WorldWideScience

Sample records for aspen trees final

  1. Genetic Augmentation of Syringyl Lignin in Low-lignin Aspen Trees, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung-Jui Tsai; Mark F. Davis; Vincent L. Chiang

    2004-11-10

    As a polysaccharide-encrusting component, lignin is critical to cell wall integrity and plant growth but also hinders recovery of cellulose fibers during the wood pulping process. To improve pulping efficiency, it is highly desirable to genetically modify lignin content and/or structure in pulpwood species to maximize pulp yields with minimal energy consumption and environmental impact. This project aimed to genetically augment the syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratio in low-lignin transgenic aspen in order to produce trees with reduced lignin content, more reactive lignin structures and increased cellulose content. Transgenic aspen trees with reduced lignin content have already been achieved, prior to the start of this project, by antisense downregulation of a 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase gene (Hu et al., 1999 Nature Biotechnol 17: 808- 812). The primary objective of this study was to genetically augment syringyl lignin biosynthesis in these low-lignin trees in order to enhance lignin reactivity during chemical pulping. To accomplish this, both aspen and sweetgum genes encoding coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase (Osakabe et al., 1999 PNAS 96: 8955-8960) were targeted for over-expression in wildtype or low-lignin aspen under control of either a constitutive or a xylem-specific promoter. A second objective for this project was to develop reliable and cost-effective methods, such as pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry and NMR, for rapid evaluation of cell wall chemical components of transgenic wood samples. With these high-throughput techniques, we observed increased syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratios in the transgenic wood samples, regardless of the promoter used or gene origin. Our results confirmed that the coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase gene is key to syringyl lignin biosynthesis. The outcomes of this research should be readily applicable to other pulpwood species, and promise to bring direct economic and environmental benefits to the pulp and paper industry.

  2. Inventory of aspen trees in spruce dominated stands in conservation area

    OpenAIRE

    Matti Maltamo; Annukka Pesonen; Lauri Korhonen; Jari Kouki; Mikko Vehmas; Kalle Eerikäinen

    2015-01-01

    Background The occurrence of aspen trees increases the conservation value of mature conifer dominated forests. Aspens typically occur as scattered individuals among major tree species, and therefore the inventory of aspens is challenging. Methods We characterized aspen populations in a boreal nature reserve using diameter distribution, spatial pattern, and forest attributes: volume, number of aspens, number of large aspen stems and basal area median diameter. The data were collecte...

  3. Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-04-15

    The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

  4. Differential response of aspen and birch trees to heat stress under elevated carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of high temperature on photosynthesis of isoprene-emitting (aspen) and non-isoprene-emitting (birch) trees were measured under elevated CO2 and ambient conditions. Aspen trees tolerated heat better than birch trees and elevated CO2 protected photosynthesis of both species against moderate heat stress. Elevated CO2 increased carboxylation capacity, photosynthetic electron transport capacity, and triose phosphate use in both birch and aspen trees. High temperature (36-39 deg. C) decreased all of these parameters in birch regardless of CO2 treatment, but only photosynthetic electron transport and triose phosphate use at ambient CO2 were reduced in aspen. Among the two aspen clones tested, 271 showed higher thermotolerance than 42E possibly because of the higher isoprene-emission, especially under elevated CO2. Our results indicate that isoprene-emitting trees may have a competitive advantage over non-isoprene emitting ones as temperatures rise, indicating that biological diversity may be affected in some ecosystems because of heat tolerance mechanisms. - We report that elevated CO2 confers increased thermotolerance on both aspen and birch trees while isoprene production in aspen confers further thermotolerance in aspen.

  5. Inventory of aspen trees in spruce dominated stands in conservation area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matti Maltamo; Annukka Pesonen; Lauri Korhonen; Jari Kouki; Mikko Vehmas; Kalle Eerikinen

    2015-01-01

    Background:The occurrence of aspen trees increases the conservation value of mature conifer dominated forests. Aspens typically occur as scattered individuals among major tree species, and therefore the inventory of aspens is challenging. Methods:We characterized aspen populations in a boreal nature reserve using diameter distribution, spatial pattern, and forest attributes:volume, number of aspens, number of large aspen stems and basal area median diameter. The data were collected from three separate forest stands in Koli National Park, eastern Finland. At each site, we measured breast height diameter and coordinates of each aspen. The comparison of inventory methods of aspens within the three stands was based on simulations with mapped field data. We mimicked stand level inventory by locating varying numbers of fixed area circular plots both systematically and randomly within the stands. Additionally, we also tested if the use of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data as auxiliary information would improve the accuracy of the stand level inventory by applying the probability proportional to size sampling to assist the selection of field plot locations. Results:The results showed that aspens were always clustered, and the diameter distributions indicated different stand structures in the three investigated forest stands. The reliability of the volume and number of large aspen trees varied from relative root mean square error figures above 50%with fewer sample plots (5–10) to values of 25%–50%with 10 or more sample plots. Stand level inventory estimates were also able to detect spatial pattern and the shape of the diameter distribution. In addition, ALS-based auxiliary information could be useful in guiding the inventories, but caution should be used when applying the ALS-supported inventory technique. Conclusions:This study characterized European aspen populations for the purposes of monitoring and management of boreal conservation areas. Our results suggest that

  6. Inventory of aspen trees in spruce dominated stands in conservation area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Maltamo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The occurrence of aspen trees increases the conservation value of mature conifer dominated forests. Aspens typically occur as scattered individuals among major tree species, and therefore the inventory of aspens is challenging. Methods We characterized aspen populations in a boreal nature reserve using diameter distribution, spatial pattern, and forest attributes: volume, number of aspens, number of large aspen stems and basal area median diameter. The data were collected from three separate forest stands in Koli National Park, eastern Finland. At each site, we measured breast height diameter and coordinates of each aspen. The comparison of inventory methods of aspens within the three stands was based on simulations with mapped field data. We mimicked stand level inventory by locating varying numbers of fixed area circular plots both systematically and randomly within the stands. Additionally, we also tested if the use of airborne laser scanning (ALS data as auxiliary information would improve the accuracy of the stand level inventory by applying the probability proportional to size sampling to assist the selection of field plot locations. Results The results showed that aspens were always clustered, and the diameter distributions indicated different stand structures in the three investigated forest stands. The reliability of the volume and number of large aspen trees varied from relative root mean square error figures above 50% with fewer sample plots (5–10 to values of 25%–50% with 10 or more sample plots. Stand level inventory estimates were also able to detect spatial pattern and the shape of the diameter distribution. In addition, ALS-based auxiliary information could be useful in guiding the inventories, but caution should be used when applying the ALS-supported inventory technique. Conclusions This study characterized European aspen populations for the purposes of monitoring and management of boreal conservation areas. Our

  7. Bioconcentration of zinc and cadmium in ectomycorrhizal fungi and associated aspen trees as affected by level of pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of Zn and Cd were measured in fruitbodies of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi and leaves of co-occurring accumulator aspen. Samples were taken on three metal-polluted sites and one control site. Fungal bioconcentration factors (BCF = fruitbody concentration: soil concentration) were calculated on the basis of total metal concentrations in surface soil horizons (BCFtot) and NH4NO3-extractable metal concentrations in mineral soil (BCFlab). When plotted on log-log scale, values of BCF decreased linearly with increasing soil metal concentrations. BCFlab for both Zn and Cd described the data more closely than BCFtot. Fungal genera differed in ZnBCF but not in CdBCF. The information on differences between fungi with respect to their predominant occurrence in different soil horizons did not improve relations of BCF with soil metal concentrations. Aspen trees accumulated Zn and Cd to similar concentrations as the ECM fungi. Apparently, the fungi did not act as an effective barrier against aspen metal uptake by retaining the metals. - Populus tremula and associated ectomycorrhizal fungi accumulate zinc and cadmium to similar concentrations

  8. Ecological interactions between herbivores and silver birch and aspen trees genetically modified for fungal disease resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Vihervuori , Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Many risks and environmental concerns have been linked with the cultivation of genetically modified (GM) trees. Among the most frequently mentioned risks are the unintentional/pleiotropic effects of transgenes on organisms or plant properties that are not the targets of genetic modification. Risks in forest ecosystems are difficult to predict, due to the long life cycles of trees and their complex ecological interactions. This thesis is focused on the interactions between insect and mammal he...

  9. Aspen Delineation - Aspen Delineation Project [ds362

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of aspen stands, where aspen assessment data was gathered. Aspen assessment information corresponding to this polygon layer can...

  10. Conservation and yield aspects of old European aspen Populus tremula L. in Swedish forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazell, Per [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Management and Products

    1999-06-01

    Biodiversity issues are becoming integrated parts of Swedish forest management. In this context, the amount and distribution of broadleaved species, including aspen, are important. This thesis summarises results of two studies in which species from the rich epiphytic flora on aspen were used to evaluate important features of aspens, and two studies relating these features to production losses due to retention of aspen. The presence and abundance of four epiphytic, bark-living bryophytes in relation to stand and host-tree characteristics, were investigated in four mixed forest stands in central Sweden. There was no general and consistent relation between aspen density and bryophyte presence. Large diameter and rough bark of the aspen host, together with site factors and stand density around the host, were important. On 35 clearfelled areas, the bryophyte Antitrichia curtipendula (Hedw.) Brid. and the lichen Lobaria pulmonaria (L.) Hoffm., species considered sensitive to clearfelling, were transplanted on retained aspen stems. As a reference, transplants were made on aspens in adjacent old stands. After two years the bryophyte showed its highest vitality in the forest, but was also vigorous on the north side of retained trees. The lichen thrived best on the clearfelled areas, on the north side of trees retained in groups. For conservation purposes, aspen are best retained in groups. Qualitative and quantitative aspects of retained large aspens (diameter 49.6{+-}7.0 cm and height 29.4{+-}1.0 m) were studied in a 110-year-old aspen stand. Twelve trees were destructively analysed to establish allometric equations relating stem, bark and branch biomass and current annual stem increment (CAI{sub s}) to diameter at breast height. Biomass of the mean tree was 1172 kg, of which 80% was stemwood. CAI{sub s} was 1.5% of total stem biomass. Finally, the yield of a 44-year-old Norway spruce stand under an aspen overstorey was compared with that of pure Norway spruce, estimated

  11. Initial soil respiration response to biomass harvesting and green-tree retention in aspen-dominated forests of the Great Lakes region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Valerie J.; Bradford, John B.; Slesak, Robert A.; D'Amato, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary forest management practices are increasingly designed to optimize novel objectives, such as maximizing biomass feedstocks and/or maintaining ecological legacies, but many uncertainties exist regarding how these practices influence forest carbon (C) cycling. We examined the responses of soil respiration (Rs) to biomass harvesting and green-tree retention in an effort to empirically assess their impacts on C cycling. We measured Rs and soil microclimatic variables over four growing seasons following implementation of these management practices using a fully replicated, operational-scale experiment in aspen-dominated forests in northern Minnesota. Treatments included three levels of biomass removal within harvested areas: whole-tree harvest (no slash deliberately retained), 20% slash retained, and stem-only harvest (all slash retained), and two levels of green-tree retention: 0.1 ha aggregate or none. The relative amount of biomass removed had a negligible effect on Rs in harvested areas, but treatment effects were probably obscured by heterogeneous slash configurations and rapid post-harvest regeneration of aspen in all of the treatments. Discrete measurements of Rs and soil temperature within green-tree aggregates were not discernible from surrounding harvested areas or unharvested control stands until the fourth year following harvest, when Rs was higher in unharvested controls than in aggregates and harvested stands. Growing season estimates of Rs showed that unharvested control stands had higher Rs than both harvested stands and aggregates in the first and third years following harvest. Our results suggest that retention of larger forest aggregates may be necessary to maintain ecosystem-level responses similar to those in unharvested stands. Moreover, they highlight the innate complexity of operational-scale research and suggest that the initial impacts of biomass harvest on Rs may be indiscernible from traditional harvest in systems where incidental

  12. Aspen Characteristics - Aspen Delineation Project [ds361

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected within aspen stands in the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit (Placer and...

  13. Characterization of PTM5 in aspen trees: a MADS-box gene expressed during woody vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseke, Leland J; Zheng, Jun; Podila, Gopi K

    2003-10-30

    The vascular component of trees possesses some of the most specialized processes active in the formation of roots, stems, and branches, and its wood component continues to be of primary importance to our daily lives. The molecular mechanisms of wood development, however, remain poorly understood with few well-characterized regulatory genes. We have identified a vascular tissue-specific MADS-box gene, Populus tremuloides MADS-box 5 (PTM5) that is expressed in differentiating primary and secondary xylem and phloem. Phylogenetic analysis has shown that PTM5 is a member of the SOC1/TM3 class of MADS-box genes. Temporal expression analysis of PTM5 in staged vascular cambium and other tissues indicated that PTM5 expression is seasonal and is limited to spring wood formation and rapidly expanding floral catkins. Spatial expression analysis using in situ hybridization revealed that PTM5 expression is localized within a few layers of differentiating vascular cambium and xylem tissues as well as the vascular bundles of expanding catkins. Since many MADS-box genes are known to act as transcription factors, these results suggest that the coordinated expression of PTM5 with other vascular developmental genes may be a hallmark of the complex events that lead to the formation of the woody plant body. PMID:14585498

  14. ptr-MIR169 is a posttranscriptional repressor of PtrHAP2 during vegetative bud dormancy period of aspen (Populus tremuloides) trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potkar, Rewati; Recla, Jill [School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Busov, Victor, E-mail: vbusov@mtu.edu [School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► We show a novel microRNA-mediated mechanism for control of bud dormancy in trees. ► ptr-MIR169a and PtrHAP2–5 gene showed inverse expression during dormancy period. ► The PtrHAP2–5 decline in abundance correlated with high ptr-MIR169a levels. ► PtrHAP2–5 cleavage occurred at the miR169 site during PtrHAP2–5 transcript decline. ► Our results show that miR169 attenuates PtrHAP2–5 transcript during dormancy. -- Abstract: Dormancy is a mechanism evolved in woody perennial plants to survive the winter freezing and dehydration stress via temporary suspension of growth. We have identified two aspen microRNAs (ptr-MIR169a and ptr-MIR169h) which were highly and specifically expressed in dormant floral and vegetative buds. ptr-MIR169a and its target gene PtrHAP2–5 showed inverse expression patterns during the dormancy period. ptr-MIR169a transcript steadily increased through the first half of the dormancy period and gradually declined with the approach of active growing season. PtrHAP2–5 abundance was higher in the beginning of the dormancy period but rapidly declined thereafter. The decline of PtrHAP2–5 correlated with the high levels of ptr-MIR169a accumulation, suggesting miR169-mediated attenuation of the target PtrHAP2–5 transcript. We experimentally verified the cleavage of PtrHAP2–5 at the predicted miR169a site at the time when PtrHAP2–5 transcript decline was observed. HAP2 is a subunit of a nuclear transcription factor Y (NF-Y) complex consisting of two other units, HAP3 and HAP5. Using digital expression profiling we show that poplar HAP2 and HAP5 are preferentially detected in dormant tissues. Our study shows that microRNAs play a significant and as of yet unknown and unstudied role in regulating the timing of bud dormancy in trees.

  15. Are wolves saving Yellowstone's aspen? A landscape-level test of a behaviorally mediated trophic cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Matthew J; Brodie, Jedediah F; Jules, Erik S

    2010-09-01

    Behaviorally mediated trophic cascades (BMTCs) occur when the fear of predation among herbivores enhances plant productivity. Based primarily on systems involving small-bodied predators, BMTCs have been proposed as both strong and ubiquitous in natural ecosystems. Recently, however, synthetic work has suggested that the existence of BMTCs may be mediated by predator hunting mode, whereby passive (sit-and-wait) predators have much stronger effects than active (coursing) predators. One BMTC that has been proposed for a wide-ranging active predator system involves the reintroduction of wolves (Canis lupus) to Yellowstone National Park, USA, which is thought to be leading to a recovery of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) by causing elk (Cervus elaphus) to avoid foraging in risky areas. Although this BMTC has been generally accepted and highly popularized, it has never been adequately tested. We assessed whether wolves influence aspen by obtaining detailed demographic data on aspen Stands using tree rings and by monitoring browsing levels in experimental elk exclosures arrayed across a gradient of predation risk for three years. Our study demonstrates that the historical failure of aspen to regenerate varied widely among stands (last recruitment year ranged from 1892 to 1956), and our data do not indicate an abrupt cessation of recruitment. This pattern of recruitment failure appears more consistent with a gradual increase in elk numbers rather than a rapid behavioral shift in elk foraging following wolf extirpation. In addition, our estimates of relative survivorship of young browsable aspen indicate that aspen are not currently recovering in Yellowstone, even in the presence of a large wolf population. Finally, in an experimental test of the BMTC hypothesis we found that the impacts of elk browsing on aspen demography are not diminished in sites where elk are at higher risk of predation by wolves. These findings suggest the need to further evaluate how trophic

  16. Are wolves saving Yellowstone's aspen? A landscape-level test of a behaviorally mediated trophic cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Matthew J.; Brodie, Jedediah F.; Jules, Erik S.

    2010-01-01

    Behaviorally mediated trophic cascades (BMTCs) occur when the fear of predation among herbivores enhances plant productivity. Based primarily on systems involving small-bodied predators, BMTCs have been proposed as both strong and ubiquitous in natural ecosystems. Recently, however, synthetic work has suggested that the existence of BMTCs may be mediated by predator hunting mode, whereby passive (sit-and-wait) predators have much stronger effects than active (coursing) predators. One BMTC that has been proposed for a wide-ranging active predator system involves the reintroduction of wolves (Canis lupus) to Yellowstone National Park, USA, which is thought to be leading to a recovery of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) by causing elk (Cervus elaphus) to avoid foraging in risky areas. Although this BMTC has been generally accepted and highly popularized, it has never been adequately tested. We assessed whether wolves influence aspen by obtaining detailed demographic data on aspen stands using tree rings and by monitoring browsing levels in experimental elk exclosures arrayed across a gradient of predation risk for three years. Our study demonstrates that the historical failure of aspen to regenerate varied widely among stands (last recruitment year ranged from 1892 to 1956), and our data do not indicate an abrupt cessation of recruitment. This pattern of recruitment failure appears more consistent with a gradual increase in elk numbers rather than a rapid behavioral shift in elk foraging following wolf extirpation. In addition, our estimates of relative survivorship of young browsable aspen indicate that aspen are not currently recovering in Yellowstone, even in the presence of a large wolf population. Finally, in an experimental test of the BMTC hypothesis we found that the impacts of elk browsing on aspen demography are not diminished in sites where elk are at higher risk of predation by wolves. These findings suggest the need to further evaluate how trophic

  17. Detection of Aspens Using High Resolution Aerial Laser Scanning Data and Digital Aerial Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Eerikäinen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to use high resolution Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS data and aerial images to detect European aspen (Populus tremula L. from among other deciduous trees. The field data consisted of 14 sample plots of 30 m × 30 m size located in the Koli National Park in the North Karelia, Eastern Finland. A Canopy Height Model (CHM was interpolated from the ALS data with a pulse density of 3.86/m2, low-pass filtered using Height-Based Filtering (HBF and binarized to create the mask needed to separate the ground pixels from the canopy pixels within individual areas. Watershed segmentation was applied to the low-pass filtered CHM in order to create preliminary canopy segments, from which the non-canopy elements were extracted to obtain the final canopy segmentation, i.e. the ground mask was analysed against the canopy mask. A manual classification of aerial images was employed to separate the canopy segments of deciduous trees from those of coniferous trees. Finally, linear discriminant analysis was applied to the correctly classified canopy segments of deciduous trees to classify them into segments belonging to aspen and those belonging to other deciduous trees. The independent variables used in the classification were obtained from the first pulse ALS point data. The accuracy of discrimination between aspen and other deciduous trees was 78.6%. The independent variables in the classification function were the proportion of vegetation hits, the standard deviation of in pulse heights, accumulated intensity at the 90th percentile and the proportion of laser points reflected at the 60th height percentile. The accuracy of classification corresponded to the validation results of earlier ALS-based studies on the classification of individual deciduous trees to tree species.

  18. Polyploidy in aspen alters plant physiology and drought sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, B.; Still, C. J.; Brooks, J. R.; Meinzer, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    Polyploids of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) may be better suited to dry climatic conditions than diploids. However, the expression of diploid and polyploid functional traits, including water use efficiency, an important component of drought avoidance and tolerance, are not well understood in quaking aspen. In this study diploid and triploid aspen clones' leaf, ramet, and stand functional traits were measured near the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Gothic, Colorado. The physiology of diploid and triploid aspen, including leaf size, chlorophyll content, stomatal size and density and stomatal conductance, as well as growth rates and carbon isotope discrimination in response to climate (measured in tree rings), were found to be significantly different between ploidy levels. These findings demonstrate different sensitivities of diploid and triploid clones to drought related climate stressors which may impact strategies for aspen forest management and conservation.

  19. Aspen management for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, S.; Chapman, P.B. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    A symposium was held to discuss the management of the aspen resource for fiber and other uses, along with public concerns regarding the aspen resource. Papers were presented on aspen regeneration, the role of balsam poplar, aspen inventory, modelling aspen growth and yield, aspen harvesting, aspen management and the environment, integrated resource management, wildlife and aspen management, genetic improvement of poplars, aspen stand thinning, sustainable development of the aspen resource, private land forestry, and the effect of climate change on aspen in Canada. A separate abstract has been prepared for one paper from this symposium.

  20. Ruffed grouse feeding behavior and its relationship to secondary metabolites of quaking aspen flower buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubas, W J; Gullion, G W; Clausen, T P

    1989-06-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) staminate flower buds and the extended catkins are primary food resources for ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus). Winter feeding observations indicate that ruffed grouse select specific trees or clones of quaking aspen to feed in. Flower buds and catkins of quaking aspen were analyzed for secondary compounds (tannins, alkaloids, and phenolics) that might cause ruffed grouse to avoid trees with high levels of these compounds. Coniferyl benzoate, a compound that has not been previously found in quaking aspen, exists in significantly higher concentrations in buds from trees with no feeding history as compared to ruffed grouse feeding trees. Aspen catkins were also significantly lower in coniferyl benzoate than buds from the same tree. Ruffed grouse feeding preference was not related to the tannin or total phenolic levels found in buds or catkins. Buds from feeding trees had higher protein levels than trees with no feeding history; however, catkins did not differ from buds in protein concentration. The high use of extended catkins in the spring by ruffed grouse is probably due to a lower percentage of bud scale material in the catkin as opposed to the dormant bud. Bud scales contain almost all of the nontannin phenolics in catkins and dormant buds. A feeding strategy where bud scales are avoided may exist for other bird species that feed on quaking aspen. Dormant flower buds are significantly lower in protein-precipitable tannins than catkins and differ in secondary metabolite composition from other aspen foliage. PMID:24272191

  1. Elevated Rocky Mountain elk numbers prevent positive effects of fire on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David Solance; Fettig, Stephen M.; Bowker, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) is the most widespread tree species in North America and has supported a unique ecosystem for tens of thousands of years, yet is currently threatened by dramatic loss and possible local extinctions. While multiple factors such as climate change and fire suppression are thought to contribute to aspen’s decline, increased browsing by elk (Cervus elaphus), which have experienced dramatic population increases in the last ∼80 years, may severely inhibit aspen growth and regeneration. Fires are known to favor aspen recovery, but in the last several decades the spatial scale and intensity of wildfires has greatly increased, with poorly understood ramifications for aspen growth. Here, focusing on the 2000 Cerro Grande fire in central New Mexico – one of the earliest fires described as a “mega-fire” - we use three methods to examine the impact of elk browsing on aspen regeneration after a mega-fire. First, we use an exclosure experiment to show that aspen growing in the absence of elk were 3× taller than trees growing in the presence of elk. Further, aspen that were both protected from elk and experienced burning were 8.5× taller than unburned trees growing in the presence of elk, suggesting that the combination of release from herbivores and stimulation from fire creates the largest aspen growth rates. Second, using surveys at the landscape level, we found a correlation between elk browsing intensity and aspen height, such that where elk browsing was highest, aspen were shortest. This relationship between elk browsing intensity and aspen height was stronger in burned (r = −0.53) compared to unburned (r = −0.24) areas. Third, in conjunction with the landscape-level surveys, we identified possible natural refugia, microsites containing downed logs, shrubs etc. that may inhibit elk browsing by physically blocking aspen from elk or by impeding elk’s ability to move through the forest patch. We did not find any

  2. Long-term monitoring of western aspen--lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, E K; Bunting, S C; Starcevich, L A; Nahorniak, M T; Dicus, G; Garrett, L K

    2015-08-01

    Aspen woodland is an important ecosystem in the western United States. Aspen is currently declining in western mountains; stressors include conifer expansion due to fire suppression, drought, disease, heavy wildlife and livestock use, and human development. Forecasting of tree species distributions under future climate scenarios predicts severe losses of western aspen within the next 50 years. As a result, aspen has been selected as one of 14 vital signs for long-term monitoring by the National Park Service Upper Columbia Basin Network. This article describes the development of a monitoring protocol for aspen including inventory mapping, selection of sampling locations, statistical considerations, a method for accounting for spatial dependence, field sampling strategies, and data management. We emphasize the importance of collecting pilot data for use in statistical power analysis and semi-variogram analysis prior to protocol implementation. Given the spatial and temporal variability within aspen stem size classes, we recommend implementing permanent plots that are distributed spatially within and among stands. Because of our careful statistical design, we were able to detect change between sampling periods with desired confidence and power. Engaging a protocol development and implementation team with necessary and complementary knowledge and skills is critical for success. Besides the project leader, we engaged field sampling personnel, GIS specialists, statisticians, and a data management specialist. We underline the importance of frequent communication with park personnel and network coordinators. PMID:26215826

  3. Aspen Delineation - Inyo National Forest [ds366

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of known aspen stands where aspen assessments were collected in the Inyo National Forest, Inyo County, California. The Inyo...

  4. Aspen Delineation - Klamath National Forest [ds370

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents polygons of aspen stands in the Klamath National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. The Klamath National Forest Region 5 Vegetation aspen...

  5. Examining mechanisms in the final stages of the elimination of boreal tree species on vulnerable sites in boreal Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, G. P.; Jess, R.; Alix, C. M.; Verbyla, D.

    2015-12-01

    The boreal forest of Alaska and western Canada exist in a complex mosaic of environments determined by elevation, aspect of exposure, and longitudinal and latitudinal gradients of change from warm, dry continental to maritime-influenced conditions. This forest region is largely made up of trees with two growth responses to temperature increases. Trees that decrease in growth are termed negative responders, and occupy warm, dry sites at low elevations. Trees that increase in radial growth are termed positive responders, and are largely in western Alaska, and at high elevation of the Brooks and Alaska Ranges. Since the Pacific climate regime shift of the 1970s, mature trees at low elevation sites have experienced increasing climate stress in several quasi-decadal cycles of intensifying drought stress. NDVI trends and tree ring records demonstrating radial growth decline are coherent. Phenological monitoring of spruce height growth also indicates that depletion of spring soil moisture is a critical process driven by the interaction of early warm season temperatures and precipitation. Novel biotic disturbance agents including spruce budworm, outbreaks of which are triggered by warm temperature anomalies related to its biology, and aspen leaf miner are depressing realized growth below climatically predicted levels, suggesting a pathway by which tree death is likely to occur before absolute temperature limits. As a result, insect outbreaks are degrading the otherwise strong long-term climate signal in Alaska boreal trees. However, young tree (> 40 yrs.) regeneration generally does not yet display the symptoms of acute high temperature stress. Overall, on these vulnerable sites, if temperature increases similar to the past 40 years continue, long term survival prospects are questionable because the climate conditions would be outside the limits that have historically defined the species ranges of aspen, Alaska birch, and black and white spruce.

  6. Contrasting the patterns of aspen forest and sagebrush shrubland gross ecosystem exchange in montane Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, A.; Flerchinger, G. N.; Seyfried, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the environmental controls on Gross Ecosystem Exchange (GEE) at an aspen forest and a sagebrush shrubland in southwest Idaho. The two sites were situated within a mosaic of vegetation that included temperate deciduous trees, shrublands, and evergreen conifer trees. The distribution of vegetation was presumably linked to water availability; aspen were located in wetter high-elevations sites, topographic drainages, or near snow drifts. Local temperatures have increased by ~2-3 °C over the past 50 years and less precipitation has arrived as snow. These ongoing changes in weather may impact snow water redistribution, plant-water availability, and plant-thermal stress, with associated impacts on vegetation health and production. We used eddy covariance to measure the exchange of water and carbon dioxide above the two sites and partitioned the net carbon flux to determine GEE. The sagebrush record was from 2003-2007 and the aspen record was from 2007-12. The region experienced a modest-to-severe drought in 2007, with ~73% of typical precipitation. We found that aspen were local "hotspots" for carbon exchange; peak rates of aspen GEE were ~ 60% greater than the peak rates of sagebrush GEE. Light, temperature, and water availability were dominant controls on the seasonality of GEE at both sites. Sagebrush and aspen were dormant during winter, limited by cold temperatures during winter and early spring, and water availability during mid-late summer. The onset of summer drought was typically later in the aspen than in the sagebrush. Drifting snow, lateral water redistribution, or increased rooting depths may have increased water availability in the aspen stand. Seasonal patterns of observed soil moisture and evaporation indicated aspen were rooted to >= 1 m. The sagebrush and aspen both responded strongly to the 2007 drought; peak GEE decreased by ~75%, peak GEE shifted to earlier parts of the year, and mid-summer GEE was decreased. We consider potential

  7. Continental-scale assessment of genetic diversity and population structure in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides)

    OpenAIRE

    Callahan, Colin M.; Rowe, Carol A.; Ryel, Ronald J.; Shaw, John D.; Madritch, Michael D.; Mock, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) has the largest natural distribution of any tree native to North America. The primary objectives of this study were to characterize range-wide genetic diversity and genetic structuring in quaking aspen, and to assess the influence of glacial history and rear-edge dynamics. Location: North America. Methods: Using a sample set representing the full longitudinal and latitudinal extent of the species’ distribution, we examined geographical patterns o...

  8. Aspen Delineation - Lassen National Forest [ds372

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of aspen stands associated with stand assessment data (LASSEN_NF_EAGLELAKE_PTS) collected in aspen stands in the in the Eagle...

  9. Aspen Delineation - Sierra State Parks [ds380

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of aspen stands associated with stand assessment data (SIERRA_SP_PTS) collected in aspen stands on lands administered by the...

  10. Aspen Delineation - Plumas National Forest [ds374

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of aspen stands associated with stand assessment data (PLUMAS_NF_PTS) collected in aspen stands in the Plumas National Forest,...

  11. Aspen Delineation - Sequoia National Forest [ds378

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of aspen stands associated with stand assessment data (SEQUOIA_NF_PTS) collected in aspen stands in the Cannell Meadows Ranger...

  12. Aspen Fire, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    On June 26, NASA's Terra satellite acquired this image of the Aspen fire burning out of control north of Tucson, AZ. As of that date, the fire had consumed more than 27,000 acres and destroyed more than 300 homes, mostly in the resort community of Summerhaven, according to news reports. These data are being used by NASA's Wildfire Response Team and the US Forest Service to assess the intensity of the burn for future remediation efforts.This image was acquired on June 26, 2003 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on Terra. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA, is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide

  13. Radiation regime and canopy architecture in a boreal aspen forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was part of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS). It took place in a mature aspen forest in Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada. The aspen trees were 21.5 m high with a 2–3 m high hazelnut understory. The objectives were: (1) to compare the radiation regime beneath the overstory before and after leaf emergence; (2) to infer the structural characteristics of the aspen canopy leaf inclination and clumping; (3) to determine the seasonal course of the leaf area index (L) for both the overstory and understory. Above-stand radiation measurements were made on a 39m walk-up tower, and understory radiation measurements were made on a tram which moved horizontally back and forth at 0.10 m s−1 on a pair of steel cables 65m in length suspended 4 m above the ground. In addition, several LI-COR LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzers were used to determine the effective leaf area index and the zenith angle dependent extinction coefficient (G(θ)) for both the aspen and the hazelnut throughout the growing season. These measurements were supplemented with destructive sampling of the hazelnut at the peak of the growing season. Before leaf emergence, the ratios of below- to above-aspen solar radiation (S), photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and net radiation (Rn) during most of the day were 0.58, 0.55 and 0.47, respectively. By midsummer, these ratios had fallen to 0.33, 0.26 and 0.26, respectively. The aspen G(θ) was relatively invariant with θ, within ±0.05 of 0.5 throughout the growing season, indicating a spherical distribution of leaf inclination angles (i.e. the leaves were randomly inclined). The hazelnut G(θ) has a cosine response with respect to θ, which was consistent with the generally planophile leaf distribution for hazelnut. Using canopy gap size distribution theories developed by Chen and Black (1992b, Agric. For. Meteorol., 60: 249–266) and Chen and Cihlar (1995a, Appl. Opt., 34: 6211–6222) based on Miller and Norman

  14. Study of Regenerated Plants Aspen from Callus

    OpenAIRE

    G. A. PETROVA; Kalashnikova, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of an experiment for obtaining healthy seed aspen by micropropagation. The studies we have obtained from callus tissue regenerated plants aspen, various different growth rate. Were obtained two types of plants: plants, characterized by rapid growth and plants, which are characterized by slow growth. The data of biochemical studies on the content of soluble phenolic compounds in plants regenerated aspen. So plants with rapid growth during the five passages, th...

  15. Aspen Characteristics - Sierra State Parks [ds379

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected within aspen stands on lands administrated by the Sierra District, California...

  16. Aspen Characteristics - Plumas National Forest [ds373

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected within aspen stands in the Plumas National Forest, Beckwourth Ranger District...

  17. Aspen Characteristics - Sequoia National Forest [ds377

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected within aspen stands in the Cannell Meadows Ranger District, Sequoia National...

  18. Aspen Characteristics - Klamath National Forest [ds369

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected with known aspen stands in the Klamath National Forest, Siskiyou County,...

  19. Genetic variation in functional traits influences arthropod community composition in aspen (Populus tremula L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Robinson

    Full Text Available We conducted a study of natural variation in functional leaf traits and herbivory in 116 clones of European aspen, Populus tremula L., the Swedish Aspen (SwAsp collection, originating from ten degrees of latitude across Sweden and grown in a common garden. In surveys of phytophagous arthropods over two years, we found the aspen canopy supports nearly 100 morphospecies. We identified significant broad-sense heritability of plant functional traits, basic plant defence chemistry, and arthropod community traits. The majority of arthropods were specialists, those coevolved with P. tremula to tolerate and even utilize leaf defence compounds. Arthropod abundance and richness were more closely related to plant growth rates than general chemical defences and relationships were identified between the arthropod community and stem growth, leaf and petiole morphology, anthocyanins, and condensed tannins. Heritable genetic variation in plant traits in young aspen was found to structure arthropod community; however no single trait drives the preferences of arthropod folivores among young aspen genotypes. The influence of natural variation in plant traits on the arthropod community indicates the importance of maintaining genetic variation in wild trees as keystone species for biodiversity. It further suggests that aspen can be a resource for the study of mechanisms of natural resistance to herbivores.

  20. Aspen Delineation - El Dorado National Forest [ds364

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of known aspen stands, where aspen assessments were gathered in the Eldorado National Forest, Eldorado and Amador Counties,...

  1. Aspen Delineation - Klamath National Forest, EUI [ds368

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of known aspen stands where aspen assessments were collected in the Klamath National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. The...

  2. The efficacy of six elite isolates of the fungus Chondrostereum purpureum against the sprouting of European aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberg, Leena; Hantula, Jarkko

    2016-04-15

    The sprouting of broad-leaved trees after cutting is problematic in forest regeneration areas, along roads and railways, under electric power and above gas pipe lines. In Finland, one of the most difficult species to control in these areas is the European aspen (Populus tremula), which produces both stump sprouts and root suckers after saplings have been cut. In this study, we investigated whether a decay fungus of broad-leaved trees, Chondrostereum purpureum, could be used as a biological control agent against aspen sprouting. The efficacy of six elite strains of C. purpureum (improved earlier in a breeding process) was investigated on aspen for three years. The most efficient C. purpureum strain, R53, tested earlier on birch (Betula pendula and B. pubescens), was efficient in causing mortality of aspen stumps and preventing the development of root suckers. With this strain, stump mortality was 78%, while significantly lower in control stumps which were cut only (47%). Aspen trees in the vicinity of the treatments (within a 10 m radius around each sapling) decreased the efficacy of C. purpureum. This study shows that the decay fungus C. purpureum can successfully be used in the sprout control of aspen saplings. PMID:26899306

  3. Forest stand structure, productivity, and age mediate climatic effects on aspen decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Because forest stand structure, age, and productivity can mediate the impacts of climate on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality, ignoring stand-scale factors limits inference on the drivers of recent sudden aspen decline. Using the proportion of aspen trees that were dead as an index of recent mortality at 841 forest inventory plots, we examined the relationship of this mortality index to forest structure and climate in the Rocky Mountains and Intermountain Western United States. We found that forest structure explained most of the patterns in mortality indices, but that variation in growing-season vapor pressure deficit and winter precipitation over the last 20 years was important. Mortality index sensitivity to precipitation was highest in forests where aspen exhibited high densities, relative basal areas, quadratic mean diameters, and productivities, whereas sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit was highest in young forest stands. These results indicate that the effects of drought on mortality may be mediated by forest stand development, competition with encroaching conifers, and physiological vulnerabilities of large trees to drought. By examining mortality index responses to both forest structure and climate, we show that forest succession cannot be ignored in studies attempting to understand the causes and consequences of sudden aspen decline.

  4. New dimension analyses with error analysis for quaking aspen and black spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, K. D.; Botkin, D. B.; Feiveson, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    Dimension analysis for black spruce in wetland stands and trembling aspen are reported, including new approaches in error analysis. Biomass estimates for sacrificed trees have standard errors of 1 to 3%; standard errors for leaf areas are 10 to 20%. Bole biomass estimation accounts for most of the error for biomass, while estimation of branch characteristics and area/weight ratios accounts for the leaf area error. Error analysis provides insight for cost effective design of future analyses. Predictive equations for biomass and leaf area, with empirically derived estimators of prediction error, are given. Systematic prediction errors for small aspen trees and for leaf area of spruce from different site-types suggest a need for different predictive models within species. Predictive equations are compared with published equations; significant differences may be due to species responses to regional or site differences. Proportional contributions of component biomass in aspen change in ways related to tree size and stand development. Spruce maintains comparatively constant proportions with size, but shows changes corresponding to site. This suggests greater morphological plasticity of aspen and significance for spruce of nutrient conditions.

  5. Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Henri

    2016-01-01

    An algebraic formalism, developped with V.~Glaser and R.~Stora for the study of the generalized retarded functions of quantum field theory, is used to prove a factorization theorem which provides a complete description of the generalized retarded functions associated with any tree graph. Integrating over the variables associated to internal vertices to obtain the perturbative generalized retarded functions for interacting fields arising from such graphs is shown to be possible for a large category of space-times.

  6. Wood Quality and Growth Characterization across Intra- and Inter-Specific Hybrid Aspen Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn D. Mansfield

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx. is one of the most abundant poplar species in North America; it is native, displays substantial breadth in distribution inhabiting several geographical and climatic ecoregions, is notable for its rapid growth, and is ecologically and economically important. As the demand for raw material continues to increase rapidly, there is a pressing need to improve both tree quality and growth rates via breeding efforts. Hybridization is considered one of the most promising options to simultaneously accelerate these tree characteristics, as it takes advantage of heterosis. Two aspen species showing particular promise for hybridization with trembling aspen are European aspen (P. tremula and Chinese aspen (P. davidiana because their native climates are similar to that of P. tremuloides and are also very easy to hybridize. In 2003, aspen clones were planted in Athabasca, Alberta from the following species crosses: open pollinated (OP P. tremuloides (NN, OP P. davidiana (CC, P. tremula × P. tremula (EE, P. tremula × P. tremuloides (EN, and P. tremuloides × P. davidiana (CN. In November 2010, growth measurements and core samples were taken from seven-year field grown clones. Comparisons of the mean growth and cell wall traits were made between crosses using generalized linear model least squares means tests for stem volume, fiber length, fiber width, coarseness, wood density, microfibril angle, total cell wall carbohydrate and lignin content, and lignin composition. The results clearly indicated that the inter-specific crosses offer a means to breed for more desirable wood characteristics than the intra-specific Populus spp. crosses.

  7. The yield of natural trembling aspen (populus tremula L.) stands (northern and eastern anatolia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trembling aspen (Populus tremula L.) is one of the most resistant to cold natural species in Turkey. In spite of its importance, there is no research on the yield. Hence, site productivity was determined and yield Table for undisturbed natural trembling aspen stands in Turkey was developed. Data were obtained from a total of 46 plots ranging in age from 17 to 82 years. Yield Table indicates that trembling aspen is very slow growing in young and middle age and Current Annual Increment (CAI) and Mean Annual Increment (MAI) values do not reach its maximum value, even at age 70. This is a proof that trembling aspen is not a fast growing species as expected. The reason for its slow growth is attributed to very short period of growth at very high altitudes. However, in the event of 50 years rotation age, mean annual volume increments of 8.0, 3.6 and 1.1 m3 are estimated for trembling aspen for site classes I, II and III, respectively. At extended rotations, trees of pole sizes could be obtained on all site classes. (author)

  8. Aspen Characteristics - Lassen National Forest [ds371

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected in aspen stands in the in the Eagle Lake Ranger District, Lassen National...

  9. Models for the distribution of quaking aspen in geographic and potential evapotranspiration spaces relevant to the Book Cliffs (Utah), 2000-2002

    OpenAIRE

    Sexton, Joseph O.

    2003-01-01

    Quaking aspen is the most widely distributed tree species in North America and an asset to sociological, ecological, and hydrological land values in the western United States. In recognition of these values, land managers seek means to oppose a regional decline of aspen in the Intermountain West—a decline apparently in progress since the close of the Pleistocene and driven by climate change, fire suppression, and increasing ungulate densities. One location of special relevance to this decline...

  10. You can save your trees from dwarf mistletoe. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawksworth, F.G.; Johnson, D.W.

    1993-03-01

    The information in the booklet will enable you to identify dwarf mistletoe infestation, treat affected trees, and minimize the spread of the parasite into healthy trees. A list of tree species that are resistant to dwarf mistletoes is provided.

  11. A simple and efficient transient transformation for hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × P. tremuloides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takata Naoki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Populus is accepted as a model system for molecular tree biology. To investigate gene functions in Populus spp. trees, generating stable transgenic lines is the common technique for functional genetic studies. However, a limited number of genes have been targeted due to the lengthy transgenic process. Transient transformation assays complementing stable transformation have significant advantages for rapid in vivo assessment of gene function. The aim of this study is to develop a simple and efficient transient transformation for hybrid aspen and to provide its potential applications for functional genomic approaches. Results We developed an in planta transient transformation assay for young hybrid aspen cuttings using Agrobacterium-mediated vacuum infiltration. The transformation conditions such as the infiltration medium, the presence of a surfactant, the phase of bacterial growth and bacterial density were optimized to achieve a higher transformation efficiency in young aspen leaves. The Agrobacterium infiltration assay successfully transformed various cell types in leaf tissues. Intracellular localization of four aspen genes was confirmed in homologous Populus spp. using fusion constructs with the green fluorescent protein. Protein-protein interaction was detected in transiently co-transformed cells with bimolecular fluorescence complementation technique. In vivo promoter activity was monitored over a few days in aspen cuttings that were transformed with luciferase reporter gene driven by a circadian clock promoter. Conclusions The Agrobacterium infiltration assay developed here is a simple and enhanced throughput method that requires minimum handling and short transgenic process. This method will facilitate functional analyses of Populus genes in a homologous plant system.

  12. Aspen Delineation - Plumas National Forest, FRRD [ds376

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of aspen stands associated with stand assessment data (PLUMAS_NF_FEATHERRIVER_PTS) collected in aspen stands in the Plumas...

  13. Bryophyte species richness on retention aspens recovers in time but community structure does not.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oldén

    Full Text Available Green-tree retention is a forest management method in which some living trees are left on a logged area. The aim is to offer 'lifeboats' to support species immediately after logging and to provide microhabitats during and after forest re-establishment. Several studies have shown immediate decline in bryophyte diversity after retention logging and thus questioned the effectiveness of this method, but longer term studies are lacking. Here we studied the epiphytic bryophytes on European aspen (Populus tremula L. retention trees along a 30-year chronosequence. We compared the bryophyte flora of 102 'retention aspens' on 14 differently aged retention sites with 102 'conservation aspens' on 14 differently aged conservation sites. We used a Bayesian community-level modelling approach to estimate the changes in bryophyte species richness, abundance (area covered and community structure during 30 years after logging. Using the fitted model, we estimated that two years after logging both species richness and abundance of bryophytes declined, but during the following 20-30 years both recovered to the level of conservation aspens. However, logging-induced changes in bryophyte community structure did not fully recover over the same time period. Liverwort species showed some or low potential to benefit from lifeboating and high potential to re-colonise as time since logging increases. Most moss species responded similarly, but two cushion-forming mosses benefited from the logging disturbance while several weft- or mat-forming mosses declined and did not re-colonise in 20-30 years. We conclude that retention trees do not function as equally effective lifeboats for all bryophyte species but are successful in providing suitable habitats for many species in the long-term. To be most effective, retention cuts should be located adjacent to conservation sites, which may function as sources of re-colonisation and support the populations of species that require old

  14. Aspen biology, community classification, and management in the Blue Mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, David K; Schmitt, Craig L; Shirley, Diane M; Erickson, Vicky; Schuetz, Kenneth J; Tatum, Michael L; Powell, David C

    2010-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is a valuable species that is declining in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon. This publication is a compilation of over 20 years of aspen management experience by USDA Forest Service workers in the Blue Mountains. It includes a summary of aspen biology and occurrence in the Blue Mountains, and a discussion of aspen conservation and management techniques such as fencing, conifer removal, and artificial propagation. Local data on bird use of as...

  15. Regularities of Tree Stand Development in Suramens of the Mari El Republic Trans-Volga Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Demakov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides the research results representing the dynamics of species composition and production of wood stands in suramens of Mari El Republic Trans-Volga region as mathematical models. It was determined that there are 15 tree species growing on this territory, however the composition of a particular forest stand includes no more than seven tree species. Almost all suramen hydrotopes, with the exception of the swampy ones, are dominated by birch trees, the share of which is especially high in wet suramens, which proves the significant transformation of the forest structure. With the growth of tree stands the species composition inevitably changes towards original formations: in new and wet suramens the tree stand transforms into spruce forest mixed with linden and oak, while in wet suramens the forest stand transforms into spruce forest mixed with birch trees, and in swampy areas – into sticky alder forest. The greatest maximum plant biomass in new suramens is by pine trees, which are followed by spruce and oak trees. Aspen and birch trees are outsiders in this respect. In wet suramens the greatest plant biomass is produced by spruce trees while the least, by sticky alder trees. In terms of annual plant biomass increment the highest is by aspen trees in all types of suramens excluding the swampy ones. In complex plantations in terms of species composition with the growth of forest stand, there are distinct variations of the total tree bole biomass. This occurs due to gradual elimination of some species and their replacement with others. Forest stands in surames of Mari El Republic Trans-Volga region do not use their production capacity to the fullest. There are still reserves to be used. In new and wet suramens the birch and aspen may be replaced by conifers and in some cases even by oak. However, the final decision as on replacement should be taken based on economic calculations and ecological limitations. The paper also stresses that

  16. Heterozygosity, gender, and the growth-defense trade-off in quaking aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Christopher T; Stevens, Michael T; Anderson, Jon E; Lindroth, Richard L

    2016-06-01

    Although plant growth is generally recognized to be influenced by allocation to defense, genetic background (e.g., inbreeding), and gender, rarely have those factors been addressed collectively. In quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), phenolic glycosides (PGs) and condensed tannins (CTs) constitute up to 30 % of leaf dry weight. To quantify the allocation cost of this chemical defense, we measured growth, defense chemistry, and individual heterozygosity (H obs at 16 microsatellite loci) for male and female trees in both controlled and natural environments. The controlled environment consisted of 12 juvenile genets grown for 3 years in a common garden, with replication. The natural environment consisted of 51 mature genets in wild populations, from which we sampled multiple ramets (trees) per genet. Concentrations of PGs and CTs were negatively correlated. PGs were uncorrelated with growth, but CT production represented a major cost. Across the range of CT levels found in wild-grown trees, growth rates varied by 2.6-fold, such that a 10 % increase in CT concentration occurred with a 38.5 % decrease in growth. H obs had a marked effect on aspen growth: for wild trees, a 10 % increase in H obs corresponded to a 12.5 % increase in growth. In wild trees, this CT effect was significant only in females, in which reproduction seems to exacerbate the cost of defense, while the H obs effect was significant only in males. Despite the lower growth rate of low-H obs trees, their higher CT levels may improve survival, which could account for the deficit of heterozygotes repeatedly found in natural aspen populations. PMID:26886130

  17. Experiential Education at Aspen High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burson, George

    1981-01-01

    Aspen High School's (Colorado) Experiential Education Week, developed to provide a "real-world" experience for students from a small, mountain, tourist-oriented community, is planned by both student and faculty; the whole process encourages both self-reliant and responsible students and develops positive student-teacher and peer relationships.…

  18. Automated Design Space Exploration with Aspen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle L. Spafford

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Architects and applications scientists often use performance models to explore a multidimensional design space of architectural characteristics, algorithm designs, and application parameters. With traditional performance modeling tools, these explorations forced users to first develop a performance model and then repeatedly evaluate and analyze the model manually. These manual investigations proved laborious and error prone. More importantly, the complexity of this traditional process often forced users to simplify their investigations. To address this challenge of design space exploration, we extend our Aspen (Abstract Scalable Performance Engineering Notation language with three new language constructs: user-defined resources, parameter ranges, and a collection of costs in the abstract machine model. Then, we use these constructs to enable automated design space exploration via a nonlinear optimization solver. We show how four interesting classes of design space exploration scenarios can be derived from Aspen models and formulated as pure nonlinear programs. The analysis tools are demonstrated using examples based on Aspen models for a three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform, the CoMD molecular dynamics proxy application, and the DARPA Streaming Sensor Challenge Problem. Our results show that this approach can compose and solve arbitrary performance modeling questions quickly and rigorously when compared to the traditional manual approach.

  19. Aspen Characteristics - Plumas National Forest, FRRD [ds375

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected within aspen stands in the Plumas National Forest, Feather River Ranger...

  20. Aspen Characteristics - El Dorado National Forest [ds363

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents aspen stand locations and field assessments conducted in the Eldorado National Forest, Eldorado and Amador Counties, California. Data was...

  1. Fast growing aspens in the development of a plant micropropagation system based on plant-produced ethylene action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Representatives of the genus Populus (poplars), such as Populus tremula L. (European aspen) and its fast-growing hybrids, are recognized as being among the most suitable tree species for short rotation coppicing in Northern Europe. Several technologies have been developed for fast propagation of selected aspen genotypes, including laboratory (in vitro) micropropagation, which is usually based on the action of exogenous plant hormones. Seeking to minimize the use of the latter, the present study was designed to test if the conditions suitable for increased accumulation of plant-produced gas, including the gaseous plant hormone ethylene, inside a culture vessel could contribute to commercially desirable changes in aspen development. Shoot cultures of several European and hybrid (Populus tremuloides Michx. × P. tremula) aspen genotypes were studied using two different types of culture vessels: tightly sealed Petri dishes (15 × 54 mm) designed to provide restricted gas exchange (RGE) conditions, and capped (but not sealed) test tubes (150 × 18 mm) providing control conditions. Under RGE conditions, not only the positive impact of the ethylene precursors 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic-acid (ACC) and ethephon on shoot proliferation was demonstrated but also a several-fold increase, compared to the control conditions, in the mean shoot number per explant was recorded even on the hormone-free nutrient medium. Moreover, the shoots developed under RGE conditions were distinguished by superior rooting ability in the subsequent culture. These results suggest that a plant micropropagation system based on the action of plant-produced ethylene rather than of exogenous hormones is possible. -- Highlights: ► Aspen in vitro cultures were grown in different vessels. ► Small-volume vessels were used for restriction of gas exchange. ► Aspen explants produced most shoots in small-volume vessels. ► Shoot proliferation was increased due to explant response to ethylene.

  2. Transcriptome responses to aluminum stress in roots of aspen (Populus tremula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grisel Nadine

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ionic aluminum (mainly Al3+ is rhizotoxic and can be present in acid soils at concentrations high enough to inhibit root growth. Many forest tree species grow naturally in acid soils and often tolerate high concentrations of Al. Previously, we have shown that aspen (Populus tremula releases citrate and oxalate from roots in response to Al exposure. To obtain further insights into the root responses of aspen to Al, we investigated root gene expression at Al conditions that inhibit root growth. Results Treatment of the aspen roots with 500 μM Al induced a strong inhibition of root growth within 6 h of exposure time. The root growth subsequently recovered, reaching growth rates comparable to that of control plants. Changes in gene expression were determined after 6 h, 2 d, and 10 d of Al exposure. Replicated transcriptome analyses using the Affymetrix poplar genome array revealed a total of 175 significantly up-regulated and 69 down-regulated genes, of which 70% could be annotated based on Arabidopsis genome resources. Between 6 h and 2 d, the number of responsive genes strongly decreased from 202 to 26, and then the number of changes remained low. The responses after 6 h were characterized by genes involved in cell wall modification, ion transport, and oxidative stress. Two genes with prolonged induction were closely related to the Arabidopsis Al tolerance genes ALS3 (for Al sensitive 3 and MATE (for multidrug and toxin efflux protein, mediating citrate efflux. Patterns of expression in different plant organs and in response to Al indicated that the two aspen genes are homologs of the Arabidopsis ALS3 and MATE. Conclusion Exposure of aspen roots to Al results in a rapid inhibition of root growth and a large change in root gene expression. The subsequent root growth recovery and the concomitant reduction in the number of responsive genes presumably reflect the success of the roots in activating Al tolerance mechanisms. The

  3. Aquatic ecosystem response to timber harvesting for the purpose of restoring aspen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobette E Jones

    Full Text Available The removal of conifers through commercial timber harvesting has been successful in restoring aspen, however many aspen stands are located near streams, and there are concerns about potential aquatic ecosystem impairment. We examined the effects of management-scale conifer removal from aspen stands located adjacent to streams on water quality, solar radiation, canopy cover, temperature, aquatic macroinvertebrates, and soil moisture. This 8-year study (2003-2010 involved two projects located in Lassen National Forest. The Pine-Bogard Project consisted of three treatments adjacent to Pine and Bogard Creeks: (i Phase 1 in January 2004, (ii Phase 2 in August 2005, and (iii Phase 3 in January 2008. The Bailey Project consisted of one treatment adjacent to Bailey Creek in September 2006. Treatments involved whole tree removal using track-laying harvesters and rubber tire skidders. More than 80% of all samples analyzed for NO₃-N, NH₄-N, and PO₄-P at Pine, Bogard, and Bailey Creeks were below the detection limit, with the exception of naturally elevated PO₄-P in Bogard Creek. All nutrient concentrations (NO₃-N, NH₄-N, PO₄-P, K, and SO₄-S showed little variation within streams and across years. Turbidity and TSS exhibited annual variation, but there was no significant increase in the difference between upstream and downstream turbidity and TSS levels. There was a significant decrease in stream canopy cover and increase in the potential fraction of solar radiation reaching the streams in response to the Pine-Bogard Phase 3 and Bailey treatments; however, there was no corresponding increase in stream temperatures. Macroinvertebrate metrics indicated healthy aquatic ecosystem conditions throughout the course of the study. Lastly, the removal of vegetation significantly increased soil moisture in treated stands relative to untreated stands. These results indicate that, with careful planning and implementation of site-specific best management

  4. Aquatic ecosystem response to timber harvesting for the purpose of restoring aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bobette E; Krupa, Monika; Tate, Kenneth W

    2013-01-01

    The removal of conifers through commercial timber harvesting has been successful in restoring aspen, however many aspen stands are located near streams, and there are concerns about potential aquatic ecosystem impairment. We examined the effects of management-scale conifer removal from aspen stands located adjacent to streams on water quality, solar radiation, canopy cover, temperature, aquatic macroinvertebrates, and soil moisture. This 8-year study (2003-2010) involved two projects located in Lassen National Forest. The Pine-Bogard Project consisted of three treatments adjacent to Pine and Bogard Creeks: (i) Phase 1 in January 2004, (ii) Phase 2 in August 2005, and (iii) Phase 3 in January 2008. The Bailey Project consisted of one treatment adjacent to Bailey Creek in September 2006. Treatments involved whole tree removal using track-laying harvesters and rubber tire skidders. More than 80% of all samples analyzed for NO₃-N, NH₄-N, and PO₄-P at Pine, Bogard, and Bailey Creeks were below the detection limit, with the exception of naturally elevated PO₄-P in Bogard Creek. All nutrient concentrations (NO₃-N, NH₄-N, PO₄-P, K, and SO₄-S) showed little variation within streams and across years. Turbidity and TSS exhibited annual variation, but there was no significant increase in the difference between upstream and downstream turbidity and TSS levels. There was a significant decrease in stream canopy cover and increase in the potential fraction of solar radiation reaching the streams in response to the Pine-Bogard Phase 3 and Bailey treatments; however, there was no corresponding increase in stream temperatures. Macroinvertebrate metrics indicated healthy aquatic ecosystem conditions throughout the course of the study. Lastly, the removal of vegetation significantly increased soil moisture in treated stands relative to untreated stands. These results indicate that, with careful planning and implementation of site-specific best management practices

  5. What Is Community College Excellence? Lessons from the Aspen Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyner, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Over the past year, in a process to select the winner of the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, the Aspen Institute has convened national experts to define and determine how to measure "excellence," to identify community colleges with high levels of student success, and to help more community colleges understand what can be done to…

  6. Growth, leaf traits and litter decomposition of roadside hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. x P. tremuloides Michx.) clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Road traffic contributes considerably to ground-level air pollution and is therefore likely to affect roadside ecosystems. Differences in growth and leaf traits among 13 hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides) clones were studied in relation to distance from a motorway. The trees sampled were growing 15 and 30 m from a motorway and at a background rural site in southern Finland. Litter decomposition was also measured at both the roadside and rural sites. Height and diameter growth rate and specific leaf area were lowest, and epicuticular wax amount highest in trees growing 15 m from the motorway. Although no significant distance x clone interactions were detected, clone-based analyses indicated differences in genotypic responses to motorway proximity. Leaf N concentration did not differ with distance from the motorway for any of the clones. Leaf litter decomposition was only temporarily retarded in the roadside environment, suggesting minor effects on nutrient cycling. - Highlights: → Roadside hybrid aspen displayed xeromorphic leaf traits and reduction in growth rate. → These responses were limited to trees close to the motorway and only to some clones. → Leaf litter decomposition was only temporarily retarded in the roadside environment. - Hybrid aspen had more xeromorphic leaves, displayed reduced growth, and showed retarded litter decomposition at an early stage in the roadside environment.

  7. Spring leaf flush in aspen (Populus tremuloides) clones is altered by long-term growth at elevated carbon dioxide and elevated ozone concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Justin M., E-mail: jmcgrath@illinois.ed [Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 190 ERML, 1201 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Karnosky, David F., E-mail: karnosky@mtu.ed [School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Ainsworth, Elizabeth A., E-mail: lisa.ainsworth@ars.usda.go [Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 190 ERML, 1201 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); USDA ARS Photosynthesis Research Unit, 147 ERML, 1201 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Early spring leaf out is important to the success of deciduous trees competing for light and space in dense forest plantation canopies. In this study, we investigated spring leaf flush and how long-term growth at elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO{sub 2}]) and elevated ozone concentration ([O{sub 3}]) altered leaf area index development in a closed Populus tremuloides (aspen) canopy. This work was done at the Aspen FACE experiment where aspen clones have been grown since 1997 in conditions simulating the [CO{sub 2}] and [O{sub 3}] predicted for approx2050. The responses of two clones were compared during the first month of spring leaf out when CO{sub 2} fumigation had begun, but O{sub 3} fumigation had not. Trees in elevated [CO{sub 2}] plots showed a stimulation of leaf area index (36%), while trees in elevated [O{sub 3}] plots had lower leaf area index (-20%). While individual leaf area was not significantly affected by elevated [CO{sub 2}], the photosynthetic operating efficiency of aspen leaves was significantly improved (51%). There were no significant differences in the way that the two aspen clones responded to elevated [CO{sub 2}]; however, the two clones responded differently to long-term growth at elevated [O{sub 3}]. The O{sub 3}-sensitive clone, 42E, had reduced individual leaf area when grown at elevated [O{sub 3}] (-32%), while the tolerant clone, 216, had larger mature leaf area at elevated [O{sub 3}] (46%). These results indicate a clear difference between the two clones in their long-term response to elevated [O{sub 3}], which could affect competition between the clones, and result in altered genotypic composition in future atmospheric conditions. - Spring leaf flush is stimulated by elevated [CO{sub 2}] and suppressed by elevated [O{sub 3}] in aspen (Populus tremuloides).

  8. Ten-year results from the long-term soil productivity study in aspen ecosystems of the northern Great Lakes region

    OpenAIRE

    Voldseth, Richard; Palik, Brian; Elioff, John

    2011-01-01

    Impacts of organic matter removal and compaction on soil physical and chemical properties and forest productivity are reported from the first 10 years of the Long-Term Soil Productivity Study in Great Lakes aspen ecosystems. Organic matter removal treatments included main bole, total tree harvest, and total tree harvest with forest floor removal. Compaction treatments included no compaction beyond normal levels from harvest, moderate compaction, and heavy compaction. Main bole harvest with...

  9. Isotope studies to determine dry deposition of sulfate to deciduous and coniferous trees: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been conducted at two locations near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, with radioactive 35S (87 day half-life) to examine the cycling behavior of sulfur in yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), red maple (Acer rubrum), and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) trees. Some findings pertain to methods development for estimating dry deposition of sulfur to forest canopies and the magnitude of sulfur emissions from natural sources (Task II). We will determine through field studies, the internal cycling, storage, and biogenic emission of sulfur, as traced by 35SO42-, in environments impacted by atmospheric sulfate deposition; and will determine through isotope dilution studies, the contribution of foliar leaching and dry deposition to net throughfall (NTF) sulfate concentrations beneath deciduous and coniferous trees in such environments. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Coniferyl benzoate in quaking aspen A ruffed grouse feeding deterrent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubas, W J; Gullion, G W

    1990-04-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) staminate flower buds and catkins are important food resources for ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus); however, ruffed grouse select only certain quaking aspen to feed upon. Earlier studies indicate that the primary difference between quaking aspen that ruffed grouse feed upon and those not used is the level of coniferyl benzoate in the flower buds. Bioassays show that coniferyl benzoate is a feeding deterrent for ruffed grouse; its effect on ruffed grouse after ingestion has not been tested. Possible physiological effects, based on the chemical properties of coniferyl benzoate and its oxidation products, include inhibition of protein digestion, toxic effects, and antiestrogenic effects. PMID:24263713

  11. Aspen Grupp võitis RKASi / Lemmi Kann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kann, Lemmi

    2008-01-01

    Ehitusfirma Aspen Grupp OÜ võitis Tallinna ringkonnakohtus Riigi Kinnisvara AS-i, kes diskvalifitseeris ehitusfirma riigihankelt seaduses olnud maksevõlgnevuse keelu tõttu. Vt. samas: Lahendust ootavad veel kaks kohtuasja

  12. Composition of cavity-nesting bird communities in montane aspen woodland fragments: The roles of landscape context and forest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, J.J.; Edwards, T.C., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    We compared cavity-nesting bird communities in aspen (Populus tremuloides) woodland fragments classified on the basis of vegetation structure (tree density) and landscape context (surrounding vegetation). We found very few cavity nesters in fragments predominantly surrounded by forests. Fragments adjacent to meadows contained more species and a greater abundance of cavity nesters. Species richness and abundance were higher in sparsely than in densely treed meadow fragments. Because secondary cavity nesters are often limited by cavity availability, we augmented natural cavities with nest boxes. Although only five boxes contained bird nests, these were all in sparse aspen fragments predominantly surrounded by meadows. However, we found 25 northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) nests in boxes, none of which were in sparse meadow fragments. In addition to high-lighting the importance of landscape context in avian and mammalian habitat relationships, our results suggest that predator or competitor interactions may help structure this cavity-nester community. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2002.

  13. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University; Zak, Donald R. [University of Michigan; Kubiske, Mark E. [USDA Forest Service; Pregitzer, Kurt S. [University of Idaho

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch

  14. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  15. New exposure-based metric approach for evaluating O(3) risk to North American aspen forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, K E; Nosal, M; Heilman, W; Dann, T; Sober, J; Legge, A H; Karnosky, D F

    2007-06-01

    The United States and Canada currently use exposure-based metrics to protect vegetation from O(3). Using 5 years (1999-2003) of co-measured O(3), meteorology and growth response, we have developed exposure-based regression models that predict Populus tremuloides growth change within the North American ambient air quality context. The models comprised growing season fourth-highest daily maximum 8-h average O(3) concentration, growing degree days, and wind speed. They had high statistical significance, high goodness of fit, include 95% confidence intervals for tree growth change, and are simple to use. Averaged across a wide range of clonal sensitivity, historical 2001-2003 growth change over most of the 26 Mha P. tremuloides distribution was estimated to have ranged from no impact (0%) to strong negative impacts (-31%). With four aspen clones responding negatively (one responded positively) to O(3), the growing season fourth-highest daily maximum 8-h average O(3) concentration performed much better than growing season SUM06, AOT40 or maximum 1h average O(3) concentration metrics as a single indicator of aspen stem cross-sectional area growth. PMID:17140714

  16. Improving root-zone soil properties for Trembling Aspen in a reconstructed mine-site soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, M. F.; Sabbagh, P.; Bockstette, S.; Landhäusser, S.; Pinno, B.

    2014-12-01

    Surface mining activities have significantly depleted natural tree cover, especially trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides), in the Boreal Forest and Aspen Parkland Natural Regions of Alberta. The natural soil profile is usually destroyed during these mining activities and soil and landscape reconstruction is typically the first step in the reclamation process. However, the mine tailings and overburden materials used for these new soils often become compacted during the reconstruction process because they are subjected to high amounts of traffic with heavy equipment. Compacted soils generally have low porosity and low penetrability through increased soil strength, making it difficult for roots to elongate and explore the soil. Compaction also reduces infiltration capacity and drainage, which can cause excessive runoff and soil erosion. To improve the pore size distribution and water transmission, subsoil ripping was carried out in a test plot at Genesee Prairie Mine, Alberta. Within the site, six replicates with two treatments each, unripped (compacted) and ripped (decompacted), were established with 20-m buffers between them. The main objective of this research was to characterize the effects of subsoil ripping on soil physical properties and the longevity of those effects.as well as soil water dynamics during spring snowmelt. Results showed improved bulk density, pore size distribution and water infiltration in the soil as a result of the deep ripping, but these improvements appear to be temporary.

  17. DEM modelling, vegetation characterization and mapping of aspen parkland rangeland using LIDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guangquan

    Detailed geographic information system (GIS) studies on plant ecology, animal behavior and soil hydrologic characteristics across spatially complex landscapes require an accurate digital elevation model (DEM). Following interpolation of last return LIDAR data and creation of a LIDAR-derived DEM, a series of 260 points, stratified by vegetation type, slope gradient and off-nadir distance, were ground-truthed using a total laser station, GPS, and 27 interconnected benchmarks. Despite an overall mean accuracy of +2 cm across 8 vegetation types, it created a RMSE (square root of the mean square error) of 1.21 m. DEM elevations were over-estimated within forested areas by an average of 20 cm with a RMSE of 1.05 m, under-estimated (-12 cm, RMSE = 1.36 m) within grasslands. Vegetation type had the greatest influence on DEM accuracy, while off-nadir distance (P = 0.48) and slope gradient (P = 0.49) did not influence DEM accuracy; however, the latter factors did interact (P physiognomy) including plant height, cover, and vertical or horizontal heterogeneity, are important factors influencing biodiversity. Vegetation over and understory were sampled for height, canopy cover, and tree or shrub density within 120 field plots, evenly stratified by vegetation formation (grassland, shrubland, and aspen forest). Results indicated that LIDAR data could be used for estimating the maximum height, cover, and density, of both closed and semi-open stands of aspen (P < 0.001). However, LIDAR data could not be used to assess understory (<1.5 m) height within aspen stands, nor grass height and cover. Recognition and mapping of vegetation types are important for rangelands as they provide a basis for the development and evaluation of management policies and actions. In this study, LIDAR data were found to be superior to digital classification schedules for their mapping accuracy in aspen forest and grassland, but not shrubland. No single classification schedule created a high classification

  18. Orbital Express Mission Operations Planning and Resource Management using ASPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Caroline; Knight, Russell; Jones, Grailing; Tran, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    As satellite equipment and mission operations become more costly, the drive to keep working equipment running with less man-power rises.Demonstrating the feasibility of autonomous satellite servicing was the main goal behind the Orbital Express (OE) mission. Planning the satellite mission operations for OE required the ability to create a plan which could be executed autonomously over variable conditions. The Automated-Scheduling and Planning Environment (ASPEN)tool, developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was used to create the schedule of events in each daily plan for the two satellites of the OE mission. This paper presents an introduction to the ASPEN tool, the constraints of the OE domain, the variable conditions that were presented within the mission, and the solution to operations that ASPEN provided. ASPEN has been used in several other domains, including research rovers, Deep Space Network scheduling research, and in flight operations for the ASE project's EO1 satellite. Related work is discussed, as are the future of ASPEN and the future of autonomous satellite servicing.

  19. Hydraulic conductivity and aquaporin transcription in roots of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by Laccaria bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Cooke, Janice E K; Kemppainen, Minna; Pardo, Alejandro G; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2016-07-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi have been reported to increase root hydraulic conductivity (L pr) by altering apoplastic and plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP)-mediated cell-to-cell water transport pathways in associated roots, or to have little effect on root water transport, depending on the interacting species and imposed stresses. In this study, we investigated the water transport properties and PIP transcription in roots of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by the wild-type strain of Laccaria bicolor and by strains overexpressing a major fungal water-transporting aquaporin JQ585595. Inoculation of aspen seedlings with L. bicolor resulted in about 30 % colonization rate of root tips, which developed dense mantle and the Hartig net that was restricted in the modified root epidermis. Transcript abundance of the aspen aquaporins PIP1;2, PIP2;1, and PIP2;2 decreased in colonized root tips. Root colonization by JQ585595-overexpressing strains had no significant impact on seedling shoot water potentials, gas exchange, or dry mass; however, it led to further decrease in transcript abundance of PIP1;2 and PIP2;3 and the significantly lower L pr than in non-inoculated roots. These results, taken together with our previous study that showed enhanced root water hydraulics of L. bicolor-colonized white spruce (Picea glauca), suggest that the impact of L. bicolor on root hydraulics varies by the ectomycorrhiza-associated tree species. PMID:26861480

  20. Intraspecific variation in root and leaf traits and leaf-root trait linkages in eight aspen demes (Populus tremula and P. tremuloides)

    OpenAIRE

    Hajek, Peter; Hertel, Dietrich; Leuschner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Leaf and fine root morphology and physiology have been found to vary considerably among tree species, but not much is known about intraspecific variation in root traits and their relatedness to leaf traits. Various aspen progenies (Populus tremula and P. tremuloides) with different growth performance are used in short-rotation forestry. Hence, a better understanding of the link between root trait syndromes and the adaptation of a deme to a particular environment is essential in order to impro...

  1. Modelling growth-competition relationships in trembling aspen and white spruce mixed boreal forests of Western Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Guo Huang

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of competition on stem growth of Picea glauca and Populus tremuloides in boreal mixedwood stands during the stem exclusion stage. We combined traditional approaches of collecting competition data with dendrochronology to provide retrospective measurements of stem diameter growth. Several competition indices including stand basal area (BA, the sum of stem diameter at breast height (SDBH, and density (N for the broadleaf and coniferous species, as well as similar indices considering only trees with diameters greater than each subject (BAGR, SDBHGR, and NGR, were evaluated. We used a nonlinear mixed model to characterize the basal area increment over the past 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 years as a function of growth of nearby dominant trees, the size of the subject trees, deciduous and coniferous competition indices, and ecoregions. SDBHGR and BAGR were better predictors for spruce, and SDBHGR and NGR were better for aspen, respectively, than other indices. Results showed strongest correlations with long-term stem growth, as the best models integrated growth for 10-25 years for aspen and ≥ 25 for spruce. Our model demonstrated a remarkable capability (adjusted R(2>0.67 to represent this complex variation in growth as a function of site, size and competition.

  2. Biomass production in forest plantations used as raw material for industry and energy. Final report. Biomasseproduktion in forstlichen Plantagen fuer die Rohstoff- und Energiegewinnung. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, M.R.; Muhs, H.J.

    1986-10-01

    European aspen (Populus tremula), quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), and their hybrids (hybrid aspen) are short-rotation, fast growing forest tree species, that apparently hold potential for biomass and energy production. Because of inherent difficulties in vegetative propagation in aspen, it has not been possible to propagate selected aspen and hybrid aspen tress on a large scale. Therefore, the aim of this project was to develop unconventional methods of vegetative propagation in aspen that can easily be adapted to nursery practices and are also cost-effective. Explants from buds, leaves, stems, and roots were cultured on a modified Woody Plant Medium for the purposes of microvegetative propagation. Protoplasts were also cultured for regenerative studies. Mainly the bud explants were employed for microvegetative propagation. A 2-step micropropagation method, which is commmercially feasible, has been developed for aspen. This method involves: (1) culture of bud explants on a medium for bud conditioning and microshoot proliferation, and (2) rooting of microshoots in peat-perlite mix. By employing this 2-step micropropagation method, several thousand plants have been regenerated from about 50 mature selected aspen and hybrid aspen trees ranging from 1 to 40 years of age. Following transfer to field conditions, tissue culture derived plants exhibited vigorous growth and attained a height of 1.5-2 meters in the first growing season. (orig.) With 23 refs., 1 tab., 20 figs.

  3. Populations of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) with different evolutionary histories differ in their climate occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Burke T; Still, Christopher; Howe, Glenn T; Tague, Christina; Roberts, Dar A

    2016-05-01

    Quaking aspens (Populus tremuloides Michx.) are found in diverse habitats throughout North America. While the biogeography of aspens' distribution has been documented, the drivers of the phenotypic diversity of aspen are still being explored. In our study, we examined differences in climate between northern and southwestern populations of aspen, finding large-scale differences between the populations. Our results suggest that northern and southwestern populations live in distinct climates and support the inclusion of genetic and phenotypic data with species distribution modeling for predicting aspens' distribution. PMID:27217950

  4. 76 FR 69279 - Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Quaking Aspen Wind Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Aspen Wind Energy Project, Wyoming, and Notice of Segregation of Public Lands AGENCY: Bureau of Land... prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Quaking Aspen Wind Energy Project (Quaking Aspen..._Aspen_Wind_Energy_WY@blm.gov ; or Mail: 280 Highway 191 N., Rock Springs, WY 82901. Documents...

  5. Orbital Express mission operations planning and resource management using ASPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Caroline; Knight, Russell; Jones, Grailing; Tran, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    As satellite equipment and mission operations become more costly, the drive to keep working equipment running with less labor-power rises. Demonstrating the feasibility of autonomous satellite servicing was the main goal behind the Orbital Express (OE) mission. Like a tow-truck delivering gas to a car on the road, the "servicing" satellite of OE had to find the "client" from several kilometers away, connect directly to the client, and transfer fluid (or a battery) autonomously, while on earth-orbit. The mission met 100% of its success criteria, and proved that autonomous satellite servicing is now a reality for space operations. Planning the satellite mission operations for OE required the ability to create a plan which could be executed autonomously over variable conditions. As the constraints for execution could change weekly, daily, and even hourly, the tools used create the mission execution plans needed to be flexible and adaptable to many different kinds of changes. At the same time, the hard constraints of the plans needed to be maintained and satisfied. The Automated Scheduling and Planning Environment (ASPEN) tool, developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was used to create the schedule of events in each daily plan for the two satellites of the OE mission. This paper presents an introduction to the ASPEN tool, an overview of the constraints of the OE domain, the variable conditions that were presented within the mission, and the solution to operations that ASPEN provided. ASPEN has been used in several other domains, including research rovers, Deep Space Network scheduling research, and in flight operations for the NASA's Earth Observing One mission's EO1 satellite. Related work is discussed, as are the future of ASPEN and the future of autonomous satellite servicing.

  6. Ecophysiology of Trembling Aspen in Response to Root-Zone Conditions and Competition on Reclaimed Mine Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockstette, S.; Landhäusser, S.; Pinno, B.; Dyck, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Reclaimed soils are typically characterized by increased bulk densities, penetration resistances and poor soil structure as well as associated problems with hydrology and aeration. As a result, available rooting space for planted tree seedlings is often restricted to a shallow layer of topsoil, which is usually of higher quality and is cultivated prior to planting. This may hinder the development of healthy root systems, thus drastically increasing the risk for plant stress by limiting access to soil resources such as water, nutrients and oxygen. These problems are exacerbated when herbaceous plants compete for the same resources within this limited root-zone. To understand how limited rooting space affects the physiology of young trees, we experimentally manipulated soil conditions and levels of competition at a reclaimed mine site in central Alberta, Canada. The site was characterized by heavily compacted, fine textured subsoil (~2.0 Mg ha-1), capped with 15 cm of topsoil (~1.5 Mg ha-1). In a replicated study (n=6) half the plots were treated with a subsoil plow to a depth of about 60 cm to increase available rooting spece. Subsequently, trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and smooth brome (Bromus inermis L.) were planted to create four vegetation covers: aspen (a), brome (b), aspen + brome (ab) and control (c) (no vegetation). Various soil properties, including texture, bulk density, penetration resistance and water availability, in conjunction with plant parameters such as root and shoot growth, leaf area development, sap flow, and stomatal conductance have since been monitored, both in-situ and through destructive sampling. Our results indicate that the soil treatment was effective in lowering bulk densities and penetration resistance, while improving moisture retention characteristics. Tree seedling growth and leaf area development were significantly greater without competition, but did not differ between soil treatments. The soil treatment generally

  7. Experimental quantification of radiocesium recycling in a coniferous tree after aerial contamination: Field loss dynamics, translocation and final partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, Y; Garcia-Sanchez, L; Hurtevent, P

    2016-09-01

    After foliar interception of radioactive atmospheric fallout by forest trees, the short-term recycling dynamics of radiocesium from the tree to the soil as well as within the tree is a primary area of uncertainty in the modeling of the overall cycle. The partitioning of radiocesium transfers in a spruce tree exposed to aerial deposits was investigated during one growth season to reveal the dynamics and significance of underlying processes. The rate of radiocesium loss resulting from foliage leaching (wash-off) was shown to have a functional dependence on the frequency of rainy episodes in a first early stage (weathering 60% of initial contamination during 70 days) and on the amount of precipitation in a second stage (weathering 10% of initial deposits during the following 80 days). A classical single exponential decay model with offset and continuous time as predictor lead to a removal half-life t1/2 of intercepted radiocesium of 25 days. During the growth season, the similar pattern of the internal (134)Cs content in new shoots and initially contaminated foliage confirmed that radiocesium was readily absorbed from needle surfaces and efficiently translocated to growing organs. In the crown, a pool of non-leachable (134)Cs (15-30%) was associated with the abiotic layer covering the twigs and needle surfaces. At the end of the growth season, 30% of the initial deposits were relocated to different tree parts, including organs like stemwood (5%) and roots (6%) not directly exposed to deposition. At the scale of the tree, 84% of the residual activity was assimilated by living tissues which corresponds to a foliar absorption rate coefficient of 0.25 year(-1) for modeling purposes. According to the significant amount of radiocesium which can be incorporated in tree through foliar uptake, our results support the hypothesis that further internal transfers could supply the tree internal cycle of radiocesium extensively, and possibly mask the contribution of root uptake for

  8. ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles W. White III

    2003-09-30

    ASPEN Plus simulations have been created for a CO{sub 2} capture process based on adsorption by monoethanolamine (MEA). Three separate simulations were developed, one each for the flue gas scrubbing, recovery, and purification sections of the process. Although intended to work together, each simulation can be used and executed independently. The simulations were designed as template simulations to be added as a component to other more complex simulations. Applications involving simple cycle or hybrid power production processes were targeted. The default block parameters were developed based on a feed stream of raw flue gas of approximately 14 volume percent CO{sub 2} with a 90% recovery of the CO{sub 2} as liquid. This report presents detailed descriptions of the process sections as well as technical documentation for the ASPEN simulations including the design basis, models employed, key assumptions, design parameters, convergence algorithms, and calculated outputs.

  9. A flexible model for biomass fast pyrolysis in Aspen+

    OpenAIRE

    Kohl, Thomas; Laukkanen, Timo; Järvinen, Mika

    2012-01-01

    In order to estimate the heat of condensation of fast pyrolysis product of woody biomass a model to be used in the chemical process simulation software Aspen+ has been developed based on the composition of wood fast pyrolysis product. A simulation model for biomass fast pyrolysis was developed. The results obtained are in good accordance with values found in the literature. With more specific data (e.g. from measurements) it should be possible to adjust the flexible model to other data. ...

  10. Analysis of Cryogenic Cycle with Process Modeling Tool: Aspen HYSYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, D. M.; Patel, H. K.

    2015-10-01

    Cryogenic engineering deals with the development and improvement of low temperature techniques, processes and equipment. A process simulator such as Aspen HYSYS, for the design, analysis, and optimization of process plants, has features that accommodate the special requirements and therefore can be used to simulate most cryogenic liquefaction and refrigeration processes. Liquefaction is the process of cooling or refrigerating a gas to a temperature below its critical temperature so that liquid can be formed at some suitable pressure which is below the critical pressure. Cryogenic processes require special attention in terms of the integration of various components like heat exchangers, Joule-Thompson Valve, Turbo expander and Compressor. Here, Aspen HYSYS, a process modeling tool, is used to understand the behavior of the complete plant. This paper presents the analysis of an air liquefaction plant based on the Linde cryogenic cycle, performed using the Aspen HYSYS process modeling tool. It covers the technique used to find the optimum values for getting the maximum liquefaction of the plant considering different constraints of other parameters. The analysis result so obtained gives clear idea in deciding various parameter values before implementation of the actual plant in the field. It also gives an idea about the productivity and profitability of the given configuration plant which leads to the design of an efficient productive plant.

  11. Analysis of Cryogenic Cycle with Process Modeling Tool: Aspen HYSYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryogenic engineering deals with the development and improvement of low temperature techniques, processes and equipment. A process simulator such as Aspen HYSYS, for the design, analysis, and optimization of process plants, has features that accommodate the special requirements and therefore can be used to simulate most cryogenic liquefaction and refrigeration processes. Liquefaction is the process of cooling or refrigerating a gas to a temperature below its critical temperature so that liquid can be formed at some suitable pressure which is below the critical pressure. Cryogenic processes require special attention in terms of the integration of various components like heat exchangers, Joule-Thompson Valve, Turbo expander and Compressor. Here, Aspen HYSYS, a process modeling tool, is used to understand the behavior of the complete plant. This paper presents the analysis of an air liquefaction plant based on the Linde cryogenic cycle, performed using the Aspen HYSYS process modeling tool. It covers the technique used to find the optimum values for getting the maximum liquefaction of the plant considering different constraints of other parameters. The analysis result so obtained gives clear idea in deciding various parameter values before implementation of the actual plant in the field. It also gives an idea about the productivity and profitability of the given configuration plant which leads to the design of an efficient productive plant

  12. Genetic Variation in Functional Traits Influences Arthropod Community Composition in Aspen (Populus tremula L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Kathryn M; Pär K Ingvarsson; Jansson, Stefan; Albrectsen, Benedicte R.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a study of natural variation in functional leaf traits and herbivory in 116 clones of European aspen, Populus tremula L., the Swedish Aspen (SwAsp) collection, originating from ten degrees of latitude across Sweden and grown in a common garden. In surveys of phytophagous arthropods over two years, we found the aspen canopy supports nearly 100 morphospecies. We identified significant broad-sense heritability of plant functional traits, basic plant defence chemistry, and arthropod ...

  13. Aquatic Ecosystem Response to Timber Harvesting for the Purpose of Restoring Aspen

    OpenAIRE

    Bobette E Jones; Monika Krupa; Kenneth W Tate

    2013-01-01

    The removal of conifers through commercial timber harvesting has been successful in restoring aspen, however many aspen stands are located near streams, and there are concerns about potential aquatic ecosystem impairment. We examined the effects of management-scale conifer removal from aspen stands located adjacent to streams on water quality, solar radiation, canopy cover, temperature, aquatic macroinvertebrates, and soil moisture. This 8-year study (2003-2010) involved two projects located ...

  14. Restoring Aspen Riparian Stands With Beaver on the Northern Yellowstone Winter Range

    OpenAIRE

    McColley, Samuel D; Tyers, Dan B; Sowell, Bok F

    2011-01-01

    Aspen (Populus tremuloides) on the Gardiner Ranger District, Gallatin National Forest, have declined over the last half-century. In an attempt to reverse this trend, beaver (Castor canadensis) were reintroduced in Eagle Creek in 1991. In 2005, we assessed the long-term effects of beaver on aspen stands and the associated riparian area in the Eagle Creek drainage. Aspen recovery was estimated by comparing vegetative changes among control sites with (n = 5), active beaver sites (n = 6), sites a...

  15. 2012 Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy and Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John; Olivier, Dore; Fox, Patrick; Furic, Ivan; Halkiadakis, Eva; Schmidt, Fabian; Senatore, Leonardo; Smith, Kendrick M; Whiteson, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Aspen Center for Physics Project Summary DE-SC0007313 Budget Period: 1/1/2012 to 12/31/2012 The Hunt for New Particles, from the Alps to the Plains to the Rockies The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Particle Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 11 to February 17, 2012. Sixty-seven participants from nine countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, The Hunt for New Particles, from the Alps to the Plains to the Rockies. There were 53 formal talks, and a considerable number of informal discussions held during the week. The weeks events included a public lecture-Hunting the Dark Universe given by Neal Weiner from New York University) and attended by 237 members of the public, and a physics cafe geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists conducted by Spencer Chang (University of Oregon), Matthew Reece (Harvard University) and Julia Shelton (Yale University) and attended by 67 locals and visitors. While there were no published proceedings, some of the talks are posted online and can be Googled. The workshop was organized by John Campbell (Fermilab), Patrick Fox (Fermilab), Ivan Furic (University of Florida), Eva Halkiadakis (Rutgers University) and Daniel Whiteson (University of California Irvine). Additional information is available at http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=143360. Inflationary Theory and its Confrontation with Data in the Planck Era The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Astroparticle physics held at the Aspen Center for Physics was Inflationary Theory and its Confrontation with Data in the Planck Era. It was held from January 30 to February 4, 2012. The 62 participants came from 7 countries and attended 43 talks over five days. Late mornings through the afternoon are reserved for informal discussions. In feedback received from participants, it is often these unplanned chats that produce the most excitement due to working through problems with fellow physicists

  16. Design and simulation of heat exchangers using Aspen HYSYS, and Aspen exchanger design and rating for paddy drying application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaun, J.; Kamin, N. H.; Wong, K. H.; Tham, H. J.; Kong, V. V.; Farajpourlar, M.

    2016-06-01

    Air heating unit is one of the most important parts in paddy drying to ensure the efficiency of a drying process. In addition, an optimized air heating unit does not only promise a good paddy quality, but also save more for the operating cost. This study determined the suitable and best specifications heating unit to heat air for paddy drying in the LAMB dryer. In this study, Aspen HYSYS v7.3 was used to obtain the minimum flow rate of hot water needed. The resulting data obtained from Aspen HYSYS v7.3 were used in Aspen Exchanger Design and Rating (EDR) to generate heat exchanger design and costs. The designs include shell and tubes and plate heat exchanger. The heat exchanger was designed in order to produce various drying temperatures of 40, 50, 60 and 70°C of air with different flow rate, 300, 2500 and 5000 LPM. The optimum condition for the heat exchanger were found to be plate heat exchanger with 0.6 mm plate thickness, 198.75 mm plate width, 554.8 mm plate length and 11 numbers of plates operating at 5000 LPM air flow rate.

  17. Using Aspen plus in thermodynamics instruction a step-by-step guide

    CERN Document Server

    Sandler, Stanley I

    2015-01-01

    A step-by-step guide for students (and faculty) on the use of Aspen in teaching thermodynamics Used for a wide variety of important engineering tasks, Aspen Plus software is a modeling tool used for conceptual design, optimization, and performance monitoring of chemical processes. After more than twenty years, it remains one of the most popular and powerful chemical engineering simulation programs used both industrially and academically. Using Aspen Plus in Thermodynamics Instruction: A Step by Step Guide introduces the reader to the use of Aspen Plus in courses in thermodynamics. It prov

  18. Tree Species Traits Influence Soil Physical, Chemical, and Biological Properties in High Elevation Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Ayres, Edward; Steltzer, Heidi; Berg, Sarah; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Simmons, Breana L.; Wall, Diana H

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that plants often have species-specific effects on soil properties. In high elevation forests in the Southern Rocky Mountains, North America, areas that are dominated by a single tree species are often adjacent to areas dominated by another tree species. Here, we assessed soil properties beneath adjacent stands of trembling aspen, lodgepole pine, and Engelmann spruce, which are dominant tree species in this region and are distributed widely in North Amer...

  19. Tree species traits influence soil physical, chemical, and biological properties in high elevation forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Ayres

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that plants often have species-specific effects on soil properties. In high elevation forests in the Southern Rocky Mountains, North America, areas that are dominated by a single tree species are often adjacent to areas dominated by another tree species. Here, we assessed soil properties beneath adjacent stands of trembling aspen, lodgepole pine, and Engelmann spruce, which are dominant tree species in this region and are distributed widely in North America. We hypothesized that soil properties would differ among stands dominated by different tree species and expected that aspen stands would have higher soil temperatures due to their open structure, which, combined with higher quality litter, would result in increased soil respiration rates, nitrogen availability, and microbial biomass, and differences in soil faunal community composition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed soil physical, chemical, and biological properties at four sites where stands of aspen, pine, and spruce occurred in close proximity to one-another in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado. Leaf litter quality differed among the tree species, with the highest nitrogen (N concentration and lowest lignin:N in aspen litter. Nitrogen concentration was similar in pine and spruce litter, but lignin:N was highest in pine litter. Soil temperature and moisture were highest in aspen stands, which, in combination with higher litter quality, probably contributed to faster soil respiration rates from stands of aspen. Soil carbon and N content, ammonium concentration, and microbial biomass did not differ among tree species, but nitrate concentration was highest in aspen soil and lowest in spruce soil. In addition, soil fungal, bacterial, and nematode community composition and rotifer, collembolan, and mesostigmatid mite abundance differed among the tree species, while the total abundance of nematodes, tardigrades, oribatid mites, and prostigmatid

  20. Tree sets

    OpenAIRE

    Diestel, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    We study an abstract notion of tree structure which generalizes tree-decompositions of graphs and matroids. Unlike tree-decompositions, which are too closely linked to graph-theoretical trees, these `tree sets' can provide a suitable formalization of tree structure also for infinite graphs, matroids, or set partitions, as well as for other discrete structures, such as order trees. In this first of two papers we introduce tree sets, establish their relation to graph and order trees, and show h...

  1. Ecology, management, and use of aspen and balsam poplar in the Prairie Provinces, Canada. Special report No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, E.B.; Peterson, N.M.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes information on the ecology, management, and use of aspen and balsam poplar in the ecosystems of the main zone of commercially important aspen-balsam poplar from southern Manitoba to northeastern British Columbia.

  2. Clinal Variation in phyB2, a Candidate Gene for Day-Length-Induced Growth Cessation and Bud Set, Across a Latitudinal Gradient in European Aspen (Populus tremula)

    OpenAIRE

    Ingvarsson, Pär K.; García, M. Victoria; Hall, David; Luquez, Virginia; Jansson, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The initiation of growth cessation and dormancy represents a critical ecological and evolutionary trade-off between survival and growth in most forest trees. The most important environmental cue regulating the initiation of dormancy is a shortening of the photoperiod and phytochrome genes have been implicated in short-day-induced bud set and growth cessation in Populus. We characterized patterns of DNA sequence variation at the putative candidate gene phyB2 in 4 populations of European aspen ...

  3. Modelling and Simulation of Gas Engines Using Aspen HYSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Ekwonu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper gas engine model was developed in Aspen HYSYS V7.3 and validated with Waukesha 16V275GL+ gas engine. Fuel flexibility, fuel types and part load performance of the gas engine were investigated. The design variability revealed that the gas engine can operate on poor fuel with low lower heating value (LHV such as landfill gas, sewage gas and biogas with biogas offering potential integration with bottoming cycles when compared to natural gas. The result of the gas engine simulation gave an efficiency 40.7% and power output of 3592kW.

  4. Tank SY-102 remediation project summary report: ASPEN modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. As a part of this program, personnel at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed and demonstrated a flow sheet to remediate tank SY-102, which is located in the 200 West Area and contains high-level radioactive waste. In the conceptual design report issued earlier, an ASPEN plus trademark computer model of the flow sheet was presented. This report documents improvements in the flow sheet model after additional thermodynamic data for the actinide species were incorporated

  5. Endogenous PttHb1 and PttTrHb, and heterologous Vitreoscilla vhb haemoglobin gene expression in hybrid aspen roots with ectomycorrhizal interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Jokipii, Soile; Häggman, Hely; Brader, Günter; Kallio, Pauli T.; Niemi, Karoliina

    2008-01-01

    Present knowledge on plant non-symbiotic class-1 (Hb1) and truncated (TrHb) haemoglobin genes is almost entirely based on herbaceous species while the corresponding tree haemoglobin genes are not well known. The function of these genes has recently been linked with endosymbioses between plants and microbes. In this work, the coding sequences of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula×tremuloides) PttHb1 and PttTrHb were characterized, indicating that the key residues of haem and ligand binding of both ...

  6. 76 FR 77591 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Aspen American Insurance Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... Supplement No. 3 to the Treasury Department Circular 570, 2011 Revision, published July 1, 2011, at 76 FR... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Aspen American Insurance Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Aspen American Insurance Company (NAIC 43460). Business Address:...

  7. Simulation of Quaking Aspen Potential Fire Behavior in Northern Utah, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Justin DeRose

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Current understanding of aspen fire ecology in western North America includes the paradoxical characterization that aspen-dominated stands, although often regenerated following fire, are “fire-proof”. We tested this idea by predicting potential fire behavior across a gradient of aspen dominance in northern Utah using the Forest Vegetation Simulator and the Fire and Fuels Extension. The wind speeds necessary for crowning (crown-to-crown fire spread and torching (surface to crown fire spread were evaluated to test the hypothesis that predicted fire behavior is influenced by the proportion of aspen in the stand. Results showed a strong effect of species composition on crowning, but only under moderate fire weather, where aspen-dominated stands were unlikely to crown or torch. Although rarely observed in actual fires, conifer-dominated stands were likely to crown but not to torch, an example of “hysteresis” in crown fire behavior. Results support the hypothesis that potential crown fire behavior varies across a gradient of aspen dominance and fire weather, where it was likely under extreme and severe fire weather, and unlikely under moderate and high fire weather. Furthermore, the “fire-proof” nature of aspen stands broke down across the gradient of aspen dominance and fire weather.

  8. Using user models in Matlab® within the Aspen Plus® interface with an Excel® link

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Fontalvo Alzate

    2014-01-01

    Process intensification and new technologies require tools for process design that can be integrated into well-known simulation software, such as Aspen Plus®. Thus, unit operations that are not included in traditional Aspen Plus software packages can be simulated with Matlab® and integrated within the Aspen Plus interface. In this way, the user can take advantage of all of the tools of Aspen Plus, such as optimization, sensitivity analysis and cost estimation. This paper gives a detailed desc...

  9. Short day-mediated cessation of growth requires the downregulation of AINTEGUMENTALIKE1 transcription factor in hybrid aspen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Karlberg

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Day length is a key environmental cue regulating the timing of major developmental transitions in plants. For example, in perennial plants such as the long-lived trees of the boreal forest, exposure to short days (SD leads to the termination of meristem activity and bud set (referred to as growth cessation. The mechanism underlying SD-mediated induction of growth cessation is poorly understood. Here we show that the AIL1-AIL4 (AINTEGUMENTALIKE transcription factors of the AP2 family are the downstream targets of the SD signal in the regulation of growth cessation response in hybrid aspen trees. AIL1 is expressed in the shoot apical meristem and leaf primordia, and exposure to SD signal downregulates AIL1 expression. Downregulation of AIL gene expression by SDs is altered in transgenic hybrid aspen plants that are defective in SD perception and/or response, e.g. PHYA or FT overexpressors. Importantly, SD-mediated regulation of growth cessation response is also affected by overexpression or downregulation of AIL gene expression. AIL1 protein can interact with the promoter of the key cell cycle genes, e.g. CYCD3.2, and downregulation of the expression of D-type cyclins after SD treatment is prevented by AIL1 overexpression. These data reveal that execution of SD-mediated growth cessation response requires the downregulation of AIL gene expression. Thus, while early acting components like PHYA and the CO/FT regulon are conserved in day-length regulation of flowering time and growth cessation between annual and perennial plants, signaling pathways downstream of SD perception diverge, with AIL transcription factors being novel targets of the CO/FT regulon connecting the perception of SD signal to the regulation of meristem activity.

  10. Modeling water/lithium bromide absorption chillers in ASPEN Plus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Single- and double-effect water/lithium bromide absorption chiller designs are numerically modeled using ASPEN. → The modeling procedure is described and the results are compared to published modeling data to access prediction accuracy. → Predictions for the single- and double-effect designs are within 3% and 5%, respectively of published data for all cycle parameters of interest. → The absorption cycle models presented allow investigation of using absorption chillers for waste heat utilization in the oil and gas industry. -- Abstract: Absorption chillers are a viable option for providing waste heat-powered cooling or refrigeration in oil and gas processing plants, thereby improving energy efficiency. In this paper, single- and double-effect water/lithium bromide absorption chiller designs are numerically modeled using ASPEN. The modeling procedure is described and the results are compared to published modeling data to access prediction accuracy. Predictions for the single- and double-effect designs are within 3% and 5%, respectively of published data for all cycle parameters of interest. The absorption cycle models presented not only allow investigation into the benefits of using absorption chillers for waste heat utilization in the oil and gas industry, but are also generically applicable to a wide range of other applications.

  11. Deciduous tree occurrence and large herbivore browsing in multiscale perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Cassing, Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    Aspen ( Populus tremula), rowan (Sorbus auquparia) and sallow (Salix caprea) are deciduous tree species of low economic value for forestry and contribute to biodiversity of boreal forests. The species are rare in managed forest landscapes, and severely browsed by moose. Their recruitment needs to increase to meet requirements of sustainable forestry to factors that affect occurrence need to be indentified. Paper I is an exploratory study on distribution of these species in relation to natural...

  12. Orbital Express Mission Operations Planning and Resource Management using ASPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Caroline; Knight, Russell; Jones, Grailing; Tran, Danny

    2008-01-01

    The Orbital Express satellite servicing demonstrator program is a DARPA program aimed at developing "a safe and cost-effective approach to autonomously service satellites in orbit". The system consists of: a) the Autonomous Space Transport Robotic Operations (ASTRO) vehicle, under development by Boeing Integrated Defense Systems, and b) a prototype modular next-generation serviceable satellite, NEXTSat, being developed by Ball Aerospace. Flexibility of ASPEN: a) Accommodate changes to procedures; b) Accommodate changes to daily losses and gains; c) Responsive re-planning; and d) Critical to success of mission planning Auto-Generation of activity models: a) Created plans quickly; b) Repetition/Re-use of models each day; and c) Guarantees the AML syntax. One SRP per day vs. Tactical team

  13. Simulation of IGFC power generation system by Aspen Plus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Rosendahl, Lasse; Sayem, Abu Sadahat;

    2010-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a promising technology for electricity generation. Sulfur free syngas from the gas cleaning unit serves as a fuel for SOFC in IGFC (Integrated gasification Fuel cell) power plant. It converts the chemical energy of the fuel gas directly to electric energy and...... therefore, very high efficiencies can be achieved. The outputs from SOFC can be utilized by HRSG which drives steam turbine for electricity production. The SOFC stack model developed using the process flow sheet simulator Aspen Plus which is of equilibrium type. The results indicate there must be tread off...... efficiency and power with respect to a variety of SOFC inputs. HRSG which is located after the SOFC is also included in current simulation study with various operating parameters. This paper also describes for the IGFC Power Plants, the optimization of the Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) is of...

  14. Aqueous electrolyte modeling in ASPEN PLUS{trademark}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomingburg, G.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Simonson, J.M.; Moore, R.C.; Mesmer, R.E.; Cochran, H.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The presence of electrolytes in aqueous solutions has long been recognized as contributing to significant departures from thermodynamic ideality. The presence of ions in process streams can greatly add to the difficulty of predicting process behavior. The difficulties are increased as temperatures and pressures within a process are elevated. Because many chemical companies now model their processes with chemical process simulators it is important that such codes be able to accurately model electrolyte behavior under a variety of conditions. Here the authors examine the electrolyte modeling capability of ASPEN PLUS{trademark}, a widely used simulator. Specifically, efforts to model alkali metal halide and sulfate systems are presented. The authors show conditions for which the models within the code work adequately and how they might be improved for conditions where the simulator models fail.

  15. Best Practices Case Study: Shaw Construction Burlingame Ranch Ph.1, Aspen, CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    Shaw Construction built 84 energy efficient, affordable condominiums forthe City of Aspen that achieved HERS scores of less than 62 with help from Building America’s research team lead Building Science Corporation.

  16. ASPEN: A Framework for Automated Planning and Scheduling of Spacecraft Control and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, David; Fukunaga, Alex S.; Rabideau, Gregg; Chien, Steve

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we describe ASPEN (Automated Planning/Scheduling Environment), a modular, reconfigurable application framework which is capable of supporting a wide variety of planning and scheduling applications.

  17. Coal conversion systems design and process modeling. Volume 1: Application of MPPR and Aspen computer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The development of a coal gasification system design and mass and energy balance simulation program for the TVA and other similar facilities is described. The materials-process-product model (MPPM) and the advanced system for process engineering (ASPEN) computer program were selected from available steady state and dynamic models. The MPPM was selected to serve as the basis for development of system level design model structure because it provided the capability for process block material and energy balance and high-level systems sizing and costing. The ASPEN simulation serves as the basis for assessing detailed component models for the system design modeling program. The ASPEN components were analyzed to identify particular process blocks and data packages (physical properties) which could be extracted and used in the system design modeling program. While ASPEN physical properties calculation routines are capable of generating physical properties required for process simulation, not all required physical property data are available, and must be user-entered.

  18. Different growth strategies determine the carbon gain and productivity of aspen collectives to be used in short-rotation plantations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Populus tremula is a favoured tree species in short-rotation forestry with a recognised large intraspecific variation in productivity. We compared the growth potential of 1-yr-old saplings of four Central European aspen collectives with different climate adaptation on a low-fertility site and searched for growth-determining physiological and morphological traits and their dependence on genetic constitution. Among the 35 investigated traits were photosynthetic capacity and mean assimilation rate, quantum yield and carboxylation efficiency, leaf water potential, leaf phaenology and the ratio of leaves lost to leaves produced (LP ratio), leaf size and total leaf area, axes length growth and canopy carbon gain as an estimate of productivity. The collectives differed by more than 30% in cumulative carbon gain with a large genotype effect, while mean assimilation rate and most photosynthetic and water status traits showed a relatively small intraspecific variation with no significant influence on the variation in C gain. The timing of the beginning of net leaf loss (leaf abscission > leaf production) in August differed between the four collectives and resulted in different maximum leaf areas and LP ratios, which were identified as key factors controlling C gain. Mean assimilation rate, though not related to cumulative C gain, was positively correlated with the light, CO2 and water use efficiencies of photosynthesis. We conclude that genotype selection for high-yielding aspen in short-rotation forestry at low-fertility sites should focus on the parameters leaf phaenology, LP ratio at the end of the growing season, and the resulting total leaf area as key traits.

  19. Tree domatic number in graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Xue-gang Chen

    2007-01-01

    A dominating set \\(S\\) in a graph \\(G\\) is a tree dominating set of \\(G\\) if the subgraph induced by \\(S\\) is a tree. The tree domatic number of \\(G\\) is the maximum number of pairwise disjoint tree dominating sets in \\(V(G)\\). First, some exact values of and sharp bounds for the tree domatic number are given. Then, we establish a sharp lower bound for the number of edges in a connected graph of given order and given tree domatic number, and we characterize the extremal graphs. Finally, we sh...

  20. Enhancement of production of eugenol and its glycosides in transgenic aspen plants via genetic engineering.

    OpenAIRE

    Koeduka, Takao; Suzuki, Shiro; Iijima, Yoko; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; SUZUKI Hideyuki; Watanabe, Bunta; Shibata, Daisuke; UMEZAWA, Toshiaki; Pichersky, Eran; Hiratake, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Eugenol, a volatile phenylpropene found in many plant species, exhibits antibacterial and acaricidal activities. This study attempted to modify the production of eugenol and its glycosides by introducing petunia coniferyl alcohol acetyltransferase (PhCFAT) and eugenol synthase (PhEGS) into hybrid aspen. Gas chromatography analyses revealed that wild-type hybrid aspen produced small amount of eugenol in leaves. The heterologous overexpression of PhCFAT alone resulted in up to 7-fold higher eug...

  1. Managed Mixtures of Aspen and White Spruce 21 to 25 Years after Establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kabzems

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intimate mixtures of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx. and white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench Voss are a key feature of western Canadian boreal forests. These mixtures have the potential to produce high yields of merchantable fibre and provide numerous ecological services. Achievement of this potential has been difficult, and often expensive, to realize as a regeneration goal in managed forests. We report 21 to 25 year results of managed mixtures on two study sites where the white spruce was planted, and the density of aspen natural regeneration manipulated within five years of the stand initiation disturbance. On both sites, white spruce mortality did not increase with increasing aspen density. While height and diameter growth of white spruce declined with increasing aspen density, the effect was not entirely consistent across the two sites. Abrasion from aspen branches was the most common source of damage to spruce crowns. Mixed stands had greater merchantable volume production than pure spruce stands based on model projections. Application of aspen harvest at year 60, while protecting the spruce component for a second harvest entry at year 90, was projected to optimize combined yield for the mixedwood stands.

  2. Planting Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Relf, Diane

    2009-01-01

    The key aspects in planning a tree planting are determining the function of the tree, the site conditions, that the tree is suited to site conditions and space, and if you are better served by a container-grown. After the tree is planted according to the prescribed steps, you must irrigate as needed and mulch the root zone area.

  3. Trees Containing Built-In Pulping Catalysts - Final Report - 08/18/1997 - 08/18/2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullman, G.; Dimmel, D.; Peter, G.

    2000-08-18

    Several hardwood and softwood trees were analyzed for the presence of anthraquinone-type molecules. Low levels of anthraquinone (AQ) and anthrone components were detected using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and sensitive selected-ion monitoring techniques. Ten out of seventeen hardwood samples examined contained AQ-type components; however, the levels were typically below {approximately}6 ppm. No AQs were observed in the few softwood samples that were examined. The AQs were more concentrated in the heartwood of teak than in the sapwood. The delignification of pine was enhanced by the addition of teak chips ({approximately}0.7% AQ-equivalence content) to the cook, suggesting that endogenous AQs can be released from wood during pulping and can catalyze delignification reactions. Eastern cottonwood contained AQ, methyl AQ, and dimethyl AQ, all useful for wood pulping. This is the first time unsubstituted AQ has been observed in wood extracts. Due to the presence of these pulping catalysts, rapid growth rates in plantation settings, and the ease of genetic transformation, eastern cottonwood is a suitable candidate for genetic engineering studies to enhance AQ content. To achieve effective catalytic pulping activity, poplar and cottonwood, respectively, require {approximately}100 and 1000 times more for pulping catalysts. A strategy to increase AQ concentration in natural wood was developed and is currently being tested. This strategy involves ''turning up'' isochorismate synthase (ICS) through genetic engineering. Isochorismate synthase is the first enzyme in the AQ pathway branching from the shikimic acid pathway. In general, the level of enzyme activity at the first branch point or committed step controls the flux through a biosynthetic pathway. To test if the level of ICS regulates AQ biosynthesis in plant tissues, we proposed to over-express this synthase in plant cells. A partial cDNA encoding a putative ICS was available from the random

  4. Aspen Simulation of Diesel-Biodiesel Blends Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Sánchez Armando

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a fuel produced by transesterification of vegetable oils or animal fats, which currently is gaining attention as a diesel substitute. It represents an opportunity to reduce CO2, SO2, CO, HC, PAH and PM emissions and contributes to the diversification of fuels in Mexico's energetic matrix. The results of the simulation of the combustion process are presented in this paper with reference to an engine specification KUBOTA D600-B, operated with diesel-biodiesel blends. The physicochemical properties of the compounds and the operating conditions of equipment were developed using the simulator Aspen® and supplementary information. The main aspects of the engine working conditions were considered such as diesel-biodiesel ratio, air/fuel mixture, temperature of the combustion gases and heat load. Diesel physicochemical specifications were taken from reports of PEMEX and SENER. Methyl esters corresponding to the transesterification of fatty acids that comprise castor oil were regarded as representative molecules of biodiesel obtained from chromatographic analysis. The results include CO2, water vapor, combustion efficiency, power and lower calorific value of fuels.

  5. Biomass growth and element uptake by young trembling aspen in relation to site treatments in Northern Ontario, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, I.K. [Canadian Forest Service, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-05-01

    A second-growth boreal mixed wood, consisting mainly of trembling aspen and balsam fir, with white spruce, balsam poplar and white birch admixed, defoliated in part by spruce budworm, was harvested in late autumn 1992 by conventional cut-and-skid, whole-tree logging. Four blocks, subdivided into 10-m by 10-m plots, separated by buffer strips, were laid out. The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy and environmental implications of screening (i.e. organic layer removal) versus high-speed mixing (using a prototype forestry rototiller), both applied in strips and across whole plots, versus no treatment (cut control) in terms of regrowth biomass production and nutrient uptake. All plots were quickly occupied by a verdant herbaceous regrowth and, depending upon treatment, hardwood shoots. Screefing generally increased numbers of hardwood shoots relative to the control, whereas mixing generally reduced numbers. Above-ground standing crops including tree and non-tree species by the middle of 1997 ranged from 9500 kgha{sup -1} on cut control plots to 4400 kgha{sup -1} on whole-area mixed plots. Nutrient contents in the aboveground vegetation varied commensurately, ranging up to 91 kgha{sup -1} for N, 11 for P, 79 for K, 94 for Ca, 18 for Mg and 8 for S. Leafy matter recovery on the most responsive treatment (harvest with no further site preparation) was ca. 70% complete within five years and the N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and S contents therein had reached or almost reached the same levels as the precut stand. This implies that nutrient cycling largely resumes within five years of harvest. (author)

  6. Autoencoder Trees

    OpenAIRE

    İrsoy, Ozan; Alpaydın, Ethem

    2014-01-01

    We discuss an autoencoder model in which the encoding and decoding functions are implemented by decision trees. We use the soft decision tree where internal nodes realize soft multivariate splits given by a gating function and the overall output is the average of all leaves weighted by the gating values on their path. The encoder tree takes the input and generates a lower dimensional representation in the leaves and the decoder tree takes this and reconstructs the original input. Exploiting t...

  7. Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    Lack of aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment and canopy replacement of aspen stands that grow on the edges of grasslands on the low-elevation elk (Cervus elaphus) winter range of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) in Colorado has been a cause of concern for more than 70 years (Packard, 1942; Olmsted, 1979; Stevens, 1980; Hess, 1993; R.J. Monello, T.L. Johnson, and R.G. Wright, Rocky Mountain National Park, 2006, written commun.). These aspen stands are a significant resource since they are located close to the park's road system and thus are highly visible to park visitors. Aspen communities are integral to the ecological structure of montane and subalpine landscapes because they contain high native species richness of plants, birds, and butterflies (Chong and others, 2001; Simonson and others, 2001; Chong and Stohlgren, 2007). These low-elevation, winter range stands also represent a unique component of the park's plant community diversity since most (more than 95 percent) of the park's aspen stands grow in coniferous forest, often on sheltered slopes and at higher elevations, while these winter range stands are situated on the low-elevation ecotone between the winter range grasslands and some of the park's drier coniferous forests.

  8. 76 FR 15306 - Aspen Merchant Energy LP; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Aspen Merchant Energy LP; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...-referenced proceeding of Aspen Merchant Energy LP's application for market-based rate authority, with...

  9. Stem and merchantable volume equations for hybrid aspen growing on farmland in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Tord

    2014-01-01

    In this study, stem volume models for hybrid aspen were developed. The study was based on 29 stands located in middle and southern Sweden (latitudes 55 – 60° N.). The mean total age of the hybrid aspen was 22 years (range 15 – 50 years) with a mean stand density of 1006 stems ha-1 (90 – 2402) and a mean diameter at breast height (over bark) of 19.7 cm (8.5 – 40.8 cm). A number of equations were assessed for modeling stem volume. Standing volume was examined in relation to soil type. Multiple ...

  10. Synergetic hydrothermal co-liquefaction of crude glycerol and aspen wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Helmer; Jasiunas, Lukas; Casamassima, Luca; Singh, Shashank; Jensen, Thomas; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup

    2015-01-01

    Crude glycerol-assisted hydrothermal co-liquefaction of aspen wood was studied in batch micro-reactors. An experimental matrix of 14 experiments was defined to investigate the effects of three different process parameters on the yields of biocrude and char, and on biocrude quality. Co-processing ......Crude glycerol-assisted hydrothermal co-liquefaction of aspen wood was studied in batch micro-reactors. An experimental matrix of 14 experiments was defined to investigate the effects of three different process parameters on the yields of biocrude and char, and on biocrude quality. Co...

  11. Physical property parameter set for modeling ICPP aqueous wastes with ASPEN electrolyte NRTL model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aqueous waste evaporators at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are being modeled using ASPEN software. The ASPEN software calculates chemical and vapor-liquid equilibria with activity coefficients calculated using the electrolyte Non-Random Two Liquid (NRTL) model for local excess Gibbs free energies of interactions between ions and molecules in solution. The use of the electrolyte NRTL model requires the determination of empirical parameters for the excess Gibbs free energies of the interactions between species in solution. This report covers the development of a set parameters, from literature data, for the use of the electrolyte NRTL model with the major solutes in the ICPP aqueous wastes

  12. Loops and trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron-Huot, S.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate relations between loop and tree amplitudes in quantum field theory that involve putting on-shell some loop propagators. This generalizes the so-called Feynman tree theorem which is satisfied at 1-loop. Exploiting retarded boundary conditions, we give a generalization to ℓ-loop expressing the loops as integrals over the on-shell phase space of exactly ℓ particles. We argue that the corresponding integrand for ℓ > 2 does not involve the forward limit of any physical tree amplitude, except in planar gauge theories. In that case we explicitly construct the relevant physical amplitude. Beyond the planar limit, abandoning direct integral representations, we propose that loops continue to be determined implicitly by the forward limit of physical connected trees, and we formulate a precise conjecture along this line. Finally, we set up technology to compute forward amplitudes in supersymmetric theories, in which specific simplifications occur.

  13. Polypropylene /Aspen/ liquid polybutadienes composites: maximization of impact strength, tensile and modulus by statistical experimental design

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kokta, B. V.; Fortelný, Ivan; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Horák, Zdeněk; Michálková, Danuše

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 99, - (2005), s. 10-11. ISSN 0009-2770. [International Conference on Polymeric Materials in Automotive , Slovak Rubber Conference /17./. 10.5.2005-12.5.2005, Bratislava] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polypropylene * Aspen-PP composite Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  14. ASPEN+ and economic modeling of equine waste utilization for localized hot water heating via fast pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASPEN Plus based simulation models have been developed to design a pyrolysis process for the on-site production and utilization of pyrolysis oil from equine waste at the Equine Rehabilitation Center at Morrisville State College (MSC). The results indicate that utilization of all available Equine Reh...

  15. ASPEN Plus in the Chemical Engineering Curriculum: Suitable Course Content and Teaching Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockstraw, David A.

    2005-01-01

    An established methodology involving the sequential presentation of five skills on ASPEN Plus to undergraduate seniors majoring in ChE is presented in this document: (1) specifying unit operations; (2) manipulating physical properties; (3) accessing variables; (4) specifying nonstandard components; and (5) applying advanced features. This…

  16. Risk Communication, Metacommunication, and Rhetorical Stases in the Aspen-EPA Superfund Controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratman, James F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Explores the relationship between current theoretical definitions of risk communication, the unique national role that EPA plays in defining health and environmental risks, and possible explanations for EPA's inability to persuade Aspen, Colorado, to accept a cleanup plan. Explores ownership messages conveyed through metacommunication conflict…

  17. 75 FR 13805 - Aspen Group Resources Corp., Commercial Concepts, Inc., Desert Health Products, Inc., Equalnet...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Aspen Group Resources Corp., Commercial Concepts, Inc., Desert Health Products, Inc., Equalnet Communications Corp., Geneva Steel Holdings Corp., Orderpro Logistics, Inc. (n/k/a Securus Renewable Energy, Inc.), and Sepragen Corp.; Order...

  18. The Sacred Tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lethbridge Univ. (Alberta).

    Designed as a text for high school students and adults, this illustrated book presents ethical concepts and teachings of Native societies throughout North America concerning the nature and possibilities of human existence. The final component of a course in self-discovery and development, the book begins with the legend of the "Sacred Tree"…

  19. Using user models in Matlab® within the Aspen Plus® interface with an Excel® link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fontalvo Alzate

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Process intensification and new technologies require tools for process design that can be integrated into well-known simulation software, such as Aspen Plus®. Thus, unit operations that are not included in traditional Aspen Plus software packages can be simulated with Matlab® and integrated within the Aspen Plus interface. In this way, the user can take advantage of all of the tools of Aspen Plus, such as optimization, sensitivity analysis and cost estimation. This paper gives a detailed description of how to implement this integration. The interface between Matlab and Aspen Plus is accomplished by sending the relevant information from Aspen Plus to Excel, which feeds the information to a Matlab routine. Once the Matlab routine processes the information, it is returned to Excel and to Aspen Plus. This paper includes the Excel and Matlab template files so the reader can implement their own simulations. By applying the protocol described here, a hybrid distillation-vapor permeation system has been simulated as an example of the applications that can be implemented. For the hybrid system, the effect of membrane selectivity on membrane area and reboiler duty for the partial dehydration of ethanol is studied. Very high selectivities are not necessarily required for an optimum hybrid distillation and vapor permeation system.

  20. Drought characteristics drive patterns in widespread aspen forest mortality across the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, W.; Anderegg, L.; Abatzoglou, J. T.; Berry, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread drought-induced forest mortality has been documented across the globe in the last few decades and influences land-atmosphere interactions, biodiversity, carbon sequestration, and biophysical and biogeochemical feedbacks to climate change. These rapid mortality events are currently not well-captured in current vegetation models, limiting the ability to predict them. While many studies have focused on the plant physiological mechanisms that mediate vegetation mortality, the characteristics of drought seasonality, sequence, severity and duration that drive mortality events have received much less attention. These characteristics are particularly relevant in light of changing precipitation regimes, changes to snowpack and snowmelt, and increasing temperature stress associated with climate change. We examine the characteristics of drought associated with the recent widespread mortality of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) across much of the western United States. We combine a regional model of watershed-level aspen mortality with in situ tissue isotopic analysis of water source to analyze the roles of drought seasonality, severity, and duration in this mortality event, including raw climate variables, derived drought indices, and variables generated by a climate envelope approach. We found that variables pertaining to spring temperatures and spring-summer water deficit, especially during the peak severity of drought, best capture regional mortality patterns, though multi-year drought variables did improve the model. Field water isotopic analysis of aspen water source over a growing season and during moderate seasonal water stress corroborate the regional model by indicating that aspen clones generally utilize surface water with little plasticity during drought stress. These results suggest that drought characteristics can play an important role in mediating widespread forest mortality and have implications for the future vulnerability of trembling aspen

  1. The role of phytochrome A and gibberellins in growth under long and short day conditions: Studies in hybrid aspen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, M.E. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology

    2000-07-01

    This thesis addresses questions concerning the regulation of growth and, specifically, the cessation of growth in response to short days in deciduous tree species. The model tree used in the studies was hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. x P. tremuloides Michx.). We have exploited the possibility of transforming this species to modulate the level of expression of target genes using over-expression and antisense techniques. The target genes in the studies were the photoreceptor phytochrome A (phyA) and gibberellin 20-oxidase (GA 20-oxidase), the latter being a highly regulated enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of gibberellins (GAs). The photoreceptor phyA has been implicated in photoperiodic regulation of growth, while GAs may regulate the physiological response further downstream. The endogenous expression of these genes has been investigated in parallel with studies of various plants with ectopic and reduced levels of expression. The main focus has been on the early stages of induction of growth cessation and its physiological and molecular mechanisms. Studies of hybrid aspen plants with an increased or reduced expression of phyA, show this receptor to mediate the photoperiodic regulation of growth. Plants with ectopic expression could not stop growing despite drastically shortened photoperiods, while the antisense plants showed the reverse phenotype, with a higher sensitivity resulting in earlier cessation of growth. The role of GAs in growth inhibition was also addressed using plants with a reduction in GA levels. These plants showed early cessation of growth and dormancy, and thus an increased sensitivity toward daylength. Conversely, plants with increased rates of GA biosynthesis showed increased growth and stopped growing much later. Furthermore, increases in GA biosynthesis, resulting in high levels of GAs have a major impact on growth. Plants with high GA levels have increased elongation and diameter growth, due to higher rates of cell production in the

  2. Differential Atmospheric Controls on Transpiration of Boreal Trees: A Potential Factor in Pre-mature Tree Mortality in Green-Tree Retention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladon, K. D.; Silins, U.; Lieffers, V. J.

    2004-05-01

    Green-tree retention, a harvesting strategy that involves the preservation of isolated and interconnected patches of live trees within the boundaries of harvested areas, is assumed to emulate natural disturbance, while preserving forest canopy continuity for wildlife habitat, maintaining forest biodiversity, and many other landscape level objectives. Unfortunately, many of the retention trees die within a few years after harvesting, thus much of the desired function of these trees is lost. This research focuses on understanding the relationship between changes in micro-climate following harvesting and transpiration, potentially leading to drought-induced mortality of aspen, balsam poplar, white spruce, and white birch. Continuous measurements of whole-tree water use (sap flow) and micro-climate were taken before and after harvesting of two adjacent boreal mixedwood stands in west-central Alberta in the summer of 2003. Differences in micro-climate including radiation, air temperature, relative humidity and wind penetration into the canopy produced large differences in atmospheric moisture demand (PET) between partially harvested (green-tree retention) and undisturbed forest canopies. The variability in atmospheric conditions created large differences in sap flow velocity and transpiration rates among these four boreal species. Differential transpiration rates among species will be discussed in context of atmospheric controls on water use and drought tolerance of boreal trees with differing autecology and/or hydraulic architecture.

  3. Spring frost and decay fungi are implicated in suppressing aspen re-growth following partial cleaning in juvenile stands

    OpenAIRE

    Wolken, Jane M; Lieffers, Victor J.; Landhausser, Simon M; Mulak, Tara

    2009-01-01

    Aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) regenerates at high densities following manual cleaning. Ten-year-old stands located near Lac La Biche and Peace River, Alberta were manually cleaned to three densities (0, 500 or 1 500 stems ha−1 ) at three times (bud set, dormancy or bud flush) to test the hypothesis that maintaining residual aspen reduces regeneration. At Lac La Biche up to 98% of the aspen regeneration died in the partially-cleaned plots compared to 67% at Peace River five years post-tre...

  4. Holy Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Elosua, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Puxi's streets are lined with plane trees, especially in the former French Concession (and particularly in the Luwan and Xuhui districts). There are a few different varieties of plane tree, but the one found in Shanghai, is the hybrid platane hispanica. In China they are called French Plane trees (faguo wutong - 法国梧桐), for they were first planted along the Avenue Joffre (now Huai Hai lu - 淮海路) in 1902 by the French. Their life span is long, over a thousand years, and they may grow as high as ...

  5. An Investigation of the Relationship Between Tritium in Groundwater and the Dendrochronology of Tritium in Trees at the Savannah River Site. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project was supported through ERDA to demonstrate that the temporal distribution of tritium can be documented by the analysis of bound hydrogen in annual tree-ring samples. The project focuses on two sample locations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a nuclear material production facility located in Aiken, SC. The SRS provided samples of cross-sections from a single tree that were to be pooled together for analysis. Annual tree-rings were identified in each cross-section sample and separated for the period 1954 to 1993. These annual samples were ground and chemically treated to separate the hollocellulose fraction of the wood, then subsequently combusted and the resulting water counting using low-level liquid scintillation counting equipment. Additionally, the ground annual tree-rings were gamma-counted to determine any temporal variation in radionuclide activity and analyzed with x-ray fluorescence to find any temporal variation in trace-element concentrations. This report presents the results and is intended to be a compilation of the work

  6. Whole-tree clearcutting in New England: Manager's guide to impacts on soils, streams, and regeneration. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of impacts of whole-tree clearcutting in spruce-fir, northern hardwood, and central hardwood forest types are summarized for use by practicing foresters, land managers, environmental protection agencies and organizations, and the general public. Guidelines are given for protecting soils, stream water quality, nutrient cycles, and site productivity

  7. Electron Tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Rønde, Heidi S

    2013-01-01

    The photo shows a close-up of a Lichtenberg figure – popularly called an “electron tree” – produced in a cylinder of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Electron trees are created by irradiating a suitable insulating material, in this case PMMA, with an intense high energy electron beam. Upon discharge......, during dielectric breakdown in the material, the electrons generate branching chains of fractures on leaving the PMMA, producing the tree pattern seen. To be able to create electron trees with a clinical linear accelerator, one needs to access the primary electron beam used for photon treatments. We...... appropriated a linac that was being decommissioned in our department and dismantled the head to circumvent the target and ion chambers. This is one of 24 electron trees produced before we had to stop the fun and allow the rest of the accelerator to be disassembled....

  8. Drought stress limits the geographic ranges of two tree species via different physiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, Leander D L; HilleRisLambers, Janneke

    2016-03-01

    Range shifts are among the most ubiquitous ecological responses to anthropogenic climate change and have large consequences for ecosystems. Unfortunately, the ecophysiological forces that constrain range boundaries are poorly understood, making it difficult to mechanistically project range shifts. To explore the physiological mechanisms by which drought stress controls dry range boundaries in trees, we quantified elevational variation in drought tolerance and in drought avoidance-related functional traits of a widespread gymnosperm (ponderosa pine - Pinus ponderosa) and angiosperm (trembling aspen - Populus tremuloides) tree species in the southwestern USA. Specifically, we quantified tree-to-tree variation in growth, water stress (predawn and midday xylem tension), drought avoidance traits (branch conductivity, leaf/needle size, tree height, leaf area-to-sapwood area ratio), and drought tolerance traits (xylem resistance to embolism, hydraulic safety margin, wood density) at the range margins and range center of each species. Although water stress increased and growth declined strongly at lower range margins of both species, ponderosa pine and aspen showed contrasting patterns of clinal trait variation. Trembling aspen increased its drought tolerance at its dry range edge by growing stronger but more carbon dense branch and leaf tissues, implying an increased cost of growth at its range boundary. By contrast, ponderosa pine showed little elevational variation in drought-related traits but avoided drought stress at low elevations by limiting transpiration through stomatal closure, such that its dry range boundary is associated with limited carbon assimilation even in average climatic conditions. Thus, the same climatic factor (drought) may drive range boundaries through different physiological mechanisms - a result that has important implications for process-based modeling approaches to tree biogeography. Further, we show that comparing intraspecific patterns of

  9. How to Create, Modify, and Interface Aspen In-House and User Databanks for System Configuration 1:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, D W

    2000-10-27

    The goal of this document is to provide detailed instructions to create, modify, interface, and test Aspen User and In-House databanks with minimal frustration. The level of instructions are aimed at a novice Aspen Plus simulation user who is neither a programming nor computer-system expert. The instructions are tailored to Version 10.1 of Aspen Plus and the specific computing configuration summarized in the Title of this document and detailed in Section 2. Many details of setting up databanks depend on the computing environment specifics, such as the machines, operating systems, command languages, directory structures, inter-computer communications software, the version of the Aspen Engine and Graphical User Interface (GUI), and the directory structure of how these were installed.

  10. Quantification of phytohormones of forest trees stressed by environmental effects and viruses. Final report. Phytohormonbestimmungen in umwelt- und virengeschaedigten Waldbaeumen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenberg, K. v.; Hahn, H.

    1989-02-01

    A procedure has been developed to quantify 4 phytohormones belonging to the cytokinins - trans-zeatin (t-Z), trans-zeatin riboside (t-ZR), isoentenyladenine (IPA), isopentenyladenosine (IPAR) - in needles of spruce, Picea abies (L.) Karst., which showed symptoms typical of the 'novel forest decline'. The recovery was ca. 66 to 93% dependent on the type of cytokinin. Measurements covering a period of one year always yielded higher contents of cytokinin ribosides in needles of damaged spruce. The results of the chlorophyll measurements correspond to the visible yellowing of the needles of damaged trees. There is a positive correlation between the contents of the cytokinin ribosides (t-ZR, IPAR) and the degree of yellowing and damage. On the basis of t-ZR contents it was possible to differentiate between slightly damaged and almost healthy spruces. The concentrations of the free bases (t-Z, IPA) display a tendency to higher values in the case of needles of damaged trees. On the basis of t-ZR-quantifications in the needles of young shoots, which showed no visible damages and no chlorophyll losses, it could be differentiated between damaged and healthy trees. Young spruce (6-7 years old) were exposed to different ozone concentrations (150, 300, 600 {mu}g O{sub 3}/m{sup 3} air) at controlled laboratory conditions over a period of 11 weeks. An effect on the cytokinin concentration in needles could be stated at O{sub 3}-concentrations higher than 150 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Obviously important for the increase of cytokinin contents in the needles of damaged trees are the soil conditions. (orig./MG).

  11. Identifying and Characterizing Important Trembling Aspen Competitors with Juvenile Lodgepole Pine in Three South-Central British Columbia Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa A. Newsome

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical height ratios for predicting competition between trembling aspen and lodgepole pine were identified in six juvenile stands in three south-central British Columbia ecosystems. We used a series of regression analyses predicting pine stem diameter from the density of neighbouring aspen in successively shorter relative height classes to identify the aspen-pine height ratio that maximized R2. Critical height ratios varied widely among sites when stands were 8–12 years old but, by age 14–19, had converged at 1.25–1.5. Maximum R2 values at age 14–19 ranged from 13.4% to 69.8%, demonstrating that the importance of aspen competition varied widely across a relatively small geographic range. Logistic regression also indicated that the risk of poor pine vigour in the presence of aspen varied between sites. Generally, the degree of competition, risk to pine vigour, and size of individual aspen contributing to the models declined along a gradient of decreasing ecosystem productivity.

  12. Modeling and optimization of a regenerative fuel cell system using the ASPEN process simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Thomas M.; Leibecki, Harold F.

    1990-01-01

    The Hydrogen-Oxygen Regenerative Fuel Cell System was identified as a key component for energy storage in support of future lunar missions. Since the H2-O2 regenerative electrochemical conversion technology has not yet been tested in space applications, it is necessary to implement predictive techniques to develop initial feasible system designs. The ASPEN simulation software furnishes a constructive medium for analyzing and optimizing such systems. A rudimentary regenerative fuel cell system design was examined using the ASPEN simulator and this modular approach allows for easy addition of supplementary ancillary components and easy integration with life support systems. The modules included in the preliminary analyses may serve as the fundamental structure for more complicated energy storage systems.

  13. Effects of Nitrogen Supplements on Degradation of Aspen Wood Lignin and Carbohydrate Components by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, I D

    1983-03-01

    A supplement of KH(2)PO(4), MgSO(4), CaCl(2), trace elements, and thiamine accelerated the initial rate of aspen wood decay by Phanerochaete chrysosporium but did not increase the extent of lignin degradation. Asparagine, casein hydrolysate, and urea supplements (1% added N) strongly inhibited lignin degradation and weight loss. The complex nitrogen sources peptone and yeast extract stimulated lignin degradation and weight loss. Albumen and NH(4)Cl had intermediate effects. Conversion of [C]lignin to CO(2) and water-soluble materials underestimated lignin degradation in the presence of the complex N sources. The highest ratio of lignin degradation to total weight loss and the largest increase in cellulase digestibility occurred during the decay of unsupplemented wood. Rotting of aspen wood by P. chrysosporium gives smaller digestibility increases than have been found with some other white-rot fungi. PMID:16346246

  14. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Order Review and Parenteral Nutrition Preparation, Including Compounding: The ASPEN Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullata, Joseph I; Holcombe, Beverly; Sacks, Gordon; Gervasio, Jane; Adams, Stephen C; Christensen, Michael; Durfee, Sharon; Ayers, Phil; Marshall, Neil; Guenter, Peggi

    2016-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a high-alert medication with a complex drug use process. Key steps in the process include the review of each PN prescription followed by the preparation of the formulation. The preparation step includes compounding the PN or activating a standardized commercially available PN product. The verification and review, as well as preparation of this complex therapy, require competency that may be determined by using a standardized process for pharmacists and for pharmacy technicians involved with PN. An American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) standardized model for PN order review and PN preparation competencies is proposed based on a competency framework, the ASPEN-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines, and is intended for institutions and agencies to use with their staff. PMID:27317615

  15. Bio energy production in birch and hybrid aspen after addition of residue based fertilizers - establishment of fertilization trials; Bioenergiproduktion hos bjoerk och hybridasp vid tillfoersel av restproduktbaserade goedselmedel - etablering av goedslingsfoersoek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelin, Gunnar (EkoBalans Fenix AB, Malmoe (Sweden))

    2009-03-15

    Sewage sludge and wood ashes could be used as fertilizers in order to increase forest tree production. In southern Sweden forest growth normally increases with approximately 10 % after ash recycling due to increased N and/or P availability. P is added with the ashes and the pH-increasing effect of the wood ash can lead to increased N net mineralization. Other positive effects of wood ash recycling are improved nutrient sustainability and less acid run-off water. Possible negative effects are heavy metal accumulation, if the content of one or more heavy metals of the recycled ash exceeds the heavy metal content of the harvested biomass, and nitrate leaching if the vegetation cannot take up nitrified N. It is important to evaluate the sustainability of fertilization systems based on residues such as sludge and wood ash. Wood ash does not contain N and the P concentration often is too low for the ashes to function as an NP fertilizer. Thus N and sometimes P must be added. Sludge is an interesting alternative. The main purpose of the project is to study sustainable production of forest bio energy in intensively cultivated birch and hybrid aspen stands. Another purpose is to establish experiments that can be used for long term studies and as demonstration objects. In the first few years the goal is to study the short term effects of residue based fertilization compared to conventional NPK fertilization on tree nutrient uptake, nutrient leaching, sustainability and economy. In the long term the goal is to design appropriate fertilization strategies in a residue based fertilization system for the intensive cultivation of birch and hybrid aspen without negative side effects such as large scale nutrient leaching. Four field experiments were established in 2008 and one additional experiment in hybrid aspen will be established in the spring of 2009. Elevated bud N and P concentrations after fertilization with both Ashes+N and NPK means good possibilities for future growth

  16. The Effect of Air Preheating in a Biomass CFB Gasifier using ASPEN Plus Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Wayne; Reynolds, Anthony; Kennedy, David

    2009-01-01

    In the context of climate change, increasing efficiency and energy security, biomass gasification is likely to play an important role in energy production. Atmospheric circulating fluidised bed (CFB) technology was selected for the current study. The primary objective of this research is to develop a computer simulation model of a CFB biomass gasifier that can accurately predict gasifier performance under various operating conditions. An original model was developed using ASPEN Plus (Advan...

  17. Quaking Aspen in the Residential-Wildland Interface: Elk Herbivory Hinders Forest Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Paul C. Rogers; Jones, Allison; Catlin, James C; Shuler, James; Morris, Arthur; Kuhns, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) forests are experiencing numerous impediments across North America. In the West, recent drought, fire suppression, insects, diseases, climate trends, inappropriate management, and ungulate herbivory are impacting these high biodiversity forests. Additionally, ecological tension zones are sometimes created where the above factors intermingle with jurisdictional boundaries. The public-private land interface may result in stress to natural areas where g...

  18. Aspen Increase Soil Moisture, Nutrients, Organic Matter and Respiration in Rocky Mountain Forest Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, Joshua R.; Samuel B. St. Clair

    2012-01-01

    Development and change in forest communities are strongly influenced by plant-soil interactions. The primary objective of this paper was to identify how forest soil characteristics vary along gradients of forest community composition in aspen-conifer forests to better understand the relationship between forest vegetation characteristics and soil processes. The study was conducted on the Fishlake National Forest, Utah, USA. Soil measurements were collected in adjacent forest stands that were c...

  19. Analysis of aspen-and-birch separated small woods’ vegetation in North Steppe of Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    N. M. Nazarenko; I. M. Loza

    2010-01-01

    Conducted analysis of forest vegetation has allowed selecting and specifying classification and typological units of the aspen-and-birch separated small woods, which have statistically significant difference of ecotopic and coenotic parameters. Those parameters of studied forest ecosystems are characterised. Existence of the lines of hygrogenic and edaphogenic substitution, and succession rows are described. Phytoindication description of ecological factors’ pivotal conditions is presented. D...

  20. DECAY RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF OIL HEAT TREATED ASPEN WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Bazyar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The decay resistance of oil-heat treated aspen wood (Populus tremula l. against white rot fungi (Coriolus versicolor and brown rot fungi (Coniophora puteana was investigated. Three different temperature stages and two time levels for oil heat treatment for the selection of optimum conditions were determined. Linseed oil as a heating medium was used. The mass loss of treated samples that were exposed to both fungi was significantly lower than that of the control samples. Results also showed improvement in dimensional stability after oil heat treatment. Decay resistance and dimensional stability of aspen wood were increased significantly with temperature increasing, but time seemed to have no effect on those properties. Oil heat treatment is a suitable method to improve decay resistance of aspen wood as it reduced the mass loss by 71% and 77% against Coriolus versicolor and Coniophora puteana compared with control samples, respectively. On the other hand, oil heat treatment improved the dimensional stability by about 20.5%.

  1. SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS BETWEEN BIRCH CHEMICAL MECHANICAL PULPS AND ASPEN BLEACHED KRAFT PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric C. Xu; Yajun Zhou

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, two different grades of birch chemical mechanical (P-RC APMP) pulps and aspen market bleached kraft pulp were compared by low consistency refining of the pulps separately and in different combinations. In addition, the separately refined pulps were also combined to compare with the pulps from the co-refined pulp blend. The results showed that in both cases there were synergistic effects between the two types of pulps: adding the birch P-RC APMP pulp to the aspen kraft pulp improved pulp properties, and the resultant pulp blends had a higher fiber bonding strength (tensile and tensile energy absorption) than the sum of weighted contributions from the individual components. Understanding this synergistic effect between chemical mechanical (P-RC APMP) and kraft pulps can help to improve their applications and performances in various papermaking processes.The results also showed that introducing, at least up to certain percentage of, the birch P-RC APMP pulp into the aspen bleached kraft pulp not only improves optical and bulk properties, but also maintains or improves tensile strength, even though the P-RC APMP pulp used has lower tensile than the kraft pulp.

  2. SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS BETWEEN BIRCH CHEMICAL MECHANICAL PULPS AND ASPEN BLEACHED KRAFT PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EricC.Xu; YajunZhou

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, two different grades of birch chemical mechanical (P-RC APMP) pulps and aspen market bleached kraft pulp were compared by low consistency refining of the pulps separately and in different combinations. In addition, the separately refined pulps were also combined to compare with the pulps from the co-refined pulp blend. The results showed that in both cases there were synergistic effects between the two types of pulps: adding the birch P-RC APMP pulp to the aspen kraft pulp improved pulp properties, and the resultant pulp blends had a higher fiber bonding strength (tensile and tensile energy absorption) than the sum of weighted contributions from the individual components. Understanding this synergistic effect between chemical mechanical (P-RC APMP) and kraft pulps can help to improve their applications and performances in various papermaking processes. The results also showed that introducing, at least up to certain percentage of, the birch P-RC APMP pulp into the aspen bleached kraft pulp not only improves optical and bulk properties, but also maintains or improves tensile strength, even though the P-RC APMP pulp used has lower tensile than the kraft pulp.

  3. Methods to inventory and strip thin in dense stands of aspen root suckers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Headlee WL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aspen and their hybrids have demonstrated high biomass productivity and can produce abundant regeneration in the form of root suckers. This makes aspen particularly intriguing for bio-energy production, because replanting costs can be avoided and additional biomass can be obtained by thinning the regenerating stands. Mechanical strip thinning (removal of stems in parallel strips has been proposed as a fast and efficient method for capturing biomass that would otherwise be lost to mortality in such stands. However, determining the appropriate width for the residual rows is challenging, due to the difficulty of conducting inventories with traditional sampling tools and the variability in gap sizes between root suckers in the residual rows. In this study, we describe the development and testing of a simple inventory tool that may be used to conduct either fixed-area or variable-radius sampling in these stands. Also described is the development and testing of an equation that uses such inventory data along with Poisson distribution theory to predict the size of the largest gap between root suckers within residual rows, which in turn can be used to inform strip thinning operations. Based on the promising results of our limited tests, we encourage further evaluation of these methods with regeneration from planted and natural aspen stands, as well as other root suckering species.

  4. EFFECT OF THERMAL TREATMENT ON THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BIRCH AND ASPEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Kocaefe

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature treatment of wood is one of the alternatives to chemical treatment. During this process, the wood is heated to higher temperatures than those of conventional drying. The wood structure changes due to decomposition of hemicelluloses, ramification of lignin, and crystallization of cellulose. The wood becomes less hygroscopic. These changes improve the dimensional stability of wood, increase its resistance to micro-organisms, darken its color, and modify its hardness. However, wood also might loose some of its elasticity. Consequently, the heat treatment conditions have to be optimized. Therefore, it is important to understand the transformation of the chemical structure of wood caused by the treatment. In this study, the modification of the surface composition of the wood was followed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and inverse gas chromatography (IGC under different experimental conditions. The effect of maximum treatment temperatures on the chemical composition of Canadian birch and aspen as well as the correlations between their chemical transformation and different mechanical properties are presented. FTIR analysis results showed that the heat treatment affected the chemical composition of birch more compared to that of aspen. The results of IGC tests illustrated that the surfaces of the aspen and birch became more basic with heat treatment. The mechanical properties were affected by degradation of hemicellulose, ramification of lignin and cellulose crystallization.

  5. Simulation of Synthesis Gas Production from Steam Oxygen Gasification of Colombian Coal Using Aspen Plus®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Preciado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A steady state simulation of syngas production from a Steam Oxygen Gasification process using commercial technologies was performed using Aspen Plus®. For the simulation, the average proximate and ultimate compositions of bituminous coal obtained from the Colombian Andean region were employed. The simulation was applied to conduct sensitivity analyses in the O2 to coal mass ratio, coal slurry concentration, WGS operating temperature and WGS steam to dry gas molar ratio (SDG over the key parameters: syngas molar composition, overall CO conversion in the WGS reactors, H2 rich-syngas lower heating value (LHV and thermal efficiency. The achieved information allows the selection of critical operating conditions leading to improve system efficiency and environmental performance. The results indicate that the oxygen to carbon ratio is a key variable as it affects significantly both the LHV and thermal efficiency. Nevertheless, the process becomes almost insensitive to SDG values higher than 2. Finally, a thermal efficiency of 62.6% can be reached. This result corresponds to a slurry solid concentration of 0.65, a WGS process SDG of 0.59, and a LTS reactor operating temperature of 473 K. With these fixed variables, a syngas with H2 molar composition of 92.2% and LHV of 12 MJ Nm−3 was attained.

  6. On the tree packing conjecture

    OpenAIRE

    Balogh, József; Palmer, Cory

    2012-01-01

    The Gy\\'arf\\'as tree packing conjecture states that any set of $n-1$ trees $T_{1},T_{2},..., T_{n-1}$ such that $T_i$ has $n-i+1$ vertices pack into $K_n$. We show that $t=1/10n^{1/4}$ trees $T_1,T_2,..., T_t$ such that $T_i$ has $n-i+1$ vertices pack into $K_{n+1}$ (for $n$ large enough). We also prove that any set of $t=1/10n^{1/4}$ trees $T_1,T_2,..., T_t$ such that no tree is a star and $T_i$ has $n-i+1$ vertices pack into $K_{n}$ (for $n$ large enough). Finally, we prove that $t=1/4n^{1/...

  7. Growth effects after whole-tree harvest in final cut of Scots pine and Norway spruce forest. Final report; Tillvaexteffekternas storlek och uthaallighet efter skogsbraensleuttag i slutavverkning av tall och gran. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valinger, E. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Silviculture

    2001-12-01

    A great concern in forestry today is whether whole-tree harvesting influence site productivity and whether it is consistent with the principle of sustainable use of forest resources. To evaluate this a randomised field experiment established 24 years ago in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Southern Sweden was used. The field experiment was established in fall 1975 as a naturally regenerated mixed forest with Scots pine and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) with a growing stock of 305 m{sup 3}/ha was clear-cut near Kosta (56 deg 52' N, 15 deg 50' E, 240 m.a.s.l.). The site was a mesic dwarf-shrub type of medium fertility, with an average precipitation of 600 mm yr-1 and the soil was an orthic podzol. Treatments were conventional stem harvest (CH), whole-tree harvest (WTH), and branch and stem harvest (BSH). Scots pine seedlings of local provenance were planted in spring 1977 at the beginning of the second growing season following the harvest. The seedlings were planted in exposed mineral soil in manually scarified patches (40 x 40 cm) at 1.7 m spacing (144 seedlings per assessment plot, i.e. 3 600 seedlings/ha). Based on calliper data, the diameter for the mean basal area per tree (db) was calculated for each plot after 24 years using the formula: db = ({sigma} b{sup 3}/{sigma} b{sup 2}), where b is basal area at breast height for each tree. Three undamaged sample trees with a diameter equal or close to the diameter of the mean basal area per tree were selected on each plot giving 36 stems that were felled for destructive measurements in 2000. Total tree height ({+-} 0.01 m) was measured on every tree felled. Stem biomass was estimated by sampling of stem discs, 2 cm thick, at stump height (1 % of tree height), breast height (1.3 m), and at every meter along the bole. Crown biomass was estimated by sampling live and dead branches on the felled trees. From every whorl of branches one living branch was sampled and all branches were counted. Stem

  8. A suffix tree or not a suffix tree?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starikovskaya, Tatiana; Vildhøj, Hjalte Wedel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the structure of suffix trees. Given an unlabeled tree τ on n nodes and suffix links of its internal nodes, we ask the question “Is τ a suffix tree?”, i.e., is there a string S whose suffix tree has the same topological structure as τ? We place no restrictions on S, in...... particular we do not require that S ends with a unique symbol. This corresponds to considering the more general definition of implicit or extended suffix trees. Such general suffix trees have many applications and are for example needed to allow efficient updates when suffix trees are built online. Deciding...... if τ is a suffix tree is not an easy task, because, with no restrictions on the final symbol, we cannot guess the length of a string that realizes τ from the number of leaves. And without an upper bound on the length of such a string, it is not even clear how to solve the problem by an exhaustive...

  9. Fault trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fault trees are a method of deductive analysis and a means of graphic representation of the reliability and security of systems. The principles of the method are set out and the main points illustrated by many examples of electrical systems, fluids, and mechanical systems as well as everyday occurrences. In addition, some advice is given on the use of the method

  10. Making CSB+-Tree Processor Conscious

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuel, Michael; Pedersen, Anders Uhl; Bonnet, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Cache-conscious indexes, such as CSB+-tree, are sensitive to the underlying processor architecture. In this paper, we focus on how to adapt the CSB+-tree so that it performs well on a range of different processor architectures. Previous work has focused on the impact of node size on the performance...... of the CSB+-tree. We argue that it is necessary to consider a larger group of parameters in order to adapt CSB+-tree to processor architectures as different as Pentium and Itanium. We identify this group of parameters and study how it impacts the performance of CSB+-tree on Itanium 2. Finally, we...

  11. Unimodular Trees versus Einstein Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, Enrique; Martin, Carmelo P

    2016-01-01

    The maximally helicity violating (MHV) tree level scattering amplitudes involving three, four or five gravitons are worked out in Unimodular Gravity. They are found to coincide with the corresponding amplitudes in General Relativity. This a remarkable result, insofar as both the propagators and the vertices are quite different in both theories.

  12. Tree encroachment dynamics in heathlands of north-west Italy: the fire regime hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascoli D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Tree encroachment is one of the primary conservation issues in Calluna-heathlands, a priority habitat in Europe. Improving understanding of the ecological factors that trigger transitions to woodlands is key to developing strategies for heathlands management. The irrational use of fire has been recognized as one of the key factors that drives the loss of heathlands of north-west Italy. The effect of high frequency pastoral burning on the replacement of heathlands by grasslands has been documented by several studies. The relationship between fire and tree encroachment is less clear. The paper examines the effect of the fire regime on the encroachment of Populus tremula L. and Betula pendula Roth. in the heathland. The study was carried out at the Managed Nature Reserve of Vauda (7° 41’ E, 45° 13’ N, which includes one of the most valuable heathlands of north-western Italy. The experimental design consisted of analysing the age structure, dendrometric variables and the species composition of three aspen and birch stands, circular-shaped and isolated within the heathland matrix. From 1986 to 2009 all stands experienced the same fire regime due to pastoral burning. Wildfires of similar behaviour occurred in 1998, 2003 and 2008 and determined the stand structure observed in 2009. The results evidenced that fire acts as a catalyst not only for seedlings establishment, as previously documented, but also for woodland expansion in the heathland. After initial establishment, stands showed a concentric encroachment dynamic, mainly due to aspen root suckering after post-fire stem mortality, whose steps of expansion coincided with the return interval of wildfires. Moreover, aspen determined the loss of heathland characteristic species, whose relative abundances were inversely correlated to aspen density along a gradient from the stands centre to the surrounding heathland. The regulation of current burning practices by prescribed burning, integrated

  13. Tree density on a vegetated uranium mill tailings site and associated estimates of Ra-226 in above ground biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfer of Ra-226 to the terrestrial pathway will depend on the uptake by indigenous species which colonize dry areas of inactive or abandoned uranium mill tailings sites. The density of trembling aspen and white birch, their heights and biomass values, have been determined 10 to 15 years after revegetation. In addition the percentage composition of the ground cover for herbs, shrubs and grasses is evaluated. For aspens of less than 1 m in height, the density of 0.0536 trees/m2 was considerably higher than for birches of the same height with 0.0097 trees/m2. As tree heights increase the number of trees/m2 decrease to 0.0049 and 0.0010 respectively for 3 to 4 m tall trees. Trees taller than 4 m were rarely found. The ground cover biomass (approximately 125 g/m2) consisted generally of two types; either shrubs were dominant or herbs and grasses prevailed. From Ra-226 concentrations in different above-ground biomass components and the average composition of the vegetation on one square metre, transfer values were estimated. Annual transfer by herbal biomass (leaves, herbs and grasses) ranged from 330 to 760 pCi/m2. The standing crop of woody biomass was estimated to range from 450 to 1700 pCi/m2

  14. Interactions between Bacteria And Aspen Defense Chemicals at the Phyllosphere - Herbivore Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Charles J; Lowe-Power, Tiffany M; Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Lindroth, Richard L; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2016-03-01

    Plant- and insect-associated microorganisms encounter a diversity of allelochemicals, and require mechanisms for contending with these often deleterious and broadly-acting compounds. Trembling aspen, Populus tremuloides, contains two principal groups of defenses, phenolic glycosides (salicinoids) and condensed tannins, which differentially affect the folivorous gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, and its gut symbionts. The bacteria genus Acinetobacter is frequently associated with both aspen foliage and gypsy moth consuming that tissue, and one isolate, Acinetobacter sp. R7-1, previously has been shown to metabolize phenolic glycosides. In this study, we aimed to characterize further interactions between this Acinetobacter isolate and aspen secondary metabolites. We assessed bacterial carbon utilization and growth in response to different concentrations of phenolic glycosides and condensed tannins. We also tested if enzyme inhibitors reduce bacterial growth and catabolism of phenolic glycosides. Acinetobacter sp. R7-1 utilized condensed tannins but not phenolic glycosides or glucose as carbon sources. Growth in nutrient-rich medium was increased by condensed tannins, but reduced by phenolic glycosides. Addition of the P450 enzyme inhibitor piperonyl butoxide increased the effects of phenolic glycosides on Acinetobacter sp. R7-1. In contrast, the esterase inhibitor S,S,S,-tributyl-phosphorotrithioate did not affect phenolic glycoside inhibition of bacterial growth. Degradation of phenolic glycosides by Acinetobacter sp. R7-1 appears to alleviate the cytotoxicity of these compounds, rather than provide an energy source. Our results further suggest this bacterium utilizes additional, complementary mechanisms to degrade antimicrobial phytochemicals. Collectively, these results provide insight into mechanisms by which microorganisms contend with their environment within the context of plant-herbivore interactions. PMID:26961755

  15. Metal and nutrient dynamics in decomposing tree litter on a metal contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a forest on sandy, metal polluted soil, we examined effects of six tree species on litter decomposition rates and accompanied changes in metal (Cd, Zn) and nutrient (base cations, N, C) amounts. Decomposition dynamics were studied by means of a litterbag experiment lasting for 30 months. The decomposition peak occurred within the first year for all tree species, except for aspen. During litter decomposition, high metal litter types released part of their accumulated metals, whereas low metal litter types were characterized by a metal enrichment. Base cations, N and C were released from all litter types. Metal release from contaminated litter might involve risks for metal dispersion towards the soil. On the other hand, metal enrichment of uncontaminated litter may be ecologically relevant as it can be easily transported or serve as food source. - Highlights: • Litter decomposition peak occurred within the first year for all tree species, except for aspen. • Base cations, N and C were released from all litter types during decomposition. • Cd and Zn were released from the high metal litter types. • Low metal litter types were characterized by a net Cd and Zn enrichment. • Metal and nutrient releases were reflected in topsoil characteristics. - Litter decomposition rates, as well as enrichment and release dynamics of metals and nutrients in decomposing litter were divergent under the different tree species

  16. Process simulation of oxy-combustion for maximization of energy output using ASPEN plus

    OpenAIRE

    Subhodeep Banerjee, Xiao Zhang, Suraj K. Puvvada, Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is a next-generation combustion technology that shows promise to address the need of low-cost carbon capture from fossil fueled power plants. Oxy-fuel combustion requires expensive pre-processing in an air separation unit to separate pure oxygen from air for the combustion process, which reduces the overall efficiency of the process. This paper employs ASPEN Plus process simulation software to model a simple oxy-fuel combustor and investigates the effect of various paramet...

  17. An efficient and extensible approach for compressing phylogenetic trees

    KAUST Repository

    Matthews, Suzanne J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Biologists require new algorithms to efficiently compress and store their large collections of phylogenetic trees. Our previous work showed that TreeZip is a promising approach for compressing phylogenetic trees. In this paper, we extend our TreeZip algorithm by handling trees with weighted branches. Furthermore, by using the compressed TreeZip file as input, we have designed an extensible decompressor that can extract subcollections of trees, compute majority and strict consensus trees, and merge tree collections using set operations such as union, intersection, and set difference.Results: On unweighted phylogenetic trees, TreeZip is able to compress Newick files in excess of 98%. On weighted phylogenetic trees, TreeZip is able to compress a Newick file by at least 73%. TreeZip can be combined with 7zip with little overhead, allowing space savings in excess of 99% (unweighted) and 92%(weighted). Unlike TreeZip, 7zip is not immune to branch rotations, and performs worse as the level of variability in the Newick string representation increases. Finally, since the TreeZip compressed text (TRZ) file contains all the semantic information in a collection of trees, we can easily filter and decompress a subset of trees of interest (such as the set of unique trees), or build the resulting consensus tree in a matter of seconds. We also show the ease of which set operations can be performed on TRZ files, at speeds quicker than those performed on Newick or 7zip compressed Newick files, and without loss of space savings.Conclusions: TreeZip is an efficient approach for compressing large collections of phylogenetic trees. The semantic and compact nature of the TRZ file allow it to be operated upon directly and quickly, without a need to decompress the original Newick file. We believe that TreeZip will be vital for compressing and archiving trees in the biological community. © 2011 Matthews and Williams; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  18. An evaluation of steam-treated aspen as a substitute for corn silage in the rations of lactating cows

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, L J

    1980-01-01

    Fifteen lactating Holsteins were used to test processed aspen added to corn silage at the levels of 0, 10 and 20% (dry matter basis). The experiment was designed as a latin square with three experimental periods each 42 days in length. The forage mixtures were fed free choice to the cows, which were housed in a free-stall barn, and their individual feed intakes were recorded by using electronic doors. The processed aspen contained 45.4% dry matter, 73.7% acid detergent fiber and 0.54% protein...

  19. Urbanization-related changes in European aspen (Populus tremula L.): Leaf traits and litter decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated foliar and litter responses of European aspen (Populus tremula L.) to urbanization, including factors such as increased temperature, moisture stress and nitrogen (N) deposition. Leaf samples were collected in 2006-2008 from three urban and three rural forest stands in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area, southern Finland, and reciprocal litter transplantations were established between urban and rural sites. Urban leaves exhibited a higher amount of epicuticular waxes and N concentration, and a lower C:N ratio than rural ones, but there was no difference in specific leaf area. Urban litter had a slightly higher N concentration, lower concentrations of lignin and total phenolics, and was more palatable to a macrofaunal decomposer. Moreover, litter decay was faster at the urban site and for urban litter. Urbanization thus resulted in foliar acclimatization in terms of increased amount of epicuticular waxes, as well as in accelerated decomposition of the N-richer leaf litter. - Urbanization can modify leaf traits of aspen and accelerate litter decomposition through changes in litter traits as well as in environmental conditions at the decomposition site.

  20. Chemical changes to leaf litter from trees grown under elevated CO2 and the implications for microbial utilization in a stream ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of elevated carbon dioxide on the chemistry and subsequent response of stream microorganisms growing on leaf litter of three riparian tree species (quaking aspen, white willow and sugar maple) were studied. Results showed that the effects were species-specific, i.e. aspen leaves contained high concentrations of lignin, maple leafs contained higher concentrations of soluble phenolic compounds and willow leaves contained higher concentrations of carbohydrate-bound condensed tannins. Initially, the higher concentrations of soluble phenolic compounds in maple leaves were rapidly leached in stream water, but overall, the impact of altered leaf chemistry on riparian trees grown under elevated carbon dioxide was clearly variable; no strongly suppressed microbial activity during stream incubation was observed. Any evidence of suppression observed, was species-specific. 49 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  1. Analysis of CO2 Separation by Selexol Based on Aspen Plus%基于Aspen Plus对Selexol分离CO2流程的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱朋华; 李丹丹; 徐宝龙; 呼姚; 杜昌帅; 吴少华

    2014-01-01

    整体煤气化联合循环发电系统可采取燃烧前捕集CO2的方法,处理的合成气量少,能耗低,且能够实现 CO2的近零排放,在 CO2脱除方面具有很大的优势。文中基于Aspen Plus 对 CO2/H2S 联合脱除和分别脱除流程建立了模型,对2流程的能耗、CO2及H2S的脱除效率以及Selexol溶液的再生性能进行了分析。得出:在出口 CO2纯度相同的情况下,CO2/H2S联合脱除流程的能耗仅占CO2/H2S分别脱除的21%左右,CO2脱除效率高于分别脱除流程,2流程Selexol溶液的再生性能相差不大,且H2S脱除效率也可达到95%以上,因此CO2/H2S联合脱除流程更经济。%Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)power generation system can adopt pre-combustion CO2 capture methods, handling with less syngas and have low energy consumption, which can achieve near-zero emissions of CO2, resulting in great advantages in terms of CO2 removal. Based on Aspen Plus, combined removal of CO2/H2S (CRCH) and separate removal of CO2/H2S (SRCH) were modeled . Energy consumption, capture efficiency of CO2 and H2S, as well as the regeneration performance of Selexol were analyzed by the two models. The results indicate that:while keeping the same CO2 purity in outlet stream, the energy consumption of CRCH accounts for only 21% of SRCH; the CO2 capture efficiency is higher than that of SRCH, the regeneration performance of Selexol is almost the same for the two processes, and the capture efficiency of H2S in the two processes can be higher than 95%. All those prove that CRCH is more economic than SRCH.

  2. Modular Tree Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Tree automata are traditionally used to study properties of tree languages and tree transformations. In this paper, we consider tree automata as the basis for modular and extensible recursion schemes. We show, using well-known techniques, how to derive from standard tree automata highly modular r...

  3. 77 FR 31351 - Adequacy Determination for Aspen PM10 and Fort Collins Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plans' Motor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... (69 FR 40004). In addition, in certain areas with monitored ambient carbon monoxide (CO) values... the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). The criteria by which we determine whether a SIP... AGENCY Adequacy Determination for Aspen PM and Fort Collins Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plans'...

  4. Bronchi, Bronchial Tree, & Lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... specific Modules Resources Archived Modules Updates Bronchi, Bronchial Tree, & Lungs Bronchi and Bronchial Tree In the mediastinum , at the level of the ... trachea. As the branching continues through the bronchial tree, the amount of hyaline cartilage in the walls ...

  5. Sofic Tree-Shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Aubrun, Nathalie; Béal, Marie-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of sofic tree-shifts which corresponds to symbolic dynamical systems of infinite ranked trees accepted by finite tree automata. We show that, contrary to shifts of infinite sequences, there is no unique reduced deterministic irreducible tree automaton accepting an irreducible sofic tree-shift, but that there is a unique synchronized one, called the Fischer automaton of the tree-shift. We define the notion of almost of finite type tree-shift which are sofic tree-shifts accepted...

  6. Simulation and validation of chemical-looping combustion using ASPEN plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhou, Zheming Zhang, Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale experimental studies have demonstrated that Chemical-Looping Combustion (CLC is an advanced technology which holds great potential for high-efficiency low-cost carbon capture. The generated syngas in CLC is subsequently oxidized to CO2 and H2O by reaction with an oxygen carrier. In this paper, process-level models of CLC are established in ASPEN Plus code for detailed simulations. The entire CLC process, from the beginning of coal gasification to reduction and oxidation of the oxygen carrier is modeled. The heat content of each major component such as fuel and air reactors and air/flue gas heat exchangers is carefully examined. Large amount of energy is produced in the fuel reactor, but energy needs to be supplied to the air reactor. The overall performance and efficiency of the modeled CLC systems are also evaluated.

  7. Simulation and validation of chemical-looping combustion using ASPEN plus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ling [Research Center of Fluid Machinery Engineering and Technology, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Zhang, Zheming; Agarwal, Ramesh K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Laboratory-scale experimental studies have demonstrated that Chemical-Looping Combustion (CLC) is an advanced technology which holds great potential for high-efficiency low-cost carbon capture. The generated syngas in CLC is subsequently oxidized to CO2 and H2O by reaction with an oxygen carrier. In this paper, process-level models of CLC are established in ASPEN Plus code for detailed simulations. The entire CLC process, from the beginning of coal gasification to reduction and oxidation of the oxygen carrier is modeled. The heat content of each major component such as fuel and air reactors and air/flue gas heat exchangers is carefully examined. Large amount of energy is produced in the fuel reactor, but energy needs to be supplied to the air reactor. The overall performance and efficiency of the modeled CLC systems are also evaluated.

  8. A simulation study of Solid Oxide fuel cell for IGCC power generation using Aspen Plus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Kim, Hyung Taek

    2010-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a promising technology for electricity generation. Sulfur free syngas from the gas cleaning unit serves as a fuel for SOFC in IGFC (Integrated gasification Fuel cell) power plant. It converts the chemical energy of the fuel gas directly to electric energy and...... more accurate fuel cell model giving an advantage over previous system studies based on simplified SOFC models. The objective of this work is to develop a simulation model of a SOFC for IGFC system, flexible enough for use in future development, capable of predicting system performance under various...... operating conditions and using diverse fuels. The SOFC stack model developed using the chemical process flow sheet simulator Aspen Plus which is of equilibrium type and is based on Gibbs free energy minimization. The SOFC model performs heat and mass balances and considers the ohmic, activation and...

  9. Continuous Hydrothermal Co-liquefaction of Aspen Wood and Glycerol with Water Phase Recirculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Helmer; Grigoras, Ionela; Hoffmann, Jessica;

    2016-01-01

    reactors, although a continuous and energy-efficient operation is paramount for such process to be feasible. In this work an experimental campaign in a continuous bench scale unit is presented. The campaign is based on glycerol-assisted hydrothermal liquefaction of aspen wood carried out with the presence...... having a higher heating value of 34.3 MJ/kg. The volatile fraction of the biocrude consisted mostly of compounds having number of carbon atoms in the C6–C12 range similar to gasoline. In terms of process feasibility, it was revealed that total organic carbon (TOC) and ash significantly accumulated in the...... water phase when such is recirculated for the proceeding batch. After four batches the TOC and the ash mass fraction of the water phase were 136.2 [g/L] and 12.6 [%], respectively. Water phase recirculation showed a slight increase in the biocrude quality in terms on an effective hydrogen...

  10. Three Stage Equilibrium Model for Coal Gasification in Entrained Flow Gasifiers Based on Aspen Plus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Xiangdong; ZHONG Weimin; DU Wenli; QIAN Feng

    2013-01-01

    A three stage equilibrium model is developed for coal gasification in the Texaco type coal gasifiers based on Aspen Plus to calculate the composition of product gas,carbon conversion,and gasification temperature.The model is divided into three stages including pyrolysis and combustion stage,char gas reaction stage,and gas phase reaction stage.Part of the water produced in the pyrolysis and combustion stage is assumed to be involved in the second stage to react with the unburned carbon.Carbon conversion is then estimated in the second stage by steam participation ratio expressed as a function of temperature.And the gas product compositions are calculated from gas phase reactions in the third stage.The simulation results are consistent with published experimental data.

  11. Process simulation of oxy-combustion for maximization of energy output using ASPEN plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhodeep Banerjee, Xiao Zhang, Suraj K. Puvvada, Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxy-fuel combustion is a next-generation combustion technology that shows promise to address the need of low-cost carbon capture from fossil fueled power plants. Oxy-fuel combustion requires expensive pre-processing in an air separation unit to separate pure oxygen from air for the combustion process, which reduces the overall efficiency of the process. This paper employs ASPEN Plus process simulation software to model a simple oxy-fuel combustor and investigates the effect of various parameters on the energy output. The composition of the flue gas is carefully examined. The results of this study provide a starting point for optimized oxy-fuel combustion operation for maximum energy output, which will be crucial for future deployment of oxy-fuel combustion technology.

  12. Modeling of a High Temperature Sulfuric Acid Loop using Aspen Plus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen energy needs are growing with increased demands for alternatives to fossil fuel. Recently, many researchers have been investigating into hydrogen production technologies from a renewable and a nuclear energy. Very High Temperature gas cooled nuclear Reactor (VHTR) is considered to be suitable for massive hydrogen production systems when it coupled with Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermo-chemical cycle. Kim et al. are developing a hybrid heat exchanger as a process heat exchanger for the sulfur trioxide decomposition. Hong et al. constructed and are operating a small scale sulfuric acid loop for the integrity and feasibility tests of a process heat exchanger coupled with VHTR and SI cycle. In this study, we performed preliminary analysis of small scale sulfuric acid test loop using Aspen Plus chemical process simulator. In addition, we studied the behavior of main component in the sulfuric acid loop on the basis of experimental results

  13. Effects of aspen harvesting on groundwater recharge and water table dynamics in a subhumid climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera-HernáNdez, J. J.; Mendoza, C. A.; Devito, K. J.; Petrone, R. M.; Smerdon, B. D.

    2011-05-01

    Numerical experiments were developed using different water table depths and soil textures to investigate the impact of aspen harvesting on hydrological processes on the Western Boreal Plain. The effect of harvesting on soil moisture dynamics, fluxes at the water table, and water table fluctuation were compared for different harvesting scenarios simulated under wet and dry climatic cycles. Strong interaction between shallow water tables (i.e., 2 m) and atmospheric variability is observed for all soil textures and is reduced as the vadose zone thickens, particularly after a dry cycle, as a series of positive net atmospheric fluxes are needed to reduce soil moisture storage in order for recharge to occur. Because of harvesting, the water table fluxes can increase by 50 mm month-1, while on a yearly basis, this increase can reach 200 mm yr-1, with rainfall events taking between 1 and 5 years to become recharge (i.e., time lag). Also, the water table is expected to rise between 1 and 3.5 m, with rainfall-water table rise time lags of 1-3 years; however, the peak manifestation of harvesting on water table elevation can take up to 7 years after harvesting. The effects of aspen harvesting are more pronounced during wet cycles, and the development of forestry activities in the Boreal Plain should consider not only preceding precipitation but also the preceding precipitation-reference evapotranspiration ratio, water table depth, and soil texture. The interaction of these factors needs to be considered in order to develop sustainable forestry plans and avoid waterlogging conditions.

  14. The dynamics of strangling among forest trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kenichi W

    2015-11-01

    Strangler trees germinate and grow on other trees, eventually enveloping and potentially even girdling their hosts. This allows them to mitigate fitness costs otherwise incurred by germinating and competing with other trees on the forest floor, as well as minimize risks associated with host tree-fall. If stranglers can themselves host other strangler trees, they may not even seem to need non-stranglers to persist. Yet despite their high fitness potential, strangler trees neither dominate the communities in which they occur nor is the strategy particularly common outside of figs (genus Ficus). Here we analyze how dynamic interactions between strangling and non-strangling trees can shape the adaptive landscape for strangling mutants and mutant trees that have lost the ability to strangle. We find a threshold which strangler germination rates must exceed for selection to favor the evolution of strangling, regardless of how effectively hemiepiphytic stranglers may subsequently replace their hosts. This condition describes the magnitude of the phenotypic displacement in the ability to germinate on other trees necessary for invasion by a mutant tree that could potentially strangle its host following establishment as an epiphyte. We show how the relative abilities of strangling and non-strangling trees to occupy empty sites can govern whether strangling is an evolutionarily stable strategy, and obtain the conditions for strangler coexistence with non-stranglers. We then elucidate when the evolution of strangling can disrupt stable coexistence between commensal epiphytic ancestors and their non-strangling host trees. This allows us to highlight parallels between the invasion fitness of strangler trees arising from commensalist ancestors, and cases where strangling can arise in concert with the evolution of hemiepiphytism among free-standing ancestors. Finally, we discuss how our results can inform the evolutionary ecology of antagonistic interactions more generally. PMID

  15. Sussing Merger Trees: The Merger Trees Comparison Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisawat, Chaichalit; Knebe, Alexander; Pearce, Frazer R.; Schneider, Aurel; Thomas, Peter A.; Behroozi, Peter; Dolag, Klaus; Elahi, Pascal J.; Han, Jiaxin; Helly, John; Jing, Yipeng; Jung, Intae; Lee, Jaehyun; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Onions, Julian; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Tweed, Dylan; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2013-11-01

    Merger trees follow the growth and merger of dark-matter haloes over cosmic history. As well as giving important insights into the growth of cosmic structure in their own right, they provide an essential backbone to semi-analytic models of galaxy formation. This paper is the first in a series to arise from the Sussing Merger Trees Workshop in which 10 different tree-building algorithms were applied to the same set of halo catalogues and their results compared. Although many of these codes were similar in nature, all algorithms produced distinct results. Our main conclusions are that a useful merger-tree code should possess the following features: (i) the use of particle IDs to match haloes between snapshots; (ii) the ability to skip at least one, and preferably more, snapshots in order to recover subhaloes that are temporarily lost during merging; (iii) the ability to cope with (and ideally smooth out) large, temporary fluctuations in halo mass. Finally, to enable different groups to communicate effectively, we defined a common terminology that we used when discussing merger trees and we encourage others to adopt the same language. We also specified a minimal output format to record the results.

  16. Multiset-based Tree Model for Membrane Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a new paradigm - multiset-based tree model. We show that trees can be represented in the form of wellfounded multisets. We also show that the conventional approach for this representation is not injective from a set of trees to the class of multisets representing such trees. We establish a one-to-one correspondence between trees and suitable permutations of a wellfounded multiset, which we call \\textit{tree structures}. We give formal definitions of a \\textit{tree structure} and a \\textit{subtree structure} of a tree structure. Finally, we represent membrane structures in the form of tree structures - a form in which membrane structures can suitably be represented at programming level.

  17. The canary tree

    OpenAIRE

    Mekler, Alan H.; Shelah, Saharon

    1993-01-01

    A canary tree is a tree of cardinality the continuum which has no uncountable branch, but gains a branch whenever a stationary set is destroyed (without adding reals). Canary trees are important in infinitary model theory. The existence of a canary tree is independent of ZFC + GCH.

  18. Healthy,Happy trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Healthy trees are important to us all. Trees provide shade, beauty, and homes for wildlife. Trees give us products like paper and wood. Trees can give us all this only if they are healthy.They must be well cared for to remain healthy.

  19. X-tree

    OpenAIRE

    Keim, Daniel A.; Bustos Cárdenas, Benjamin Eugenio; Berchtold, Stefan; Kriegel, Hans-Peter

    2008-01-01

    The X-tree (eXtended node tree) [1] is a spatial access method [2] that supports efficient query processing for high-dimensional data. It supports not only point data but also extended spatial data. The X-tree provides overlap-free split whenever it is possible without allowing the tree to degenerate; otherwise, the X-tree uses extended variable size directory nodes, so-called supernodes. The X-tree may be seen as a hybrid of a linear array-like and a hierarchical R-tree-like directory.

  20. TreeDT

    OpenAIRE

    Sevon, Petteri; Toivonen, Hannu; Ollikainen, Vesa

    2006-01-01

    We describe TreeDT, a novel association-based gene mapping method. Given a set of disease-associated haplotypes and a set of control haplotypes, TreeDT predicts likely locations of a disease susceptibility gene. TreeDT extracts, essentially in the form of haplotype trees, information about historical recombinations in the population: A haplotype tree constructed at a given chromosomal location is an estimate of the genealogy of the haplotypes. TreeDT constructs these trees for all locations o...

  1. An efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and regeneration system for leaf explants of two elite aspen hybrid clones Populus alba × P. berolinensis and Populus davidiana × P. bolleana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haihai; Wang, Cuiting; Liu, Hua; Tang, Renjie; Zhang, Hongxia

    2011-11-01

    Transgenic technology has been successfully used for gene function analyses and trait improvement in cereal plants. However, its usage is limited in woody plants, especially in the difficult-to-transform but commercially viable hybrid poplar. In this work, an efficient regeneration and transformation system was established for the production of two hybrid aspen clones: Populus alba × P. berolinensis and Populus davidiana × P. bolleana. A plant transformation vector designed to express the reporter gene uidA, encoding β-glucuronidase (GUS), driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, was used to detect transformation event at early stages of plant regeneration, and to optimize the parameters that may affect poplar transformation efficiency. Bacterium strain and age of leaf explant are two major factors that affect transformation efficiency. Addition of thidiazuron (TDZ) improved both regeneration and transformation efficiency. The transformation efficiency is approximately 9.3% for P. alba × P. berolinensis and 16.4% for P. davidiana × P. bolleana. Using this system, transgenic plants were usually produced in less than 1 month after co-cultivation. The growth characteristics and morphology of transgenic plants were identical to the untransformed wild type plants, and the transgenes could be inherited by vegetative propagation, as confirmed by PCR, Southern blotting, RT-PCR and β-glucuronidase staining analyses. The establishment of this system will help to facilitate the studies of gene functions in tree growth and development at a genome level, and as well as the introduction of some valuable traits in aspen breeding. PMID:21717184

  2. Distributed Merge Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Dmitriy; Weber, Gunther

    2013-01-08

    Improved simulations and sensors are producing datasets whose increasing complexity exhausts our ability to visualize and comprehend them directly. To cope with this problem, we can detect and extract significant features in the data and use them as the basis for subsequent analysis. Topological methods are valuable in this context because they provide robust and general feature definitions. As the growth of serial computational power has stalled, data analysis is becoming increasingly dependent on massively parallel machines. To satisfy the computational demand created by complex datasets, algorithms need to effectively utilize these computer architectures. The main strength of topological methods, their emphasis on global information, turns into an obstacle during parallelization. We present two approaches to alleviate this problem. We develop a distributed representation of the merge tree that avoids computing the global tree on a single processor and lets us parallelize subsequent queries. To account for the increasing number of cores per processor, we develop a new data structure that lets us take advantage of multiple shared-memory cores to parallelize the work on a single node. Finally, we present experiments that illustrate the strengths of our approach as well as help identify future challenges.

  3. Tree of life and its applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limin Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “Tree of Life” was first used by Charles Darwin in 1859 as a metaphor for describing phylogenetic relationships among organisms. Over the past three decades, the recognized tree of life has improved considerably in overall size and reliability due to an increase in diversity of character resources, a dramatic growth in useable data, and the development of tree-reconstruction methods. As a bridge connecting phylogeny, evolution and related disciplines, such as molecular biology, ecology, genomics, bioinformatics and computer science, the tree of life is increasingly widely used. In this paper, we review the history and progress of tree of life studies and focus on its application in the following fields: (1 the reconstruction of phylogenetic trees at different taxonomic hierarchies to understand phylogenetic relationships among taxa; (2 investigation of the origins of taxa and biogeographic patterns based on dating estimation and biogeographic reconstruction; (3 examination of species’ diversification and its causes by integrating dated trees, ecological factors, environmental variation and key innovations; (4 the study of the origin and patterns of biodiversity, predating biodiversity dynamics, and development of conservation strategies. Finally, we evaluate the difficulties from matrix alignment, gene tree incongruence and “rogue taxa” distraction in tree reconstruction due to massive increases of useable data and in the context consider “supertree” building in the future.

  4. Fault tree handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This handbook describes a methodology for reliability analysis of complex systems such as those which comprise the engineered safety features of nuclear power generating stations. After an initial overview of the available system analysis approaches, the handbook focuses on a description of the deductive method known as fault tree analysis. The following aspects of fault tree analysis are covered: basic concepts for fault tree analysis; basic elements of a fault tree; fault tree construction; probability, statistics, and Boolean algebra for the fault tree analyst; qualitative and quantitative fault tree evaluation techniques; and computer codes for fault tree evaluation. Also discussed are several example problems illustrating the basic concepts of fault tree construction and evaluation

  5. Simulation of a tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack using AspenPlusTM unit operation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a fuel cell system involves both optimization of the fuel cell stack and the balance of plant with respect to efficiency and economics. Many commercially available process simulators, such as AspenPlusTM, can facilitate the analysis of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. A SOFC system may include fuel pre-processors, heat exchangers, turbines, bottoming cycles, etc., all of which can be very effectively modelled in process simulation software. The current challenge is that AspenPlusTM or any other commercial process simulators do not have a model of a basic SOFC stack. Therefore, to enable performing SOFC system simulation using one of these simulators, one must construct an SOFC stack model that can be implemented in them. The most common approach is to develop a complete SOFC model in a programming language, such as Fortran, Visual Basic or C++, first and then link it to a commercial process simulator as a user defined model or subroutine. This paper introduces a different approach to the development of a SOFC model by utilizing existing AspenPlusTM functions and existing unit operation modules. The developed ''AspenPlusTM SOFC'' model is able to provide detailed thermodynamic and parametric analyses of the SOFC operation and can easily be extended to study the entire power plant consisting of the SOFC and the balance of plant without the requirement for linking with other software. Validation of this model is performed by comparison to a Siemens-Westinghouse 100 kW class tubular SOFC stack. Sensitivity analyses of major operating parameters, such as utilization factor (Uf), current density (Ic) and steam-carbon ratio (S/C), were performed using the developed model, and the results are discussed in this paper

  6. Organo-mineral interactions promote greater soil organic carbon stability under aspen in semi-arid montane forests in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Miegroet, H.; Roman Dobarco, M.

    2014-12-01

    Forest species influence soil organic carbon (SOC) storage through litter input, which in interaction with soil microclimate, texture and mineralogy, lead to different SOC stabilization and storage patterns. We sampled mineral soil (0-15 cm) across the ecotone between aspen (Populus tremuloides) and mixed conifers stands (Abies lasiocarpa and Pseudotsuga menziesii) in semi-arid montane forests from Utah, to investigate the influence of vegetation vs. site characteristics on SOC stabilization, storage and chemistry. SOC was divided into light fraction (LF), mineral-associated SOC in the silt and clay fraction (MoM), and a dense subfraction > 53 μm (SMoM) using wet sieving and electrostatic attraction. SOC decomposability and solubility was derived from long term laboratory incubations and hot water extractions (HWE). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study differences in chemical functional groups in LF and MoM. Vegetation cover did not affect SOC storage (47.0 ± 16.5 Mg C ha-1), SOC decomposability (cumulative CO2-C release of 93.2 ± 65.4 g C g-1 C), or SOC solubility (9.8 ± 7.2 mg C g-1 C), but MoM content increased with presence of aspen [pure aspen (31.2 ± 15.1 Mg C ha-1) > mixed (25.7 ± 8.8 Mg C ha-1) > conifer (22.8 ± 9.0 Mg C ha-1)]. Organo-mineral complexes reduced biological availability of SOC, indicated by the negative correlation between silt+clay (%) and decomposable SOC per gram of C (r = -0.48, p = 0.001) or soluble SOC (r = -0.59, p plant or microbial origin. FTIR spectra clustered by sites with similar parent material rather than by vegetation cover. This suggests that initial differences in litter chemistry between aspen and conifers converged into similar MoM chemistry within sites.

  7. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jian-Ying; Ibragimov, Rashid

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting...... tree is isomorphic to T? We prove that in the general setting, CST is NP-complete, which implies that the tree edit distance considered here is also NP-hard, even when both input trees having diameters bounded by 10. We also show that, when the number of distinct stars is bounded by a constant k, CTS...

  8. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jiong; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting...... tree is isomorphic to T? We prove that in the general setting, CST is NP-complete, which implies that the tree edit distance considered here is also NP-hard, even when both input trees having diameters bounded by 10. We also show that, when the number of distinct stars is bounded by a constant k, CTS...

  9. Comparative simulation study of gas-phase propylene polymerization in fluidized bed reactors using aspen polymers and two phase models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamiria Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study describing gas-phase propylene polymerization in fluidized-bed reactors using Ziegler-Natta catalyst is presented. The reactor behavior was explained using a two-phase model (which is based on principles of fluidization as well as simulation using the Aspen Polymers process simulator. The two-phase reactor model accounts for the emulsion and bubble phases which contain different portions of catalysts with the polymerization occurring in both phases. Both models predict production rate, molecular weight, polydispersity index (PDI and melt flow index (MFI of the polymer. We used both models to investigate the effect of important polymerization parameters, namely catalyst feed rate and hydrogen concentration, on the product polypropylene properties, such as production rate, molecular weight, PDI and MFI. Both the two-phase model and Aspen Polymers simulator showed good agreement in terms of production rate. However, the models differed in their predictions for weight-average molecular weight, PDI and MFI. Based on these results, we propose incorporating the missing hydrodynamic effects into Aspen Polymers to provide a more realistic understanding of the phenomena encountered in fluidized bed reactors for polyolefin production.

  10. Effectiveness of mycorrhizal inoculation in the nursery on root colonization, growth, and nutrient uptake of aspen and balsam poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quoreshi, A.M.; Khasa, D.P. [Symbiotech Research Inc. 201, 509-11 Avenue, Nisku, AB (Canada); Forest Biology Research Centre, University of Laval, Quebec (Canada)

    2008-05-15

    Aspen and balsam poplar seedlings were inoculated with six species of ectomycorrhizal fungi (Hebeloma longicaudum, Laccaria bicolor, Paxillus involutus, Pisolithus tinctorius, Rhizopogon vinicolor, and Suillus tomentosus), one species of endomycorrhizal fungus (Glomus intraradices), two species of bacteria (Agrobacterium sp. and Burkholderia cepacia), treated with a growth hormone (SR3), and co-inoculated with a combination of Paxillus and Burkholderia. The seedlings were grown in a greenhouse under three different fertility regimes. Bacterial inoculation alone did not affect seedling growth and nutrition as observed when co-inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungus. The biomass and root collar diameter of aspen and balsam poplar were significantly increased when adequate mycorrhizas are formed and more prominent when co-inoculated with P. involutus and B. cepacia and grown at the 67% fertilizer level. Except for R. vinicolor and S. tomentosus, the other four species of ectomycorrhizal fungi and G. intraradices formed symbiotic associations with both plant species. Both ectomycorrhizal and endomycorrhizal colonization were observed at all fertilizer levels and fertilizer applications did not affect the colonization rates. Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were significantly improved in both aspen and balsam poplar compared with control only when co-inoculated with P. involutus and B. cepacia. However, plant net nitrogen uptake (content) increased significantly in all successful inoculation treatments and co-inoculated treatment when compared with control. These results hold promise for incorporation of inoculation of Populus sp. with appropriate mycorrhizal fungi and selected bacteria into commercial nursery system to improve the establishment of Populus in various sites. (author)

  11. STUDY ON THE STRUCTURAL CHANGE OF LIGNIN DURING AUTO-CATALYZED ETHANOL-WATER PULPING OF ASPEN BY 1H-NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghui Zhou

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns the structural change of lignin during auto-catalyzed ethanol-water pulping of aspen by 1H-NMR. The results showed that the linkages of alkyl-aryl ether of lignin, such as the α-ether linkages (α-O-4 and the β-ether linkages (β-O-4, were broken and the alkyl part formed carbenium at the Cα and Cβ of the aliphatic branch. Meanwhile, the aryl part of ether accepted one H+ and formed phenol. Because of the electronegative effect originating from the electron cloud of phenyl, partial carbenium of Cβ was rearranged. Due to its ether or hydroxyl linkage, rearranging to Cβ, the Cα was changed into carbenium and formed a new β-O-4 alkyl-aryl ether. The β-O-4 alkyl-aryl ether was not stable and broken further. So the large molecule of lignin was disintegrated into a smaller one and dissolved into ethanol. Finally, the α+ carbenium reformed α-O-4 linkages of ether with phenol.

  12. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3 on tree branch growth and implications for hydrologic budgeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The forest hydrologic budget may be impacted by increasing CO2 and tropospheric O3. Efficient means to quantify such effects are beneficial. We hypothesized that changes in the balance of canopy interception, stem flow, and through-fall in the presence of elevated CO2 and O3 could be discerned using image analysis of leafless branches. We compared annual stem flow to the results of a computerized analysis of all branches from the 2002, 2004, and 2006 annual growth whorls of 97 ten-year-old trees from the Aspen Free-Air CO2 and O3 Enrichment (Aspen FACE) experiment in Rhinelander, WI. We found significant effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on some branch metrics, and that the branch metrics were useful for predicting stem flow from birch, but not aspen. The results of this study should contribute to development of techniques for efficient characterization of effects on the forest hydrologic budget of increasing CO2 and tropospheric O3. - Canopy architecture and stem flow are affected by elevated CO2 and tropospheric O3.

  13. Using fuzzy arithmetic in containment event trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of fuzzy arithmetic is proposed for the evaluation of containment event trees. Concepts such as improbable, very improbable, and so on, which are subjective by nature, are represented by fuzzy numbers. The quantitative evaluation of containment event trees is based on the extension principle, by which operations on real numbers are extended to operations on fuzzy numbers. Expert knowledge is considered as state of the base variable with a normal distribution, which is considered to represent the membership function. Finally, this paper presents results of an example calculation of a containment event tree for the CAREM-25 nuclear power plant, presently under detailed design stage at Argentina. (author)

  14. Sussing Merger Trees: The Merger Trees Comparison Project

    CERN Document Server

    Srisawat, Chaichalit; Pearce, Frazer R; Schneider, Aurel; Thomas, Peter A; Behroozi, Peter; Dolag, Klaus; Elahi, Pascal J; Han, Jiaxin; Helly, John; Jing, Yipeng; Jung, Intae; Lee, Jaehyun; Mao, Yao Yuan; Onions, Julian; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Tweed, Dylan; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2013-01-01

    Merger trees follow the growth and merger of dark-matter haloes over cosmic history. As well as giving important insights into the growth of cosmic structure in their own right, they provide an essential backbone to semi-analytic models of galaxy formation. This paper is the first in a series to arise from the SUSSING MERGER TREES Workshop in which ten different tree-building algorithms were applied to the same set of halo catalogues and their results compared. Although many of these codes were similar in nature, all algorithms produced distinct results. Our main conclusions are that a useful merger-tree code should possess the following features: (i) the use of particle IDs to match haloes between snapshots; (ii) the ability to skip at least one, and preferably more, snapshots in order to recover subhaloes that are temporarily lost during merging; (iii) the ability to cope with (and ideally smooth out) large, temporary flucuations in halo mass. Finally, to enable different groups to communicate effectively, ...

  15. Evolution of tree nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Andrews, Mitchell

    2010-09-01

    Using a broad definition of trees, the evolutionary origins of trees in a nutritional context is considered using data from the fossil record and molecular phylogeny. Trees are first known from the Late Devonian about 380 million years ago, originated polyphyletically at the pteridophyte grade of organization; the earliest gymnosperms were trees, and trees are polyphyletic in the angiosperms. Nutrient transporters, assimilatory pathways, homoiohydry (cuticle, intercellular gas spaces, stomata, endohydric water transport systems including xylem and phloem-like tissue) and arbuscular mycorrhizas preceded the origin of trees. Nutritional innovations that began uniquely in trees were the seed habit and, certainly (but not necessarily uniquely) in trees, ectomycorrhizas, cyanobacterial, actinorhizal and rhizobial (Parasponia, some legumes) diazotrophic symbioses and cluster roots. PMID:20581011

  16. ASPEN: A fully kinetic, reduced-description particle-in-cell model for simulating parametric instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fully kinetic, reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) model is presented in which deviations from quasineutrality, electron and ion kinetic effects, and nonlinear interactions between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities are modeled correctly. The model is based on a reduced description where the electromagnetic field is represented by three separate temporal envelopes in order to model parametric instabilities with low-frequency and high-frequency daughter waves. Because temporal envelope approximations are invoked, the simulation can be performed on the electron time scale instead of the time scale of the light waves. The electrons and ions are represented by discrete finite-size particles, permitting electron and ion kinetic effects to be modeled properly. The Poisson equation is utilized to ensure that space-charge effects are included. The RPIC model is fully three dimensional and has been implemented in two dimensions on the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) parallel computer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the resulting simulation code has been named ASPEN. The authors believe this code is the first particle-in-cell code capable of simulating the interaction between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities in multiple dimensions. Test simulations of stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and Langmuir decay instability are presented

  17. Thermochemical Equilibrium Model of Synthetic Natural Gas Production from Coal Gasification Using Aspen Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Barrera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of synthetic or substitute natural gas (SNG from coal is a process of interest in Colombia where the reserves-to-production ratio (R/P for natural gas is expected to be between 7 and 10 years, while the R/P for coal is forecasted to be around 90 years. In this work, the process to produce SNG by means of coal-entrained flow gasifiers is modeled under thermochemical equilibrium with the Gibbs free energy approach. The model was developed using a complete and comprehensive Aspen Plus model. Two typical technologies used in entrained flow gasifiers such as coal dry and coal slurry are modeled and simulated. Emphasis is put on interactions between the fuel feeding technology and selected energy output parameters of coal-SNG process, that is, energy efficiencies, power, and SNG quality. It was found that coal rank does not significantly affect energy indicators such as cold gas, process, and global efficiencies. However, feeding technology clearly has an effect on the process due to the gasifying agent. Simulations results are compared against available technical data with good accuracy. Thus, the proposed model is considered as a versatile and useful computational tool to study and optimize the coal to SNG process.

  18. How light, temperature, and measurement and growth [CO2] interactively control isoprene emission in hybrid aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Sun, Zhihong

    2015-02-01

    Plant isoprene emissions have been modelled assuming independent controls by light, temperature and atmospheric [CO2]. However, the isoprene emission rate is ultimately controlled by the pool size of its immediate substrate, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), and isoprene synthase activity, implying that the environmental controls might interact. In addition, acclimation to growth [CO2] can shift the share of the control by DMADP pool size and isoprene synthase activity, and thereby alter the environmental sensitivity. Environmental controls of isoprene emission were studied in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides) saplings acclimated either to ambient [CO2] of 380 μmol mol(-1) or elevated [CO2] of 780 μmol mol(-1). The data demonstrated strong interactive effects of environmental drivers and growth [CO2] on isoprene emissions. Light enhancement of isoprene emission was the greatest at intermediate temperatures and was greater in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants, indicating greater enhancement of the DMADP supply. The optimum temperature for isoprene emission was higher at lower light, suggesting activation of alternative DMADP sinks at higher light. In addition, [CO2] inhibition of isoprene emission was lost at a higher temperature with particularly strong effects in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. Nevertheless, DMADP pool size was still predicted to more strongly control isoprene emission at higher temperatures in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. We argue that interactive environmental controls and acclimation to growth [CO2] should be incorporated in future isoprene emission models at the level of DMADP pool size. PMID:25399006

  19. A Simulation Study of Downdraft Gasification of Oil-Palm Fronds using ASPEN PLUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Yusup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of biomass gasification for conversion of hydrocarbons to permanent fuel gas mainly composed of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, dates back to late 1700. However, the successful design and operation of gasifiers is not an easy task. No clear cut methods of performance prediction of gasifiers is yet available as the thermodynamics of gasifier operation is less understood and highly dependent on the specific biomass feedstock used. In this study, the performance study of downdraft gasification of oil-palm fronds, is carried out making use of ASPEN PLUS 0process simulator software, to study the effect of operating conditions (zone temperature, operating pressure, air fuel ratio and moisture content on syngas composition. In this study, the pyrolysis yield is calculated from the ultimate analysis (CHNS test values of the oil-palm fronds, rather than approximating typical yield distribution for pyrolysis products. The results of the simulation showed better agreement with the syngas composition results of other authors. From the simulation study it is shown that higher mass fraction of CO and CH4 can be obtained at lower air-fuel ratio and lower pressure (below 5 bars. The mass fraction of CO increases sharply with increase in the oxidation zone temperature, for the temperature range of 500-700C.

  20. Elevated CO{sub 2} response of photosynthesis depends on ozone concentration in aspen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noormets, Asko, E-mail: anoorme@ncsu.ed [Michigan Technological University, School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Kull, Olevi; Sober, Anu [University of Tartu, Institute of Botany and Ecology, Tartu, Estonia (United States); Kubiske, Mark E. [US Forest Service, Northern Research Lab, Rhinelander, WI 54501 (United States); Karnosky, David F. [Michigan Technological University, School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The effect of elevated CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} on apparent quantum yield (phi), maximum photosynthesis (P{sub max}), carboxylation efficiency (V{sub cmax}) and electron transport capacity (J{sub max}) at different canopy locations was studied in two aspen (Populus tremuloides) clones of contrasting O{sub 3} tolerance. Local light climate at every leaf was characterized as fraction of above-canopy photosynthetic photon flux density (%PPFD). Elevated CO{sub 2} alone did not affect phi or P{sub max}, and increased J{sub max} in the O{sub 3}-sensitive, but not in the O{sub 3}-tolerant clone. Elevated O{sub 3} decreased leaf chlorophyll content and all photosynthetic parameters, particularly in the lower canopy, and the negative impact of O{sub 3} increased through time. Significant interaction effect, whereby the negative impact of elevated O{sub 3} was exaggerated by elevated CO{sub 2} was seen in Chl, N and J{sub max}, and occurred in both O{sub 3}-tolerant and O{sub 3}-sensitive clones. The clonal differences in the level of CO{sub 2} x O{sub 3} interaction suggest a relationship between photosynthetic acclimation and background O{sub 3} concentration. - Photosynthetic acclimation to elevated CO{sub 2} depends on the background oxidant levels.

  1. Full employment and competition in the Aspen economic model: implications for modeling acts of terrorism.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprigg, James A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew

    2004-11-01

    Acts of terrorism could have a range of broad impacts on an economy, including changes in consumer (or demand) confidence and the ability of productive sectors to respond to changes. As a first step toward a model of terrorism-based impacts, we develop here a model of production and employment that characterizes dynamics in ways useful toward understanding how terrorism-based shocks could propagate through the economy; subsequent models will introduce the role of savings and investment into the economy. We use Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool developed at Sandia, to demonstrate for validation purposes that a single-firm economy converges to the known monopoly equilibrium price, output, and employment levels, while multiple-firm economies converge toward the competitive equilibria typified by lower prices and higher output and employment. However, we find that competition also leads to churn by consumers seeking lower prices, making it difficult for firms to optimize with respect to wages, prices, and employment levels. Thus, competitive firms generate market ''noise'' in the steady state as they search for prices and employment levels that will maximize profits. In the context of this model, not only could terrorism depress overall consumer confidence and economic activity but terrorist acts could also cause normal short-run dynamics to be misinterpreted by consumers as a faltering economy.

  2. Uniform random spanning trees

    OpenAIRE

    Pemantle, Robin

    2004-01-01

    There are several good reasons you might want to read about uniform spanning trees, one being that spanning trees are useful combinatorial objects. Not only are they fundamental in algebraic graph theory and combinatorial geometry, but they predate both of these subjects, having been used by Kirchoff in the study of resistor networks. This article addresses the question about spanning trees most natural to anyone in probability theory, namely what does a typical spanning tree look like?

  3. Coded Splitting Tree Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to multiple access control called coded splitting tree protocol. The approach builds on the known tree splitting protocols, code structure and successive interference cancellation (SIC). Several instances of the tree splitting protocol are initiated, each...... as possible. Evaluations show that the proposed protocol provides considerable gains over the standard tree splitting protocol applying SIC. The improvement comes at the expense of an increased feedback and receiver complexity....

  4. Sperner and KKM-type theorems on trees and cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Niedermaier, Andrew; Su, Francis Edward

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we prove a new combinatorial theorem for labellings of trees, and show that it is equivalent to a KKM-type theorem for finite covers of trees and to discrete and continuous fixed point theorems on finite trees. This is in analogy with the equivalence of the classical Sperner's lemma, KKM lemma, and the Brouwer fixed point theorem on simplices. Furthermore, we use these ideas to develop new KKM and fixed point theorems for infinite covers and infinite trees. Finally, we extend the KKM theorem on trees to an entirely new KKM theorem for cycles, and discuss interesting social consequences, including an application in voting theory.

  5. The Wish Tree Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sarah DeWitt

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the author's experience in implementing a Wish Tree project in her school in an effort to bring the school community together with a positive art-making experience during a potentially stressful time. The concept of a wish tree is simple: plant a tree; provide tags and pencils for writing wishes; and encourage everyone to…

  6. Diary of a Tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srulowitz, Frances

    1992-01-01

    Describes an activity to develop students' skills of observation and recordkeeping by studying the growth of a tree's leaves during the spring. Children monitor the growth of 11 tress over a 2-month period, draw pictures of the tree at different stages of growth, and write diaries of the tree's growth. (MDH)

  7. Total well dominated trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finbow, Arthur; Frendrup, Allan; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    cardinality then G is a total well dominated graph. In this paper we study composition and decomposition of total well dominated trees. By a reversible process we prove that any total well dominated tree can both be reduced to and constructed from a family of three small trees....

  8. D2-tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Sioutas, Spyros; Pantazos, Kostas;

    2015-01-01

    We present a new overlay, called the Deterministic Decentralized tree (D2-tree). The D2-tree compares favorably to other overlays for the following reasons: (a) it provides matching and better complexities, which are deterministic for the supported operations; (b) the management of nodes (peers...

  9. Analyzing tree cores to detect petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater at a former landfill site in the community of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, eastern Canadian subarctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonkwe, Merline L D; Trapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the feasibility of analyzing tree cores to detect benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m, p, o-xylene (BTEX) compounds and methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in groundwater in eastern Canada subarctic environments, using a former landfill site in the remote community of Happ...... Valley-Goose Bay, Labrador. Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination at the landfill site is the result of environmentally unsound pre-1990s disposal of households and industrial solid wastes. Tree cores were taken from trembling aspen, black spruce, and white birch and analyzed by headspace...... not found in the tree cores and is considered to be absent in the groundwater. The results demonstrate that tree-core analysis can be useful for detecting anomalous concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons, such as BTEX compounds, in subarctic sites with shallow unconfined aquifers and permeable soils...

  10. Trees in Lhasa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Degyi

    2008-01-01

    Trees are flourishing in Lhasa wherever the history exists. There is such a man. He has already been through cus-toms after his annual trek to Lhasa, which he has been doing for over twenty years in succession to visit his tree.Although he has been making this journey for so long,it is neither to visit friends or family,nor is it his hometown.It is a tree that is tied so profoundly to his heart.When the wind blows fiercely on the bare tree and winter snow falls,he stands be-fore the tree with tears of jo...

  11. Distributed Contour Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Dmitriy; Weber, Gunther H.

    2014-03-31

    Topological techniques provide robust tools for data analysis. They are used, for example, for feature extraction, for data de-noising, and for comparison of data sets. This chapter concerns contour trees, a topological descriptor that records the connectivity of the isosurfaces of scalar functions. These trees are fundamental to analysis and visualization of physical phenomena modeled by real-valued measurements. We study the parallel analysis of contour trees. After describing a particular representation of a contour tree, called local{global representation, we illustrate how di erent problems that rely on contour trees can be solved in parallel with minimal communication.

  12. A Classification of Recent Widespread Tree Mortality in the Western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicke, J. A.; Anderegg, W.; Allen, C. D.; Stephenson, N.

    2015-12-01

    Widespread tree mortality has been documented across the western United States in recent decades. Climate change has been implicated in these events, in particular warming and associated effects on tree stress and biotic disturbance agents. Given projected future warming, the capability of accurately predicting future tree mortality is critical. However, sufficient ecological understanding is needed to do so. Here we describe differences in various mortality types associated with spatial characteristics and climate drivers. We loosely classify mortality types into four categories: 1) widespread but low severity background mortality that has been increasing mainly because of greater stress associated with rising climatic water deficit; 2) tree die-offs that are driven by severe, hotter drought in which biotic agents play minor roles, such as sudden aspen decline; 3) tree die-offs in which hotter droughts combined with outbreaks of biotic agents, often less aggressive bark beetles, to cause mortality, such as piñon pine mortality in the Southwest; and 4) tree die-offs that were initiated or facilitated by droughts but which were associated with aggressive biotic agents that can kill healthy trees at high populations, such as mountain pine beetle outbreaks. An important use of this classification is the different pathways by which climate change can cause tree mortality. For some classes (background and primarily drought-driven mortality), predictions may be sufficiently accurate based on climate (drought) metrics. For classes in which biotic agents play a role, the direct warming effect on insects may occur through mechanisms not related to drought, and therefore predictions may need to include mechanisms other than drought. We note that this is a simplistic classification designed to facilitate understanding of tree mortality, and that overlap occurs among categories.

  13. Growth of a Pine Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinson, Susan Wells

    2012-01-01

    The growth of a pine tree is examined by preparing "tree cookies" (cross-sectional disks) between whorls of branches. The use of Christmas trees allows the tree cookies to be obtained with inexpensive, commonly available tools. Students use the tree cookies to investigate the annual growth of the tree and how it corresponds to the number of whorls…

  14. From gene trees to species trees II: Species tree inference in the deep coalescence model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Louxin

    2010-01-01

    When gene copies are sampled from various species, the resulting gene tree might disagree with the containing species tree. The primary causes of gene tree and species tree discord include lineage sorting, horizontal gene transfer, and gene duplication and loss. Each of these events yields a different parsimony criterion for inferring the (containing) species tree from gene trees. With lineage sorting, species tree inference is to find the tree minimizing extra gene lineages that had to coexi...

  15. Estimation of Power Production Potential from Natural Gas Pressure Reduction Stations in Pakistan Using ASPEN HYSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Nazir Unar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pakistan is a gas rich but power poor country. It consumes approximately 1, 559 Billion cubic feet of natural gas annually. Gas is transported around the country in a system of pressurized transmission pipelines under a pressure range of 600-1000 psig exclusively operated by two state owned companies i.e. SNGPL (Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Limited and SSGCL (Sui Southern Gas Company Limited. The gas is distributed by reducing from the transmission pressure into distribution pressure up to maximum level of 150 psig at the city gate stations normally called SMS (Sales Metering Station. As a normal practice gas pressure reduction at those SMSs is accomplished in pressure regulators (PCVs or in throttle valves where isenthalpic expansion takes place without producing any energy. Pressure potential of natural gas is an untapped energy resource which is currently wasted by its throttling. This pressure reduction at SMS (pressure drop through SMS may also be achieved by expansion of natural gas in TE, which converts its pressure into the mechanical energy, which can be transmitted any loading device for example electric generator. The aim of present paper is to explore the expected power production potential of various Sales Metering Stations of SSGCL company in Pakistan. The model of sales metering station was developed in a standard flow sheeting software Aspen HYSYS®7.1 to calculate power and study other parameters when an expansion turbine is used instead of throttling valves. It was observed from the simulation results that a significant power (more than 140 KW can be produced at pressure reducing stations of SSGC network with gas flows more than 2.2 MMSCFD and pressure ration more than 1.3.

  16. Simulation of integrated pollutant removal (IPR) water-treatment system using ASPEN Plus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harendra, Sivaram; Oryshcyhn, Danylo [U.S. DOE/NETL; Ochs, Thomas [U.S. DOE/NETL; Gerdemann, Stephen; Clark, John

    2013-01-01

    Capturing CO2 from fossil fuel combustion provides an opportunity for tapping a significant water source which can be used as service water for a capture-ready power plant and its peripherals. Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have patented a process—Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR®)—that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO2 stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Water condensed from oxy-combustion flue gas via the IPR system has been analyzed for composition and an approach for its treatment—for in-process reuse and for release—has been outlined. A computer simulation model in ASPEN Plus has been developed to simulate water treatment of flue gas derived wastewater from IPR systems. At the field installation, water condensed in the IPR process contains fly ash particles, sodium (largely from spray-tower buffering) and sulfur species as well as heavy metals, cations, and anions. An IPR wastewater treatment system was modeled using unit operations such as equalization, coagulation and flocculation, reverse osmosis, lime softening, crystallization, and pH correction. According to the model results, 70% (by mass) of the inlet stream can be treated as pure water, the other 20% yields as saleable products such as gypsum (CaSO4) and salt (NaCl) and the remaining portion is the waste. More than 99% of fly ash particles are removed in the coagulation and flocculation unit and these solids can be used as filler materials in various applications with further treatment. Results discussed relate to a slipstream IPR installation and are verified experimentally in the coagulation/flocculation step.

  17. The effect of air preheating in a biomass CFB gasifier using ASPEN Plus simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doherty, Wayne; Reynolds, Anthony; Kennedy, David [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dublin Institute of Technology, Bolton Street, Dublin 1 (Ireland)

    2009-09-15

    In the context of climate change, efficiency and energy security, biomass gasification is likely to play an important role. Circulating fluidised bed (CFB) technology was selected for the current study. The objective of this research is to develop a computer model of a CFB biomass gasifier that can predict gasifier performance under various operating conditions. An original model was developed using ASPEN Plus. The model is based on Gibbs free energy minimisation. The restricted equilibrium method was used to calibrate it against experimental data. This was achieved by specifying the temperature approach for the gasification reactions. The model predicts syn-gas composition, conversion efficiency and heating values in good agreement with experimental data. Operating parameters were varied over a wide range. Parameters such as equivalence ratio (ER), temperature, air preheating, biomass moisture and steam injection were found to influence syn-gas composition, heating value, and conversion efficiency. The results indicate an ER and temperature range over which hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) are maximised, which in turn ensures a high heating value and cold gas efficiency (CGE). Gas heating value was found to decrease with ER. Air preheating increases H{sub 2} and CO production, which increases gas heating value and CGE. Air preheating is more effective at low ERs. A critical air temperature exists after which additional preheating has little influence. Steam has better reactivity than fuel bound moisture. Increasing moisture degrades performance therefore the input fuel should be pre-dried. Steam injection should be employed if a H{sub 2} rich syn-gas is desired. (author)

  18. Experimental Investigation and Aspen Plus Simulation of the MSW Pyrolysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansah, Emmanuel

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a potential feedstock for producing transportation fuels because it is readily available using an existing collection/transportation infrastructure and fees are provided by the suppliers or government agencies to treat MSW. North Carolina with a population of 9.4 millions generates 3.629 million metric tons of MSW each year, which contains about 113,396,356 TJs of energy. The average moisture content of MSW samples is 44.3% on a wet basis. About 77% of the dry MSW mass is combustible components including paper, organics, textile and plastics. The average heating values of MSW were 9.7, 17.5, and 22.7 MJ/kg on a wet basis, dry basis and dry combustible basis, respectively. The MSW generated in North Carolina can produce 7.619 million barrels of crude bio-oil or around 4% of total petroleum consumption in North Carolina. MSW can be thermally pyrolyzed into bio-oil in the absence of oxygen or air at a temperature of 500°C or above. As bio-oil can be easily stored and transported, compared to bulky MSW, landfill gas and electricity, pyrolysis offers significant logistical and economic advantages over landfilling and other thermal conversion processes such as combustion and gasification. Crude bio-oils produced from the pyrolysis of MSW can be further refined to transportation fuels in existing petroleum refinery facilities. The objective of this research is to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of pyrolyzing MSW into liquid transportation fuels. A combined thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) instrument, which can serve as a micro-scale pyrolysis reactor, was used to simultaneously determine the degradation characteristics of MSW during pyrolysis. An ASPEN Plus-based mathematical model was further developed to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of pyrolysing of MSW into liquid transportation fuels in fixed bed reactors at varying operating conditions

  19. Aspen Plus simulation of biomass integrated gasification combined cycle systems at corn ethanol plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) systems and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) systems are employed to provide heat and electricity to a 0.19 hm3 y−1 (50 million gallon per year) corn ethanol plant using different fuels (syrup and corn stover, corn stover alone, and natural gas). Aspen Plus simulations of BIGCC/NGCC systems are performed to study effects of different fuels, gas turbine compression pressure, dryers (steam tube or superheated steam) for biomass fuels and ethanol co-products, and steam tube dryer exhaust treatment methods. The goal is to maximize electricity generation while meeting process heat needs of the plant. At fuel input rates of 110 MW, BIGCC systems with steam tube dryers provide 20–25 MW of power to the grid with system thermal efficiencies (net power generated plus process heat rate divided by fuel input rate) of 69–74%. NGCC systems with steam tube dryers provide 26–30 MW of power to the grid with system thermal efficiencies of 74–78%. BIGCC systems with superheated steam dryers provide 20–22 MW of power to the grid with system thermal efficiencies of 53–56%. The life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction for conventional corn ethanol compared to gasoline is 39% for process heat with natural gas (grid electricity), 117% for BIGCC with syrup and corn stover fuel, 124% for BIGCC with corn stover fuel, and 93% for NGCC with natural gas fuel. These GHG emission estimates do not include indirect land use change effects. -- Highlights: •BIGCC and natural gas combined cycle systems at corn ethanol plants are simulated. •The best performance results in 25–30 MW power to grid. •The best performance results in 74–78% system thermal efficiencies. •GHG reduction for corn ethanol with BIGCC systems compared to gasoline is over 100%

  20. Simulation of the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] refrigeration system using the ASPEN/SP process simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SSC Magnet must maintain at a super conducting temperature of 4 K. The proposed refrigeration cooling processes consist of fairly simple closed cycles which take advantage of the Joule-Thompson effect via a series of expansions and compressions of helium gas which has been precooled by liquid nitrogen. The processes currently under consideration consist of three cycles, the 20 K shield cooling, the 45 K helium refrigerator and the helium liquefier. The process units which are to be employed are compressors, turbines, expanders, mixers, flashes, two stream heat exchangers and multiple stream heat exchangers. The cycles are to be operated at or near steady state. Due to the large number of competing cooling sector designs to be considered and the high capital and operating costs of the proposed processes, the SSC Laboratory requires a software tool for the validation and optimization of the individual designs and for the performance of cost-benefit analyses among competing designs. Since these processes are steady state flow processes involving primarily standard unit operations, a decision was made to investigate the application of a commercial process simulator to the task. Several months of internal evaluations by the SSC Laboratory revealed that while the overall structure and calculation approach of number of the commercial simulators were appropriate for this task, all were lacking essential capabilities in the areas of thermodynamic property calculations for cryogenic systems and modeling of complex, multiple stream heat exchangers. An acceptable thermodynamics model was provided and a series of simple, but representative benchmark problems developed. The model and problems were provided to three software vendors. Based on the results of the benchmark test, the ASPEN/SP process simulator was selected for future modeling work

  1. ASPEN Plus simulation of coal integrated gasification combined blast furnace slag waste heat recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An integrated system of coal gasification with slag waste heat recovery was proposed. • The goal of BF slag heat saving and emission reduction was achieved by this system. • The optimal parameters were obtained and the waste heat recovery rate reached 83.08%. • About 6.64 kmol/min syngas was produced when using one ton BF slag to provide energy. - Abstract: This article presented a model for the system of coal gasification with steam and blast furnace slag waste heat recovery by using the ASPEN Plus as the simulating and modeling tool. Constrained by mass and energy balance for the entire system, the model included the gasifier used to product syngas at the chemical equilibrium based on the Gibbs free energy minimization approach and the boiler used to recover the heat of the blast furnace slag (BF slag) and syngas. Two parameters of temperature and steam to coal ratio (S/C) were considered to account for their impacts on the Datong coal (DT coal) gasification process. The carbon gasification efficiency (CE), cold gasification efficiency (CGE), syngas product efficiency (PE) and the heating value of syngas produced by 1 kg pulverized coal (HV) were adopted as the indicators to examine the gasification performance. The optimal operating temperature and S/C were 800 °C and 1.5, respectively. At this condition, CE reached above 90% and the maximum values of the CGE, PE and HV were all obtained. Under the optimal operating conditions, 1000 kg/min BF slag, about 40.41 kg/min DT pulverized coal and 77.94 kg/min steam were fed into the gasifier and approximate 6.64 kmol/min syngas could be generated. Overall, the coal was converted to clean syngas by gasification reaction and the BF slag waste heat was also recovered effectively (reached up to 83.08%) in this system, achieving the objective of energy saving and emission reduction

  2. The effect of air preheating in a biomass CFB gasifier using ASPEN Plus simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of climate change, efficiency and energy security, biomass gasification is likely to play an important role. Circulating fluidised bed (CFB) technology was selected for the current study. The objective of this research is to develop a computer model of a CFB biomass gasifier that can predict gasifier performance under various operating conditions. An original model was developed using ASPEN Plus. The model is based on Gibbs free energy minimisation. The restricted equilibrium method was used to calibrate it against experimental data. This was achieved by specifying the temperature approach for the gasification reactions. The model predicts syn-gas composition, conversion efficiency and heating values in good agreement with experimental data. Operating parameters were varied over a wide range. Parameters such as equivalence ratio (ER), temperature, air preheating, biomass moisture and steam injection were found to influence syn-gas composition, heating value, and conversion efficiency. The results indicate an ER and temperature range over which hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) are maximised, which in turn ensures a high heating value and cold gas efficiency (CGE). Gas heating value was found to decrease with ER. Air preheating increases H2 and CO production, which increases gas heating value and CGE. Air preheating is more effective at low ERs. A critical air temperature exists after which additional preheating has little influence. Steam has better reactivity than fuel bound moisture. Increasing moisture degrades performance therefore the input fuel should be pre-dried. Steam injection should be employed if a H2 rich syn-gas is desired. (author)

  3. Estimation of power production potential from natural gas pressure reduction stations in pakistan using aspen hysys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakistan is a gas rich but power poor country. It consumes approximately 1, 559 Billion cubic feet of natural gas annually. Gas is transported around the country in a system of pressurized transmission pipelines under a pressure-range of 600-1 000 psig exclusively operated by two state owned companies i.e. SNGPL (Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Limited) and SSGCL (Sui Southern Gas Company Limited). The gas is distributed by reducing from the transmission pressure into distribution pressure up to maximum level of 150 psig at the city gate stations normally called SMS (Sales Metering Station). As a normal practice gas pressure reduction at those SMSs is accomplished in pressure regulators (PCVs or in of natural gas is an untapped energy resource which is currently wasted by its throttling. This pressure reduction at SMS (pressure drop through SMS) may also be achieved by expansion of natural gas in TE, which converts its pressure into the mechanical energy, which can be transmitted any loading device for example electric generator. The aim of present paper is to explore the expected power production potential of various Sales Metering Stations of SSGCL company in Pakistan. The model of sales metering station was developed in a standard flow sheeting software Aspen HYSYS at the rate 7.1 to calculate power and study other parameters when an expansion turbine is used instead of throttling valves. It was observed from the simulation results that a significant power (more than 140 KW) can be produced at pressure reducing stations of SSGC network with gas flows more than 2.2 MMSCFD and pressure ration more than 1.3. (author)

  4. Process optimization for bioethanol conversion to bioethylene using ASPEN PLUS%基于ASPEN PLUS平台的生物乙醇制生物乙烯的工艺优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王林; 崔国燊; 徐檬; 谭天伟

    2009-01-01

    生物乙醇与生物乙烯的过程耦合是降低生物乙烯成本的重要途径.在充分分析生物乙醇制乙烯工艺的特点后,以ASPEN PLUS模拟软件为平台,对乙醇分离与乙醇脱水反应过程的耦合进行了优化设计,优化后的工艺流程节省蒸汽73%,节省能耗6%.

  5. Study performed on the secondary metabolites of trees as indicators for forest damage. Pt. 1. August 1984-July 1985. Final report. Untersuchung der sekundaeren Stoffwechselprodukte von Baeumen als Indikator von Waldschaeden. T. 1. August 1984-Juli 1985. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzl, K.; Lorbeer, E.; Mayr, M.; Hausmann, B.; Zelman, N.

    1986-01-01

    The research report describes the results obtained from the analysis of the composition of secondary metabolites of Picea abies. Analysis methods were used allowing to study both rapidly and reproducibly the volatile (monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes) and the nonvolatile (diterpenoids, fatty acids) components of spruces. Analysis was performed on different tree organs. Application of sophisticated separation methods (glass capillary gas chromatography, GC/MS technique) allowed to seperate almost all components of these complex extract mixtures and to determine their respective structure. Studies allowed to detect interesting regularities and correlations existing between a number of terpenes, and characteristic trends in the content of certain diterpenoids. Selection of spruce trees for examination also considered possible injuries and damage degrees in order to use the obtained analysis data for the detection of differences in the composition of metabolites from sound and injured trees. An annex supplement to this volume demonstrates in detail the findings for volatile monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes.

  6. 2012 Aspen Winter Conference New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials, February 5-10, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Joel; Rabe, Karin; Nayak, Chetan; Troyer, Matthias

    2012-05-01

    Aspen Center for Physics Project Summary DOE Budget Period: 10/1/2011 to 9/30/2012 Contract # DE-SC0007479 New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Condensed Matter Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 5 to 10, 2012. Seventy-four participants from seven countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials. There were 34 formal talks, and a number of informal discussions held during the week. Talks covered a variety of topics related to DOE BES priorities, including, for example, advanced photon techniques (Hasan, Abbamonte, Orenstein, Shen, Ghosh) and predictive theoretical modeling of materials properties (Rappe, Pickett, Balents, Zhang, Vanderbilt); the full conference schedule is provided with this report. The week's events included a public lecture (Quantum Matters given by Chetan Nayak from Microsoft Research) and attended by 234 members of the public, and a physics caf© geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists conducted by Kathryn Moler (Stanford University) and Andrew M. Rappe (University of Pennsylvania) and attended by 67 locals and visitors. While there were no published proceedings, some of the talks are posted online and can be Googled. The workshop was organized by Joel Moore (University of California Berkeley), Chetan Nayak (Microsoft Research), Karin Rabe (Rutgers University), and Matthias Troyer (ETH Zurich). Two organizers who did not attend the conference were Gabriel Aeppli (University College London & London Centre for Nanotechnology) and Andrea Cavalleri (Oxford University & Max Planck Hamburg).

  7. Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Stability in the Aspen-Conifer Ecotone in Montane Forests in Utah, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Román Dobarco

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the potential impact of conifer encroachment on soil organic carbon (SOC dynamics and storage in montane aspen-conifer forests from the interior western US, we sampled mineral soils (0–15 cm across the aspen-conifer ecotones in southern and northern Utah and quantified total SOC stocks, stable SOC (i.e., mineral-associated SOC (MoM, labile SOC (i.e., light fraction (LF, decomposable (CO2 release during long-term aerobic incubations and soluble SOC (hot water extractable organic carbon (HWEOC. Total SOC storage (47.0 ± 16.5 Mg C ha−1 and labile SOC as LF (14.0 ± 7.10 Mg C ha−1, SOC decomposability (cumulative released CO2-C of 5.6 ± 3.8 g C g−1 soil or HWEOC (0.6 ± 0.6 mg C g−1 soil did not differ substantially with vegetation type, although a slight increase in HWEOC was observed with increasing conifer in the overstory. There were statistically significant differences (p = 0.035 in stable MoM storage, which was higher under aspen (31.2 ± 15.1 Mg C ha−1 than under conifer (22.8 ± 9.0 Mg C ha−1, with intermediate values under mixed (25.7 ± 8.8 Mg C ha−1. Texture had the greatest impact on SOC distribution among labile and stable fractions, with increasing stabilization in MoM and decreasing bio-availability of SOC with increasing silt + clay content. Only at lower silt + clay contents (40%–70% could we discern the influence of vegetation on MoM content. This highlights the importance of chemical protection mechanisms for long-term C sequestration.

  8. A Knowledge Tree Model for Managing Organizational Knowledge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Zhen-qiang; WANG Ning-sheng

    2002-01-01

    According to the relation of organizational knowledge, this paper analyzes the structure of organizational knowledge at first. A concept of knowledge tree is introduced and a process model of knowledge management is described by a knowledge tree. In this paper a definition of value of knowledge is given and the life cycle of a knowledge tree is analyzed. Finally, some principles for knowledge management are presented.

  9. Trees in renorming theory

    OpenAIRE

    Haydon, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Trees are very agreeable objects to work with, offering a diversity of behaviour within a structure that is sufficiently simple to admit precise analysis. Thus we are able to offer fairly satisfactory necessary and sufficient conditions on a tree $\\Upsilon $ for the existence of equivalent LUR or strictly convex norms on $\\C_0(\\Upsilon )$ and for norms with the Kadec Property. In particular, we show that for a {\\sl finitely branching} tree $\\Upsilon $ the space $\\C_0(\\Upsilon )$ admits a Kade...

  10. Annotated Stack Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Hague, Matthew; Penelle, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Annotated pushdown automata provide an automaton model of higher-order recursion schemes, which may in turn be used to model higher-order programs for the purposes of verification. We study Ground Annotated Stack Tree Rewrite Systems -- a tree rewrite system where each node is labelled by the configuration of an annotated pushdown automaton. This allows the modelling of fork and join constructs in higher-order programs and is a generalisation of higher-order stack trees recently introduced by...

  11. From Fields to Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Hamze, Firas; De Freitas, Nando

    2012-01-01

    We present new MCMC algorithms for computing the posterior distributions and expectations of the unknown variables in undirected graphical models with regular structure. For demonstration purposes, we focus on Markov Random Fields (MRFs). By partitioning the MRFs into non-overlapping trees, it is possible to compute the posterior distribution of a particular tree exactly by conditioning on the remaining tree. These exact solutions allow us to construct efficient blocked and Rao-Blackwellised ...

  12. The valuative tree

    CERN Document Server

    Favre, Charles

    2004-01-01

    This volume is devoted to a beautiful object, called the valuative tree and designed as a powerful tool for the study of singularities in two complex dimensions. Its intricate yet manageable structure can be analyzed by both algebraic and geometric means. Many types of singularities, including those of curves, ideals, and plurisubharmonic functions, can be encoded in terms of positive measures on the valuative tree. The construction of these measures uses a natural tree Laplace operator of independent interest.

  13. Generalized Binomial Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Jackwerth, Jens Carsten

    1996-01-01

    We consider the problem of consistently pricing new options given the prices of related options on the same stock. The Black-Scholes formula and standard binomial trees can only accommodate one related European option which then effectively specifies the volatility parameter. Implied binomial trees can accommodate only related European options with the same time-to-expiration.The generalized binomial trees introduced here can accommodate any kind of related options (European, American, or exo...

  14. The tree BVOC index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.R., E-mail: jrsimpson@ucdavis.edu [U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Urban Ecosystems and Processes, 1731 Research Park Drive, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); McPherson, E.G. [U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Urban Ecosystems and Processes, 1731 Research Park Drive, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Urban trees can produce a number of benefits, among them improved air quality. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted by some species are ozone precursors. Modifying future tree planting to favor lower-emitting species can reduce these emissions and aid air management districts in meeting federally mandated emissions reductions for these compounds. Changes in BVOC emissions are calculated as the result of transitioning to a lower-emitting species mix in future planting. A simplified method for calculating the emissions reduction and a Tree BVOC index based on the calculated reduction is described. An example illustrates the use of the index as a tool for implementation and monitoring of a tree program designed to reduce BVOC emissions as a control measure being developed as part of the State Implementation Plan (SIP) for the Sacramento Federal Nonattainment Area. - Highlights: > A Tree BVOC index based on reduced emissions from low emitting trees is described. > An example illustrates use of the index as an implementation and monitoring tool. > This index could be useful for including urban trees in air quality mitigation plans. - A tree BVOC index is presented that calculates reduced BVOC emissions from planting lower-emitting urban tree species that has potential application for SIP compliance.

  15. Symmetric M-tree

    CERN Document Server

    Sexton, Alan P

    2010-01-01

    The M-tree is a paged, dynamically balanced metric access method that responds gracefully to the insertion of new objects. To date, no algorithm has been published for the corresponding Delete operation. We believe this to be non-trivial because of the design of the M-tree's Insert algorithm. We propose a modification to Insert that overcomes this problem and give the corresponding Delete algorithm. The performance of the tree is comparable to the M-tree and offers additional benefits in terms of supported operations, which we briefly discuss.

  16. The tree BVOC index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban trees can produce a number of benefits, among them improved air quality. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted by some species are ozone precursors. Modifying future tree planting to favor lower-emitting species can reduce these emissions and aid air management districts in meeting federally mandated emissions reductions for these compounds. Changes in BVOC emissions are calculated as the result of transitioning to a lower-emitting species mix in future planting. A simplified method for calculating the emissions reduction and a Tree BVOC index based on the calculated reduction is described. An example illustrates the use of the index as a tool for implementation and monitoring of a tree program designed to reduce BVOC emissions as a control measure being developed as part of the State Implementation Plan (SIP) for the Sacramento Federal Nonattainment Area. - Highlights: → A Tree BVOC index based on reduced emissions from low emitting trees is described. → An example illustrates use of the index as an implementation and monitoring tool. → This index could be useful for including urban trees in air quality mitigation plans. - A tree BVOC index is presented that calculates reduced BVOC emissions from planting lower-emitting urban tree species that has potential application for SIP compliance.

  17. A theory of game trees, based on solution trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); A. de Bruin (Arie); A. Plaat (Aske)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper a complete theory of game tree algorithms is presented, entirely based upon the notion of a solution tree. Two types of solution trees are distinguished: max and min solution trees respectively. We show that most game tree algorithms construct a superposition of a max and a

  18. Aspen Plus Applications in Low Temperature Heat Recyling Technology of Tail Oil of Hydrocracking Unit%Aspen Plus在加氢裂化尾油低温热利用技术改造中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤秀伟; 单敏

    2012-01-01

    Recycling and energy consumption. In order using the to enlarge was used to simulate the tail oil heat for tower DA912 in 920 unit was low temperature heat was an important means in oil refining enterprise to reduce energy saving space to recovery the low temperature heat as possible, Aspen Plus exchange proposed in hydrocracking equipment, and the scheme of revamping the heat source to achieve the purpose of saving energy and reducing consumption. The eco- nomic benefit was remarkable, with annual savinz oroduction costs of 4.23 million vuan.%目前炼油企业低温热回收利用是降低能耗的一种重要手段[1]。扬子石化加氢裂化装置为了挖掘节能空间尽量回收低温热,利用Aspen Plus对尾油换热流程进行模拟分析,在此基础上提出了920单元DA912塔再沸器热源技术改造方案,达到了节能降耗的目的。每年可节约生产成本约423万元,经济效益显著。

  19. Parameter Changes Which Characterize the Wear of the Cutting Tool in the Milling Process of Aspen Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andis ĀBELE

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to determine changesof parameters (cutting power, roughness of woodensurface and rounding of cutting edge whichcharacterize the wear of the cutting tool in the millingprocess of aspen wood (Populus tremula,depending on the rake angle of the cutting tool.The milling process was performed by meansof a computer numerical control milling machine andtwo cutterheads with a rake angle of the fixed cutterknife adjusted at 100, 150, 200 and 300. The cuttersmade of high speed steel and highly alloyed toolsteel. After reaching the definite length of the cuttingtrajectory, the cutting power and the roughness ofthe processed wood surface were measured, as wellas replicates of the cutting edge, by pressing it inlead sheet.By milling aspen wood with highly alloyed toolsteel cutter knives at rake angle of cutter 10º, theroughness of the processed wooden surface beganincreasing after 44 000m length of cutting trajectory,which corresponds to a cutting time of 15 hours.

  20. Matching Subsequences in Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2009-01-01

    Given two rooted, labeled trees P and T the tree path subsequence problem is to determine which paths in P are subsequences of which paths in T. Here a path begins at the root and ends at a leaf. In this paper we propose this problem as a useful query primitive for XML data, and provide new...

  1. Searching informed game trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); A. de Bruin (Arie)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWell-known algorithms for the evaluation of the minimax function in game trees are alpha-beta and SSS*. An improved version of SSS* is SSS-2. All these algorithms don't use any heuristic information on the game tree. In this paper the use of heuristic information is introduced into the a

  2. Pruning peach trees

    OpenAIRE

    Sagers, Larry A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the importance of annual pruning to produce high yield and quality of peaches. Advises that the successful pruner should understand how the trees grow, and how the trees respond to pruning. Also cautions that improper pruning will lower yield and quality of fruit.

  3. The arithmetic of trees

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno, Adriano; Yasaki, Dan

    2008-01-01

    The arithmetic of the natural numbers can be extended to arithmetic operations on planar binary trees. This gives rise to a non-commutative arithmetic theory. In this exposition, we describe this arithmetree, first defined by Loday, and investigate prime trees.

  4. Tree damage and mycotrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyser, W.; Iken, J.; Meyer, F.H.

    1988-10-22

    Tree species that are particularly endangered in our forests are characterized by the fact that they live in an obligatory symbiosis with ectomycorrhiza fungii. In verifying which tree species appear to be more damaged or less severely damaged, a conspicuous phenomenon noted was that the tree species exhibiting slight symptoms of damage or none at all included such ones as form mycorrhizas facultatively or dispense with mycorrhizas, e.g. Acer, Aesculus, Fraxinus, Populus, Salix. Given that trees in municipal gardens reflect the development and extent of damage in a way similar to forests, and given also that much greater numbers of tree species are often cultured in parks of this type, the latter were considered particularly suited to examine the question of whether a relationship exists between mycotrophy and the severity of damage.

  5. TreePM Method for Two-Dimensional Cosmological Simulations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suryadeep Ray

    2004-09-01

    We describe the two-dimensional TreePM method in this paper. The 2d TreePM code is an accurate and efficient technique to carry out large two-dimensional N-body simulations in cosmology. This hybrid code combines the 2d Barnes and Hut Tree method and the 2d Particle–Mesh method. We describe the splitting of force between the PM and the Tree parts. We also estimate error in force for a realistic configuration. Finally, we discuss some tests of the code.

  6. The First-Order Theory of Ground Tree Rewrite Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Göller, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    We prove that the complexity of the uniform first-order theory of ground tree rewrite graphs is in ATIME(2^{2^{poly(n)}},O(n)). Providing a matching lower bound, we show that there is some fixed ground tree rewrite graph whose first-order theory is hard for ATIME(2^{2^{poly(n)}},poly(n)) with respect to logspace reductions. Finally, we prove that there exists a fixed ground tree rewrite graph together with a single unary predicate in form of a regular tree language such that the resulting structure has a non-elementary first-order theory.

  7. Sustainable management of Neo -Tropical Tree Genetic Resources: Combining molecular and modelling methods to understand the structure and dynamics of gene diversity. Final Scientific Report. February 2002 - January 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Cavers, Stephen; Walker, Katherine; Davies, Samantha; Munro, Robert; Home-Robertson, Patrick; Lowe, Andrew; Navarro, Carlos; Finegan, Bryan; Hernandez, Gustavo; Cascante, Carolina; Caron, Henri; Degen, Bernd; Kremer, Antoine; Lemes, Maristerra; Gribel, Rogerio

    2007-01-01

    Original Objectives: • Examine the structure and dynamics of genetic variation for a range of economically and ecologically important Central and South American tree species within natural ecosystems and identify the main factors that are responsible for partitioning of variation within species • Examine the impact of identified extraction methods/habitat degradation (i.e. fragmentation, logging, forest clearance and domestication) on selected economically important species • Produc...

  8. Tree structure compression with RePair

    CERN Document Server

    Lohrey, Markus; Mennicke, Roy

    2010-01-01

    In this work we introduce a new linear time compression algorithm, called "Re-pair for Trees", which compresses ranked ordered trees using linear straight-line context-free tree grammars. Such grammars generalize straight-line context-free string grammars and allow basic tree operations, like traversal along edges, to be executed without prior decompression. Our algorithm can be considered as a generalization of the "Re-pair" algorithm developed by N. Jesper Larsson and Alistair Moffat in 2000. The latter algorithm is a dictionary-based compression algorithm for strings. We also introduce a succinct coding which is specialized in further compressing the grammars generated by our algorithm. This is accomplished without loosing the ability do directly execute queries on this compressed representation of the input tree. Finally, we compare the grammars and output files generated by a prototype of the Re-pair for Trees algorithm with those of similar compression algorithms. The obtained results show that that our...

  9. Accurate determination of 13C/12C in CO2 of past atmospheres from 13C/12C in tree rings by removal of climatic interferences. Final technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of delta13C in tree rings offers the potential for reconstructing changes in delta13C of atmospheric CO2, which combined with 14C trends will be important in evaluating the past and present role of the biosphere as a net carbon dioxide source or sink. One problem with such tree-ring delta13C records is that in addition to changes in atmospheric delta13C, climatic factors may influence the isotopic composition of the rings. This study examines delta13C in cellulose of five-year intervals of juniper tree rings. The sampling sites were near weather stations for which climate data are readily available. delta13C vs winter climate relationships were derived from those sites not under the influence of local pollution sources. These relationships facilitated development of a delta13C record from which climate effects have been factored out. The resulting 1930-1979 delta13C reconstruction shows a pronounced delta13C decrease from 1930 to 1960 and then a post-1960 flattening of the curve. We interpret this trend as representing an increasing role of biospheric CO2 sinks relative to sources, although other interpretations may be possible within the limits of precision of data analysis. Research with this technique is continuing with pinyon pine and dendroclimatological reconstructions to verify these results and to develop a climate-free delta13C chronology back to pre-industrial time

  10. Can plasticity make spatial structure irrelevant in individual-tree models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar García

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Distance-dependent individual-tree models have commonly been found to add little predictive power to that of distance-independent ones. One possible reason is plasticity, the ability of trees to lean and to alter crown and root development to better occupy available growing space. Being able to redeploy foliage (and roots into canopy gaps and less contested areas can diminish the importance of stem ground locations. Methods Plasticity was simulated for 3 intensively measured forest stands, to see to what extent and under what conditions the allocation of resources (e.g., light to the individual trees depended on their ground coordinates. The data came from 50 × 60 m stem-mapped plots in natural monospecific stands of jack pine, trembling aspen and black spruce from central Canada. Explicit perfect-plasticity equations were derived for tessellation-type models. Results Qualitatively similar simulation results were obtained under a variety of modelling assumptions. The effects of plasticity varied somewhat with stand uniformity and with assumed plasticity limits and other factors. Stand-level implications for canopy depth, distribution modelling and total productivity were examined. Conclusions Generally, under what seem like conservative maximum plasticity constraints, spatial structure accounted for less than 10% of the variance in resource allocation. The perfect-plasticity equations approximated well the simulation results from tessellation models, but not those from models with less extreme competition asymmetry. Whole-stand perfect plasticity approximations seem an attractive alternative to individual-tree models.

  11. Populus: arabidopsis for forestry. Do we need a model tree?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gail

    2002-12-01

    Trees are used to produce a variety of wood-based products including timber, pulp and paper. More recently, their use as a source of renewable energy has also been highlighted, as has their value for carbon mitigation within the Kyoto Protocol. Relative to food crops, the domestication of trees has only just begun; the long generation time and complex nature of juvenile and mature growth forms are contributory factors. To accelerate domestication, and to understand further some of the unique processes that occur in woody plants such as dormancy and secondary wood formation, a 'model' tree is needed. Here it is argued that Populus is rapidly becoming accepted as the 'model' woody plant and that such a 'model' tree is necessary to complement the genetic resource being developed in arabidopsis. The genus Populus (poplars, cottonwoods and aspens) contains approx. 30 species of woody plant, all found in the Northern hemisphere and exhibiting some of the fastest growth rates observed in temperate trees. Populus is fulfilling the 'model' role for a number of reasons. First, and most important, is the very recent commitment to sequence the Populus genome, a project initiated in February 2002. This will be the first woody plant to be sequenced. Other reasons include the relatively small genome size (450-550 Mbp) of Populus, the large number of molecular genetic maps and the ease of genetic transformation. Populus may also be propagated vegetatively, making mapping populations immortal and facilitating the production of large amounts of clonal material for experimentation. Hybridization occurs routinely and, in these respects, Populus has many similarities to arabidopsis. However, Populus also differs from arabidopsis in many respects, including being dioecious, which makes selfing and back-cross manipulations impossible. The long time-to-flower is also a limitation, whilst physiological and biochemical experiments are more readily conducted in Populus compared with the

  12. Skewed Binary Search Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Moruz, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    It is well-known that to minimize the number of comparisons a binary search tree should be perfectly balanced. Previous work has shown that a dominating factor over the running time for a search is the number of cache faults performed, and that an appropriate memory layout of a binary search tree...... can reduce the number of cache faults by several hundred percent. Motivated by the fact that during a search branching to the left or right at a node does not necessarily have the same cost, e.g. because of branch prediction schemes, we in this paper study the class of skewed binary search trees. For...... all nodes in a skewed binary search tree the ratio between the size of the left subtree and the size of the tree is a fixed constant (a ratio of 1/2 gives perfect balanced trees). In this paper we present an experimental study of various memory layouts of static skewed binary search trees, where each...

  13. Phylogenetic trees in bioinformatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, Tom L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Genetic data is often used to infer evolutionary relationships among a collection of viruses, bacteria, animal or plant species, or other operational taxonomic units (OTU). A phylogenetic tree depicts such relationships and provides a visual representation of the estimated branching order of the OTUs. Tree estimation is unique for several reasons, including: the types of data used to represent each OTU; the use ofprobabilistic nucleotide substitution models; the inference goals involving both tree topology and branch length, and the huge number of possible trees for a given sample of a very modest number of OTUs, which implies that fmding the best tree(s) to describe the genetic data for each OTU is computationally demanding. Bioinformatics is too large a field to review here. We focus on that aspect of bioinformatics that includes study of similarities in genetic data from multiple OTUs. Although research questions are diverse, a common underlying challenge is to estimate the evolutionary history of the OTUs. Therefore, this paper reviews the role of phylogenetic tree estimation in bioinformatics, available methods and software, and identifies areas for additional research and development.

  14. Wood properties of trembling aspen and paper birch after 5 years of exposure to elevated concentrations of CO(2) and O(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiainen, Katri; Kaakinen, Seija; Warsta, Elina; Kubiske, Mark E; Nelson, Neil D; Sober, Jaak; Karnosky, David F; Saranpää, Pekka; Vapaavuori, Elina

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the interactive effects of elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide ([CO(2)]) and ozone ([O(3)]) on radial growth, wood chemistry and structure of five 5-year-old trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) clones and the wood chemistry of paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.). Material for the study was collected from the Aspen FACE (free-air CO(2) enrichment) experiment in Rhinelander, WI, where the saplings had been exposed to four treatments: control, elevated [CO(2)] (560 ppm), elevated [O(3)] (1.5 x ambient) and their combination for five growing seasons. Wood properties of both species were altered in response to exposure to the treatments. In aspen, elevated [CO(2)] decreased uronic acids (constituents of, e.g., hemicellulose) and tended to increase stem diameter. In response to elevated [O(3)] exposure, acid-soluble lignin concentration decreased and vessel lumen diameter tended to decrease. Elevated [O(3)] increased the concentration of acetone-soluble extractives in paper birch, but tended to decrease the concentration of these compounds in aspen. In paper birch, elevated [CO(2)] decreased and elevated [O(3)] increased starch concentration. The responses of wood properties to 5 years of fumigation differed from those previously reported after 3 years of fumigation. PMID:18316312

  15. Software development to assist in fault tree construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews and classifies fault tree construction methods developed for system safety and reliability. We have outlined two generally different approaches: automatic and interactive fault tree construction. Automatic fault tree approach is no jet enough developed to covering various uses in practice. Interactive approach is intending to be support to the analyst (not vice verse like in automatic approach). The aim is not so high as automatic one but it is accessible. We have favored interactive approach as well because to our opinion the process of fault tree construction is very important for better system understanding. We have described our example of interactive fault tree construction approach. Computer code GIFFT (Graphical Interactive Fault Tree Tool) is in phase of intensive testing and final developing. (author)

  16. Compatible spanning trees

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Olaverri, Alfredo Martin; Huemer, Clemens; Hurtado Díaz, Fernando Alfredo; Tejel Altarriba, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Two plane geometric graphs are said to be compatible when their union is a plane geometric graph. Let S be a set of n points in the Euclidean plane in general position and let T be any given plane geometric spanning tree of S. In this work, we study the problem of finding a second plane geometric tree T' spanning S, such that is compatible with T and shares the minimum number of edges with T. We prove that there is always a compatible plane geometric tree T' having at most #n - 3#/4 edges in ...

  17. Counting trees using symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardi, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    We present a new approach for counting trees, and we apply it to count multitype Cayley trees and to prove the multivariate Lagrange inversion formula. The gist of our approach is to exploit the symmetries of refined enumerative formulas: proving these symmetries is easy, and once the symmetries are proved the formulas follow effortlessly. Somewhat surprisingly, our formula for the generating function of multitype Cayley trees appears to be new, and implies certain recent results by Bousquet-M\\'elou and Chapuy. We also adapt our approach to recover known enumerative formulas for cacti counted according to their degree distribution.

  18. The gravity apple tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa Aldama, Mariana

    2015-04-01

    The gravity apple tree is a genealogical tree of the gravitation theories developed during the past century. The graphic representation is full of information such as guides in heuristic principles, names of main proponents, dates and references for original articles (See under Supplementary Data for the graphic representation). This visual presentation and its particular classification allows a quick synthetic view for a plurality of theories, many of them well validated in the Solar System domain. Its diachronic structure organizes information in a shape of a tree following similarities through a formal concept analysis. It can be used for educational purposes or as a tool for philosophical discussion.

  19. The TS-Tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assent, Ira; Krieger, Ralph; Afschari, Farzad;

    2008-01-01

    -dimensional data in an overlap-free manner. During query processing, powerful pruning via quantized separator and meta data information greatly reduces the number of pages which have to be accessed, resulting in substantial speed-up. In thorough experiments on synthetic and real world time series data we......, the efficiency benefits of indexing are lost. In this paper, we propose the TS-tree (time series tree), an index structure for efficient time series retrieval and similarity search. Exploiting inherent properties of time series quantization and dimensionality reduction, the TS-tree indexes high...

  20. Evolutionary tree reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Kanefsky, Bob

    1990-01-01

    It is described how Minimum Description Length (MDL) can be applied to the problem of DNA and protein evolutionary tree reconstruction. If there is a set of mutations that transform a common ancestor into a set of the known sequences, and this description is shorter than the information to encode the known sequences directly, then strong evidence for an evolutionary relationship has been found. A heuristic algorithm is described that searches for the simplest tree (smallest MDL) that finds close to optimal trees on the test data. Various ways of extending the MDL theory to more complex evolutionary relationships are discussed.

  1. Regional Models of Diameter as a Function of Individual Tree Attributes, Climate and Site Characteristics for Six Major Tree Species in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan A. MacIsaac

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the relationship of stem diameter to tree, site and stand characteristics for six major tree species (trembling aspen, white birch, balsam fir, lodgepole pine, black spruce, and white spruce in Alberta (Canada with data from Alberta Sustainable Resource Development Permanent Sample Plots. Using non-linear mixed effects modeling techniques, we developed models to estimate diameter at breast height using height, crown and stand attributes. Mixed effects models (with plot as subject using height, crown area, and basal area of the larger trees explained on average 95% of the variation in diameter at breast height across the six species with a root mean square error of 2.0 cm (13.4% of mean diameter. Fixed effects models (without plot as subject including the Natural Sub-Region (NSR information explained on average 90% of the variation in diameter at breast height across the six species with a root mean square error equal to 2.8 cm (17.9% of mean diameter. Selected climate variables provided similar results to models with NSR information. The inclusion of nutrient regime and moisture regime did not significantly improve the predictive ability of these models.

  2. Process simulation of oxy-fuel combustion for a 300 MW pulverized coal-fired power plant using Aspen Plus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: This paper studied the combustion processes of pulverized coal in a 300 MW power plant using Aspen Plus software. The amount of each component in flue gas in coal-fired processes with air or O2/CO2 as oxidizer was obtained. The differences between the two processes were identified, and the parameter influences of temperature, excess oxygen ratio and molar fraction of O2/CO2 on the proportions of different components in flue gas were examined by sensitivity analysis. - Highlights: • Combustion processes were studied with Aspen Plus for a 300 MW pulverized coal power plant. • The amount of each flue gas component in coal-fired processes with air or O2/CO2 as oxidizer was obtained. • Differences between the two process models were identified. • The influences of operation parameters on the flue gas components were examined. - Abstract: This work focuses on the amounts and components of flue gas for oxy-fuel combustion in a coal-fired power plant (CFPP). The combustion process of pulverized coal in a 300 MW power plant is studied using Aspen Plus software. The amount of each component in flue gas in coal-fired processes with air or O2/CO2 as oxidizer is obtained. The differences between the two processes are identified, and the influences of temperature, excess oxygen ratio and molar fraction of O2/CO2 on the proportions of different components in flue gas are examined by sensitivity analysis. The process simulation results show that replacing atmospheric air by a 21%O2/79%CO2 mixture leads the decrease of the flame temperature from 1789 °C to 1395 °C. The equilibrium amount of NOx declines obviously but the SOx are still at the same level. The mass fraction of CO2 in flue gas increased from 21.3% to 81.5%. The amount of NOx is affected sensitively by the change of temperature and the excess oxygen ratio, but the change of O2/CO2 molar fraction has a little influence to the generation of NOx. With the increasing of O2 concentration, the

  3. A Characterization of the average tree solution for tree games

    OpenAIRE

    Debasis Mishra; Dolf Talman

    2009-01-01

    For the class of tree games, a new solution called the average tree solution has been proposed recently. We provide a characterization of this solution. This characterization underlines an important difference, in terms of symmetric treatment of the agents, between the average tree solution and the Myerson value for the class of tree games.

  4. ControlTree: Navigating and Selecting in a Large Tree

    OpenAIRE

    Appert, Caroline; Fekete, Jean-Daniel

    2006-01-01

    International audience We introduce ControlTree, a novel interface using crossing interaction to navigate and select nodes in a large tree. ControlTree combines an optimized dynamic layout with interaction features to quickly reach a node in a node-link tree representation.

  5. Tree-Indexed Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Pemantle, Robin

    1995-01-01

    This article examines a recent body of work on stochastic processes indexed by a tree. Emphasis is on the application of this new framework to existing probability models. Proofs are largely omitted, with references provided.

  6. Tree-like tableaux

    CERN Document Server

    Aval, Jean-Christophe; Nadeau, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    In this work we introduce and study tree-like tableaux, which are certain fillings of Ferrers diagrams in simple bijection with permutation tableaux and alternative tableaux. We exhibit an elementary insertion procedure on our tableaux which gives a clear proof that tableaux of size n are counted by n!, and which moreover respects most of the well-known statistics studied originally on alternative and permutation tableaux. Our insertion procedure allows to define in particular two simple new bijections between tree-like tableaux and permutations: the first one is conceived specifically to respect the generalized pattern 2-31, while the second one respects the underlying tree of a tree-like tableau.

  7. Generalized constructive tree weights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Loop Vertex Expansion (LVE) is a quantum field theory (QFT) method which explicitly computes the Borel sum of Feynman perturbation series. This LVE relies in a crucial way on symmetric tree weights which define a measure on the set of spanning trees of any connected graph. In this paper we generalize this method by defining new tree weights. They depend on the choice of a partition of a set of vertices of the graph, and when the partition is non-trivial, they are no longer symmetric under permutation of vertices. Nevertheless we prove they have the required positivity property to lead to a convergent LVE; in fact we formulate this positivity property precisely for the first time. Our generalized tree weights are inspired by the Brydges-Battle-Federbush work on cluster expansions and could be particularly suited to the computation of connected functions in QFT. Several concrete examples are explicitly given

  8. Value tree analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    What are the targets and criteria on which national energy policy should be based. What priorities should be set, and how can different social interests be matched. To answer these questions, a new instrument of decision theory is presented which has been applied with good results to controversial political issues in the USA. The new technique is known under the name of value tree analysis. Members of important West German organisations (BDI, VDI, RWE, the Catholic and Protestant Church, Deutscher Naturschutzring, and ecological research institutions) were asked about the goals of their organisations. These goals were then ordered systematically and arranged in a hierarchical tree structure. The value trees of different groups can be combined into a catalogue of social criteria of acceptability and policy assessment. The authors describe the philosophy and methodology of value tree analysis and give an outline of its application in the development of a socially acceptable energy policy. (orig.)

  9. The tree BVOC index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J R; McPherson, E G

    2011-01-01

    Urban trees can produce a number of benefits, among them improved air quality. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted by some species are ozone precursors. Modifying future tree planting to favor lower-emitting species can reduce these emissions and aid air management districts in meeting federally mandated emissions reductions for these compounds. Changes in BVOC emissions are calculated as the result of transitioning to a lower-emitting species mix in future planting. A simplified method for calculating the emissions reduction and a Tree BVOC index based on the calculated reduction is described. An example illustrates the use of the index as a tool for implementation and monitoring of a tree program designed to reduce BVOC emissions as a control measure being developed as part of the State Implementation Plan (SIP) for the Sacramento Federal Nonattainment Area. PMID:21435760

  10. Tea tree oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David; Jacob, Sharon E

    2012-01-01

    Tea tree oil is an increasingly popular ingredient in a variety of household and cosmetic products, including shampoos, massage oils, skin and nail creams, and laundry detergents. Known for its potential antiseptic properties, it has been shown to be active against a variety of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and mites. The oil is extracted from the leaves of the tea tree via steam distillation. This essential oil possesses a sharp camphoraceous odor followed by a menthol-like cooling sensation. Most commonly an ingredient in topical products, it is used at a concentration of 5% to 10%. Even at this concentration, it has been reported to induce contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis reactions. In 1999, tea tree oil was added to the North American Contact Dermatitis Group screening panel. The latest prevalence rates suggest that 1.4% of patients referred for patch testing had a positive reaction to tea tree oil. PMID:22653070

  11. NLCD 2001 - Tree Canopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The National Land Cover Database 2001 tree canopy layer for Minnesota (mapping zones 39-42, 50-51) was produced through a cooperative project conducted by the...

  12. A parallel buffer tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitchinava, Nodar; Zeh, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    We present the parallel buffer tree, a parallel external memory (PEM) data structure for batched search problems. This data structure is a non-trivial extension of Arge's sequential buffer tree to a private-cache multiprocessor environment and reduces the number of I/O operations by the number...... of available processor cores compared to its sequential counterpart, thereby taking full advantage of multicore parallelism. The parallel buffer tree is a search tree data structure that supports the batched parallel processing of a sequence of N insertions, deletions, membership queries, and range queries...... in the optimal OhOf(psortN + K/PB) parallel I/O complexity, where K is the size of the output reported in the process and psortN is the parallel I/O complexity of sorting N elements using P processors....

  13. Robustness of a routing tree for the Push Tree Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Havet, Frédéric

    2002-01-01

    The Push Tree problem contains elements from both the Steiner Tree and Shortest Path problem. It deals with the trade-offs between the push and pull mechanism used in information distribution and retrieval. In , a two step approach for the Push Tree Problem was proposed. In the first step, a «good» spanning tree (called routing tree) is constructed and then the problem is solved in this particular tree. Finding a routing tree is NP-hard but the second step may be performed easily, thus the id...

  14. Multiscale singularity trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somchaipeng, Kerawit; Sporring, Jon; Johansen, Peter; Kreiborg, Sven

    2007-01-01

    We propose MultiScale Singularity Trees (MSSTs) as a structure to represent images, and we propose an algorithm for image comparison based on comparing MSSTs. The algorithm is tested on 3 public image databases and compared to 2 state-of-theart methods. We conclude that the computational complexity...... of our algorithm only allows for the comparison of small trees, and that the results of our method are comparable with state-of-the-art using much fewer parameters for image representation....

  15. Tree-Level Formalism

    OpenAIRE

    Brandhuber, Andreas; Spence, Bill; Travaglini, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    We review two novel techniques used to calculate tree-level scattering amplitudes efficiently: MHV diagrams, and on-shell recursion relations. For the MHV diagrams, we consider applications to tree-level amplitudes and focus in particular on the N=4 supersymmetric formulation. We also briefly describe the derivation of loop amplitudes using MHV diagrams. For the recursion relations, after presenting their general proof, we discuss several applications to massless theories with and without sup...

  16. Minimum Error Tree Decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, L; Ma, Y.; Wilkins, D.; Bian, Z.; Ying, X

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a generalization of previous methods for constructing tree-structured belief network with hidden variables. The major new feature of the described method is the ability to produce a tree decomposition even when there are errors in the correlation data among the input variables. This is an important extension of existing methods since the correlational coefficients usually cannot be measured with precision. The technique involves using a greedy search algorithm that locall...

  17. Visualisation of Regression Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Brunsdon, Chris

    2007-01-01

    he regression tree [1] has been used as a tool for exploring multivariate data sets for some time. As in multiple linear regression, the technique is applied to a data set consisting of a contin- uous response variable y and a set of predictor variables { x 1 ,x 2 ,...,x k } which may be continuous or categorical. However, instead of modelling y as a linear function of the predictors, regression trees model y as a series of ...

  18. Type extension trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    We introduce type extension trees as a formal representation language for complex combinatorial features of relational data. Based on a very simple syntax this language provides a unified framework for expressing features as diverse as embedded subgraphs on the one hand, and marginal counts of...... attribute values on the other. We show by various examples how many existing relational data mining techniques can be expressed as the problem of constructing a type extension tree and a discriminant function....

  19. Generic Ising trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durhuus, Bergfinnur Jøgvan; Napolitano, George Maria

    2012-01-01

    The Ising model on a class of infinite random trees is defined as a thermodynamiclimit of finite systems. A detailed description of the corresponding distribution of infinite spin configurations is given. As an application, we study the magnetization properties of such systems and prove that they...... exhibit no spontaneous magnetization. Furthermore, the values of the Hausdorff and spectral dimensions of the underlying trees are calculated and found to be, respectively,¯dh =2 and¯ds = 4/3....

  20. Biased Range Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Dujmovic, Vida; Morin, Pat

    2008-01-01

    A data structure, called a biased range tree, is presented that preprocesses a set S of n points in R^2 and a query distribution D for 2-sided orthogonal range counting queries. The expected query time for this data structure, when queries are drawn according to D, matches, to within a constant factor, that of the optimal decision tree for S and D. The memory and preprocessing requirements of the data structure are O(n log n).

  1. Urban tree mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Roman, Lara Angelica

    2013-01-01

    Urban forests have aesthetic, environmental, human health, and economic benefits that motivate tree planting programs. Realizing these benefits depends on tree survival. Cost-benefit analyses for urban forest ecosystem services are sensitive to mortality rate assumptions and associated population projections. However, long-term mortality data is needed to assess the accuracy of these assumptions. Analytical tools from demography, such as life tables, mortality curves, and survival analysis, c...

  2. Information flow on trees

    OpenAIRE

    Mossel, Elchanan; Peres, Yuval

    2003-01-01

    Consider a tree network $T$, where each edge acts as an independent copy of a given channel $M$, and information is propagated from the root. For which $T$ and $M$ does the configuration obtained at level $n$ of $T$ typically contain significant information on the root variable? This problem arose independently in biology, information theory and statistical physics. ¶ For all $b$, we construct a channel for which the variable at the root of the break $b$-ary tree is...

  3. Tree Improvement Glossary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars Holger

    Forest tree improvement encompasses a number of scientific and technical areas like floral-, reproductive- and micro-biology, genetics breeding methods and strategies, propagation, gene conservation, data analysis and statistics, each area with a comprehensive terminology. The terms selected for...... definition here are those most frequently used in tree improvement literature. Clonal propagation is included in the view of the great expansion of that field as a means of mass multiplication of improved material....

  4. Tree felling 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    With a view to creating new landscapes and making its population of trees safer and healthier, this winter CERN will complete the tree-felling campaign started in 2010.   Tree felling will take place between 15 and 22 November on the Swiss part of the Meyrin site. This work is being carried out above all for safety reasons. The trees to be cut down are at risk of falling as they are too old and too tall to withstand the wind. In addition, the roots of poplar trees are very powerful and spread widely, potentially damaging underground networks, pavements and roadways. Compensatory tree planting campaigns will take place in the future, subject to the availability of funding, with the aim of creating coherent landscapes while also respecting the functional constraints of the site. These matters are being considered in close collaboration with the Geneva nature and countryside directorate (Direction générale de la nature et du paysage, DGNP). GS-SE Group

  5. Integrated model of G189A and Aspen-plus for the transient modeling of extravehicular activity atmospheric control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodney, Matthew; Conger, Bruce C.

    1990-01-01

    A computerized modeling tool, under development for the transient modeling of an extravehicular activity atmospheric control subsystem is described. This subsystem includes the astronaut, temperature control, moisture control, CO2 removal, and oxygen make-up components. Trade studies evaluating competing components and subsystems to guide the selection and development of hardware for lunar and Martian missions will use this modeling tool. The integrated modeling tool uses the Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) to accomplish pseudosteady-state simulations, and the general environmental thermal control and life support program (G189A) to manage overall control of the run and transient input output, as well as transient modeling computations and database functions. Flow charts and flow diagrams are included.

  6. Application of Aspen in Flare System Design%ASPEN在火炬排放系统设计的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛茂梅; 奚文杰; 曹枫; 沈红霞; 张世程

    2010-01-01

    火炬排放系统是石油化工及炼油装置不可缺少的安全配套设施.水力工况对系统的安全性有着莺要的影响.由于火炬排放工况的复杂性,水力计算也成为一个比较复杂的问题.本文介绍了Aspen Flare System Analyzer模拟软件及其特点和数学模型,并通过工程实例证明其在火炬排放系统设计中发挥的重要作用.

  7. Analyzing tree cores to detect petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater at a former landfill site in the community of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, eastern Canadian subarctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonkwe, Merline L D; Trapp, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    This research examines the feasibility of analyzing tree cores to detect benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m, p, o-xylene (BTEX) compounds and methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in groundwater in eastern Canada subarctic environments, using a former landfill site in the remote community of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Labrador. Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination at the landfill site is the result of environmentally unsound pre-1990s disposal of households and industrial solid wastes. Tree cores were taken from trembling aspen, black spruce, and white birch and analyzed by headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. BTEX compounds were detected in tree cores, corroborating known groundwater contamination. A zone of anomalously high concentrations of total BTEX constituents was identified and recommended for monitoring by groundwater wells. Tree cores collected outside the landfill site at a local control area suggest the migration of contaminants off-site. Tree species exhibit different concentrations of BTEX constituents, indicating selective uptake and accumulation. Toluene in wood exhibited the highest concentrations, which may also be due to endogenous production. Meanwhile, MTBE was not found in the tree cores and is considered to be absent in the groundwater. The results demonstrate that tree-core analysis can be useful for detecting anomalous concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons, such as BTEX compounds, in subarctic sites with shallow unconfined aquifers and permeable soils. This method can therefore aid in the proper management of contamination during landfill operations and after site closures. PMID:27151238

  8. Colocalization of low-methylesterified pectins and Pb deposits in the apoplast of aspen roots exposed to lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-methylesterified homogalacturonans have been suggested to play a role in the binding and immobilization of Pb in CW. Using root apices of hybrid aspen, a plant with a high phytoremediation potential, as a model, we demonstrated that the in situ distribution pattern of low-methylesterified homogalacturonan, pectin epitope (JIM5-P), reflects the pattern of Pb occurrence. The region which indicated high JIM5-P level corresponded with “Pb accumulation zone”. Moreover, JIM5-P was especially abundant in cell junctions, CWs lining the intercellular spaces and the corners of intercellular spaces indicating the highest accumulation of Pb. Furthermore, JIM5-P and Pb commonly co-localized. The observations indicate that low-methylesterified homogalacturonan is the CW polymer that determines the capacity of CW for Pb sequestration. Our results suggest a promising directions for CW modification for enhancing the efficiency of plant roots in Pb accumulation, an important aspect in the phytoremediation of soils contaminated with trace metals. - Highlights: • Co-localization of low-methylesterified pectins and Pb was analysed in situ. • The pattern of Pb accumulation matched low-methylesterified pectins distribution. • Low-methylesterified pectins and Pb commonly co-localized in cell walls. • Low-methylesterified pectins revealed an important compound in Pb sequestration. • We suggest a new direction in enhancing plant efficiency for phytoremediation. - The distribution of lead in developing tissues of aspen root tips exposed to short-term lead treatment mimics the distribution of low-methylesterified pectin epitope

  9. Sustainable cultivation of broadleaved trees in a recycling community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the future, with problems of global warming and acidification and with an increasing need to recirculate wastes of the community in an ecologically acceptable and economically sound manner, the cultivation of broadleaved species (birch, aspen, poplar, alder and willow in particular) on suitable forest land and on former agricultural land is of utmost interest if following the recycling philosophy. The wood produced could be used primarily for short fibres and for energy. Also of interest is the production of methanol, biogas and electricity, chipboard and laminates, in the context of a forest industry concerned with the further development of the raw materials. The main advantages of cultivating fast-growing, broadleaved trees on former agricultural land are that: * in Sweden it has been shown possible to produce 10-12 tonnes of dry matter of woody biomass per hectare and year by cultivating willows and hybrid poplars, * in such plantations, the energy efficiency ratio will be 1 to 15-20, meaning that for every energy unit used, 15-20 can be harvested, and * some residual products from society, such as sludges, ashes, and wastewaters can be used as fertilizers in such plantations. 16 refs

  10. Laser scanning measurements on trees for logging harvesting operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yili; Liu, Jinhao; Wang, Dian; Yang, Ruixi

    2012-01-01

    Logging harvesters represent a set of high-performance modern forestry machinery, which can finish a series of continuous operations such as felling, delimbing, peeling, bucking and so forth with human intervention. It is found by experiment that during the process of the alignment of the harvesting head to capture the trunk, the operator needs a lot of observation, judgment and repeated operations, which lead to the time and fuel losses. In order to improve the operation efficiency and reduce the operating costs, the point clouds for standing trees are collected with a low-cost 2D laser scanner. A cluster extracting algorithm and filtering algorithm are used to classify each trunk from the point cloud. On the assumption that every cross section of the target trunk is approximate a standard circle and combining the information of an Attitude and Heading Reference System, the radii and center locations of the trunks in the scanning range are calculated by the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient algorithm. The method is validated through experiments in an aspen forest, and the optimized calculation time consumption is compared with the previous work of other researchers. Moreover, the implementation of the calculation result for automotive capturing trunks by the harvesting head during the logging operation is discussed in particular. PMID:23012543

  11. Laser Scanning Measurements on Trees for Logging Harvesting Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixi Yang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Logging harvesters represent a set of high-performance modern forestry machinery, which can finish a series of continuous operations such as felling, delimbing, peeling, bucking and so forth with human intervention. It is found by experiment that during the process of the alignment of the harvesting head to capture the trunk, the operator needs a lot of observation, judgment and repeated operations, which lead to the time and fuel losses. In order to improve the operation efficiency and reduce the operating costs, the point clouds for standing trees are collected with a low-cost 2D laser scanner. A cluster extracting algorithm and filtering algorithm are used to classify each trunk from the point cloud. On the assumption that every cross section of the target trunk is approximate a standard circle and combining the information of an Attitude and Heading Reference System, the radii and center locations of the trunks in the scanning range are calculated by the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient algorithm. The method is validated through experiments in an aspen forest, and the optimized calculation time consumption is compared with the previous work of other researchers. Moreover, the implementation of the calculation result for automotive capturing trunks by the harvesting head during the logging operation is discussed in particular.

  12. Biologic diversity, forest fuels and silviculture: Effects of biomass harvesting in deciduous tree stands. Final report; Biologisk maangfald, skogsbraensle och skoetsel av bestaand: effekter av biomassauttag i loevskog. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norden, Bjoern [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Botanical Inst.; Goetmark, Frank [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Zoology

    2005-06-01

    This report concerns a research project studying biodiversity effects of partial cutting for biofuel harvest in temperate deciduous forest dominated by oaks (abandoned woodland pastures). Partial cutting (30%) resulted in fewer species of wood-decay fungi and bryophytes, but increase of vascular plants. It did not increase survival of oak seedlings in the short term. For epixylic bryophytes and lichens, wood-decay fungi, beetles and mycetophilids, area of valuable forest patches at the landscape level increased local species species richness, but not the number of red-listed and indicator species of vascular plants. We recommend that partial cutting for biofuel is not applied indiscriminantly, and a share of at least 25% of stands should be left as no intervention forests when oak grows mixed with other trees. More caution should be taken in regional areas rich in old deciduous forest, and in south-eastern Sweden.

  13. A Beta-splitting model for evolutionary trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainudiin, Raazesh; Véber, Amandine

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we construct a generalization of the Blum-François Beta-splitting model for evolutionary trees, which was itself inspired by Aldous' Beta-splitting model on cladograms. The novelty of our approach allows for asymmetric shares of diversification rates (or diversification 'potential') between two sister species in an evolutionarily interpretable manner, as well as the addition of extinction to the model in a natural way. We describe the incremental evolutionary construction of a tree with n leaves by splitting or freezing extant lineages through the generating, organizing and deleting processes. We then give the probability of any (binary rooted) tree under this model with no extinction, at several resolutions: ranked planar trees giving asymmetric roles to the first and second offspring species of a given species and keeping track of the order of the speciation events occurring during the creation of the tree, unranked planar trees, ranked non-planar trees and finally (unranked non-planar) trees. We also describe a continuous-time equivalent of the generating, organizing and deleting processes where tree topology and branch lengths are jointly modelled and provide code in SageMath/Python for these algorithms. PMID:27293780

  14. A Beta-splitting model for evolutionary trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainudiin, Raazesh

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we construct a generalization of the Blum–François Beta-splitting model for evolutionary trees, which was itself inspired by Aldous' Beta-splitting model on cladograms. The novelty of our approach allows for asymmetric shares of diversification rates (or diversification ‘potential’) between two sister species in an evolutionarily interpretable manner, as well as the addition of extinction to the model in a natural way. We describe the incremental evolutionary construction of a tree with n leaves by splitting or freezing extant lineages through the generating, organizing and deleting processes. We then give the probability of any (binary rooted) tree under this model with no extinction, at several resolutions: ranked planar trees giving asymmetric roles to the first and second offspring species of a given species and keeping track of the order of the speciation events occurring during the creation of the tree, unranked planar trees, ranked non-planar trees and finally (unranked non-planar) trees. We also describe a continuous-time equivalent of the generating, organizing and deleting processes where tree topology and branch lengths are jointly modelled and provide code in SageMath/Python for these algorithms. PMID:27293780

  15. Steiner trees in industry

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Ding-Zhu

    2001-01-01

    This book is a collection of articles studying various Steiner tree prob­ lems with applications in industries, such as the design of electronic cir­ cuits, computer networking, telecommunication, and perfect phylogeny. The Steiner tree problem was initiated in the Euclidean plane. Given a set of points in the Euclidean plane, the shortest network interconnect­ ing the points in the set is called the Steiner minimum tree. The Steiner minimum tree may contain some vertices which are not the given points. Those vertices are called Steiner points while the given points are called terminals. The shortest network for three terminals was first studied by Fermat (1601-1665). Fermat proposed the problem of finding a point to minimize the total distance from it to three terminals in the Euclidean plane. The direct generalization is to find a point to minimize the total distance from it to n terminals, which is still called the Fermat problem today. The Steiner minimum tree problem is an indirect generalization. Sch...

  16. Equiseparable chemical trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORIS FURTULA

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Let n1(e|T and n2(e|T denote the number of vertices of a tree T, lying on the two sides of the edge e. Let T1 and T2 be two trees with equal number of vertices, let e be an edge of T1 and f an edge of T2. Then e and f are said to be equiseparable if either n1(e|T1 = n1(e|T2 or n1(e|T1 = n2(e|T2. If all edges of T1 and T2 can be chosen so as to form equiseparable pairs, then T1 and T2 are equiseparable trees. A number of molecular structure-descriptors of equiseparable chemical trees coincide, implying that the corresponding alkane isomers must have similar physico-chemical properties. It is shown how equiseparable chemical trees can be constructed in a systematic manner.

  17. Odds-On Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Prosenjit; Douieb, Karim; Dujmovic, Vida; King, James; Morin, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Let R^d -> A be a query problem over R^d for which there exists a data structure S that can compute P(q) in O(log n) time for any query point q in R^d. Let D be a probability measure over R^d representing a distribution of queries. We describe a data structure called the odds-on tree, of size O(n^\\epsilon) that can be used as a filter that quickly computes P(q) for some query values q in R^d and relies on S for the remaining queries. With an odds-on tree, the expected query time for a point drawn according to D is O(H*+1), where H* is a lower-bound on the expected cost of any linear decision tree that solves P. Odds-on trees have a number of applications, including distribution-sensitive data structures for point location in 2-d, point-in-polytope testing in d dimensions, ray shooting in simple polygons, ray shooting in polytopes, nearest-neighbour queries in R^d, point-location in arrangements of hyperplanes in R^d, and many other geometric searching problems that can be solved in the linear-decision tree mo...

  18. Bound entanglement in tree graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we discuss the entanglement properties of graph-diagonal states, with particular emphasis on calculating the threshold for the transition between the presence and absence of entanglement (i.e. the separability point). Special consideration is made of the thermal states of trees, including the linear cluster state. We characterize the type of entanglement present, and describe the optimal entanglement witnesses and their implementation on a quantum computer, up to an additive approximation. In the case of general graphs, we invoke a relation with the partition function of the classical Ising model, thereby intimating a connection to computational complexity theoretic tasks. Finally, we show that the entanglement is robust to some classes of local perturbations.

  19. Inferring optimal species trees under gene duplication and loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayzid, M S; Mirarab, S; Warnow, T

    2013-01-01

    Species tree estimation from multiple markers is complicated by the fact that gene trees can differ from each other (and from the true species tree) due to several biological processes, one of which is gene duplication and loss. Local search heuristics for two NP-hard optimization problems - minimize gene duplications (MGD) and minimize gene duplications and losses (MGDL) - are popular techniques for estimating species trees in the presence of gene duplication and loss. In this paper, we present an alternative approach to solving MGD and MGDL from rooted gene trees. First, we characterize each tree in terms of its "subtree-bipartitions" (a concept we introduce). Then we show that the MGD species tree is defined by a maximum weight clique in a vertex-weighted graph that can be computed from the subtree-bipartitions of the input gene trees, and the MGDL species tree is defined by a minimum weight clique in a similarly constructed graph. We also show that these optimal cliques can be found in polynomial time in the number of vertices of the graph using a dynamic programming algorithm (similar to that of Hallett and Lagergren(1)), because of the special structure of the graphs. Finally, we show that a constrained version of these problems, where the subtree-bipartitions of the species tree are drawn from the subtree-bipartitions of the input gene trees, can be solved in time that is polynomial in the number of gene trees and taxa. We have implemented our dynamic programming algorithm in a publicly available software tool, available at http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/phylo/software/dynadup/. PMID:23424130

  20. Tree Classification with Fused Mobile Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Hyyppä

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Laser Scanning data were collected simultaneously with hyperspectral data using the Finnish Geodetic Institute Sensei system. The data were tested for tree species classification. The test area was an urban garden in the City of Espoo, Finland. Point clouds representing 168 individual tree specimens of 23 tree species were determined manually. The classification of the trees was done using first only the spatial data from point clouds, then with only the spectral data obtained with a spectrometer, and finally with the combined spatial and hyperspectral data from both sensors. Two classification tests were performed: the separation of coniferous and deciduous trees, and the identification of individual tree species. All determined tree specimens were used in distinguishing coniferous and deciduous trees. A subset of 133 trees and 10 tree species was used in the tree species classification. The best classification results for the fused data were 95.8% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes. The best overall tree species classification succeeded with 83.5% accuracy for the best tested fused data feature combination. The respective results for paired structural features derived from the laser point cloud were 90.5% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes and 65.4% for the species classification. Classification accuracies with paired hyperspectral reflectance value data were 90.5% for the separation of coniferous and deciduous classes and 62.4% for different species. The results are among the first of their kind and they show that mobile collected fused data outperformed single-sensor data in both classification tests and by a significant margin.

  1. Active flows on trees

    CERN Document Server

    Forrow, Aden; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Coherent, large scale dynamics in many nonequilibrium physical, biological, or information transport networks are driven by small-scale local energy input. We introduce and explore a generic model for compressible active flows on tree networks. In contrast to thermally-driven systems, active friction selects discrete states with only a small number of oscillation modes activated at distinct fixed amplitudes. This state selection interacts with graph topology to produce different localized dynamical time scales in separate regions of large networks. Using perturbation theory, we systematically predict the stationary states of noisy networks and find good agreement with a Bayesian state estimation based on a hidden Markov model applied to simulated time series data on binary trees. While the number of stable states per tree scales exponentially with the number of edges, the mean number of activated modes in each state averages $\\sim 1/4$ the number of edges. More broadly, these results suggest that the macrosco...

  2. Predictive Classification Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugosz, Stephan; Müller-Funk, Ulrich

    CART (Breiman et al., Classification and Regression Trees, Chapman and Hall, New York, 1984) and (exhaustive) CHAID (Kass, Appl Stat 29:119-127, 1980) figure prominently among the procedures actually used in data based management, etc. CART is a well-established procedure that produces binary trees. CHAID, in contrast, admits multiple splittings, a feature that allows to exploit the splitting variable more extensively. On the other hand, that procedure depends on premises that are questionable in practical applications. This can be put down to the fact that CHAID relies on simultaneous Chi-Square- resp. F-tests. The null-distribution of the second test statistic, for instance, relies on the normality assumption that is not plausible in a data mining context. Moreover, none of these procedures - as implemented in SPSS, for instance - take ordinal dependent variables into account. In the paper we suggest an alternative tree-algorithm that: Requires explanatory categorical variables

  3. Visualization of Uncertain Contour Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Contour trees can represent the topology of large volume data sets in a relatively compact, discrete data structure. However, the resulting trees often contain many thousands of nodes; thus, many graph drawing techniques fail to produce satisfactory results. Therefore, several visualization methods...... were proposed recently for the visualization of contour trees. Unfortunately, none of these techniques is able to handle uncertain contour trees although any uncertainty of the volume data inevitably results in partially uncertain contour trees. In this work, we visualize uncertain contour trees by...... combining the contour trees of two morphologically filtered versions of a volume data set, which represent the range of uncertainty. These two contour trees are combined and visualized within a single image such that a range of potential contour trees is represented by the resulting visualization. Thus...

  4. The gene tree delusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level relationships among placental mammals are mostly resolved, but several polytomies remain contentious. Song et al. (2012) claimed to have resolved three of these using shortcut coalescence methods (MP-EST, STAR) and further concluded that these methods, which assume no within-locus recombination, are required to unravel deep-level phylogenetic problems that have stymied concatenation. Here, we reanalyze Song et al.'s (2012) data and leverage these re-analyses to explore key issues in systematics including the recombination ratchet, gene tree stoichiometry, the proportion of gene tree incongruence that results from deep coalescence versus other factors, and simulations that compare the performance of coalescence and concatenation methods in species tree estimation. Song et al. (2012) reported an average locus length of 3.1 kb for the 447 protein-coding genes in their phylogenomic dataset, but the true mean length of these loci (start codon to stop codon) is 139.6 kb. Empirical estimates of recombination breakpoints in primates, coupled with consideration of the recombination ratchet, suggest that individual coalescence genes (c-genes) approach ∼12 bp or less for Song et al.'s (2012) dataset, three to four orders of magnitude shorter than the c-genes reported by these authors. This result has general implications for the application of coalescence methods in species tree estimation. We contend that it is illogical to apply coalescence methods to complete protein-coding sequences. Such analyses amalgamate c-genes with different evolutionary histories (i.e., exons separated by >100,000 bp), distort true gene tree stoichiometry that is required for accurate species tree inference, and contradict the central rationale for applying coalescence methods to difficult phylogenetic problems. In addition, Song et al.'s (2012) dataset of 447 genes includes 21 loci with switched taxonomic names, eight duplicated loci, 26 loci with non-homologous sequences that are

  5. Performance Evaluation of Tree Object Matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somchaipeng, Kerawit; Sporring, Jon; Kreiborg, Sven;

    2005-01-01

    Multi-Scale Singularity Trees (MSSTs) represents the deep structure of images in scale-space and provide both the connections between image features at different scales and their strengths. In this report we present and evaluate an algorithm that exploits the MSSTs for image matching. Two version......, and the COIL database. Finally the performance is compared with algorithms based on the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT), and the Position of Catastrophes (CAT)....

  6. Trees and spatial topology change in CDT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjorn, Jan; Budd, Timothy George

    2013-01-01

    Generalized causal dynamical triangulations (generalized CDT) is a model of two-dimensional quantum gravity in which a limited number of spatial topology changes is allowed to occur. We solve the model at the discretized level using bijections between quadrangulations and trees. In the continuum...... faces and we determine the distance function on this ensemble of planar maps. Finally, the relation with planar maps is used to illuminate a mysterious identity of certain continuum cylinder amplitudes....

  7. 基于Aspen Plus软件的循环流化床烟气脱硫模型%A model of flue gas desulfurization for circulating fluidized bed using Aspen Plus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜湘华; 朱廷钰; 王威; 何京东

    2009-01-01

    Model study and flow simulation of circulating fluidized bed flue gas desulfurization (CFB-FGD) were described in this pa-per. The mathematic model of flue gas desulfurization for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) was buih on the basis of element analysis for mass transfer of SO2. The enhancement of the desulfurization reaction in the process of mass transfer of SO2 was analyzed with the doub-le-membrane theory in the model. And the real formation process of slurry droplet was accounted with the theory of inertia collision. And then a simulation study of CFB-FGD was conducted based on Aspen Plus, where a module subroutine was programmed in FOR-TRAN based on this model. The influences of the key parameters such as calcium-to-sulfur ration (Ca/S), flux of spay water, concen-tration of sorbent particles and water drop size on the desulfurization efficiency were analyzed. The modeling results were compared with the experimental data and the comparing results showed that this model could preferably predict the real trends, This paper would help the application of CFB-FGD as references.%本文研究和模拟循环流化床烟气脱硫的流程和模型.以微元分析SO2的传质为基础,建立循环流化床烟气脱硫的数学模型,模型用双膜理论分析脱硫反应对SO2传质过程的增强影响,并采用惯性碰撞理论解释浆滴的形成过程.借助Aspen Plus过程模拟平台,用FORTRAN语言编写基于该模型的用户单元模块,模拟循环流化床烟气脱硫工艺,分析Ca/S、增湿水量、塔内颗粒物浓度、水滴粒径等参数对脱硫的影响,模拟计算结果和实验数据的对比显示模型能如实反映实际的趋势.本文为应用循环流化床烟气脱硫技术提供参考.

  8. A Suffix Tree Or Not a Suffix Tree?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starikovskaya, Tatiana; Vildhøj, Hjalte Wedel

    In this paper we study the structure of suffix trees. Given an unlabeled tree r on n nodes and suffix links of its internal nodes, we ask the question “Is r a suffix tree?”, i.e., is there a string S whose suffix tree has the same topological structure as r? We place no restrictions on S, in...... particular we do not require that S ends with a unique symbol. This corresponds to considering the more general definition of implicit or extended suffix trees. Such general suffix trees have many applications and are for example needed to allow efficient updates when suffix trees are built online. We prove...... that r is a suffix tree if and only if it is realized by a string S of length n - 1, and we give a linear-time algorithm for inferring S when the first letter on each edge is known. This generalizes the work of I et al....

  9. Pre- and Post-Harvest Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from an Upland Boreal Aspen (Populus tremuloides) Forest in Western Boreal Plain, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Kayla

    The Utikuma Region Study Area (URSA) is located in north-central Alberta, Canada, in a region where aspen (Populus tremuloides) dominate the upland vegetation of the Western Boreal Plain Due to the heterogeneity of the surficial geology as well as the sub-humid climate where the water balance is dominated by evapotranspiration, the carbon balance across this landscape is highly variable. Moreover, the upland aspen regions represent significant stores of carbon. More recently, aspen stands have become valuable commercial resources for pulp and paper processing. These stands are harvested through a clear cutting process and are generally left to regenerate on their own, a process which occurs rapidly in clonal species like aspen. Since clonal species establish very quickly following harvest, information on the key ecohydrological controls on stand carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange from the years immediately following harvest are essential to understand the successional trajectory. However, most information currently available on these interactions are obtained several years following a disturbance. Thus, to determine the effects of harvest on aspen regeneration and productivity, ecosystem level fluxes of CO2 three years before and three years after timber harvest were analyzed. Prior to harvest, the ecosystem sequestered 1216 to 1286 g CO2 m-2period-1 over the growing season. Immediately after harvest, the ecosystem became a significant source of CO2 ranging from -874 to -1183 g CO2 m -2period-1, while the second growing season ranged from -233 to -577 g CO2 m-2period-1. The third growing season resulted in a net sink (76 g CO2 m -2period-1) over the same period, but if extrapolated over the whole year, the ecosystem would remain a source of carbon. The magnitude of Gross Ecosystem Productivity (GEP) returned pre-harvest range within two growing seasons. Ecosystem respiration (RE), on the other hand, increased year over year after harvest had taken place. Forest floor

  10. Christmas Tree Category Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, James S.; Turmel, Jon P.

    This manual provides information needed to meet the standards for pesticide applicator certification. Pests and diseases of christmas tree plantations are identified and discussed. Section one deals with weeds and woody plants and the application, formulation and effects of herbicides in controlling them. Section two discusses specific diseases…

  11. Base tree property

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balcar, B.; Doucha, Michal; Hrušák, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2015), s. 69-81. ISSN 0167-8094 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : forcing * Boolean algebra s * base tree Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.621, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11083-013-9316-2

  12. Oklee Tree Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oklee Tree Project is a cooperative effort between the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute, University of Minnesota-Crookston (UMC), Natural Resources Research Institute (NRRI), Minnesota Power (MP), and local, state, and federal agencies designed to demonstrate the feasibility of growing hybrid poplar trees as cash crop in Minnesota. Local meetings were held to assess grower interest in a long-term commitment to growing trees as a crop. Most potential growers were concerned with annual payments, provisions for land reclamation if the contract length was less than 15 years, and a market with a fair price for the wood. Other concerns were availability of technical assistance and securing vendors for land preparation, planting stock, planting, and weed control. Features included in the program to plant 3,000 acres of trees on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land eligible for five-year contract extensions were cost sharing from the Consolidated Farm Service Agency, an $85/acre payment for establishment and maintenance from the Legislative Commission on Minnesota Resources (LCMR), and 25-year contracts with MP. Contracts with MP include guaranteed purchase of wood and annual payments to participating growers. Landowner interest and participation in this program, along with outreach activities such as newsletters, field days, information meetings, and media coverage has increased awareness and acceptance of hybrid poplar as a potential crop in the region. (author)

  13. Tree-string duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the termination of perturbative QCD tree evolution, colourless clusters are formed. Similarly, after the first generation cuts in the (classical) Artru-Mennessier string model, disconnected lengths of string result. The mass spectra of clusters and first generation strings are similar, and the similarity extends to the rapidity distributions as a function of mass. (author)

  14. A Universal Phylogenetic Tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a universal phylogenetic tree suitable for use in high school and college-level biology classrooms. Illustrates the antiquity of life and that all life is related, even if it dates back 3.5 billion years. Reflects important evolutionary relationships and provides an exciting way to learn about the history of life. (SAH)

  15. Online community marketing of ski resorts : an in-depth best practice study of aspen/snowmass and breckenridge ski resort

    OpenAIRE

    Kráľ, Branislav

    2013-01-01

    Online brand community is a novel phenomenon that carries a number of benefits, but lack of clarity in antecedents of its effectiveness as a marketing alternative. Aspen/Snowmass and Breckenridge Ski Resort are two leading players in the ski industry, and this paper analyzes their activity in-depth in order to bring clarity by extracting implications on best practice. For the purpose, a tailor-made methodology is constructed. It consists of combining two analytical frameworks, interviews with...

  16. A Minimum Spanning Tree Representation of Anime Similarities

    OpenAIRE

    Wibowo, Canggih Puspo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new way to represent Japanese animation (anime) is presented. We applied a minimum spanning tree to show the relation between anime. The distance between anime is calculated through three similarity measurements, namely crew, score histogram, and topic similarities. Finally the centralities are also computed to reveal the most significance anime. The result shows that the minimum spanning tree can be used to determine the similarity anime. Furthermore, by using centralities ca...

  17. Active XML Document Rewriting Based on Tree Automata Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Haitao; HAO Zhongxiao; ZHU Yan

    2006-01-01

    The problem of document rewriting is a fundamental problem in active XML(AXML) data exchange and usually has a higher complexity.Prior work was focused on string automaton theory.This paper tries to solve it by using tree automaton.More precisely, the paper firstly defines a new tree automaton, active XML tree automaton (AXTA),which can efficiently represent the set of AXML documents produced by an AXML document or AXML document schema.And then, an algorithm for constructing AXTA automaton is also proposed.Finally, a polynomial time(PTIME) determining algorithm for AXML document rewriting is presented based on AXTA automaton.

  18. The effect of warming and enhanced ultraviolet radiation on gender-specific emissions of volatile organic compounds from European aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maja, Mengistu M; Kasurinen, Anne; Holopainen, Toini; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2016-03-15

    Different environmental stress factors often occur together but their combined effects on plant secondary metabolism are seldom considered. We studied the effect of enhanced ultraviolet (UV-B) (31% increase) radiation and temperature (ambient +2 °C) singly and in combination on gender-specific emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from 2-year-old clones of European aspen (Populus tremula L.). Plants grew in 36 experimental plots (6 replicates for Control, UV-A, UV-B, T, UV-A+T and UV-B+T treatments), in an experimental field. VOCs emitted from shoots were sampled from two (1 male and 1 female) randomly selected saplings (total of 72 saplings), per plot on two sampling occasions (June and July) in 2014. There was a significant UV-B×temperature interaction effect on emission rates of different VOCs. Isoprene emission rate was increased due to warming, but warming also modified VOC responses to both UV-A and UV-B radiation. Thus, UV-A increased isoprene emissions without warming, whereas UV-B increased emissions only in combination with warming. Warming-modified UV-A and UV-B responses were also seen in monoterpenes (MTs), sesquiterpenes (SQTs) and green leaf volatiles (GLVs). MTs showed also a UV × gender interaction effect as females had higher emission rates under UV-A and UV-B than males. UV × gender and T × gender interactions caused significant differences in VOC blend as there was more variation (more GLVs and trans-β-caryophyllene) in VOCs from female saplings compared to male saplings. VOCs from the rhizosphere were also collected from each plot in two exposure seasons, but no significant treatment effects were observed. Our results suggest that simultaneous warming and elevated-UV-radiation increase the emission of VOCs from aspen. Thus the contribution of combined environmental factors on VOC emissions may have a greater impact to the photochemical reactions in the atmosphere compared to the impact of individual factors acting alone. PMID

  19. Tree Formation Using Coordinate Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Choudhary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we are introducing a new method of tree formation, we propose a coordinate based method by which we can store and access tree structures. As we know in NLP, parsing is the most important module. The output of this module is generally parsed trees. Currently, TAG (Tree Adjoining Grammar is widely used grammar due to its linguistic and formal nature. It is simply tree generating system. The unit structure used in TAG is structured trees. So we used our new method to store trees where we worked on English to Hindi language. We worked on different sentences from English to Hindi, our method is the easiest way to manipulate tree. We have implemented within small corpus and for finite number of structures and further can be extended in future.

  20. Tree Transduction Tools for Cdec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Matthews

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a collection of open source tools for learning tree-to-string and tree-to-tree transducers and the extensions to the cdec decoder that enable translation with these. Our modular, easy-to-extend tools extract rules from trees or forests aligned to strings and trees subject to different structural constraints. A fast, multithreaded implementation of the Cohn and Blunsom (2009 model for extracting compact tree-to-string rules is also included. The implementation of the tree composition algorithm used by cdec is described, and translation quality and decoding time results are presented. Our experimental results add to the body of evidence suggesting that tree transducers are a compelling option for translation, particularly when decoding speed and translation model size are important.

  1. 基于Aspen Plus模拟的垃圾衍生燃料富氧燃烧研究%Simulation on oxygen-enriched combustion of refuse derived fuel by aspen plus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李延吉; 邹科威; 宋政刚; 李润东; 池涌

    2013-01-01

    利用Aspen Plus软件建立了垃圾衍生燃料(RDF)的富氧燃烧模型,对RDF在富氧和空气气氛下的燃烧产物生产进行了对比,研究了燃烧温度T和过氧系数δ对燃烧产物生成量的影响规律.结果表明:气氛对RDF燃烧后SOx及CO2生成量的影响较小;NOx生成量随燃烧温度T的升高和过氧系数δ的增大而逐渐增大;随燃烧温度T的升高SO2生成量逐渐增加而SO3生成量相应减少,而随过氧系数δ的增大二者呈现相反趋势;当燃烧温度T高于1 200℃时,CO生成量急剧增加,而当过氧系数δ大于1.0时,CO生成量急速减少.

  2. Simulation and experimental of refuse derived fuel pyrolysis based on aspen plus%基于aspen plus的垃圾衍生燃料热解模拟与实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李延吉; 姜璐; 邹科威; 赵宁; 李玉龙; 李润东; 池涌

    2013-01-01

    采用化工流程模拟软件aspen plus对垃圾衍生燃料(RDF)建立热解反应模型,得出RDF各热解产物产率及气体体积分数.在高温管式炉中进行RDF热解实验,利用气相色谱分析仪测出各气体体积分数.将模拟值与实验值进行比较,结果表明:热解终温增加,热解液和热解气产率增大,半焦产率下降H2体积分数增加,CO2体积分数下降;与添加废石灰的RDF相比,添加污泥的RDF热解液和半焦产率更低,热解气产率更高;生物质质量分数下降,CO2体积分数下降;与添加废石灰RDF相比,添加污泥的RDF的CO2体积分数下降.

  3. FTAP, Minimal Cut Sets of Arbitrary Fault Trees. FRTPLT, Fault Tree Structure and Logical Gates Plot for Program FTAP. FRTGEN, Fault Trees by Sub-tree Generator from Parent Tree for Program FTAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of problem or function: FTAP is a general-purpose program for deriving minimal reliability cut and path set families from the fault tree for a complex system. The program has a number of useful features that make it well-suited to nearly all fault tree applications. An input fault tree may specify the system state as any logical function of subsystem or component state variables or complements of these variables; thus, for instance, 'exclusive-or' type relations may be formed. When fault tree logical relations involve complements of state variables, the analyst may instruct FTAP to produce a family of prime implicants, a generalization of the minimal cut set concept. The program offers the flexibility of several distinct methods of generating cut set families. FTAP can also identify certain subsystems as system modules and provide a collection of minimal cut set families that essentially expresses the system state as a function of these module state variables. Another feature allows a useful subfamily to be obtained when the family of minimal cut sets or prime implicants is too large to be found in its entirety; this subfamily may consist of only those sets not containing more than some fixed number of elements or only those sets 'interesting' to the analyst in some special sense. Finally, the analyst can modify the input fault tree in various ways by declaring state variables identically true or false. 2 - Method of solution: Fault tree methods are based on the observation that the system state, either working or failed, can usually be expressed as a Boolean relation between states of several large, readily identifiable subsystems. The state of each subsystem in turn depends on states of simpler subsystems and components which compose it, so that the state of the system itself is determined by a hierarchy of logical relationships between states of subsystems. A fault tree is a graphical representation of these relationships. 3 - Restrictions on the

  4. Learning Stochastic Tree Edit Distance

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, Marc; Habrard, Amaury; Sebban, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Trees provide a suited structural representation to deal with complex tasks such as web information extraction, RNA secondary structure prediction, or conversion of tree structured documents. In this context, many applications require the calculation of similarities between tree pairs. The most studied distance is likely the tree edit distance for which improvements in terms of complexity have been achieved during the last decade. However, this classic edit distance usually uses a priori fixe...

  5. Cover Tree Bayesian Reinforcement Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Tziortziotis, Nikolaos; Dimitrakakis, Christos; Blekas, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an online tree-based Bayesian approach for reinforcement learning. For inference, we employ a generalised context tree model. This defines a distribution on multivariate Gaussian piecewise-linear models, which can be updated in closed form. The tree structure itself is constructed using the cover tree method, which remains efficient in high dimensional spaces. We combine the model with Thompson sampling and approximate dynamic programming to obtain effective exploration po...

  6. Connected searching of weighted trees

    CERN Document Server

    Dereniowski, Dariusz

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of connected edge searching of weighted trees. It is shown that there exists a polynomial-time algorithm for finding optimal connected search strategy for bounded degree trees with arbitrary weights on the edges and vertices of the tree. The problem is NP-complete for general node-weighted trees (the weight of each edge is 1).

  7. HyperChromatic trees: a fine-grained approach to distributed algorithms on RedBlack trees

    OpenAIRE

    Messeguer Peypoch, Xavier; Valles Fuente, Borja

    1998-01-01

    We introduce a relaxed version of RedBlack trees. As concurrent algorithms on balanced search trees are nowadays based on local rules, we propose a set of fine-grained local rules that take more advantage of concurrency that previous approaches. Based on them we design a rebalancing concurrent algorithm and prove its correctness. Finally we sketch how to complete this algorithm to include concurrent insertions and deletions.

  8. Design and implementation of binary tree data structure based on DNA computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chun-de; WEI Guo-hui

    2009-01-01

    The designing,encodings and an instance of simulation of a binary tree for DNA computer were proposed,which utilizes the method of biology to complete inserting and deleting of the binary tree. Firstly,DNA encodings for storage and all elements of the binary tree were completely given out. Then, the implementations of all bio-operations in DNA computer were described. Finally, to prove the feasibility of this method, an actual binary tree with detailed nucleotide encodings was introduced. The process of an algorithm implemented on this binary tree was demonstrated. Based on this method, more other data structures in DNA computer can be developed.

  9. A Class of Graceful Trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟凡洪; 苏耕; 杨继

    2000-01-01

    The present paper shows the coordinates of a tree and its vertices, defines a kind of Trees with Odd-Number Radiant Type (TONRT), deals with the gracefulness of TONRT by using the edge-moving theorem, and uses graceful TONRT to construct another class of graceful trees.

  10. Providing R-Tree Support for Mongodb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Longgang; Shao, Xiaotian; Wang, Dehao

    2016-06-01

    Supporting large amounts of spatial data is a significant characteristic of modern databases. However, unlike some mature relational databases, such as Oracle and PostgreSQL, most of current burgeoning NoSQL databases are not well designed for storing geospatial data, which is becoming increasingly important in various fields. In this paper, we propose a novel method to provide R-tree index, as well as corresponding spatial range query and nearest neighbour query functions, for MongoDB, one of the most prevalent NoSQL databases. First, after in-depth analysis of MongoDB's features, we devise an efficient tabular document structure which flattens R-tree index into MongoDB collections. Further, relevant mechanisms of R-tree operations are issued, and then we discuss in detail how to integrate R-tree into MongoDB. Finally, we present the experimental results which show that our proposed method out-performs the built-in spatial index of MongoDB. Our research will greatly facilitate big data management issues with MongoDB in a variety of geospatial information applications.

  11. Tree Colors: Color Schemes for Tree-Structured Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennekes, Martijn; de Jonge, Edwin

    2014-12-01

    We present a method to map tree structures to colors from the Hue-Chroma-Luminance color model, which is known for its well balanced perceptual properties. The Tree Colors method can be tuned with several parameters, whose effect on the resulting color schemes is discussed in detail. We provide a free and open source implementation with sensible parameter defaults. Categorical data are very common in statistical graphics, and often these categories form a classification tree. We evaluate applying Tree Colors to tree structured data with a survey on a large group of users from a national statistical institute. Our user study suggests that Tree Colors are useful, not only for improving node-link diagrams, but also for unveiling tree structure in non-hierarchical visualizations. PMID:26356921

  12. Dynamic characteristics of Oxy-CFB combustion system based on Aspen%基于Aspen平台的Oxy-CFB燃烧侧动态特性模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建新; 邵壮; 李崇; 司风琪; 徐治皋

    2014-01-01

    Taking an oxy-fuel circulating fluidized bed (Oxy-CFB )combustor pilot facility as the simulation object,a steady-state model for the Oxy-CFB combustion system was built with the plat-form of Aspen Plus.After modifying the steady-state model for the dynamic process simulation,a new dynamic model for the combustion system was built based on Aspen Dynamics and the results were validated by the test data.The simulation study on the responses of the bed temperature and the components,including carbon dioxide,oxygen,carbon monoxide,and nitrogen monoxide in the flue gas,was carried out.The research results show that the dynamic model based on Aspen pro-vides a new method to investigate the dynamic characteristics of the Oxy-CFB combustion system. The dynamic response characteristics of bed temperature and gas components for the coal feed and primary air step changes can provide valuable information for design and implementation of the con-trol system of the Oxy-CFB combustion system.%以某循环流化床富氧燃烧中试系统为模拟对象,借助Aspen Plus流程模拟软件搭建了Oxy-CFB燃烧系统的稳态模型。在此基础上针对动态过程模拟进行改进,并利用Aspen Dynam-ics平台建立了该燃烧系统的动态模型,利用试验数据对模拟结果进行了验证。基于动态模型对Oxy-CFB床温以及燃烧排放产物中二氧化碳、氧气、一氧化碳、一氧化氮等进行了仿真研究。研究表明,基于Aspen平台的动态过程模拟为Oxy-CFB锅炉燃烧系统的动态特性分析提供了新的研究手段,模拟所得的床温及烟气各组分随给煤量、一次风量阶跃变化的动态响应规律可为今后Oxy-CFB燃烧系统的控制设计提供重要依据。

  13. Global modeling of Hanford tank waste pretreatment alternatives within a total cleanup system using ASPEN PLUS trademark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate and compare radionuclide separations/processing technologies being developed or considered as Hanford tank waste pretreatment alternatives. These technologies are integrated into a total cleanup system that includes tank waste retrieval, treatment, and disposal. Current Hanford flowsheets typically include only mature, developed technologies, not new technologies. Thus, this work examines the impact/benefits of inserting new technologies into Hanford flowsheets. Waste treatment must produce disposal fractions which are less troublesome than the original material. Researchers seeking effective treatment methods may lack the tools or expertise to fully understand the implications of their approach in terms of secondary and tertiary waste streams or the extent to which a unique new process will affect upstream or downstream processes. This work has developed and demonstrated mass balance methods that clarify the effect of including individual processes in an integrated waste treatment system, such as the Hanford cleanup system. The methods provide a measure of treatment effectiveness and a format for the researcher to understand waste stream interrelationships and determine how a particular treatment technology can best be used in a cleanup system. A description of the Hanford tank waste cleanup model developed using the ASPEN PLUS flowsheet simulation tool is given. Important aspects of the modeling approach are discussed along with a description of how performance measures were developed and integrated within the simulation to evaluate and compare various Hanford tank waste pretreatment alternatives

  14. Controls of the quantum yield and saturation light of isoprene emission in different-aged aspen leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Sun, Zhihong; Talts, Eero

    2015-12-01

    Leaf age alters the balance between the use of end-product of plastidic isoprenoid synthesis pathway, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), in prenyltransferase reactions leading to synthesis of pigments of photosynthetic machinery and in isoprene synthesis, but the implications of such changes on environmental responses of isoprene emission have not been studied. Because under light-limited conditions, isoprene emission rate is controlled by DMADP pool size (SDMADP ), shifts in the share of different processes are expected to particularly strongly alter the light dependency of isoprene emission. We examined light responses of isoprene emission in young fully expanded, mature and old non-senescent leaves of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides) and estimated in vivo SDMADP and isoprene synthase activity from post-illumination isoprene release. Isoprene emission capacity was 1.5-fold larger in mature than in young and old leaves. The initial quantum yield of isoprene emission (αI ) increased by 2.5-fold with increasing leaf age primarily as the result of increasing SDMADP . The saturating light intensity (QI90 ) decreased by 2.3-fold with increasing leaf age, and this mainly reflected limited light-dependent increase of SDMADP possibly due to feedback inhibition by DMADP. These major age-dependent changes in the shape of the light response need consideration in modelling canopy isoprene emission. PMID:26037962

  15. Ensemble of Causal Trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the geometry of trees endowed with a causal structure using the conventional framework of equilibrium statistical mechanics. We show how this ensemble is related to popular growing network models. In particular we demonstrate that on a class of afine attachment kernels the two models are identical but they can differ substantially for other choice of weights. We show that causal trees exhibit condensation even for asymptotically linear kernels. We derive general formulae describing the degree distribution, the ancestor--descendant correlation and the probability that a randomly chosen node lives at a given geodesic distance from the root. It is shown that the Hausdorff dimension dH of the causal networks is generically infinite. (author)

  16. Ensemble of Causal Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialas, Piotr

    2003-10-01

    We discuss the geometry of trees endowed with a causal structure using the conventional framework of equilibrium statistical mechanics. We show how this ensemble is related to popular growing network models. In particular we demonstrate that on a class of afine attachment kernels the two models are identical but they can differ substantially for other choice of weights. We show that causal trees exhibit condensation even for asymptotically linear kernels. We derive general formulae describing the degree distribution, the ancestor--descendant correlation and the probability that a randomly chosen node lives at a given geodesic distance from the root. It is shown that the Hausdorff dimension dH of the causal networks is generically infinite.

  17. Tree Level Gauge Mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Nardecchia, Marco; Romanino, Andrea; Ziegler, Robert

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new scheme in which supersymmetry breaking is communicated to the MSSM sfermions by GUT gauge interactions at the tree level. The (positive) contribution of MSSM fields to $\\text{Str}(\\mathcal{M}^2)$ is automatically compensated by a (negative) contribution from heavy fields. Sfermion masses are flavour universal, thus solving the supersymmetric flavour problem. In the simplest SO(10) embedding, the ratio of different sfermion masses is predicted and differs from mSugra and other...

  18. Tree Interpolation in Vampire

    OpenAIRE

    McMillan, Ken; Middeldorp, Aart; Voronkov, Andrei; Blanc, Régis; Gupta, Ashutosh; Kovács, Laura; Kragl, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    We describe new extensions of the Vampire theorem prover for computing tree interpolants. These extensions generalize Craig interpolation in Vampire, and can also be used to derive sequence interpolants. We evaluated our implementation on a large number of examples over the theory of linear integer arithmetic and integer-indexed arrays, with and without quantifiers. When compared to other methods, our experiments show that some examples could only be solved by our implementation.

  19. Tree farming; Traedjordbruk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, B. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research

    1992-07-01

    Fallowed land can initially provide very favourable conditions for tree farming, thus enabling rapid canopy closure and a short rotation period. There may be justification for fertilization, particularly close to the time of canopy closure. Heavy clay soils should be avoided on account of poor tree growth. Crosses of balsam poplar are easy to regenerate through cuttings. The plantation should either be done with small plants protected against damage by game, or with planting stems branched at the bottoms in spacing patterns that are not too dense (3.5x3.5 - 5x5m). Branches at the bottom help to avoid rubbing by deer. Drainage systems are clogged by tree roots and fields drained by subsurface drainage systems should be avoided. Open ditches are sufficient for the requirements of the trees. Selected clones of balsam poplar crosses may have great resistance against disease. However, they do not have a growth rhythm that is ideally suited to Swedish conditions. Further breeding is probably necessary. The main use for balsam poplar is expected to be in the manufacture of pulp, mechanical or chemical. Other uses are veneer, building, glulam and fuel. Under good conditions, height and diameter development suggests a very high production. In plantations with suitable spacing patterns, the economically optimum rotation time is 15-20 year and the plantation appears to withstand high demands for return on investments and price competition. Future activities should foremost be concentrated on development of additional clone material, investigations of wood quality and the establishment and following up of further production experiments. (48 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.).

  20. Tree farming. Traedjordbruk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, B. (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research)

    1992-07-01

    Fallowed land can initially provide very favourable conditions for tree farming, thus enabling rapid canopy closure and a short rotation period. There may be justification for fertilization, particularly close to the time of canopy closure. Heavy clay soils should be avoided on account of poor tree growth. Crosses of balsam poplar are easy to regenerate through cuttings. The plantation should either be done with small plants protected against damage by game, or with planting stems branched at the bottoms in spacing patterns that are not too dense (3.5x3.5 - 5x5m). Branches at the bottom help to avoid rubbing by deer. Drainage systems are clogged by tree roots and fields drained by subsurface drainage systems should be avoided. Open ditches are sufficient for the requirements of the trees. Selected clones of balsam poplar crosses may have great resistance against disease. However, they do not have a growth rhythm that is ideally suited to Swedish conditions. Further breeding is probably necessary. The main use for balsam poplar is expected to be in the manufacture of pulp, mechanical or chemical. Other uses are veneer, building, glulam and fuel. Under good conditions, height and diameter development suggests a very high production. In plantations with suitable spacing patterns, the economically optimum rotation time is 15-20 year and the plantation appears to withstand high demands for return on investments and price competition. Future activities should foremost be concentrated on development of additional clone material, investigations of wood quality and the establishment and following up of further production experiments. (48 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.).

  1. Wood for the trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Garbutt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Our paper focuses on the materiality, cultural history and cultural relations of selected artworks in the exhibition Wood for the trees (Lismore Regional Gallery, New South Wales, Australia, 10 June – 17 July 2011. The title of the exhibition, intentionally misreading the aphorism “Can’t see the wood for the trees”, by reading the wood for the resource rather than the collective wood[s], implies conservation, preservation, and the need for sustaining the originating resource. These ideas have particular resonance on the NSW far north coast, a region once rich in rainforest. While the Indigenous population had sustainable practices of forest and land management, the colonists deployed felling and harvesting in order to convert the value of the local, abundant rainforest trees into high-value timber. By the late twentieth century, however, a new wave of settlers launched a protest movements against the proposed logging of remnant rainforest at Terania Creek and elsewhere in the region. Wood for the trees, curated by Gallery Director Brett Adlington, plays on this dynamic relationship between wood, trees and people. We discuss the way selected artworks give expression to the themes or concepts of productive labour, nature and culture, conservation and sustainability, and memory. The artworks include Watjinbuy Marrawilil’s (1980 Carved ancestral figure ceremonial pole, Elizabeth Stops’ (2009/10 Explorations into colonisation, Hossein Valamanesh’s (2008 Memory stick, and AñA Wojak’s (2008 Unread book (in a forgotten language. Our art writing on the works, a practice informed by Bal (2002, Muecke (2008 and Papastergiadis (2004, becomes a conversation between the works and the themes or concepts. As a form of material excess of the most productive kind (Grosz, 2008, p. 7, art seeds a response to that which is in the air waiting to be said of the past, present and future.

  2. Fermilab Capacitor Tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermilab Capacitor Tree is a capacitor bank used in series with the feeders carrying 3-phase, 13.8 kV power to the main ring power supply system. Its function is to reduce the voltage droop of the power supplies at high currents, by acting in series resonance with the leakage inductances of the system. A description is given of the electrical system and operational experience since May 1976

  3. Asymptotic analysis of Hoppe trees

    CERN Document Server

    Leckey, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a random tree model associated to Hoppe's urn. The tree is built successively by adding nodes to the existing tree when starting with the single root node. In each step a node is added to the tree as a child of an existing node where these parent nodes are chosen randomly with probabilities proportional to their weights. The root node has weight $\\vartheta>0$, a given fixed parameter, all other nodes have weight 1. This resembles the stochastic dynamic of Hoppe's urn. For $\\vartheta=1$ the resulting tree is the well-studied random recursive tree. We analyze the height, internal path length and number of leaves of the Hoppe tree with $n$ nodes as well as the depth of the last inserted node asymptotically as $n\\to \\infty$. Mainly expectations, variances and asymptotic distributions of these parameters are derived.

  4. Pushdown machines for the macro tree transducer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelfriet, Joost; Vogler, Heiko

    1986-01-01

    The macro tree transducer can be considered as a system of recursive function procedures with parameters, where the recursion is on a tree (e.g., the syntax tree of a program). We investigate characterizations of the class of tree (tree-to-string) translations which is induced by macro tree transduc

  5. 24 Ways to Kill a Tree

    OpenAIRE

    Appleton, Bonnie Lee, 1948-2012

    2009-01-01

    Few residential trees die of old age. Mechanical damage and improper tree care kill more trees than any insects or diseases. This publication shows 24 ways to void making the tree-damaging mistake. Few of these items alone would kill a tree, but multiple problems will certainly stress, and could eventually kill, a tree.

  6. Gene tree correction for reconciliation and species tree inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swenson Krister M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconciliation is the commonly used method for inferring the evolutionary scenario for a gene family. It consists in “embedding” inferred gene trees into a known species tree, revealing the evolution of the gene family by duplications and losses. When a species tree is not known, a natural algorithmic problem is to infer a species tree from a set of gene trees, such that the corresponding reconciliation minimizes the number of duplications and/or losses. The main drawback of reconciliation is that the inferred evolutionary scenario is strongly dependent on the considered gene trees, as few misplaced leaves may lead to a completely different history, with significantly more duplications and losses. Results In this paper, we take advantage of certain gene trees’ properties in order to preprocess them for reconciliation or species tree inference. We flag certain duplication vertices of a gene tree, the “non-apparent duplication” (NAD vertices, as resulting from the misplacement of leaves. In the case of species tree inference, we develop a polynomial-time heuristic for removing the minimum number of species leading to a set of gene trees that exhibit no NAD vertices with respect to at least one species tree. In the case of reconciliation, we consider the optimization problem of removing the minimum number of leaves or species leading to a tree without any NAD vertex. We develop a polynomial-time algorithm that is exact for two special classes of gene trees, and show a good performance on simulated data sets in the general case.

  7. Minimization of Deterministic Fuzzy Tree Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Moghari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Until now, some methods for minimizing deterministic fuzzy finite tree automata (DFFTA and weighted tree automata have been established by researchers. Those methods are language preserving, but the behavior of original automata and minimized one may be different. This paper, considers both language preserving and behavior preserving in minimization process. We drive Myhill-Nerode kind theorems corresponding to each proposed method and introduce PTIME algorithms for behaviorally and linguistically minimization. The proposed minimization algorithms are based on two main steps. The first step includes finding dependency between equivalency of states, according to the set of transition rules of DFFTA, and making merging dependency graph (MDG. The second step is refinement of MDG and making minimization equivalency set (MES. Additionally, behavior preserving minimization of DFFTA requires a pre-processing for modifying fuzzy membership grade of rules and final states, which is called normalization.

  8. Substrate influences ecophysiological performance of tree seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pröll, Gisela; Hietz, Peter; Delaney, Christina M; Katzensteiner, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Unfavourable soil conditions frequently limit tree regeneration in mountain forests on calcareous bedrock. Rocky, shallow organic soils on dolomite pose a particular problem for tree regeneration due to commonly restricted water and nutrient supplies. Moreover, an often dense layer of understorey vegetation competes for the limited resources available. Hence, an array of interacting factors impairs tree seedlings' performance on dolomite, but there is little information on the ecophysiological mechanisms. We studied the effects of substrate, competing vegetation and foliar nutrient concentrations on the photosynthetic rate (A), stomatal conductance (gs) and leaf water potentials (ψ) of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.), beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and larch (Larix decidua Mill.) under controlled (well-watered/drought-stressed) conditions and under prevailing field conditions. While A and gs of well-watered spruce in the pot experiment were reduced by the mineral substrate, the organic dolomite substrate with dense competing vegetation reduced gs and ψ of sycamore, spruce and larch under drought-stressed conditions in the field. For sycamore and spruce, A and gs were strongly correlated with foliar nitrogen (N) and potassium (K) concentrations in the pot experiment. In contrast, soil water primarily affected beech and larch. Finally, dense competing vegetation negatively affected A and gs of spruce and A of larch on dolomite. Our results highlight the critical role of N, K and water availability for tree seedlings in shallow soils on calcareous bedrock. On these sites, natural tree regeneration is at particular risk from episodic drought, a likely consequence of climate change. PMID:26446268

  9. The tree water isoscape of a central Pennsylvania catchment: ecohydrologic patterns and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, K. M.; Gaines, K.

    2015-12-01

    The connections between vegetation and catchment hydrology are important for tree physiology, plant geography, stream flow, and transport of solutes within a watershed. While water isotopes from tree stems have been studied extensively to examine source-water differences at a small scale, there has been little emphasis on modeling of plant stem water isotopes at larger scales, due to the expensive and laborious extraction and analysis processes. We characterized the tree stem water for stable isotopes over a landscape (isoscape) at a first-order catchment in central Pennsylvania in order to address the following questions: 1) How does tree water isotopic composition relate to catchment topography and tree characteristics? 2) What are the underlying hydrologic processes that are revealed by tree water isotopes? We used 267 observations of tree xylem water δ18O from 121 trees to build a statistical model with candidate variables related to topography and tree characteristics. We then applied the final model to predict the tree xylem water δ18O composition during the growing season of the remaining trees defined as > 18-cm diameter (at breast height; DBH) in the catchment. The final model included tree canopy height and slope magnitude as predictors, and explained about 56% of variance in tree water δ18O composition in the catchment. Tree canopy height and degree of slope were both negatively related to tree water δ18O suggesting the tallest trees and trees on the steepest slopes had tree water isotopic compositions most depleted in heavy isotopes. Each of these suggested the influence of cool-season isotopic inputs. On the valley floor, where tree canopy heights were tallest, the tree water δ18O composition was likely due to early growing season soil saturation from a shallow ground water table. Conversely, the steep hill slope δ18O composition may be a result of tree water use of tightly-bound soil water originating from cool season precipitation. The model

  10. Completely Independent Spanning Trees in (Partial k-Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsushita Masayoshi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Two spanning trees T1 and T2 of a graph G are completely independent if, for any two vertices u and v, the paths from u to v in T1 and T2 are internally disjoint. For a graph G, we denote the maximum number of pairwise completely independent spanning trees by cist(G. In this paper, we consider cist(G when G is a partial k-tree.

  11. Sequence Algebra, Sequence Decision Diagrams and Dynamic Fault Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauzy, Antoine B., E-mail: Antoine.Rauzy@lix.polytechnique.f [LIX-CNRS, Computer Science, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2011-07-15

    A large attention has been focused on the Dynamic Fault Trees in the past few years. By adding new gates to static (regular) Fault Trees, Dynamic Fault Trees aim to take into account dependencies among events. Merle et al. proposed recently an algebraic framework to give a formal interpretation to these gates. In this article, we extend Merle et al.'s work by adopting a slightly different perspective. We introduce Sequence Algebras that can be seen as Algebras of Basic Events, representing failures of non-repairable components. We show how to interpret Dynamic Fault Trees within this framework. Finally, we propose a new data structure to encode sets of sequences of Basic Events: Sequence Decision Diagrams. Sequence Decision Diagrams are very much inspired from Minato's Zero-Suppressed Binary Decision Diagrams. We show that all operations of Sequence Algebras can be performed on this data structure.

  12. Tree Level Gauge Mediation

    CERN Document Server

    Nardecchia, Marco; Ziegler, Robert

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new scheme in which supersymmetry breaking is communicated to the MSSM sfermions by GUT gauge interactions at the tree level. The (positive) contribution of MSSM fields to $\\text{Str}(\\mathcal{M}^2)$ is automatically compensated by a (negative) contribution from heavy fields. Sfermion masses are flavour universal, thus solving the supersymmetric flavour problem. In the simplest SO(10) embedding, the ratio of different sfermion masses is predicted and differs from mSugra and other schemes, thus making this framework testable at the LHC. Gaugino masses are generated at the loop level but enhanced by model dependent factors.

  13. Bisphosphonate inhibitors reveal a large elasticity of plastidic isoprenoid synthesis pathway in isoprene-emitting hybrid aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasulov, Bahtijor; Talts, Eero; Kännaste, Astrid; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-06-01

    Recently, a feedback inhibition of the chloroplastic 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP)/2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid synthesis by end products dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP) and isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) was postulated, but the extent to which DMADP and IDP can build up is not known. We used bisphosphonate inhibitors, alendronate and zoledronate, that inhibit the consumption of DMADP and IDP by prenyltransferases to gain insight into the extent of end product accumulation and possible feedback inhibition in isoprene-emitting hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides). A kinetic method based on dark release of isoprene emission at the expense of substrate pools accumulated in light was used to estimate the in vivo pool sizes of DMADP and upstream metabolites. Feeding with fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of DXP reductoisomerase, alone or in combination with bisphosphonates was used to inhibit carbon input into DXP/MEP pathway or both input and output. We observed a major increase in pathway intermediates, 3- to 4-fold, upstream of DMADP in bisphosphonate-inhibited leaves, but the DMADP pool was enhanced much less, 1.3- to 1.5-fold. In combined fosmidomycin/bisphosphonate treatment, pathway intermediates accumulated, reflecting cytosolic flux of intermediates that can be important under strong metabolic pull in physiological conditions. The data suggested that metabolites accumulated upstream of DMADP consist of phosphorylated intermediates and IDP. Slow conversion of the huge pools of intermediates to DMADP was limited by reductive energy supply. These data indicate that the DXP/MEP pathway is extremely elastic, and the presence of a significant pool of phosphorylated intermediates provides an important valve for fine tuning the pathway flux. PMID:25926480

  14. Accounting for density reduction and structural loss in standing dead trees: Implications for forest biomass and carbon stock estimates in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domke Grant M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standing dead trees are one component of forest ecosystem dead wood carbon (C pools, whose national stock is estimated by the U.S. as required by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Historically, standing dead tree C has been estimated as a function of live tree growing stock volume in the U.S.'s National Greenhouse Gas Inventory. Initiated in 1998, the USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis program (responsible for compiling the Nation's forest C estimates began consistent nationwide sampling of standing dead trees, which may now supplant previous purely model-based approaches to standing dead biomass and C stock estimation. A substantial hurdle to estimating standing dead tree biomass and C attributes is that traditional estimation procedures are based on merchantability paradigms that may not reflect density reductions or structural loss due to decomposition common in standing dead trees. The goal of this study was to incorporate standing dead tree adjustments into the current estimation procedures and assess how biomass and C stocks change at multiple spatial scales. Results Accounting for decay and structural loss in standing dead trees significantly decreased tree- and plot-level C stock estimates (and subsequent C stocks by decay class and tree component. At a regional scale, incorporating adjustment factors decreased standing dead quaking aspen biomass estimates by almost 50 percent in the Lake States and Douglas-fir estimates by more than 36 percent in the Pacific Northwest. Conclusions Substantial overestimates of standing dead tree biomass and C stocks occur when one does not account for density reductions or structural loss. Forest inventory estimation procedures that are descended from merchantability standards may need to be revised toward a more holistic approach to determining standing dead tree biomass and C attributes (i.e., attributes of tree biomass outside of sawlog

  15. Limit theorems for sequences of random trees

    OpenAIRE

    Balding, David; Ferrari, Pablo A.; Fraiman, Ricardo; Sued, Mariela

    2004-01-01

    We consider a random tree and introduce a metric in the space of trees to define the ``mean tree'' as the tree minimizing the average distance to the random tree. When the resulting metric space is compact we have laws of large numbers and central limit theorems for sequence of independent identically distributed random trees. As application we propose tests to check if two samples of random trees have the same law.

  16. Barking up the Right Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Paul D.

    2006-01-01

    There is a childhood saying about a confused dog who thinks he sees a possum in a tree. The problem is that the possum is actually in a different tree so the dog barks up the wrong tree. American education is constantly playing both dog and possum. Sometimes they are the prey, and sometimes they are just confused about what and where the prey is.…

  17. Fifteen years of forest tree biosafety research in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoenicka H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Since beginning of 1990, several projects on biosafety research were initiated in Germany with genetically modified plants. Germany was also one of the first countries active on biosafety research with genetically modified trees (GMTs. An EU-funded project coordinated by the Institute of Forest Genetics (Johann Heinrich von Thuenen Institute, Grosshansdorf, from 1994 to 1997, was the first project of this kind in Germany. In the frame of this project, transgene stability was studied under greenhouse conditions in different transgenic aspen clones. A high degree of transgene expression stability was found in transgenic lines, however, gene silencing was detected in some transgenic plants. In Germany, the jump of the GMTs from the greenhouse to the field was initiated in 1996 by the Institute of Forest Genetics (Grosshansdorf, when the first field trial with genetically modified (GM poplar was approved for five years. In the year 2000 and in cooperation with the University of Tuebingen, the same institute established a second field trial with GM poplar to study possible horizontal gene transfer (HGT from the transgenic poplar into mycorrhizal fungi. No HGT was detected in those studies. Two further national funded projects on phytoremediation and status of mycorrhizal fungi in GMTs under field conditions were run by the University of Freiburg on 2002 - 2004 and 2003 - 2005. Topics of national funded biosafety research projects on GMTs released to the field but as well on greenhouse grown plants were transgene stability, genetic containment, transgene influence on mycorrhizal and phytopathogenic fungi, generative and vegetative propagation capacity, and horizontal gene transfer.

  18. Occurrence of leguminous trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkbride, J.H.; Arkcoll, D.B.A.; Turnbull, J.W.; Magalhaes, L.M.S.; Fernandes, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    Five papers from the symposium are presented. Kirkbride, J.H. Jr.; Legumes of the cerrado. pp 23-46 (Refs. 55) A review is given. Some 548 legume species in 59 genera are listed that have been reported from cerrado vegetation. Felker, P.; Legume trees in semi-arid and arid areas. pp 47-59 (Refs. 41) A review is given of worldwide research activities. Arkcoll, D.B.; A comparison of some fast growing species suitable for woodlots in the wet tropics. pp 61-68 (Refs. 9) Studies are described near Manaus on intensive silviculture (for fuelwood production) of Eucalyptus deglupta, Cedrelinga catanaeformis (catenaeformis), Jacaranda copaia, and Inga edulis. Turnbull, J.W.; Six phyllodinous Acacia species for planting in the humid tropical lowlands. pp 69-73 (Refs. 14) Distribution, ecology, growth, and utilization are described for A. auriculiformis, A. mangium, A. aulacocarpa, A. crassicarpa, A. cincinnata, and A. polystachya. Magalhaes, L.M.S., Fernandes, N.P.; Experimental stands of leguminous trees in the Manaus region. pp 75-79 (Refs. 8) Performance up to age 20 yr of Cedrelinga catenaeformis, Dalbergia nigra, Dinizia excelsa, Dipteryx odorata, Dipteryx sp., Diplotropis sp., Eperua bijuga, Pithecellobium racemosum, Vouacapoua pallidior, and Hymenaea sp. is described.

  19. The Steiner tree problem

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, FK; Winter, P

    1992-01-01

    The Steiner problem asks for a shortest network which spans a given set of points. Minimum spanning networks have been well-studied when all connections are required to be between the given points. The novelty of the Steiner tree problem is that new auxiliary points can be introduced between the original points so that a spanning network of all the points will be shorter than otherwise possible. These new points are called Steiner points - locating them has proved problematic and research has diverged along many different avenues. This volume is devoted to the assimilation of the rich field of intriguing analyses and the consolidation of the fragments. A section has been given to each of the three major areas of interest which have emerged. The first concerns the Euclidean Steiner Problem, historically the original Steiner tree problem proposed by Jarník and Kössler in 1934. The second deals with the Steiner Problem in Networks, which was propounded independently by Hakimi and Levin and has enjoyed the most...

  20. An International Comparison of Individual Tree Detection and Extraction Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Michael Wolf

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the “Tree Extraction” project organized by EuroSDR (European Spatial data Research and ISPRS (International Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing was to evaluate the quality, accuracy, and feasibility of automatic tree extraction methods, mainly based on laser scanner data. In the final report of the project, Kaartinen and Hyyppä (2008 reported a high variation in the quality of the published methods under boreal forest conditions and with varying laser point densities. This paper summarizes the findings beyond the final report after analyzing the results obtained in different tree height classes. Omission/Commission statistics as well as neighborhood relations are taken into account. Additionally, four automatic tree detection and extraction techniques were added to the test. Several methods in this experiment were superior to manual processing in the dominant, co-dominant and suppressed tree storeys. In general, as expected, the taller the tree, the better the location accuracy. The accuracy of tree height, after removing gross errors, was better than 0.5 m in all tree height classes with the best methods investigated in this experiment. For forest inventory, minimum curvature-based tree detection accompanied by point cloud-based cluster detection for suppressed trees is a solution that deserves attention in the future.

  1. The Hill and the Trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王燕文

    2007-01-01

    Once there was a well-known hill here. There were many lush trees, beautiful flowers and green grasses on it. One day, the hill said to the trees proudly, “Look, how beautiful I am! But you look so ugly on my back. It must be better if I could drive you away.” One of the trees said, “You won't have beautiful and green clothing without us trees? If you leave us, you will die away.” The hill laughed and said again,”I feel very ashamed for I am staying with you together. Sooner or later I will drive you all...

  2. Tree felling: a necessary evil

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    CERN started a campaign of tree felling in 2010 for safety reasons, and it will continue this year in various parts of the Meyrin site. As in previous years, the trees cut down in 2013 will be recycled and some will be replaced.   Diseased tree that had to be cut down on the Meyrin site. In association with the Geneva nature and countryside directorate (Direction générale de la nature et du paysage, DGNP), CERN commissioned the Geneva school of landscaping, engineering and architecture (Haute école du paysage, d’ingénierie et d’architecture, HEPIA) to compile an inventory of the trees on the Meyrin site. In total, 1285 trees (excluding poplars) were recorded. 75.5% of these trees were declared to be in a good state of health (i.e. 971 trees), 21.5% in a moderate state of health (276 trees) and 3% in a poor state of health (38 trees). As for the poplars, the 236 specimens recorded on the Meyrin site were judged to be too old, to...

  3. Human decision error (HUMDEE) trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical presentations of human actions in incident and accident sequences have been used for many years. However, for the most part, human decision making has been underrepresented in these trees. This paper presents a method of incorporating the human decision process into graphical presentations of incident/accident sequences. This presentation is in the form of logic trees. These trees are called Human Decision Error Trees or HUMDEE for short. The primary benefit of HUMDEE trees is that they graphically illustrate what else the individuals involved in the event could have done to prevent either the initiation or continuation of the event. HUMDEE trees also present the alternate paths available at the operator decision points in the incident/accident sequence. This is different from the Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP) event trees. There are many uses of these trees. They can be used for incident/accident investigations to show what other courses of actions were available and for training operators. The trees also have a consequence component so that not only the decision can be explored, also the consequence of that decision

  4. Human decision error (HUMDEE) trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrom, L.T.

    1993-08-01

    Graphical presentations of human actions in incident and accident sequences have been used for many years. However, for the most part, human decision making has been underrepresented in these trees. This paper presents a method of incorporating the human decision process into graphical presentations of incident/accident sequences. This presentation is in the form of logic trees. These trees are called Human Decision Error Trees or HUMDEE for short. The primary benefit of HUMDEE trees is that they graphically illustrate what else the individuals involved in the event could have done to prevent either the initiation or continuation of the event. HUMDEE trees also present the alternate paths available at the operator decision points in the incident/accident sequence. This is different from the Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP) event trees. There are many uses of these trees. They can be used for incident/accident investigations to show what other courses of actions were available and for training operators. The trees also have a consequence component so that not only the decision can be explored, also the consequence of that decision.

  5. Interacting CO2 and O3 effects on litter production, chemistry and decomposition in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem: final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rihard L. Lindroth

    2004-08-03

    The overall purpose of this research was to evaluate the independent and interactive effects of elevated levels of CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} on tree leaf litter quality and decomposition. This research was conducted at the Aspen FACE (Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) facility near Rhinelander, Wisconsin. This research comprised one facet of a larger project assessing how CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} pollutants will alter carbon sequestration and nutrient cycling in north temperate forest ecosystems.

  6. Comparative analysis of the effect of pretreating aspen wood with aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions of sulfuric and nitric acid on its reactivity during enzymatic hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dotsenko, Gleb; Osipov, D. O.; Zorov, I. N.;

    2016-01-01

    The effect of aspen wood pretreatment methods with the use of both aqueous solutions of sulfuric and nitric acids and aqueous-organic solutions (ethanol, butanol) of sulfuric acid (organosolv) on the limiting degree of conversion of this type of raw material into simple sugars during enzymatic...... hydrolysis are compared. The effects of temperature, acid concentration, composition of organic phase (for sulfuric acid), and pressure (for nitric acid) on the effectiveness of pretreatment were analyzed. It is shown that the use of organosolv with 0.5% sulfuric acid allows us to increase the reactivity of...

  7. Tree Decomposition based Steiner Tree Computation over Large Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Wei-Kleiner, Fang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present an exact algorithm for the Steiner tree problem. The algorithm is based on certain pre-computed index structures. Our algorithm offers a practical solution for the Steiner tree problems on graphs of large size and bounded number of terminals.

  8. Sussing Merger Trees: A proposed Merger Tree data format

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Peter A; Tweed, Dylan; Benson, Andrew J; Croton, Darren; Elahi, Pascal; Henriques, Bruno; Iliev, Ilian T; Knebe, Alexander; Lux, Hanni; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Neyrinck, Mark; Pearce, Frazer R; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Schneider, Aurel; Srisawat, Chaichalit

    2015-01-01

    We propose a common terminology for use in describing both temporal merger trees and spatial structure trees for dark-matter halos. We specify a unified data format in HDF5 and provide example I/O routines in C, FORTRAN and PYTHON.

  9. 76 FR 69094 - Christmas Tree Promotion, Research, and Information Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1214 RIN 0581-AD00 Christmas Tree Promotion, Research, and Information Order AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule.... Petrella, Marketing Specialist, Research and Promotion Division, Fruit and Vegetable Programs, AMS,...

  10. On aligning trees

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, J

    1997-01-01

    The increasing availability of corpora annotated for linguistic structure prompts the question: if we have the same texts, annotated for phrase structure under two different schemes, to what extent do the annotations agree on structuring within the text? We suggest the term tree alignment to indicate the situation where two markup schemes choose to bracket off the same text elements. We propose a general method for determining agreement between two analyses. We then describe an efficient implementation, which is also modular in that the core of the implementation can be reused regardless of the format of markup used in the corpora. The output of the implementation on the Susanne and Penn treebank corpora is discussed.

  11. Fires on trees

    CERN Document Server

    Bertoin, Jean

    2010-01-01

    We consider random dynamics on the edges of a uniform Cayley tree with $n$ vertices, in which edges are either inflammable, fireproof, or burt. Every inflammable edge is replaced by a fireproof edge at unit rate, while fires start at smaller rate $n^{-\\alpha}$ on each inflammable edge, then propagate through the neighboring inflammable edges and are only stopped at fireproof edges. A vertex is called fireproof when all its adjacent edges are fireproof. We show that as $n\\to \\infty$, the density of fireproof vertices converges to 1 when $\\alpha>1/2$, to 0 when $\\alpha<1/2$, and to some non-degenerate random variable when $\\alpha=1/2$. We further study the connectivity of the fireproof forest, in particular the existence of a giant component.

  12. TREE DECOMPOSITIONS OF MULTIGRAPHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Minyong

    1999-01-01

    For a graph G, ifE(G) can be partitioned into several pairwise disjointsets as { E1, E2,……,El} such thatthe subgraph induced by Ei is a tree of orderki, (i=1,2, ……, l), then G is said to have a {k1,k2,……, kl}-tree-decomposition, denoted by {k1,k2,……, kl}∈G.For k≥1 and l≥0, a collection(G)(k,l) is the setof multigraphs such that G∈(G)(k,l) if and only if ε(G) = k(|G|-1)-l and ε(H)≤max{(k-1)(|H|-1), k(|H|-1)-l} for any subgraph H of G.We prove that (1) If k≥2, 0≤l≤3 and G∈(G)(k,l) of order n≥l+1, then {n,n,……, n-l}∈ G. (2) If k≥2 and G∈(G)(k,2) oforder n≥3, then {n,n,……, n,n-2}∈G and {n,n,……, n,n-1,n-1}∈G. (3) If k3 and G∈(G)(k,3) oforder n≥4, then {n,n,……, n,n-3}∈G ,{ n,n,……, n,n-1,n-2}∈ G and {n,n, ……, n,n-1,n-1,n-1}∈G.

  13. Tree Hydraulics: How Sap Rises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Trees transport water from roots to crown--a height that can exceed 100 m. The physics of tree hydraulics can be conveyed with simple fluid dynamics based upon the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and Murray's law. Here the conduit structure is modelled as conical pipes and as branching pipes. The force required to lift sap is generated mostly by…

  14. Misunderstanding sap ascent in trees

    OpenAIRE

    Cochard, Hervé; Delzon, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Trees transport water from their roots to their leaves thanks to an efficient but vulnerable vascular system. Assessing the vulnerability to drought of the xylem and its ability to recover from failure are not an easy task but recent findings demonstrate that, contrary to what is commonly believed, hydraulic failure and embolism repair are not routine in trees.

  15. Community tree nursery, Meru, Kenya.

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This is a photograph of a community tree nursery, Meru, Kenya. In this nursery a community group has started a nursery to provide seedlings for their own forest reforestation projects as well as for sale. This shows that use of common pool resources and shows community forestry activities that also do private tree planting on homesteads.

  16. Visualizing Contour Trees within Histograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Many of the topological features of the isosurfaces of a scalar volume field can be compactly represented by its contour tree. Unfortunately, the contour trees of most real-world volume data sets are too complex to be visualized by dot-and-line diagrams. Therefore, we propose a new visualization ...

  17. The trouble with travel and trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Hannah; Roe, Dilys

    2007-10-15

    The aviation industry is a small – although fast-growing – contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, but per kilometre its impact outstrips that of any other form of transport. As today's technology looks unlikely to reduce that impact significantly over the next 25 years, aviation has become a key issue in the climate change debate. Many air travellers and people working in the travel industry see carbon offsetting as a viable green solution to the problem. But how accurate is that view? It is becoming clear that offsetting schemes based on tree planting or forest conservation may trigger a cascade of other problems. Entire communities may be evicted from land allocated for tree planting, or denied access to forest resources designated as protected carbon stores. Forest-based offsetting schemes are also subject to considerable uncertainty: forests can be chopped down or burnt, for instance, which releases stored carbon back into the atmosphere. Some schemes also fail to prevent 'leakage', in which planting trees or conserving forests in one place just shifts deforestation to another, adding nothing to overall carbon stores. For real progress to be made on carbon sequestration and reducing greenhouse gas emissions, we need to go beyond tree-planting and offsetting. Too often they are an excuse for 'business as usual'. The focus must first be on a sustained reduction in emissions. Secondly, it needs to be recognised that the people bearing the heaviest costs of climate change contribute little to the problem, and that new mechanisms for compensating them and helping them adapt to changing conditions are needed. Finally, where offsetting is appropriate, schemes must take full account of the needs and rights of local people who live with the consequences of our new climate consciousness.

  18. On the accuracy of language trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Pompei

    Full Text Available Historical linguistics aims at inferring the most likely language phylogenetic tree starting from information concerning the evolutionary relatedness of languages. The available information are typically lists of homologous (lexical, phonological, syntactic features or characters for many different languages: a set of parallel corpora whose compilation represents a paramount achievement in linguistics. From this perspective the reconstruction of language trees is an example of inverse problems: starting from present, incomplete and often noisy, information, one aims at inferring the most likely past evolutionary history. A fundamental issue in inverse problems is the evaluation of the inference made. A standard way of dealing with this question is to generate data with artificial models in order to have full access to the evolutionary process one is going to infer. This procedure presents an intrinsic limitation: when dealing with real data sets, one typically does not know which model of evolution is the most suitable for them. A possible way out is to compare algorithmic inference with expert classifications. This is the point of view we take here by conducting a thorough survey of the accuracy of reconstruction methods as compared with the Ethnologue expert classifications. We focus in particular on state-of-the-art distance-based methods for phylogeny reconstruction using worldwide linguistic databases. In order to assess the accuracy of the inferred trees we introduce and characterize two generalizations of standard definitions of distances between trees. Based on these scores we quantify the relative performances of the distance-based algorithms considered. Further we quantify how the completeness and the coverage of the available databases affect the accuracy of the reconstruction. Finally we draw some conclusions about where the accuracy of the reconstructions in historical linguistics stands and about the leading directions to improve

  19. Modelling tree biomasses in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repola, J.

    2013-06-01

    Biomass equations for above- and below-ground tree components of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L), Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) and birch (Betula pendula Roth and Betula pubescens Ehrh.) were compiled using empirical material from a total of 102 stands. These stands (44 Scots pine, 34 Norway spruce and 24 birch stands) were located mainly on mineral soil sites representing a large part of Finland. The biomass models were based on data measured from 1648 sample trees, comprising 908 pine, 613 spruce and 127 birch trees. Biomass equations were derived for the total above-ground biomass and for the individual tree components: stem wood, stem bark, living and dead branches, needles, stump, and roots, as dependent variables. Three multivariate models with different numbers of independent variables for above-ground biomass and one for below-ground biomass were constructed. Variables that are normally measured in forest inventories were used as independent variables. The simplest model formulations, multivariate models (1) were mainly based on tree diameter and height as independent variables. In more elaborated multivariate models, (2) and (3), additional commonly measured tree variables such as age, crown length, bark thickness and radial growth rate were added. Tree biomass modelling includes consecutive phases, which cause unreliability in the prediction of biomass. First, biomasses of sample trees should be determined reliably to decrease the statistical errors caused by sub-sampling. In this study, methods to improve the accuracy of stem biomass estimates of the sample trees were developed. In addition, the reliability of the method applied to estimate sample-tree crown biomass was tested, and no systematic error was detected. Second, the whole information content of data should be utilized in order to achieve reliable parameter estimates and applicable and flexible model structure. In the modelling approach, the basic assumption was that the biomasses of

  20. Dendrochronological Investigations of Valonia Oak Trees in Western Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Papadopoulos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Valonia oak (Quercus ithaburensis subsp. macrolepis (Kotschy Hedge & Yalt. is an east Mediterranean endemic, xerothermic and deciduous tree of particular interest in forestry. There has been a growing demand lately to include the species in reforestations in Greece which also increased the interest to investigate its response to climate change. The main purpose of this research is to study valonia oak from a dendrochronological – dendroclimatological point of view within its Mediterranean distribution range. Materials and Methods: Sampling took place in characteristic valonia oak stands where cross sections or tree-cores were taken from 40 trees. The cross sections and the tree-cores were prepared and cross-dated using standard dendrochronological methods and tree-ring widths were measured to the nearest 0.001 mm using the Windendro software program. The ARSTAN program was used to standardize the tree-ring data and to calculate dendrochronological statistical parameters. The inter-annual variability of tree-ring width and the radial growth trend were examined. Finally, tree-ring widths to climate relationships were calculated by orthogonal regression in combination with the bootstrap procedure using master residual chronology and monthly precipitation, temperature data and scPDSI drought index, from October of the n-1 year up to November of the n year. Results: The master chronology of valonia oak trees in Western Greece reaches 365 years, with an average ring width of 0.89 mm and with mean sensitivity being 0.21. The variation of the tree-ring widths indicates the influence of climate and human intervention in the past. Tree-ring to climate relationships show that valonia oak growth is positively affected by precipitations in January and March and by drought reduction during June and July. Conclusions: Valonia oak in Western Greece is a species of great interest for dendrochronological and dendroclimatological studies

  1. Validation of chemical-looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU using Cu-based oxygen carrier and comparative study of Cu, Mn and Co based oxygen carriers using ASPEN plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Zhang, Subhodeep Banerjee, Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical-looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU has been demonstrated to be an effective technological pathway for high-efficiency low-cost carbon dioxide capture when particulate coal serves as the fuel. In this paper, complete process-level modeling of CLOU process conducted in ASPEN Plus is presented. The heat content of fuel and air reactors and air/flue gas heat exchangers is carefully examined. It is shown that the established model provides results which are in excellent agreement with the experiments for the overall power output of the CLOU process. Finally the effect of varying the air flow rate and three different types of coal as the solid fuel on energy output is investigated, and the performance of three – Copper (Cu, Manganese (Mn and Cobalt (Co based oxygen carriers in CLOU process is compared. It is shown that there exists an optimal air flow rate to obtain the maximum power output for a given coal feeding rate and coal type. The effect of three different oxygen carriers on energy output is also investigated using the optimal air flow rate. Among the three oxygen carriers - CuO, Mn2O3, and Co3O4; Mn2O3 shows the best performance on power output. The results presented in this paper can be used to estimate the amount of various quantities such as the air flow rate and oxygen carrier (and its type required to achieve near optimal energy output from a CLOU process based power plant.

  2. ¿Son las herramientas recomendadas por la ASPEN y la ESPEN equiparables en la valoración del estado nutricional? Are the tools recommended by ASPEN and ESPEN comparable for assessing the nutritional status?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.ª A. Valero

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: No existe un método de valoración nutricional universalmente aceptado. Los expertos de ASPEN (2002 sugieren utilizar la valoración subjetiva global (VSG, mientras que los de ESPEN (2002 recomiendan el sistema NRS-2002. Objetivos y ámbito: Este estudio transversal tiene como objetivos: 1 conocer la prevalencia de malnutrición al ingreso hospitalario en un hospital terciario y 2 conocer el grado de asociación entre dos herramientas utilizadas para valorar el estado de nutrición: la VSG y el sistema NRS-2002. Material y métodos: Se estudian 135 pacientes (42,2 % mujeres y 58,8 % varones, edad 62,1 ± 14,5 años en los tres primeros días del ingreso hospitalario, ingresados en camas de Medicina Interna y Cirugía. Se analizan diferentes variables del estado nutricional. Se compara las necesidades calóricas (Harris Benedict x factor de agresión y la ingesta calórica del día anterior al ingreso, mediante recordatorio de 24 horas. Se calcula la prevalencia de malnutrición al ingreso con dos herramientas de screening: VSG y el sistema NRS-2002. Resultados: El 42,2 % de los pacientes reconocen haber perdido peso y el 39,3 % ingieren una dieta inferior a sus necesidades al ingreso en el hospital. Según el método utilizado de valoración nutricional, la prevalencia de malnutrición es del 40,7 y del 45,1/100 pacientes ingresados con el VSG y el NRS-2002, respectivamente. Existe una asociación significativa entre los resultados obtenidos con ambas herramientas (p = 0,000. Los niveles de albúmina sérica y linfocitos totales son inferiores en los pacientes malnutridos. Conclusiones: La prevalencia de malnutrición al ingreso hospitalario es elevada. Existe una asociación estrecha entre los resultados obtenidos con la VSG y el sistema NRS-2002. Aunque en la práctica clínica cualquiera de los dos métodos puede ser utilizado para valorar el estado de nutrición, consideramos que el sistema NRS-2002, aunque más complejo, es

  3. Microcomputer applications of, and modifications to, the modular fault trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LaSalle Probabilistic Risk Assessment was the first major application of the modular logic fault trees after the IREP program. In the process of performing the analysis, many errors were discovered in the fault tree modules that led to difficulties in combining the modules to form the final system fault trees. These errors are corrected in the revised modules listed in this report. In addition, the application of the modules in terms of editing them and forming them into the system fault trees was inefficient. Originally, the editing had to be done line by line and no error checking was performed by the computer. This led to many typos and other logic errors in the construction of the modular fault tree files. Two programs were written to help alleviate this problem: (1) MODEDIT - This program allows an operator to retrieve a file for editing, edit the file for the plant specific application, perform some general error checking while the file is being modified, and store the file for later use, and (2) INDEX - This program checks that the modules that are supposed to form one fault tree all link up appropriately before the files are,loaded onto the mainframe computer. Lastly, the modules were not designed for relay type logic common in BWR designs but for solid state type logic. Some additional modules were defined for modeling relay logic, and an explanation and example of their use are included in this report

  4. Randomized Binomial Tree and Pricing of American-Style Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Randomized binomial tree and methods for pricing American options were studied. Firstly, both the completeness and the no-arbitrage conditions in the randomized binomial tree market were proved. Secondly, the description of the node was given, and the cubic polynomial relationship between the number of nodes and the time steps was also obtained. Then, the characteristics of paths and storage structure of the randomized binomial tree were depicted. Then, the procedure and method for pricing American-style options were given in a random binomial tree market. Finally, a numerical example pricing the American option was illustrated, and the sensitivity analysis of parameter was carried out. The results show that the impact of the occurrence probability of the random binomial tree environment on American option prices is very significant. With the traditional complete market characteristics of random binary and a stronger ability to describe, at the same time, maintaining a computational feasibility, randomized binomial tree is a kind of promising method for pricing financial derivatives.

  5. Predicting 'very poor' beach water quality gradings using classification tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoe, Wai; Choi, King Wah; Lee, Joseph Hun-wei

    2016-02-01

    A beach water quality prediction system has been developed in Hong Kong using multiple linear regression (MLR) models. However, linear models are found to be weak at capturing the infrequent 'very poor' water quality occasions when Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration exceeds 610 counts/100 mL. This study uses a classification tree to increase the accuracy in predicting the 'very poor' water quality events at three Hong Kong beaches affected either by non-point source or point source pollution. Binary-output classification trees (to predict whether E. coli concentration exceeds 610 counts/100 mL) are developed over the periods before and after the implementation of the Harbour Area Treatment Scheme, when systematic changes in water quality were observed. Results show that classification trees can capture more 'very poor' events in both periods when compared to the corresponding linear models, with an increase in correct positives by an average of 20%. Classification trees are also developed at two beaches to predict the four-category Beach Water Quality Indices. They perform worse than the binary tree and give excessive false alarms of 'very poor' events. Finally, a combined modelling approach using both MLR model and classification tree is proposed to enhance the beach water quality prediction system for Hong Kong. PMID:26837834

  6. The incorporation of an organic soil layer in the Noah-MP Land Surface Model and its evaluation over a Boreal Aspen Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Li, Y.; Chen, F.; Barr, A.; Barlage, M.; Wan, B.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the multi-parameterization version of the Noah land-surface model (Noah-MP) was used to investigate the impact of adding a forest-floor organic soil layer on the simulated surface energy and water cycle components at a boreal aspen forest. The test site selected is BERMS Old Aspen Flux (OAS) field station in central Saskatchewan, Canada. The selection of different parameterization schemes for each process within the current Noah-MP model significantly affected the simulation results. The best combination options without incorporating organic soil is referred as the control experiment (CTL). By including an organic-soil parameterization within the Noah-MP model for the first time, the verification results (OGN) against site show significantly improved performance of the model in surface energy fluxes and hydrology simulation due to the lower thermal conductivity and greater porosity of the organic soil. The effects of including an organic soil layer on soil temperature are not uniform throughout the soil depth and year, and those effects are more prominent in summer and in deep soils. For drought years, the OGN simulation substantially modified the partition between direct soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration. For wet years, the OGN simulated latent heat fluxes are similar to CTL except for spring season where OGN produced less evaporation. The impact of the organic soil on sub-surface runoff is substantive with much higher runoff throughout the season.

  7. Thermal analysis of wood of the main tree species of Central Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Loskutov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal decomposition of wood from coniferous and deciduous species of Siberia has been studied using thermogravimetry (TG and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The tree species were larch Larix sibirica Ledeb., Scots pine Pinus sylvestris L., spruce Picea obovata Ledeb., fir Abies sibirica Ledeb., Siberian pine Pinus sibirica Du Tour., birch Betula pendula Roth., and aspen Populus tremula L. Thermal analysis of wood samples was carried out under oxidative (air and inert (argon atmospheres from 25 to 700 °С at heating rates 10, 20, 40 °С • min–1 (TG/DTG and from 25 to 590 °С at heating rates 10, 40 °С • min–1 (DSC. The stages of thermal decomposition, the temperature intervals, the mass loss, the mass loss rate, the temperature of DTG/DSC peaks, and heating effects were determined for each tree species. The kinetic thermal degradation parameters of wood were obtained by the Broido and Ozawa–Flynn–Wall models. The wood of coniferous and deciduous species of Siberia was characterized on the base of analysis of activation energy values at various stages of thermal decomposition and the relations of activation energy on conversion level of wood substance of different tree species, and also the comparison of mass loss at the same stages of thermal destruction, heating effects, residual mass and other parameters of TG/DTG, DSC. In our opinion, the results of this work present interest for researchers and specialists in the field of forest pyrology, wood science, dendrochemistry.

  8. Spanning Trees in Random Satisfiability Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezanpour, A.; Moghimi-Araghi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Working with tree graphs is always easier than with loopy ones and spanning trees are the closest tree-like structures to a given graph. We find a correspondence between the solutions of random K-satisfiability problem and those of spanning trees in the associated factor graph. We introduce a modified survey propagation algorithm which returns null edges of the factor graph and helps us to find satisfiable spanning trees. This allows us to study organization of satisfiable spanning trees in t...

  9. Modeling individual trees in an urban environment using dense discrete return LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Madhurima; van Aardt, Jan A. N.; van Leeuwen, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The urban forest is becoming increasingly important in the contexts of urban green space, carbon sequestration and offsets, and socio-economic impacts. This has led to a recent increase in attention being paid to urban environmental management. Tree biomass, specifically, is a vital indicator of carbon storage and has a direct impact on urban forest health and carbon sequestration. As an alternative to expensive and time-consuming field surveys, remote sensing has been used extensively in measuring dynamics of vegetation and estimating biomass. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) has proven especially useful to characterize the three dimensional (3D) structure of forests. In urban contexts however, information is frequently required at the individual tree level, necessitating the proper delineation of tree crowns. Yet, crown delineation is challenging for urban trees where a wide range of stress factors and cultural influences affect growth. In this paper high resolution LiDAR data were used to infer biomass based on individual tree attributes. A multi-tiered delineation algorithm was designed to extract individual tree-crowns. At first, dominant tree segments were obtained by applying watershed segmentation on the crown height model (CHM). Next, prominent tree top positions within each segment were identified via a regional maximum transformation and the crown boundary was estimated for each of the tree tops. Finally, undetected trees were identified using a best-fitting circle approach. After tree delineation, individual tree attributes were used to estimate tree biomass and the results were validated with associated field mensuration data. Results indicate that the overall tree detection accuracy is nearly 80%, and the estimated biomass model has an adjusted-R2 of 0.5.

  10. A generalized model for stability of trees under impact conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattola, Giuseppe; Crosta, Giovanni; Castellanza, Riccardo; di Prisco, Claudio; Canepa, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Stability of trees to external actions involve the combined effects of stem and tree root systems. A block impacting on the stem or an applied force pulling the stem can cause a tree instability involving stem bending or failure and tree root rotation. So different contributions are involved in the stability of the system. The rockfalls are common natural phenomena that can be unpredictable in terms of frequency and magnitude characteristics, and this makes difficult the estimate of potential hazard and risk for human lives and activities. In mountain areas a natural form of protection from rockfalls is provided by forest growing. The difficulties in the assessment of the real capability of this natural barrier by means of models is an open problem. Nevertheless, a large amount of experimental data are now available which provides support for the development of advanced theoretical framework and corresponding models. The aim of this contribution consists in presenting a model developed to predict the behavior of trees during a block impact. This model describes the tree stem by means of a linear elastic beam system consisting of two beams connected in series and with an equivalent geometry. The tree root system is described via an equivalent foundation, whose behavior is modelled through an elasto-plastic macro-element model. In order to calibrate the model parameters, simulations reproducing a series of winching tests, are performed. These numerical simulations confirm the capability of the model to predict the mechanical behavior of the stem-root system in terms of displacement vs force curves. Finally, numerical simulations of the impact of a boulder with a tree stem are carried out. These simulations, done under dynamic regime and with the model parameters obtained from the previous set of simulations, confirm the capability of the model to reproduce the effects on the stem-roots system generated by impulsive loads.

  11. Gene Tree Discordance Causes Apparent Substitution Rate Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Fábio K; Hahn, Matthew W

    2016-07-01

    Substitution rates are known to be variable among genes, chromosomes, species, and lineages due to multifarious biological processes. Here, we consider another source of substitution rate variation due to a technical bias associated with gene tree discordance. Discordance has been found to be rampant in genome-wide data sets, often due to incomplete lineage sorting (ILS). This apparent substitution rate variation is caused when substitutions that occur on discordant gene trees are analyzed in the context of a single, fixed species tree. Such substitutions have to be resolved by proposing multiple substitutions on the species tree, and we therefore refer to this phenomenon as Substitutions Produced by ILS (SPILS). We use simulations to demonstrate that SPILS has a larger effect with increasing levels of ILS, and on trees with larger numbers of taxa. Specific branches of the species trees are consistently, but erroneously, inferred to be longer or shorter, and we show that these branches can be predicted based on discordant tree topologies. Moreover, we observe that fixing a species tree topology when performing tests of positive selection increases the false positive rate, particularly for genes whose discordant topologies are most affected by SPILS. Finally, we use data from multiple Drosophila species to show that SPILS can be detected in nature. Although the effects of SPILS are modest per gene, it has the potential to affect substitution rate variation whenever high levels of ILS are present, particularly in rapid radiations. The problems outlined here have implications for character mapping of any type of trait, and for any biological process that causes discordance. We discuss possible solutions to these problems, and areas in which they are likely to have caused faulty inferences of convergence and accelerated evolution. PMID:26927960

  12. Are There Infinite Irrigation Trees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernot, M.; Caselles, V.; Morel, J. M.

    2006-08-01

    In many natural or artificial flow systems, a fluid flow network succeeds in irrigating every point of a volume from a source. Examples are the blood vessels, the bronchial tree and many irrigation and draining systems. Such systems have raised recently a lot of interest and some attempts have been made to formalize their description, as a finite tree of tubes, and their scaling laws [25], [26]. In contrast, several mathematical models [5], [22], [10], propose an idealization of these irrigation trees, where a countable set of tubes irrigates any point of a volume with positive Lebesgue measure. There is no geometric obstruction to this infinitesimal model and general existence and structure theorems have been proved. As we show, there may instead be an energetic obstruction. Under Poiseuille law R(s) = s -2 for the resistance of tubes with section s, the dissipated power of a volume irrigating tree cannot be finite. In other terms, infinite irrigation trees seem to be impossible from the fluid mechanics viewpoint. This also implies that the usual principle analysis performed for the biological models needs not to impose a minimal size for the tubes of an irrigating tree; the existence of the minimal size can be proven from the only two obvious conditions for such irrigation trees, namely the Kirchhoff and Poiseuille laws.

  13. Novel Degree Constrained Minimum Spanning Tree Algorithm Based on an Improved Multicolony Ant Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Degree constrained minimum spanning tree (DCMST refers to constructing a spanning tree of minimum weight in a complete graph with weights on edges while the degree of each node in the spanning tree is no more than d (d ≥ 2. The paper proposes an improved multicolony ant algorithm for degree constrained minimum spanning tree searching which enables independent search for optimal solutions among various colonies and achieving information exchanges between different colonies by information entropy. Local optimal algorithm is introduced to improve constructed spanning tree. Meanwhile, algorithm strategies in dynamic ant, random perturbations ant colony, and max-min ant system are adapted in this paper to optimize the proposed algorithm. Finally, multiple groups of experimental data show the superiority of the improved algorithm in solving the problems of degree constrained minimum spanning tree.

  14. Tree Coding of Bilevel Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Bo; Forchhammer, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Presently, sequential tree coders are the best general purpose bilevel image coders and the best coders of halftoned images. The current ISO standard, Joint Bilevel Image Experts Group (JBIG), is a good example. A sequential tree coder encodes the data by feeding estimates of conditional...... one order of magnitude slower than JBIG, obtains excellent and highly robust compression performance. A multipass free tree coding scheme produces superior compression results for all test images. A multipass free template coding scheme produces significantly better results than JBIG for difficult...... images such as halftones. By utilizing randomized subsampling in the template selection, the speed becomes acceptable for practical image coding...

  15. Counting spanning trees in graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Azarija, Jernej

    2012-01-01

    The history of counting the number of spanning trees dates back into the year 1842 in which the German mathematician Gustav Kirchhoff derived a relation between the number of spanning trees of a graph G (τ(G)) and the determinant of a specific submatrix associated with G. After this result many other related results followed. For example in 1889 the British mathematician A. Cayley showed that the complete graph on n nodes has nn−2 spanning trees.The function τ can nowadays be found in the fi...

  16. Rectilinear Full Steiner Tree Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariasen, Martin

    1999-01-01

    The fastest exact algorithm (in practice) for the rectilinear Steiner tree problem in the plane uses a two-phase scheme: First, a small but sufficient set of full Steiner trees (FSTs) is generated and then a Steiner minimum tree is constructed from this set by using simple backtrack search, dynam...... generated instances, approximately 4n FSTs are generated (where n is the number of terminals). The observed running time is quadratic and the FSTs for a 10,000 terminal instance can, on average, be generated within 5 minutes....

  17. Trees Are Useful to Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明

    2005-01-01

    Trees are useful to man in three impor-tant ways. They provide him with wood and other products;they give him shade;they help prevent drought(干旱)and floods. Unfortunately,in many parts of the world, man has not realized that the third one is the most important. Two thousand years ago a rich and pow-erful country cut down its trees to build war-ships, with which to gain itself an empire. It gained the empire,however,without its trees, its soil became hard and poor. When the em-pire fell to pieces, the home c...

  18. Implementing Municipal Tree Planting: Los Angeles Million-Tree Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Pincetl, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Urban forests are increasingly being seen as an important infrastructure that can help cities remediate their environmental impacts. This work reports on the first steps in implementing a million tree program in Los Angeles and the ways such a biogenic—living—infrastructure has been approached. Numbers of studies have been done to quantify the benefits of urban forests, but little has been written on the process of implementing urban tree planting programs. The investigative methods were prim...

  19. Tree Simulation Techniques for Integrated Safety Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the development of a PSA a central role is played by the construction of the event trees that, stemming from each initiating event considered, will finally lead to the calculation of the core damage frequency (CDF). This construction is extensively done by means of expert judgement, performing simulation of the sequences only when some doubt arises (typically for small break LOCAs) using integrated codes. Transient analysis done within the framework of the PSA has important simplifications that affect the transient simulation, specially in relation with the control and protection systems, and may not identify complicated sequences. Specialised simulation tools such as RELAP5 have been used only at very specific points of the PSAs due to time and model complexity constraints. On the other hand, a large amount of work and expertise has been laid in the development of simulation tools, independently of the PSA effort. Tools simplified in the phenomena they consider, but complete in the treatment of automatic and manual control and protection systems are now available for automatic generation and testing of the sequences appearing in the Event Trees. Additionally, an increasing effort and interest has been spent in the development of efficient means for the representation of the Emergency Operating Procedures, which, incorporated into the simulating tool would make a more realistic picture of the real plant performance. At present; both types of analyses - transient and probabilistic - can converge to be able to dynamically generate an Event Tree while taking into account the actual performance of the control and protection systems of the plant and the operator actions. Such a tool would allow for an assessment of the Event Trees, and, if fed with probabilistic data, can provide results of the same nature. Key aspects of this approach that imply new theoretical as well as practical developments in addition to those traditionally covered by classical simulation

  20. Aspen Code Development Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,; Cherry, Robert S. [INL; Richard, Boardman D. [INL

    2013-10-03

    Wyoming has a wealth of primary energy resources in the forms of coal, natural gas, wind, uranium, and oil shale. Most of Wyoming?s coal and gas resources are exported from the state in unprocessed form rather than as refined higher value products. Wyoming?s leadership recognizes the opportunity to broaden the state?s economic base energy resources to make value-added products such as synthetic vehicle fuels and commodity chemicals. Producing these higher value products in an environmentally responsible manner can benefit from the use of clean energy technologies including Wyoming?s abundant wind energy and nuclear energy such as new generation small modular reactors including the high temperature gas-cooled reactors.

  1. Implementing municipal tree planting: Los Angeles million-tree initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincetl, Stephanie

    2010-02-01

    Urban forests are increasingly being seen as an important infrastructure that can help cities remediate their environmental impacts. This work reports on the first steps in implementing a million tree program in Los Angeles and the ways such a biogenic-living-infrastructure has been approached. Numbers of studies have been done to quantify the benefits of urban forests, but little has been written on the process of implementing urban tree planting programs. The investigative methods were primarily qualitative, involving interviews, attending meetings and conducting literature reviews. Results indicate that multiple nonprofit and city agency programs are involved in planting and maintaining trees and this has required coordination among groups that here-to-fore were unaccustomed to having to collaborate. The main finding that emerge from this research is that the implementation of such a program in Los Angeles is more complicated than it may seem due to several interacting factors: the need to rely on multiple public and private organizations to put trees into the ground and to maintain them; coordination of these multiple efforts must be centralized, but requires a great deal of time and effort and maybe resisted by some of the partners; funding for planting and long term maintenance must be pieced together from multiple sources; acceptance of trees by residents varies by neighborhood as does tree canopy cover; appropriate nursery supply can be limited; the location of the program within the city administration is determined by who initiates the program. PMID:20016982

  2. Implementing Municipal Tree Planting: Los Angeles Million-Tree Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincetl, Stephanie

    2010-02-01

    Urban forests are increasingly being seen as an important infrastructure that can help cities remediate their environmental impacts. This work reports on the first steps in implementing a million tree program in Los Angeles and the ways such a biogenic—living—infrastructure has been approached. Numbers of studies have been done to quantify the benefits of urban forests, but little has been written on the process of implementing urban tree planting programs. The investigative methods were primarily qualitative, involving interviews, attending meetings and conducting literature reviews. Results indicate that multiple nonprofit and city agency programs are involved in planting and maintaining trees and this has required coordination among groups that here-to-fore were unaccustomed to having to collaborate. The main finding that emerge from this research is that the implementation of such a program in Los Angeles is more complicated than it may seem due to several interacting factors: the need to rely on multiple public and private organizations to put trees into the ground and to maintain them; coordination of these multiple efforts must be centralized, but requires a great deal of time and effort and maybe resisted by some of the partners; funding for planting and long term maintenance must be pieced together from multiple sources; acceptance of trees by residents varies by neighborhood as does tree canopy cover; appropriate nursery supply can be limited; the location of the program within the city administration is determined by who initiates the program.

  3. The Tree of Industrial Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to bring forth an interaction between evolutionary economics and industrial systematics. The suggested solution is to reconstruct the "family tree" of the industries. Such a tree is based on similarities, but it may also reflect the evolutionary history in industries...... and their knowledge bases. The paper is inspired by molecular biology, where phylogenies of biological life are reconstructed by means of extremely rich genomic data and powerful computer algorithms. The paper suggests that input-output data can be used as a first source of reconstructing industrial...... for the heuristic finding of optimal industrial trees. The results are presented as taxonomic trees that can easily be compared with the hierarchical structure of existing systems of industrial classification....

  4. Spanning Tree Based Attribute Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yifeng; Jorge, Cordero Hernandez

    2009-01-01

    inconsistent edges from a maximum spanning tree by starting appropriate initial modes, therefore generating stable clusters. It discovers sound clusters through simple graph operations and achieves significant computational savings. We compare the Star Discovery algorithm against earlier attribute clustering...

  5. Efficient Frequent Pattern Tree Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Bujji Babu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Association rule learning is a popular and well researched technique for discovering interesting relations between variables in large databases in the area of data mining. The association rules are a part of intelligent systems. Association rules are usually required to satisfy a user-specified minimum support and a user-specified minimum confidence at the same time. Apriori and FP-Growth algorithms are very familiar algorithms for association rule mining. In this paper we are more concentrated on the Construction of efficient frequent pattern trees. Here, we present the novel frequent pattern trees and the performance issues. The proposed trees are fast and efficient trees helps to extract the frequent patterns. This paper provides the major advantages in the FP-Growth algorithm for association rule mining with using the newly proposed approach.

  6. Algorithms for Decision Tree Construction

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The study of algorithms for decision tree construction was initiated in 1960s. The first algorithms are based on the separation heuristic [13, 31] that at each step tries dividing the set of objects as evenly as possible. Later Garey and Graham [28] showed that such algorithm may construct decision trees whose average depth is arbitrarily far from the minimum. Hyafil and Rivest in [35] proved NP-hardness of DT problem that is constructing a tree with the minimum average depth for a diagnostic problem over 2-valued information system and uniform probability distribution. Cox et al. in [22] showed that for a two-class problem over information system, even finding the root node attribute for an optimal tree is an NP-hard problem. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011.

  7. Tree and tree-like species of Mexico: gymnosperms, monocotyledons, and tree ferns

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Ricker; Hernández, Héctor M.

    2010-01-01

    Trees or tree-like plants are defined here broadly as perennial, self-supporting plants with an adult height of at least 5 m (without ascending leaves or inflorescences), and with 1 or several erect stems with a diameter of at least 10 cm. We present an updated list of all Mexican tree species under that definition in the Gymnospermae (86 species, 38% endemic to Mexico), Monocotyledonae (75 species, 55% endemic), and Pteridophyta (9 species, none endemic). The list contains a total of 170 spe...

  8. Quantum Simulation of Phylogenetic Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Ellinas, Demosthenes; Jarvis, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Quantum simulations constructing probability tensors of biological multi-taxa in phylogenetic trees are proposed, in terms of positive trace preserving maps, describing evolving systems of quantum walks with multiple walkers. Basic phylogenetic models applying on trees of various topologies are simulated following appropriate decoherent quantum circuits. Quantum simulations of statistical inference for aligned sequences of biological characters are provided in terms of a quantum pruning map o...

  9. Classifying melodies using tree grammars

    OpenAIRE

    Bernabeu Briones, José Francisco; CALERA RUBIO, JORGE; Iñesta Quereda, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Similarity computation is a difficult issue in music information retrieval, because it tries to emulate the special ability that humans show for pattern recognition in general, and particularly in the presence of noisy data. A number of works have addressed the problem of what is the best representation for symbolic music in this context. The tree representation, using rhythm for defining the tree structure and pitch information for leaf and node labeling has proven to be effective in melodic...

  10. Short Tree, Long Tree, Right Tree, Wrong Tree: New Acquisition Bias Corrections for Inferring SNP Phylogenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaché, Adam D; Banbury, Barbara L; Felsenstein, Joseph; de Oca, Adrián Nieto-Montes; Stamatakis, Alexandros

    2015-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are useful markers for phylogenetic studies owing in part to their ubiquity throughout the genome and ease of collection. Restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) methods are becoming increasingly popular for SNP data collection, but an assessment of the best practises for using these data in phylogenetics is lacking. We use computer simulations, and new double digest RADseq (ddRADseq) data for the lizard family Phrynosomatidae, to investigate the accuracy of RAD loci for phylogenetic inference. We compare the two primary ways RAD loci are used during phylogenetic analysis, including the analysis of full sequences (i.e., SNPs together with invariant sites), or the analysis of SNPs on their own after excluding invariant sites. We find that using full sequences rather than just SNPs is preferable from the perspectives of branch length and topological accuracy, but not of computational time. We introduce two new acquisition bias corrections for dealing with alignments composed exclusively of SNPs, a conditional likelihood method and a reconstituted DNA approach. The conditional likelihood method conditions on the presence of variable characters only (the number of invariant sites that are unsampled but known to exist is not considered), while the reconstituted DNA approach requires the user to specify the exact number of unsampled invariant sites prior to the analysis. Under simulation, branch length biases increase with the amount of missing data for both acquisition bias correction methods, but branch length accuracy is much improved in the reconstituted DNA approach compared to the conditional likelihood approach. Phylogenetic analyses of the empirical data using concatenation or a coalescent-based species tree approach provide strong support for many of the accepted relationships among phrynosomatid lizards, suggesting that RAD loci contain useful phylogenetic signal across a range of divergence times despite the

  11. Generic physical protection logic trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generic physical protection logic trees, designed for application to nuclear facilities and materials, are presented together with a method of qualitative evaluation of the trees for design and analysis of physical protection systems. One or more defense zones are defined where adversaries interact with the physical protection system. Logic trees that are needed to describe the possible scenarios within a defense zone are selected. Elements of a postulated or existing physical protection system are tagged to the primary events of the logic tree. The likelihood of adversary success in overcoming these elements is evaluated on a binary, yes/no basis. The effect of these evaluations is propagated through the logic of each tree to determine whether the adversary is likely to accomplish the end event of the tree. The physical protection system must be highly likely to overcome the adversary before he accomplishes his objective. The evaluation must be conducted for all significant states of the site. Deficiencies uncovered become inputs to redesign and further analysis, closing the loop on the design/analysis cycle

  12. Generic physical protection logic trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, W.K.

    1981-10-01

    Generic physical protection logic trees, designed for application to nuclear facilities and materials, are presented together with a method of qualitative evaluation of the trees for design and analysis of physical protection systems. One or more defense zones are defined where adversaries interact with the physical protection system. Logic trees that are needed to describe the possible scenarios within a defense zone are selected. Elements of a postulated or existing physical protection system are tagged to the primary events of the logic tree. The likelihood of adversary success in overcoming these elements is evaluated on a binary, yes/no basis. The effect of these evaluations is propagated through the logic of each tree to determine whether the adversary is likely to accomplish the end event of the tree. The physical protection system must be highly likely to overcome the adversary before he accomplishes his objective. The evaluation must be conducted for all significant states of the site. Deficiencies uncovered become inputs to redesign and further analysis, closing the loop on the design/analysis cycle.

  13. Objective consensus from decision trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consensus-based approaches provide an alternative to evidence-based decision making, especially in situations where high-level evidence is limited. Our aim was to demonstrate a novel source of information, objective consensus based on recommendations in decision tree format from multiple sources. Based on nine sample recommendations in decision tree format a representative analysis was performed. The most common (mode) recommendations for each eventuality (each permutation of parameters) were determined. The same procedure was applied to real clinical recommendations for primary radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Data was collected from 16 radiation oncology centres, converted into decision tree format and analyzed in order to determine the objective consensus. Based on information from multiple sources in decision tree format, treatment recommendations can be assessed for every parameter combination. An objective consensus can be determined by means of mode recommendations without compromise or confrontation among the parties. In the clinical example involving prostate cancer therapy, three parameters were used with two cut-off values each (Gleason score, PSA, T-stage) resulting in a total of 27 possible combinations per decision tree. Despite significant variations among the recommendations, a mode recommendation could be found for specific combinations of parameters. Recommendations represented as decision trees can serve as a basis for objective consensus among multiple parties

  14. Layered Working-Set Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Prosenjit; Dujmović, Vida; Howat, John

    2009-01-01

    The working-set bound [Sleator and Tarjan, J. ACM, 1985] roughly states that searching for an element is fast if the element was accessed recently. Binary search trees, such as splay trees, can achieve this property in the amortized sense, while data structures that are not binary search trees are known to have this property in the worst case. We close this gap and present a binary search tree called a layered working-set tree that guarantees the working-set property in the worst case. The unified bound [Badoiu et al., TCS, 2007] roughly states that searching for an element is fast if it is near (in terms of rank distance) to a recently accessed element. We show how layered working-set trees can be used to achieve the unified bound to within a small additive term in the amortized sense while maintaining in the worst case an access time that is both logarithmic and within a small multiplicative factor of the working-set bound.

  15. Computing Refined Buneman Trees in Cubic Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, G.S.; Fagerberg, R.; Östlin, A.;

    2003-01-01

    Reconstructing the evolutionary tree for a set of n species based on pairwise distances between the species is a fundamental problem in bioinformatics. Neighbor joining is a popular distance based tree reconstruction method. It always proposes fully resolved binary trees despite missing evidence ...... complexity of our algorithm makes the method of refined Buneman trees computational competitive to methods based on neighbor joining....

  16. Semiregular Trees with Minimal Laplacian Spectral Radius

    OpenAIRE

    Biyikoglu, Türker; Leydold, Josef

    2009-01-01

    A semiregular tree is a tree where all non-pendant vertices have the same degree. Among all semiregular trees with fixed order and degree, a graph with minimal (adjacency / Laplacian) spectral radius is a caterpillar. Counter examples show that the result cannot be generalized to the class of trees with a given (non-constant) degree sequence. (author´s abstract)

  17. Mapping tree health using airborne laser scans and hyperspectral imagery: a case study for a floodplain eucalypt forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendryk, Iurii; Tulbure, Mirela; Broich, Mark; McGrath, Andrew; Alexandrov, Sergey; Keith, David

    2016-04-01

    crown transparency, 15% of trees were classified as high-density, 81% as medium-density and 4% as sparse or defoliated with 70% overall accuracy. Finally, Landsat derived flooding frequency map for over 12 years showed that trees in areas that were flooded less than 5 times and more than 30 times were most susceptible to dieback. Similarly, sparse and medium-density tree crowns were concentrated in areas that were flooded less than 15 and more than 30 times, respectively. Our results provide two algorithms that accurately delineate and classify the health of trees in a structurally complex forest, enabling us to prioritize areas for forest health promotion and biodiversity conservation. This study is novel in using airborne remote sensing to assess the health of structurally complex individual trees on a relatively large scale.

  18. Patterns of thinking about phylogenetic trees: A study of student learning and the potential of tree thinking to improve comprehension of biological concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naegle, Erin

    . Chapter 2 explores the construction, validity, and reliability of a tree thinking concept inventory. Concept inventories are research based instruments that diagnose faulty reasoning among students. Such inventories are tools for improving teaching and learning of concepts. Test scores indicate that tree thinking misconceptions are held by novice and intermediate biology students. Finally, Chapter 3 presents a tree thinking rubric. The rubric aids teachers in selecting and improving introductory tree thinking learning exercises that address students' tree thinking misconceptions.

  19. Simulations of lattice animals and trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Nadler, Walter; Grassberger, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The scaling behaviour of randomly branched polymers in a good solvent is studied in two to nine dimensions, using as microscopic models lattice animals and lattice trees on simple hypercubic lattices. As a stochastic sampling method we use a biased sequential sampling algorithm with re-sampling, similar to the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) used extensively for linear polymers. Essentially we start simulating percolation clusters (either site or bond), re-weigh them according to the animal (tree) ensemble, and prune or branch the further growth according to a heuristic fitness function. In contrast to previous applications of PERM, this fitness function is not the weight with which the actual configuration would contribute to the partition sum, but is closely related to it. We obtain high statistics of animals with up to several thousand sites in all dimension 2 animals) we estimate gyration radii and numbers of perimeter sites. In all dimensions we verify the Parisi-Sourlas prediction, and we verify all exactly known critical exponents in dimensions 2, 3, 4 and >=8. In addition, we present the hitherto most precise estimates for growth constants in d >= 3. For clusters with one site attached to an attractive surface, we verify for d >= 3 the superuniversality of the cross-over exponent phgr at the adsorption transition predicted by Janssen and Lyssy, but not for d = 2. There, we find phgr = 0.480(4) instead of the conjectured phgr = 1/2. Finally, we discuss the collapse of animals and trees, arguing that our present version of the algorithm is also efficient for some of the models studied in this context, but showing that it is not very efficient for the 'classical' model for collapsing animals.

  20. Unifying synchronous tree-adjoining grammars and tree transducers via bimorphisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Shieber, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    We place synchronous tree-adjoining grammars and tree transducers in the single overarching framework of bimorphisms, continuing the unification of synchronous grammars and tree transducers initiated by Shieber (2004). Along the way, we present a new definition of the tree-adjoining grammar derivation relation based on a novel direct inter-reduction of TAG and monadic macro tree transducers.

  1. Habitat trees: key elements for forest biodiversity

    OpenAIRE

    Bütler, R.; Lachat, T.; Larrieu, L.; Y. Paillet

    2013-01-01

    Habitat trees are defined as standing live or dead trees providing ecological niches (microhabitats) such as cavities, bark pockets, large dead branches, cracks or trunk rot. They are of prime concern for forest biodiversity as they can harbor many threatened species of flora and fauna. Habitat trees are a legacy of the past and are of exceptional importance given the hundreds of years such a tree might need to reach this status. The retention of habitat trees with a suitable distribution ...

  2. A bicriterion Steiner tree problem on graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujošević Mirko B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a formulation of bicriterion Steiner tree problem which is stated as a task of finding a Steiner tree with maximal capacity and minimal length. It is considered as a lexicographic multicriteria problem. This means that the bottleneck Steiner tree problem is solved first. After that, the next optimization problem is stated as a classical minimums Steiner tree problem under the constraint on capacity of the tree. The paper also presents some computational experiments with the multicriteria problem.

  3. Systems analysis of a closed loop ECLSS using the ASPEN simulation tool. Thermodynamic efficiency analysis of ECLSS components. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sharmista

    1993-01-01

    Our first goal in this project was to perform a systems analysis of a closed loop Environmental Control Life Support System (ECLSS). This pertains to the development of a model of an existing real system from which to assess the state or performance of the existing system. Systems analysis is applied to conceptual models obtained from a system design effort. For our modelling purposes we used a simulator tool called ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineering). Our second goal was to evaluate the thermodynamic efficiency of the different components comprising an ECLSS. Use is made of the second law of thermodynamics to determine the amount of irreversibility of energy loss of each component. This will aid design scientists in selecting the components generating the least entropy, as our penultimate goal is to keep the entropy generation of the whole system at a minimum.

  4. Why and where do adult trees die in a young secondary temperate forest? The role of neighbourhood

    OpenAIRE

    Olano, José Miguel; Laskurain, Nere Amaia; Escudero, Adrián; Cruz Rot, Marcelino de la

    2009-01-01

    The density and identity of tree neighbourhood is a key factor to explain tree mortality in forests, especially during the stem exclusion phase. To understand this process, we built a logistic model for mortality in a spatially explicit context,including tree and neighbourhood predictors. Additionally, we used this model to build mortality risk frequency distributions. Finally, we tested this model against a random mortality model to predict the spatial pattern of the forest. Annual mor...

  5. Estimation of carcinogenicity using molecular fragments tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Lu, Jing; Wang, Fei; Shen, Qiancheng; Zheng, Mingyue; Luo, Xiaomin; Zhu, Weiliang; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Kaixian

    2012-08-27

    Carcinogenicity is an important toxicological endpoint that poses high concern to drug discovery. In this study, we developed a method to extract structural alerts (SAs) and modulating factors of carcinogens on the basis of statistical analyses. First, the Gaston algorithm, a frequent subgraph mining method, was used to detect substructures that occurred at least six times. Then, a molecular fragments tree was built and pruned to select high-quality SAs. The p-value of the parent node in the tree and that of its children nodes were compared, and the nodes that had a higher statistical significance in binomial tests were retained. Finally, modulating factors that suppressed the toxic effects of SAs were extracted by three self-defining rules. The accuracy of the 77 SAs plus four SA/modulating factor pairs model for the training set, and the test set was 0.70 and 0.65, respectively. Our model has higher predictive ability than Benigni's model, especially in the test set. The results highlight that this method is preferable in terms of prediction accuracy, and the selected SAs are useful for prediction as well as interpretation. Moreover, our method is convenient to users in that it can extract SAs from a database using an automated and unbiased manner that does not rely on a priori knowledge of mechanism of action. PMID:22834690

  6. Application of date palm trees mulch as a bedding material for dry heifers in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadik M.W

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the safety of using Saudi date palm trees mulch as a bedding material for dry heifers. Date palm trees mulch was used as bedding material for 10 days. Final Composite regulated elements (N, P, K, Na, Ca, and Mg, NDF, ADF, pH, moisture, and EC were improved by use of date palm trees mulch as a bedding material especially in concrete area (1.85%, 0.50%, 1.42%, 0.59%, 2.56%, 0.26%, 60.00%, 49.40%, 7.53, 30%, 16.88 for N, P, K, Na, Ca. Mg, NDF, ADF, pH, Moisture and Electrical conductivity, respectively. On a dry matter basis, highly enriched element fresh manure was collected from the concrete section bedded with date palm trees mulch. Both Concrete area bedded with date palm trees mulch and Sand area bedded with date palm trees mulch were free of salmonella after 10 days. Date palm trees mulch was unsuitable medium for pathogenic bacteria especially Escherichia coli O157:H7 .Total viable bacterial counts failed to increase with the incubation time (104. Date palm tree mulch was unsuitable medium for flies and minimizes density of house flies. Date palm trees mulch seemed to be a safe, comfortable and effective bedding material for cow’s feedlots.

  7. Modeling the Ecosystem Services Provided by Trees in Urban Ecosystems: Using Biome-BGC to Improve i-Tree Eco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly E.; McGroddy, Megan; Spence, Caitlin; Flake, Leah; Sarfraz, Amna; Nowak, David J.; Milesi, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    As the world becomes increasingly urban, the need to quantify the effect of trees in urban environments on energy usage, air pollution, local climate and nutrient run-off has increased. By identifying, quantifying and valuing the ecological activity that provides services in urban areas, stronger policies and improved quality of life for urban residents can be obtained. Here we focus on two radically different models that can be used to characterize urban forests. The i-Tree Eco model (formerly UFORE model) quantifies ecosystem services (e.g., air pollution removal, carbon storage) and values derived from urban trees based on field measurements of trees and local ancillary data sets. Biome-BGC (Biome BioGeoChemistry) is used to simulate the fluxes and storage of carbon, water, and nitrogen in natural environments. This paper compares i-Tree Eco's methods to those of Biome-BGC, which estimates the fluxes and storage of energy, carbon, water and nitrogen for vegetation and soil components of the ecosystem. We describe the two models and their differences in the way they calculate similar properties, with a focus on carbon and nitrogen. Finally, we discuss the implications of further integration of these two communities for land managers such as those in Maryland.

  8. Production of Gum from Cashew Tree Latex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. AZEEZ

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at producing gum from cashew tree latex, which can act as substitute for gum Arabic. The method used include drying and size reduction of the exudates gum, sieving of the gum to remove impurities, dissolution of the gum in distilled water, filtration to remove polysaccharide waste and finally concentration and stability of the gum. Glycerine, starch and Zinc oxide are some of the additives used in stabilizing the gum. The pH and Viscosity on addition of various percentage concentration of stabilizing agent were determined. Gum of the best quality was obtained with viscosity and pH of 4.52 Ns/m2 and 4.2 respectively; this is because the natural pH of gum from Acacia Senegal ranges between 3.9 - 4.9. The gum can be used as an alternative for synthetic adhesive used presently for stamps and envelopes.

  9. Modeling of blood flow in arterial trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anor, Tomer; Grinberg, Leopold; Baek, Hyoungsu; Madsen, Joseph R; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Karniadakis, George E

    2010-01-01

    Advances in computational methods and medical imaging techniques have enabled accurate simulations of subject-specific blood flows at the level of individual blood cell and in complex arterial networks. While in the past, we were limited to simulations with one arterial bifurcation, the current state-of-the-art is simulations of arterial networks consisting of hundreds of arteries. In this paper, we review the advances in methods for vascular flow simulations in large arterial trees. We discuss alternative approaches and validity of various assumptions often made to simplify the modeling. To highlight the similarities and discrepancies of data computed with different models, computationally intensive three-dimensional (3D) and inexpensive one-dimensional (1D) flow simulations in very large arterial networks are employed. Finally, we discuss the possibilities, challenges, and limitations of the computational methods for predicting outcomes of therapeutic interventions for individual patients. PMID:20836052

  10. Swing Detection Using Onto Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Pandit

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an hybrid approach for Ontology designing by combining Data structure storage techniques and Ontology characteristics to improve understanding about a passages/statement or opinion. By applying classification task we focus on forming a right positive and left negative sub tree and to calculate its positive or negative swing. It serves many Purposes such as, e.g., opinion mining, Inclination and proper designing. Most Existing techniques utilize a list of opinion (also called opinion Lexicon. Opinion words are of both Characteristics (positive or negative .By using binary search technique we have developed Unique onto trees that utilize tree structure to improve feature ranking. In the end we have formed a swing table that projects the inclination of any statement/opinion or passage.

  11. On the Count of Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Barcenas, Everardo; Layaida, Nabil; Schmitt, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Regular tree grammars and regular path expressions constitute core constructs widely used in programming languages and type systems. Nevertheless, there has been little research so far on frameworks for reasoning about path expressions where node cardinality constraints occur along a path in a tree. We present a logic capable of expressing deep counting along paths which may include arbitrary recursive forward and backward navigation. The counting extensions can be seen as a generalization of graded modalities that count immediate successor nodes. While the combination of graded modalities, nominals, and inverse modalities yields undecidable logics over graphs, we show that these features can be combined in a decidable tree logic whose main features can be decided in exponential time. Our logic being closed under negation, it may be used to decide typical problems on XPath queries such as satisfiability, type checking with relation to regular types, containment, or equivalence.

  12. ASPEN PLUS在氯碱工程设计中的应用——氯氢处理流程模拟开发%Application of ASPEN PLUS in chlorine- alkali engineering design —— Development of imitiative process of chlorine and hydrogen treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨萍; 邓敏

    2001-01-01

    The binary interaction parameters are derived from gas- liquid equilibrium regression by using the ASPEN PLUS 10. O. Main point in this paper is the introduction of the calculation of mass balance and heat balance in chlorine and hydrogen treatment process in ion - exchange membrane caustic soda production process with the above imitiative flow path software. The calcalation results are compared with actual data from plants,and agreeable results are obtained.%ASPEN PLUS 10.0版中有较为全面的气液平衡回归出来的二元交互作用参数,文中主要介绍了用该流程模拟软件对离子膜烧碱氯氢处理工序进行物料平衡和热量平衡的计算,并与工厂实际数据进行比较,获得满意的结果。

  13. Attention trees and semantic paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Christian; Pieroni, Goffredo G.; Pieroni, Laura

    2007-02-01

    In the last few decades several techniques for image content extraction, often based on segmentation, have been proposed. It has been suggested that under the assumption of very general image content, segmentation becomes unstable and classification becomes unreliable. According to recent psychological theories, certain image regions attract the attention of human observers more than others and, generally, the image main meaning appears concentrated in those regions. Initially, regions attracting our attention are perceived as a whole and hypotheses on their content are formulated; successively the components of those regions are carefully analyzed and a more precise interpretation is reached. It is interesting to observe that an image decomposition process performed according to these psychological visual attention theories might present advantages with respect to a traditional segmentation approach. In this paper we propose an automatic procedure generating image decomposition based on the detection of visual attention regions. A new clustering algorithm taking advantage of the Delaunay- Voronoi diagrams for achieving the decomposition target is proposed. By applying that algorithm recursively, starting from the whole image, a transformation of the image into a tree of related meaningful regions is obtained (Attention Tree). Successively, a semantic interpretation of the leaf nodes is carried out by using a structure of Neural Networks (Neural Tree) assisted by a knowledge base (Ontology Net). Starting from leaf nodes, paths toward the root node across the Attention Tree are attempted. The task of the path consists in relating the semantics of each child-parent node pair and, consequently, in merging the corresponding image regions. The relationship detected in this way between two tree nodes generates, as a result, the extension of the interpreted image area through each step of the path. The construction of several Attention Trees has been performed and partial

  14. Tree hydraulics: how sap rises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Trees transport water from roots to crown—a height that can exceed 100 m. The physics of tree hydraulics can be conveyed with simple fluid dynamics based upon the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and Murray's law. Here the conduit structure is modelled as conical pipes and as branching pipes. The force required to lift sap is generated mostly by transpiration or capillary action; we investigate the effectiveness of both these forces for the two conduit architectures considered. The level of analysis is appropriate for undergraduates. The subject is of broad interest because it provides a naturally-occurring example of an unusual metastable state of matter: liquid under tension.

  15. The tree gangs of Glittertown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the activities of four groups in Los Angeles as part of The Global ReLeaf challenge to plant trees for environmental improvement and to combat global warming. The activities include: training of 'citizen foresters' in selection of tree species, planting sites, maintenance, and fund-raising; education of school children about recycling, organic gardening, water conservation and composting. By working with civic groups, school children, public works, housing developers and the forestry division these groups hope to cool their communities and reduce energy consumption

  16. Multiple Tree for Partially Observable Monte-Carlo Tree Search

    OpenAIRE

    Auger, David

    2011-01-01

    We propose an algorithm for computing approximate Nash equilibria of partially observable games using Monte-Carlo tree search based on recent bandit methods. We obtain experimental results for the game of phantom tic-tac-toe, showing that strong strategies can be efficiently computed by our algorithm.

  17. Tree Height Calculator: An Android App for Estimating Tree Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burca, V. S.; Htet, N. M.; Huang, X.; de Lanerolle, T. R.; Morelli, R.; Gourley, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Conventionally, measuring tree height requires a collection of different tools - clinometer, transit, pencil, paper, laptop computer. Results are recorded manually and entered into a spreadsheet or database for future calculation and analysis. Tree Height Calculator is a mobile Android app the integrates the various steps in this process thereby improving the accuracy and dramatically reducing the time required to go from taking measurements to analyzing data. Given the user's height and the distance from the base of the tree (which can be downloaded into the app from a server), the app uses the phone's orientation sensor to calculate the angle of elevation. A simple trigonometric formula is then used to calculate and record the tree's height in the phone's database. When the phone has a WiFi connection, the data are transmitted to a server, from where they can be downloaded directly into a spreadsheet. The application was first tested in an Environmental Science laboratory at Trinity College. On the first trial, 103 data samples were collected, stored, and uploaded to the online database with only couple of dropped data points. On the second trial, 98 data samples were gathered with no loss of data. The app combined the individual measurements taken by the students in the lab, reducing the time required to produce a graph of the class's results from days to hours.

  18. Water Transport in Trees--An Artificial Laboratory Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susman, K.; Razpet, N.; Cepic, M.

    2011-01-01

    Water transport in tall trees is an everyday phenomenon, seldom noticed and not completely understood even by scientists. As a topic of current research in plant physiology it has several advantages for presentation within school physics lectures: it is interdisciplinary and clearly shows the connection between physics and biology; the…

  19. Integrating cyber attacks within fault trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a new method for quantitative security risk assessment of complex systems is presented, combining fault-tree analysis, traditionally used in reliability analysis, with the recently introduced Attack-tree analysis, proposed for the study of malicious attack patterns. The combined use of fault trees and attack trees helps the analyst to effectively face the security challenges posed by the introduction of modern ICT technologies in the control systems of critical infrastructures. The proposed approach allows considering the interaction of malicious deliberate acts with random failures. Formal definitions of fault tree and attack tree are provided and a mathematical model for the calculation of system fault probabilities is presented.

  20. Human action analysis with randomized trees

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Gang; Liu, Zicheng

    2014-01-01

    This book will provide a comprehensive overview on human action analysis with randomized trees. It will cover both the supervised random trees and the unsupervised random trees. When there are sufficient amount of labeled data available, supervised random trees provides a fast method for space-time interest point matching. When labeled data is minimal as in the case of example-based action search, unsupervised random trees is used to leverage the unlabelled data. We describe how the randomized trees can be used for action classification, action detection, action search, and action prediction.

  1. Edge-Disjoint Fibonacci Trees in Hypercube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indhumathi Raman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fibonacci tree is a rooted binary tree whose number of vertices admit a recursive definition similar to the Fibonacci numbers. In this paper, we prove that a hypercube of dimension h admits two edge-disjoint Fibonacci trees of height h, two edge-disjoint Fibonacci trees of height h-2, two edge-disjoint Fibonacci trees of height h-4 and so on, as subgraphs. The result shows that an algorithm with Fibonacci trees as underlying data structure can be implemented concurrently on a hypercube network with no communication latency.

  2. Forward and Backward Application of Symbolic Tree Transducers

    OpenAIRE

    Fülöp, Zoltán; Vogler, Heiko

    2012-01-01

    We consider symbolic tree automata (sta) and symbolic tree transducers (stt). We characterize s-recognizable tree languages (which are the tree languages recognizable by sta) in terms of (classical) recognizable tree languages and relabelings. We prove that sta and the recently introduced variable tree automata are incomparable with respect to their recognition power. We define symbolic regular tree grammars and characterize s-regular tree languages in terms of regular tree languages and rela...

  3. Tree-space statistics and approximations for large-scale analysis of anatomical trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Owen, Megan; Petersen, Jens;

    2013-01-01

    parametrize the relevant parts of tree-space well. Using the developed approximate statistics, we illustrate how the structure and geometry of airway trees vary across a population and show that airway trees with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease come from a different distribution in tree-space than...... space of leaf-labeled trees. This tree-space is a geodesic metric space where any two trees are connected by a unique shortest path, which corresponds to a tree deformation. However, tree-space is not a manifold, and the usual strategy of performing statistical analysis in a tangent space and projecting...... onto tree-space is not available. Using tree-space and its shortest paths, a variety of statistical properties, such as mean, principal component, hypothesis testing and linear discriminant analysis can be defined. For some of these properties it is still an open problem how to compute them; others...

  4. ESTONIAN TRACES IN THE TREE OF LIFE CONCEPT AND IN THE LANGUAGE FAMILY TREE THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urmas Sutrop

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the tree model – a well-formed tree is shortly described. After that the language family tree model by August Schleicher is treated and compared with the Charles Darwin’s tree of life diagram and metaphor. The development of the idea of the linguistic trees and the tree of life is considered historically. Earlier models – scala naturae – and tree models, both well-formed and not-well-formed are introduced. Special attention is paid to the scholars connected to Estonia who developed the idea of tree models: Georg Stiernhielm was the first who pictured a language tree already in 1671; Karl Eduard Eichwald published an early tree of animal life in 1829; and Karl Ernst von Baer influenced the tree of life models and diagrams of Charles Darwin.

  5. Automated Generation of Attack Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigo, Roberto; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2014-01-01

    Attack trees are widely used to represent threat scenarios in a succinct and intuitive manner, suitable for conveying security information to non-experts. The manual construction of such objects relies on the creativity and experience of specialists, and therefore it is error-prone and impractica...

  6. A distributed spanning tree algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Karl Erik; Jørgensen, Ulla Lundin; Nielsen, Svend Hauge;

    1988-01-01

    We present a distributed algorithm for constructing a spanning tree for connected undirected graphs. Nodes correspond to processors and edges correspond to two way channels. Each processor has initially a distinct identity and all processors perform the same algorithm. Computation as well as...

  7. The Tree of Life Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbrath, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Middle-school students are just beginning to recognize their place in the world. That is why this author believes it is important to incorporate their world into their art. In this article, the author discusses the "Tree of Life" project, which she developed for her students in order to make them aware of various environmental issues, and how to…

  8. The Tree of Animal Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braude, Stan

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a short activity which introduces third- to fifth-grade students to animal classification. The Tree of Animal Life activity is a simple, sorting exercise that can help them see a bigger picture. The activity sets the stage for learning about animal taxonomy and introduces the characteristics of various animal…

  9. MYCOTOXINS IN EDIBLE TREE NUTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tree nuts (almonds, pistachios, and walnuts) are an exceptionally valuable crop, especially in California, with an aggregate value approaching $3.5 billion. Much of this economic value comes from overseas markets, with up to 60% of the crop being exported. The product can be contaminated with aflat...

  10. Trees of Our National Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Presented is a description of the creation of the National Forests system, how trees grow, managing the National Forests, types of management systems, and managing for multiple use, including wildlife, water, recreation and other uses. Included are: (1) photographs; (2) line drawings of typical leaves, cones, flowers, and seeds; and (3)…

  11. The Trees that surround us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M. E. G.; Rodrigues, M. A. S.

    2012-04-01

    In our school the activities linked with sciences are developed in a partnership with other school subjects. Interdisciplinary projects are always valued from beginning to end of a project. It is common for teachers of different areas to work together in a Science project. Research of English written articles is very important not only for the development of our students' scientific literacy but also as a way of widening knowledge and a view on different perspectives of life instead of being limited to research of any articles in Portuguese language. In this study we are going to collect data about the predominant tree species in the region, especially the invasive trees from the acacia species, the native tree species and the commercial species. We are going to study the reasons for the appearance of each species and draw a chart of soil occupation in the council. This chart will also allow the study of the distribution and use of land for each tree species. This research work is the first stage for a contribution to warn the town council of the dangers of the invasive species to the future economy of the council.

  12. A Distributed Spanning Tree Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Karl Erik; Jørgensen, Ulla Lundin; Nielsen, Sven Hauge; Nielsen, Søren Erik; Skyum, Sven

    We present a distributed algorithm for constructing a spanning tree for connected undirected graphs. Nodes correspond to processors and edges correspond to two-way channels. Each processor has initially a distinct identity and all processors perform the same algorithm. Computation as well as...

  13. Ecophysiology of the internal cycling of nitrogen in deciduous fruit trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    physiology has led to significant improvements in our understanding of cycling of N in trees. It is clear that nitrogen has a very high mobility in the tree and that its initial partitioning to a target organ does not necessarily represent its final destination. Increasing the effectiveness of the recycling of the N already present in the orchard is a basic step to reduce external N inputs. The better understanding of the role of internal tree cycling of N allows a fine tuning of N supply to improve its uptake efficiency and reduce potential losses

  14. Creating ensembles of oblique decision trees with evolutionary algorithms and sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu-Paz, Erick; Kamath, Chandrika

    2006-06-13

    A decision tree system that is part of a parallel object-oriented pattern recognition system, which in turn is part of an object oriented data mining system. A decision tree process includes the step of reading the data. If necessary, the data is sorted. A potential split of the data is evaluated according to some criterion. An initial split of the data is determined. The final split of the data is determined using evolutionary algorithms and statistical sampling techniques. The data is split. Multiple decision trees are combined in ensembles.

  15. Tree rings and radiocarbon calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only a few kinds of trees in Australia and Southeast Asia are known to have growth rings that are both distinct and annual. Those that do are therefore extremely important to climatic and isotope studies. In western Tasmania, extensive work with Huon pine (Lagarostrobos franklinii) has shown that many living trees are more than 1,000 years old, and that their ring widths are sensitive to temperature, rainfall and cloud cover (Buckley et al. 1997). At the Stanley River there is a forest of living (and recently felled) trees which we have sampled and measured. There are also thousands of subfossil Huon pine logs, buried at depths less than 5 metres in an area of floodplain extending over a distance of more than a kilometre with a width of tens of metres. Some of these logs have been buried for 50,000 years or more, but most of them belong to the period between 15,000 years and the present. In previous expeditions in the 1980s and 1990s, we excavated and sampled about 350 logs (Barbetti et al. 1995; Nanson et al. 1995). By measuring the ring-width patterns, and matching them between logs and living trees, we have constructed a tree-ring dated chronology from 571 BC to AD 1992. We have also built a 4254-ring floating chronology (placed by radiocarbon at ca. 3580 to 7830 years ago), and an earlier 1268-ring chronology (ca. 7,580 to 8,850 years ago). There are many individuals, or pairs of logs which match and together span several centuries, at 9,000 years ago and beyond

  16. International Tree Ring Data Bank (ITRDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tree ring data from the International Tree Ring Data Bank and World Data Center for Paleoclimatology archives. Data include raw treering measurements (most are...

  17. Leader growth in Nordman fir christmas trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Jerram; Pedersen, Lars Bo

    Leader Griowth in Nordman fir Christmas trees: Growth visualization and effects of fertilization, irrigation and drought......Leader Griowth in Nordman fir Christmas trees: Growth visualization and effects of fertilization, irrigation and drought...

  18. The effects of subsampling gene trees on coalescent methods applied to ancient divergences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Mark P; Sloan, Daniel B; Gatesy, John

    2016-04-01

    Gene-tree-estimation error is a major concern for coalescent methods of phylogenetic inference. We sampled eight empirical studies of ancient lineages with diverse numbers of taxa and genes for which the original authors applied one or more coalescent methods. We found that the average pairwise congruence among gene trees varied greatly both between studies and also often within a study. We recommend that presenting plots of pairwise congruence among gene trees in a dataset be treated as a standard practice for empirical coalescent studies so that readers can readily assess the extent and distribution of incongruence among gene trees. ASTRAL-based coalescent analyses generally outperformed MP-EST and STAR with respect to both internal consistency (congruence between analyses of subsamples of genes with the complete dataset of all genes) and congruence with the concatenation-based topology. We evaluated the approach of subsampling gene trees that are, on average, more congruent with other gene trees as a method to reduce artifacts caused by gene-tree-estimation errors on coalescent analyses. We suggest that this method is well suited to testing whether gene-tree-estimation error is a primary cause of incongruence between concatenation- and coalescent-based results, to reconciling conflicting phylogenetic results based on different coalescent methods, and to identifying genes affected by artifacts that may then be targeted for reciprocal illumination. We provide scripts that automate the process of calculating pairwise gene-tree incongruence and subsampling trees while accounting for differential taxon sampling among genes. Finally, we assert that multiple tree-search replicates should be implemented as a standard practice for empirical coalescent studies that apply MP-EST. PMID:26768112

  19. Drought stress, growth, and nonstructural carbohydrate dynamics of pine trees in a semi-arid forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tamir; Yakir, Dan; Hoch, Günter

    2014-05-01

    • In trees under prolonged drought, both carbon uptake (C source) and growth (C sink) typically decrease. This correlation raises two important questions: (1) to what degree is tree growth limited by C availability; and (2) Is growth limited by concurrent C storage (e.g. as nonstructural carbohydrates, NSC). • To test the relationships between drought, growth, and C reserves, we monitored the changes in NSC levels and constructed stem growth chronologies of Pinus halepensis trees of three drought stress levels growing in Yatir forest, Israel, at the dry limit of forest existence. • Moderately stressed and stressed trees showed 37% and 21% of the stem growth of healthy trees in 2012; 71% and 31% of the sap flux density; and 79% and 66% of the final needle length. In spite of these large reductions, both starch and soluble sugars concentrations in branches of these trees were similar in all trees throughout the dry season (2-4% dry mass). At the same time the root starch concentrations of moderately stressed and stressed trees were 47% and 58% of that of healthy trees, but never below 2% d.m. • Our results suggest that the drought-induced growth reduction is associated with a general C shortage, rather than competition with concurrent C storage. The relatively small effect of drought stress level on NSC dynamics, the maintenance of a 2% d.m. starch, and the continued sap flow indicate that a whole-tree C starvation is not likely to occur in these trees growing at the edge of the desert. Special request: If the abstract is not accepted for presentation in this session, please consider for presentation in session BG2.11 Plant traits and biogeochemical cycles. Thank you.

  20. 工业级催化重整装置的全流程模拟与优化%Modeling, Simulation and Optimization of a Whole Industrial Catalytic Naphtha Reforming Process on Aspen Plus Platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯卫锋; 苏宏业; 胡永有; 褚健

    2006-01-01

    A new 18-lump kinetic model for naphtha catalytic reforming reactions is discussed. By developing this model as a user module, a whole industrial continuous catalytic reforming process is simulated on Aspen plus plat form. The technique utilizes the strong databases, complete sets of modules, and flexible simulation tools of the Aspen plus system and retains the characteristics of the proposed kinetic model. The calculated results are in fair agreement with the actual operating data. Based on the model of the whole reforming process, the process is optimized and the optimization results are tested in the actual industrial unit for about two months. The test shows that the process profit increases about 1000yuan·h-1 averagely, which is close to the calculated result.

  1. Size-mediated tree transpiration along soil drainage gradients in a boreal black spruce forest wildfire chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstmann, J L; Ewers, B E; Kwon, H

    2012-05-01

    Boreal forests are crucial to climate change predictions because of their large land area and ability to sequester and store carbon, which is controlled by water availability. Heterogeneity of these forests is predicted to increase with climate change through more frequent wildfires, warmer, longer growing seasons and potential drainage of forested wetlands. This study aims at quantifying controls over tree transpiration with drainage condition, stand age and species in a central Canadian black spruce boreal forest. Heat dissipation sensors were installed in 2007 and data were collected through 2008 on 118 trees (69 Picea mariana (Mill.) Britton, Sterns & Poggenb. (black spruce), 25 Populus tremuloides Michx. (trembling aspen), 19 Pinus banksiana Lamb. (jack pine), 3 Larix laricina (Du Roi) K. Koch (tamarack) and 2 Salix spp. (willow)) at four stand ages (18, 43, 77 and 157 years old) each containing a well- and poorly-drained stand. Transpiration estimates from sap flux were expressed per unit xylem area, J(S), per unit ground area, E(C) and per unit leaf area, E(L), using sapwood (A(S)) and leaf (A(L)) area calculated from stand- and species-specific allometry. Soil drainage differences in transpiration were variable; only the 43- and 157-year-old poorly-drained stands had ∼ 50% higher total stand E(C) than well-drained locations. Total stand E(C) tended to decrease with stand age after an initial increase between the 18- and 43-year-old stands. Soil drainage differences in transpiration were controlled primarily by short-term physiological drivers such as vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture whereas stand age differences were controlled by successional species shifts and changes in tree size (i.e., A(S)). Future predictions of boreal climate change must include stand age, species and soil drainage heterogeneity to avoid biased estimates of forest water loss and latent energy exchanges. PMID:22539635

  2. A New R*Q-tree Spatial Index based on the Delaying Selection and Clustering Splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanyou Song

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The original R*Q-tree is an important class of query index in the spatial database, but when carry on frequent insertion and deletion, the efficiency is very low, because its construction cost is much more than that of the other query methods. So the new R*Q-tree using the delaying and Clustering splitting technology has been proposed for improving the shortcomings of the original R*Q-tree. When the data objects are inserted into the new R*Q-tree, the nodes may overflow. During the process of insertion, rather than split the node immediately, it attempts to insert the nodes into the adjacent neighboring nodes by using of the delaying selection splitting technology until they are full. If the adjacent neighboring nodes are full, it will use the clustering technology to split the nodes, data items will be reorganized between the neighboring nodes and the splitted nodes. The new R*Q-tree can ensure the premise of the query performance and the cost of structure greatly reduced, at the same time, significantly the space utilization of the index structure is improved. Finally, the experimental analysis and appraisals show that the operation efficiency of the new R*Q-tree is enhanced. And in the new R*Q-tree and the promoter region, there are no duplicated elements, so the structure of the new R*Q-tree can be simplified.

  3. Recovery of crown mass for energy with whole-tree skidding methods; Puupolttoaineen tuottaminen kokopuujuontomenetelmillae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nousiainen, I. [Finntech Ltd Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Vesisenaho, T. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The main aim of the project `Recovery of crown mass for energy with whole-tree skidding methods` was to develop the integrated harvesting method of wood raw material and wood fuel based on whole-tree skidding. The developed method gives also the possibility to deliver to sawmills raw material in the form of log section. In the harvesting chain under development whole-trees are felled and bunched with a normal one-grip harvester. The whole-trees are skidded to the roadside by a forwarder equipped with a clam bunk. At the roadside the trees are delimbed and cut with the one-grip harvester used for felling and bunching. According to the results of the field tests the harvesting costs of logging residues are in certain final cutting conditions even under 10 FIM/m{sup 3}, when the average stem size is over 0,500 m{sup 3}. In the developed method felling and bunching of whole trees with the one-grip harvester and skidding of whole-trees with the clam skidder succeeded well. The problems of the method concentrate on delimbing and bucking of whole-trees in landing site

  4. Soil to plant transfer of 134Cs for olive and orange trees after four years' experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfer parameters of 134Cs from soil to tree crops (olive and orange trees) were calculated within a long-term glass-house pot experiment which was started in 1994. The effect of the soil characteristics on 134Cs uptake was also studied using two soils with different physical and chemical properties. Both evergreen trees exhibited a similar behavior in the two soils, showing that a higher or lower uptake is not crop specific. The capacity of the trees for 134Cs absorption through the roots seems to be significantly influenced by the soil type. The transfer factors were very low in the calcareous heavy soil and much higher in the acid light soil (up to 10 times for olives and 40 for the edible part of oranges). The difference in the TFs is higher between the two soils than between the two tree species. 134Cs concentration kept increasing in the orange trees up to the 4th year of growth, while it seems to reach an equilibrium, with no further increase, in the olive trees. Although the behavior of the two tree species is similar, the difference in the final processed product is extreme. A significant amount of 134Cs was observed in olives grown in the light-acid soil whereas no transfer to the olive oil was detected. On the other hand, the edible part of the oranges showed the highest 134Cs of nearly all the plant parts

  5. Organic tree propagation under Welsh nursery conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, David; Clarke, Aldwyn

    2007-01-01

    The demand for organically raised tree and hedging plants had been reported from organic farmers in Tir Gofal, as well as within the landscaping industry. Although there are a number of plant raising nurseries producing organically raised plants for vegetable and fruit production, there are no tree nurseries producing to organic standards. Nursery tree growers were concerned that there was currently too little known about the performance of tree seedlings in organic substrates (e.g. in root-t...

  6. The LIGNUM functional-structural tree model

    OpenAIRE

    Perttunen, Jari

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to construct a single tree model that builds a bridge between traditional process based tree models and detailed, three-dimensional architectural tree models. The result of the thesis, the functional-structural tree model LIGNUM, integrates both the functional and the structural aspects of woody arborescent plants in a single generic modelling framework. The thesis consists of five articles and the summary part. The first article presents the model structure of...

  7. Urban Tree Effects on Soil Organic Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Edmondson, J. L.; O'Sullivan, O.S.; R Inger; Potter, J.; Mchugh, N; Gaston, K.J.; Leake, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Urban trees sequester carbon into biomass and provide many ecosystem service benefits aboveground leading to worldwide tree planting schemes. Since soils hold ~75% of ecosystem organic carbon, understanding the effect of urban trees on soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil properties that underpin belowground ecosystem services is vital. We use an observational study to investigate effects of three important tree genera and mixed-species woodlands on soil properties (to 1 m depth) compared to ad...

  8. A Durable Flash Memory Search Tree

    OpenAIRE

    Clay III, James; Wortman, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We consider the task of optimizing the B-tree data structure, used extensively in operating systems and databases, for sustainable usage on multi-level flash memory. Empirical evidence shows that this new flash memory tree, or FM Tree, extends the operational lifespan of each block of flash memory by a factor of roughly 27 to 70 times, while still supporting logarithmic-time search tree operations.

  9. Poplus Diversifolia:The Most Beautiful Tree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhanHua

    2004-01-01

    Populus diversifolia,an old and rare tree species,is an only tree variety that can naturally grow into forest in Xinjiang's deserts.It is called "Tokolako"in the Uigur language,meaning"the most beautiful tree".Its extraordinary resistance to drought,sand wind and sanitization enables it to thrive in deserts and gains it repute

  10. Simplifying gene trees for easier comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mundry Marvin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the genomic age, gene trees may contain large amounts of data making them hard to read and understand. Therefore, an automated simplification is important. Results We present a simplification tool for gene trees called TreeSimplifier. Based on species tree information and HUGO gene names, it summarizes "monophyla". These monophyla correspond to subtrees of the gene tree where the evolution of a gene follows species phylogeny, and they are simplified to single leaves in the gene tree. Such a simplification may fail, for example, due to genes in the gene tree that are misplaced. In this way, misplaced genes can be identified. Optionally, our tool glosses over a limited degree of "paraphyly" in a further simplification step. In both simplification steps, species can be summarized into groups and treated as equivalent. In the present study we used our tool to derive a simplified tree of 397 leaves from a tree of 1138 leaves. Comparing the simplified tree to a "cartoon tree" created manually, we note that both agree to a high degree. Conclusion Our automatic simplification tool for gene trees is fast, accurate, and effective. It yields results of similar quality as manual simplification. It should be valuable in phylogenetic studies of large protein families. The software is available at http://www.uni-muenster.de/Bioinformatics/services/treesim/.

  11. D2-tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Sioutas, Spyros; Tsichlas, Kostas; Zaroliagis, Christos

    2010-01-01

    We present a new overlay, called the Deterministic Decentralized tree (D 2-tree). The D 2-tree compares favourably to other overlays for the following reasons: (a) it provides matching and better complexities, which are deterministic for the supported operations; (b) the management of nodes (peer...

  12. Effective Tree Scattering at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurum, Mehmet; ONeill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Cosh, Michael H.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    these parameters. In a recent study [9], effective vegetation opacity of coniferous trees was compared with two independent estimates of the same parameter. First, a zero-order RT model was fitted to multiangular microwave emissivity data in a least-square sense to provide effective vegetation optical depth as done in spaceborne retrieval algorithms. Second, a ratio between radar backscatter measurements with a corner reflector under trees and in an open area was calculated to obtain measured tree propagation characteristics. Finally, the theoretical propagation constant was determined by forward scattering theorem using detailed measurements of size/angle distributions and dielectric constants of the tree constituents (trunk, branches, and needles). Results indicated that the effective attenuation values are smaller than but of similar magnitude to both the theoretical and measured values. This study will complement the previous work [9] and will focus on characterization of effective scattering albedo by assuming that effective vegetation opacity is same as theoretical opacity. The resultant effective albedo will not be the albedo of single forest canopy element anymore, but it becomes a global parameter, which depends on all the processes taking place within the canopy including multiple scattering as described.

  13. MARRT: Medial Axis biased rapidly-exploring random trees

    KAUST Repository

    Denny, Jory

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Motion planning is a difficult and widely studied problem in robotics. Current research aims not only to find feasible paths, but to ensure paths have certain properties, e.g., shortest or safest paths. This is difficult for current state-of-the-art sampling-based techniques as they typically focus on simply finding any path. Despite this difficulty, sampling-based techniques have shown great success in planning for a wide range of applications. Among such planners, Rapidly-Exploring Random Trees (RRTs) search the planning space by biasing exploration toward unexplored regions. This paper introduces a novel RRT variant, Medial Axis RRT (MARRT), which biases tree exploration to the medial axis of free space by pushing all configurations from expansion steps towards the medial axis. We prove that this biasing increases the tree\\'s clearance from obstacles. Improving obstacle clearance is useful where path safety is important, e.g., path planning for robots performing tasks in close proximity to the elderly. Finally, we experimentally analyze MARRT, emphasizing its ability to effectively map difficult passages while increasing obstacle clearance, and compare it to contemporary RRT techniques.

  14. Connected Filtering on Tree-Based Shape-Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongchao; Geraud, Thierry; Najman, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    Connected filters are well-known for their good contour preservation property. A popular implementation strategy relies on tree-based image representations: for example, one can compute an attribute characterizing the connected component represented by each node of the tree and keep only the nodes for which the attribute is sufficiently high. This operation can be seen as a thresholding of the tree, seen as a graph whose nodes are weighted by the attribute. Rather than being satisfied with a mere thresholding, we propose to expand on this idea, and to apply connected filters on this latest graph. Consequently, the filtering is performed not in the space of the image, but in the space of shapes built from the image. Such a processing of shape-space filtering is a generalization of the existing tree-based connected operators. Indeed, the framework includes the classical existing connected operators by attributes. It also allows us to propose a class of novel connected operators from the leveling family, based on non-increasing attributes. Finally, we also propose a new class of connected operators that we call morphological shapings. Some illustrations and quantitative evaluations demonstrate the usefulness and robustness of the proposed shape-space filters. PMID:26415150

  15. Decision Tree Classifiers for Star/Galaxy Separation

    CERN Document Server

    Vasconcellos, E C; Gal, R R; LaBarbera, F L; Capelato, H V; Velho, H F Campos; Trevisan, M; Ruiz, R S R

    2010-01-01

    We study the star/galaxy classification efficiency of 13 different decision tree algorithms applied to photometric objects in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven (SDSS DR7). Each algorithm is defined by a set of parameters which, when varied, produce different final classification trees. We extensively explore the parameter space of each algorithm, using the set of $884,126$ SDSS objects with spectroscopic data as the training set. The efficiency of star-galaxy separation is measured using the completeness function. We find that the Functional Tree algorithm (FT) yields the best results as measured by the mean completeness in two magnitude intervals: $14\\le r\\le21$ ($85.2%$) and $r\\ge19$ ($82.1%$). We compare the performance of the tree generated with the optimal FT configuration to the classifications provided by the SDSS parametric classifier, 2DPHOT and Ball et al. (2006). We find that our FT classifier is comparable or better in completeness over the full magnitude range $15\\le r\\le21$, with m...

  16. Palm Tree Detection Using Circular Autocorrelation of Polar Shape Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manandhar, A.; Hoegner, L.; Stilla, U.

    2016-06-01

    Palm trees play an important role as they are widely used in a variety of products including oil and bio-fuel. Increasing demand and growing cultivation have created a necessity in planned farming and the monitoring different aspects like inventory keeping, health, size etc. The large cultivation regions of palm trees motivate the use of remote sensing to produce such data. This study proposes an object detection methodology on the aerial images, using shape feature for detecting and counting palm trees, which can support an inventory. The study uses circular autocorrelation of the polar shape matrix representation of an image, as the shape feature, and the linear support vector machine to standardize and reduce dimensions of the feature. Finally, the study uses local maximum detection algorithm on the spatial distribution of standardized feature to detect palm trees. The method was applied to 8 images chosen from different tough scenarios and it performed on average with an accuracy of 84% and 76.1%, despite being subjected to different challenging conditions in the chosen test images.

  17. MeqTrees: Software package for implementing Measurement Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordam, Jan E.; Smirnov, Oleg M.

    2012-09-01

    MeqTrees is a software package for implementing Measurement Equations. This makes it uniquely suited for simulation and calibration of radioastronomical data, especially that involving new radiotelescopes and observational regimes. MeqTrees is implemented as a Python-based front-end called the meqbrowser, and an efficient (C++-based) computational back-end called the meqserver. Numerical models are defined on the front-end via a Python-based Tree Definition Language (TDL), then rapidly executed on the back-end. The use of TDL facilitates an extremely short turn-around time for experimentation with new ideas. This is also helped by unprecedented visualization capabilities for all final and intermediate results. A flexible data model and a number of important optimizations in the back-end ensures that the numerical performance is comparable to that of hand-written code. MeqTrees includes a highly capable FITS viewer and sky model manager called Tigger, which can also work as a standalone tool.

  18. Contrasting Effects of Cattle Grazing Intensity on Upland-Nesting Duck Production at Nest and Field Scales in the Aspen Parkland, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Warren

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Aspen Parkland of Canada is one of the most important breeding areas for temperate nesting ducks in North America. The region is dominated by agricultural land use, with approximately 9.3 million ha in pasture land for cattle grazing. However, the effects of using land for cattle grazing on upland-nesting duck production are poorly understood. The current study was undertaken during 2001 and 2002 to investigate how nest density and nesting success of upland-nesting ducks varied with respect to the intensity of cattle grazing in the Aspen Parkland. We predicted that the removal and trampling of vegetation through cattle grazing would reduce duck nest density. Both positive and negative responses of duck nesting success to grazing have been reported in previous studies, leading us to test competing hypotheses that nesting success would (1 decline linearly with grazing intensity or (2 peak at moderate levels of grazing. Nearly 3300 ha of upland cover were searched during the study. Despite extensive and severe drought, nest searches located 302 duck nests. As predicted, nest density was higher in fields with lower grazing intensity and higher pasture health scores. A lightly grazed field with a pasture score of 85 out of a possible 100 was predicted to have 16.1 nests/100 ha (95% CI = 11.7–22.1, more than five times the predicted nest density of a heavily grazed field with a pasture score of 58 (3.3 nests/100 ha, 95% CI = 2.2–4.5. Nesting success was positively related to nest-site vegetation density across most levels of grazing intensity studied, supporting our hypothesis that reductions in vegetation caused by grazing would negatively affect nesting success. However, nesting success increased with grazing intensity at the field scale. For example, nesting success for a well-concealed nest in a lightly grazed field was 11.6% (95% CI = 3.6–25.0%, whereas nesting success for a nest with the same level of nest-site vegetation in a heavily

  19. ESTONIAN TRACES IN THE TREE OF LIFE CONCEPT AND IN THE LANGUAGE FAMILY TREE THEORY

    OpenAIRE

    Urmas Sutrop

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the tree model – a well-formed tree is shortly described. After that the language family tree model by August Schleicher is treated and compared with the Charles Darwin’s tree of life diagram and metaphor. The development of the idea of the linguistic trees and the tree of life is considered historically. Earlier models – scala naturae – and tree models, both well-formed and not-well-formed are introduced. Special attention is paid to the scholars connected to Estonia who develo...

  20. Detection and Segmentation of Small Trees in the Forest-Tundra Ecotone Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Hauglin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to expected climate change and increased focus on forests as a potential carbon sink, it is of interest to map and monitor even marginal forests where trees exist close to their tolerance limits, such as small pioneer trees in the forest-tundra ecotone. Such small trees might indicate tree line migrations and expansion of the forests into treeless areas. Airborne laser scanning (ALS has been suggested and tested as a tool for this purpose and in the present study a novel procedure for identification and segmentation of small trees is proposed. The study was carried out in the Rollag municipality in southeastern Norway, where ALS data and field measurements of individual trees were acquired. The point density of the ALS data was eight points per m2, and the field tree heights ranged from 0.04 to 6.3 m, with a mean of 1.4 m. The proposed method is based on an allometric model relating field-measured tree height to crown diameter, and another model relating field-measured tree height to ALS-derived height. These models are calibrated with local field data. Using these simple models, every positive above-ground height derived from the ALS data can be related to a crown diameter, and by assuming a circular crown shape, this crown diameter can be extended to a crown segment. Applying this model to all ALS echoes with a positive above-ground height value yields an initial map of possible circular crown segments. The final crown segments were then derived by applying a set of simple rules to this initial “map” of segments. The resulting segments were validated by comparison with field-measured crown segments. Overall, 46% of the field-measured trees were successfully detected. The detection rate increased with tree size. For trees with height >3 m the detection rate was 80%. The relatively large detection errors were partly due to the inherent limitations in the ALS data; a substantial fraction of the smaller trees was hit by no or just a few