bioactive compounds were analyzed in the plant extracts. Medicinal plant extracts in this study can control conidia viability and hence with further development can control toxigenic fungal spread.

  5. Rifampin Enhances the Activity of Amphotericin B against Fusarium solani Species Complex and Aspergillus flavus Species Complex Isolates from Keratitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; Zhou, Lutan; Gao, Chuanwen; Han, Lei; Xu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    The in vitro activities of amphotericin B in combination with rifampin were assessed against 95 ocular fungal isolates. The interactions between amphotericin B and rifampin at 4, 8, 16, and 32 μg/ml were synergistic for 11.8%, 51.0%, 90.2%, and 94.1%, respectively, of Fusarium solani species complex isolates and for 13.6%, 45.5%, 93.2%, and 95.5%, respectively, of Aspergillus flavus species complex isolates. Antagonism was never observed for the amphotericin B-rifampin combinations. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Improvement of the antifungal activity of Litsea cubeba vapor by using a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser against Aspergillus flavus on brown rice snack bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhem, Kitiya; Matan, Narumol; Matan, Nirundorn; Danworaphong, Sorasak; Aewsiri, Tanong

    2015-12-23

    The aim of this study was to improve the antifungal activity of the volatile Litsea cubeba essential oil and its main components (citral and limonene) on brown rice snack bars by applying He-Ne laser treatment. Different volumes (50-200 μL) of L. cubeba, citral or limonene were absorbed into a filter paper and placed inside an oven (18 L). Ten brown rice snack bars (2 cm wide × 4 cm long × 0.5 cm deep) were put in an oven and heated at 180 °C for 20 min. The shelf-life of the treated snack bars at 30 °C was assessed and sensory testing was carried out to investigate their consumer acceptability. A count of total phenolic content (TPC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) on the properties of essential oil, citral, and limonene before and after the laser treatment was studied for possible modes of action. It was found that the laser treatment improved the antifungal activity of the examined volatile L. cubeba and citral with Aspergillus flavus inhibition by 80% in comparison with those of the control not treated with the laser. L. cubeba vapor at 100 μL with the laser treatment was found to completely inhibit the growth of natural molds on the snack bars for at least 25 days; however, without essential oil vapor and laser treatment, naturally contaminating mold was observed in 3 days. Results from the sensory tests showed that the panelists were unable to detect flavor and aroma differences between essential oil treatment and the control. Laser treatment caused an increase in TPC of citral oil whereas the TPC in limonene showed a decrease after the laser treatment. These situations could result from the changing peak of the aliphatic hydrocarbons that was revealed by the FTIR spectra. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biological Control of Aflatoxin Contamination in U.S. Crops and the Use of Bioplastic Formulations of Aspergillus flavus Biocontrol Strains To Optimize Application Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Hamed K; Accinelli, Cesare; Shier, W Thomas

    2017-08-23

    Aflatoxin contamination has a major economic impact on crop production in the southern United States. Reduction of aflatoxin contamination in harvested crops has been achieved by applying nonaflatoxigenic biocontrol Aspergillus flavus strains that can out-compete wild aflatoxigenic A. flavus, reducing their numbers at the site of application. Currently, the standard method for applying biocontrol A. flavus strains to soil is using a nutrient-supplying carrier (e.g., pearled barley for Afla-Guard). Granules of Bioplastic (partially acetylated corn starch) have been investigated as an alternative nutritive carrier for biocontrol agents. Bioplastic granules have also been used to prepare a sprayable biocontrol formulation that gives effective reduction of aflatoxin contamination in harvested corn kernels with application of much smaller amounts to leaves later in the growing season. The ultimate goal of biocontrol research is to produce biocontrol systems that can be applied to crops only when long-range weather forecasting indicates they will be needed.

  8. The proportion of non-aflatoxigenic strains of the Aspergillus flavus/oryzae complex from meju by analyses of the aflatoxin biosynthetic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Beom; Lee, Mina; Kim, Dae-Ho; Chung, Soo-Hyun; Shin, Hyeon-Dong; Samson, Robert A

    2013-12-01

    Strains of the Aspergillus flavus/oryzae complex are frequently isolated from meju, a fermented soybean product, that is used as the starting material for ganjang (soy sauce) and doenjang (soybean paste) production. In this study, we examined the aflatoxin producing capacity of A. flavus/oryzae strains isolated from meju. 192 strains of A. flavus/oryzae were isolated from more than 100 meju samples collected from diverse regions of Korea from 2008 to 2011, and the norB-cypA, omtA, and aflR genes in the aflatoxin biosynthesis gene cluster were analyzed. We found that 178 strains (92.7%) belonged to non-aflatoxigenic group (Type I of norB-cypA, IB-L-B-, IC-AO, or IA-L-B- of omtA, and AO type of aflR), and 14 strains (7.3%) belonged to aflatoxin-producible group (Type II of norB-cypA, IC-L-B+/B- or IC-L-B+ of omtA, and AF type of aflR). Only 7 strains (3.6%) in the aflatoxin-producible group produced aflatoxins on Czapek yeast-extract medium. The aflatoxin-producing capability of A. flavus/oryzae strains from other sources in Korea were also investigated, and 92.9% (52/56) strains from air, 93.9% (31/33) strains from rice straw, 91.7% (11/12) strains from soybean, 81.3% (13/16) strains from corn, 82% (41/50) strains from peanut, and 73.2% (41/56) strains from arable soil were included in the non-aflatoxigenic group. The proportion of non-aflatoxigenicity of meju strains was similar to that of strains from soybean, air and rice straw, all of which have an effect on the fermentation of meju. The data suggest that meju does not have a preference for non-aflatoxigenic or aflatoxin-producible strains of A. flavus/oryzae from the environment of meju. The non-aflatoxigenic meju strains are proposed to be named A. oryzae, while the meju strains that can produce aflatoxins should be referred to A. flavus in this study.

  9. Bioprocess and biotechnology: effect of xylanase from Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus on pulp biobleaching and enzyme production using agroindustrial residues as substract

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelciele Cavalieri de Alencar Guimaraes; Michele Sorgatto; Simone de Carvalho Peixoto-Nogueira; Jorge Henrique Almeida Betini; Fabiana Fonseca Zanoelo; Maria Rita Marques; Maria de Lourdes Teixeira de Moraes Polizeli; Giovana C Giannesi

    2013-01-01

      This study compares two xylanases produced by filamentous fungi such as A. niger and A. flavus using agroindustrial residues as substract and evaluated the effect of these enzymes on cellulose pulp biobleaching process...

  10. In vitro evaluation of leaf extracts on the growth of Aspergillus niger infecting maize grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Okereke

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxin producing fungi are important pathogens affecting stored maize grains. Conventional management strategies using synthetic chemicals are expensive, hazardous and environmentally unfriendly. This has necessitated the search for alternatives in botanicals. Market sampling of maize grains were carried out in five markets in Port Hartcourt, Nigeria, namely; Choba-main and Choba junction, Rumuosi, Aluu and Ozuoba, to evaluate the occurrence of mycotoxin-producing fungi. Studies were then carried out in the laboratory to evaluate the efficacy of water leaf extracts of Azadirachta indica, Garcina kola, Moringa oliefera, Ocimium gratissimum, Gongronema latifolium and Vernonia amygdalina at three different concentrations (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5% w/v on the prevalent fungus. Result from the market sampling showed that Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Pennicillin sp were commonly isolated from the maize grains with Aspergillus niger having the highest occurrence. Choba markets were observed to have the highest percentage occurrence of Aspergillus niger (66-100%. Laboratory studies showed that Gongronema latifolium, effectively reduced the growth of A. niger on PDA media and leaf extract concentration at 7.5% was the most effective.

  11. Aspergillus: introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species in the genus Aspergillus possess versatile metabolic activities that impact our daily life both positively and negatively. Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus oryzae are closely related fungi. While the former is able to produce carcinogenic aflatoxins and is an etiological agent of aspergill...

  12. A Public Platform for the Verification of the Phenotypic Effect of Candidate Genes for Resistance to Aflatoxin Accumulation and Aspergillus flavus Infection in Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyan Shan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A public candidate gene testing pipeline for resistance to aflatoxin accumulation or Aspergillus flavus infection in maize is presented here. The pipeline consists of steps for identifying, testing, and verifying the association of selected maize gene sequences with resistance under field conditions. Resources include a database of genetic and protein sequences associated with the reduction in aflatoxin contamination from previous studies; eight diverse inbred maize lines for polymorphism identification within any maize gene sequence; four Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL mapping populations and one association mapping panel, all phenotyped for aflatoxin accumulation resistance and associated phenotypes; and capacity for Insertion/Deletion (InDel and SNP genotyping in the population(s for mapping. To date, ten genes have been identified as possible candidate genes and put through the candidate gene testing pipeline, and results are presented here to demonstrate the utility of the pipeline.

  13. Biosorption characteristics of Aspergillus flavus biomass for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions from an aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Tamer; Tunali, Sibel

    2006-10-01

    The Pb(II) and Cu(II) biosorption characteristics of Aspergillus flavus fungal biomass were examined as a function of initial pH, contact time and initial metal ion concentration. Heat inactivated (killed) biomass was used in the determination of optimum conditions before investigating the performance of pretreated biosorbent. The maximum biosorption values were found to be 13.46 +/- 0.99 mg/g for Pb(II) and 10.82 +/- 1.46 mg/g for Cu(II) at pH 5.0 +/- 0.1 with an equilibrium time of 2 h. Detergent, sodium hydroxide and dimethyl sulfoxide pretreatments enhanced the biosorption capacity of biomass in comparison with the heat inactivated biomass. The biosorption data obtained under the optimum conditions were well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. Competitive biosorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions was also investigated to determine the selectivity of the biomass. The results indicated that A. flavus is a suitable biosorbent for the removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution.

  14. Vitality Stains and Real Time PCR Studies to Delineate the Interactions of Pichia anomala and Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were to probe the effect of the yeast, P. anomala against A flavus by using real time RT-PCR technique and vitality fluorescent stains. Yeast and fungi were inoculated into a 250 ml-flask containing 50 ml potato dextrose broth (PDB) at yeast to fungus (Y : F) ratios of ...

  15. Pharmacodynamics of Voriconazole against Wild-Type and Azole-Resistant Aspergillus flavus Isolates in a Nonneutropenic Murine Model of Disseminated Aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Dhaliwal, Manpreet; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Meis, Jacques F; Mouton, Johan W

    2017-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) due to Aspergillus flavus is associated with high mortality. Although voriconazole (VRC) is widely recommended as the first-line treatment for IA, emergence of azole resistance in Aspergillus spp. is translating to treatment failure. We evaluated the efficacy of voriconazole in a nonneutropenic murine model of disseminated A. flavus infection using two voriconazole-resistant isolates (one harboring the Y319H substitution in the cyp51C gene) and two wild-type isolates without mutations. All isolates exhibited a dose-response relationship, and voriconazole treatment improved mouse survival in a dose-dependent manner. At 40 mg/kg of body weight, 100% efficacy was observed for 1 susceptible isolate and 1 resistant isolate (with mutation), whereas for another susceptible isolate and resistant isolate (without mutation), survival rates were 81% and 72%, respectively. The Hill equation with a variable slope fitted the relationship between the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)/MIC ratio and 14-day survival well for each strain. An F test showed the 50% effective doses to be significantly different from each other (P = 0.0023). However, contrary to expectation, there was a significant difference in exposure-response relationships between strains, and it appeared that the susceptible strains required a relatively higher exposure than the resistant ones to result in the same treatment effect, the 50% effective pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) index (EI 50 ) required being negatively and log-linearly related to the MIC (P = 0.04). We conclude that the efficacy of voriconazole depended on drug exposure and the voriconazole MIC of the isolates, but lower exposures are required for strains with higher MICs. These findings may have profound significance in clinical practice with respect to dosing and drug choice. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Ação fungitóxica do óleo essencial de Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur. e K. Shum sobre o Aspergillus flavus isolado da castanha-do-Brasil (Bertholletia excelsa Fungitoxic action of the essential oil of Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur. and K. Shum on Aspergillus flavus isolated from the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Araújo Pimentel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, avaliou-se a capacidade fungitóxica do óleo essencial de folhas frescas de Tanaecium nocturnum sobre o Aspergillus flavus isolado da castanha-do-brasil, por meio das técnicas de contato e fumigação. Pelos resultados dos bioensaios realizados até 10 dias de incubação, verificou-se que a inibição total do crescimento micelial ocorreu quando se utilizou o óleo essencial nas concentrações de 782 ppm (técnica de contato e 1000 ppm (técnica de fumigação. Em ambas as técnicas, o óleo essencial inibiu a esporulação a partir da concentração de 500 ppm. Observou-se que nos cinco primeiros dias de incubação não houve diferença significativa nos resultados apresentados pelas duas técnicas estudadas, havendo a partir daí uma redução da atividade do óleo essencial nas concentrações inferiores a 1000 ppm pelo teste de fumigação. A ação fungitóxica do óleo essencial sobre o microrganismo estudado pode ser atribuída à presença do benzaldeído (composto majoritário do óleo essencial estudado, em associação com outros compostos também presentes nesse óleo essencial, tais como; álcool benzílico, benzoato de benzila e mandelonitrila.The present work sought to evaluate the fungitoxic activity of the essential oil from fresh Tanaecium nocturnum fresh leaves on Aspergillus flavus isolated from Brazil nuts, using contact and fumigation techniques. The results of bioassays performed up to 10 days of incubation demonstrated that total inhibition of mycelial growth occurred when using the essential oil at concentrations of 782 ppm (contact technique and 1000 ppm (fumigation technique. In both techniques, the essential oil inhibited the formation of spores at the concentration of 500 ppm. No significant difference in the results presented by the two techniques was observed in the first five days of incubation. After this period, the essential oil showed a reduction in activity at concentrations lower than

  17. Perfil bioquímico do soro de frangos de corte alimentados com dieta suplementada com alfa-amilase de Cryptococcus flavus e Aspergillus niger HM2003 Biochemichal serum profile of broilers fed diets suplemented with alfa-amylase from Cryptococcus flavus and Aspergillus niger HM2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Silva Minafra

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o perfil bioquímico do soro de frangos de corte alimentados com a enzima α-amilase produzida por dois microrganismos. Produziram-se dois extratos, um com a-amilase obtida a partir de Cryptococcus flavus em meio de levedura comercial e outro com Aspergillus niger HM2003 em meio de proteína de soja e amido comercial, com atividade de 9,58 U/mL e 10,0 U/mL, respectivamente. Utilizaram-se 360 pintos de corte Cobb 500 de 1 dia de idade e com 49,72 ± 0,68 g de peso vivo inicial. As aves foram alojadas em baterias e foram criadas até os 21 dias de idade. Foram utilizados três dietas, cada uma com cinco repetições de 12 aves, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado. A primeira dieta (basal foi formulada sem adição de enzima e as outras duas receberam a suplementação de a-amilase produzida por cultivo de Cryptococcus flavus e Aspergillus niger HM2003. Dietas à base de milho e soja foram formuladas em duas fases: pré-inicial (1-7 dias e inicial (8-21 dias. Na fase pré-inicial, foram observados os seguintes valores médios para cálcio (6,90 e 5,99 mg/dL, proteína plasmática (2,0 e 2,50 g/dL e fosfatase alcalina (979,98 e 974,66 UI/L, respectivamente para Cryptococcus flavus e Aspergillus niger HM2003. A dieta acrescida de a-amilase obtida a partir de Aspergillus niger HM2003 determinou maior concentração sérica de fósforo. Na fase inicial, os resultados significativos relacionaram-se a potássio quando avaliadas dietas com adição de a-amilase pelas duas fontes. A incorporação das enzimas testadas não proporciona alterações metabólicas ou toxicidade nos animais.It was evaluated the biochemical serum profile of broilers fed rations supplemented with α-amylase produced by two microorganisms. Two extracts were produced, one was produced with a-amylase obtained from Cryptococcus flavus in a commercial yeast-based medium and the other with Aspergillus niger HM2003 produced in soybean protein and commercial starch medium

  18. Self-affine fractal growth front of Aspergillus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Shu; Miyazima, Sasuke

    1992-12-01

    Aspergillus oryzae have been grown in various environmental conditions and analyzed from the viewpoint of self-affinity. The growth behavior can be described by the Eden model in favorable conditions, and by DLA in unfavorable conditions.

  19. Mycetoma in South India: retrospective analysis of 13 cases and description of two cases caused by unusual pathogens: Neoscytalidium dimidiatum and Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Somanath; Uppin, Shantveet G; Uppin, Megha S; Umabala, P; Challa, Sundaram; Laxmi, V; Prasad, V B N

    2010-11-01

    Mycetoma is a chronic suppurative and/or granulomatous inflammatory lesion of skin, subcutaneous tissue, fascia, and tendons caused by the traumatic inoculation of either fungal (eumycotic) or bacterial (actinomycotic) organisms present in the soil. The disease is characterized by triad of tumefaction, discharging sinuses, and grains. Thirteen new cases of biopsy proven mycetomas were analyzed, retrospectively, from January 2000 to October 2009. Clinical parameters, bone involvement, microbiological properties, and histopathological features were evaluated. Categorization into eumycotic or actinomycotic was based upon features on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections with special stains. Therapeutic outcome was presented wherever available. There were eight actinomycetomas and five eumycetoma cases including 11 men and two women. Foot and lower extremities were the most common site of involvement (9 of 13, 69%). Culture results were available in 8 of 13 cases (61.5%). Madurella mycetomatis, Neoscytalidium dimidiatum, and Aspergillus flavus were the isolates among eumycetomas whereas Acinomadura madurae, Actinomadura pelletieri, and Nocardia species were the isolates among actinomycetomas. Two cases had underlying bone involvement. On follow-up, four of five eumycetoma cases showed partial improvement following surgery and antifungal therapy, one had amputation of the lower leg. Of the actinomycetomas, six of eight had dramatic improvement following sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim based therapy, one had complete cure, and one was lost to follow-up. Strong clinical suspicion, exact categorization of lesion into eumycotic or actinomycotic along with culture correlation, is essential for prognosis and effective therapy. © 2010 The International Society of Dermatology.

  20. Production of thermostable glucoamylase by newly isolated Aspergillus flavus A 1.1 and Thermomyces lanuginosus A 13.37 Produção e glucoamilase por Aspergillus flavus A1.1 e Thermomyces lanuginosus A13.37

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Gomes

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen thermophilic fungal strains were isolated from agricultural soil, tubers and compost samples in tropical Brazil. Two strains were selected based on of their ability to produce considerable glucoamylase activity while growing in liquid medium at 45ºC with starch as the only carbon source. They were identified as Aspergillus flavus A1.1 and Thermomyces lanuginosus A 13.37 Tsiklinsky. The experiment to evaluate the effect of carbon source, temperature and initial pH of the medium on enzyme production was developed in a full factorial design (2x2x3. Enzyme productivity was influenced by the type of starch used as carbon source. Cassava starch showed to be a better substrate than corn starch for glucoamylase production by A. flavus but for T. lanuginosus the difference was not significant. Enzyme activities were determined using as substrates 0.3% soluble starch, 0.3% maltose or 0.3% of starch plus 0.1% maltose. The enzymes from A. flavus A1.1 hydrolyzed soluble starch preferentially but also exhibited a significant maltase activity. Moreover higher quantities of glucose were released when the substrate used was a mixture of starch and maltose, suggesting that this fungus produced two types of enzyme. In the case T. lanuginosus A 13.37, the substrate specificity test indicated that the enzyme released also hydrolyzed starch more efficiently than maltose, but there was no increase in the liberation of glucose when a mixture of starch and maltose was used as substrate, suggesting that only one type of enzyme was secreted. Glucoamylases produced from A. flavus A1.1 and T. lanuginous A.13-37 have high optimum temperature (65ºC and 70ºC and good thermostability in the absence of substrate (maintaining 50% of activity for 5 and 8 hours, respectively, at 60ºC and are stable over in a wide pH range. These new strains offer an attractive alternative source of enzymes for industrial starch processing.Entre 13 linhagens de fungos filamentosos

  1. Interacções de estirpes de Aspergillus flavus não-toxígenas com Aspergillus parasiticus na produção de aflatoxinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermínia Marina Martins

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available A produção de aflatoxinas é afetada por parâmetros abióticos, bióticos e genéticos. As condições eugenésicas e disgenésicas da aflatoxinogênese estão relativamente bem estudadas, tal como as influências ecológicas (temperatura, pH, Aw, tensão de oxigênio, pressão osmótica, nutrientes e substâncias fungistáticas. Contudo, é muito escasso o conhecimento relativo aos mecanismos reguladores endógenos, à cinética do anabolismo e à interação dos fungos produtores com a restante microflora presente em substratos eutrofizantes. O principal objetivo deste estudo é avaliar a interação de cinco estirpes indígenas de A. flavus, comprovadamente atoxígenas, com uma geneticamente apta (A. parasiticus ATCC 15517, cultivadas simultaneamente em dois substratos: um natural (milho triturado e outro sintético (Caldo de Czapeck-Dox Modificado. A quantificação das aflatoxinas foi efetuada no 8º e 12º dias de incubação, por Cromatografia Líquida de Alta Resolução (HPLC. Os resultados demonstraram que todas as estirpes foram sinérgicas, aumentando o rendimento da produção entre 5,6 e 106,5%, quando comparados com os valores das testemunhas.

  2. Effect of cinnamomum zeylanicum blume essential oil on the growth and morphogenesis of some potentially pathogenic Aspergillus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Egberto Santos; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes; de Souza, Evandro Leite; de Sousa, Frederico Barbosa

    2008-01-01

    Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume is known for a wide range of medicinal properties. This study aimed to assess the interference of C. zeylanicum essential oil on the growth and morphogenesis of some potentially pathogenic Aspergillus species. The essential oil presented strong antifungal effect causing the growth inhibition of the assayed strains and development of large growth inhibition zones. MIC50 and MIC90 values were 40 and 80 μL/mL, respectively. 80, 40 and 20 μL/mL of the oil strongly inhibited the radial mycelial growth of A. niger, A. flavus and A. fumigatus along 14 days. 80 and 40 μL/mL of the oil caused a 100% inhibition of the fungal spore germination. Main morphological changes observed under light microscopy provided by the essential oil in the fungal strains were decreased conidiation, leakage of cytoplasm, loss of pigmentation and disrupted cell structure indicating fungal wall degeneration. It is concluded that C. zeylanicum essential oil could be known as potential antifungal compound, particularly, to protect against the growth of Aspergillus species. PMID:24031186

  3. Effect of cinnamomum zeylanicum blume essential oil on the growth and morphogenesis of some potentially pathogenic Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Egberto Santos; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes; de Souza, Evandro Leite; de Sousa, Frederico Barbosa

    2008-01-01

    Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume is known for a wide range of medicinal properties. This study aimed to assess the interference of C. zeylanicum essential oil on the growth and morphogenesis of some potentially pathogenic Aspergillus species. The essential oil presented strong antifungal effect causing the growth inhibition of the assayed strains and development of large growth inhibition zones. MIC50 and MIC90 values were 40 and 80 μL/mL, respectively. 80, 40 and 20 μL/mL of the oil strongly inhibited the radial mycelial growth of A. niger, A. flavus and A. fumigatus along 14 days. 80 and 40 μL/mL of the oil caused a 100% inhibition of the fungal spore germination. Main morphological changes observed under light microscopy provided by the essential oil in the fungal strains were decreased conidiation, leakage of cytoplasm, loss of pigmentation and disrupted cell structure indicating fungal wall degeneration. It is concluded that C. zeylanicum essential oil could be known as potential antifungal compound, particularly, to protect against the growth of Aspergillus species.

  4. Assessment of Aspergillus niger biofilm growth kinetics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspergillus niger ATCC 10864 was grown on bubble minicolumns aerated with pure oxygen either as biofilm or free-mycelium submerged systems. Growth kinetics was followed by estimating biomass from released carbon dioxide using a titration method and mathematical models. Submerged cultures showed increased ...

  5. VeA is associated with the response to oxidative stress in the aflatoxin producer Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Survival of fungal species depends on the ability of these organisms to respond to environmental stresses. Osmotic stress or high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can cause stress in fungi resulting in growth inhibition. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells have developed numerous mechanisms...

  6. evaluation of growth of some fungi in crude oil polluted environment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The two species of Aspergillus A. niger and flavus used in the study appreciably tolerated the oil though the growth of A. flavus was retarded as the concentration of oil increased. Botrytis cinerea, Curvularia lunata and Colletotrichum sp. could not grow beyond the concentration of 1ml/10mls of oil Potato Dextrose Dextrose ...

  7. The potential of Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae essential oil in inhibiting the growth of some food-related Aspergillus species Potencial do óleo essencial de Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae em inibir o crescimento de algumas cepas de Aspergillus de interesse em alimentos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egberto Santos Carmo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae has been currently known for their interesting antimicrobial activity being regarded as alternative antimicrobial for use is food conservation systems. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of O. vulgare essential oil in inhibiting the growth of some food-related Aspergillus species (A. flavus, A. parasiticus, A. terreus, A. ochraceus, A. fumigatus and A. niger. The essential oil revealed a strong anti-Aspergillus property providing an inhibition of all assayed mould strains. MIC values were between 80 and 20 µL/mL being found a MIC50 of 40 µL/mL. The essential oil at concentration of 80 and 40 µL/mL provided a fungicidal effect on A. flavus, A. fumigatus and A. niger noted by a total inhibition of the radial mycelial growth along 14 days of interaction. In addition, the essential oil was able to inhibit the mould spores germination when assayed at concentrations of 80 and 40 µL/mL. Our results showed the interesting anti-Aspergillus activity of O. vulgare essential oil supporting their possible use as anti-mould compound in food conservation.Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae tem sido atualmente reconhecido por sua intensa atividade antimicrobiana sendo considerado como fonte de compostos antimicrobianos alternativos para uso em sistemas de conservação de alimentos. Este estudo objetivou avaliar a efetividade do óleo essencial de O. vulgare em inibir o crescimento de algumas espécies de Aspergillus (A. flavus, A. parasiticus, A. terreus and A. fumigatus de interesse em alimentos. O óleo essencial revelou uma forte atividade atni-Aspergillus provocando a inibição de todas as cepas fúngicas ensaiadas. Os valores de MIC estiveram entre 80 e 20 µL/mL sendo encontrado uma MIC50 de 40 µL/mL. O óleo essencial nas concentrações de 80 e 40 µL/mL causou um efeito fungicida sobre A. flavus, A. fumigatus e A. niger notado por uma total inibição do crescimento micelial radial ao longo de 14 dias de

  8. 76 FR 16297 - Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... are not limited to: Crop production (NAICS code 111). Animal production (NAICS code 112). Food... AF36, in cotton fields, demonstrated replacement of toxigenic (aflatoxin-producing) fungi with atoxic...

  9. Atypical Aspergillus parasiticus isolates from pistachio with aflR gene nucleotide insertion identical to Aspergillus sojae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxins are the most toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites produced primarily by the filamentous fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. The toxins cause devastating economic losses because of strict regulations on distribution of contaminated products. Aspergillus sojae are...

  10. Genotypic Regulation of Aflatoxin Accumulation but Not Aspergillus Fungal Growth upon Post-Harvest Infection of Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Ahmed Korani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin contamination is a major economic and food safety concern for the peanut industry that largely could be mitigated by genetic resistance. To screen peanut for aflatoxin resistance, ten genotypes were infected with a green fluorescent protein (GFP—expressing Aspergillus flavus strain. Percentages of fungal infected area and fungal GFP signal intensity were documented by visual ratings every 8 h for 72 h after inoculation. Significant genotypic differences in fungal growth rates were documented by repeated measures and area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC analyses. SICIA (Seed Infection Coverage and Intensity Analyzer, an image processing software, was developed to digitize fungal GFP signals. Data from SICIA image analysis confirmed visual rating results validating its utility for quantifying fungal growth. Among the tested peanut genotypes, NC 3033 and GT-C20 supported the lowest and highest fungal growth on the surface of peanut seeds, respectively. Although differential fungal growth was observed on the surface of peanut seeds, total fungal growth in the seeds was not significantly different across genotypes based on a fluorometric GFP assay. Significant differences in aflatoxin B levels were detected across peanut genotypes. ICG 1471 had the lowest aflatoxin level whereas Florida-07 had the highest. Two-year aflatoxin tests under simulated late-season drought also showed that ICG 1471 had reduced aflatoxin production under pre-harvest field conditions. These results suggest that all peanut genotypes support A. flavus fungal growth yet differentially influence aflatoxin production.

  11. Contaminação por Aspergillus flavus e A. fumigatus em sementes de girassol (Helianthus annuus utilizados na alimentação de psitacídeos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandro Machado Conceição

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2010v23n2p145 Amplamente difundido na alimentação de psitacídeos em razão do preço baixo, elevada palatabilidade, e por razões culturais, o Helianthus annuus, conhecido como girassol, vem se mostrando importante na clínica aviária em decorrência do excesso de calorias, e da alta incidência na contaminação por alguns fungos, principalmente do gênero Aspergillus, especificamente A. flavus e A. fumigatus. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a contaminação por Aspegillus ssp. em sementes de girassol destinada à alimentação de psitacídeos comercializadas em Aracaju, estado de Sergipe. As análises foram realizadas no Laboratório de Microbiologia, do Hospital Veterinário Dr. Vicente Borreli, na Faculdade Pio Décimo. Avaliaram-se quatro amostras de sementes de girassol, sendo uma comercializada no mercado público municipal, de forma granel e três marcas comerciais, envasadas e de diferentes hipermercados, processadas segundo Forsythe (2002. De acordo com a pesquisa realizada, foi possível observar um elevado desenvolvimento de A. flavus e A. fumigatus nas sementes de girassol. Esta contaminação pode estar relacionada a vários fatores: colheita e fases de secagem, beneficiamento e armazenamento do grão inadequado. Além disso, é importante destacar a necessidade de que haja um melhor armazenamento de grãos, com controle de temperatura e umidade relativa, visando reduzir a possibilidade de contaminação por Aspergillus spp. que causa prejuízos na alimentação de psitacídeos, e de outras espécies animais.

  12. The Effectiveness of Antifungal Controlling Aspergillus Niger Growth on Plasterboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parjo Umi Kalthsom

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Good indoor environmental quality is desired for a healthy indoor environment. The microbial growth under indoor environments contribute to the poor indoor environmental quality that can cause various of health problems. In this study, the applications of three types of antifungals to prevent microbial migration, subsequent growth and bio-deterioration of the substrates. The aim of this research was to evaluate the coating-bio resistance in remediation of indoor fungal using three types of antifungals with different types of wall finishing materials. The treatment was exposed to optimum temperature and relative humidity at 30°C and 90% respectively. The potassium sorbate, zinc salicylate and calcium benzoate are tested against Aspergillus niger which is collected from indoor rooms. This study has revealed the growth of A. niger are more affected by the potassium sorbate on thick wallpaper, which is the percentage growth are 47%.

  13. Effect of Cymbopogon martinii, Foeniculum vulgare, and Trachyspermum ammi Essential Oils on the Growth and Mycotoxins Production by Aspergillus Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negero Gemeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate effect of essential oils on Aspergillus spore germination, growth, and mycotoxin production. In vitro antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic activities of Cymbopogon martinii, Foeniculum vulgare, and Trachyspermum ammi essential oils were carried out on toxigenic strains of Aspergillus species. Plant materials were hydrodistilled for 4-5 h in Clevenger apparatus. 0.25 μL/mL, 0.5 μL/mL, 1 μL/mL, 2 μL/mL, and 4 μL/mL concentrations of each essential oil were prepared in 0.1% Tween 80 (V/V. T. ammi oil showed highest antifungal activity. Absolute mycelial inhibition was recorded at 1 μL/mL by essential oils of T. ammi. The oil also showed complete inhibition of spore germination at a concentration of 2 μL/mL. In addition, T. ammi oil showed significant antiaflatoxigenic potency by totally inhibiting toxin production from A. niger and A. flavus at 0.5 and 0.75 μL/mL, respectively. C. martinii, F. vulgare, and T. ammi oils as antifungals were found superior over synthetic preservative. Moreover, a concentration of 5336.297 μL/kg body weight was recorded for LC50 on mice indicating the low mammalian toxicity. In conclusion, the essential oils from T. ammi can be a potential source of safe natural food preservative for food commodities contamination by Aspergillus species.

  14. Inhibitory Effect of Natural Phenolic Compounds on Aspergillus parasiticus Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina P. Pizzolitto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the impact of Aspergillus species on crops, it appears to be highly desirable to apply strategies to prevent their growth, as well as to eliminate or reduce their presence in food products. For this reason, the aims of this investigation were to evaluate the effects of ten natural phenolic compounds on the Aspergillus parasiticus growth and to determine which physicochemical properties are involved in the antifungal activity. According to the results of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of the individual compounds, isoeugenol, carvacrol, and thymol were the most active phenolic components (1.26 mM, 1.47 mM, and 1.50 mM, resp., followed by eugenol (2.23 mM. On the other hand, creosol, p-cresol, o-cresol, m-cresol, vanillin, and phenol had no effects on fungal development. Logarithm of the octanol/water partition coefficient (log P, refractivity index (RI, and molar volume (MV were demonstrated to be the descriptors that best explained the antifungal activity correlated to lipophilicity, reactivity of the components, and steric aspect. These findings make an important contribution to the search for new compounds with antifungal activity.

  15. Movilidad de Aspergillus flavus link ex fries en mazorcas de cinco genotipos de maiz (Zea Mays L. empleando tres métodos de inoculación (ING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Villalobos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Three inoculation techniques for evaluating reaction of corn to kernel infection by Aspergillus flavus were tested in the field of five different genotypes. Inoculations were made 20 days after midsilk stage, using 0.5 ml of 105 conidial suspensions. The methods were: a injection of small amounts of inoculum in each kernel of a vertical row (M1; b injection in the first well developed kernels around the top part of the ear (M2; c injection of inoculum in the kernels at the lower part of the ear, forming a semicircle (M3. Two weeks after inoculation ears were harvested, and kernels not wounded were separated according to its position to the inoculated kernels, then surface sterilized and planted on PDA, to determine the infection percentage. M1 and M2 were found very efficient because they produced higher infection levels. M1 is considered the best because it provided a larger number of kernels for assay and was easy to use. No statistical difference was found among genotypes.

  16. Assessment of Aspergillus niger biofilm growth kinetics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... assessed by evaluating the CO2 released during the fermentation in minibioreactors. Key words: Aspergillus niger, biofilm, mathematical modeling, endogenous respiration, Cryo-SEM. INTRODUCTION. Aspergillus niger is currently one of the microbial species of main biotechnological importance because ...

  17. Effect of Environmental Factors on the Growth of Aspergillus Species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mycotoxins of public health importance (Ehrlich,. 2007). As such, the occurrence of Aspergillus secondary metabolites in food stuffs such as millet grains is becoming an increasing environmental concern. The presence of Aspergillus species in stored millet may pose a threat to the health of both humans and livestock.

  18. Growth pattern of the surface of fungus Aspergillus colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Shu; Miyazima, Sasuke

    1992-05-01

    Aspergillus oryzae colonies were grown under various glucose concentrations, temperatures, and agar concentrations, and the effects on the pattern were investigated. Patterns of colony were found to vary from uniform to diffusion-limited aggregation type.

  19. Identification of secreted proteins of Aspergillus oryzae associated with growth on solid cereal substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesebeke, te R.; Boussier, A.; Biezen, de N.; Hondel, van den C.; Punt, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    Filamentous growth of Aspergillus oryzae on solid cereal substrates involves secretion of substrate converting enzymes and a solid substrate specific polarised hyphal growth phenotype. To identify proteins produced under these specific conditions, the extracts of A. oryzae grown on wheat-based media

  20. Efficacy of corn silage inoculants on the fermentation quality under farm conditions and their influence on Aspergillus parasitucus, A. flavus and A. fumigatus determined by q-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogi, Cecilia A; Pellegrino, Matías; Poloni, Valeria; Poloni, Luis; Pereyra, Carina M; Sanabria, Analía; Pianzzola, María Julia; Dalcero, Ana; Cavaglieri, Lilia

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory-scale silos were prepared to evaluate the efficacy of two different lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on the fermentation quality and mycobiota of corn silage. Their influence on Aspergillus species' variability by using the q-PCR technique was studied. Silage inoculated with Lactobacillus rhamnosus RC007 or L. plantarum RC009 were compared with uninoculated silage. Silos were opened after 1, 7, 45, 90 and 120 days after ensiling. At the end of the ensiling period, silos were left open for 7 days to evaluate aerobic stability. Rapid lactic acid production and decline in pH values were seen in the early stages of fermentation in silage inoculated with L. rhamnosus RC007. After aerobic exposure, a significant decline in lactic acid content was observed in untreated and L. plantarum RC009-inoculated silages. Counts for yeasted and toxigenic fungus remained lower, after aerobic exposure, in L. rhamnosus RC007-inoculated silage, in comparison with L. plantarum RC009 and uninoculated silages. Comparing the influence exerted by both BAL, it was observed that L. rhamnosus RC007 was more efficient at inhibiting the three fungal species tested whose DNA concentrations, determined by q-PCR, oscillated near the initial value (pre-ensiling maize). The ability of L. rhamnosus RC007 to produce lactic acid rapidly and the decline in pH values in the early stages of the fermentation along with the reduction of yeast and mycotoxicogenic fungus after aerobic exposure shows its potential as a bio-control inoculant agent in animal feed.

  1. Aspergillus triggers phenazine production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    Aspergillus species. Methods: A suspension of fungal spores was streaked onto WATM agar plates. After 24 hours incubation at 37 °C, a P. aeruginosa overnight culture was streaked out perpendicular to the fungal streak. The plates were incubated at 37 °C for five days, examined and plugs were extracted...... for HPLC-DAD and HPLC-DAD-MS analysis. Results: P. aeruginosa PAO1 suppressed growth of A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, A. terreus and Emericella nidulans. HPLC and HPLC-DAD-MS results showed an increase in phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide production by P. aeruginosa...

  2. Suppression of Aspergillus by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    culture plates. After 24 hours incubation at 37 °C, a P. aeruginosa overnight culture diluted to 108 CFU/ml was streaked out perpendicular to the fungal streak. The plates were incubated at 37 °C for 5 days, examined and plugs were extracted for HPLC and LC-DAD-MS analysis. Results: P. aeruginosa PAO1...... suppressed growth of A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, A. terreus and E. nidulans. HPLC and LC-DAD-MS results showed an increase in phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide production by P. aeruginosa in the contact area of Aspergillus. Different quinolones were also identified...

  3. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Strain Inhibits Growth and Decreases Ochratoxin A Biosynthesis by Aspergillus carbonarius and Aspergillus ochraceus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Budroni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to select wine yeast strains as biocontrol agents against fungal contaminants responsible for the accumulation of ochratoxin A (OTA in grape and wine and to dissect the mechanism of OTA detoxification by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (DISAABA1182, which had previously been reported to reduce OTA in a synthetic must. All of the yeast strains tested displayed an ability to inhibit the growth of Aspergillus carbonarius both in vivo and in vitro and addition of culture filtrates from the tested isolates led to complete inhibition of OTA production. S. cerevisiae DISAABA1182 was selected and further tested for its capacity to inhibit OTA production and pks (polyketide synthase transcription in A. carbonarius and Aspergillus ochraceus in vitro. In order to dissect the mechanism of OTA detoxification, each of these two fungi was co-cultured with living yeast cells exposed to yeast crude or to autoclaved supernatant: S. cerevisiae DISAABA1182 was found to inhibit mycelial growth and OTA production in both Aspergilli when co-cultured in the OTA-inducing YES medium. Moreover, a decrease in pks transcription was observed in the presence of living cells of S. cerevisiae DISAABA1182 or its supernatant, while no effects were observed on transcription of either of the constitutively expressed calmodulin and β-tubulin genes. This suggests that transcriptional regulation of OTA biosynthetic genes takes place during the interaction between DISAABA1182 and OTA-producing Aspergilli.

  4. Characterization of Aspergillus species associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results also reveal that only A. flavus showed amplification with all the three aflatoxigenic primers apa-2, ver-1 and omt-1, which means that only A. flavus was identified as aflatoxigenic and other Aspergillus species as non-toxigenic after PCR analysis. Hence, morphological, microscopic and molecular methods are ...

  5. Gβ-like CpcB plays a crucial role for growth and development of Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qing; Wang, Long; Liu, Zengran; Kwon, Nak-Jung; Kim, Sun Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Growth, development, virulence and secondary metabolism in fungi are governed by heterotrimeric G proteins (G proteins). A Gβ-like protein called Gib2 has been shown to function as an atypical Gβ in Gpa1-cAMP signaling in Cryptococcus neoformans. We found that the previously reported CpcB (cross pathway control B) protein is the ortholog of Gib2 in Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus. In this report, we further characterize the roles of CpcB in governing growth, development and toxigenesis in the two aspergilli. The deletion of cpcB results in severely impaired cellular growth, delayed spore germination, and defective asexual sporulation (conidiation) in both aspergilli. Moreover, CpcB is necessary for proper expression of the key developmental activator brlA during initiation and progression of conidiation in A. nidulans and A. fumigatus. Somewhat in accordance with the previous study, the absence of cpcB results in the formation of fewer, but not micro-, cleistothecia in A. nidulans in the presence of wild type veA, an essential activator of sexual development. However, the cpcB deletion mutant cleistothecia contain no ascospores, validating that CpcB is required for progression and completion of sexual fruiting including ascosporogenesis. Furthermore, unlike the canonical GβSfaD, CpcB is not needed for the biosynthesis of the mycotoxin sterigmatocystin (ST) as the cpcB null mutant produced reduced amount of ST with unaltered STC gene expression. However, in A. fumigatus, the deletion of cpcB results in the blockage of gliotoxin (GT) production. Further genetic analyses in A. nidulans indicate that CpcB may play a central role in vegetative growth, which might be independent of FadA- and GanB-mediated signaling. A speculative model summarizing the roles of CpcB in conjunction with SfaD in A. nidulans is presented.

  6. Gβ-like CpcB plays a crucial role for growth and development of Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Kong

    Full Text Available Growth, development, virulence and secondary metabolism in fungi are governed by heterotrimeric G proteins (G proteins. A Gβ-like protein called Gib2 has been shown to function as an atypical Gβ in Gpa1-cAMP signaling in Cryptococcus neoformans. We found that the previously reported CpcB (cross pathway control B protein is the ortholog of Gib2 in Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus. In this report, we further characterize the roles of CpcB in governing growth, development and toxigenesis in the two aspergilli. The deletion of cpcB results in severely impaired cellular growth, delayed spore germination, and defective asexual sporulation (conidiation in both aspergilli. Moreover, CpcB is necessary for proper expression of the key developmental activator brlA during initiation and progression of conidiation in A. nidulans and A. fumigatus. Somewhat in accordance with the previous study, the absence of cpcB results in the formation of fewer, but not micro-, cleistothecia in A. nidulans in the presence of wild type veA, an essential activator of sexual development. However, the cpcB deletion mutant cleistothecia contain no ascospores, validating that CpcB is required for progression and completion of sexual fruiting including ascosporogenesis. Furthermore, unlike the canonical GβSfaD, CpcB is not needed for the biosynthesis of the mycotoxin sterigmatocystin (ST as the cpcB null mutant produced reduced amount of ST with unaltered STC gene expression. However, in A. fumigatus, the deletion of cpcB results in the blockage of gliotoxin (GT production. Further genetic analyses in A. nidulans indicate that CpcB may play a central role in vegetative growth, which might be independent of FadA- and GanB-mediated signaling. A speculative model summarizing the roles of CpcB in conjunction with SfaD in A. nidulans is presented.

  7. Atoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus isolated from peanuts collected from northern Philippines as potential biocon agents against pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination of peanut and corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxin contamination of food products causes liver cancer and weakened immunity in humans, and stunted growth and reduced productivity in animals (CAST, 2003). Effective control of pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination of peanut and corn due to AflaGuard and Aflasafe in the United States and Africa...

  8. Expression of Aspergillus hemoglobin domain activities in Aspergillus oryzae grown on solid substrates improves growth rate and enzyme production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesebeke, te R.; Boussier, A.; Biezen van, N.; Braaksma, M.; Hondel, van den C.A.M.J.J.; Vos, de W.M.; Punt, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    DNA fragments coding for hemoglobin domains (HBD) were isolated from Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus niger. The HBD activities were expressed in A. oryzae by introduction of HBD gene fragments under the control of the promoter of the constitutively expressed gpdA gene. In the transformants,

  9. Assessment of Aspergillus niger biofilm growth kinetics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... other hand, A. niger biofilm growth followed a logistic model having higher maximal specific growth rate than submerged cultures (0.061 ... applications in the food industry, beverages, textiles, agriculture, pulp and paper and ..... curves showed the same trend over time (Figure 4A). However, in submerged ...

  10. Effects of Botanical Extracts on the Mycelial Growth of Seed-Borne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of crude ethanolic plant extracts of Garcinia kola seeds and Nauclea latifolia root on mycelial growth of seed-borne fungi of African yam bean at different concentrations (100 mg/ml, 60 mg/ml and 20 mg/ml) were investigated. The seed-borne fungi were Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium moniliforme, Penicillium sp.

  11. Assessment of growth of Aspergillus spp. from agricultural soils in the presence of glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Cecilia S; Barberis, Carla L; Chiacchiera, Stella M; Magnoli, Carina E

    Agriculture is one of the bases of the Argentine economy. Glyphosate is undoubtedly one of the most important herbicides used. The increasing consumption and the efficiency of glyphosate-based herbicides have encouraged several studies on their persistence in soils, their effects on soil microbiota and their degradation processes. Fungi have been reported as being the main herbicide-degrading microorganisms as well as the most tolerant to environmental stress conditions. This study evaluated the growth performance of Aspergillus section Flavi and Aspergillus niger aggregate strains on Czapek Dox media supplied with a commercial glyphosate formulation as sole source of carbon (CZC), phosphorus (CZP) or nitrogen (CZN). Six Aspergillus spp. strains were evaluated. Each medium was stab-inoculated with fungal spores from 7-day old cultures. Two measures of colony radii were taken daily. All of the Aspergillus section Flavi strains showed a significant increase (from 24 to 44%) in growth rate on the CZN medium, as compared to controls. The A. niger aggregate strains exhibited the same behavioral pattern under all the conditions tested, except on the CZN medium. Velutinous or slightly floccose colonies with abundant sporulation were observed on CZP. Moreover, the colonies produced sparse sporulation on CZC or CZN media, being their appearances completely different from those on the CZP medium. This study establishes that A. section Flavi and A. niger aggregate strains can grow in vitro in the presence of glyphosate, especially when it is used as a sole source of phosphorus or nitrogen. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Growth and enzyme production during continuous cultures of a high amylase-producing variant of Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangirolami, Teresa; Carlsen, M.; Nielsen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Growth and product formation by a selected variant of Aspergillus oryzae showing high alpha-amylase production was studied in continuous cultivations carried out at six different specific growth rates, using glucose as the growth-limiting nutrient. The analysis of the steady-state data revealed...... to the characteristics of the selected variant....

  13. Chemical Composition and Antifungal Activity of Cuminum cyminum L. Essential Oil From Alborz Mountain Against Aspergillus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Hossein; Moghimipour, Eskandar; Rasooli, Iraj; Fakoor, Mohammad Hadi; Alipoor Astaneh, Shakiba; Shehni Moosaie, Sara; Jalili, Zeynab

    2012-01-01

    Background Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a highly toxic and hepatocarcinogenic metabolite produced by Aspergillus species. Some natural products are known to kill fungi and destroy toxins and toxin-producing agents. Objectives The purpose of this study is to provide experimental data on the antifungal activity of cumin oils and their components that could be considered suitable for application in foods and drugs. Materials and Methods The essential oil (EO) of Cuminum cyminum L. collected from Alborz Mountain, Iran, was obtained by hydro-distillation. The oil was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and chromatography/mass spectrophotometry (GC/MS). The antifungal activity of the oil was studied with regard to the inhibition of the growth of Aspergillus flavus PICC-AF39 , Aspergillus flavus PICC-AF24, Aspergillus parasiticus NRRL-2999 and Aspergillus niger. The minimal inhibitory (MIC) and minimal fungicidal (MFC) concentrations of the oil were determined. Results α–Pinene (29.2%), limonene (21.7%), 1,8-cineole (18.1%), linalool (10.5%), linalyl acetate (4.8%), and α-terpineole (3.17%) were the major components of the essential oil from C. cyminum L., and the oil showed a strong inhibitory effect on fungal growth. Conclusions Essential oils could be safely used as preservatives in pharmaceuticals as well as health and food products to protect them against toxigenic fungal infections. PMID:24624154

  14. H3K9 methylation regulates growth and development in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jonathan M; Perrin, Robyn M; Dagenais, Taylor R T; Keller, Nancy P

    2008-12-01

    In most species, chromatin remodeling mediates critical biological processes ranging from development to disease states. In fungi within the genus Aspergillus, chromatin remodeling may regulate expression of metabolic gene clusters, but other processes regulated by chromatin structure remain to be elucidated. In many eukaryotic species, methylation of lysine 9 of histone 3 (H3K9) is a hallmark of heterochromatin formation and subsequent gene silencing. The sole H3K9 methyltransferase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is Clr4. We report that disruption of the Clr4 homolog in the pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus (ClrD), which is involved in both mono- and trimethylation of H3K9, results in several growth abnormalities. Developmental defects in DeltaAfclrD include reduction in radial growth, reduction in conidial production, and delayed conidiation after developmental competence mediated by delayed expression of brlA, the master regulator of conidiophore development. Sensitivity of DeltaAfclrD to 6-azauracil suggests that ClrD influences transcriptional processing in A. fumigatus. Despite growth abnormalities, macrophage assays suggest ClrD may be dispensable for host interactions.

  15. Identification of growth phenotype-related genes in Aspergillus oryzae by heterologous macroarray and suppression subtractive hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesebeke, R. te; Levin, A.; Sagt, C.; Bartels, J.; Goosen, T.; Ram, A.; Hondel, C. van den; Punt, P.

    2005-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae requires polarized growth for colonization of solid substrates, and this growth phenotype differs from that seen in liquid medium. Various experimental approaches were used to identify genes that are differentially expressed when A. oryzae is grown on wheat kernels and in a

  16. Suppression of Growth Rate of Colony-Associated Fungi by High Fructose Corn Syrup Feeding Supplement, Formic Acid, and Oxalic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Select colony-associated fungi (bee isolates). Absidia sp., Ascosphaera apis, Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium sp., Penicillium glabrum, Mucor sp., showed a 40% reduction in radial growth rate with formic acid, a 28% reduction with oxalic acid, and a 15% reduction with fructose and high fructose corn sy...

  17. Isolate-dependent growth, virulence, and cell wall composition in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nansalmaa Amarsaikhan

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus is a mediator of allergic sensitization and invasive disease in susceptible individuals. The significant genetic and phenotypic variability between and among clinical and environmental isolates are important considerations in host-pathogen studies of A. fumigatus-mediated disease. We observed decreased radial growth, rate of germination, and ability to establish colony growth in a single environmental isolate of A. fumigatus, Af5517, when compared to other clinical and environmental isolates. Af5517 also exhibited increased hyphal diameter and cell wall β-glucan and chitin content, with chitin most significantly increased. Morbidity, mortality, lung fungal burden, and tissue pathology were decreased in neutropenic Af5517-infected mice when compared to the clinical isolate Af293. Our results support previous findings that suggest a correlation between in vitro growth rates and in vivo virulence, and we propose that changes in cell wall composition may contribute to this phenotype.

  18. Growth and hydrolase profiles can be used as characteristics to distinguish Aspergillus niger and other black aspergilli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, M.; Houbraken, J.A.M.P.; Dalhuijsen, S.; Samson, R.A.; de Vries, R.P.

    2011-01-01

    Wild type Aspergillus niger isolates from different biotopes from all over the world were compared to each other and to the type strains of other black Aspergillus species with respect to growth and extracellular enzyme profiles. The origin of the A. niger isolate did not result in differences in growth profile with respect to monomeric or polymeric carbon sources. Differences were observed in the growth rate of the A. niger isolates, but these were observed on all carbon sources and not specific for a particular carbon source. In contrast, carbon source specific differences were observed between the different species. Aspergillus brasiliensis is the only species able to grow on D-galactose, and A. aculeatus had significantly better growth on Locus Bean gum than the other species. Only small differences were found in the extracellular enzyme profile of the A. niger isolates during growth on wheat bran, while large differences were observed in the profiles of the different black aspergilli. In addition, differences were observed in temperature profiles between the black Aspergillus species, but not between the A. niger isolates, demonstrating no isolate-specific adaptations to the environment. These data indicate that the local environment does not result in stable adaptations of A. niger with respect to growth profile or enzyme production, but that the potential is maintained irrespective of the environmental parameters. It also demonstrates that growth, extracellular protein and temperature profiles can be used for species identification within the group of black aspergilli. PMID:21892240

  19. Antimycotic activity of 5'-prenylisoflavanones of the plant Geoffroea decorticans, against Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Emma N; Sampietro, Diego A; Sgariglia, Melina A; Soberón, José R; Vattuone, Marta A

    2009-06-01

    The antifungal activity of the ethanolic extract (EE), (3R)-5,7,2',3'-tetrahydroxy-4'-methoxy-5'-prenylisoflavanone (1) and (3R)-7-2'-3'-trihydroxy-4'-methoxy-5'-prenylisoflavanone (2) isolated from Geoffroea decorticans was evaluated against four different species of Aspergillus. Their effect was compared with that displayed by synthetic products. The antifungal activity was assayed by bioautography, hyphal radial growth, hyphal extent and microdilution in liquid medium. The percentage of hyphal radial growth inhibition produced by EE varied between 18.4+/-0.1 and 39.6+/-0.2 for Aspergillus nomius VSC23 and Aspergillus nomius 13137, respectively; and the same value for 1 and 2 were between 31.2+/-0.1-60.8+/-1.5 and 28.9+/-0.7-57.2+/-0.6 for Aspergillus flavus (IEV 018) and Aspergillus nomius 13137, respectively. The values of MIC/MFC determined for EE, 1 and 2 were compared with the actions of ascorbic and sorbic acids, and clotrimazole. The sequence of antifungal potency was clotrimazole>1>2>ascorbic acid>sorbic acid>EE. Consequently, EE as well as the purified substances from Geoffroea decorticans would be used as biopesticides against Aspergillus species. The cytotoxicity was evaluated.

  20. The Growth of Aspergillus Niger on a Wood Based Material with 4 Types of Wall Finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam Menega

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings are a vital component in a human’s daily life. It provides shelter from the environment, weather and animals. Mold growth within the building might be caused by the moisture problems which directly act on it such as water leaks or indirect factor such as high humidity levels. This growth causes esthetic problems and deterioration of its wall coatings. Spores from the fungi also cause health problems to humans. The fungus species studied in this research is Aspergillus niger. The material is made of wood and its finishing is thick wallpaper, thin wallpaper, acrylic paint and glycerol based paint. ASTMD5590-00 standard was used to evaluate fungal growth and to determine if non antifungal agent was effective in inhibiting the amount of fungal growth on four types of wall finishing used on wooden walls. This research was conducted without using any antifungal agent. Highest percentage of growth of the fungi was found on acrylic paint, followed by glycerol based paint and thin wallpaper. Thick wall paper shows the least growth of fungi. The maximum growth is visible on day 12 which is more than 60% by all the wall finishing.

  1. Metabolic flux analysis for optimizing the specific growth rate of recombinant Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheshlaghi, R; Scharer, J M; Moo-Young, M; Douglas, P L

    2007-11-01

    A comprehensive metabolic network comprising three intracellular compartments (cytoplasm, mitochondrion and peroxisome) was developed for Aspergillus niger. The metabolic flux network includes carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism in both anabolic and catabolic reactions. Linear programming was used for the optimization of the specific growth rates in combination with 37 measured input and output fluxes of the key metabolites to evaluate corresponding intracellular flux distributions throughout the batch fermentations. Logarithmic sensitivity analysis revealed that the addition of proline, alanine and glutamate benefited growth in defined media. The experimental observations and flux analysis showed that tyrosine was a potential candidate for biomass production improvement. Model predictions was verified by conducting batch and fed-batch fermentations and it was found that the addition of the four amino acids according to the predetermined schedule resulted in a 44 and 41% improvements in biomass and recombinant protein productions, respectively.

  2. The effects of dsRNA mycoviruses on growth and murine virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Muhammad F; Jamal, Atif; Petrou, Michael A; Cairns, Timothy C; Bignell, Elaine M; Coutts, Robert H A

    2011-11-01

    Some isolates of the opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus are known to be infected with mycoviruses. The dsRNA genomes of two of these mycoviruses, which include a chrysovirus and a partitivirus, have been completely sequenced and an RT-PCR assay for the viruses has been developed. Through curing virus-infected A. fumigatus isolates by cycloheximide treatment and transfecting virus-free isolates with purified virus, as checked by RT-PCR, isogenic virus-free and virus-infected lines of the fungus were generated whose phenotypes and growth have been directly compared. Mycovirus infection of A. fumigatus with either the chrysovirus or the partitivirus resulted in significant aberrant phenotypic alterations and attenuation of growth of the fungus but had no effect on susceptibility to common antifungals. Chrysovirus infection of A. fumigatus caused no significant alterations to murine pathogenicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Aspergillus parasiticus growth and aflatoxin production on black and white pepper and the inhibitory action of their chemical constituents.

    OpenAIRE

    Madhyastha, M S; Bhat, R V

    1984-01-01

    Aspergillus parasiticus Speare NRRL 2999 growth and aflatoxin production in black and white pepper and the penetration of the fungus in black pepper corn over various incubation periods were studied. Also, the effects of piperine and pepper oil on growth and aflatoxin production were studied. Under laboratory conditions, black and white pepper supported aflatoxin production (62.5 and 44 ppb (ng/g), respectively) over 30 days of incubation. Fungal growth measured in terms of chitin was conside...

  4. A colorimetric and spectrophotometric method for in vitro susceptibility testing of Aspergillus species against caspofungin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorsthorst, D.T.A. te; Zwaaftink, R.B.; Rijs, A.J.M.M.; Meletiadis, J.; Verweij, P.E.

    2007-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of 45 Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus isolates against caspofungin (CAS) was assessed by the CLSI reference method with spectrophotometric reading and by a colorimetric method that employed the dye MTT. Perfect agreement was found between

  5. The Aspergillus niger growth on the treated concrete substrate using variable antifungals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parjo, U. K.; Sunar, N. M.; Leman, A. M.; Gani, P.; Embong, Z.; Tajudin, S. A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Aspergillus niger (A. niger) growth on substrates after incorporates with different compounds of antifungals which is normally used in food industry. The antifungals named as potassium sorbate (PS), calcium benzoate (CB) and zinc salicylate (ZS) were applied on concrete substrate covered with different wall finishing such as acrylic paint (AP), glycerol based paint (GBP), thin wallpaper (THIN) and thick wallpaper (THICK). The concrete substrate were inoculated with spore suspension, incubated at selected temperature (30oC) and relative humidity (90%)in plant growth chamber. The observations were done from the Day 3 until Day 27. The results showed that the growth of the A. niger for concrete treated by PS for AP, GBP, THIN, and THICK were 64%, 32%, 11% and 100%, respectively. Meanwhile for CB, the growth of A. niger on AP, GBP, THIN, and THICK were 100%, 12%, 41%, and 13%, respectively. Similarly, treated concrete by ZS revealed that the growth of A. niger on the same substrate cover were 33%, 47%, 40%, and 39%, respectively. The results obtained in this study provide a valuable knowledge on the abilities of antifungals to remediate A. niger that inoculated on the concrete substrate. Consequently, this study proved that the PS covering with THIN more efficiency compares CB and ZS to prevent A. niger growth.

  6. High sequence variations in the region containing genes encoding a cellular morphogenesis protein and the repressor of sexual development help to reveal origins of Aspergillus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus flavus are closely related fungal species. The A. flavus population that produces numerous small sclerotia (S strain) and aflatoxin has a unique 1.5 kb deletion in the norB-cypA region of the aflatoxin gene cluster (the S genotype). Phylogenetic studies have indica...

  7. On-line study of growth kinetics of single hyphae of Aspergillus oryzae in a flow-through cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Torben; Spohr, Anders Bendsen; Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1999-01-01

    Using image analysis the growth kinetics of the single hyphae of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae has been determined on-line in a flow-through cell at different glucose concentrations in the range from 26 mg L-1 to 20 g L-1. The tip extension rate of the individual hyphae can be described...

  8. Growth and product formation of Aspergillus oryzae during submerged cultivations: Verification of a morphologically structured model using fluorescent probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Teit; Spohr, Anders Bendsen; Carlsen, Morten

    1998-01-01

    of Aspergillus oryzae. The model is based on a division of the fungal hyphae into three different regions: an extension zone, representing the tips of the hyphae; an active region, which is responsible for growth and product formation; and an inactive hyphal region. Two metamorphosis reactions describing...

  9. The weak acid preservative sorbic acid inhibits conidial germination and mycelial growth of Aspergillus niger through intracellular acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plumridge, A.; Hesse, S.J.A.; Watson, A.J.; Lowe, K.C.; Stratford, M.; Archer, D.B.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger, a common food spoilage organism, is inhibited by the weak acid preservative sorbic acid (trans-trans-2,4-hexadienoic acid). Conidia inoculated at 105/ml of medium showed a sorbic acid MIC of 4.5 mM at pH 4.0, whereas the MIC for the amount of

  10. Integrative Effects of Feeding Aspergillus awamori and fructooligosaccharide on Growth Performance and Digestibility in Broilers: Promotion Muscle Protein Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to show the effect of Aspergillus awamori (AA, fructooligosaccharide (FOS, and combined Aspergillus awamori and fructooligosaccharide (AA + FOS on growth, digestibility, blood parameters, and expression of some growth-related genes. A total of 60 broiler chicks at the age of 15 d were divided into a control group (n=15 and 3 treatment groups. The control group was fed a basal diet, and the treatment groups were fed basal diets supplemented with 0.05% AA, 0.05% FOS, and combined of 0.05% AA and 0.05% FOS. Results from measurement of growth performance and digestibility revealed a significant increase in the body weight gain with improved feed conversion rate in the experimental groups. Interestingly, dry matter digestibility (DMD and crude protein utilization (CPU were improved. In addition, plasma total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C were decreased, while plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C was increased by feeding AA, FOS, and AA + FOS. Expressions of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1, and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R were increased in experimental groups. In conclusion, the supplementation of either Aspergillus awamori or fructooligosaccharide or both improves digestibility and growth performance probably by promoting skeletal muscle protein metabolism.

  11. Unfolded protein response is required for Aspergillus oryzae growth under conditions inducing secretory hydrolytic enzyme production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mizuki; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-12-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is an intracellular signaling pathway for adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In yeast UPR, Ire1 cleaves the unconventional intron of HAC1 mRNA, and the functional Hac1 protein translated from the spliced HAC1 mRNA induces the expression of ER chaperone genes and ER-associated degradation genes for the refolding or degradation of unfolded proteins. In this study, we constructed an ireA (IRE1 ortholog) conditionally expressing strain of Aspergillus oryzae, a filamentous fungus producing a large amount of amylolytic enzymes, and examined the contribution of UPR to ER stress adaptation under physiological conditions. Repression of ireA completely blocked A. oryzae growth under conditions inducing the production of hydrolytic enzymes, such as amylases and proteases. This growth defect was restored by the introduction of unconventional intronless hacA (hacA-i). Furthermore, UPR was observed to be induced by amylolytic gene expression, and the disruption of the transcriptional activator for amylolytic genes resulted in partial growth restoration of the ireA-repressing strain. In addition, a homokaryotic ireA disruption mutant was successfully generated using the strain harboring hacA-i as a parental host. These results indicated that UPR is required for A. oryzae growth to alleviate ER stress induced by excessive production of hydrolytic enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of temperature, water activity, and pH on growth and production of ochratoxin A by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus carbonarius from Brazilian grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamani, Fabiana Reinis Franca; Hernandes, Thais; Lopes, Noelly Alves; Bastos, Sabrina Carvalho; Santiago, Wilder Douglas; Cardoso, Maria das Graças; Batista, Luís Roberto

    2014-11-01

    The growth of ochratoxigenic fungus and the presence of ochratoxin A (OTA) in grapes and their derivatives can be caused by a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological factors. The determination of interactions between these factors and fungal species from different climatic regions is important in designing models for minimizing the risk of OTA in wine and grape juice. This study evaluated the influence of temperature, water activity (aw), and pH on the development and production of OTA in a semisynthetic grape culture medium by Aspergillus carbonarius and Aspergillus niger strains. To analyze the growth conditions and production of OTA, an experimental design was conducted using response surface methodology as a tool to assess the effects of these abiotic variables on fungal behavior. A. carbonarius showed the highest growth at temperatures from 20 to 33°C, aw between 0.95 and 0.98, and pH levels between 5 and 6.5. Similarly, for A. niger, temperatures between 24 and 37°C, aw greater than 0.95, and pH levels between 4 and 6.5 were optimal. The greatest toxin concentrations for A. carbonarius and A. niger (10 μg/g and 7.0 μg/g, respectively) were found at 15°C, aw 0.99, and pH 5.35. The lowest pH was found to contribute to greater OTA production. These results show that the evaluated fungi are able to grow and produce OTA in a wide range of temperature, aw, and pH. However, the optimal conditions for toxin production are generally different from those optimal for fungal growth. The knowledge of optimal conditions for fungal growth and production of OTA, and of the stages of cultivation in which these conditions are optimal, allows a more precise assessment of the potential risk to health from consumption of products derived from grapes.

  13. Effect of mint (Mentha piperita L. and caraway (Carum carvi L. on the growth of some toxigenic aspergillus species and aflatoxin B1 production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škrinjar Marija M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An inhibitory effect of various concentrations (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2,0% of mint (Mentha piperita L. and caraway (Carvum carvi L. on the growth of A. fumigatus, A. flavus and A. ochraceus was examined during 10 days of cultivation in YES medium at temperature of 25°C. Mint showed stronger inhibitory effect than caraway. Total dry weight (g/l after 10 days of the growth of A. fumigatus in YES medium with 0.5% of mint decreased by about 95%, A. flavus by 97% and A. ochraceus by about 82%. Addition of higher concentrations of mint (1.0, 1.5 and 2.0% reduced the growth of all tested species. It was poor and hardly visible. pH values of the media increased with the increase of mint concentrations. A. fumigatus showed the highest sensitivity towards caraway and A. flavus the lowest. Total dry weight (g/l after 10 days of growth of A. fumigatus in medium with 0.5% of caraway decreased by about 72% in comparison to the control. In media with higher concentrations of caraway, its growth was found to be very poor. Concentration of 1.0% of caraway reduced A. flavus growth by 15% and of 1.5% by 92%, in regard to the control. In medium with 2.0% of caraway the growth of A. flavus was observed as poor and hardly visible. The growth of A. ochraceus in medium with 0.5% of caraway decreased by about 85% comparing with control and further decrease was noticed by the increase of concentrations. In medium with 1.5% of caraway a reduction of about 95% of growth was found and under 2.0% of caraway it was poor. pH of the media also increased with the increase of caraway concentrations. Applied concentrations of mint and caraway inhibited completely the production of AB1 by A. flavus.

  14. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles synthesized by Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and its antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities were investigated. Silver nanoparticles were extracellularly synthesized using Aspergillus flavus and the formation of nanoparticles was observed after 72 h of incubation. The results recorded from colour ...

  15. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles synthesized by Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    agents. Keywords. Aspergillus flavus; silver nanoparticles; antimicrobial; antioxidant; cytotoxicity. 1. Introduction. Nanoparticles with controlled size and composition are of fundamental and technological interest as they provide solu- tions to technological and environmental challenges in the areas of solar energy conversion ...

  16. Dynamics of actin cables in polarized growth of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eBergs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Highly polarized growth of filamentous fungi requires a continuous supply of proteins and lipids to the hyphal tip. This transport is managed by vesicle trafficking via the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and their associated motor proteins. Particularly, actin cables originating from the hyphal tip are essential for hyphal growth. Although specific marker proteins to visualize actin cables have been developed in filamentous fungi, the exact organization and dynamics of actin cables has remained elusive. Here we visualized actin cables using tropomyosin (TpmA and Lifeact fused to fluorescent proteins in Aspergillus nidulans and studied the dynamics and regulation. GFP tagged TpmA visualized dynamic actin cables formed from the hyphal tip with cycles of elongation and shrinkage. The elongation and shrinkage rates of actin cables were similar and approximately 0.6 μm/s. Comparison of actin markers revealed that high concentrations of Lifeact reduced actin dynamics. Simultaneous visualization of actin cables and microtubules suggests temporally and spatially coordinated polymerization and depolymerization between the two cytoskeletons. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ordered polarized growth regulated by actin cables and microtubules.

  17. Novel Antifungal Peptides Produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides DU15 Effectively Inhibit Growth of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhialdin, Belal J; Hassan, Zaiton; Abu Bakar, Fatimah; Algboory, Hussein L; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-05-01

    The ability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides DU15 to produce antifungal peptides that inhibit growth of Aspergillus niger was evaluated under optimum growth conditions of 30 °C for 48 h. The cell-free supernatant showed inhibitory activity against A. niger. Five novel peptides were isolated with the sequences GPFPL, YVPLF, LLHGVPLP, GPFPLEMTLGPT, and TVYPFPGPL as identified by de novo sequencing using PEAKS 6 software. Peptide LLHGVPLP was the only positively charged (cationic peptides) and peptide GPFPLEMTLGPT negatively charged (anionic), whereas the rest are neutral. The identified peptides had high hydrophobicity ratio and low molecular weights with amino acids sequences ranging from 5 to 12 residues. The mode of action of these peptides is observed under the scanning electron microscope and is due to cell lysis of fungi. This work reveals the potential of peptides from L. mesenteroides DU15 as natural antifungal preservatives in inhibiting the growth of A. niger that is implicated to the spoilage during storage. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Tail domain of the Aspergillus fumigatus class V myosin orchestrates septal localization and hyphal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Hilary; Vargas-Muñiz, José M; Juvvadi, Praveen R; Richards, Amber D; Waitt, Greg; Soderblom, Erik J; Moseley, M Arthur; Steinbach, William J

    2017-12-08

    Myosins are critical motor proteins that contribute to the secretory pathway, polarized growth, and cytokinesis. The globular tail domains of class V myosins have been shown to be important for cargo binding and actin cable organization. Additionally, phosphorylation plays a role in class V myosin cargo choice. Our previous studies on the class V myosin, MyoE, in the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus confirmed its requirement for normal morphology and virulence. However, the domains and molecular mechanisms governing MyoE's function remain unknown. Here, by analyzing tail mutants we demonstrate that the tail is required for radial growth, conidiation, septation frequency, and MyoE localization at the septum. Furthermore, MyoE is phosphorylated at multiple residues in vivo; however, alanine substitution mutants revealed that no single phosphorylated residue was critical. Importantly, in the absence of the phosphatase calcineurin, an additional residue was phosphorylated in its tail domain. Mutation of this tail residue led to mislocalization of MyoE from the septa. This work reveals the importance of the MyoE tail domain and its phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the growth and morphology of A. fumigatus. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Isolation of culturable mycobiota from agricultural soils and determination of tolerance to glyphosate of nontoxigenic Aspergillus section Flavi strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Cecilia S; Barberis, Carla L; Chiacchiera, Stella M; Dalcero, Ana María; Magnoli, Carina E

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are extensively used in Argentina's agricultural system to control undesirable weeds. This study was conducted to evaluate the culturable mycobiota [colony forming units (CFU) g(-1) and frequency of fungal genera or species] from an agricultural field exposed to pesticides. In addition, we evaluated the tolerance of A. oryzae and nontoxigenic A. flavus strains to high concentrations (100 to 500 mM - 17,000 to 84,500 ppm) of a glyphosate commercial formulation. The analysis of the mycobiota showed that the frequency of the main fungal genera varied according to the analyzed sampling period. Aspergillus spp. or Aspergillus section Flavi strains were isolated from 20 to 100% of the soil samples. Sterilia spp. were also observed throughout the sampling (50 to 100%). Aspergillus section Flavi tolerance assays showed that all of the tested strains were able to develop at the highest glyphosate concentration tested regardless of the water availability conditions. In general, significant reductions in growth rates were observed with increasing concentrations of the herbicide. However, a complete inhibition of fungal growth was not observed with the concentrations assayed. This study contributes to the knowledge of culturable mycobiota from agricultural soils exposed to pesticides and provides evidence on the effective growth ability of A. oryzae and nontoxigenic A. flavus strains exposed to high glyphosate concentrations in vitro.

  20. Lactobacillus brevis-based bioingredient inhibits Aspergillus niger growth on pan bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariaelena Di Biase

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bread shelf life is generally compromised by fungi mainly belonging to Aspergillus and Penicillium genera, which colonise the surface of the product within few days from the production. The aim of this study was to select a Lactobacillus brevis-based bioingredient (LbBio able to inhibit the growth of Aspergillus niger ITEM5132 on pan bread in order to prolong its shelf life. Four LbBio formulations, obtained by growing a selected L. brevis strain in a flour-based medium containing different carbon sources or acid precursors (fructose, LbBio1; fructose and maltose, LbBio2; α-chetoglutaric acid, LbBio3; short-chain fructooligosaccharides, LbBio4, were evaluated for their content of organic acids (lactic, acetic, propionic, phenyllactic, 4-hydroxy-phenyllactic, valeric, isovaleric acids. The LbBio formulations were applied in yeast-leavened bread during bread-making trials and the resulting products were inoculated after baking with A. niger spore’s suspension and the fungal growth was monitored during storage (25°C for 6 days. The formulation showing the highest inhibitory activity was separated by ultra-filtration method, and whole and fractions obtained were evaluated for their in vitro activity. The fraction showing the highest activity was further separated by gel-filtration and the resulting products were investigated for their protein content and in vitro inhibition. The results from the bread-making trials performed using different formulations of LbBio showed a delay in fungal growth (1 day respect to the bread not containing the bioingredient (control or including calcium propionate (0.3% w/w. The formulation LbBio2, prepared with fructose and maltose 1% (w/vol, contained the highest amount of total organic acids, including phenyllactic and hydroxyl-phenyllactic acids, and reduced the visual spoilage of bread. This formulation was separated by ultra-filtration and fractions containing metabolites with molecular weight higher than 30 k

  1. Contaminação endógena por Aspergillus spp. em milho pós-colheita no Estado do Paraná Endogenous Aspergillus spp. contamination of postharvest corn in Paraná State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTONIO XAVIER DE FARIAS

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Sessenta amostras de milho pós-colheita foram avaliadas quanto à contaminação fúngica endógena e o potencial toxígeno de espécies do gênero Aspergillus e seus teleomorfos. Quarenta grãos aparentemente sadios de cada amostra foram desinfestados em NaClO e incubados em câmara úmida a 25±1ºC para exteriorização dos fungos, que posteriormente foram isolados em ágar Czapek-Dox. Foram identificadas as espécies Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus, Eurotium amstelodami e E. chevalieri. O potencial toxígeno dos fungos A. flavus e A. parasiticus foi avaliado quanto à síntese de aflatoxinas em meio ágar-coco. Espécies do gênero Eurotium foram avaliadas quanto à síntese de esterigmatocistina, nos meios ágar-amendoim e trigo triturado. A porcentagem de grãos contaminados variou entre 0 e 100%, prevalecendo os gêneros Aspergillus, Penicillium e Fusarium. A espécie predominante foi a A. flavus (64%, seguida por E. amstelodami (19%, E. chevalieri (10% e A. parasiticus (7%. A partir de 109 isolados de A. flavus, evidenciou-se que 73 isolados sintetizaram aflatoxinas B1 e B2, 20 sintetizaram B1, sete sintetizaram B1 e G1, três sintetizaram B1, B2 e G1 e em seis não foi detectada a síntese de aflatoxina. A síntese de esterigmatocistina pelas espécies E. amstelodami e E. chevalieri não foi detectada.Sixty post-harvested samples of maize kernels from three regions of the Paraná State, Brazil, were evaluated concerning endogenous fungi contamination and toxigenic potential of Aspergillus spp. and some of their teleomorfs. Forty apparently healthy kernels were selected from each sample, disinfested with NaClO and incubated at 25±1ºC for fungal growth. Fungus species were isolated in Czapek-Dox agar plates. The species Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus, Eurotium amstelodami and E. chevalieri were identified. The toxigenic potential of Aspergillus species were analyzed in coconut agar medium. Eurotium spp. were evaluated for their

  2. Identificação de Aspergillus spp: toxigênico em arroz Identification of toxigenic Aspergillus spp: in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ívina Catarina de Oliveira Guimarães

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A composição química e o modo de cultivo do arroz o tornam susceptível à contaminação fúngica e, consequentemente, por micotoxinas. Considerando-se o expressivo consumo de arroz e a possibilidade de ser potencial fonte de micotoxinas, especial atenção deve ser dispensada quanto à qualidade do produto adquirido. Assim, o presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar espécies do gênero Aspergillus quanto à capacidade toxigênica, em diferentes subgrupos de arroz. As amostras constituíram-se de 31 marcas de arroz referentes aos subgrupos branco polido (21 e parboilizado (10, mais comumente comercializadas na cidade de Lavras - MG. Ao contrário dos outros subgrupos, a incidência de Aspergillus flavus e Aspergillus niger em amostras de arroz branco polido aumentou significativamente após a desinfecção. Pôde-se observar que, 50% dos Aspergillus flavus e 50% dos Aspergillus niger encontrados, foram considerados toxigênicos para o subgrupo branco polido. Na amostra de arroz parboilizado, 67% dos Aspergillus flavus eram potenciais produtores. O Aspergillus ochraceus não se revelou como toxigênico. Este estudo permitiu concluir que, apesar de trabalhos isolados, a presença de fungos toxigênicos em arroz é verídico, o que se torna relevante por se tratar de um cereal importante no cenário mundial.The chemical composition and its methods of cultivation, make rice plants susceptible to fungi and consequently to mycotoxins contamination. Considering the expressive rice consumption and given the possibility that it maybe a potential source of mycotoxins, special attention should be devoted to its quality. Thus, this study was carried out to evaluate the Aspergillus species as to its toxigenic capacities in different rice subgroups. Thirty one and rice brands among the most popular brands sold in the city of Lavras - MG, were collected as samples, (21 polished white and (10 parboiled, respectively. Unlike other subgroups, the

  3. Qualitative ubiquitome unveils the potential significances of protein lysine ubiquitination in hyphal growth of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xin-Ling; Feng, Ming-Guang; Ying, Sheng-Hua

    2016-02-01

    Protein ubiquitination is an evolutionarily conserved post-translational modification process in eukaryotes, and it plays an important role in many biological processes. Aspergillus nidulans, a model filamentous fungus, contributes to our understanding of cellular physiology, metabolism and genetics, but its ubiquitination is not completely revealed. In this study, the ubiquitination sites in the proteome of A. nidulans were identified using a highly sensitive mass spectrometry combined with immuno-affinity enrichment of the ubiquitinated peptides. The 4816 ubiquitination sites were identified in 1913 ubiquitinated proteins, accounting for 18.1% of total proteins in A. nidulans. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that the ubiquitinated proteins associated with a number of biological functions and displayed various sub-cellular localisations. Meanwhile, seven motifs were revealed from the ubiquitinated peptides, and significantly over-presented in the different pathways. Comparison of the enriched functional catalogues indicated that the ubiquitination functions divergently during growth of A. nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Additionally, the proteins in A. nidulans-specific sub-category (cell growth/morphogenesis) were subjected to the protein interaction analysis which demonstrated that ubiquitination is involved in the comprehensive protein interactions. This study presents a first proteomic view of ubiquitination in the filamentous fungus, and provides an initial framework for exploring the physiological roles of ubiquitination in A. nidulans.

  4. Effects of Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica on Growth and Aflatoxin Production by Aspergillus parasiticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodavaisy, Sadegh; Rezaie, Sassan; Noorbakhsh, Fatemeh; Baghdadi, Elham; Sharifynia, Somayeh; Aala, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Background Aflatoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites mainly produced by Aspergillus parasiticus. This species can contaminate a wide range of agricultural commodities, including cereals, peanuts, and crops in the field. In recent years, research on medicinal herbs, such as Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica, have led to reduced microbial growth, and these herbs also have a particular effect on the production of aflatoxins as carcinogenic compounds. Objectives In this study, we to examine P. atlantica subsp. kurdica as a natural compound used to inhibit the growth of A. parasiticus and to act as an anti-mycotoxin. Materials and Methods In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of P. atlantica subsp. kurdica for A. parasiticus was performed according to CLSI document M38-A2. The rate of aflatoxin production was determined using the HPLC technique after exposure to different concentrations (62.5 - 125 mg/mL) of the gum. The changes in expression levels of the aflR gene were analyzed with a quantitative real-time PCR assay. Results The results showed that P. atlantica subsp. kurdica can inhibit A. parasiticus growth at a concentration of 125 mg/mL. HPLC results revealed a significant decrease in aflatoxin production with 125 mg/mL of P. atlantica subsp. kurdica, and AFL-B1 production was entirely inhibited. Based on quantitative real-time PCR results, the rate of aflR gene expression was significantly decreased after treatment with P. atlantica subsp. kurdica. Conclusions Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica has anti-toxic properties in addition to an inhibitory effect on A. parasiticus growth, and is able to decrease aflatoxin production effectively in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, this herbal extract maybe considered a potential anti-mycotoxin agent in medicine or industrial agriculture. PMID:27800127

  5. A putative APSES transcription factor is necessary for normal growth and development of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Lee-Han; Kim, Ha-Eun; Park, Jae-Sin; Han, Kap-Hoon; Han, Dong-Min

    2013-12-01

    The nsdD gene encoding a GATA type transcription factor positively controls sexual development in Aspergillus nidulans. According to microarray data, 20 genes that were upregulated by deleting nsdD during various life cycle stages were randomly selected and deleted for functional analysis. None of the mutants showed apparent changes in growth or development compared with those of the wild-type except the AN3154 gene that encodes a putative APSES transcription factor and is an ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae swi4. Deleting AN3154 resulted in retarded growth and development, and the gene was named rgdA (retared growth and development). The rgdA deletion mutant developed a reduced number of conidia even under favorable conditions for asexual development. The retarded growth and development was partially suppressed by the veA1 mutation. The conidial heads of the mutant aborted, showing reduced and irregular shaped phialides. Fruiting body development was delayed compared with that in the wild-type. The mutant did not respond to various nutritional or environmental factors that affected the development patterns. The rgdA gene was expressed at low levels throughout the life cycle and was not significantly affected by several regulators of sexual and asexual development such as nsdD, veA, stuA, or brlA. However, the rgdA gene affected brlA and abaA expression, which function as key regulators of asexual sporulation, suggesting that rgdA functions upstream of those genes.

  6. Biodiversity of Aspergillus species in some important agricultural products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrone, Giancarlo; Susca, A.,; Cozzi, G.

    2007-01-01

    . flavus and A. parasiticus, and ochratoxinogenic A. niger, A. ochraceus and A. carbonarius species are frequently encountered in agricultural products. Studies on the biodiversity of toxigenic Aspergillus species is useful to clarify molecular, ecological and biochemical characteristics of the different...... species in relation to their different adaptation to environmental and geographical conditions, and to their potential toxigenicity. Here we analyzed the biodiversity of ochratoxin producing species occurring on two important crops: grapes and coffee, and the genetic diversity of A. flavus populations...

  7. Influence of the antimicrobial compound allyl isothiocyanate against the Aspergillus parasiticus growth and its aflatoxins production in pizza crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles, Juan M; Manyes, Lara; Luciano, Fernando; Mañes, Jordi; Meca, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are secondary metabolites produced by different species of Aspergillus, such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, which possess mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic activities in humans. In this study, active packaging devices containing allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) or oriental mustard flour (OMF) + water were tested to inhibit the growth of A. parasiticus and AFs production in fresh pizza crust after 30 d. The antimicrobial and anti-aflatoxin activities were compared to a control group (no antimicrobial treatment) and to a group added with commercial preservatives (sorbic acid + sodium propionate). A. parasiticus growth was only inhibited after 30 d by AITC in filter paper at 5 μL/L and 10 μL/L, AITC sachet at 5 μL/L and 10 μL/L and OMF sachet at 850 mg + 850 μL of water. However, AFs production was inhibited by all antimicrobial treatments in a dose-dependent manner. More importantly, AITC in a filter paper at 10 μL/L, AITC sachet at 10 μL/L, OMF sachet at 850 mg + 850 μL of water and sorbic acid + sodium propionate at 0.5-2.0 g/Kg completely inhibited AFs formation. The use of AITC in active packaging devices could be a natural alternative to avoid the growth of mycotoxinogenic fungi in refrigerated bakery products in substitution of common commercial preservatives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Secreted glutamic protease rescues aspartic protease Pep deficiency in Aspergillus fumigatus during growth in acidic protein medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriranganadane, Dev; Reichard, Utz; Salamin, Karine; Fratti, Marina; Jousson, Olivier; Waridel, Patrice; Quadroni, Manfredo; Neuhaus, Jean-Marc; Monod, Michel

    2011-05-01

    In an acidic protein medium Aspergillus fumigatus secretes an aspartic endoprotease (Pep) as well as tripeptidyl-peptidases, a prolyl-peptidase and carboxypeptidases. In addition, LC-MS/MS revealed a novel glutamic protease, AfuGprA, homologous to Aspergillus niger aspergillopepsin II. The importance of AfuGprA in protein digestion was evaluated by deletion of its encoding gene in A. fumigatus wild-type D141 and in a pepΔ mutant. Either A. fumigatus Pep or AfuGprA was shown to be necessary for fungal growth in protein medium at low pH. Exoproteolytic activity is therefore not sufficient for complete protein hydrolysis and fungal growth in a medium containing proteins as the sole nitrogen source. Pep and AfuGprA constitute a pair of endoproteases active at low pH, in analogy to A. fumigatus alkaline protease (Alp) and metalloprotease I (Mep), where at least one of these enzymes is necessary for fungal growth in protein medium at neutral pH. Heterologous expression of AfuGprA in Pichia pastoris showed that the enzyme is synthesized as a preproprotein and that the propeptide is removed through an autoproteolytic reaction at low pH to generate the mature protease. In contrast to A. niger aspergillopepsin II, AfuGprA is a single-chain protein and is structurally more similar to G1 proteases characterized in other non-Aspergillus fungi.

  9. Comparison of the ability of three Aspergillus strains to form aflatoxins on bakery products and on nutrient agar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, J

    1982-02-19

    The growth of Aspergillus parasiticus NRRL 2999, A. parasiticus NRRL 3000 and A. flavus NRRL 3251 on whole wheat bread and on cake ('Rührkuchen') was compared and the formation of the aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, G2 and M2 on these substrates and, for purpose of comparison, on malt extract agar was determined. On cake the moulds grew better than on bread and formed the highest yields of aflatoxins. Malt extract agar was the most unfavourable substrate for toxin production. The ratio M1/B1 on bread and cake was in the order of 0.1-0.4 and was higher than the data reported for grains. The highest yields of aflatoxin B1 (1.0 micrograms/g) were produced by A. flavus NRRL 3251 on cake.

  10. Identification by Molecular Methods and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry and Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Clinically Significant Rare Aspergillus Species in a Referral Chest Hospital in Delhi, India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masih, A.; Singh, P.K.; Kathuria, S.; Agarwal, K.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Chowdhary, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus species cause a wide spectrum of clinical infections. Although Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus remain the most commonly isolated species in aspergillosis, in the last decade, rare and cryptic Aspergillus species have emerged in diverse clinical settings. The present study

  11. Antifungal activity of Oleoresins used in meat industry on some toxigenic Aspergillus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šošo Vladislava M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Different spice oleoresins are widely used in meat industry. They contribute to the specific aroma and flavor of the end products, but they have also been reported to have strong antimicrobial activity. These properties open a plenty of possibilities to be used for defining the specific sensory profile of the product but also as natural food preservatives. This paper focuses on the antifungal activity of four oleoresins against different foodborne toxigenic Aspergillus species. Oleoresins used in the experiments were cayenne pepper, black pepper, garlic and rosemary oleoresins, and they were tested against following Aspergillus species: A. clavatus, A. flavus, A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. ochraceus and A. versicolor. Antifungal activity was tested using microtitre-plate-based assay incorporating resazurin as an indicator of cell growth and broth microdilution-method. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46009

  12. Inhibitory effect of essential oils on Aspergillus ochraceus growth and ochratoxin A production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Hua

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA is a mycotoxin which is a common contaminant in grains during storage. Aspergillus ochraceus is the most common producer of OTA. Essential oils play a crucial role as a biocontrol in the reduction of fungal contamination. Essential oils namely natural cinnamaldehyde, cinnamon oil, synthetic cinnamaldehyde, Litsea citrate oil, citral, eugenol, peppermint, eucalyptus, anise and camphor oils, were tested for their efficacy against A. ochraceus growth and OTA production by fumigation and contact assays. Natural cinnamaldehyde proved to be the most effective against A. ochraceus when compared to other oils. Complete fungal growth inhibition was obtained at 150-250 µL/L with fumigation and 250-500 µL/L with contact assays for cinnamon oil, natural and synthetic cinnamaldehyde, L. citrate oil and citral. Essential oils had an impact on the ergosterol biosynthesis and OTA production. Complete inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis was observed at ≥ 100 µg/mL of natural cinnamaldehyde and at 200 µg/mL of citral, but total inhibition was not observed at 200 µg/mL of eugenol. But, citral and eugenol could inhibit the OTA production at ≥ 75 µg/mL and ≥ 150 µg/mL respectively, while natural cinnamaldehyde couldn't fully inhibit OTA production at ≤ 200 µg/mL. The inhibition of OTA by natural cinnamaldehyde is mainly due to the reduction in fungal biomass. However, citral and eugenol could significant inhibit the OTA biosynthetic pathway. Also, we observed that cinnamaldehyde was converted to cinnamic alcohol by A. ochraceus, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of cinnamaldehyde was mainly attributed to its carbonyl aldehyde group. The study concludes that natural cinnamaldehyde, citral and eugenol could be potential biocontrol agents against OTA contamination in storage grains.

  13. Anti-hyphal formation property of allicin in suppression of Aspergillus fumigatus growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajali, N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to examine whether allicin, a compound derived from fresh garlic, leads to growth inhibition and changes in the ultrastructure of the cell surface on medically important filamentous fungi, particularly Aspergillus fumigatus.Methodology and results: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of allicin in A. fumigatus ATCC 36607 was determined by broth microdilution method according to the CLSI M38-A2 documents whereby the minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC was determined by plating suspensions from visibly clear wells onto Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA. Morphological changes on cell surface were observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM after 48 h incubation with allicin. In addition, time kill assay was conducted by incubating A. fumigatus at selected time points within 24 h period. Our finding indicated that the MIC and MFC for allicin were both 3.2 µg/mL. Quantitative data for optical density obtained through microplate reader indicated that p<0.05 at MIC value in comparison with untreated control. Observation of allicin-treated cells through SEM demonstrated complete abrogation of hyphae formation at 3.2 µg/mL and reduced mycelial growth at 1.6 µg/mL of allicin. This finding revealed anti-hyphal activity of allicin at 3.2 µg/mL. When A. fumigatus was incubated with 3.2 µg/mL allicin in the time course assay, the inhibitory effect of allicin was evident after 12 h incubation. Conclusion, significance and impact of study: Our finding strongly implied that allicin exerts its antifungal activity against A. fumigatus via inhibiting the fungal cell proliferation as well as hindering transformation of the conidia into hyphae. Thus, this study depicted potential antifungal property of allicin to be used as alternative therapy to alleviate invasive fungal infection caused by A. fumigatus.

  14. Inhibitory effect of essential oils on Aspergillus ochraceus growth and ochratoxin A production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Huijuan; Xing, Fuguo; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Yueju; Zhou, Lu; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin which is a common contaminant in grains during storage. Aspergillus ochraceus is the most common producer of OTA. Essential oils play a crucial role as a biocontrol in the reduction of fungal contamination. Essential oils namely natural cinnamaldehyde, cinnamon oil, synthetic cinnamaldehyde, Litsea citrate oil, citral, eugenol, peppermint, eucalyptus, anise and camphor oils, were tested for their efficacy against A. ochraceus growth and OTA production by fumigation and contact assays. Natural cinnamaldehyde proved to be the most effective against A. ochraceus when compared to other oils. Complete fungal growth inhibition was obtained at 150-250 µL/L with fumigation and 250-500 µL/L with contact assays for cinnamon oil, natural and synthetic cinnamaldehyde, L. citrate oil and citral. Essential oils had an impact on the ergosterol biosynthesis and OTA production. Complete inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis was observed at ≥ 100 µg/mL of natural cinnamaldehyde and at 200 µg/mL of citral, but total inhibition was not observed at 200 µg/mL of eugenol. But, citral and eugenol could inhibit the OTA production at ≥ 75 µg/mL and ≥ 150 µg/mL respectively, while natural cinnamaldehyde couldn't fully inhibit OTA production at ≤ 200 µg/mL. The inhibition of OTA by natural cinnamaldehyde is mainly due to the reduction in fungal biomass. However, citral and eugenol could significant inhibit the OTA biosynthetic pathway. Also, we observed that cinnamaldehyde was converted to cinnamic alcohol by A. ochraceus, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of cinnamaldehyde was mainly attributed to its carbonyl aldehyde group. The study concludes that natural cinnamaldehyde, citral and eugenol could be potential biocontrol agents against OTA contamination in storage grains.

  15. The putative guanine nucleotide exchange factor RicA mediates upstream signaling for growth and development in Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Nak-Jung; Park, Hee-Soo; Jung, Seunho; Kim, Sun Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2012-11-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (G proteins) govern growth, development, and secondary metabolism in various fungi. Here, we characterized ricA, which encodes a putative GDP/GTP exchange factor for G proteins in the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans and the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. In both species, ricA mRNA accumulates during vegetative growth and early developmental phases, but it is not present in spores. The deletion of ricA results in severely impaired colony growth and the total (for A. nidulans) or near (for A. fumigatus) absence of asexual sporulation (conidiation). The overexpression (OE) of the A. fumigatus ricA gene (AfricA) restores growth and conidiation in the ΔAnricA mutant to some extent, indicating partial conservation of RicA function in Aspergillus. A series of double mutant analyses revealed that the removal of RgsA (an RGS protein of the GanB Gα subunit), but not sfgA, flbA, rgsB, or rgsC, restored vegetative growth and conidiation in ΔAnricA. Furthermore, we found that RicA can physically interact with GanB in yeast and in vitro. Moreover, the presence of two copies or OE of pkaA suppresses the profound defects caused by ΔAnricA, indicating that RicA-mediated growth and developmental signaling is primarily through GanB and PkaA in A. nidulans. Despite the lack of conidiation, brlA and vosA mRNAs accumulated to normal levels in the ΔricA mutant. In addition, mutants overexpressing fluG or brlA (OEfluG or OEbrlA) failed to restore development in the ΔAnricA mutant. These findings suggest that the commencement of asexual development requires unknown RicA-mediated signaling input in A. nidulans.

  16. The effect of humidity after gamma-irradiation on aflatoxin B-1 production of A.flavus in ground nutmeg and peanut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmy, N.; Chosdu, R. [Center for the Application of Isotopes and Radiation, Jakarta (Indonesia); Matsuyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture (Japan). Nodai Research Inst.

    1995-10-01

    The effect of humidity of 75 up to 97% after irradiation on radiosensitivity and aflatoxin B1 production of Aspergillus flavus isolated from Indonesian nutmeg were examined. Irradiation doses used were 0;0.5;1 and 3 kGy. Mould free ground nutmeg and peanut were used as the growth media, and about 10{sup 8} of spores were used to contaminate each of the media. Aflatoxin productions were measured after having incubated 3 days up to 5 months under humidity of 91 and 97%. Prior to HPLC analysis, aflatoxin was cleaned-up using an immunoaffinity column. The results were: (1) A. flavus indicated no or almost no growth under RH of 85% or less. (2) Under 91-97% RH, growth of mycelium and toxin production were inhibited more or less by irradiation up to 1 kGy, although the effectiveness of irradiation varied with different RH and media during postirradiation incubation. (3) By 3 kGy or more, both mycelium growth and toxin production of the mould were found to be completely inhibited. (4) The production of aflatoxin in nutmeg began after having incubated for 25 and 45 days and in peanut for 3 and 6 days under 97 and 91% RH, respectively. (Author).

  17. Fumigant antifungal activity of Myrtaceae essential oils and constituents from Leptospermum petersonii against three Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunae; Park, Il-Kwon

    2012-09-03

    Commercial plant essential oils obtained from 11 Myrtaceae plant species were tested for their fumigant antifungal activity against Aspergillus ochraceus, A. flavus, and A. niger. Essential oils extracted from Leptospermum petersonii at air concentrations of 56 × 10(-3) mg/mL and 28 × 10(-3) mg/mL completely inhibited the growth of the three Aspergillus species. However, at an air concentration of 14 × 10(-3) mg/mL, inhibition rates of L. petersonii essential oils were reduced to 20.2% and 18.8% in the case of A. flavus and A. niger, respectively. The other Myrtaceae essential oils (56 × 10(-3) mg/mL) only weakly inhibited the fungi or had no detectable affect. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis identified 16 compounds in L. petersonii essential oil. The antifungal activity of the identified compounds was tested individually by using standard or synthesized compounds. Of these, neral and geranial inhibited growth by 100%, at an air concentration of 56 × 10(-3) mg/mL, whereas the activity of citronellol was somewhat lover (80%). The other compounds exhibited only moderate or weak antifungal activity. The antifungal activities of blends of constituents identified in L. petersonii oil indicated that neral and geranial were the major contributors to the fumigant and antifungal activities.

  18. Antifungal effect of Allium tuberosum, Cinnamomum cassia, and Pogostemon cablin essential oils and their components against population of Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocevski, Dragana; Du, Muying; Kan, Jianquan; Jing, Chengjun; Lačanin, Ines; Pavlović, Hrvoje

    2013-05-01

    Antifungal activity of Allium tuberosum (AT), Cinnamomum cassia (CC), and Pogostemon cablin (Patchouli, P) essential oils against Aspergillus flavus strains 3.2758 and 3.4408 and Aspergillus oryzae was tested at 2 water activity levels (aw : 0.95 and 0.98). Main components of tested essential oils were: allyl trisulfide 40.05% (AT), cinnamaldehyde 87.23% (CC), and patchouli alcohol 44.52% (P). The minimal inhibitory concentration of the plant essential oils against A. flavus strains 3.2758 and 3.4408 and A. oryzae was 250 ppm (A. tuberosum and C. cassia), whereas Patchouli essential oil inhibited fungi at concentration > 1500 ppm. The essential oils exhibited suppression effect on colony growth at all concentrations (100, 175, and 250 ppm for A. tuberosum; 25, 50, and 75 for C. cassia; 100, 250, and 500 for P. cablin essential oil). Results of the study represent a solution for possible application of essential oil of C. cassia in different food systems due to its strong inhibitory effect against tested Aspergillus species. In real food system (table grapes), C. cassia essential oil exhibited stronger antifungal activity compared to cinnamaldehyde. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Biological control products for aflatoxin prevention in Italy: Commercial field evaluation of atoxigenic A.flavus active ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 2003, non-compliant aflatoxin concentrations have been detected in maize produced in Italy. The most successful worldwide experiments in aflatoxin prevention resulted from distribution of atoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus to displace aflatoxin-producers during crop development. The disp...

  20. Two novel aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus species from Argentinean peanuts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pildain, M.B.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Vaamonde, G.

    2008-01-01

    Two novel species from Aspergillus section Flavi from different species of Arachis (peanuts) in Argentina are described as Aspergillus arachidicola sp. nov. and Aspergillus minisclerotigenes sp. nov. Their novel taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach with phenotypic...... (morphology and extrolite profiles) and molecular (beta-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences) characters. A. minisclerotigenes resembles Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parvisclerotigenus in producing aflatoxins B-1 and B-2, cyclopiazonic acid, kojic acid and aspergillic acid, but in addition it produces...... and parasiticolide, and some strains produce aspergillic acid. The type strain of A. arachidicola is CBS 117610(T) =IBT 25020(T) and that of A. minisclerotigenes is CBS 117635(T) =IBT 27196(T). The Mycobank accession numbers for Aspergillus minisclerotigenes sp. nov. and Aspergillus arachidicola sp. nov...

  1. Growth and enzymatic responses of phytopathogenic fungi to glucose in culture media and soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz de Oliveira Costa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of inoculation of Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium verticillioides, and Penicillium sp. in Dystrophic Red Latosol (DRL and Eutroferric Red Latosol (ERL soils with or without glucose on the total carbohydrate content and the dehydrogenase and amylase activities was studied. The fungal growth and spore production in culture medium with and without glucose were also evaluated. A completely randomized design with factorial arrangement was used. The addition of glucose in the culture medium increased the growth rate of A. flavus and Penicillium sp. but not of F. verticillioides. The number of spores increased 1.2 for F. verticillioides and 8.2 times for A. flavus in the medium with glucose, but was reduced 3.5 times for Penicillium sp. The total carbohydrates contents reduced significantly according to first and second degree equations. The consumption of total carbohydrates by A. flavus and Penicillium sp. was higher than the control or soil inoculated with F. verticillioides. The addition of glucose to soils benefited the use of carbohydrates, probably due to the stimulation of fungal growth. Dehydrogenase activity increased between 1.5 to 1.8 times (p <0.05 in soils with glucose and inoculated with the fungi (except F. verticillioides, in relation to soil without glucose. Amylase activity increased 1.3 to 1.5 times due to the addition of glucose in the soil. Increased amylase activity was observed in the DRL soil with glucose and inoculated with A. flavus and Penicillium sp. when compared to control.

  2. Calcineurin Orchestrates Hyphal Growth, Septation, Drug Resistance and Pathogenesis of Aspergillus fumigatus: Where Do We Go from Here?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen R Juvvadi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on fungal pathogens belonging to the ascomycota phylum are critical given the ubiquity and frequency with which these fungi cause infections in humans. Among these species, Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive aspergillosis, a leading cause of death in immunocompromised patients. Fundamental to A. fumigatus pathogenesis is hyphal growth. However, the precise mechanisms underlying hyphal growth and virulence are poorly understood. Over the past 10 years, our research towards the identification of molecular targets responsible for hyphal growth, drug resistance and virulence led to the elucidation of calcineurin as a key signaling molecule governing these processes. In this review, we summarize our salient findings on the significance of calcineurin for hyphal growth and septation in A. fumigatus and propose future perspectives on exploiting this pathway for designing new fungal-specific therapeutics.

  3. The Effect of Inoculants of Thiobacillus and Aspergillus on Corn Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohammdi Aria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Phosphorus (P is one of the essential macronutrients for growth and development of plant. Phosphorus is added to soil in the form of phosphatic fertilizers, part of which is utilized by plants and the remainder converted into insoluble fixed forms. Increasingly high cost of chemical fertilizers has been the major stimulus to search for an alternative, naturally-occurring, phosphate source. The researchers offered phosphorus rocks as a valuable alternative source for P. fertilizer. Unfortunately, rock phosphate is not plant available in soils with a pH greater than 6. One method to increase soluble form inorganic P is application of phosphate solublizing microorganisms and sulfur oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus with rock phosphate. A greenhouse experiment was carried out with two bio fertilizers (bio fertilizers santes in incubation condition in a soil with low available P on corn growth. The bio fertilizers were: rock phosphate with 20% sulfur, 15% vermicompost, Thiobacillus bacteria and Aspergillus fungi (BFS20V15 at three rates: 440 kg/ha (BF1 , 880 kg/ha (BF2, 1320kg/ha (BF3, rock phosphate with 20% sulfur, 15% vermicompost, Thiobacillus bacteria (BFS20V15 at three rates: 440 kg/ha (B1 , 880 kg/ha (B2, 1320kg/ha (B3, triple super phosphate (TSP, and control without phosphorus. In the greenhouse experiment, shoot dry matter, p uptake in plant and available p in soil were determined. The results showed that maximum yield obtained from BF3 with the shoot dry weight 7.2 g per plant and with no significant difference in relation to the triple super phosphate (7.5g at 5% level. Also highest rate p-uptake resulted from BF3. There was significant difference between treatment BF3 and TSP on p-uptake. Results indicated that it could be possible to substitute rock phosphate inoculated with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and phosphorous-solublizing fungus for super phosphate. Keywords: Uptake-p, pH Rock phosphate, Solfur, Vermicompost

  4. Detection of Aspergillus in lung and other tissue samples using the MycAssay Aspergillus real-time PCR kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass-Flörl, C; Follett, S A; Moody, A; Denning, D W

    2011-09-01

    The MycAssay™ Aspergillus real-time PCR kit was tested on tissues from patients with invasive fungal infections. Tissue samples from nine organ transplant recipients and 33 patients with haematological malignancy were from lung (n = 30), skin (n = 4), and others. Samples were preprocessed with proteinase K and lyticase, followed by DNA extraction and real-time PCR. For all samples, the sensitivity of the MycAssay Aspergillus test was 82% and specificity 79% relative to microscopy and 90% and 64%, respectively, compared with Aspergillus culture. The positive predictive value and negative predictive values compared with culture were 69% and 88% and were 88% and 69% compared with microscopy, respectively. The MycAssay Aspergillus test detected tissue invasive infections with Aspergillus fumigatus , Aspergillus flavus , and Aspergillus terreus.

  5. Septic arthritis due to tubercular and Aspergillus co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus septic arthritis is a rare and serious medical and surgical problem. It occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common causative organism followed by Aspergillus flavus. The most common site affected is knee followed by shoulder, ankle, wrist, hip and sacroiliac joint. Debridement and voriconazole are primary treatment of articular aspergilosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of co-infection of tuberculosis (TB and Aspergillus infecting joints. We report a case of co-infection of TB and A. flavus of hip and knee of a 60-year-old male, with type 2 diabetes mellitus. He was treated with debridement, intravenous voriconazole, and antitubercular drugs.

  6. The effect of cocoa fermentation and weak organic acids on growth and ochratoxin A production by Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copetti, Marina V; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Mororó, Raimundo C; Pereira, José L; Frisvad, Jens C; Taniwaki, Marta H

    2012-04-16

    The acidic characteristics of cocoa beans have influence on flavor development in chocolate. Cocoa cotyledons are not naturally acidic, the acidity comes from organic acids produced by the fermentative microorganisms which grow during the processing of cocoa. Different concentrations of these metabolites can be produced according to the fermentation practices adopted in the farms, which could affect the growth and ochratoxin A production by fungi. This work presents two independent experiments carried out to investigate the effect of some fermentation practices on ochratoxin A production by Aspergillus carbonarius in cocoa, and the effect of weak organic acids such as acetic, lactic and citric at different pH values on growth and ochratoxin A production by A. carbonarius and Aspergillus niger in culture media. A statistical difference (ρorganic acids on fungal growth and ochratoxin A production, with differences according to the media pH and the organic acid present. Acetic acid was the most inhibitory acid against A. carbonarius and A. niger. From the point of view of food safety, considering the amount of ochratoxin A produced, fermentation practices should be conducted towards the enhancement of acetic acid, although lactic and citric acids also have an important role in lowering the pH to improve the toxicity of acetic acid. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. New applications for known drugs: Human glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors as modulators of Aspergillus fumigatus growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián-Pérez, Víctor; Manoli, Maria-Tsampika; Pérez, Daniel I; Gil, Carmen; Mellado, Emilia; Martínez, Ana; Espeso, Eduardo A; Campillo, Nuria E

    2016-06-30

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is one of the most severe forms of fungi infection. IA disease is mainly due to Aspergillus fumigatus, an air-borne opportunistic pathogen. Mortality rate caused by IA is still very high (50-95%), because of difficulty in early diagnostics and reduced antifungal treatment options, thus new and efficient drugs are necessary. The aim of this work is, using Aspergillus nidulans as non-pathogen model, to develop efficient drugs to treat IA. The recent discovered role of glycogen synthase kinase-3 homologue, GskA, in A. fumigatus human infection and our previous experience on human GSK-3 inhibitors focus our attention on this kinase as a target for the development of antifungal drugs. With the aim to identify effective inhibitors of colonial growth of A. fumigatus we use A. nidulans as an accurate model for in vivo and in silico studies. Several well-known human GSK-3β inhibitors were tested for inhibition of A. nidulans colony growth. Computational tools as docking studies and binding site prediction was used to explain the different biological profile of the tested inhibitors. Three of the five tested hGSK3β inhibitors are able to reduce completely the colonial growth by covalent bind to the enzyme. Therefore these compounds may be useful in different applications to eradicate IA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Systems Analysis Unfolds the Relationship between the Phosphoketolase Pathway and Growth in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Grotkjær, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background: Aspergillus nidulans is an important model organism for studies on fundamental eukaryotic cell biology and on industrial processes due to its close relation to A. niger and A. oryzae. Here we identified the gene coding for a novel metabolic pathway in A. nidulans, namely...

  9. Chemical composition and antifungal activity of Hyptis suaveolens (L. poit leaves essential oil against Aspergillus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Pessoa Moreira

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the constituents of the essential oil from Hyptis suaveolens (L. leaves using a Gas Chromatograph -Mass Spectrometer and assess its inhibitory effect on some potentially pathogenic Aspergilli (A. flavus, A. parasiticus, A. ochraceus, A. fumigatus and A. niger. Eucaliptol (47.64 % was the most abundant component in the oil, followed for gama-ellemene (8.15 %, beta-pynene (6.55 %, (+3-carene (5.16 %, trans-beta-cariophyllene (4.69 % and germacrene (4.86 %. The essential oil revealed an interesting anti-Aspergillus property characterized by a Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and Minimum Fungicidal Concentration of 40 and 80 µL/mL, respectively. The oil at 80 and 40 µL/mL strongly inhibited the mycelial growth of A. fumigatus and A. parasiticus along 14 days. In addition, at 10 and 20 µL/mL the oil was able to cause morphological changes in A. flavus as decreased conidiation, leakage of cytoplasm, loss of pigmentation and disrupted cell structure suggesting fungal wall degeneration. These findings showed the interesting anti-Aspergillus property of H. suaveolens leaves essential oil supporting its possible rational use as alternative source of new antifungal compounds to be applied in the aspergillosis treatment.

  10. Chemical composition and antifungal activity of Hyptis Suaveolens (L.) Poit leaves essential oil against Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana Carolina Pessoa; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes; Wanderley, Paulo Alves; Carmo, Egberto Santos; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the constituents of the essential oil from Hyptis suaveolens (L.) leaves using a Gas Chromatograph - Mass Spectrometer and assess its inhibitory effect on some potentially pathogenic Aspergilli (A. flavus, A. parasiticus, A. ochraceus, A. fumigatus and A. niger). Eucaliptol (47.64 %) was the most abundant component in the oil, followed for gama-ellemene (8.15 %), beta-pynene (6.55 %), (+)-3-carene (5.16 %), trans-beta-cariophyllene (4.69 %) and germacrene (4.86 %). The essential oil revealed an interesting anti-Aspergillus property characterized by a Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and Minimum Fungicidal Concentration of 40 and 80 µL/mL, respectively. The oil at 80 and 40 µL/mL strongly inhibited the mycelial growth of A. fumigatus and A. parasiticus along 14 days. In addition, at 10 and 20 µL/mL the oil was able to cause morphological changes in A. flavus as decreased conidiation, leakage of cytoplasm, loss of pigmentation and disrupted cell structure suggesting fungal wall degeneration. These findings showed the interesting anti-Aspergillus property of H. suaveolens leaves essential oil supporting its possible rational use as alternative source of new antifungal compounds to be applied in the aspergillosis treatment.

  11. Growth, ruminal measurements, and health characteristics of Holstein bull calves fed an Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohe, T T; O'Diam, K M; Daniels, K M

    2015-09-01

    A fermentation extract of the fungus Aspergillus oryzae can be used as a prebiotic. The objective was to determine if dietary inclusion of a fermentation extract of A. oryzae as well as calf age would alter growth, health, performance parameters, and the growth and development of the rumen in Holstein calves from birth thru 1 wk postweaning; it was hypothesized that it would. Purchased bull calves (n=52) that originated from 1 of 13 farms were used in this experiment. All calves had serum IgG greater than 10 mg/mL. Calves were randomly assigned to a slaughter age, 4 (n=16) or 8 wk (n=36), and treatment, control (n=27) or fermentation extract of A. oryzae (AMF; n=25). Calves were housed and fed individually; no bedding was used and no forage was fed. Calves assigned to AMF were fed 2 g of AMF daily. Liquid AMF was delivered in milk replacer for the first 4 wk of the study; solid AMF was top-dressed on texturized starter thereafter. Calves were fed nonmedicated milk replacer twice daily (22.0% crude protein, 20.0% fat, dry matter basis; 680 g/d) and were weaned upon consumption of 0.91 kg of starter (20% crude protein, 2.0% fat; medicated with decoquinate) for 3 consecutive days or on d 45 of the study, whichever came first. Calves had ad libitum access to starter and water throughout the study. Feed intake as well as fecal and respiratory scores were recorded daily; body weight, withers height, and hip height were recorded weekly. Gross rumen measurements and rumen samples for future gross and histological analyses were taken at 4 and 8 wk. All calves grew similarly; weaning age averaged 40.39±0.77 d. Lifetime average daily gain was 0.60±0.05 kg/d and lifetime gain-to-feed ratio was 0.56±0.05. Milk replacer, starter, total dry matter intake, gross and histological rumen measurements, rumen pH, fecal and respiratory scores, and total medical costs were not affected by treatment. Despite total medical costs not differing by treatment, a lower percentage of AMF

  12. Radiosensitivity of A. ochraceus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. parasiticus and A. carbonarius in CYA medium and on grains of rice, oat, wheat and peanuts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Valeria Barbosa [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Veterinaria. Dept. de Tecnologia de Alimentos]. E-mail: niveam@uol.com.br; Vital, Helio de Carvalho; Hernandes, Nilber Kenup [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Defesa Quimica, Biologica e Nuclear]. E-mail: vital@ctex.eb.br; Rosa, Carlos Alberto da Rocha [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Veterinaria. Dept. de Microbiologia e Imunologia Veterinaria]. E-mail: shalako@ufrrj.br

    2007-07-01

    Irradiation is regarded as an efficient process to delay fungi growth in foods. However information on the resistance of toxigenic molds to gamma radiation is still scarce in the literature. This work investigated the radiosensitivity of five species of Aspergillus spp., namely: A. ochraceus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. parasiticus and A. carbonarius grown and irradiated in CYA medium, peanuts and on grains of rice, oat and wheat. After inoculation the colonies were stored for five days at 25 deg C and gamma irradiated with doses ranging from 0 to 5.5 kGy. Six days later the colonies were analyzed for post-irradiation growth. Survival curves were then determined as linear functions of the absorbed doses. Regardless of the substrates, the radiosensitivities of the five species have been grouped in three different levels. Expressed in terms of the parameters D{sub 50} and Do (the doses needed to reduce the number of active colonies by 50% and 100%, respectively), those groups are: D{sub 50} = 2.2 kGy and D0 = 3.2 kGy for A. ochraceus and A. carbonarius; D{sub 50} = 2.5 kGy and D0 = 4.1 kGy for A. niger and A. flavus; and D{sub 50} = 3.1 kGy and D0 = 4.7 kGy for A. parasiticus. (author)

  13. ASPERGILLUS NIGER ASPERGILLUS NIGER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Additives such as low molecular weight alcohols, trace metals, phytate, lipids etc have been reported to stimulate citric acid production. Hence the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of stimulating the metabolic activity of activity of Aspergillus niger for the purpose of improved citric acid production from ...

  14. Biological control of post harvest disease caused by Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biological control of post harvest disease caused by Aspergillus flavus on stored lemon fruits. ... Erwinia chrysanthemi RK-67 and Bacillus subtilis RK-6 treatments reduced disease severity on both lemon cultivars. Furthermore, both the cell suspension and culture filtrates of Burkholderia cepacia strain RK- 277 reduced ...

  15. Biological control of post harvest disease caused by Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antagonistic activity of 24 selected bacterial strains detected by previous microbiological studies to Aspergillus flavus was tested in vitro and in vivo conditions. Within 24 strains, only ten strains showed remarkable inhibition zone (6-34 mm) against the pathogen in assays carried out in Petri plates. Both cell suspension and ...

  16. Prevention of melanin formation during aryl alcohol oxidase production under growth-limited conditions using an Aspergillus nidulans cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Planas, Oscar; Prade, Rolf A; Müller, Michael; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Wilkins, Mark R

    2017-11-01

    An Aspergillus nidulans cell factory was genetically engineered to produce an aryl alcohol oxidase (AAO). The cell factory initiated production of melanin when growth-limited conditions were established using stationary plates and shaken flasks. This phenomenon was more pronounced when the strain was cultured in a trickle bed reactor (TBR). This study investigated different approaches to reduce melanin formation in fungal mycelia and liquid medium in order to increase the enzyme production yield. Removal of copper from the medium recipe reduced melanin formation in agar cultures and increased enzyme activities by 48% in agitated liquid cultures. Copper has been reported as a key element for tyrosinase, an enzyme responsible for melanin production. Ascorbic acid (0.44g/L) stopped melanin accumulation, did not affect growth parameters and resulted in AAO activity that was more than two-fold greater than a control treatment with no ascorbic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of low oxygen concentrations on growth and alpha-amylase production of Aspergillus oryzae in model solid-state fermentation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahardjo, Y.S.P.; Sie, S.; Weber, F.J.; Tramper, J.; Rinzema, A.

    2005-01-01

    Oxygen transfer in the fungal mat is a major concern in solid-state fermentation (SSF). Oxygen supply into the mycelial layers is hampered by diffusion limitation. For aerobic fungi, like Aspergillus oryzae, this oxygen depletion can be a severely limiting factor for growth and metabolite

  18. aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus in groundnut seeds across India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-05-08

    May 8, 2013 ... problems in the tropical hot and humid climate of World. (Keenan and Savage, 1994; Kishore et al., ... cerns in many countries (Bhatnagar et al., 2003). Aflatoxin is a group of mycotoxins produced .... curves using absorbance (A) vs. logarithm of analyte concentration were plotted. Total aflatoxins in the ...

  19. Genomic sequences of Aspergillus flavus accessions in Georgia USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The data was produced as part of the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Collaborative Research on Peanut Productivity and Aflatoxin Control (the Peanut &...

  20. Photodynamic inactivation of Aspergillus flavus mediated by Bidens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurrence of mycotoxins in food and animal feeds poses major health risks to human and animals, and effective control requires integration of crop management strategies both in the field and during post-harvest storage and processing. Photodynamic inactivation is a novel light-based approach which offers a promising ...

  1. Effects of Aspergillus niger fermented rapeseed meal on nutrient digestibility, growth performance and serum parameters in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changyou; He, Jun; Wang, Jianping; Yu, Jie; Yu, Bing; Mao, Xiangbing; Zheng, Ping; Huang, Zhiqing; Chen, Daiwen

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influences of Aspergillus niger fermented rapeseed meal (FRSM) on growth performance and nutrient digestibility of growing pigs. A total of 72 growing pigs (body weight = 40.8 ± 2.1 kg) were used in feeding trials, lasting for up to 42 days, and were randomly allotted to one of three diets, including a corn-soybean meal control diet as well as two experimental diets containing 10% unfermented rapeseed meal (RSM) or 10% FRSM. The results showed that average daily gain and feed conversion ratio of pigs fed FRSM were superior (P digestibility for dry matter, protein, calcium and phosphorus than pigs fed unfermented RSM diet and did not differ from the FRSM diet. Pigs fed FRSM had lower levels (P digestibility of RSM for pigs and FRSM is a promising alternative protein for pig production. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  2. Post-operative Aspergillus mediastinitis in a man who was immunocompetent: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orfanos Stylianos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Aspergillus spp. infections mainly affect patients who are immunocompromised, and are extremely rare in immunocompetent individuals. Case presentation Aspergillus post-operative mediastinitis is considered to be a devastating infection, usually affecting patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery with specific predisposing factors. We describe the case of an immunocompetent 68-year-old Caucasian man with severe chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, who underwent pulmonary thromboendarterectomy and developed post-operative mediastinitis due to Aspergillus flavus. The environmental control did not reveal the source of A. flavus infection and, despite combined antifungal therapy, our patient died as a result of septic shock and multiple organ failure. Conclusion Aspergillus mediastinitis mainly affects patients after cardiosurgery operations with predisposing factors, and it is unusual in patients who are immunocompetent. The identification of the Aspergillus spp. source is often difficult, and there are no guidelines for the administration of pre-emptive therapy in this population of at-risk patients.

  3. Molecular identification of Aspergillus and Eurotium species isolated from rice and their toxin-producing ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, D; Zainal Abidin, M A; Tan, Y H; Kamaruzaman, S

    2011-01-01

    Thirty milled rice samples were collected from retailers in 4 provinces of Malaysia. These samples were evaluated for Aspergillus spp. infection by direct plating on malt extract salt agar (MESA). All Aspergillus holomorphs were isolated and identified using nucleotide sequences of ITS 1 and ITS 2 of rDNA. Five anamorphs (Aspergillus flavus, A. oryzae, A. tamarii, A. fumigatus and A. niger) and 5 teleomorphs (Eurotium rubrum, E. amstelodami, E. chevalieri, E. cristatum and E. tonophilum) were identified. The PCR-sequencing based technique for sequences of ITS 1 and ITS 2 is a fast technique for identification of Aspergillus and Eurotium species, although it doesn't work flawlessly for differentiation of Eurotium species. All Aspergillus and Eurotium isolates were screened for their ability to produce aflatoxin and ochratoxin A (OTA) by HPLC and TLC techniques. Only A. flavus isolate UPM 89 was able to produce aflatoxins B1 and B2.

  4. Lipase Production in Solid-State Fermentation Monitoring Biomass Growth of Aspergillus niger Using Digital Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Julio C. V.; da Terzi, Selma C.; Bevilaqua, Juliana Vaz; Damaso, Mônica C. T.; Couri, Sônia; Langone, Marta A. P.; Senna, Lilian F.

    The aim of this study was to monitor the biomass growth of Aspergillus niger in solid-state fermentation (SSF) for lipase production using digital image processing technique. The strain A. niger 11T53A14 was cultivated in SSF using wheat bran as support, which was enriched with 0.91% (m/v) of ammonium sulfate. The addition of several vegetable oils (castor, soybean, olive, corn, and palm oils) was investigated to enhance lipase production. The maximum lipase activity was obtained using 2% (m/m) castor oil. In these conditions, the growth was evaluated each 24 h for 5 days by the glycosamine content analysis and digital image processing. Lipase activity was also determined. The results indicated that the digital image process technique can be used to monitor biomass growth in a SSF process and to correlate biomass growth and enzyme activity. In addition, the immobilized esterification lipase activity was determined for the butyl oleate synthesis, with and without 50% v/v hexane, resulting in 650 and 120 U/g, respectively. The enzyme was also used for transesterification of soybean oil and ethanol with maximum yield of 2.4%, after 30 min of reaction.

  5. Effect of colour LEDs on mycelia growth of Aspergillus ficuum and phytase production in photo-fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chien-Wei; Chen, Ching-Kuo; Chang, Chih-Jui; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2012-01-05

    Aspergillus ficuum grown on plates and in liquid cultures were illuminated by a white fluorescent light and four different colour LED lights (white, blue, green and red) to evaluate the regulation of LED lights on fungal growth. Biomass conversion, pellet size and phytase activity were examined. In liquid culture, luminous intensity was highly correlated with the rate of biomass conversion but did not affect pellet size. The white fluorescent light contained several different wavelengths, and therefore, its effect on A. ficuum represents the cooperative effect of these wavelengths. Strong luminance of a white fluorescent light inhibited growth of A. ficuum mycelia on plates, whereas white LED light enhanced growth. The development of mycelia was also inhibited by blue LED light and enhanced by red LED light illumination. Investigating the effect of LED lights on the growth of A. ficuum could provide evidence on the luminous intensity that is sufficient for regulating fermentation by light. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Significance of lower respiratory tract cultures yielding Aspergillus spp. growth in a hospital without transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Paloma; Barberán, José; Eroles, Guillermo; Granizo, Juan-José; Giménez, María-José; Mir, Nuria; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Prieto, José; Cuétara, Maria Soledad

    2010-12-01

    Isolation of Aspergillus spp. in non-neutropenic, non-transplant patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) usually treated with corticosteroids is not easily interpretable. A retrospective review of clinical records corresponding to cultures (respiratory samples) yielding Aspergillus spp. in non- transplant patients was carried out. Patients were assigned to four categories: colonization, possible, probable or definitive aspergillosis. A logistic regression model (step-wise procedure) was performed using as dependent variable mortality, and as independent variables those showing differences (p≤0.1) in the bivariant analysis. Sixty-nine patients were identified. Most were elderly (68.1% ≥65 years), male (73.9%), presented comorbidities (84.1% Charlson index ≥3), COPD (76.8%), were receiving high corticosteroid doses (66.7%), and had previously received antibiotics (94.2%). Forty-five cases were colonizations, 4 possible, 15 probable and 5 definitive aspergillosis. A. fumigatus was isolated in 75.4% patients: 66.7% colonized, 75% possible, 93.3% probable and 100% definitive aspergillosis. Colonized patients were older (71.9 ± 11.9 vs. 65.1 ± 9.2 years; p= 0.018) and presented higher (p=0.034) comorbidity index than patients with aspergillosis. Mortality was 31.1% in colonized vs. 62.5% in aspergillosis (p=0.012). The isolation of A. fumigatus was associated with an increased probability of aspergillosis, with statistical association in the multivariate analysis between mortality and variables related to chemotherapy (no antifungal treatment), disease (diagnostic category) and immunity (leukocytosis).

  7. GROWTH AND ENZYME PRODUCTION DURING CONTINUOUS CULTURES OF A HIGH AMYLASE-PRODUCING VARIANT OF Aspergillus Oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.C. Zangirolami

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Growth and product formation by a selected variant of Aspergillus oryzae showing high alpha-amylase production was studied in continuous cultivations carried out at six different specific growth rates, using glucose as the growth-limiting nutrient. The analysis of the steady-state data revealed that the variant and wild-type strains were similar with respect to glucose uptake system and stoichiometric coefficients. However, the variant was capable of maintaining an enzyme production as high as 40 FAUgDW-1h-1 at a dilution rate of 0.2 h-1, while the wild-type strain reached a maximum specific alpha-amylase production rate of 17 FAUgDW-1h-1 at a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1. Using a morphologically structured model originally proposed for the wild-type strain, it was possible to describe enzyme production, biomass formation and glucose consumption after modification of a few parameters to adjust the model to the characteristics of the selected variant.

  8. Effects of carbon, nitrogen and pH on the growth of Aspergillus parasiticus and aflatoxins production in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gabr, Hamid Moh; Ye, Chengsong; Zhang, Yongli; Khan, Sardar; Lin, Huirong; Zheng, Tianling

    2013-04-01

    Mycotoxins are considered as the most hazardous fungal metabolites for human, animals and plant health. Recently, more attention has been paid on the occurrence of this group of fungi in different water sources throughout the globe. In this study, Aspergillus parasiticus ATCC strain was used as representative strain producing aflatoxins in drinking water. This study aimed to investigate the activation of fungi in drinking water and their ability to produce aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, and G2) in water under different ratios of C:N using different concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN). Glucose and ammonium sulphate were used for changing the levels of TOC and TN in the selected water media. Similarly, the effects of different water pH levels from 4.5 to 8.2 on the growth of this group of fungi and aflatoxins production were also investigated. The results indicate that the growth of fungi was highest, at C:N ratio of 1:1 as compared to other selected ratios. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the pH levels 5.5-6.5 showed best growth of fungi as compared to other pH levels. Aflatoxin concentrations were measured in the water samples using HPLC technique, but selected fungi were not able to produce aflatoxins in water at applied concentrations of TOC and TN mimicking the ratios and concentrations present in the natural aquatic environment.

  9. Effect of water activity on the growth of fungi isolated from „muesli“ components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimić Gordana R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of water activity (aw (0.85-0.97 on the growth of Aspergillus niger, A. flavus, Penicillium chrysogenum, P. brevicompactum and Eurotium herbariorum was examined. The growth of A. niger was lower than that of A. flavus at aw of 0.89 and 0.85. A. niger was the least tolerant of reduced moisture, and low aw (0.85 could prevent colony formation in 5 days. P. brevicompactum was less sensitive to reduced moisture conditions than P. chrysogenum. The maximal growth of E. herbariorum was observed at the level of 0.89 aw. Among the tested fungi, E. herbariorum appeared to be best adapted to the conditions of low aw. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR - 31017

  10. Feeding of Aspergillus oryzae fermentation culture (AOFC to growing sheep: 2. Growth rate and feed efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Lubis

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of yeast and or filamentous fungi as feed additive to ruminants has been of interest since the late 1980’s. Two fungi species have been commercially produced in the United States, (1 Yea-Sacc containing living cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and (2 Amaferm bearing Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract. It has been demonstrated and proven that the cultures can enhance rumen development and function in young ruminants. This paper concerns the use of Aspergillus oryzae fermentation culture (AOFC as feed additive for young-growing male ‘Garut’ sheep. The A. oryzae was cultured in a media made of mineral-enriched ‘onggok’ flour, a material of tapioca processing waste. The AOFC was prepared gradually by incubating the fungus at room temperature (26 – 300C for 5 days, dried at 400C and ground. The AOFC was added to a commercial concentrate (GT-03 at 0, 5 and 10% (w/w levels, as treatment C0 (control, C1, and C2, respectively. Fifteen growing ‘Garut’ sheep were used and the concentrate feed treatments were randomly allotted based on a randomized block design. Drinking water was available at all time. The amount of feed offered (chopped King grass and concentrates and their refusals were weighed daily and live-weight of sheep was measured once a week in the morning. Daily feces was collected and weighed in the last 10 days of the 14-week experimental period. All feed and fecal samples were analyzed for dry matter, crude protein, total fiber (NDF, and ash. AOFC supplementation resulted in higher weight gains (P<0.05, which were 94.81; 122.08; and 140.52 g/d for C0, C1, and C2 treatments, respectively. Dry and organic matter, as well as protein intake was also significantly increased by inclusion of AOFC into concentrate diet (P<0.05. The increment in nutrient intake was from increased consumption of concentrates, and not from King grass, however, there was no effect of AOFC supplementation on feed efficiency.

  11. Coinfection by Aspergillus and Zygomycetes Species in a Case of Acute Rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhara Vaidya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive mycotic infections can be effectively treated if rapid identification of fungus is obtained. We reported a case of coinfection by Aspergillus and Rhizopus sp. involving nose, paranasal sinuses, orbit, and brain in a 68-year-old known hypertensive male. He was presented to ENT OPD with history of fever and intermittent headache since fifteen days along with history of right-sided nasal obstruction and proptosis since seven days. CT scan of brain and paranasal sinuses showed findings of pansinusitis with cellulitic changes in right orbit. MRI confirmed the same along with features of intracranial extension with focal meningitis in right frontotemporal region. Laboratory parameters did not conclude much except for leucocytosis and hyponatremia. Patient was taken for endoscopic debridement from nose and paranasal sinuses, and tissue was sent for microbiological and histopathological examination. Minced tissue was processed, and after 48 hrs of incubation two types of growth were identified, one was yellowish, granular, and powdery consistent with Aspergillus sp., and another was cottony and woolly consistent with Rhizopus sp. LCB mount confirmed presence of Aspergillus flavus and Rhizopus arrhizus. Patient responded to therapy with IV amphotericin B and surgical debridement. On discharge patient's condition was good.

  12. Phylogeny of fungal hemoglobins and expression analysis of the Aspergillus oryzae flavohemoglobin gene fhbA during hyphal growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesebeke, R. te; Levasseur, A.; Boussier, A.; Record, E.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    The fhbA genes encoding putative flavohemoglobins (FHb) from Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae were isolated. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the A. niger fhbA gene and other putative filamentous fungal FHb-encoding genes to that of Ralstonia eutropha shows an overall

  13. Altering the expression of two chitin synthase genes differentially affects the growth and morphology of Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Christian; Hjort, C.M.; Hansen, K.

    2002-01-01

    In Aspergillus oryzae, one full-length chitin synthase (chsB) and fragments of two other chitin synthases (csmA and chsC) were identified. The deduced amino acid sequence of chsB was similar (87% identity) to chsB from Aspergillus nidulans, which encodes a class III chitin synthase. The sequence...

  14. Effect of feeding Aspergillus awamori and canola seed on the growth performance and muscle fatty acid profile in broiler chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Ahmed A; Hayashi, Kunioki; Ijiri, Daichi; Ohtsuka, Akira

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine effects of dietary supplementation with Aspergillus awamori and feeding canola seed on the growth and fatty acid profile in broilers. Twenty-eight chicks (15 days old) were assigned to the following groups: (1) control, fed a basal diet; (2) awamori, fed the basal diet supplemented with 0.05% A. awamori; (3) canola, fed a diet containing 5% canola seed; and (4) canola + awamori, fed the canola diet supplemented with A. awamori (seven birds/group). Body weight gain was increased by A. awamori but not influenced by canola seed. Breast muscle weight was increased in either awamori or canola groups. Although plasma triglyceride and cholesterol were decreased by feeding A. awamori or canola seed, fat content in the breast muscle were increased, accompanied by decrease in saturated fatty acids and increase in unsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and increased α-tocopherol content in the breast muscle was observed in all experimental groups. In conclusion, these results suggested that feeding canola seed and A. awamori might improve growth performance, and modified muscle fatty acid profile and α-tocopherol content, suggesting that they may improve meat quality. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  15. Growth kinetics and mechanistic action of reactive oxygen species released by silver nanoparticles from Aspergillus niger on Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninganagouda, Shivaraj; Rathod, Vandana; Singh, Dattu; Hiremath, Jyoti; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Mathew, Jasmine; ul-Haq, Manzoor

    2014-01-01

    Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs), the real silver bullet, are known to have good antibacterial properties against pathogenic microorganisms. In the present study AgNPs were prepared from extracellular filtrate of Aspergillus niger. Characterization of AgNPs by UV-Vis spectrum reveals specific surface plasmon resonance at peak 416 nm; TEM photographs revealed the size of the AgNPs to be 20-55 nm. Average diameter of the produced AgNPs was found to be 73 nm with a zeta potential that was -24 mV using Malvern Zetasizer. SEM micrographs showed AgNPs to be spherical with smooth morphology. EDS revealed the presence of pure metallic AgNPs along with carbon and oxygen signatures. Of the different concentrations (0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 μg/mL) used 10 μg/mL were sufficient to inhibit 10(7) CFU/mL of E. coli. ROS production was measured using DCFH-DA method and the the free radical generation effect of AgNPs on bacterial growth inhibition was investigated by ESR spectroscopy. This paper not only deals with the damage inflicted on microorganisms by AgNPs but also induces cell death through the production of ROS released by AgNPs and also growth kinetics of E. coli supplemented with AgNPs produced by A. niger.

  16. Effects of Cymbopogon citratus L. essential oil on the growth, lipid content and morphogenesis of Aspergillus niger ML2-strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, G A; Sarhan, M M; Abu Shahla, A N K; Abou El-Khair, E K

    2006-01-01

    The mycelial growth of Aspergillus niger van Tieghem was completely inhibited using 1.5 (microl/ml or 2.0 (microl/ml of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil applied by fumigation or contact method in Czapek liquid medium, respectively. This oil was found also to be fungicidal at the same concentrations. The sublethal doses 1.0 and 1.5 (microl/ml inhibited about 70% of fungal growth after five days of incubation and delayed conidiation as compared with the control. Microscopic observations using Light Microscope (LM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) were carried out to determine the ultra structural modifications of A. niger hyphae after treatment with C. citratus essential oil. The hyphal diameter and hyphal wall appeared markedly thinner. This oil also caused plasma membrane disruption and mitochondrial structure disorganization. Moreover, Ca+2, K+ and Mg+2 leakages increased from the fumigated mycelium and its total lipid content decreased, while the saturated fatty acids decreased and unsaturated fatty acids increased. These findings increase the possibility of exploiting C. citratus essential oil as an effective inhibitor of biodegrading and storage contaminating fungi and in fruit juice preservation. ((c) 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  17. Growth Kinetics and Mechanistic Action of Reactive Oxygen Species Released by Silver Nanoparticles from Aspergillus niger on Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaraj Ninganagouda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs, the real silver bullet, are known to have good antibacterial properties against pathogenic microorganisms. In the present study AgNPs were prepared from extracellular filtrate of Aspergillus niger. Characterization of AgNPs by UV-Vis spectrum reveals specific surface plasmon resonance at peak 416 nm; TEM photographs revealed the size of the AgNPs to be 20–55 nm. Average diameter of the produced AgNPs was found to be 73 nm with a zeta potential that was −24 mV using Malvern Zetasizer. SEM micrographs showed AgNPs to be spherical with smooth morphology. EDS revealed the presence of pure metallic AgNPs along with carbon and oxygen signatures. Of the different concentrations (0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 μg/mL used 10 μg/mL were sufficient to inhibit 107 CFU/mL of E. coli. ROS production was measured using DCFH-DA method and the the free radical generation effect of AgNPs on bacterial growth inhibition was investigated by ESR spectroscopy. This paper not only deals with the damage inflicted on microorganisms by AgNPs but also induces cell death through the production of ROS released by AgNPs and also growth kinetics of E. coli supplemented with AgNPs produced by A. niger.

  18. Inhibition of the Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase Siderophore A (SidA) Blocks Siderophore Biosynthesis and Aspergillus fumigatus Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Del Campo, Julia S; Vogelaar, Nancy; Tolani, Karishma; Kizjakina, Karina; Harich, Kim; Sobrado, Pablo

    2016-11-18

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen and the most common causative agent of fatal invasive mycoses. The flavin-dependent monooxygenase siderophore A (SidA) catalyzes the oxygen and NADPH dependent hydroxylation of l-ornithine (l-Orn) to N5-l-hydroxyornithine in the biosynthetic pathway of hydroxamate-containing siderophores in A. fumigatus. Deletion of the gene that codes for SidA has shown that it is essential in establishing infection in mice models. Here, a fluorescence polarization high-throughput assay was used to screen a 2320 compound library for inhibitors of SidA. Celastrol, a natural quinone methide, was identified as a noncompetitive inhibitor of SidA with a MIC value of 2 μM. Docking experiments suggest that celastrol binds across the NADPH and l-Orn pocket. Celastrol prevents A. fumigatus growth in blood agar. The addition of purified ferric-siderophore abolished the inhibitory effect of celastrol. Thus, celastrol inhibits A. fumigatus growth by blocking siderophore biosynthesis through SidA inhibiton.

  19. Effects of aqueous extract of Cinnamomum verum on growth of bread spoilage fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Doudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Food waste has been identified as a considerable problem and bread is the most wasted food. This study aimed to evaluate In-vitro anti-fungal activity of cinnamon extract on bread spoilage fungi and to determine its anti-fungal effect in the bread slices. At first, the MIC and MFC values of the extract were determined against Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium notatum and Rhizopus oryzae. Then, Aspergillus sp was selected to assess antifungal activities of different doses of cinnamon extract in bread slices. Cinnamon extract at a dose of 64 mg/ml completely inhibited all standard and bread isolated fungi. This concentration of extract also inhibited Aspergillus growth on bread slices and delayed colony formation but adversely affected the sensory characteristics of bread. Cinnamon extract at 32 mg/ml not only delayed fungal growth, but also improved bread shelf life and delayed its staling. Moreover, 32mg/ml of extract did not adversely affect bread aroma, flavor and texture. However, sodium acetate inhibited the growth of Aspergillus sp but is not recommended for fungal control because it is considered as chemical. Therefore 32 mg/ml of extract is recommended for increasing the shelf-life of flat bread.

  20. Optimization of growth conditions for xylanase production by Aspergillus niger in solid state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavya, Venkatesh; Padmavathi, Tallapragada

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were isolation, identification and characterization of xylanase producing fungi, optimization of medium composition and cultural conditions for xylanase enzyme production using cheaper sources. The fungal strains were isolated from garden soil by serial dilution technique and Aspergillus niger was identified and isolated in pure form. In conformation screening by congo red test, based on the reddish zone of enzyme activity formation in oat spelt xylan agar plates, A. niger was selected and optimized for xylanase enzyme production in solid state fermentation using cheaper sources like wheat bran, rice bran, soya bran, ragi bran and dust. Maximum enzyme activity was observed in wheat bran (9.87 U/ml). The use of wheat bran as a major carbon source is particularly valuable because oat spelt xylan or birch wood xylan are more expensive. The effects of time course, incubation substrate, inoculum size, moisturizing agent, moisture content, temperature and volume of fermentation medium on the production of xylanase were studied. The maximum xylanase production (12.65 U/ml) was observed at optimized condition, incubation temperature of 28 degrees C after 6 days of incubation period while minimum production (9.38 U/ml) at unoptimized condition. The maximum production of enzyme was found to be in wheat bran when the volume of fermentation medium was kept as 10 g/250 ml conical flasks, with mineral solution as moisturizing agent and moisture ratio 1:0.7. Thus the present study proved that the fungal strain A. niger used is highly potential and useful for xylanase production.

  1. PINA is essential for growth and positively influences NIMA function in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, James D; Daigle, Scott N; Means, Anthony R

    2004-07-30

    The phospho-Ser/Thr-directed prolyl-isomerase Pin1 was originally identified in vertebrate systems as a negative regulator of NIMA, a Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates the G(2)/M transition in Aspergillus nidulans. Here we explore the physiological roles of the Pin1 orthologue, PINA, in A. nidulans and evaluate the relevance of the interaction of PINA with NIMA in this fungus. We find pinA to be an essential gene in A. nidulans. In addition, when PINA levels are reduced 50-fold the cells grow at a reduced rate. Upon germination under conditions that repress PINA expression, the cells are delayed in the interphase activation of NIMX(cdc2), whereas they traverse the other phases of the cell cycle at a similar rate to controls. These results indicate that a marked reduction of PINA results in a lengthening of G(1). Additionally, PINA repression increases the rate at which the cells enter mitosis following release from a hydroxyurea arrest without altering the sensitivity of the fungus to agents that activate the replication or DNA damage checkpoints. In contrast to predictions based on Pin1, the physical interaction between PINA and NIMA is primarily dependent upon the prolylisomerase domain of PINA and the C-terminal 303 amino acids of NIMA. Finally, reduction of PINA levels exacerbates the nimA5 temperature-sensitive mutant, whereas overexpression of PINA decreases the severity of this mutation, results that are consistent with a positive genetic interaction between PINA and NIMA. Thus, although PINA is essential and positively regulates NIMA function, A. nidulans is most sensitive to a reduction in PINA concentration in G(1) rather than in G(2)/M.

  2. Influence of dissolved oxygen concentration on intracellular pH for regulation of Aspergillus niger growth rate during citric acid fermentation in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Ikram-Ul; Ali, Sikander; Qadeer, M A

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we report the regulation of Aspergillus niger growth rate during citric acid fermentation in a stirred tank bioreactor. For this, the influence of dissolved oxygen concentration in a medium on intracellular pH values and consequently on overall microbial metabolism was emphasized. Intracellular pH of mycelium grown under different concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the medium was determined. Sensitivity of proteins toward proton concentration is well recognized, therefore pH influences on the activities of key regulatory enzymes of Aspergillus niger were determined at pH values similar to those detected in the cells grown under lower dissolved oxygen concentrations. The results have shown significantly reduced specific activities of hexokinase, 6-phosphofructokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in more acidic environment, while pyruvate kinase was found to be relatively insensitive towards higher proton concentration. As expected, due to the reduced specific activities of regulatory enzymes under more acidic conditions, overall metabolism should be hindered in the medium with lower dissolved oxygen concentration which was confirmed by detecting the reduced specific growth rates. From the studies, we conclude that dissolved oxygen concentration affects the intracellular pH and thus growth rate of Aspergillus niger during the fermentation process.

  3. GROWTH EVALUATION OF FUNGI (PENICILLIUM AND ASPERGILLUS SPP.) ON CEILING TILES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of the potential for fungal growth on four different ceiling tiles in static chambers. It was found that even new ceiling tiles supported fungal growth under favorable conditions. Used ceiling tiles appeared to be more susceptible to funga...

  4. Efficacy of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in the control of Aspergillus parasiticus growth and aflatoxins production on pistachio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahmoshteh, Fatemeh; Siciliano, Ilenia; Banani, Houda; Hamidi-Esfahani, Zohreh; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi; Gullino, Maria Lodovica; Spadaro, Davide

    2017-08-02

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera) is an important nut for its economic, nutritional and health aspects but it can be contaminated by aflatoxigenic fungi in the field and during storage. Biological control could be considered as an alternative to chemical treatment. In this study, we evaluated the antifungal and anti-mycotoxigenic capability of two Bacillus spp. both in vitro and on pistachio kernels. In in vitro conditions, both strains were able to reduce the mycelial growth and they were able to degrade the four aflatoxins during the first three days after inoculation. AFG1 and AFG2 were rapidly degraded within two days of incubation with the bacterial strains. No aflatoxin was found in the bacterial cell walls, permitting exclusion of mycotoxin adsorption and hypothesis of an in vitro biodegradation as a mode of action. The cultivar of pistachio most susceptible to fungal colonization was 'Ahmad-Aghaei', selected among four main Iranian cultivars. A. parasiticus was able to grow and produce aflatoxins on pistachios, but at longer inoculation periods, a natural decrease of aflatoxins was registered. Both strains were able to reduce the fungal incidence and number of spores on pistachio with a stronger effect during the first 5dpi. The effect on aflatoxin content in vivo was less pronounced than in vitro, with a maximum effect at 8dpi. At longer times, there was a contrasting effect due to the lower activity of Bacillus spp. in stationary phase and higher growth of Aspergillus species. This consideration could explain the lack of aflatoxin reduction at 12dpi. Both bacterial strains showed good antifungal activity and aflatoxin reduction in in vitro conditions and on pistachio kernels. Altogether, these results indicate that Bacillus species could be considered as potential biocontrol agents to combat toxigenic fungal growth and subsequent aflatoxin contamination of nuts and agricultural crops in practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Shedding light on Aspergillus niger volatile exometabolome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Costa, Carina Pedrosa; Gonçalves Silva, Diogo; Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Almeida, Adelaide; Rocha, Sílvia M

    2016-01-01

    An in-depth exploration of the headspace content of Aspergillus niger cultures was performed upon different growth conditions, using a methodology based on advanced multidimensional gas chromatography...

  6. Effect of Essential Oils of Syzygium aromaticum and Melaleuca alternifolia on Isolates of Aspergillus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lima

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Essential  oils  have  antimicrobial  substances,  lower  cost  and  the  lower  resistance  of microorganism. This study aimed to evaluate the inhibition of mycelial growth of Aspergillus flavus and  A.  niger  with  essential  oils  of  Syzygium  aromaticum  and  Melaleuca  alternifolia.  For  this, aliquots  (0.5,  5,  10  and  15μL  of  essential  oils  from  S.  aromaticum  and  M.  alternifolia   were distributed on the surface of the culture medium Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA with Drigaslsky. In the control treatment were used only plates containing PDA plus chloramphenicol (1%. After 2 hours, a disc (8mm diameter of the isolated mycelium, with 10 days of age on PDA, was peaked to the center of the plates, these plates were sealed and incubated at 282°C, in the dark. The essential  oil  of  S.  aromaticum  inhibited  the  mycelial  growth  of  A.  flavus  and  A.  niger,  in  all aliquots. When using the essential oil of M. alternifolia decreased the mycelial growth of A. flavus in all aliquots, however, showed a low efficiency in control of A. niger. It was concluded that the essential  oil  S.  aromaticum  is  effective  against  A.  flavus  and  A.  niger,  which  can  be  used  in control against these microorganisms, and M. alternifolia not show satisfactory results in relation to reducing the growth of pathogens evaluated.

  7. LAMMER Kinase LkhA plays multiple roles in the vegetative growth and asexual and sexual development of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Hye Kang

    Full Text Available LAMMER kinase plays pivotal roles in various physiological processes in eukaryotes; however, its function in filamentous fungi is not known. We performed molecular studies on the function of the Aspergillus nidulans LAMMER kinase, LkhA, and report its involvement in multiple developmental processes. The gene for LkhA was highly expressed during reproductive organ development, such as that of conidiophores and cleistothecia. During vegetative growth, the patterns of germ tube emergence and hyphal polarity were changed and septation was increased by lkhA deletion. Northern analyses showed that lkhA regulated the transcription of brlA, csnD, and ppoA, which supported the detrimental effect of lkhA-deletion on asexual and sexual differentiation. LkhA also affected expression of cyclin-dependent kinase NimX(cdc2, a multiple cell cycle regulator, and StuA, an APSES family of fungal transcription factors that play pivotal roles in multiple differentiation processes. Here, for the first time, we present molecular evidence showing that LAMMER kinase is involved in A. nidulans development by modulating the expression of key regulators of developmental processes.

  8. Comparative Secretome Analysis of Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger during Growth on Sugarcane Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borin, Gustavo Pagotto; Sanchez, Camila Cristina; de Souza, Amanda Pereira; de Santana, Eliane Silva; de Souza, Aline Tieppo; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Squina, Fabio Marcio; Buckeridge, Marcos; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Oliveira, Juliana Velasco de Castro

    2015-01-01

    Background Our dependence on fossil fuel sources and concern about the environment has generated a worldwide interest in establishing new sources of fuel and energy. Thus, the use of ethanol as a fuel is advantageous because it is an inexhaustible energy source and has minimal environmental impact. Currently, Brazil is the world's second largest producer of ethanol, which is produced from sugarcane juice fermentation. However, several studies suggest that Brazil could double its production per hectare by using sugarcane bagasse and straw, known as second-generation (2G) bioethanol. Nevertheless, the use of this biomass presents a challenge because the plant cell wall structure, which is composed of complex sugars (cellulose and hemicelluloses), must be broken down into fermentable sugar, such as glucose and xylose. To achieve this goal, several types of hydrolytic enzymes are necessary, and these enzymes represent the majority of the cost associated with 2G bioethanol processing. Reducing the cost of the saccharification process can be achieved via a comprehensive understanding of the hydrolytic mechanisms and enzyme secretion of polysaccharide-hydrolyzing microorganisms. In many natural habitats, several microorganisms degrade lignocellulosic biomass through a set of enzymes that act synergistically. In this study, two fungal species, Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma reesei, were grown on sugarcane biomass with two levels of cell wall complexity, culm in natura and pretreated bagasse. The production of enzymes related to biomass degradation was monitored using secretome analyses after 6, 12 and 24 hours. Concurrently, we analyzed the sugars in the supernatant. Results Analyzing the concentration of monosaccharides in the supernatant, we observed that both species are able to disassemble the polysaccharides of sugarcane cell walls since 6 hours post-inoculation. The sugars from the polysaccharides such as arabinoxylan and β-glucan (that compose the most external

  9. Modelling the effect of temperature, water activity and carbon dioxide on the growth of Aspergillus niger and Alternaria alternata isolated from fresh date fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belbahi, A; Leguerinel, I; Méot, J-M; Loiseau, G; Madani, K; Bohuon, P

    2016-12-01

    To quantify and model the combined effects of temperature (T) (10-40°C), water activity (aw ) (0·993-0·818) and CO2 concentration (9·4-55·1%, v/v) on the growth rate of Aspergillus niger and Alternaria alternata that cause spoilage during the storage and packaging of dates. The effects of environmental factors were studied using the γ-concept. Cardinal models were used to quantify the effect of studied environmental factors on the growth rates. Firstly, the cardinal parameters were estimated independently from experiments carried out on potato dextrose agar using a monofactorial design. Secondly, model performance evaluation was conducted on pasteurized date paste. The boundary between growth and no-growth was predicted using a deterministic approach. Aspergillus niger displayed a faster growth rate and higher tolerance to low aw than Al. alternata, which in turn proved more resistant to CO2 concentration. Minimal cardinal parameters of T and aw were lower than those reported in the literature. The combination of the aw and CO2 effects significantly affected As. niger and Al. alternata growth. The γ-concept model overestimated growth rates, however, it is optimistic and provides somewhat conservative predictions. The developed model provides a decision support tool for the choice of the date fruit conservation mode (refrigeration, drying, modified atmospheric packaging or their combination) using T, aw and CO2 as environmental factors. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. The evolutionary imprint of domestication on genome variation and function of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, John G.; Salichos, Leonidas; Slot, Jason C.; Rinker, David C.; McGary, Kriston L.; King, Jonas G.; Klich, Maren A.; Tabb, David L.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Rokas, Antonis

    2012-01-01

    Summary The domestication of animals, plants and microbes fundamentally transformed the lifestyle and demography of the human species [1]. Although the genetic and functional underpinnings of animal and plant domestication are well understood, little is known about microbe domestication [2–6]. We systematically examined genome-wide sequence and functional variation between the domesticated fungus Aspergillus oryzae, whose saccharification abilities humans have harnessed for thousands of years to produce sake, soy sauce and miso from starch-rich grains, and its wild relative A. flavus, a potentially toxigenic plant and animal pathogen [7]. We discovered dramatic changes in the sequence variation and abundance profiles of genes and wholesale primary and secondary metabolic pathways between domesticated and wild relative isolates during growth on rice. Through selection by humans, our data suggest that an atoxigenic lineage of A. flavus gradually evolved into a “cell factory” for enzymes and metabolites involved in the saccharification process. These results suggest that whereas animal and plant domestication was largely driven by Neolithic “genetic tinkering” of developmental pathways, microbe domestication was driven by extensive remodeling of metabolism. PMID:22795693

  11. The weak acid preservative sorbic acid inhibits conidial germination and mycelial growth of Aspergillus niger through intracellular acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumridge, Andrew; Hesse, Stephan J A; Watson, Adrian J; Lowe, Kenneth C; Stratford, Malcolm; Archer, David B

    2004-06-01

    The growth of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger, a common food spoilage organism, is inhibited by the weak acid preservative sorbic acid (trans-trans-2,4-hexadienoic acid). Conidia inoculated at 10(5)/ml of medium showed a sorbic acid MIC of 4.5 mM at pH 4.0, whereas the MIC for the amount of mycelia at 24 h developed from the same spore inoculum was threefold lower. The MIC for conidia and, to a lesser extent, mycelia was shown to be dependent on the inoculum size. A. niger is capable of degrading sorbic acid, and this ability has consequences for food preservation strategies. The mechanism of action of sorbic acid was investigated using (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We show that a rapid decline in cytosolic pH (pH(cyt)) by more than 1 pH unit and a depression of vacuolar pH (pH(vac)) in A. niger occurs in the presence of sorbic acid. The pH gradient over the vacuole completely collapsed as a result of the decline in pH(cyt). NMR spectra also revealed that sorbic acid (3.0 mM at pH 4.0) caused intracellular ATP pools and levels of sugar-phosphomonoesters and -phosphodiesters of A. niger mycelia to decrease dramatically, and they did not recover. The disruption of pH homeostasis by sorbic acid at concentrations below the MIC could account for the delay in spore germination and retardation of the onset of subsequent mycelial growth.

  12. Probing the effect of tip pressure on fungal growth: Application to Aspergillus nidulans

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bermúdez, Blanca; Li, Qingxuan; Guinea, Gustavo V.; Peñalva, Miguel A.; Plaza, Gustavo R.

    2017-08-01

    The study of fungal cells is of great interest due to their importance as pathogens and as fermenting fungi and for their appropriateness as model organisms. The differential pressure between the hyphal cytoplasm and the bordering medium is essential for the growth process, because the pressure is correlated with the growth rate. Notably, during the invasion of tissues, the external pressure at the tip of the hypha may be different from the pressure in the surrounding medium. We report the use of a method, based on the micropipette-aspiration technique, to study the influence of this external pressure at the hyphal tip. Moreover, this technique makes it possible to study hyphal growth mechanics in the case of very thin hyphae, not accessible to turgor pressure probes. We found a correlation between the local pressure at the tip and the growth rate for the species Arpergillus nidulans. Importantly, the proposed method allows one to measure the pressure at the tip required to arrest the hyphal growth. Determining that pressure could be useful to develop new medical treatments for fungal infections. Finally, we provide a mechanical model for these experiments, taking into account the cytoplasm flow and the wall deformation.

  13. The Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygen on the Growth of Mucor sp. Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    especially Clostridium perfringens ) infections (1). Petri plates containing 24-hour, single-spore cultures of Mucor sp. and of A. fuxigatus were...A-OS72FI AKE JSlE EERC A NTDSAE IRFREA-T I / THE EFFECT OF HYPERBARIC OXYGEN ON THE GROWTH OF MUCOR SP. ASPE--ETC(U) FEB S W J CAIRNET UNLIID FSLT...FRANK J. SOLER RESEARCH LABORATORY FJSRL TECHNICAL REPORT 80-004 FEBRUARY 1980 Gci THE EFFECT OF HYPERBARIC OXYGEN ON THE GROWTH OF JUCOR SP. AND

  14. Overexpression of a novel endogenous NADH kinase in Aspergillus nidulans enhances growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Grotkjær, Thomas; Hofmann, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    aeration rates were studied in well-controlled glucose batch fermentations. Metabolite pro. ling and metabolic network analysis with [1-C-13] glucose were used for characterisation of the strains, and the results demonstrated that NADH kinase activity has paramount influence on growth physiology. Biomass...... to NADPH. Our findings indicate that A. nidulans is not optimised for growth in nutrient-rich conditions typically found in laboratory and industrial fermentors. This conclusion may impact the design of new strains capable of generating reducing power in the form of NADPH, which is crucial for efficient...

  15. Efeito da toxicidade de Cr (VI e Zn (II no crescimento do fungo filamentoso Aspergillus niger isolado de efluente industrial Toxicity effect of Cr (VI and Zn (II on growth of filamentous fungi Aspergillus niger isolated from industrial effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Socorro Vale

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Processos convencionais de tratamento de efluentes utilizam microrganismos vivos, o que sugere limitações relativas À toxicidade de metais para os microrganismos. O experimento consistiu em adicionar soluções monoelementares de Cr (VI e Zn(II em diferentes concentrações (0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 mg.L-1 ao meio de crescimento e observar a influência dos metais no crescimento micelial e germinativo do fungo Aspergillus Níger por verificação visual da expansão radial do micélio e da germinação de esporos, seguida de registro fotográfico. Os resultados mostraram que o metabolismo do fungo foi completamente inibido em concentrações acima de 500 mg Zn (II.L-1 e 150 mg Cr (VI.L-1. O ED50 (concentração de ingrediente ativo capaz de inibir 50% do crescimento micelial do fungo para os dois íons metálicos, nas condições estudadas, está na faixa entre 100 e 150 mg.L-1. Palavras-chave: metais pesados; inibição; crescimento micelial; Aspergillus niger; ED50.Many standard processes of wastewater treatment use live microorganisms, which suggests limitations on a metal toxicity to the microorganism. The experiment consisted in adding mono elementary solutions of Cr (VI and Zn (II at different concentrations (0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 mg.L-1 to the growth mean, and to observe the influence of metals on mycelial and germinative growth of the Aspergillus niger fungus, by means of visual observation of the radial expansion of the mycelius and the germination of spores, followed by photograph registration. The results showed that the metabolism of the fungus was completely inhibited at concentrations above 500 mg Zn (II.L-1 and 150 mg Cr (VI.L-1. The ED50 (concentration of active ingredient capable of inhibiting 50% of mycelial growth of the fungus for both metal ions, under the studied conditions, is in the range between 100 and 150 mg.L-1.

  16. Biosynthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles by Aspergillus Species

    OpenAIRE

    Zomorodian, K.; Pourshahid, S; Sadatsharifi, A; Mehryar, P; Pakshir, K.; Rahimi, MJ; Monfared, AA

    2016-01-01

    Currently, researchers turn to natural processes such as using biological microorganisms in order to develop reliable and ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. In this study, we have investigated extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using four Aspergillus species including A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, A. niger, and A. flavus. We have also analyzed nitrate reductase activity in the studied species in order to determine the probable role of this enzyme in ...

  17. Antifungal effect of gaseous nitric oxide on mycelium growth, sporulation and spore germination of the postharvest horticulture pathogens, Aspergillus niger, Monilinia fructicola and Penicillium italicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, E E; Wills, R B H; Ho, B T; Harris, A M; Spohr, L J

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate the antifungal activity of nitric oxide (NO) against the growth of the postharvest horticulture pathogens Aspergillus niger, Monilinia fructicola and Penicillium italicum under in vitro conditions. Different volumes of NO gas were injected into the Petri dish headspace to obtain the desired concentrations of 50-500 microl l(-1). The growth of the fungi was measured for 8 days of incubation in air at 25 degrees C. All concentrations of NO were found to produce an antifungal effect on spore germination, sporulation and mycelial growth of the three fungi, with the most effective concentration for A. niger and P. italicum being 100 and 500 microl l(-1) for M. fructicola. Short-term exposure to a low concentration of NO gas was able to inhibit the subsequent growth of A. niger, M. fructicola and P. italicum. NO gas has potential use as a natural fungicide to inhibit microbial growth on postharvest fruit and vegetables.

  18. Retraction of colonies and structures of Aspergillus Spp. as a possible high dose sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Valeria B., E-mail: valeriabborges@hotmail.com [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Processos Quimicos e Bioquimicos (EQ/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica; Vital, Helio C., E-mail: vital@ctex.eb.br [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (DDQBN/CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Defesa Quimica, Biologica e Nuclear. Secao de Defesa Nuclear; Moraes, Aurea M.L., E-mail: ltbbf@ioc.fiocruz.br [Instituto Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Micologia

    2013-07-01

    Changes in the length of macro-and microscopic structures of irradiated Aspergillus spp. colonies were investigated in this work in search for correlations with radiation dose. Effects related to growth and morphology produced by exposure to radiation doses ranging from 0.0 up to 8.0 kGy on strains of A. flavus (CMT 00079), A. parasiticus (CMT 00064) and A ochraceus (CMT 00145) were analyzed. Fungal colonies were inoculated on fresh peanut seeds and incubated for 5 days at 25°C. On the sixth day the samples were irradiated and moved to Petri dishes containing PDA culture medium where they remained incubated for 7 days at 25°C Post irradiation growth was periodically monitored by visual inspections and measurements of mycelial diameters. In addition, microscopic analyses were performed to determine the length of the major structures of the colonies. It has been found that irradiation causes a decrease in the diameter of colonies as well as in the length of microscopic structures of the fungus. The amount of retraction has been found to be strongly correlated to radiation dose. Such findings hint at the possibility of using in situ Aspergillus spp. colonies as high-dose living dosimeters in the event of massive radiation exposures. (author)

  19. Hypertonic conditions trigger transient plasmolysis, growth arrest and blockage of transporter endocytosis in Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsikas, Vassilis; Karachaliou, Mayia; Gournas, Christos; Diallinas, George

    2011-01-01

    By using Aspergillus nidulans strains expressing functional GFP-tagged transporters under hypertonic conditions, we noticed the rapid appearance of cortical, relatively static, fluorescent patches (0.5-2.3 μm). These patches do not correspond to transporter microdomains as they co-localize with other plasma membrane-associated molecules, such as the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and the SsoA t-Snare, or the lipophilic markers FM4-64 and filipin. In addition, they do not show characteristics of lipid rafts, MCCs or other membrane microdomains. Deconvoluted microscopic images showed that fluorescent patches correspond to plasma membrane invaginations. Transporters remain fully active during this phenomenon of localized plasmolysis. Plasmolysis was however associated with reduced growth rate and a dramatic blockage in transporter and FM4-64 endocytosis. These phenomena are transient and rapidly reversible upon wash-out of hypertonic media. Based on the observation that block in endocytosis by hypertonic treatment altered dramatically the cellular localization of tropomyosin (GFP-TpmA), although it did not affect the cortical appearance of upstream (SlaB-GFP) or downstream (AbpA-mRFP) endocytic components, we conclude that hypertonicity modifies actin dynamics and thus acts indirectly on endocytosis. This was further supported by the effect of latrunculin B, an actin depolymerization agent, on endocytosis. We show that the phenomena observed in A. nidulans also occur in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that they constitute basic homeostatic responses of ascomycetes to hypertonic shock. Finally, our work shows that hypertonic treatments can be used as physiological tools to study the endocytic down-regulation of transporters in A. nidulans, as non-conditional genetic blocks affecting endocytic internalization are lethal or severely debilitating.

  20. In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Voriconazole Activity against Aspergillus Species in a New In Vitro Dynamic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saigh, R.; Elefanti, A.; Velegraki, A.; Zerva, L.

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacodynamics (PD) of voriconazole activity against Aspergillus spp. were studied using a new in vitro dynamic model simulating voriconazole human pharmacokinetics (PK), and the PK-PD data were bridged with human drug exposure to assess the percent target (near-maximum activity) attainment of different voriconazole dosages. Three Aspergillus clinical isolates (1 A. fumigatus, 1 A. flavus, and 1 A. terreus isolate) with CLSI MICs of 0.5 mg/liter were tested in an in vitro model simulating voriconazole PK in human plasma with Cmax values of 7, 3.5, and 1.75 mg/liter and a t1/2 of 6 h. The area under the galactomannan index-time curve (AUCGI) was used as the PD parameter. In vitro PK-PD data were bridged with population human PK of voriconazole exposure, and the percent target attainment was calculated. The in vitro PK-PD relationship of fAUC0-24-AUCGI followed a sigmoid pattern (global R2 = 0.97), with near-maximum activities (10% fungal growth) observed at an fAUC0-24 (95% confidence interval [CI]) of 18.9 (14.4 to 23.1) mg · h/liter against A. fumigatus, 26.6 (21.1 to 32.9) mg · h/liter against A. flavus, and 36.2 (27.8 to 45.7) mg · h/liter against A. terreus (F test; P voriconazole dosages was 24% (11 to 45%), 80% (32 to 97%), and 93% (86 to 97%) for A. fumigatus, 12% (5 to 26%), 63% (17 to 93%), and 86% (73 to 94%) for A. flavus, and 4% (2 to 11%), 36% (6 to 83%), and 68% (47 to 83%) for A. terreus. Based on the in vitro exposure-effect relationships, a standard dosage of voriconazole may be adequate for most patients with A. fumigatus but not A. flavus and A. terreus infections, for which a higher drug exposure may be required. This could be achieved using a higher voriconazole dosage, thus highlighting the usefulness of therapeutic drug monitoring in patients receiving a standard dosage. PMID:22869563

  1. Growth-Phase Sterigmatocystin Formation on Lactose Is Mediated via Low Specific Growth Rates in Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Németh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Seed contamination with polyketide mycotoxins such as sterigmatocystin (ST produced by Aspergilli is a worldwide issue. The ST biosynthetic pathway is well-characterized in A. nidulans, but regulatory aspects related to the carbon source are still enigmatic. This is particularly true for lactose, inasmuch as some ST production mutant strains still synthesize ST on lactose but not on other carbon substrates. Here, kinetic data revealed that on d-glucose, ST forms only after the sugar is depleted from the medium, while on lactose, ST appears when most of the carbon source is still available. Biomass-specified ST production on lactose was significantly higher than on d-glucose, suggesting that ST formation may either be mediated by a carbon catabolite regulatory mechanism, or induced by low specific growth rates attainable on lactose. These hypotheses were tested by d-glucose limited chemostat-type continuous fermentations. No ST formed at a high growth rate, while a low growth rate led to the formation of 0.4 mg·L−1 ST. Similar results were obtained with a CreA mutant strain. We concluded that low specific growth rates may be the primary cause of mid-growth ST formation on lactose in A. nidulans, and that carbon utilization rates likely play a general regulatory role during biosynthesis.

  2. Growth-Phase Sterigmatocystin Formation on Lactose Is Mediated via Low Specific Growth Rates in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Zoltán; Molnár, Ákos P; Fejes, Balázs; Novák, Levente; Karaffa, Levente; Keller, Nancy P; Fekete, Erzsébet

    2016-11-28

    Seed contamination with polyketide mycotoxins such as sterigmatocystin (ST) produced by Aspergilli is a worldwide issue. The ST biosynthetic pathway is well-characterized in A. nidulans, but regulatory aspects related to the carbon source are still enigmatic. This is particularly true for lactose, inasmuch as some ST production mutant strains still synthesize ST on lactose but not on other carbon substrates. Here, kinetic data revealed that on d-glucose, ST forms only after the sugar is depleted from the medium, while on lactose, ST appears when most of the carbon source is still available. Biomass-specified ST production on lactose was significantly higher than on d-glucose, suggesting that ST formation may either be mediated by a carbon catabolite regulatory mechanism, or induced by low specific growth rates attainable on lactose. These hypotheses were tested by d-glucose limited chemostat-type continuous fermentations. No ST formed at a high growth rate, while a low growth rate led to the formation of 0.4 mg·L(-1) ST. Similar results were obtained with a CreA mutant strain. We concluded that low specific growth rates may be the primary cause of mid-growth ST formation on lactose in A. nidulans, and that carbon utilization rates likely play a general regulatory role during biosynthesis.

  3. Exploration of Islamic medicine plant extracts as powerful antifungals for the prevention of mycotoxigenic Aspergilli growth in organic silage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tayel, Ahmed A.; Salem, Mohammed F.; El-Tras, Wael F.

    2011-01-01

    Feed contamination with mycotoxins is a major risk factor for animals and humans as several toxins can exist as residues in meat and milk products, giving rise to carry-over to consumers via ingestion of foods of animal origin. The starting point for prevention, in this chain, is to eliminate the...... the growth of mycotoxigenic fungi in the animal forage. Ten plant extracts, recommended in Islamic medicine, were evaluated as antifungal agents against mycotoxigenic Aspergilli, i.e. Aspergillus flavus and A. ochraceus, growth in organic maize silage....

  4. Microclimatic conditions of Lasius flavus ant mounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véle, Adam; Holuša, Jaroslav

    2017-05-01

    Like other organisms, ants require suitable microclimatic conditions for their development. Thus, ant species inhabiting colder climates build nest mounds that rise above the soil surface, presumably to obtain heating from solar radiation. Although some ant species construct mounds of organic materials, which generate substantial heat due to microbial metabolism, Lasius flavus mounds consists mostly of soil, not organic material. The use of artificial shading in the current study demonstrated that L. flavus depends on direct solar radiation to regulate the temperature in its mound-like nests. Temperatures were much lower in shaded mounds than in unshaded mounds and were likely low enough in shaded mounds to reduce ant development and reproduction. In areas where L. flavus and similar ants are undesirable, they might be managed by shading.

  5. Density and Molecular Epidemiology of Aspergillus in Air and Relationship to Outbreaks of Aspergillus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Alexander C. A. P.; van Belkum, Alex; Behrendt, Myra; Luijendijk, Ad; Verbrugh, Henri A.

    1999-01-01

    After five patients were diagnosed with nosocomial invasive aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus, a 14-month surveillance program for pathogenic and nonpathogenic fungal conidia in the air within and outside the University Hospital in Rotterdam (The Netherlands) was begun. A. fumigatus isolates obtained from the Department of Hematology were studied for genetic relatedness by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. This was repeated with A. fumigatus isolates contaminating culture media in the microbiology laboratory. The density of the conidia of nonpathogenic fungi in the outside air showed a seasonal variation: higher densities were measured during the summer, while lower densities were determined during the fall and winter. Hardly any variation was found in the numbers of Aspergillus conidia. We found decreasing numbers of conidia when comparing air from outside the hospital to that inside the hospital and when comparing open areas within the hospital to the closed department of hematology. The increase in the number of patients with invasive aspergillosis could not be explained by an increase in the number of Aspergillus conidia in the outside air. The short-term presence of A. flavus can only be explained by the presence of a point source, which was probably patient related. Genotyping A. fumigatus isolates from the department of hematology showed that clonally related isolates were persistently present for more than 1 year. Clinical isolates of A. fumigatus obtained during the outbreak period were different from these persistent clones. A. fumigatus isolates contaminating culture media were all genotypically identical, indicating a causative point source. Knowledge of the epidemiology of Aspergillus species is necessary for the development of strategies to prevent invasive aspergillosis. RAPD fingerprinting of Aspergillus isolates can help to determine the cause of an outbreak of invasive aspergillosis. PMID:10325319

  6. Fermentation of sugar beet waste by ¤Aspergillus niger¤ facilitates growth and P uptake of external mycelium of mixed populations of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medina, A.; Jakobsen, Iver; Vassilev, N.

    2007-01-01

    Sugar beet waste has potential value as a soil amendment and this work studied whether fermentation of the waste by Aspergillus niger would influence the growth and P uptake of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Plants were grown in compartmentalised growth units, each with a root compartment (RC......) and two lateral root-free compartments (RFC). One RFC contained untreated soil while the other RFC contained soil, which was uniformly mixed with sugar beet waste, either untreated (SB) or degraded by A. niger (ASB) in a rock phosphate (RP)-supplied medium. The soil in each pair of RFC was labelled with P......-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was higher in SB than in ASB treatments. Whilst ASB increased growth and activity of AM mycelium, SB had the opposite effect. Moreover, shoot P content was increased by the addition of ASB, and by inoculation with AM fungi. Modification of soil microbial structure and production...

  7. Population structure and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus Sect. Flavi from maize in Nigeria and Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Giancarlo; Haidukowski, Miriam; Stea, Gaetano; Epifani, Filomena; Bandyopadhyay, Ranajit; Leslie, John F; Logrieco, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    Aflatoxins are highly toxic carcinogens that contaminate crops worldwide. Previous studies conducted in Nigeria and Ghana found high concentrations of aflatoxins in pre- and post-harvest maize. However, little information is available on the population structure of Aspergillus Sect. Flavi in West Africa. We determined the incidence of Aspergillus Sect. Flavi and the level of aflatoxin contamination in 91 maize samples from farms and markets in Nigeria and Ghana. Aspergillus spp. were recovered from 61/91 maize samples and aflatoxins B1 and/or B2 occurred in 36/91 samples. Three samples from the farms also contained aflatoxin G1 and/or G2. Farm samples were more highly contaminated than were samples from the market, in terms of both the percentage of the samples contaminated and the level of mycotoxin contamination. One-hundred-and-thirty-five strains representative of the 1163 strains collected were identified by using a multilocus sequence analysis of portions of the genes encoding calmodulin, β-tubulin and actin, and evaluated for aflatoxin production. Of the 135 strains, there were 110 - Aspergillus flavus, 20 - Aspergillus tamarii, 2 - Aspergillus wentii, 2 - Aspergillus flavofurcatus, and 1 - Aspergillus parvisclerotigenus. Twenty-five of the A. flavus strains and the A. parvisclerotigenus strain were the only strains that produced aflatoxins. The higher contamination of the farm than the market samples suggests that the aflatoxin exposure of rural farmers is even higher than previously estimated based on reported contamination of market samples. The relative infrequency of the A. flavus SBG strains, producing small sclerotia and high levels of both aflatoxins (B and G), suggests that long-term chronic exposure to this mycotoxin are a much higher health risk in West Africa than is the acute toxicity due to very highly contaminated maize in east Africa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals Specific Novel Tetrapeptide and Potential Anti-Inflammatory Metabolites in Pathogenic Aspergillus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim-Chung Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Infections related to Aspergillus species have emerged to become an important focus in infectious diseases, as a result of the increasing use of immunosuppressive agents and high fatality associated with invasive aspergillosis. However, laboratory diagnosis of Aspergillus infections remains difficult. In this study, by comparing the metabolomic profiles of the culture supernatants of 30 strains of six pathogenic Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. terreus, A. nomius and A. tamarii and 31 strains of 10 non-Aspergillus fungi, eight compounds present in all strains of the six Aspergillus species but not in any strain of the non-Aspergillus fungi were observed. One of the eight compounds, Leu–Glu–Leu–Glu, is a novel tetrapeptide and represents the first linear tetrapeptide observed in Aspergillus species, which we propose to be named aspergitide. Two other closely related Aspergillus-specific compounds, hydroxy-(sulfooxybenzoic acid and (sulfooxybenzoic acid, may possess anti-inflammatory properties, as 2-(sulfooxybenzoic acid possesses a structure similar to those of aspirin [2-(acetoxybenzoic acid] and salicylic acid (2-hydroxybenzoic acid. Further studies to examine the potentials of these Aspergillus-specific compounds for laboratory diagnosis of aspergillosis are warranted and further experiments will reveal whether Leu–Glu–Leu–Glu, hydroxy-(sulfooxybenzoic acid and (sulfooxybenzoic acid are virulent factors of the pathogenic Aspergillus species.

  9. Loss of CclA, required for histone 3 lysine 4 methylation, decreases growth but increases secondary metabolite production in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Palmer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolite (SM production in filamentous fungi is mechanistically associated with chromatin remodeling of specific SM clusters. One locus recently shown to be involved in SM suppression in Aspergillus nidulans was CclA, a member of the histone 3 lysine 4 methylating COMPASS complex. Here we examine loss of CclA and a putative H3K4 demethylase, HdmA, in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Although deletion of hdmA showed no phenotype under the conditions tested, the cclA deletant was deficient in tri- and di-methylation of H3K4 and yielded a slowly growing strain that was rich in the production of several SMs, including gliotoxin. Similar to deletion of other chromatin modifying enzymes, ΔcclA was sensitive to 6-azauracil indicating a defect in transcriptional elongation. Despite the poor growth, the ΔcclA mutant had wild-type pathogenicity in a murine model and the Toll-deficient Drosophila model of invasive aspergillosis. These data indicate that tri- and di-methylation of H3K4 is involved in the regulation of several secondary metabolites in A. fumigatus, however does not contribute to pathogenicity under the conditions tested.

  10. Biological Control of Sclerotium rolfsii and Verticillium dahliae by Talaromyces flavus Is Mediated by Different Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, L; Katan, T; Katan, J; Henis, Y

    1997-10-01

    ABSTRACT Ten wild-type strains and two benomyl-resistant mutants of Talaromyces flavus were examined for their ability to secrete the cell wall-degrading enzymes chitinase, beta-1,3-glucanase, and cellulase, to parasitize sclerotia of Sclerotium rolfsii, to reduce bean stem rot caused by S. rolfsii, and to secrete antifungal substance(s) active against Verticillium dahliae. The benomyl-resistant mutant Ben(R)TF1-R6 overproduced extracellular enzymes and exhibited enhanced antagonistic activity against S. rolfsii and V. dahliae compared to the wild-type strains and other mu tants. Correlation analyses between the extracellular enzymatic activities of different isolates of T. flavus and their ability to antagonize S. rolfsii indicated that mycoparasitism by T. flavus and biological control of S rolfsii were related to the chitinase activity of T. flavus. On the other hand, production of antifungal compounds and glucose-oxidase activity may play a role in antagonism of V. dahliae by retardation of germination and hyphal growth and melanization of newly formed microsclerotia.

  11. Interaction of Wild Strains of Aspergilla with Aspergillus parasiticus ATCC15517 and Aflatoxin Production †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, H. Marina; Almeida, Inês; Marques, Marta; Bernardo, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by some competent mould strains of Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. These compounds have been extensively studied with regards to their toxicity for animals and humans; they are able to induce liver cancer and may cause a wide range of adverse effects in living organisms. Aflatoxins are found as natural contaminants of food and feed; the main line of the strategy to control them is based on the prevention of the mould growth in raw vegetable or during its storage and monitoring of each crop batch. Mould growth is conditioned by many ecological factors, including biotic ones. Hazard characterization models for aflatoxins in crops must take into consideration biotic interactions between moulds and their potential effects on growth development. The aim of this work is to study the effect of the biotic interaction of 14 different wild strains of Aspergilla (different species), with a competent strain (Aspergillus parasiticus ATCC 15517) using an in vitro production model. The laboratory model used was a natural matrix (humidified cracked corn), on which each wild strain challenged the aflatoxin production of a producer strain. Cultures were incubated at 28°C for 12 days and sampled at the 8th and 12th. Aflatoxin detection and quantification was performed by HPLC using a procedure with a MRPL = 1 μg/kg. Results of those interactive cultures revealed both synergic and antagonistic effects on aflatoxin biosynthesis. Productivity increases were particularly evident on the 8th day of incubation with wild strains of A. flavipes (+ 70.4 %), A. versicolor (+ 54.9 %) and A. flavus 3 (+ 62.6 %). Antagonistic effects were found with A. niger (− 69.5%), A. fumigatus (− 47.6 %) and A. terreus (− 47.6 %) on the 12th day. The increased effects were more evident on the 8th of incubation and the decreases were more patent on the 12th day. Results show that the development of Aspergilla strains concomitantly with

  12. Fumigant Antifungal Activity of Myrtaceae Essential Oils and Constituents from Leptospermum petersonii against Three Aspergillus Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il-Kwon Park

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Commercial plant essential oils obtained from 11 Myrtaceae plant species were tested for their fumigant antifungal activity against Aspergillus ochraceus, A. flavus, and A. niger. Essential oils extracted from Leptospermum petersonii at air concentrations of 56 × 10−3 mg/mL and 28 × 10−3 mg/mL completely inhibited the growth of the three Aspergillus species. However, at an air concentration of 14 × 10−3 mg/mL, inhibition rates of L. petersonii essential oils were reduced to 20.2% and 18.8% in the case of A. flavus and A. niger, respectively. The other Myrtaceae essential oils (56 × 10−3 mg/mL only weakly inhibited the fungi or had no detectable affect. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis identified 16 compounds in L. petersonii essential oil. The antifungal activity of the identified compounds was tested individually by using standard or synthesized compounds. Of these, neral and geranial inhibited growth by 100%, at an air concentration of 56 × 10−3 mg/mL, whereas the activity of citronellol was somewhat lover (80%. The other compounds exhibited only moderate or weak antifungal activity. The antifungal activities of blends of constituents identified in L. petersonii oil indicated that neral and geranial were the major contributors to the fumigant and antifungal activities.

  13. High sequence variations in the region containing genes encoding a cellular morphogenesis protein and the repressor of sexual development help to reveal origins of Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Scharfenstein, Leslie L; Solorzano, Cesar D; Abbas, Hamed K; Hua, Sui-Sheng T; Jones, Walker A; Zablotowicz, Robert M

    2015-05-04

    Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus flavus are closely related fungal species. The A. flavus morphotype that produces numerous small sclerotia (S strain) and aflatoxin has a unique 1.5 kb deletion in the norB-cypA region of the aflatoxin gene cluster (i.e. the S genotype). Phylogenetic studies have indicated that an isolate of the nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus with the S genotype is the ancestor of A. oryzae. Genome sequence comparison between A. flavus NRRL3357, which produces large sclerotia (L strain), and S-strain A. flavus 70S identified a region (samA-rosA) that was highly variable in the two morphotypes. A third type of samA-rosA region was found in A. oryzae RIB40. The three samA-rosA types were later revealed to be commonly present in A. flavus L-strain populations. Of the 182 L-strain A. flavus field isolates examined, 46%, 15% and 39% had the samA-rosA type of NRRL3357, 70S and RIB40, respectively. The three types also were found in 18 S-strain A. flavus isolates with different proportions. For A. oryzae, however, the majority (80%) of the 16 strains examined had the RIB40 type and none had the NRRL3357 type. The results suggested that A. oryzae strains in the current culture collections were mostly derived from the samA-rosA/RIB40 lineage of the nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus with the S genotype. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Post-genomic insights into the plant polysaccharide degradation potential of Aspergillus nidulans and comparison to Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Pedro M.; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Kolenova, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    The plant polysaccharide degradative potential of Aspergillus nidulans was analysed in detail and compared to that of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae using a combination of bioinformatics, physiology and transcriptomics. Manual verification indicated that 28.4% of the A. nidulans ORFs...... on polysaccharides. Growth differences were observed between the Aspergilli and Podospora anserina, which has a more different genomic potential for polysaccharide degradation, suggesting that large genomic differences are required to cause growth differences oil polysaccharides, Differences were also detected...

  15. Biosynthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles by Aspergillus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Pourshahid, Seyedmohammad; Sadatsharifi, Arman; Mehryar, Pouyan; Pakshir, Keyvan; Rahimi, Mohammad Javad; Arabi Monfared, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Currently, researchers turn to natural processes such as using biological microorganisms in order to develop reliable and ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. In this study, we have investigated extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using four Aspergillus species including A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, A. niger, and A. flavus. We have also analyzed nitrate reductase activity in the studied species in order to determine the probable role of this enzyme in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. The formation of silver nanoparticles in the cell filtrates was confirmed by the passage of laser light, change in the color of cell filtrates, absorption peak at 430 nm in UV-Vis spectra, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). There was a logical relationship between the efficiencies of studied Aspergillus species in the production of silver nanoparticles and their nitrate reductase activity. A. fumigatus as the most efficient species showed the highest nitrate reductase activity among the studied species while A. flavus exhibited the lowest capacity in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles which was in accord with its low nitrate reductase activity. The present study showed that Aspergillus species had potential for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles depending on their nitrate reductase activity.

  16. Biosynthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles by Aspergillus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourshahid, Seyedmohammad; Mehryar, Pouyan; Pakshir, Keyvan; Rahimi, Mohammad Javad; Arabi Monfared, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Currently, researchers turn to natural processes such as using biological microorganisms in order to develop reliable and ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. In this study, we have investigated extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using four Aspergillus species including A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, A. niger, and A. flavus. We have also analyzed nitrate reductase activity in the studied species in order to determine the probable role of this enzyme in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. The formation of silver nanoparticles in the cell filtrates was confirmed by the passage of laser light, change in the color of cell filtrates, absorption peak at 430 nm in UV-Vis spectra, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). There was a logical relationship between the efficiencies of studied Aspergillus species in the production of silver nanoparticles and their nitrate reductase activity. A. fumigatus as the most efficient species showed the highest nitrate reductase activity among the studied species while A. flavus exhibited the lowest capacity in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles which was in accord with its low nitrate reductase activity. The present study showed that Aspergillus species had potential for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles depending on their nitrate reductase activity. PMID:27652264

  17. Biosynthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles by Aspergillus Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamiar Zomorodian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, researchers turn to natural processes such as using biological microorganisms in order to develop reliable and ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. In this study, we have investigated extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using four Aspergillus species including A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, A. niger, and A. flavus. We have also analyzed nitrate reductase activity in the studied species in order to determine the probable role of this enzyme in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. The formation of silver nanoparticles in the cell filtrates was confirmed by the passage of laser light, change in the color of cell filtrates, absorption peak at 430 nm in UV-Vis spectra, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. There was a logical relationship between the efficiencies of studied Aspergillus species in the production of silver nanoparticles and their nitrate reductase activity. A. fumigatus as the most efficient species showed the highest nitrate reductase activity among the studied species while A. flavus exhibited the lowest capacity in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles which was in accord with its low nitrate reductase activity. The present study showed that Aspergillus species had potential for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles depending on their nitrate reductase activity.

  18. Highly active promoters and native secretion signals for protein production during extremely low growth rates in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanka, Franziska; Arentshorst, Mark; Cairns, Timothy C; Jørgensen, Thomas; Ram, Arthur F J; Meyer, Vera

    2016-08-20

    The filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus niger is used in many industrial processes for the production of enzymes and organic acids by batch and fed-batch cultivation. An alternative technique is continuous cultivation, which promises improved yield and optimized pipeline efficiency. In this work, we have used perfusion (retentostat) cultivation to validate two promoters that are suitable for A. niger continuous cultivation of industrially relevant products. Firstly, promoters of genes encoding either an antifungal protein (Panafp) or putative hydrophobin (PhfbD) were confirmed as active throughout retentostat culture by assessing mRNA and protein levels using a luciferase (mluc) reporter system. This demonstrated the anafp promoter mediates a high but temporally variable expression profile, whereas the hfbD promoter mediates a semi-constant, moderate-to-high protein expression during retentostat culture. In order to assess whether these promoters were suitable to produce heterologous proteins during retentostat cultivation, the secreted antifungal protein (AFP) from Aspergillus giganteus, which has many potential biotechnological applications, was expressed in A. niger during retentostat cultivation. Additionally, this assay was used to concomitantly validate that native secretion signals encoded in anafp and hfbD genes can be harnessed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Afp mRNA and protein abundance were comparable to luciferase measurements throughout retentostat cultivation, validating the use of Panafp and PhfbD for perfusion cultivation. Finally, a gene encoding the highly commercially relevant thermal hysteresis protein (THP) was expressed in this system, which did not yield detectable protein. Both hfbD and anafp promoters are suitable for production of useful products in A. niger during perfusion cultivation. These findings provide a platform for further optimisations for high production of heterologous proteins with industrial relevance.

  19. Effect of powdered spice treatments on mycelial growth, sporulation and production of aflatoxins by toxigenic fungi Efeito de tratamentos com condimentos em pó sobre o crescimento micelial, esporulação e produção de aflatoxinas por fungos toxigênicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sára Maria Chalfoun

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ten powdered spice plants was evaluated at the concentration of 1, 2, 3 and 4% to observe the mycelial growth and sporulation of Aspergillus niger and Eurotium repens. The spices were added to the culture media PDA and CYA20S. Clove completely inhibited the mycelial growth of the tested fungi. The other spices: cinnamon, garlic, thyme, mint, anis, oregano and onion were, in a decreasing order, promising antifungals. Bay leaf and basil did not show a pronounced fungistatic effect. The antitoxigenic potential of the spices was tested against one aflatoxin-producing strain of AspergiIIus flavus. The spices were tested at the same concentrations previously mentioned and were added to the culture medium YES, appropriate for the production of those metabolites. Clove completely inhibited the mycelial growth of Aspergillus flavus. Cinnamon and anis totally inhibited the production of Bl and B2 aflatoxin. Both bay leaf and basil inhibited the synthesis of aflatoxin starting from the concentration of 2%. The other spices did not have a pronounced antiaflatoxigenic effect.O efeito de dez plantas condimentares em pó foi avaliado nas concentrações de 1, 2, 3 e 4%, para observar o desenvolvimento micelial e esporulação de Aspergillus niger e Eurotium repens. Os condimentos foram adicionados aos meios de cultura BDA e CYA 20S. O cravo inibiu completamente o desenvolvimento micelial dos fungos testados. Os outros condimentos: canela, alho, tomilho, menta, erva-doce, orégano e cebola foram, em ordem decrescente, antifúngicos promissores. Louro e manjericão não apresentaram um efeito fungistático pronunciado. O potencial antitoxigênico dos condimentos foi testado contra uma cepa de Aspergillus flavus, produtora de aflatoxina. Os condimentos foram testados nas mesmas concentrações previamente mencionadas e foram adicionados ao meio de cultura YES, apropriado para a produção daqueles metabólitos. O cravo inibiu completamente o

  20. Molecular Identification and Amphotericin B Susceptibility Testing of Clinical Isolates of Aspergillus From 11 Hospitals in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Min Seok; Choi, Min Ji; Park, Yeon-Joon; Lee, Hye Soo; Koo, Sun Hoe; Lee, Won Gil; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung-Geun; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated the species distribution and amphotericin B (AMB) susceptibility of Korean clinical Aspergillus isolates by using two Etests and the CLSI broth microdilution method. Methods A total of 136 Aspergillus isolates obtained from 11 university hospitals were identified by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and β-tubulin genomic regions. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of AMB were determined in Etests using Mueller-Hinton agar (Etest-MH) and RPMI agar (Etest-RPG), and categorical agreement with the CLSI method was assessed by using epidemiological cutoff values. Results ITS sequencing identified the following six Aspergillus species complexes: Aspergillus fumigatus (42.6% of the isolates), A. niger (23.5%), A. flavus (17.6%), A. terreus (11.0%), A. versicolor (4.4%), and A. ustus (0.7%). Cryptic species identifiable by β-tubulin sequencing accounted for 25.7% (35/136) of the isolates. Of all 136 isolates, 36 (26.5%) had AMB MICs of ≥2 µg/mL by the CLSI method. The categorical agreement of Etest-RPG with the CLSI method was 98% for the A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. versicolor complexes, 87% for the A. terreus complex, and 37.5% for the A. flavus complex. That of Etest-MH was ≤75% for the A. niger, A. flavus, A. terreus, and A. versicolor complexes but was higher for the A. fumigatus complex (98.3%). Conclusions Aspergillus species other than A. fumigatus constitute about 60% of clinical Aspergillus isolates, and reduced AMB susceptibility is common among clinical isolates of Aspergillus in Korea. Molecular identification and AMB susceptibility testing by Etest-RPG may be useful for characterizing Aspergillus isolates of clinical relevance. PMID:26354348

  1. Kinetics of mould growth in the stored barley ecosystem contaminated with Aspergillus westerdijkiae, Penicillium viridicatum and Fusarium poae at 23-30 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Jolanta; Ryniecki, Antoni; Gawrysiak-Witulska, Marzena

    2013-03-15

    Owing to the lack of a rapid method for determining fungi on cereals, the best way to enhance the safety and nutritive value of stored grain is to develop prognostic tools based on the relationship between easily measurable online parameters, e.g. water activity (a(w)) and temperature (t) of grain, and fungal growth. This study examined the effect of unfavourable temperature (23 and 30 °C) and humidity (0.80-0.94 a(w)) storage conditions on mould growth in the stored barley ecosystem with its adverse microbiological state provided by contamination with Aspergillus westerdijkiae, Penicillium viridicatum and Fusarium poae. Among the applied storage parameters, a(w) turned out to be the main factor affecting mould development. The longest lag phase and period of fungal activation were observed for grain with 0.80 a(w), which was not threatened with fungal development for at least 30 days. However, in grain with 0.92 and 0.94 a(w), fungal activation occurred within 24-48 h. The obtained data and the identification of critical points in mould growth may be used to develop a control system for the postharvest preservation of barley based on a(w) and temperature of grain, which are easy to measure in practice. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Impact of alg3 gene deletion on growth, development, pigment production, protein secretion, and functions of recombinant Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolases in Aspergillus niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Ziyu; Aryal, Uma K.; Shukla, Anil; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Adney, William S.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Ju, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiao; Baker, Scott E.

    2013-12-01

    ALG3 is a Family 58 glycosyltransferase enzyme involved in early N-linked glycan synthesis. Here, we investigated the effect of the alg3 gene disruption on growth, development, metabolism, and protein secretion in Aspergillus niger. The alg3 gene deletion resulted in a significant reduction of growth on complete (CM) and potato dextrose agar (PDA) media and a substantial reduction of spore production on CM. It also delayed spore germination in the liquid cultures of both CM and PDA media, but led to a significant accumulation of red pigment on both CM and liquid modified minimal medium (MM) supplemented with yeast extract. The relative abundance of 55 proteins of the total 190 proteins identified in the secretome was significantly different as a result of alg3 gene deletion. Comparison of a Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) heterologously expressed in A. niger parental and Δalg3 strains showed that the recombinant Cel7A expressed in the mutant background was smaller in size than that from the parental strains. This study suggests that ALG3 is critical for growth and development, pigment production, and protein secretion in A. niger. Functional analysis of recombinant Cel7A with aberrant glycosylation demonstrates the feasibility of this alternative approach to evaluate the role of N-linked glycosylation in glycoprotein secretion and function.

  3. Multilocus sequence analysis of Aspergillus Sect. Nigri in dried vine fruits of worldwide origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susca, Antonia; Perrone, Giancarlo; Cozzi, Giuseppe; Stea, Gaetano; Logrieco, Antonio F; Mulè, Giuseppina

    2013-07-15

    Dried vine fruits may be heavily colonized by Aspergillus species. The molecular biodiversity of an Aspergillus population (234 strains) isolated from dried vine fruit samples of worldwide origin were analyzed by investigating four housekeeping gene loci (calmodulin, β-tubulin, elongation factor 1-α, RPB2). Aspergillus Sect. Nigri was dominant and the strains were identified as A. tubingensis (138), A. awamori (38), A. carbonarius (27), A. uvarum (16) and A. niger (11). Four Aspergillus flavus strains were also identified from Chilean raisins. Two clusters closely related to the A. tubingensis species with a significant bootstrap (60% and 99%) were identified as distinct populations. Among the four loci, RPB2 showed the highest genetic variability. This is the first complete study on the worldwide distribution of black Aspergilli occurring on dried vine fruits identified by a molecular approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Host-Induced Gene Silencing (HIGS) of aflatoxin synthesis genes in peanut and maize: use of RNA interference and genetic diversity of Aspergillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 4.5 billion people are chronically exposed to aflatoxins, these are powerful carcinogens produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. High levels of aflatoxins in crops result in approximately 100 million metric tons of cereals, ¬nuts, root crops and other agricultural products ...

  5. [Aspergillus species in hospital environments with pediatric patients in critical condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Mariana; Cattana, María; Rojas, Florencia; Sosa, María de Los Ángeles; Aguirre, Clarisa; Vergara, Marta; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus is a group of opportunistic fungi that cause infections, with high morbimortality in immunosuppressed patients. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most frequent species in these infections, although the incidence of other species has increased in the last few years. To evaluate the air fungal load and the diversity of Aspergillus species in hospitals with pediatric patients in critical condition. The Intensive Care Unit and Burns Unit of a pediatric hospital were sampled every 15 days during the autumn and spring seasons. The air samples were collected with SAS Super 100(®) and the surface samples were collected by swab method. The UFC/m(3) counts found exceeded the acceptable levels. The UFC/m(3) and the diversity of Aspergillus species found in the Intensive Care Unit were higher than those found in the Burns Unit. The fungal load and the diversity of species within the units were higher than those in control environments. The use of both methods -SAS and swab- allowed the detection of a higher diversity of species, with 96 strains of Aspergillus being isolated and 12 species identified. The outstanding findings were Aspergillus sydowii, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus parasiticus, due to their high frequency. Aspergillus fumigatus, considered unacceptable in indoor environments, was isolated in both units. Aspergillus was present with high frequency in these units. Several species are of interest in public health for being potential pathogenic agents. Air control and monitoring are essential in the prevention of these infections. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Antioxidant Mixtures on Growth and Ochratoxin A Production of Aspergillus Section Nigri Species under Different Water Activity Conditions on Peanut Meal Extract Agar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Barberis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of mixtures of antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisol (BHA and propyl paraben (PP on lag phase, growth rate and ochratoxin A (OTA production by four Aspergillus section Nigri strains was evaluated on peanut meal extract agar (PMEA under different water activities (aw. The antioxidant mixtures used were: BHA + PP (mM, M1 (0.5 + 0.5, M2 (1.0 + 0.5, M3 (2.5 + 0.5, M4 (0.5 + 1.0, M5 (1.0 + 1.0, M6 (2.5 + 1.0, M7 (5.0 + 2.5 and M8 (10 + 2.5. The mixture M8 completely suppressed mycelial growth for all strains. A significant stimulation in OTA production was observed with mixtures M1 to M5 mainly at the highest aw; whereas M6, M7 and M8 completely inhibited OTA production in all strains assayed; except M6 in A. carbonarius strain (RCP G. These results could enable a future intervention strategy to minimize OTA contamination.

  7. The role of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase at the early stages of Aspergillus niger growth in a high-citric-acid-yielding medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar, Tina; Tursic, Janja; Legisa, Matic

    2008-03-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) deaminase seems to be the main enzyme in Aspergillus niger cells responsible for rapid glucosamine accumulation during the early stages of growth in a high-citric-acid-yielding medium. By determining basic kinetic parameters on the isolated enzyme, a high affinity toward fructose-6-phosphate (Fru6P) was measured, while in the reverse direction the K(m) value for glucosamine-6-phosphate was lower than deaminases from other organisms measured so far. The enzyme characteristics of GlcN6P deaminase suggest it must compete with 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK1) for the common substrate-Fru6P in A. niger cells. Glucosamine accumulation seems therefore to remove an intermediate from the glycolytic flux, a situation which is reflected in slower citric acid accumulation and a specific growth rate after the germination of spores. When ammonium ions are depleted from the medium, one of the substrates for GlcN6P deaminase becomes limiting and Fru6P can be catabolised by PFK1 which enhances glycolytic flux. Other enzymatic features of GlcN6P deaminase such as pH optima for both aminating and deaminating reactions might play a significant role in rapid glucosamine accumulation during the early phase of fermentation and a slow consumption of aminosugar during the citric-acid-producing phase.

  8. Cowpeas as growth substrate do not support the production of aflatoxinby Aspergillus sp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houssou, P.A.; Schnidt-Heydt, M.; Geisen, R.

    2008-01-01

    produced high amounts of aflatoxin after growth on YES medium. However after growth on cowpea based medium aflatoxin biosynthesis was strongly ceased, albeit the growth of the colony was only partly reduced. This was true for media made either with the whole cowpea seed or with cowpea seed without seed...

  9. What can comparative genomics tell us about species concepts in the genus Aspergillus?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokas, Antonis; payne, gary; Federova, Natalie D.; Baker, Scott E.; Machida, Masa; yu, Jiujiang; georgianna, D. R.; Dean, Ralph A.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, T. E.; Wortman, Jennifer R.; Maiti, R.; Joardar, V.; Amedeo, Paolo; Denning, David W.; Nierman, William C.

    2007-12-15

    Understanding the nature of species" boundaries is a fundamental question in evolutionary biology. The availability of genomes from several species of the genus Aspergillus allows us for the first time to examine the demarcation of fungal species at the whole-genome level. Here, we examine four case studies, two of which involve intraspecific comparisons, whereas the other two deal with interspecific genomic comparisons between closely related species. These four comparisons reveal significant variation in the nature of species boundaries across Aspergillus. For example, comparisons between A. fumigatus and Neosartorya fischeri (the teleomorph of A. fischerianus) and between A. oryzae and A. flavus suggest that measures of sequence similarity and species-specific genes are significantly higher for the A. fumigatus - N. fischeri pair. Importantly, the values obtained from the comparison between A. oryzae and A. flavus are remarkably similar to those obtained from an intra-specific comparison of A. fumigatus strains, giving support to the proposal that A. oryzae represents a distinct ecotype of A. flavus and not a distinct species. We argue that genomic data can aid Aspergillus taxonomy by serving as a source of novel and unprecedented amounts of comparative data, as a resource for the development of additional diagnostic tools, and finally as a knowledge database about the biological differences between strains and species.

  10. In Vitro Activity of a Novel Broad-Spectrum Antifungal, E1210, Tested against Aspergillus spp. Determined by CLSI and EUCAST Broth Microdilution Methods ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A.; Duncanson, Frederick; Messer, Shawn A.; Moet, Gary J.; Jones, Ronald N.; Castanheira, Mariana

    2011-01-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class broad-spectrum antifungal that suppresses hyphal growth by inhibiting fungal glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. In the present study, we extend these findings by examining the activity of E1210 and comparator antifungal agents against Aspergillus spp. by using the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) to test wild-type (WT) as well as amphotericin B (AMB)-resistant (-R) and azole-R strains (as determined by CLSI methods). Seventy-eight clinical isolates of Aspergillus were tested including 20 isolates of Aspergillus flavus species complex (SC), 22 of A. fumigatus SC, 13 of A. niger SC, and 23 of A. terreus SC. The collection included 15 AMB-R (MIC, ≥2 μg/ml) isolates of A. terreus SC and 10 itraconazole-R (MIC, ≥4 μg/ml) isolates of A. fumigatus SC (7 isolates), A. niger SC (2 isolates), and A. terreus SC (1 isolate). Comparator antifungal agents included anidulafungin, caspofungin, amphotericin B, itraconazole, posaconzole, and voriconazole. Both CLSI and EUCAST methods were highly concordant for E1210 and all comparators. The essential agreement (EA; ±2 log2 dilution steps) was 100% for all comparisons with the exception of posaconazole versus A. terreus SC (EA = 91.3%). The minimum effective concentration (MEC)/MIC90 values (μg/ml) for E1210, anidulafungin, caspofungin, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole, respectively, were as follows for each species: for A. flavus SC, 0.03, ≤0.008, 0.12, 1, 1, and 1; for A. fumigatus SC, 0.06, 0.015, 0.12, >8, 1, and 4; for A. niger SC, 0.015, 0.03, 0.12, 4, 1, and 2; and for A. terreus SC, 0.06, 0.015, 0.12, 1, 0.5, and 1. E1210 was very active against AMB-R strains of A. terreus SC (MEC range, 0.015 to 0.06 μg/ml) and itraconazole-R strains of A. fumigatus SC (MEC range, 0.03 to 0.12 μg/ml), A. niger SC (MEC, 0.008 μg/ml), and A. terreus SC (MEC, 0.015

  11. In vitro activity of a novel broad-spectrum antifungal, E1210, tested against Aspergillus spp. determined by CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Duncanson, Frederick; Messer, Shawn A; Moet, Gary J; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2011-11-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class broad-spectrum antifungal that suppresses hyphal growth by inhibiting fungal glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. In the present study, we extend these findings by examining the activity of E1210 and comparator antifungal agents against Aspergillus spp. by using the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) to test wild-type (WT) as well as amphotericin B (AMB)-resistant (-R) and azole-R strains (as determined by CLSI methods). Seventy-eight clinical isolates of Aspergillus were tested including 20 isolates of Aspergillus flavus species complex (SC), 22 of A. fumigatus SC, 13 of A. niger SC, and 23 of A. terreus SC. The collection included 15 AMB-R (MIC, ≥ 2 μg/ml) isolates of A. terreus SC and 10 itraconazole-R (MIC, ≥ 4 μg/ml) isolates of A. fumigatus SC (7 isolates), A. niger SC (2 isolates), and A. terreus SC (1 isolate). Comparator antifungal agents included anidulafungin, caspofungin, amphotericin B, itraconazole, posaconzole, and voriconazole. Both CLSI and EUCAST methods were highly concordant for E1210 and all comparators. The essential agreement (EA; ± 2 log(2) dilution steps) was 100% for all comparisons with the exception of posaconazole versus A. terreus SC (EA = 91.3%). The minimum effective concentration (MEC)/MIC(90) values (μg/ml) for E1210, anidulafungin, caspofungin, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole, respectively, were as follows for each species: for A. flavus SC, 0.03, ≤ 0.008, 0.12, 1, 1, and 1; for A. fumigatus SC, 0.06, 0.015, 0.12, >8, 1, and 4; for A. niger SC, 0.015, 0.03, 0.12, 4, 1, and 2; and for A. terreus SC, 0.06, 0.015, 0.12, 1, 0.5, and 1. E1210 was very active against AMB-R strains of A. terreus SC (MEC range, 0.015 to 0.06 μg/ml) and itraconazole-R strains of A. fumigatus SC (MEC range, 0.03 to 0.12 μg/ml), A. niger SC (MEC, 0.008 μg/ml), and A. terreus SC (MEC, 0.015

  12. Two new coumarins from Talaromyces flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun-Wei; Qin, Da-Peng; Gao, Hao; Kuang, Run-Qiao; Yu, Yang; Liu, Xing-Zhong; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2014-12-12

    Two new coumarins, talacoumarins A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of the wetland soil-derived fungus Talaromyces flavus BYD07-13. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic data (NMR, MS) analyses. The absolute configuration of C-12 in 1 was assigned using the modified Mosher's method, whereas that of C-12 in 2 was deduced via the circular dichroism data of its corresponding [Rh2(OCOCF3)4] complex. Compounds 1 and 2 were evaluated for their anti-Aβ42 aggregation, cytotoxic, and antimicrobial activities. The results showed that the two compounds had moderate anti-Aβ42 aggregation activity, and this is the first report on the Aβ42 inhibitory aggregation activity of coumarins.

  13. Improved Growth of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus as well as Increased Antioxidant Activity by Biotransforming Litchi Pericarp Polysaccharide with Aspergillus awamori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to increase the bioactivity of litchi pericarp polysaccharides (LPPs biotransformed by Aspergillus awamori. Compared to the non-A. awamori-fermented LPP, the growth effects of A. awamori-fermented LPP on Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus were four and two times higher after 3 days of fermentation, respectively. Increased 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity and DNA protection activity of litchi pericarp polysaccharides were also achieved after A. awamori fermentation. Moreover, the relative content of glucose and arabinose in LPP after fermentation decreased from 58.82% to 22.60% and from 18.82% to 10.09%, respectively, with a concomitant increase in the relative contents of galactose, rhamnose, xylose, and mannose. Furthermore, lower molecular weight polysaccharides were obtained after A. awamori fermentation. It can be concluded that A. awamori was effective in biotransforming LPP into a bioactive mixture with lower molecular weight polysaccharides and higher antioxidant activity and relative galactose content.

  14. Development and application of a predictive model of Aspergillus candidus growth as a tool to improve shelf life of bakery products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huchet, V; Pavan, S; Lochardet, A; Divanac'h, M L; Postollec, F; Thuault, D

    2013-12-01

    Molds are responsible for spoilage of bakery products during storage. A modeling approach to predict the effect of water activity (aw) and temperature on the appearance time of Aspergillus candidus was developed and validated on cakes. The gamma concept of Zwietering was adapted to model fungal growth, taking into account the impact of temperature and aw. We hypothesized that the same model could be used to calculate the time for mycelium to become visible (tv), by substituting the matrix parameter by tv. Cardinal values of A. candidus were determined on potato dextrose agar, and predicted tv were further validated by challenge-tests run on 51 pastries. Taking into account the aw dynamics recorded in pastries during reasonable conditions of storage, high correlation was shown between predicted and observed tv when the aw at equilibrium (after 14 days of storage) was used for modeling (Af = 1.072, Bf = 0.979). Validation studies on industrial cakes confirmed the experimental results and demonstrated the suitability of the model to predict tv in food as a function of aw and temperature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. On-line monitoring of Aspergillus niger GH1 growth in a bioprocess for the production of ellagic acid and ellagitannase by solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Zárate, Pedro; Wong-Paz, Jorge E; Rodríguez-Duran, Luis V; Buenrostro-Figueroa, Juan; Michel, Mariela; Saucedo-Castañeda, Gerardo; Favela-Torres, Ernesto; Ascacio-Valdés, Juan A; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan C; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2018-01-01

    The present work describes the monitoring of CO2 production by Aspergillus niger GH1 in a bioprocess for the production of ellagitannase (EAH) and ellagic acid by solid state fermentation. Pomegranate ellagitannins, mainly punicalagin, were used as carbon source and EAH inducer. A second condition, using ellagitannins and maltose as growth promoting carbon source, was tested. The ellagic acid production was quantified and the EAH activity was assayed. The accumulated metabolites were identified by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Higher CO2 production (7.79mg/grams of dry material) was reached in media supplemented with maltose. Short-time lag phase (7.79h) and exponential phase (10.42h) were obtained using only ellagitannins, despite its lower CO2 production (3.79mg/grams of dry material). Without the use of maltose lower ellagic acid (11.85mg/L/h) and EAH (21.80U/L/h) productivities were reached. The use of maltose enhances the productivity of EA (33.18mg/L/h) and EAH (33.70U/L/h). Besides of punicalin and ellagic acid, two unknown compounds with mass weight of 702 and 290g/mol (ions 701 and 289m/z in negative mode, respectively) were identified and characterized by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Studies on the Production of Pectinase from Tamarind Kernel Powder by Submerged Fermentation using Aspergillus Species,and Optimization of Medium Using Design Expert

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, R.; JagadeeshBabu, P. E.

    2008-01-01

    Six strains of filamentous fungi (Aspergillus foetidus NCIM 505, Aspergillus foetidus NCIM 510, Aspergillus foetidus NCIM 1027, Aspergillus niger NCIM 548, Aspergillus niger NCIM 616 and Aspergillus awamorii NCIM 885) were compared for their capacity to produce exo-pectinase in submerged fermentation (SMF) from a new substrate (tamarind kernel powder; TKP). Maximum pectinolytic activity was reached at 72 h of growth, the best fungal strain being A. foetidus NCIM 505. Different types of car...

  17. Aspergillus korhogoensis, a Novel Aflatoxin Producing Species from the Côte d’Ivoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaranta Carvajal-Campos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Several strains of a new aflatoxigenic species of Aspergillus, A. korhogoensis, were isolated in the course of a screening study involving species from section Flavi found contaminating peanuts (Arachis hypogaea and peanut paste in the Côte d’Ivoire. Based on examination of four isolates, this new species is described using a polyphasic approach. A concatenated alignment comprised of nine genes (ITS, benA, cmdA, mcm7, amdS, rpb1, preB, ppgA, and preA was subjected to phylogenetic analysis, and resulted in all four strains being inferred as a distinct clade. Characterization of mating type for each strain revealed A. korhogoensis as a heterothallic species, since three isolates exhibited a singular MAT1-1 locus and one isolate exhibited a singular MAT1-2 locus. Morphological and physiological characterizations were also performed based on their growth on various types of media. Their respective extrolite profiles were characterized using LC/HRMS, and showed that this new species is capable of producing B- and G-aflatoxins, aspergillic acid, cyclopiazonic acid, aflavarins, and asparasones, as well as other metabolites. Altogether, our results confirm the monophyly of A. korhogoensis, and strengthen its position in the A. flavus clade, as the sister taxon of A. parvisclerotigenus.

  18. Effect of Capsicum carotenoids on growth and ochratoxin A production by chilli and paprika Aspergillus spp. isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, L; Kasper, R; Gil-Serna, J; Marín, S; Sanchis, V; Ramos, A J

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a natural carotenoid mixture (Capsantal FS-30-NT), containing capsanthin and capsorubin, on growth and mycotoxin production of ochratoxin A-producing A. ochraceus, A. westerdijkiae, and A. tubingensis isolates. One isolate of each species, previously isolated from paprika or chilli, was inoculated on Czapek Yeast extract Agar (CYA) medium supplemented with different amounts of capsantal (0 to 1%) and incubated at 10, 15 and 25 degrees C for 21days. Growth rates and lag phases were obtained, and OTA production was determined at 7, 14 and 21days. The taxonomically related A. ochraceus and A. westerdijkiae showed the same behavior at 15 degrees C, but A. ochraceus was able to grow at 10 degrees C and had higher growth rates at 25 degrees C. A. tubingensis had the highest growth rates and lowest OTA production capacity of the assayed isolates, and it was not able to grow at 10 degrees C. Capsantal addition resulted in increased lag phases at 15 degrees C for all the strains, while growth rates remained rather constant. At 25 degrees C capsantal reduced growth rates, with rather constant lag phases. However, the effect of capsantal on OTA production was inconclusive, because it depended on temperature or time, and mostly was not significant. Low temperature has been a crucial factor in OTA production, regardless of the capsantal concentration tested, especially for A. tubingensis and A. westerdijkiae. Industrial storage temperature for paprika and chilli is approximately 10 degrees C. If this temperature is maintained, mould growth and OTA production should be reduced. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibition of Aspergillus fumigatus and Its Biofilm by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Dependent on the Source, Phenotype and Growth Conditions of the Bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A G Ferreira

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus (Af and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa are leading fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, in many clinical situations. Relevant to this, their interface and co-existence has been studied. In some experiments in vitro, Pa products have been defined that are inhibitory to Af. In some clinical situations, both can be biofilm producers, and biofilm could alter their physiology and affect their interaction. That may be most relevant to airways in cystic fibrosis (CF, where both are often prominent residents. We have studied clinical Pa isolates from several sources for their effects on Af, including testing involving their biofilms. We show that the described inhibition of Af is related to the source and phenotype of the Pa isolate. Pa cells inhibited the growth and formation of Af biofilm from conidia, with CF isolates more inhibitory than non-CF isolates, and non-mucoid CF isolates most inhibitory. Inhibition did not require live Pa contact, as culture filtrates were also inhibitory, and again non-mucoid>mucoid CF>non-CF. Preformed Af biofilm was more resistant to Pa, and inhibition that occurred could be reproduced with filtrates. Inhibition of Af biofilm appears also dependent on bacterial growth conditions; filtrates from Pa grown as biofilm were more inhibitory than from Pa grown planktonically. The differences in Pa shown from these different sources are consistent with the extensive evolutionary Pa changes that have been described in association with chronic residence in CF airways, and may reflect adaptive changes to life in a polymicrobial environment.

  20. Screening a strain of Aspergillus niger and optimization of fermentation conditions for degradation of aflatoxin B₁.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Xue, Beibei; Li, Mengmeng; Mu, Yang; Chen, Zhihui; Li, Jianping; Shan, Anshan

    2014-11-13

    Aflatoxin B₁, a type of highly toxic mycotoxin produced by some species belonging to the Aspergillus genus, such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, is widely distributed in feed matrices. Here, coumarin was used as the sole carbon source to screen microorganism strains that were isolated from types of feed ingredients. Only one isolate (ND-1) was able to degrade aflatoxin B₁ after screening. ND-1 isolate, identified as a strain of Aspergillus niger using phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 18S rDNA, could remove 26.3% of aflatoxin B₁ after 48 h of fermentation in nutrient broth (NB). Optimization of fermentation conditions for aflatoxin B₁ degradation by selected Aspergillus niger was also performed. These results showed that 58.2% of aflatoxin B₁ was degraded after 24 h of culture under the optimal fermentation conditions. The aflatoxin B₁ degradation activity of Aspergillus niger supernatant was significantly stronger than cells and cell extracts. Furthermore, effects of temperature, heat treatment, pH, and metal ions on aflatoxin B₁ degradation by the supernatant were examined. Results indicated that aflatoxin B₁ degradation of Aspergillus niger is enzymatic and this process occurs in the extracellular environment.

  1. Molecular Detection and Species-Specific Identification of Medically Important Aspergillus Species by Real-Time PCR in Experimental Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Thomas J.; Wissel, Mark C.; Grantham, Kevin J.; Petraitiene, Ruta; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Kasai, Miki; Francesconi, Andrea; Cotton, Margaret P.; Hughes, Johanna E.; Greene, Lora; Bacher, John D.; Manna, Pradip; Salomoni, Martin; Kleiboeker, Steven B.; Reddy, Sushruth K.

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) remains a major challenge to clinical microbiology laboratories. We developed rapid and sensitive quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for genus- and species-specific identification of Aspergillus infections by use of TaqMan technology. In order to validate these assays and understand their potential diagnostic utility, we then performed a blinded study of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid specimens from well-characterized models of IPA with the four medically important species. A set of real-time qPCR primers and probes was developed by utilizing unique ITS1 regions for genus- and species-specific detection of the four most common medically important Aspergillus species (Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, and A. terreus). Pan-Aspergillus and species-specific qPCRs with BAL fluid were more sensitive than culture for detection of IPA caused by A. fumigatus in untreated (P PCR amplification from BAL fluid yielded similar sensitivities for untreated and treated animals. Pan-Aspergillus PCR was more sensitive than culture for detection of A. flavus in treated animals (P = 0.002). BAL fluid pan-Aspergillus and species-specific PCRs were comparable in sensitivity to BAL fluid galactomannan (GM) assay. The copy numbers from the qPCR assays correlated with quantitative cultures to determine the pulmonary residual fungal burdens in lung tissue. Pan-Aspergillus and species-specific qPCR assays may improve the rapid and accurate identification of IPA in immunocompromised patients. PMID:21976757

  2. Assessment of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus and other fungi in millet and sesame from Plateau State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekiel, C.N.; Udom, I.E.; Frisvad, J.C.; Adetunji, M.C.; Houbraken, J.; Fapohunda, S.O.; Samson, R.A.; Atanda, O.O.; Agi-Otto, M.C.; Onashile, O.A.

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen fonio millet and 17 sesame samples were analysed for incidence of moulds, especially aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species, in order to determine the safety of both crops to consumers, and to correlate aflatoxin levels in the crops with levels produced by toxigenic isolates on laboratory medium. Diverse moulds including Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cercospora, Fusarium, Mucor, Penicillium, Rhizopus and Trichoderma were isolated. Aspergillus was predominantly present in both crops (46–48%), and amongst the potentially aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species, A. flavus recorded the highest incidence (68% in fonio millet; 86% in sesame kernels). All A. parvisclerotigenus isolates produced B and G aflatoxins in culture while B aflatoxins were produced by only 39% and 20% of A. flavus strains isolated from the fonio millet and sesame kernels, respectively. Aflatoxin concentrations in fonio millet correlated inversely (r = −0.55; p = 0.02) with aflatoxin levels produced by toxigenic isolates on laboratory medium, but no correlation was observed in the case of the sesame samples. Both crops, especially sesame, may not be suitable substrates for aflatoxin biosynthesis. This is the first report on A. parvisclerotigenus in sesame. PMID:24772370

  3. Nitrogen metabolism and growth enhancement in tomato plants challenged with Trichoderma harzianum expressing the Aspergillus nidulans acetamidase amdS gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Domínguez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trichoderma is a fungal genus that includes species that are currently being used as biological control agents and/or as biofertilizers. In addition to the direct application of Trichoderma spp. as biocontrol agents in plant protection, recent studies have focused on the beneficial responses exerted on plants, stimulating the growth, activating the defenses, and/or improving nutrient uptake. The amdS gene, encoding an acetamidase of Aspergillus, has been used as a selectable marker for the transformation of filamentous fungi, including Trichoderma spp., but the physiological effects of the introduction of this gene into the genome of these microorganisms still remains unexplored. No evidence of amdS orthologous genes has been detected within the Trichoderma spp. genomes and the amdS heterologous expression in T. harzianum T34 did not affect the growth of this fungus in media lacking acetamide. However, it did confer the ability for the fungus to use this amide as a nitrogen source. Although a similar antagonistic behavior was observed for T34 and amdS transformants in dual cultures against Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum, a significantly higher antifungal activity was detected in amdS transformants against F. oxysporum, compared to that of T34, in membrane assays on media lacking acetamide. In Trichoderma-tomato interaction assays, amdS transformants were able to promote plant growth to a greater extent than the wild-type T34, although compared with this strain the transformants showed similar capability to colonize tomato roots. Gene expression patterns from aerial parts of 3-week-old tomato plants treated with T34 and the amdS transformants have also been investigated using GeneChip Tomato Genome Arrays. The downregulation of defense genes and the upregulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism genes observed in the microarrays were accompanied by i enhanced growth, ii increased carbon and nitrogen levels and iii a

  4. Nitrogen Metabolism and Growth Enhancement in Tomato Plants Challenged with Trichoderma harzianum Expressing the Aspergillus nidulans Acetamidase amdS Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Sara; Rubio, M Belén; Cardoza, Rosa E; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Nicolás, Carlos; Bettiol, Wagner; Hermosa, Rosa; Monte, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Trichoderma is a fungal genus that includes species that are currently being used as biological control agents and/or as biofertilizers. In addition to the direct application of Trichoderma spp. as biocontrol agents in plant protection, recent studies have focused on the beneficial responses exerted on plants, stimulating the growth, activating the defenses, and/or improving nutrient uptake. The amdS gene, encoding an acetamidase of Aspergillus, has been used as a selectable marker for the transformation of filamentous fungi, including Trichoderma spp., but the physiological effects of the introduction of this gene into the genome of these microorganisms still remains unexplored. No evidence of amdS orthologous genes has been detected within the Trichoderma spp. genomes and the amdS heterologous expression in Trichoderma harzianum T34 did not affect the growth of this fungus in media lacking acetamide. However, it did confer the ability for the fungus to use this amide as a nitrogen source. Although a similar antagonistic behavior was observed for T34 and amdS transformants in dual cultures against Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea, and Fusarium oxysporum, a significantly higher antifungal activity was detected in amdS transformants against F. oxysporum, compared to that of T34, in membrane assays on media lacking acetamide. In Trichoderma-tomato interaction assays, amdS transformants were able to promote plant growth to a greater extent than the wild-type T34, although compared with this strain the transformants showed similar capability to colonize tomato roots. Gene expression patterns from aerial parts of 3-week-old tomato plants treated with T34 and the amdS transformants have also been investigated using GeneChip Tomato Genome Arrays. The downregulation of defense genes and the upregulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism genes observed in the microarrays were accompanied by (i) enhanced growth, (ii) increased carbon and nitrogen levels, and (iii) a

  5. Ecophysiological characterization of Aspergillus carbonarius, Aspergillus tubingensis and Aspergillus niger isolated from grapes in Spanish vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cela, E; Crespo-Sempere, A; Ramos, A J; Sanchis, V; Marin, S

    2014-03-03

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diversity of black aspergilli isolated from berries from different agroclimatic regions of Spain. Growth characterization (in terms of temperature and water activity requirements) of Aspergillus carbonarius, Aspergillus tubingensis and Aspergillus niger was carried out on synthetic grape medium. A. tubingensis and A. niger showed higher maximum temperatures for growth (>45 °C versus 40-42 °C), and lower minimum aw requirements (0.83 aw versus 0.87 aw) than A. carbonarius. No differences in growth boundaries due to their geographical origin were found within A. niger aggregate isolates. Conversely, A. carbonarius isolates from the hotter and drier region grew and produced OTA at lower aw than other isolates. However, little genetic diversity in A. carbonarius was observed for the microsatellites tested and the same sequence of β-tubulin gene was observed; therefore intraspecific variability did not correlate with the geographical origin of the isolates or with their ability to produce OTA. Climatic change prediction points to drier and hotter climatic scenarios where A. tubingensis and A. niger could be even more prevalent over A. carbonarius, since they are better adapted to extreme high temperature and drier conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Biocontrol of Aspergillus species on peanut kernels by antifungal diketopiperazine producing Bacillus cereus associated with entomopathogenic nematode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasidharan Nishanth Kumar

    Full Text Available The rhabditid entomopathogenic nematode associated Bacillus cereus and the antifungal compounds produced by this bacterium were evaluated for their activity in reducing postharvest decay of peanut kernels caused by Aspergillus species in in vitro and in vivo tests. The results showed that B. cereus had a significant effect on biocontrol effectiveness in in vitro and in vivo conditions. The antifungal compounds produced by the B. cereus were purified using silica gel column chromatography and their structure was elucidated using extensive spectral analyses. The compounds were identified as diketopiperazines (DKPs [cyclo-(L-Pro-Gly, cyclo(L-Tyr-L-Tyr, cyclo-(L-Phe-Gly and cyclo(4-hydroxy-L-Pro-L-Trp]. The antifungal activities of diketopiperazines were studied against five Aspergillus species and best MIC of 2 µg/ml was recorded against A. flavus by cyclo(4-hydroxy-L-Pro-L-Trp. To investigate the potential application of cyclo(4-hydroxy-L-Pro-L-Trp to eliminate fungal spoilage in food and feed, peanut kernels was used as a food model system. White mycelia and dark/pale green spores of Aspergillus species were observed in the control peanut kernels after 2 days incubation. However the fungal growth was not observed in peanut kernels treated with cyclo(4-hydroxy-L-Pro-L-Trp. The cyclo(4-hydroxy-L-Pro-L-Trp was nontoxic to two normal cell lines [fore skin (FS normal fibroblast and African green monkey kidney (VERO] up to 200 µg/ml in MTT assay. Thus the cyclo(4-hydroxy-L-Pro-L-Trp identified in this study may be a promising alternative to chemical preservatives as a potential biopreservative agent which prevent fungal growth in food and feed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the entomopathogenic nematode associated B. cereus and cyclo(4-hydroxy-L-Pro-L-Trp could be used as a biocontrol agents against postharvest fungal disease caused by Aspergillus species.

  7. Evidence for synergistic activity of plant-derived volatile essential oils against fungal pathogens of food

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antifungal activities of eight essential oils (EOs) namely basil, cinnamon, eucalyptus, mandarin, oregano, peppermint, tea tree and thyme were evaluated for their ability to inhibit growth of Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus paraciticus and Penicillium chrysogenum. The antifung...

  8. Impact of alg3 gene deletion on growth, development, pigment production, protein secretion, and functions of recombinant Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolases in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ziyu; Aryal, Uma K; Shukla, Anil; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D; Magnuson, Jon K; Adney, William S; Beckham, Gregg T; Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E; Decker, Stephen R; Ju, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiao; Baker, Scott E

    2013-12-01

    Dolichyl-P-Man:Man(5)GlcNAc(2)-PP-dolichyl α-1,3-mannosyltransferase (also known as "asparagine-linked glycosylation 3", or ALG3) is involved in early N-linked glycan synthesis and thus is essential for formation of N-linked protein glycosylation. In this study, we examined the effects of alg3 gene deletion (alg3Δ) on growth, development, pigment production, protein secretion and recombinant Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase (rCel7A) expressed in Aspergillus niger. The alg3Δ delayed spore germination in liquid cultures of complete medium (CM), potato dextrose (PD), minimal medium (MM) and CM with addition of cAMP (CM+cAMP), and resulted in significant reduction of hyphal growth on CM, potato dextrose agar (PDA), and CM+cAMP and spore production on CM. The alg3Δ also led to a significant accumulation of red pigment on both liquid and solid CM cultures. The relative abundances of 54 of the total 215 proteins identified in the secretome were significantly altered as a result of alg3Δ, 63% of which were secreted at higher levels in alg3Δ strain than the parent. The rCel7A expressed in the alg3Δ mutant was smaller in size than that expressed in both wild-type and parental strains, but still larger than T. reesei Cel7A. The circular dichroism (CD)-melt scans indicated that change in glycosylation of rCel7A does not appear to impact the secondary structure or folding. Enzyme assays of Cel7A and rCel7A on nanocrystalline cellulose and bleached kraft pulp demonstrated that the rCel7As have improved activities on hydrolyzing the nanocrystalline cellulose. Overall, the results suggest that alg3 is critical for growth, sporulation, pigment production, and protein secretion in A. niger, and demonstrate the feasibility of this alternative approach to evaluate the roles of N-linked glycosylation in glycoprotein secretion and function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. High fungal spore burden with predominance of Aspergillus in hospital air of a tertiary care hospital in Chandigarh

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    S M Rudramurthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fungal spores in the hospital air is essential to understand the hospital-acquired fungal infections. Air conditioners (ACs used in hospitals may either reduce spores in air or be colonised by fungi and aid in its dissemination. The present study was conducted to assess the fungal spore burden in AC and non-AC areas. We found a high fungal spore count in air irrespective of whether the area was AC or non-AC. The most predominant species isolated were Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus fumigatus. Such high concentrations of pathogenic fungi in air may predispose individuals to develop disease.

  10. Using aCGH to study intraspecific genetic variability in two pathogenic molds, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intraspecific molecular divergence is the basis of all sequence-based typing methods employed in many clinical laboratories to differentiate strains of pathogenic fungi. We have examined the feasibility of using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) approaches to explore the extent of gene...

  11. Sunflower seed for human consumption as a substrate for the growth of mycopopulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škrinjar Marija M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available These mycological investigations are implicating samples of protein sunflower seed from regular cultivation in the Vojvodina Province. Samples are examined in different stages of production: reception in the silo, separation of massive fraction on peeler and then peeling, kernel after peeling, hull, final product, i.e. kernels separated from visible impurities on conveyor bel, that are later manually divided in two fractions - a seemingly whole, undamaged kernels, without change of colour, and b seemingly damaged kernels, broken, with change of colour. For the determination of viable count of moulds and their isolation, two different media are used in parallel: Sabouraud maltose agar (SMA and malt/yeast extract with 50% of glucose (MY50G, favourable for growth of xerophilic moulds. All samples tested were contaminated with fungi. Total viable mould count per seed varied from 1.6 (SMA respecting 1.3 (MY50G on reception, to 5.6 (SMA and 7.5 (MY50G cfu/seed in visually damaged sunflower kernels (final product. From seeds, kernels and hull, numerous moulds were isolated, belonging to 8 genera and 13 species (Alternaria alternata, Arthrinium phaeospermum, Aspergillus candidus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. ochraceus, A. versicolor, A. wentii, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Eurotium herbariorum, Penicillium aurantiogriseum, Rhizopus stolonifer and Trichoderma harzianum. Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus flavus, A.ochraceus, A. versicolor and Eurotium herbariorum were isolated on both media. Aspergillus candidus, A. versicolor, C. Cladosporioides, P. aurantiogriseum and T. harzianum were isolated only on SMA, while A. niger, A. wentii and R. stolonifer were exclusively isolated on MY50G. Most ubiquitous species is A. alternata, which is isolated from all tested samples, while A. candidus, C. cladosporioides and T. harzianum were isolated from sunflower seed on reception in silo, using SMA medium.

  12. BASAL MEDIA FORMULATION USING CANAVALIA ENSIFORMIS AS CARBON AND NITROGEN SOURCE FOR THE GROWTH OF SOME FUNGI SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.J. Akinyele2

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of developing alternative media to commercial potato dextrose agar was assessed using, Canavalia ensiformis (Linn (jack beans as carbon and nitrogen source. Six leguminous meal media were used as substitute for either carbon or nitrogen or both, while potato dextrose broth (PDB was used as a positive control and basal medium as a negative control. Six species of fungi Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, Meria coniospora, Mucor sp, Neurospora crassa and Rhizopus oryzae were aseptically inoculated into the formulated media and allowed to grow. Their mycelia dry weights were taken after 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours. Growth of all fungal species was observed to be slightly lower, about the same or better in the formulated media relative to the control. Aspergillus flavus had its highest biomass of 1.70g in the media formulated with Canavalia ensiformis as the carbon source relative to 1.42g as the standard at the 120 hour. A. niger had a growth of 0.62g relative to 0.61g at 120 hours of the control. Meria coniospora had a growth of 0.27g relative to 0.38g at 120 hours. Mucor sp had a growth of 0.54g relative to 0.44g at 120 hours. Neurospora crassa had a growth of 1.05g relative to 0.24g at 120 hours. Rhizopus oryzae had a growth of 0.14g relative to 0.25g at 120 hours. The study revealed that Canavalia ensiformis contains minerals and nutrients that is able to provide the nutritional requirements of these fungi. Thus, it can be used as an alternative material in the preparation of culture media for in vitro cultivation of these fungi for teaching and research purposes.

  13. Metabolomics of Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Rank, Christian; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important species in Aspergillus causing infective lung diseases. This species has been reported to produce a large number of extrolites, including secondary metabolites, acids, and proteins such as hydrophobins and extracellular enzymes. At least 226 potentially...

  14. Bioimpact of application of pesticides with plant growth hormone (gibberellic acid on target and non-target microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdullah Al Abboud

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation was to determine the impacts of fungicide, insecticide, plant growth hormone (gibberellic acid on soil microbiota, and the growth characteristics of Aspergillus flavus. In the fungicide or insecticide mixed with plant growth hormone treated soil sample, the total viable number of soil microbiota was found to be higher than that of the soil treated with fungicide or insecticide alone. Moderate effect of insecticide used on the total number of fungi was observed. On the other hand the effect of insecticide on soil bacteria was more than effect of fungicide, and the negative effect of fungicide on soil bacteria was observed particularly at latent periods (15 and 20 days of application. A great sensitivity to fungicide and insecticide was observed in the case of nitrogen fixing bacteria. At 15 days after fungicide and insecticide application the adverse effect was found. Morphological deformations were clear in A. flavus cultivated on medium containing fungicide, the fungus failed to form conidiospores, conidiophores and vesicles. Intermediate and terminal outgrowths like blisters and terminal vesicle originate from hyphae. The addition of plant growth hormone reduced the effect of fungicide on fungus.

  15. Effect of cinnamomum zeylanicum blume essential oil on the rowth and morphogenesis of some potentially pathogenic Aspergillus species Efeito do óleo essencial de Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume sobre o crescimento e morfogênese de algumas espécies de Aspergillus potencialmente patogênicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egberto Santos Carmo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume is known for a wide range of medicinal properties. This study aimed to assess the interference of C. zeylanicum essential oil on the growth and morphogenesis of some potentially pathogenic Aspergillus species. The essential oil presented strong antifungal effect causing the growth inhibition of the assayed strains and development of large growth inhibition zones. MIC50 and MIC90 values were 40 and 80 µL/mL, respectively. 80, 40 and 20 µL/mL of the oil strongly inhibited the radial mycelial growth of A. niger, A. flavus and A. fumigatus along 14 days. 80 and 40 µL/mL of the oil caused a 100% inhibition of the fungal spore germination. Main morphological changes observed under light microscopy provided by the essential oil in the fungal strains were decreased conidiation, leakage of cytoplasm, loss of pigmentation and disrupted cell structure indicating fungal wall degeneration. It is concluded that C. zeylanicum essential oil could be known as potential antifungal compound, particularly, to protect against the growth of Aspergillus species.Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume é uma planta conhecida por apresentar ampla variedade de propriedades medicinais. Portanto, este estudo teve por objetivo avaliar a interferência do óleo essencial C. zeylanicum sobre o crescimento e morfogênese de algumas espécies de Aspergillus potencialmente patogênicas. O óleo essencial testado apresentou potente efeito antifúngico demonstrado pela visualização de grandes zonas de inibição de crescimento de todas as linhagens testadas. Os valores de CIM50 e de CIM90 foram 40 e 80 µL/mL, respectivamente. Nas concentrações de 80, 40 e 20 µL/mL o óleo demonstrou um potente efeito fumigante, inibindo o crescimento micelial radial de A. niger, A. flavus e A. fumigatus ao longo de 14 dias de exposição. A 80 e 40 µL/mL o óleo essencial promoveu inibição de 100% da germinação de esporos, das três espécies de Aspergillus citadas

  16. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator CbbR controlling autotrophic CO2 fixation by Xanthobacter flavus is an NADPH sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, G; Girbal, L; van den Bergh, E.R E; Dijkhuizen, L.; Meijer, W.G

    Autotrophic growth of Xanthobacter flavus is dependent on the fixation of carbon dioxide via the Calvin cycle and on the oxidation of simple organic and inorganic compounds to provide the cell with energy. Maximal induction of the cbb and gap-pgk operons encoding enzymes of the Calvin cycle occurs

  17. Glucose uptake and growth of glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Aspergillus niger and a disruptant lacking MstA, a high-affinity glucose transporter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorgensen, T.R.; vanKuyk, P.A.; Poulsen, B.R.; Ruijter, G.J.G.; Visser, J.; Iversen, J.J.L.

    2007-01-01

    This is a study of high-affinity glucose uptake in Aspergillus niger and the effect of disruption of a high-affinity monosaccharide-transporter gene, mstA. The substrate saturation constant (K-s) of a reference strain was about 15 mu M in glucose-limited chemostat culture. Disruption of mstA

  18. New Perspectives for the Application of Bioplastic Materials in the Biocontrol of Aspergillus flavus in Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolities produced by certain filamentous fungi that can contaminate a large variety of agricultural commodities before and after harvest. Among different mycotoxins, aflatoxins and especially aflatoxin B1 are of particular concern because they are potent natural carcino...

  19. The Aspergillus flavus homeobox gene, hbx1, is required for development and aflatoxin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeobox proteins are a class of transcription factors that are well conserved in many eukaryotes including fungi. Homeobox proteins regulate the expression of target genes, especially those involved in development. Studies in several filamentous fungi have shown that homeobox genes are required for...

  20. Blocking aflatoxins in corn by using non-toxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are over 500 previously reported mycotoxins. However, only a few have been identified as important for food safety, including aflatoxins, fumonisins, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), trichothecenes, zearalenone, ochratoxins, and patulin. Mycotoxins contaminate plant materials, causing acute and ch...

  1. Assessment of Ribosomal Large-Subunit D1-D2, Internal Transcribed Spacer 1, and Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 Regions as Targets for Molecular Identification of Medically Important Aspergillus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrikson, Hans P.; Hurst, Steven F.; Lott, Timothy J.; Warnock, David W.; Morrison, Christine J.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular approaches are now being developed to provide a more rapid and objective identification of fungi compared to traditional phenotypic methods. Ribosomal targets, especially the large-subunit RNA gene (D1-D2 region) and internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2 regions), have shown particular promise for the molecular identification of some fungi. We therefore conducted an assessment of these regions for the identification of 13 medically important Aspergillus species: Aspergillus candidus, Aspergillus (Eurotium) chevalieri, Aspergillus (Fennellia) flavipes, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus granulosus, Aspergillus (Emericella) nidulans, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus restrictus, Aspergillus sydowii, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus ustus, and Aspergillus versicolor. The length of ribosomal regions could not be reliably used to differentiate among all Aspergillus species examined. DNA alignment and pairwise nucleotide comparisons demonstrated 91.9 to 99.6% interspecies sequence identities in the D1-D2 region, 57.4 to 98.1% in the ITS1 region, and 75.6 to 98.3% in the ITS2 region. Comparative analysis using GenBank reference data showed that 10 of the 13 species examined exhibited a ≤1-nucleotide divergence in the D1-D2 region from closely related but different species. In contrast, only 5 of the species examined exhibited a ≤1-nucleotide divergence from sibling species in their ITS1 or ITS2 sequences. Although the GenBank database currently lacks ITS sequence entries for some species, and major improvement in the quality and accuracy of GenBank entries is needed, current identification of medically important Aspergillus species using GenBank reference data seems more reliable using ITS query sequences than D1-D2 sequences, especially for the identification of closely related species. PMID:15872227

  2. Exploration of Islamic medicine plant extracts as powerful antifungals for the prevention of mycotoxigenic Aspergilli growth in organic silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayel, Ahmed A; Salem, Mohammed F; El-Tras, Wael F; Brimer, Leon

    2011-09-01

    Feed contamination with mycotoxins is a major risk factor for animals and humans as several toxins can exist as residues in meat and milk products, giving rise to carry-over to consumers via ingestion of foods of animal origin. The starting point for prevention, in this chain, is to eliminate the growth of mycotoxigenic fungi in the animal forage. Ten plant extracts, recommended in Islamic medicine, were evaluated as antifungal agents against mycotoxigenic Aspergilli, i.e. Aspergillus flavus and A. ochraceus, growth in organic maize silage. Most extracts had remarkable antifungal activities using both qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods. Cress (Lepidium sativum) seed extract was proven to be the most powerful among the plants examined. Blending of the most effective extracts (garden cress seed, pomegranate peel and olive leaf extracts), individually at their minimal fungicidal concentrations, with maize silage resulted in the reduction of inoculated A. flavus colony counts by 99.9, 99.6 and 98.7%, respectively, whereas silage blending with the combined extracts completely prohibited fungal growth for up to 30 days of incubation under aerobic conditions. Besides the health promoting effects, silage blending with the bioactive plant extracts examined could lead to the required protection from pathogenic and mycotoxigenic fungi. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Inhibition of growth and mycotoxins formation in moulds by marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Yeasts: Saccharomyces cerevisiae (4 strains), Candida albicans (4 strains) Debaryomyces sp (1 strains) and Kluyveromyces sp (1 strains). Moulds : Aspergillus flavus (3 strains), Penicillium sp (2 strains ). Yeasts. The amount of the extract to be tested was added to 0.5 mL of the liquid medium in microplate wells, which ...

  4. Diversity of food-borne Bacillus volatile compounds and influence on fungal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-López, C; Serio, A; Gianotti, A; Sacchetti, G; Ndagijimana, M; Ciccarone, C; Stellarini, A; Corsetti, A; Paparella, A

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the antifungal activity of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by 75 different food-borne Bacillus species against Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus clavatus, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lactucae and Moniliophthora perniciosa and to determine the VOCs responsible for the inhibition. Bacillus strains inhibited fungal growth, although with different inhibition grades, with Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus cereus strains as the best antifungal VOCs producers. While M. perniciosa DM4B and F. oxysporum f.sp. lactucae MA28 were the most sensitive fungi, A. parasiticus MG51 showed the greatest resistance to Bacillus VOCs exposure. Thirty-seven compounds were detected by SPME-GC-MS analysis, although similar patterns in volatile compounds were evidenced within the species, interspecific VOCs differences determined different effects on fungal growth. Multiple partial least regression (MPLRS) and antifungal activity of the individual VOCs revealed that only propanone, 1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, acetic acid, 2-methylpropanoic acid, carbon disulphide, 3-methylbutanoic acid and ethyl acetate were responsible for mycelia inhibition of M. perniciosa DM4B and F. oxysporum f.sp. lactucae MA28. The antagonistic activity of the Bacillus VOCs was demonstrated, although it cannot easily be explained through the action of a single molecule, thus a holistic approach could be more appropriate to estimate the fungal growth inhibition. VOCs produced by Bacillus from cooked food can be considered as promising antifungal compounds useful in the control of fungal plant pathogens. This study investigates for the first time the correlation between mycelia inhibition of M. perniciosa and F. oxysporum f. sp. lactucae and the VOCs emitted by the Bacillus species. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Toxigenic Potential of Aspergillus Species Occurring on Maize Kernels from Two Agro-Ecological Zones in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesa Joutsjoki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Two agro-ecological zones in Kenya were selected to compare the distribution in maize of Aspergillus spp. and their toxigenicity. These were Nandi County, which is the main maize growing region in the country but where no human aflatoxicoses have been reported, and Makueni County where most of the aflatoxicosis cases have occurred. Two hundred and fifty-five households were sampled in Nandi and 258 in Makueni, and Aspergillus was isolated from maize. Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus isolates were tested for the presence of aflD and aflQ genes. Positive strains were induced to produce aflatoxins on yeast extract sucrose and quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS. Aspergillus flavus was the most common contaminant, and the incidence of occurrence in Nandi and Makueni was not significantly different (82.33% and 73.26%, respectively. Toxigenic strains were more prevalent than non-toxigenic strains. All the toxigenic strains from Makueni were of the S-type while those from Nandi belonged to the l-type. Quantitative differences in aflatoxin production in vitro between isolates and between strains were detected with S strains producing relatively larger amounts of total aflatoxins, B toxins and lower values for G toxins. This was in accord with the frequent aflatoxicosis outbreaks in Makueni. However some L strains produced considerable amounts of B toxins. Given the widespread distribution of toxigenic strains in both regions, the risk of aflatoxin poisoning is high when favorable conditions for toxin production occur.

  6. Inhibitory effect of gamma radiation and Nigella sativa seeds oil on growth, spore germination and toxin production of fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinab, E. M. EL-Bazza; Hala, A. Farrag; Mohie, E. D. Z. EL-Fouly; Seham, Y. M. EL-Tablawy

    2001-02-01

    Twenty samples of Nigella sativa seeds (Black cumin) were purchased from different localities in Egypt. The mold viable count ranged from 1.7×10 1 to 9.8×10 3 c.f.u. Sixty six molds were isolated belonging to six genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Rhizopus, Mucor, Alternaria and Fusarium. Exposure of seeds samples to different radiation doses showed that a dose level of 6.0 kGy could be considered as a sufficient dose for decontamination of the tested samples. Seven radioresistant isolates were identified as Rhizopus oryzae, Rhizopus stolonifer, Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicillium corylophillum. All the herb samples were found to be free from aflatoxins B 1, B 2, G 1, G 2 and ochratoxin A. One mold isolate was identified as Aspergillus flavus could produce aflatoxin B 1 and G 1. None of the isolated radioresistant strains could produce mycotoxins. The water activities of seeds were slightly decreased by the storage time and the seeds needed to be stored at relative humidity not more than 85%. The addition of extract volatile and fixed oil from tested seeds to the medium stimulated the growth of isolated Aspergillus sp.

  7. Inhibitory effect of gamma radiation and Nigella sativa seeds oil on growth, spore germination and toxin production of fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bazza, Z.E.; Hala, A.F. E-mail: hfarragmassoud@hotmail.com; El-Fouly, M.E.Z.; El-Tablawy, S.Y.M

    2001-02-01

    Twenty samples of Nigella sativa seeds (Black cumin) were purchased from different localities in Egypt. The mold viable count ranged from 1.7x10{sup 1} to 9.8x10{sup 3} c.f.u. Sixty six molds were isolated belonging to six genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Rhizopus, Mucor, Alternaria and Fusarium. Exposure of seeds samples to different radiation doses showed that a dose level of 6.0 kGy could be considered as a sufficient dose for decontamination of the tested samples. Seven radioresistant isolates were identified as Rhizopus oryzae, Rhizopus stolonifer, Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicillium corylophillum. All the herb samples were found to be free from aflatoxins B{sub 1}, B{sub 2}, G{sub 1}, G{sub 2} and ochratoxin A. One mold isolate was identified as Aspergillus flavus could produce aflatoxin B{sub 1} and G{sub 1}. None of the isolated radioresistant strains could produce mycotoxins. The water activities of seeds were slightly decreased by the storage time and the seeds needed to be stored at relative humidity not more than 85%. The addition of extract volatile and fixed oil from tested seeds to the medium stimulated the growth of isolated Aspergillus sp. (author)

  8. The potential of Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungi isolated included Aspergillus candidus, A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. tamarii, Mucor rouxii, Penicillium notatum and Rhizopus sp. Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger were selected for heavy metals bioaccumulation studies on PDB-amended with lagoon water in ratios of 1:1, 1:3 and 1:5 respectively for 3 weeks.

  9. A rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Gupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus endophthalmitis is a devastating inflammatory condition of the intraocular cavities that may result in irreparable loss of vision and rapid destruction of the eye. Almost all cases in the literature have shown an identified source causing aspergillus endophthalmitis as a result of direct extension of disease. We present a rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis. A 72-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus, congenital Hirschsprung disease, and recent culture-positive candida pyelonephritis with hydronephrosis status post-surgical stent placement presented with difficulty opening her eyes. She complained of decreased vision (20/200 with pain and redness in both eyes – right worse then left. Examination demonstrated multiple white fungal balls in both retinas consistent with bilateral fungal endophthalmitis. Bilateral vitreous taps for cultures and staining were performed. Patient was given intravitreal injections of amphotericin B, vancomycin, ceftazidime, and started on oral fluconazole. Patient was scheduled for vitrectomy to decrease organism burden and to remove loculated areas of infection that would not respond to systemic antifungal agents. Four weeks after initial presentation, the fungal cultures revealed mold growth consistent with aspergillus. Patient was subsequently started on voriconazole and fluconazole was discontinued due to poor efficacy against aspergillus. Further workup was conducted to evaluate for the source of infection and seeding. Transthoracic cardiogram was unremarkable for any vegetation or valvular abnormalities. MRI of the orbits and sinuses did not reveal any mass lesions or bony destruction. CT of the chest was unremarkable for infection. Aspergillus endophthalmitis may occur because of one of these several mechanisms: hematogenous dissemination, direct inoculation by trauma, and contamination during surgery. Our patient's cause of bilateral endophthalmitis was through an

  10. An attempt to optimize potassium sorbate use to preserve low pH (4.5-5.5) intermediate moisture bakery products by modelling Eurotium spp., Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium corylophilum growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guynot, M Elena; Marín, Sonia; Sanchis, Vicente; Ramos, Antonio J

    2005-05-25

    Mould growth was modelled on fermented bakery product analogues (FBPA) of two different pH (4.5 and 5.5), different water activity (a(w)) levels (0.80-0.90) and potassium sorbate concentrations (0-0.3%) by using seven moulds commonly causing spoilage of bakery products (Eurotium spp., Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium corylophilum). For the description of fungal growth (growth rates) as a function of a(w), potassium sorbate concentration and pH, 10-terms polynomial models were developed. Modelling enables prediction of spoilage during storage as a function of the factors affecting fungal growth. At pH 4.5 the concentration of potassium sorbate could be reduced to some extent only at low levels of a(w), whereas at pH 5.5 fungal growth was observed even by adding 0.3% of potassium sorbate. However, this preservative could be a valuable alternative as antifungal in such bakery product, of slightly acidic pH, if a long shelf life has not to be achieved.

  11. Occurrence of Aspergillus section Flavi and aflatoxins in Brazilian rice: From field to market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsurayama, Aline M.; Martins, Ligia Manoel; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.

    2018-01-01

    The guarantee of the high quality of rice is of utmost importance because any toxic contaminant may affect consumer health, especially in countries such as Brazil where rice is part of the daily diet. A total of 187 rice samples, from field, processing and market from two different production...... systems, wetland from the state of Rio Grande do Sul, dryland, from the state of Maranhão and market samples from the state of São Paulo, were analyzed for fungi belonging to Aspergillus section Flavi and the presence of aflatoxins. Twenty-three soil samples from wetland and dryland were also analyzed....... A total of 383 Aspergillus section Flavi strains were isolated from rice and soil samples. Using a polyphasic approach, with phenotypic (morphology and extrolite profiles) and molecular data (beta-tubulin gene sequences), five species were identified: A. flavus, A. caelatus, A. novoparasiticus, A...

  12. Determination of Isavuconazole Susceptibility of Aspergillus and Candida Species by the EUCAST Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Susan J.; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a novel expanded-spectrum triazole, which has recently been approved by the FDA as an orphan drug to treat invasive aspergillosis and is currently being studied in phase III clinical trials for invasive candidiasis. The susceptibility of relatively few clinical isolates has been reported. In this study, the isavuconazole susceptibilities of 1,237 Aspergillus and 2,010 Candida geographically diverse clinical isolates were determined by EUCAST methodology at four European mycology laboratories, producing the largest multicenter data set thus far for this compound. In addition, a blinded collection of 30 cyp51A mutant Aspergillus fumigatus clinical isolates and 10 wild-type isolates was tested. From these two data sets, the following preliminary epidemiological cutoff (ECOFF) values were suggested: 2 mg/liter for Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, and Aspergillus flavus; 4 mg/liter for Aspergillus niger; 0.25 mg/liter for Aspergillus nidulans; and 0.03 mg/liter for Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis. Unfortunately, ECOFFs could not be determined for Candida glabrata or Candida krusei due to an unexplained interlaboratory MIC variation. For the blinded collection of A. fumigatus isolates, all MICs were ≤2 mg/liter for wild-type isolates. Differential isavuconazole MICs were observed for triazole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates with different cyp51A alterations: TR34/L98H mutants had elevated isavuconazole MICs, whereas isolates with G54 and M220 alterations had MICs in the wild-type range, suggesting that the efficacy of isavuconazole may not be affected by these alterations. This study will be an aid in interpreting isavuconazole MICs for clinical care and an important step in the future process of setting official clinical breakpoints. PMID:23959309

  13. Biological control of Verticillium dahliae by Talaromyces flavus

    OpenAIRE

    Nagtzaam, M.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Verticillium dahliae causes vascular wilt in a wide range of host plants. Control of Verticillium wilt is by soil disinfestation and to a lesser extent by crop rotation or, for a few host plants, by growing resistant varieties. For environmental reasons, the development of alternatives to chemical soil disinfestation is being sought. Biocontrol by microbial agents is one of the options. The potential of Talaromyces flavus as a biocontrol agen...

  14. Production and Purification of Peroxidase from Aspergillus niger.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed A. Jebor

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted in the laboratories of Biology Department, College of Science, which deals with isolation and purification of peroxidase and optimization of process parameters to achieve maximum yield of peroxidase by Aspergillus niger. Solid-state fermentation of Aspergillus niger was carried out for enhanced production of peroxidase using hydrogen peroxide as the substrate of enzyme maximum activity of the enzyme was achieved under optimum growth conditions. The optimum conditi...

  15. Occupational exposure to Aspergillus by swine and poultry farm workers in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, R; Faísca, V M; Carolino, E; Veríssimo, C; Viegas, C

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus is among a growing list of allergens that aggravate asthmatic responses. Significant pulmonary pathology is associated with Aspergillus-induced allergic and asthmatic lung disease. Environments with high levels of exposure to fungi are found in animal production facilities such as for swine and poultry, and farmers working with these are at increased risk for occupational respiratory diseases. Seven Portuguese poultry and seven swine farms were analyzed in order to estimate the prevalence, amount, and distribution of Aspergillus species, as well as to determine the presence of clinical symptoms associated with asthma and other allergy diseases in these highly contaminated settings. From the collected fungal isolates (699), an average incidence of 22% Aspergillus was detected in poultry farms, while the prevalence at swine farms was 14%. The most frequently isolated Aspergillus species were A. versicolor, A. flavus, and A. fumigatus. In poultry farms, A. flavus presented the highest level of airborne spores (>2000 CFU/m³), whereas in swine farms the highest was A. versicolor, with an incidence fourfold greater higher than the other mentioned species. Eighty workers in these settings were analyzed, ranging in age from 17 to 93 yr. The potentially hazardous exposure of poultry workers to mold allergens using sensitization markers was evaluated. Although no significant positive association was found between fungal contamination and sensitization to fungal antigens, a high incidence of respiratory symptoms in professionals without asthma was observed, namely, wheezing associated with dyspnea (23.8%) and dyspnea after strenuous activities (12.3%), suggesting underdiagnosed respiratory disturbances. Further, 32.5% of all exposed workers noted an improvement of respiratory ability during resting and holidays. From all the analyzed workers, seven were previously diagnosed with asthma and four reported the first attack after the age of 40 yr, which may be

  16. PRODUCTION AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROWTH CONDITIONS FOR INVERTASE ENZYME BY ASPERGILLUS SP., IN SOLID STATE FERMENTATION (SSF USING PAPAYA PEEL AS SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brindha Chelliappan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Invertase enzymes are produced mainly by plants, some filamentous fungi, yeast and many other microorganisms which finds applications in food industries, confectionaries, pharmaceuticals, etc., The present work deals with the production of Invertase by Aspergillus sp., isolated from various soil samples in solid state fermentation using papaya peel waste as substrate. Enzyme activity was checked using Fehling’s reagent and assay was carried out by DNSA method. The results of optimized conditions showed that the invertase activity was high in the SSF using papaya peel as substrate, incubated for 6 days at temperature of 35°C, pH 7, with 2.25gms/100ml of Ammonium nitrate as nitrogen source and 10gms/100ml of sucrose as carbon source. Hence the agro wastes from industries can be recycled by using it as substrate in SSF for high invertase enzyme production which finds applications in many fields.

  17. The impact of dose, irradiance and growth conditions on Aspergillus niger (renamed A. brasiliensis) spores low-pressure (LP) UV inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Edmonds, Lizbeth; Lichi, Tovit; Rotstein-Mayer, Adi; Mamane, Hadas

    2015-01-01

    The use of Aspergillus niger (A. niger) fungal spores as challenge organism for UV reactor validation studies is attractive due to their high UV-resistance and non-pathogenic nature. However A. niger spores UV dose-response was dependent upon sporulation conditions and did not follow the Bunsen-Roscoe Principle of time-dose reciprocity. Exposure to 8 h of natural sunlight for 10 consecutive days increased UV resistance when compared to spores grown solely in dark conditions. Application of 250 mJ cm(-2) at high irradiance (0.11 mW cm(-2)) resulted in a 2-log inactivation; however, at low irradiance (0.022 mW cm(-2)) a 1-log inactivation was achieved. In addition, surface electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed morphological changes between the control and UV exposed spores in contrast to other well accepted UV calibrated test organisms, which show no morphological difference with UV exposure.

  18. Effect of crude honey on stability of aflatoxins and growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because aflatoxin contamination is unavoidable, numerous strategies for their detoxification have been proposed. sample of natural honey was studied for their detoxification on aflatoxin (B1, B2) and their antimicrobial activities on Aspergillus flavus compared with H2O2 .Dilutions of honey ranging from 12,14,16,18 and ...

  19. (+)-Geodin from Aspergillus terreus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, Mads Holger; Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Leber, Blanka

    2011-01-01

    The fungal metabolite (+)-geodin [systematic name: (2R)-methyl 5,7-dichloro-4-hydroxy-6'-methoxy-6-methyl-3,4'-dioxospiro[benzofuran-2,1'-cyclohexa-2',5'-diene]-2'-carboxylate], C(17)H(12)Cl(2)O(7), was isolated from Aspergillus terreus. The crystal structure contains two independent molecules...

  20. Aspergillus infection in urinary tract post-ureteric stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections of the urinary tract are usually encountered following prolonged antibiotic use, instrumentation and indwelling urinary catheters. These type of infections are mostly seen in immuno-compromised patients. Candida is the most common among the fungal infections of urinary tract followed by Aspergillus infection. Here is a case report of a 26 year old diabetic female who presented with abdominal pain, fever, nausea and vomiting. She had undergone double-J stenting 15-20 days back. The cause of the symptoms was not detected till the patient underwent C.T Scan-KUB with excretory urography which showed the displaced D-J stent. Then on performing replacement of D-J stent, cystoscopy was done and the tissue sample was sent for microbiological and histopathological examination. On Microbiological examination, Aspergillus flavus was isolated from the tissue, which was culprit behind the disease. Patient was then treated with anti-fungal drugs, following which she gradually improved.

  1. An evaluation of aflatoxin and cyclopiazonic acid production in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Yeun; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Inhyung; Ji, Geun Eog

    2014-06-01

    To date, edible fungi such as Aspergillus flavus var. oryzae (A. oryzae) has been considered as safe. However, some strains can produce mycotoxins. Thus, the biosynthetic ability to produce mycotoxins should be reevaluated to determine the safety of edible fungi. We analyzed the production of aflatoxins and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) from edible fungi such as A. oryzae isolated from various Korean foods using multiplex PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In the multiplex PCR analysis of aflatoxin biosynthetic genes omtB, aflR, ver-1, and omtA, 5 of 19 Aspergillus strains produced all PCR products. Among them, aflatoxin B1 and aflatoxin B2 were detected from only A. flavus KACC 41403 by HPLC. Aflatoxins were not detected from the other four strains that produced all positive PCR bands. Aflatoxin also was not detected from 12 strains that had PCR patterns without aflR or ver-1 and from 2 strains that did not produce any of the expected PCR products. Only the seven A. oryzae strains that produced all of the positive PCR bands including the CPA biosynthetic genes maoA, dmaT, and pks-nrps produced CPA. CPA and aflatoxin production must be evaluated before A. oryzae strains are used for the development of fermented foods.

  2. Occurrence of Aspergillus section Flavi and aflatoxins in Brazilian rice: From field to market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsurayama, Aline M; Martins, Ligia M; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Fungaro, Maria Helena P; Silva, Josué J; Frisvad, Jens C; Pitt, John I; Taniwaki, Marta H

    2018-02-02

    The guarantee of the high quality of rice is of utmost importance because any toxic contaminant may affect consumer health, especially in countries such as Brazil where rice is part of the daily diet. A total of 187 rice samples, from field, processing and market from two different production systems, wetland from the state of Rio Grande do Sul, dryland, from the state of Maranhão and market samples from the state of São Paulo, were analyzed for fungi belonging to Aspergillus section Flavi and the presence of aflatoxins. Twenty-three soil samples from wetland and dryland were also analyzed. A total of 383 Aspergillus section Flavi strains were isolated from rice and soil samples. Using a polyphasic approach, with phenotypic (morphology and extrolite profiles) and molecular data (beta-tubulin gene sequences), five species were identified: A. flavus, A. caelatus, A. novoparasiticus, A. arachidicola and A. pseudocaelatus. This is the first report of these last three species from rice and rice plantation soil. Only seven (17%) of the A. flavus isolates produced type B aflatoxins, but 95% produced kojic acid and 69% cyclopiazonic acid. Less than 14% of the rice samples were contaminated with aflatoxins, but two of the market samples were well above the maximum tolerable limit (5μg/kg), established by the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiosensitivity of toxigenic Aspergillus isolated from spices and destruction of aflatoxins by gamma-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Ito, Hitoshi; Soedarman, Harsono; Ishigaki, Isao

    Radiosensitivities of Aspergillus flavus var columnaris isolated from spices were investigated. The D10 values and induction doses were 267-293 Gy and 75-165 Gy in wet conditions, respectively. In dry conditions, the survival curves were exponential and D10 values were 538-600 Gy. The survival curves of standard strain of A. parasiticus IFO 30179 were similar both in wet and dry conditions. The necessary dose of 8 kGy for the destruction of these toxigenic Aspergillus was calculated from these values. Two of 11 strains of A. flavus var columnaris produced aflatoxins and the content of B 1 was especially high. In the study of irradiation effect on aflatoxins produced on polished rice, aflatoxins G 1 and B 1 were more radiosensitive than G 2 and B 2. However, these aflatoxins were very stable to radiation and the dose required for destruction was found to be more than 500 kGy. It is therfore concluded that the decontamination of molds by irradiation is necessary prior to their production of aflatoxins.

  4. Lipoxygenase activity accelerates programmed spore germination in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory J. Fischer; William Bacon; Jun Yang; Jonathan M. Palmer; Taylor Dagenais; Bruce D. Hammock; Nancy P. Keller

    2017-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus initiates invasive growth through a programmed germination process that progresses from dormant spore to swollen spore (SS) to germling (GL) and ultimately invasive hyphal growth. We find a lipoxygenase with considerable homology to human Alox5 and Alox15, LoxB, that impacts the transitions of...

  5. Isolation and growth characterization of chlorate and/or bromate resistant mutants generated by spontaneous and induced foreword mutations at several gene loci in aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanan, Ghassan J. M.; Al-Najjar, Heyam E.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed her mainly to evaluate the contribution of newly employed bromate selection system, in obtaining new Aspergillus niger nitrate/nitrite assimilation defective mutants, through Ultraviolet treatment (UV), 1, 2, 7, 8-Diepoxyoctane (DEO), phenols mixture (Phx)) and spontaneous treatments. The newly employed bromate selection system was able to specify only two putative novel mutant types designated brn (bromate resistant but chlorate sensitive (RS) strain, which may specify nitrite specific transporter) and cbrn mutants (bromate resistant and chlorate resistant strain, which may specify nitrate/nitrite bispecific system). The most relevant and innovative findings of this research work involve the isolation of the RR ( cbrn) mutants (a new type of nitrate assimilation defective mutants), that could be useful for studying the bispecific nitrate /nitrite transporter system. The majority of obtained bromate resistant mutants (93.3% of the total mutants obtained by all treatments) were of the brn type, whereas the remaining percentage (6.76%) was given to cbrn strains. The highest percentages of brn mutant strains (48% and 58.6% of the total RS strains) were obtained with UA after spontaneous and Phx treatment, whereas Trp has generated 29% and 42% of RS strains after UV and DEO treatments, respectively. The obtained ratios of cbrn mutants were higher (i.e. in the range of 8.4%-11.64% of the total bromate mutants) with chemical treatments, especially when U.A or Pro was serving as sole N-sources at 25ºC rather than 37ºC. A 69% mutants` yield of Aspergillus niger mutant strains representing nine gene loci ( niaD, cnx-6 loci , nrt and nirA) were selected on the bases of chlorate (600 mM) toxicity. All chlorate resistant mutants were completely sensitive to bromate (250 mM). The niaD mutants showed the highest percentage (73.97%) of chlorate resistant mutants obtained with all tested treatments. The UV treatment has generated the highest ratio (86.9%) of nia

  6. Isolation and growth characterization of chlorate and/or bromate resistant mutants generated by spontaneous and induced foreword mutations at several gene loci in Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan J. M. Kanan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed her mainly to evaluate the contribution of newly employed bromate selection system, in obtaining new Aspergillus niger nitrate/nitrite assimilation defective mutants, through Ultraviolet treatment (UV, 1, 2, 7, 8-Diepoxyoctane (DEO, phenols mixture (Phx and spontaneous treatments. The newly employed bromate selection system was able to specify only two putative novel mutant types designated brn (bromate resistant but chlorate sensitive (RS strain, which may specify nitrite specific transporter and cbrn mutants (bromate resistant and chlorate resistant strain, which may specify nitrate/nitrite bispecific system. The most relevant and innovative findings of this research work involve the isolation of the RR (cbrn mutants (a new type of nitrate assimilation defective mutants, that could be useful for studying the bispecific nitrate /nitrite transporter system. The majority of obtained bromate resistant mutants (93.3% of the total mutants obtained by all treatments were of the brn type, whereas the remaining percentage (6.76% was given to cbrn strains. The highest percentages of brn mutant strains (48% and 58.6% of the total RS strains were obtained with UA after spontaneous and Phx treatment, whereas Trp has generated 29% and 42% of RS strains after UV and DEO treatments, respectively. The obtained ratios of cbrn mutants were higher (i.e. in the range of 8.4%-11.64% of the total bromate mutants with chemical treatments, especially when U.A or Pro was serving as sole N-sources at 25ºC rather than 37ºC. A 69% mutants' yield of Aspergillus niger mutant strains representing nine gene loci (niaD, cnx-6 loci, nrt and nirA were selected on the bases of chlorate (600 mM toxicity. All chlorate resistant mutants were completely sensitive to bromate (250 mM. The niaD mutants showed the highest percentage (73.97% of chlorate resistant mutants obtained with all tested treatments. The UV treatment has generated the highest ratio (86.9% of niaD mutants

  7. New taxa in Aspergillus section Usti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, R. A.; Varga, J.; Meijer, M.

    2011-01-01

    Based on phylogenetic analysis of sequence data, Aspergillus section Usti includes 21 species, inducing two teleomorphic species Aspergillus heterothallicus (=Emericella heterothallica) and Fennellia monodii. Aspergillus germanicus sp. nov. was isolated from indoor air in Germany. This species ha...

  8. D-Galactose uptake is nonfunctional in the conidiospores of Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fekete, E.; de Vries, R.P.; Seiboth, B.; vanKuyk, P.A.; Sandor, E.; Metz, B.; Kubicek, C.P.; Karaffa, L.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of black Aspergilli (Aspergillus section Nigri), including Aspergillus niger, as well as many other Ascomycetes fail to germinate on d-galactose as a sole carbon source. Here, we provide evidence that the ability of A. niger to transport d-galactose is growth stage dependent, being

  9. Formation of Sclerotia and Production of Indoloterpenes by Aspergillus niger and Other Species in Section Nigri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Petersen, Lene Maj; Lyhne, Ellen Kirstine

    2014-01-01

    Several species in Aspergillus section Nigri have been reported to produce sclerotia on well-known growth media, such as Czapek yeast autolysate (CYA) agar, with sclerotia considered to be an important prerequisite for sexual development. However Aspergillus niger sensu stricto has not been repor...

  10. Enhanced itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger using genetic modification and medium optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, A.; Pfelzer, N.; Zuijderwijk, R.; Punt, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aspergillus niger was selected as a host for producing itaconic acid due to its versatile and tolerant character in various growth environments, and its extremely high capacity of accumulating the precursor of itaconic acid: citric acid. Expressing the CAD gene from Aspergillus terreus

  11. Comparative studies on pectinases obtained from Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative studies on pectinases obtained from Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger in submerged fermentation system using pectin extracted from mango, orange and pineapple peels as carbon sources.

  12. Early detection of fungal growth in bakery products by use of an electronic nose based on mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinaixa, Maria; Marín, Sonia; Brezmes, Jesús; Llobet, Eduard; Vilanova, Xavier; Correig, Xavier; Ramos, Antonio; Sanchis, Vicent

    2004-10-06

    This paper presents the design, optimization, and evaluation of a mass spectrometry-based electronic nose (MS e-nose) for early detection of unwanted fungal growth in bakery products. Seven fungal species (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Eurotium amstelodami, Eurotium herbariorum, Eurotium rubrum, Eurotium repens, and Penicillium corylophillum) were isolated from bakery products and used for the study. Two sampling headspace techniques were tested: static headspace (SH) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME). Cross-validated models based on principal component analysis (PCA), coupled to discriminant function analysis (DFA) and fuzzy ARTMAP, were used as data treatment. When attempting to discriminate between inoculated and blank control vials or between genera or species of in vitro growing cultures, sampling based on SPME showed better results than those based on static headspace. The SPME-MS-based e-nose was able to predict fungal growth with 88% success after 24 h of inoculation and 98% success after 48 h when changes were monitored in the headspace of fungal cultures growing on bakery product analogues. Prediction of the right fungal genus reached 78% and 88% after 24 and 96 h, respectively.

  13. A trispecies Aspergillus microarray: Comparative transcriptomics of three Aspergillus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2008-01-01

    The full-genome sequencing of the filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus oryzae has opened possibilities for studying the cellular physiology of these fungi on a systemic level. As a tool to explore this, we are making available an Affymetrix GeneChip developed...... data identified 23 genes to be a conserved response across Aspergillus sp., including the xylose transcriptional activator XlnR. A promoter analysis of the up-regulated genes in all three species indicates the conserved XInR-binding site to be 5'-GGNTAAA-3'. The composition of the conserved gene......-set suggests that xylose acts as a molecule, indicating the presence of complex carbohydrates such as hemicellulose, and triggers an array of degrading enzymes. With this case example, we present a validated tool for transcriptome analysis of three Aspergillus species and a methodology for conducting cross...

  14. Effect of simulated microgravity on Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Jeffrey J.

    2005-08-01

    A rotating bioreactor was developed to simulate microgravity and its influence was studied on fungal growth. The reactor was designed to simulate microgravity using 'free fall' principle, which creates an apparent weightlessness for a brief period of time. In this experiment, a sealed vertically rotating tube is the reactor in which the cells are grown. For the first time vertically rotating tubes were used to obtain 'free fall' thereby simulating microgravity. Simulated microgravity served significant in the alteration of growth and productivity of Aspergillus niger, a common soil fungi. Two other sets of similar cultures were maintained as still and shake control cultures to compare with the growth and productivity of cells in rotating culture. It was found increased growth and productivity occurred in simulated microgravity. Since this experiment involves growth of cells in a liquid medium, the fluidic effects must also be studied which is a limitation.

  15. FigA, a putative homolog of low-affinity calcium system member Fig1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is involved in growth and asexual and sexual development in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shizhu; Zheng, Hailin; Long, Nanbiao; Carbó, Natalia; Chen, Peiying; Aguilar, Pablo S; Lu, Ling

    2014-02-01

    Calcium-mediated signaling pathways are widely employed in eukaryotes and are implicated in the regulation of diverse biological processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, at least two different calcium uptake systems have been identified: the high-affinity calcium influx system (HACS) and the low-affinity calcium influx system (LACS). Compared to the HACS, the LACS in fungi is not well known. In this study, FigA, a homolog of the LACS member Fig1 from S. cerevisiae, was functionally characterized in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Loss of figA resulted in retardant hyphal growth and a sharp reduction of conidial production. Most importantly, FigA is essential for the homothallic mating (self-fertilization) process; further, FigA is required for heterothallic mating (outcrossing) in the absence of HACS midA. Interestingly, in a figA deletion mutant, adding extracellular Ca(2+) rescued the hyphal growth defects but could not restore asexual and sexual reproduction. Furthermore, quantitative PCR results revealed that figA deletion sharply decreased the expression of brlA and nsdD, which are known as key regulators during asexual and sexual development, respectively. In addition, green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagging at the C terminus of FigA (FigA::GFP) showed that FigA localized to the center of the septum in mature hyphal cells, to the location between vesicles and metulae, and between the junctions of metulae and phialides in conidiophores. Thus, our findings suggest that FigA, apart from being a member of a calcium uptake system in A. nidulans, may play multiple unexplored roles during hyphal growth and asexual and sexual development.

  16. Expression Profiling of Non-Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus parasiticus Mutants Obtained by 5-Azacytosine Treatment or Serial Mycelial Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiujiang Yu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are carcinogenic secondary metabolites produced by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Previous studies found that repeated serial mycelial transfer or treatment of A. parasiticus with 5-azacytidine produced colonies with a fluffy phenotype and inability to produce aflatoxins. To understand how these treatments affect expression of genes involved in aflatoxin production and development, we carried out expressed sequence tag (EST-based microarray assays to identify genes in treated clones that are differentially expressed compared to the wild-type. Expression of 183 genes was significantly dysregulated. Of these, 38 had at least two-fold or lower expression compared to the untreated control and only two had two-fold or higher expression. The most frequent change was downregulation of genes predicted to encode membrane-bound proteins. Based on this result we hypothesize that the treatments cause changes in the structure of cellular and organelle membranes that prevent normal development and aflatoxin biosynthesis.

  17. In vitro activity of a new oral glucan synthase inhibitor (MK-3118) tested against Aspergillus spp. by CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Motyl, Mary R; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-02-01

    MK-3118, a glucan synthase inhibitor derived from enfumafungin, and comparator agents were tested against 71 Aspergillus spp., including itraconazole-resistant strains (MIC, ≥ 4 μg/ml), using CLSI and EUCAST reference broth microdilution methods. The CLSI 90% minimum effective concentration (MEC(90))/MIC(90) values (μg/ml) for MK-3118, amphotericin B, and caspofungin, respectively, were as follows: 0.12, 2, and 0.03 for Aspergillus flavus species complex (SC); 0.25, 2, and 0.06 for Aspergillus fumigatus SC; 0.12, 2, and 0.06 for Aspergillus terreus SC; and 0.06, 1, and 0.03 for Aspergillus niger SC. Essential agreement between the values found by CLSI and EUCAST (± 2 log(2) dilution steps) was 94.3%. MK-3118 was determined to be a potent agent regardless of the in vitro method applied, with excellent activity against contemporary wild-type and itraconazole-resistant strains of Aspergillus spp.

  18. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis of voriconazole against Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. in children, adolescents and adults by Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gaoqi; Zhu, Liqin; Ge, Tingyue; Liao, Shasha; Li, Na; Qi, Fang

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cumulative fraction of response of various voriconazole dosing regimens against six Candida and six Aspergillus spp. in immunocompromised children, immunocompromised adolescents, and adults. Using pharmacokinetic parameters and pharmacodynamic data, 5000-subject Monte Carlo simulations (MCSs) were conducted to evaluate the ability of simulated dosing strategies in terms of fAUC/MIC targets of voriconazole. According to the results of the MCSs, current voriconazole dosage regimens were all effective for children, adolescents and adults against Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Candida orthopsilosis. For adults, dosing regimens of 4 mg/kg intravenous every 12 h (q12h) and 300 mg orally q12h were sufficient to treat fungal infections by six Candida spp. (C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei and C. orthopsilosis) and five Aspergillus spp. (Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans). However, high doses should be recommended for children and adolescents in order to achieve better clinical efficacy against A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. The current voriconazole dosage regimens were all ineffective against A. niger for children and adolescents. All voriconazole dosage regimens were not optimal against Aspergillus versicolor. This is the first study to evaluate clinical therapy of various voriconazole dosing regimens against Candida and Aspergillus spp. infections in children, adolescents and adults using MCS. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic-based dosing strategy provided a theoretical rationale for identifying optimal voriconazole dosage regimens in children, adolescents and adults in order to maximise clinical response and minimise the probability of exposure-related toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of the pesticides glyphosate, chlorpyrifos and atrazine on growth parameters of nonochratoxigenic Aspergillus section Nigri strains isolated from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Cecilia S; Barberis, Carla L; Chiacchiera, Stella M; Magnoli, Carina E

    2014-01-01

    This investigation was undertake to determine the effect of glyphosate, chlorpyrifos and atrazine on the lag phase and growth rate of nonochratoxigenic A. niger aggregate strains growing on soil extract medium at -0.70, -2.78 and -7.06 MPa. Under certain conditions, the glyphosate concentrations used significantly increased micelial growth as compared to control. An increase of about 30% was observed for strain AN 251 using 5 and 20 mg L(-1) of glyphosate at -2.78 MPa. The strains behaved differently in the presence of the insecticide chlorpyrifos. A significant decrease in growth rate, compared to control, was observed for all strains except AN 251 at -2.78 MPa with 5 mg L(-1). This strain showed a significant increase in growth rate. With regard to atrazine, significant differences were observed only under some conditions compared to control. An increase in growth rate was observed for strain AN 251 at -2.78 MPa with 5 and 10 mg L(-1) of atrazine. By comparison, a reduction of 25% in growth rate was observed at -7.06 MPa and higher atrazine concentrations. This study shows that glyphosate, chlorpyrifos and atrazine affect the growth parameters of nonochratoxigenic A. niger aggregate strains under in vitro conditions.

  20. Aspergillus arthritis: analysis of clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of 31 reported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaletsou, Maria N; Rammaert, Blandine; Bueno, Marimelle A; Sipsas, Nikolaos V; Moriyama, Brad; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Roilides, Emmanuel; Zeller, Valerie; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Henry, Michael; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Denning, David W; Lortholary, Olivier; Walsh, Thomas J

    2017-04-01

    Aspergillus arthritis is a debilitating form of invasive aspergillosis. Little is known about its epidemiology, clinical manifestations, laboratory features, treatment, and prognosis. Cases of Aspergillus arthritis were reviewed in the English literature from 1967 through 2015 for variables of arthritis with Aspergillus spp. recovered from joint and/or adjacent bone, underlying conditions, symptoms, signs, inflammatory biomarkers, diagnostic imaging, management, and outcome. Among 31 evaluable cases, 87% were males and 13% pediatric. Median age was 50 y (range 1-83 y). Seventeen (55%) patients were immunosuppressed with such conditions as hematological malignancies (26%), corticosteroids (39%), and/or transplantation (26%). Approximately one-half (52%) of patients had hematogenous seeding of the joint, and more than 80% had de novo infection with no prior antifungal therapy. Oligoarticular infection (2-3 joints) occurred in 45% and contiguous osteomyelitis was present in 61%. Clinical manifestations included pain (87%), edema (26%), and limited function (23%), with knees (35%), intervertebral discs (26%), and hips (16%) being most commonly infected. Aspergillus fumigatus constituted 77% of cases followed by Aspergillus flavus in 13%, Aspergillus niger in 3%, and not specified in 7%. Median ESR was 90 mm/hr and median CRP was 3.6 mg/dl. Median synovial fluid WBC was 17,200/μL (7,300-128,000) with 72% PMNs (range 61-92). Osteolysis occurred in 35%, and soft-tissue extension 47%. Nineteen patients (61%) were managed with combined medical and surgical therapy, 10 (32%) with medical therapy only, and 2 (6%) surgery only. Amphotericin B and itraconazole were the most frequently used agents with median duration of therapy of 219 days (range 30-545). Surgical interventions included debridement in 61%, drainage 19%, and amputation 6%. Complete or partial response was achieved in 71% and relapse occurred in 16%. Medical therapy was reinstituted with successful outcome in

  1. HGT-Finder: A New Tool for Horizontal Gene Transfer Finding and Application to Aspergillus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Marcus; Ekstrom, Alex; Li, Xueqiong; Yin, Yanbin

    2015-10-09

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a fast-track mechanism that allows genetically unrelated organisms to exchange genes for rapid environmental adaptation. We developed a new phyletic distribution-based software, HGT-Finder, which implements a novel bioinformatics algorithm to calculate a horizontal transfer index and a probability value for each query gene. Applying this new tool to the Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, and Aspergillus nidulans genomes, we found 273, 542, and 715 transferred genes (HTGs), respectively. HTGs have shorter length, higher guanine-cytosine (GC) content, and relaxed selection pressure. Metabolic process and secondary metabolism functions are significantly enriched in HTGs. Gene clustering analysis showed that 61%, 41% and 74% of HTGs in the three genomes form physically linked gene clusters (HTGCs). Overlapping manually curated, secondary metabolite gene clusters (SMGCs) with HTGCs found that 9 of the 33 A. fumigatus SMGCs and 31 of the 65 A. nidulans SMGCs share genes with HTGCs, and that HTGs are significantly enriched in SMGCs. Our genome-wide analysis thus presented very strong evidence to support the hypothesis that HGT has played a very critical role in the evolution of SMGCs. The program is freely available at http://cys.bios.niu.edu/HGTFinder/ HGTFinder.tar.gz.

  2. Branching is coordinated with mitosis in growing hyphae of Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dynesen, Jens Østergaard; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Filamentous fungi like Aspergillus nidulans can effectively colonize their surroundings by the formation of new branches along the existing hyphae. While growth conditions, chemical perturbations, and mutations affecting branch formation have received great attention during the last decades, the ...

  3. Nutritional Evaluation of Graded Levels of Aspergillus-treated Rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nine pregnant West African dwarf (WAD) goats were fed untreated (control diet A with 30% inclusion level) and Aspergillus treated diet, B (10%) and diet C (20%) in total mixed rations. The effect of treatment was evaluated on feed intake, digestibility, BW and growth rate. Fungus-treated rice husk appeared to be well ...

  4. Control of Aspergillus niger with garlic, onion and leek extracts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-02-19

    Feb 19, 2007 ... Condiments Chemistry,Microbiology ,Technology.Academic Press,. San Fransisco,pp 35-305. Rasooli I, Abyaneh MR (2004).Inhibitory effects of thyme oils on growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus parasiticus. Food Control. 15: 479-483. Rivlin RS (2001). Historical perspective on the use of garlic.

  5. Aspergillus saccharolyticus sp. nov., a new black Aspergillus species isolated in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette; Lübeck, Peter S.; Lübeck, Mette

    2011-01-01

    A novel species, Aspergillus saccharolyticus sp. nov., belonging to the Aspergillus section Nigri group is described. This species was isolated in Denmark from treated hardwood. Its taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach including phenotypic (morphology and extrolite...... Aspergillus species that is morphologically similar to Aspergillus japonicus and Aspergillus aculeatus, but has a totally different extrolite profile compared to any known Aspergillus species. The type strain of A. saccharolyticus sp. nov. is CBS 127449T ( = IBT 28509T)....

  6. Fumonisins in Aspergillus niger: Industrial and food aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Mogensen, Jesper

    Introduction: Fumonisins are toxic seconday metabolites from Fusarium verticillioides and other Fusaria, from Tolypocladium and Aspergillus niger 1,2. Being a generalist Aspergillus niger is the workhorse in a very large number of industrial applications, and is also a common contaminant in foods...... of approximately 6% of the strains. None of the other species in the black Aspergilli produced fumonisins. One strain (NRRL 337), called the “food fungus”, because it is used for single cell protein based on cheap growth substrates, produced both fumonisins and ochratoxin A. Industrial citric acid producers...

  7. Identification of morphological and molecular Aspergillus species isolated from patients based on beta-tubulin gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Kheirkhah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aspergillus species are opportunistic pathogens among immunocompromised patients. In terms of pathogenesis and mycotoxin production, they are in great value. The aim of the this study was to evaluate of beta-tubulin gene for identification of clinical Aspergillus species by PCR-sequencing method compared to morphological features of clinical isolates (such as conidial shape in direct microscopic examination, colony shape in culture, and physiological tests. Materials and Methods: In this study, 465 patients referred to the Shefa laboratory of Isfahan were evaluated. Morphological and molecular identification of clinical samples were performed using culture on sabouraud agar, malt extract agar, czapekdox agar, direct microscopy, and PCR-sequencing of beta tubulin gene, respectively. Sequences were analyzed in comparison with gene bank data. Results: Thirty nine out of 465 suspected cases (8.4% had aspergillosis. The most prevalent species were Aspergillus flavus (56.4%, A. oryzae (20.5%, and A. fumigatus (10.2%, respectively. Fifty nine percent of patients were females and 49% were males. Conclusion: In comparison with phenotypic tests, sequencing of beta-tubulin gene for identification of Aspergillus species is at great value. Replacement of molecular techniques with conventional tests is recommended for precise identification of microorganism for better management of infection.

  8. Contaminação do ar por Aspergillus em ambiente de reabilitação de animais marinhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Orzechowski Xavier

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillosis in captivity seabirds is often associated with elevated rates of mortality. The infection is usually acquired by inhalation of airborne fungal conidia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of Aspergillus species in the indoor environment of a rehabilitation centre for marine animals in Southern Brazil. This centre continuously receives injured penguins, seagulls, albatrosses and petrels. Petri dishes plates with Agar Sabouraud dextrose and chloramphenicol were left open for 15 minutes in 3 distinct points in the rehabilitation centre and then incubated at 25ºC. During a period of two years the indoor air was sampled in 81 occasions. A total of 43 isolates belonging to 7 different Aspergillus species were recovered. Aspegillus fumigatus was the predominant species (27.9%, followed by A. niger (25.6%, and A. flavus (16.3%. Four other Aspergillus species were isolated. This study demonstrates that seabirds were exposed to pathogenic Aspergillus species in our rehabilitation centre, reinforcing the need for a strict microbiology control of the indoor air in the captivity environment.

  9. Evaluation of the in vitro activity of isavuconazole and comparator voriconazole against 2635 contemporary clinical Candida and Aspergillus isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astvad, K. M.T.; Hare, R. K.; Arendrup, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The in vitro activity of isavuconazole was determined for 1677 Candida and 958 Aspergillus isolates from 2012 to 2014 with voriconazole as comparator. Methods Aspergillus isolates were screened for resistance using azole-agar. Aspergillus isolates that screened positive and all Candida.......03 (≤0.03–4), Candida krusei: 0.06 (≤0.03–0.5), Candida parapsilosis: ≤0.03 (≤0.03–0.06), Candida tropicalis: ≤0.03 (≤0.03 to >4), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (anamorph: Candida robusta): ≤0.03 (≤0.03–0.5). Non-wt isavuconazole/voriconazole MICs were found for C. albicans: 0.8/1.0%, C. dubliniensis: 0...... flavus: 1 (0.5–2), Aspergillus nidulans: ≤0.125 (≤0.125–0.25). Non-wt isavuconazole/voriconazole MICs were found for 13.7/15.2% A. fumigatus, 4.9/0% A. niger and 48.2/22.2% A. terreus. Conclusion Isavuconazole displayed broad in vitro activity, similar to that of voriconazole. Up to 15% of C. glabrata, C...

  10. Aspergillus-Related Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia Al-Alawi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus is a ubiquitous dimorphic fungus that causes a variety of human diseases ranging in severity from trivial to life-threatening, depending on the host response. An intact host defence is important to prevent disease, but individuals with pre-existing structural lung disease, atopy, occupational exposure or impaired immunity are susceptible. Three distinctive patterns of aspergillus-related lung disease are recognized: saprophytic infestation of airways, cavities and necrotic tissue; allergic disease including extrinsic allergic alveolitis, asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, bronchocentric granulomatosis and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia; and airway and tissue invasive disease -- pseudomembranous tracheobronchitis, acute bronchopneumonia, angioinvasive aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing aspergillosis and invasive pleural disease. A broad knowledge of these clinical presentations and a high index of suspicion are required to ensure timely diagnosis and treatment of the potentially lethal manifestations of aspergillus-related pulmonary disease. In the present report, the clinical, radiographic and pathological aspects of the various aspergillus-related lung diseases are briefly reviewed.

  11. Aspergillus bronchitis without significant immunocompromise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chrdle, Ales; Mustakim, Sahlawati; Bright‐Thomas, Rowland J; Baxter, Caroline G; Felton, Timothy; Denning, David W

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus bronchitis is poorly understood and described. We extracted clinical data from more than 400 referred patients with persistent chest symptoms who did not fulfill criteria for allergic, chronic, or invasive aspergillosis...

  12. Tremorgenic Mycotoxins from Aspergillus Caespitosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, H. W.; Cole, R. J.; Hein, H.; Kirksey, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Two tremorgenic mycotoxins were isolated from Aspergillus caespitosus, and identified as verruculogen and fumitremorgin B. They were produced at the rate of 172 and 325 mg per kg, respectively, on autoclaved cracked field corn. PMID:1155935

  13. Aspergillus niger contains the cryptic phylogenetic species A. awamori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrone, Giancarlo; Stea, Gaetano; Epifani, Filomena

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus section Nigri is an important group of species for food and medical mycology, and biotechnology. The Aspergillus niger ‘aggregate’ represents its most complicated taxonomic subgroup containing eight morphologically indistinguishable taxa: A. niger, Aspergillus tubingensis, Aspergillus...

  14. Evaluation of the Bruker Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Aspergillus Species Directly from Growth on Solid Agar Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the accuracy of the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS system at identifying clinical isolates of Aspergillus species that were grown on agar media. A total of 381 non-duplicate Aspergillus isolates representing 21 different Aspergillus species identified by molecular analysis were included in this study. The Bruker Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS system was able to identify 30.2% (115/381 of the isolates to the species level (score values of ≥2.000 and 49.3% to the genus level (score values of 1.700–1.999. When the identification cutoff value was lowered from ≥2.000 to ≥1.700, the species-level identification rate increased to 79.5% with a slight rise of false identification from 2.6 to 5.0%. From another aspect, a correct species-level identification rate of 89% could be reached by the Bruker Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS system regardless of the score values obtained. The Bruker Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS system had a moderate performance in identification of Aspergillus directly inoculated on solid agar media. Continued expansion of the Bruker Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS database and adoption of alternative cutoff values for interpretation are required to improve the performance of the system for identifying highly diverse species of clinically encountered Aspergillus isolates.

  15. Deletion of creB in Aspergillus oryzae increases secreted hydrolytic enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, A J; Morris, T A; Jin, B; Saint, C P; Kelly, J M

    2013-09-01

    Aspergillus oryzae has been used in the food and beverage industry for centuries, and industrial strains have been produced by multiple rounds of selection. Targeted gene deletion technology is particularly useful for strain improvement in such strains, particularly when they do not have a well-characterized meiotic cycle. Phenotypes of an Aspergillus nidulans strain null for the CreB deubiquitinating enzyme include effects on growth and repression, including increased activity levels of various enzymes. We show that Aspergillus oryzae contains a functional homologue of the CreB deubiquitinating enzyme and that a null strain shows increased activity levels of industrially important secreted enzymes, including cellulases, xylanases, amylases, and proteases, as well as alleviated inhibition of spore germination on glucose medium. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis showed that the increased levels of enzyme activity in both Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus oryzae are mirrored at the transcript level, indicating transcriptional regulation. We report that Aspergillus oryzae DAR3699, originally isolated from soy fermentation, has a similar phenotype to that of a creB deletion mutant of the RIB40 strain, and it contains a mutation in the creB gene. Collectively, the results for Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus nidulans, Trichoderma reesei, and Penicillium decumbens show that deletion of creB may be broadly useful in diverse fungi for increasing production of a variety of enzymes.

  16. Impacts of environmental stress on growth, secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and metabolite production of xerotolerant/xerophilic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Angel; Schmidt-Heydt, Markus; Rodríguez, Alicia; Parra, Roberto; Geisen, Rolf; Magan, Naresh

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the impact that single and interacting environmental stress factors have on tolerance mechanisms, molecular ecology and the relationship with secondary metabolite production by a group of mycotoxigenic species of economic importance. Growth of these fungi (Aspergillus flavus, A.ochraceus, A.carbonarius, Penicillium nordicum and P. verrucosum) is influenced by water and temperature interactions and type of solute used to induce water stress. Such abiotic stresses are overcome by the synthesis of increased amounts of low molecular weight sugar alcohols, especially glycerol and erythritol, to enable them to remain active under abiotic stress. This is accompanied by increased expression of sugar transporter genes, e.g., in A. flavus, which provides the nutritional means of tolerating such stress. The optimum conditions of water activity (a w) × temperature stress for growth are often different from those for secondary metabolite production. The genes for toxin production are clustered together and their relative expression is influenced by abiotic interacting stress factors. For example., A. flavus synthesises aflatoxins under water stress in non-ionic solutes. In contrast, P. nordicum specifically occupies a high salt (0.87 a w = 22% NaCl) niche such as cured meats, and produces ochratoxin A (OTA). There is differential and temporal expression of the genes in the secondary metabolite clusters in response to a w × temperature stress. We have used a microarray and integrated data on growth, relative expression of key genes in the biosynthetic pathways for secondary metabolite production and toxin production using a mixed growth model. This was used to correlate these factors and predict the toxin levels produced under different abiotic stress conditions. This system approach to integrate these different data sets and model the relationships could be a powerful tool for predicting the relative toxin production under extreme stress conditions

  17. Inhibitory effect of the essential oil of Curcuma longa L. and curcumin on aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Flavio Dias; Kemmelmeier, Carlos; Arrotéia, Carla Cristina; da Costa, Christiane Luciana; Mallmann, Carlos Augusto; Janeiro, Vanderly; Ferreira, Francine Maery Dias; Mossini, Simone Aparecida Galerani; Silva, Expedito Leite; Machinski, Miguel

    2013-01-15

    Aflatoxins are highly toxic, mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic mycotoxins. Consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated food and commodities poses serious hazards to the health of humans and animals. Turmeric, Curcuma longa L., is a native plant of Southeast Asia and has antimicrobial, antioxidant and antifungal properties. This paper reports the antiaflatoxigenic activities of the essential oil of C. longa and curcumin. The medium tests were prepared with the oil of C. longa, and the curcumin standard at concentrations varied from 0.01% to 5.0%. All doses of the essential oil of the plant and the curcumin standard interfered with mycotoxin production. Both the essential oil and curcumin significantly inhibited the production of aflatoxins; the 0.5% level had a greater than 96% inhibitory effect. The levels of aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) production were 1.0 and 42.7 μg/mL, respectively, for the samples treated with the essential oil of C. longa L. and curcumin at a concentration of 0.5%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Utilization of RNA Silencing Technology to Mitigate the Voriconazole Resistance of Aspergillus Flavus; Lipofectamine-Based Delivery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanam Nami; Behzad Baradaran; Behzad Mansoori; Parivash Kordbacheh; Sasan Rezaie; Mehraban Falahati; Leila Mohamed Khosroshahi; Mahin Safara; Farideh Zaini

    2017-01-01

    ... * Lipofectamine Abstract Purpose: Introducing the effect of RNAi in fungi to downregulate essential genes has made it a powerful tool to investigate gene function, with potential strategies for novel disease treatments...

  19. Tolerancia a endosulfan de Aspergillus flavus aislados de suelos agrícolas destinados al cultivo de oleaginosas

    OpenAIRE

    Barberis, Carla; Asurmendi, Paula; Carranza, Cecilia Soledad; Dalcero, Ana Maria; Magnoli, Carina Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    En nuestro país, pesticidas tales como endosulfan, son de importancia durante el desarrollo del cultivo de soja y maní. La Agencia de Protección Ambiental (EPA, USA,), clasifica a este como alta y agudamente tóxico. Debido a las preocupaciones asociadas con la acumulación de plaguicidas en alimentos y agua, en la actualidad existe una gran necesidad de desarrollar métodos seguros, convenientes y económicamente viables para la degradación de éstas sustancias. La acción de los microorganismos d...

  20. Chemical Composition and Antifungal Effect of Echinophora platyloba Essential Oil against Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium expansum and Fusarium graminearum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammad Hashemi; Ali Ehsani; Asma Afshari; Majid Aminzare; Mojtaba Raeisi

    2016-01-01

    .... The essential oil composition of E. platyloba was analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and its antifungal effect was evaluated by disk diffusion and micro dilution methods...