WorldWideScience

Sample records for aspen cancer conference

  1. 2012 Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy and Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John; Olivier, Dore; Fox, Patrick; Furic, Ivan; Halkiadakis, Eva; Schmidt, Fabian; Senatore, Leonardo; Smith, Kendrick M; Whiteson, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Aspen Center for Physics Project Summary DE-SC0007313 Budget Period: 1/1/2012 to 12/31/2012 The Hunt for New Particles, from the Alps to the Plains to the Rockies The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Particle Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 11 to February 17, 2012. Sixty-seven participants from nine countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, The Hunt for New Particles, from the Alps to the Plains to the Rockies. There were 53 formal talks, and a considerable number of informal discussions held during the week. The weeks events included a public lecture-Hunting the Dark Universe given by Neal Weiner from New York University) and attended by 237 members of the public, and a physics cafe geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists conducted by Spencer Chang (University of Oregon), Matthew Reece (Harvard University) and Julia Shelton (Yale University) and attended by 67 locals and visitors. While there were no published proceedings, some of the talks are posted online and can be Googled. The workshop was organized by John Campbell (Fermilab), Patrick Fox (Fermilab), Ivan Furic (University of Florida), Eva Halkiadakis (Rutgers University) and Daniel Whiteson (University of California Irvine). Additional information is available at http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=143360. Inflationary Theory and its Confrontation with Data in the Planck Era The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Astroparticle physics held at the Aspen Center for Physics was Inflationary Theory and its Confrontation with Data in the Planck Era. It was held from January 30 to February 4, 2012. The 62 participants came from 7 countries and attended 43 talks over five days. Late mornings through the afternoon are reserved for informal discussions. In feedback received from participants, it is often these unplanned chats that produce the most excitement due to working through problems with fellow physicists

  2. 2012 Aspen Winter Conference New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials, February 5-10, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Joel; Rabe, Karin; Nayak, Chetan; Troyer, Matthias

    2012-05-01

    Aspen Center for Physics Project Summary DOE Budget Period: 10/1/2011 to 9/30/2012 Contract # DE-SC0007479 New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Condensed Matter Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 5 to 10, 2012. Seventy-four participants from seven countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials. There were 34 formal talks, and a number of informal discussions held during the week. Talks covered a variety of topics related to DOE BES priorities, including, for example, advanced photon techniques (Hasan, Abbamonte, Orenstein, Shen, Ghosh) and predictive theoretical modeling of materials properties (Rappe, Pickett, Balents, Zhang, Vanderbilt); the full conference schedule is provided with this report. The week's events included a public lecture (Quantum Matters given by Chetan Nayak from Microsoft Research) and attended by 234 members of the public, and a physics caf© geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists conducted by Kathryn Moler (Stanford University) and Andrew M. Rappe (University of Pennsylvania) and attended by 67 locals and visitors. While there were no published proceedings, some of the talks are posted online and can be Googled. The workshop was organized by Joel Moore (University of California Berkeley), Chetan Nayak (Microsoft Research), Karin Rabe (Rutgers University), and Matthias Troyer (ETH Zurich). Two organizers who did not attend the conference were Gabriel Aeppli (University College London & London Centre for Nanotechnology) and Andrea Cavalleri (Oxford University & Max Planck Hamburg).

  3. Aspen Delineation - Aspen Delineation Project [ds362

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of aspen stands, where aspen assessment data was gathered. Aspen assessment information corresponding to this polygon layer can...

  4. The Third International Inflammatory Breast Cancer Conference

    OpenAIRE

    van Golen, Kenneth L; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive and deadly form of breast cancer. Disease-specific research and conferences have been organized since 2008 with the intent to bring together experts in various disciplines. This report focus on the Third International IBC Conference held in Philadelphia on December 2012.

  5. Aspen Characteristics - Aspen Delineation Project [ds361

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected within aspen stands in the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit (Placer and...

  6. The Canadian Lung Cancer Conference 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Melosky, B.; Ho, C

    2016-01-01

    Each February, the Canadian Lung Cancer Conference brings together lung cancer researchers, clinicians, and care professionals who are united in their commitment to improve the care of patients with lung cancer. This year’s meeting, held 11–12 February, featured a resident education session, a welcome dinner, networking sessions, lectures, breakout sessions, debates, and a satellite symposium. Key themes from this year’s meeting included innovations across the care spectrum and results of rec...

  7. Attitudes and Technologies--Striving To Match New Electronic Information Products and Services to the Needs and Interests of Elderly People. Report of an Aspen Institute Conference: New Electronic Technologies To Meet the Needs of Elderly People: More Issues and Cases (Queenstown, Maryland, March 23-25, 1988). Communications and Society Forum Report #7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingay, Michael

    Participants in the Aspen Institute Conference considered how communications technologies may be applied to serve the needs and interests of this country's expanding community of retired and older citizens. Conference findings fell into two categories, reflecting questions originating in the human aspirations found in a public opinion survey…

  8. The 2014 Beatson International Cancer Conference: Powering the Cancer Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Kamphorst, Jurre J; Daniel J. Murphy

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present a report of the 2014 annual Beatson International Cancer Conference, Glasgow, July 6–9, 2014. The theme was “Powering the Cancer Machine”, focusing on oncogenic signals that regulate metabolic rewiring and the adaptability of the metabolic network in response to stress.

  9. The Canadian Lung Cancer Conference 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosky, B.; Ho, C.

    2016-01-01

    Each February, the Canadian Lung Cancer Conference brings together lung cancer researchers, clinicians, and care professionals who are united in their commitment to improve the care of patients with lung cancer. This year’s meeting, held 11–12 February, featured a resident education session, a welcome dinner, networking sessions, lectures, breakout sessions, debates, and a satellite symposium. Key themes from this year’s meeting included innovations across the care spectrum and results of recent clinical trials with targeted agents, immuno-oncology agents, and novel drug combinations.

  10. Aspen management for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, S.; Chapman, P.B. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    A symposium was held to discuss the management of the aspen resource for fiber and other uses, along with public concerns regarding the aspen resource. Papers were presented on aspen regeneration, the role of balsam poplar, aspen inventory, modelling aspen growth and yield, aspen harvesting, aspen management and the environment, integrated resource management, wildlife and aspen management, genetic improvement of poplars, aspen stand thinning, sustainable development of the aspen resource, private land forestry, and the effect of climate change on aspen in Canada. A separate abstract has been prepared for one paper from this symposium.

  11. Feedback - Colon Cancer Conference and Workshop 2010 —

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document contains feedback given by the participants of the Colon Cancer Conference and the Histopathology workshop. The meetings took place in October 2010 at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine.

  12. Aspen Delineation - Inyo National Forest [ds366

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of known aspen stands where aspen assessments were collected in the Inyo National Forest, Inyo County, California. The Inyo...

  13. Aspen Delineation - Klamath National Forest [ds370

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents polygons of aspen stands in the Klamath National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. The Klamath National Forest Region 5 Vegetation aspen...

  14. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO consensus conference on endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic;

    2015-01-01

    panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: Prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent......The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary...... disease. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question and a consensus was reached. Results of this consensus conference, together with a summary of evidence...

  15. Abstracts Book of 2. Research Conference 'Thyroid cancer 2000'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sessions in the 2. Research Conference 'Thyroid cancer 2000' concerned molecular biology, epidemiology, pathology, advances in diagnosis and therapy of thyroid cancer. Some communications discussed molecular, biological and environmental risk factors (ionizing radiation, iodine deficiency). Radiobiological, dosimetric and radiological protection problems connected with iodine-131 therapy have been presented and discussed

  16. Differential response of aspen and birch trees to heat stress under elevated carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of high temperature on photosynthesis of isoprene-emitting (aspen) and non-isoprene-emitting (birch) trees were measured under elevated CO2 and ambient conditions. Aspen trees tolerated heat better than birch trees and elevated CO2 protected photosynthesis of both species against moderate heat stress. Elevated CO2 increased carboxylation capacity, photosynthetic electron transport capacity, and triose phosphate use in both birch and aspen trees. High temperature (36-39 deg. C) decreased all of these parameters in birch regardless of CO2 treatment, but only photosynthetic electron transport and triose phosphate use at ambient CO2 were reduced in aspen. Among the two aspen clones tested, 271 showed higher thermotolerance than 42E possibly because of the higher isoprene-emission, especially under elevated CO2. Our results indicate that isoprene-emitting trees may have a competitive advantage over non-isoprene emitting ones as temperatures rise, indicating that biological diversity may be affected in some ecosystems because of heat tolerance mechanisms. - We report that elevated CO2 confers increased thermotolerance on both aspen and birch trees while isoprene production in aspen confers further thermotolerance in aspen.

  17. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Surgery Guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázár, György; Bursics, Attila; Farsang, Zoltán; Harsányi, László; Kósa, Csaba; Maráz, Róbert; Mátrai, Zoltán; Paszt, Attila; Pavlovics, Gábor; Tamás, Róbert

    2016-09-01

    Therapy for breast cancer today is characterised by ever more precise diagnostic methods and ever more effective oncological treatments, a trend which will certainly continue in the future. Breast preservation and the application of oncoplastic principles are increasingly popular. A sentinel lymph node biopsy in the surgical treatment of the axilla is primary, with the indication for axillary block dissection (ABD) narrowing and radiation therapy becoming an alternative to ABD in certain cases. This publication summarises our recommendations on the surgical treatment of breast cancer based on the content of the 2nd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference and considering the latest international studies and professional recommendations. PMID:27579720

  18. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the...

  19. Aspen Delineation - Lassen National Forest [ds372

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of aspen stands associated with stand assessment data (LASSEN_NF_EAGLELAKE_PTS) collected in aspen stands in the in the Eagle...

  20. Aspen Delineation - Sierra State Parks [ds380

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of aspen stands associated with stand assessment data (SIERRA_SP_PTS) collected in aspen stands on lands administered by the...

  1. Aspen Delineation - Plumas National Forest [ds374

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of aspen stands associated with stand assessment data (PLUMAS_NF_PTS) collected in aspen stands in the Plumas National Forest,...

  2. Aspen Delineation - Sequoia National Forest [ds378

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of aspen stands associated with stand assessment data (SEQUOIA_NF_PTS) collected in aspen stands in the Cannell Meadows Ranger...

  3. Polypropylene /Aspen/ liquid polybutadienes composites: maximization of impact strength, tensile and modulus by statistical experimental design

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kokta, B. V.; Fortelný, Ivan; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Horák, Zdeněk; Michálková, Danuše

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 99, - (2005), s. 10-11. ISSN 0009-2770. [International Conference on Polymeric Materials in Automotive , Slovak Rubber Conference /17./. 10.5.2005-12.5.2005, Bratislava] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polypropylene * Aspen-PP composite Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  4. Aspen Fire, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    On June 26, NASA's Terra satellite acquired this image of the Aspen fire burning out of control north of Tucson, AZ. As of that date, the fire had consumed more than 27,000 acres and destroyed more than 300 homes, mostly in the resort community of Summerhaven, according to news reports. These data are being used by NASA's Wildfire Response Team and the US Forest Service to assess the intensity of the burn for future remediation efforts.This image was acquired on June 26, 2003 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on Terra. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA, is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide

  5. Stem cells and cancer immunotherapy: Arrowhead’s 2nd annual cancer immunotherapy conference

    OpenAIRE

    Bot, Adrian; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Cornforth, Andrew; Brian J Czerniecki; Ferrone, Soldano; Geles, Kenneth; Greenberg, Philip D.; Hurt, Elaine; Koya, Richard C.; Masoud H Manjili; Matsui, William; Morgan, Richard A.; Palena, Claudia M; Powell Jr, Daniel J; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2014-01-01

    Investigators from academia and industry gathered on April 4 and 5, 2013, in Washington DC at the Arrowhead’s 2nd Annual Cancer Immunotherapy Conference. Two complementary concepts were discussed: cancer “stem cells” as targets and therapeutic platforms based on stem cells.

  6. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the...... expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through...

  7. (Reprint of) National Cancer Act Amendments of 1974. Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-07-10

    This is a conference committee report of the House and Senate to amend the Public Health Service Act to improve the national cancer program and to authorize appropriations for such programs. Title 1, Extension of Cancer Program, deals with administrative, budgetary, and personnel matters; programs of routine exfoliative cytology tests; and requirements of peer review of grant applications and contract projects. Title 2, Biomedical Research, establishes a President's Biomedical Research Panel to study and make recommendations concerning the subject, content, organization, and operation of biomedical and behavioral reserach conducted and supported under programs of the National Institutes of Health and the National Institutes of Mental Health. After 15 months, the panel will submit to the President and Congress a comprehensive report of its findings and recomendations. The 7-member panel shall expire after 18 months. PMID:12229414

  8. Study of Regenerated Plants Aspen from Callus

    OpenAIRE

    G. A. PETROVA; Kalashnikova, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of an experiment for obtaining healthy seed aspen by micropropagation. The studies we have obtained from callus tissue regenerated plants aspen, various different growth rate. Were obtained two types of plants: plants, characterized by rapid growth and plants, which are characterized by slow growth. The data of biochemical studies on the content of soluble phenolic compounds in plants regenerated aspen. So plants with rapid growth during the five passages, th...

  9. Aspen Characteristics - Sierra State Parks [ds379

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected within aspen stands on lands administrated by the Sierra District, California...

  10. Aspen Characteristics - Plumas National Forest [ds373

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected within aspen stands in the Plumas National Forest, Beckwourth Ranger District...

  11. Aspen Characteristics - Sequoia National Forest [ds377

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected within aspen stands in the Cannell Meadows Ranger District, Sequoia National...

  12. Aspen Characteristics - Klamath National Forest [ds369

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected with known aspen stands in the Klamath National Forest, Siskiyou County,...

  13. Aspen Delineation - El Dorado National Forest [ds364

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of known aspen stands, where aspen assessments were gathered in the Eldorado National Forest, Eldorado and Amador Counties,...

  14. Aspen Delineation - Klamath National Forest, EUI [ds368

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of known aspen stands where aspen assessments were collected in the Klamath National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. The...

  15. Aspen Characteristics - Lassen National Forest [ds371

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected in aspen stands in the in the Eagle Lake Ranger District, Lassen National...

  16. Advances in Treating Metastatic Bone Cancer: Summary Statement for the First Cambridge Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Lipton, Allan; Berenson, James R; Body, Jean-Jacques; Boyce, Brendan F.; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Carducci, Michael A; Cleeland, Charles S.; Clohisy, Denis R.; Coleman, Robert E.; Cook, Richard J.; Guise, Theresa A.; Pearse, Roger N.; Powles, Trevor J; Rogers, Michael J; Roodman, G. David

    2006-01-01

    The First Cambridge Conference on Advances in Treating Metastatic Bone Cancer, a symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 28 to 29, 2005, was convened to discuss recent advances and research related to the natural history of bone metastases and skeletal complications, bone cancer biology, treatment of myeloma and other solid tumors, and treatment-induced bone loss. The conference format combined brief presentations with extended periods of discussion. The conclusions reached during...

  17. Multidisciplinary team conferences promote treatment according to guidelines in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännström, Fredrik; Kroll Bjerregaard, Jon; Winbladh, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary team (MDT) conferences have been introduced into standard cancer care, though evidence that it benefits the patient is weak. We used the national Swedish Rectal Cancer Register to evaluate predictors for case discussion at a MDT conference and its impact on treatment...... radiotherapy. These results indirectly support the introduction into clinical practice of discussing all rectal cancer patients at MDT conferences, not least those being treated at low-volume hospitals.......BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary team (MDT) conferences have been introduced into standard cancer care, though evidence that it benefits the patient is weak. We used the national Swedish Rectal Cancer Register to evaluate predictors for case discussion at a MDT conference and its impact on treatment....... MATERIAL AND METHODS: Of the 6760 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer in Sweden between 2007 and 2010, 78% were evaluated at a MDT. Factors that influenced whether a patient was discussed at a preoperative MDT conference were evaluated in 4883 patients, and the impact of MDT evaluation on the...

  18. MTAP deletion confers enhanced dependency on the PRMT5 arginine methyltransferase in cancer cells | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The discovery of cancer dependencies has the potential to inform therapeutic strategies and to identify putative drug targets. Integrating data from comprehensive genomic profiling of cancer cell lines and from functional characterization of cancer cell dependencies, we discovered that loss of the enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) confers a selective dependence on protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) and its binding partner WDR77. MTAP is frequently lost due to its proximity to the commonly deleted tumor suppressor gene, CDKN2A.

  19. Aspen Delineation - Plumas National Forest, FRRD [ds376

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents delineations of aspen stands associated with stand assessment data (PLUMAS_NF_FEATHERRIVER_PTS) collected in aspen stands in the Plumas...

  20. Aspen biology, community classification, and management in the Blue Mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, David K; Schmitt, Craig L; Shirley, Diane M; Erickson, Vicky; Schuetz, Kenneth J; Tatum, Michael L; Powell, David C

    2010-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is a valuable species that is declining in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon. This publication is a compilation of over 20 years of aspen management experience by USDA Forest Service workers in the Blue Mountains. It includes a summary of aspen biology and occurrence in the Blue Mountains, and a discussion of aspen conservation and management techniques such as fencing, conifer removal, and artificial propagation. Local data on bird use of as...

  1. Experiential Education at Aspen High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burson, George

    1981-01-01

    Aspen High School's (Colorado) Experiential Education Week, developed to provide a "real-world" experience for students from a small, mountain, tourist-oriented community, is planned by both student and faculty; the whole process encourages both self-reliant and responsible students and develops positive student-teacher and peer relationships.…

  2. OECI-EACR precision medicine for cancer: Conference report 1–4 March 2015, Luxembourg

    OpenAIRE

    Golebiewska, Anna; Fritah, Sabrina; Girotti, Maria Romina

    2015-01-01

    The ‘Precision Medicine for Cancer’ was the first meeting of a new series of conferences organised biannually by the European Association for Cancer Research (EACR) and the Organisation for European Cancer Institutes (OECI). The main objective of the meeting was to focus on novel topics in precision medicine by allowing strong interactions between participants and to access the speakers easily. As the first implementations of personalised medicine are appreciated in the clinic, the aim of the...

  3. On the path to translation: Highlights from the 2010 Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thériault Brigitte L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ovarian cancer continues to be the most lethal of the gynaecologic malignancies due to the lack of early detection, screening strategies and ineffective therapeutics for late-stage metastatic disease, particularly in the recurrent setting. The gathering of researchers investigating fundamental pathobiology of ovarian cancer and the clinicians who treat patients with this insidious disease is paramount to meeting the challenges we face. Since 2002, the Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research, held every two years, has served this essential purpose. The objectives of this conference have been to disseminate new information arising from the most recent ovarian cancer research and identify the most pressing challenges we still face as scientists and clinicians. This is best accomplished through direct encounters and exchanges of innovative ideas among colleagues and trainees from the realms of basic science and clinical disciplines. This meeting has and continues to successfully facilitate rapid networking and establish new collaborations from across Canada. This year, more guest speakers and participants from other countries have extended the breadth of the research on ovarian cancer that was discussed at the meeting. This report summarizes the key findings presented at the fifth biennial Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research held in Toronto, Ontario, and includes the important issues and challenges we still face in the years ahead to make a significant impact on this devastating disease.

  4. Automated Design Space Exploration with Aspen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle L. Spafford

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Architects and applications scientists often use performance models to explore a multidimensional design space of architectural characteristics, algorithm designs, and application parameters. With traditional performance modeling tools, these explorations forced users to first develop a performance model and then repeatedly evaluate and analyze the model manually. These manual investigations proved laborious and error prone. More importantly, the complexity of this traditional process often forced users to simplify their investigations. To address this challenge of design space exploration, we extend our Aspen (Abstract Scalable Performance Engineering Notation language with three new language constructs: user-defined resources, parameter ranges, and a collection of costs in the abstract machine model. Then, we use these constructs to enable automated design space exploration via a nonlinear optimization solver. We show how four interesting classes of design space exploration scenarios can be derived from Aspen models and formulated as pure nonlinear programs. The analysis tools are demonstrated using examples based on Aspen models for a three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform, the CoMD molecular dynamics proxy application, and the DARPA Streaming Sensor Challenge Problem. Our results show that this approach can compose and solve arbitrary performance modeling questions quickly and rigorously when compared to the traditional manual approach.

  5. Something going on in Milan: a review of the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference

    OpenAIRE

    C. SEGRÉ

    2010-01-01

    The 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference was held at the IFOM-IEO-Campus in Milan from 19–21 May 2010 http://www.semm.it/events_researchPast.php The Conference covered many topics related to cancer, from basic biology to clinical aspects of the disease. All attendees presented their research, by either giving a talk or presenting a poster. This conference is an opportunity to introduce PhD students to top cancer research institutes across Europe. The core participanting institutes ...

  6. A report from the World Conference on Lung Cancer (September 6-9, 2015 - Denver, Colorado, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasseda, X

    2015-09-01

    The mile-high city of Denver was the site of this year's World Conference on Lung Cancer, which reached its 16th event. The conference scheduled 3 days of intensive scientific research presentations and discussions arranged in oral, mini-oral and poster sessions, plus an array of additional educational sessions. Being the largest international gathering of lung cancer and thoracic malignancy clinicians and researchers, important new research on prevention, screening and treatment of lung cancer and other malignancies of the thorax, with special emphasis on thymoma and mesothelioma, was presented during the conference. PMID:26488035

  7. Report from the 13th Annual Western Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference; Calgary, Alberta; September 8–10, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Vickers, M.M.; Pasieka, J; Dixon, E; McEwan, S.; McKay, A; Renouf, D.; Schellenberg, D; Ruether, D.

    2012-01-01

    The 13th annual Western Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference was held in Calgary, Alberta, September 8–10, 2011. Health care professionals involved in the care of patients with gastrointestinal cancers participated in presentation and discussion sessions for the purposes of developing the recommendations presented here. This consensus statement addresses current issues in the management neuroendocrine tumours and locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  8. Aspen Characteristics - Plumas National Forest, FRRD [ds375

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents point locations and associated stand assessment data collected within aspen stands in the Plumas National Forest, Feather River Ranger...

  9. Aspen Characteristics - El Dorado National Forest [ds363

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The database represents aspen stand locations and field assessments conducted in the Eldorado National Forest, Eldorado and Amador Counties, California. Data was...

  10. Inventory of aspen trees in spruce dominated stands in conservation area

    OpenAIRE

    Matti Maltamo; Annukka Pesonen; Lauri Korhonen; Jari Kouki; Mikko Vehmas; Kalle Eerikäinen

    2015-01-01

    Background The occurrence of aspen trees increases the conservation value of mature conifer dominated forests. Aspens typically occur as scattered individuals among major tree species, and therefore the inventory of aspens is challenging. Methods We characterized aspen populations in a boreal nature reserve using diameter distribution, spatial pattern, and forest attributes: volume, number of aspens, number of large aspen stems and basal area median diameter. The data were collecte...

  11. Multimodal imaging of lung cancer and its microenvironment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Niederst, Matthew J.; Mulvey, Hillary; Adams, David C.; Hu, Haichuan; Chico Calero, Isabel; Szabari, Margit V.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Bouma, Brett E.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite significant advances in targeted therapies for lung cancer, nearly all patients develop drug resistance within 6-12 months and prognosis remains poor. Developing drug resistance is a progressive process that involves tumor cells and their microenvironment. We hypothesize that microenvironment factors alter tumor growth and response to targeted therapy. We conducted in vitro studies in human EGFR-mutant lung carcinoma cells, and demonstrated that factors secreted from lung fibroblasts results in increased tumor cell survival during targeted therapy with EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib. We also demonstrated that increased environment stiffness results in increased tumor survival during gefitinib therapy. In order to test our hypothesis in vivo, we developed a multimodal optical imaging protocol for preclinical intravital imaging in mouse models to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time. We have successfully conducted multimodal imaging of dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) window mice implanted with GFP-labeled human EGFR mutant lung carcinoma cells and visualized changes in tumor development and microenvironment facets over time. Multimodal imaging included structural OCT to assess tumor viability and necrosis, polarization-sensitive OCT to measure tissue birefringence for collagen/fibroblast detection, and Doppler OCT to assess tumor vasculature. Confocal imaging was also performed for high-resolution visualization of EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells labeled with GFP, and was coregistered with OCT. Our results demonstrated that stromal support and vascular growth are essential to tumor progression. Multimodal imaging is a useful tool to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time.

  12. What Is Community College Excellence? Lessons from the Aspen Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyner, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Over the past year, in a process to select the winner of the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, the Aspen Institute has convened national experts to define and determine how to measure "excellence," to identify community colleges with high levels of student success, and to help more community colleges understand what can be done to…

  13. Germline mutation in the RAD51B gene confers predisposition to breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most currently known breast cancer predisposition genes play a role in DNA repair by homologous recombination. Recent studies conducted on RAD51 paralogs, involved in the same DNA repair pathway, have identified rare germline mutations conferring breast and/or ovarian cancer predisposition in the RAD51C, RAD51D and XRCC2 genes. The present study analysed the five RAD51 paralogs (RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2, XRCC3) to estimate their contribution to breast and ovarian cancer predisposition. The study was conducted on 142 unrelated patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer either with early onset or with a breast/ovarian cancer family history. Patients were referred to a French family cancer clinic and had been previously tested negative for a BRCA1/2 mutation. Coding sequences of the five genes were analysed by EMMA (Enhanced Mismatch Mutation Analysis). Detected variants were characterized by Sanger sequencing analysis. Three splicing mutations and two likely deleterious missense variants were identified: RAD51B c.452 + 3A > G, RAD51C c.706-2A > G, RAD51C c.1026 + 5-1026 + 7del, RAD51B c.475C > T/p.Arg159Cys and XRCC3 c.448C > T/p.Arg150Cys. No RAD51D and XRCC2 gene mutations were detected. These mutations and variants were detected in families with both breast and ovarian cancers, except for the RAD51B c.475C > T/p.Arg159Cys variant that occurred in a family with 3 breast cancer cases. This study identified the first RAD51B mutation in a breast and ovarian cancer family and is the first report of XRCC3 mutation analysis in breast and ovarian cancer. It confirms that RAD51 paralog mutations confer breast and ovarian cancer predisposition and are rare events. In view of the low frequency of RAD51 paralog mutations, international collaboration of family cancer clinics will be required to more accurately estimate their penetrance and establish clinical guidelines in carrier individuals

  14. Polyploidy in aspen alters plant physiology and drought sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, B.; Still, C. J.; Brooks, J. R.; Meinzer, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    Polyploids of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) may be better suited to dry climatic conditions than diploids. However, the expression of diploid and polyploid functional traits, including water use efficiency, an important component of drought avoidance and tolerance, are not well understood in quaking aspen. In this study diploid and triploid aspen clones' leaf, ramet, and stand functional traits were measured near the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Gothic, Colorado. The physiology of diploid and triploid aspen, including leaf size, chlorophyll content, stomatal size and density and stomatal conductance, as well as growth rates and carbon isotope discrimination in response to climate (measured in tree rings), were found to be significantly different between ploidy levels. These findings demonstrate different sensitivities of diploid and triploid clones to drought related climate stressors which may impact strategies for aspen forest management and conservation.

  15. Breast cancer disparities: Frontline strategies, proceedings of the 7 th annual texas conference on health disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyne Kpetemey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are striking disparities in health status, access to health care, and risk factors among racial and ethnic minorities and the general population in Texas. The disparities are multifactorial comprising genetic, sociocultural, and environmental variables. The Texas Center for Health Disparities (TCHD, a NIMHD Center of Excellence (COE, aims to prevent, reduce, and eliminate health disparities in the communities through research, education, and community-based programs. As part of the center′s outreach activities, an annual conference is organized to build awareness and knowledge on health disparities. The overall theme for the 2012 conference was "Battling Breast Cancer Disparities: Frontline Strategies". The scientific program consisted of three sessions: "Breakthroughs in Breast Cancer", "Triple Negative Breast Cancer," and "Hormone Resistant Breast Cancer" featuring different aspects of bench-research from molecular biology, proteomics, and genetics to the clinical aspects such as detection, diagnosis, and finally to community-based approaches. This article summarizes the proceedings of the meeting providing salient strategies and best practices presented by the speakers.

  16. The 5th Conference on Asian Trends in Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Moore, Malcolm A; Chang, Shu-Jen; Cheng, Christopher; Choi, Han Yong; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan; Hinotsu, Shiro; Hong, Sung-Joon; Kim, Choung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Murai, Masaru; Naito, Seiji; Soebadi, Doddy; Song, Jae-Mann; Umbas, Rainy; Usami, Michiyuki; Xia, Shujie; Yang, Chi-Rei

    2007-01-01

    The Conference on Asian Trends in Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy is an annual forum for Asian urologists now in its 5th year. The 2006 conference, held in Bali, Indonesia, was attended by 27 leading urologic oncologists from China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan and featured a packed program of presentations and discussions on a wide range of topics such as relationships among clinicians and the newly opened Asia Regional Office for Cancer Control of the International Union Against Cancer (UICC), detection rates of prostate cancer by biopsy in each of the 6 Asian countries, and favored treatment modalities for hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) in each country. The first session of the conference kicked off with a keynote lecture entitled "Activities of the UICC ARO". UICC's new office will be the nerve center for its activities in the Asia region. Along with the Asian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention (APOCP), UICC aims to shift the focus of attention to cancer control. As such APOCP's long-running publication the APJCP is to be re-launched as the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Control. Although UICC is primarily concerned with cancer, several risk factors for cancer are common also to other non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, and an important strategy is to implement measures to control these various pathologic conditions as a whole. Apart from contributing to an Asian prostate cancer registry the UICC-ARO will provide training courses, working groups, and assistance in collecting and processing data. The keynote lecture was followed by a roundtable discussion on possible ways in which clinicians from each Asian country can work with UICC. A number of suggestions were put forth including better registration, epidemiology research, possible implementation of UICC prostate cancer guidelines, early detection and screening, and roles of diet and phytotherapy. The underlying reasons for the large but

  17. Mammaglobin 1 promotes breast cancer malignancy and confers sensitivity to anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, Nadia; Guerrette, Roxann; Beauregard, Annie-Pier; Jean, Stéphanie; Michaud, Pascale; Harquail, Jason; Benzina, Sami; Robichaud, Gilles A

    2016-07-01

    Mammaglobin 1 (MGB1), a member of the secretoglobin family, is expressed in mammary epithelial tissues and is overexpressed in most mammary carcinomas. Despite the extensive research correlating MGB1 expression profiles to breast cancer pathogenesis and disease outcome, the biological significance of MGB1 in cancer processes is still unclear. We have thus set out to conduct a functional evaluation of the molecular and cellular roles of MGB1 in breast cancer processes leading to disease progression. Using a series of breast cancer cell models with conditional MGB1 expression, we demonstrate that MGB1 promotes cancer cell malignant features. More specifically, loss of MGB1 expression resulted in a decrease of cell proliferation, soft agar spheroid formation, migration, and invasion capacities of breast cancer cells. Concomitantly, we also observed that MGB1 expression activates signaling pathways mediated by MAPK members (p38, JNK, and ERK), the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and NFκB. Moreover, MGB1 regulates epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) features and modulates Snail, Twist and ZEB1 expression levels. Interestingly, we also observed that expression of MGB1 confers breast cancer cell sensitivity to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis. Together, our results support a role for MGB1 in tumor malignancy in exchange for chemosensitivity. These findings provide one of the first descriptive overview of the molecular and cellular roles of MGB1 in breast cancer processes and may offer new insight to the development of therapeutic and prognostic strategies in breast cancer patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26207726

  18. Reasons for Hope: Canadian Breast Cancer Research Conference, Le Concorde Hotel, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, 3–5 May 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Roskelley, Calvin

    2001-01-01

    Canadian breast cancer researchers and international colleagues met recently to present and discuss their latest data. The conference, which was sponsored by the Canadian Breast Cancer Research Initiative, was held in Quebec City, 3–5 May 2001. The Research Initiative was founded in 1993 and is a unique partnership of groups from the public, private and non-profit sectors committed to funding a broad spectrum of breast cancer research. From this meeting, and others like it, it is becoming inc...

  19. Activating Transcription Factor 4 Confers a Multidrug Resistance Phenotype to Gastric Cancer Cells through Transactivation of SIRT1 Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Hongwu Zhu; Limin Xia; Yongguo Zhang; Honghong Wang; Wenjing Xu; Hao Hu; Jing Wang; Jing Xin; Yi Gang; Sumei Sha; Bin Xu; Daiming Fan; Yongzhan Nie; Kaichun Wu

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidrug resistance (MDR) in gastric cancer remains a major challenge to clinical treatment. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a stress response gene involved in homeostasis and cellular protection. However, the expression and function of ATF4 in gastric cancer MDR remains unknown. In this study, we investigate whether ATF4 play a role in gastric cancer MDR and its potential mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated that ATF4 overexpression confered th...

  20. Coniferyl benzoate in quaking aspen A ruffed grouse feeding deterrent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubas, W J; Gullion, G W

    1990-04-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) staminate flower buds and catkins are important food resources for ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus); however, ruffed grouse select only certain quaking aspen to feed upon. Earlier studies indicate that the primary difference between quaking aspen that ruffed grouse feed upon and those not used is the level of coniferyl benzoate in the flower buds. Bioassays show that coniferyl benzoate is a feeding deterrent for ruffed grouse; its effect on ruffed grouse after ingestion has not been tested. Possible physiological effects, based on the chemical properties of coniferyl benzoate and its oxidation products, include inhibition of protein digestion, toxic effects, and antiestrogenic effects. PMID:24263713

  1. Two variants on chromosome 17 confer prostate cancer risk, and the one in TCF2 protects against type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur;

    2007-01-01

    17 with the disease. These two variants, 33 Mb apart, fall within a region previously implicated by family-based linkage studies on prostate cancer. The risks conferred by these variants are moderate individually (allele odds ratio of about 1.20), but because they are common, their joint population......We performed a genome-wide association scan to search for sequence variants conferring risk of prostate cancer using 1,501 Icelandic men with prostate cancer and 11,290 controls. Follow-up studies involving three additional case-control groups replicated an association of two variants on chromosome...... attributable risk is substantial. One of the variants is in TCF2 (HNF1beta), a gene known to be mutated in individuals with maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5. Results from eight case-control groups, including one West African and one Chinese, demonstrate that this variant confers protection against...

  2. Aspen Grupp võitis RKASi / Lemmi Kann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kann, Lemmi

    2008-01-01

    Ehitusfirma Aspen Grupp OÜ võitis Tallinna ringkonnakohtus Riigi Kinnisvara AS-i, kes diskvalifitseeris ehitusfirma riigihankelt seaduses olnud maksevõlgnevuse keelu tõttu. Vt. samas: Lahendust ootavad veel kaks kohtuasja

  3. NRF2 Mutation Confers Malignant Potential and Resistance to Chemoradiation Therapy in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiro Shibata

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal squamous cancer (ESC is one of the most aggressive tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. A combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CRT has improved the clinical outcome, but the molecular background determining the effectiveness of therapy remains unknown. NRF2 is a master transcriptional regulator of stress adaptation, and gain of-function mutation of NRF2 in cancer confers resistance to stressors including anticancer therapy. Direct resequencing analysis revealed that Nrf2 gain-of-function mutation occurred recurrently (18/82, 22% in advanced ESC tumors and ESC cell lines (3/10. The presence of Nrf2 mutation was associated with tumor recurrence and poor prognosis. Short hairpin RNA-mediated down-regulation of NRF2 in ESC cells that harbor only mutated Nrf2 allele revealed that themutant NRF2 conferred increased cell proliferation, attachment-independent survival, and resistance to 5-fluorouracil and γ-irradiation. Based on the Nrf2 mutation status, gene expression signatures associated with NRF2 mutation were extracted from ESC cell lines, and their potential utility for monitoring and prognosis was examined in a cohort of 33 pre-CRT cases of ESC. The molecular signatures of NRF2 mutation were significantly predictive and prognostic for CRT response. In conclusion, recurrent NRF2 mutation confers malignant potential and resistance to therapy in advanced ESC, resulting in a poorer outcome. Molecular signatures of NRF2 mutation can be applied as predictive markers of response to CRT, and efficient inhibition of aberrant NRF2 activation could be a promising approach in combination with CRT.

  4. Long-term monitoring of western aspen--lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, E K; Bunting, S C; Starcevich, L A; Nahorniak, M T; Dicus, G; Garrett, L K

    2015-08-01

    Aspen woodland is an important ecosystem in the western United States. Aspen is currently declining in western mountains; stressors include conifer expansion due to fire suppression, drought, disease, heavy wildlife and livestock use, and human development. Forecasting of tree species distributions under future climate scenarios predicts severe losses of western aspen within the next 50 years. As a result, aspen has been selected as one of 14 vital signs for long-term monitoring by the National Park Service Upper Columbia Basin Network. This article describes the development of a monitoring protocol for aspen including inventory mapping, selection of sampling locations, statistical considerations, a method for accounting for spatial dependence, field sampling strategies, and data management. We emphasize the importance of collecting pilot data for use in statistical power analysis and semi-variogram analysis prior to protocol implementation. Given the spatial and temporal variability within aspen stem size classes, we recommend implementing permanent plots that are distributed spatially within and among stands. Because of our careful statistical design, we were able to detect change between sampling periods with desired confidence and power. Engaging a protocol development and implementation team with necessary and complementary knowledge and skills is critical for success. Besides the project leader, we engaged field sampling personnel, GIS specialists, statisticians, and a data management specialist. We underline the importance of frequent communication with park personnel and network coordinators. PMID:26215826

  5. Mitochondrial respiratory modifiers confer survival advantage by facilitating DNA repair in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High rate of aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), one of the primary hallmarks of cancer cells, acquired during the multistep development of tumors is also responsible for therapeutic resistance. Underlying this hallmark is the compromised respiratory metabolism that contributes to the acquisition of the glycolytic phenotype for sustained ATP production and cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms underlying the glycolysis-linked radio-resistance in cancer cells remain elusive. In this study, we transiently elevated glycolysis by treating human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1) with mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs) viz. 2,4-dinitrophenol, Photosan-3, and Methylene blue to examine if transient stimulation of glycolysis before irradiation using MRMs is sufficient to confer radioresistance. Treatment with MRMs led to a significant (two-fold) increase in glucose consumption and lactate production together with a robust increase in the protein levels of two key regulators of glucose metabolism, i.e. GLUT-1 and HK-II. MRMs also enhanced the clonogenic survival and facilitated DNA repair by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. Inhibition of glucose uptake by inhibitors like 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), 3-bromo pyruvate (3-BP) and fasentin under conditions of stimulated glycolysis not only reversed the effect but also sensitized the cells to radiation more profoundly. The inhibition of glycolysis using 2-DG also reduced the levels of Ku 70 (NHEJ) and Rad-51 (HR) proteins. Thus, our results suggest that enhanced glycolysis in cancer cells may confer radio-resistance and offers survival advantage partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage. (author)

  6. BRCA1 R1699Q variant displaying ambiguous functional abrogation confers intermediate breast and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Whiley, Phillip J; Thompson, Bryony;

    2012-01-01

    Clinical classification of rare sequence changes identified in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 is essential for appropriate genetic counselling of individuals carrying these variants. We previously showed that variant BRCA1 c.5096G>A p.Arg1699Gln in the BRCA1 transcriptional...... transactivation domain demonstrated equivocal results from a series of functional assays, and proposed that this variant may confer low to moderate risk of cancer....

  7. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  8. Prolactin confers resistance against cisplatin in breast cancer cells by activating glutathione-S-transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPensee, Elizabeth W; Schwemberger, Sandy J; LaPensee, Christopher R; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Afton, Scott E; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2009-08-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle for successful treatment of breast cancer patients. Given that prolactin (PRL) acts as an anti-apoptotic/survival factor in the breast, we postulated that it antagonizes cytotoxicity by chemotherapeutic drugs. Treatment of breast cancer cells with PRL caused variable resistance to taxol, vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin. PRL prevented cisplatin-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In the presence of PRL, significantly less cisplatin was bound to DNA, as determined by mass spectroscopy, and little DNA damage was seen by gamma-H2AX staining. PRL dramatically increased the activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), which sequesters cisplatin in the cytoplasm; this increase was abrogated by Jak and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. PRL upregulated the expression of the GSTmu, but not the pi, isozyme. A GST inhibitor abrogated antagonism of cisplatin cytotoxicity by PRL. In conclusion, PRL confers resistance against cisplatin by activating a detoxification enzyme, thereby reducing drug entry into the nucleus. These data provide a rational explanation for the ineffectiveness of cisplatin in breast cancer, which is characterized by high expression of both PRL and its receptor. Suppression of PRL production or blockade of its actions should benefit patients undergoing chemotherapy by allowing for lower drug doses and expanded drug options. PMID:19443905

  9. [Recent history: 12th International Conference on Cancer, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1978].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Hugo

    2014-04-01

    Using the approaches of history of the present, this article recovers the discussions surrounding the 12th International Conference on Cancer carried out in Buenos Aires in 1978, in reaction to which Georges Périès organized a "counter-conference" in Paris. In order to understand this discussion, the political situation of the time is described, as is the state of human rights at the time in Argentina, the role of the media - in particular the newspapers La Nación and Clarín and the magazine Gente - and the institutional position adopted by the National Academy of Medicine, as expressed in a letter sent to the presidents of the primary scientific societies of the world. The letter is reprinted in this text as a documentary source, taken from Memoria: Año 1978 (Presidencia de Dr. José E. Rivarola) [Acta: Year 1978 (Presidency of Dr. José E. Rivarola)]. The framework of the discussion makes reference to science's social policy versus science's supposed neutrality and the role of scientific societies. PMID:24823605

  10. FGFR2 risk SNPs confer breast cancer risk by augmenting oestrogen responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Thomas M; Castro, Mauro A A; de Santiago, Ines; Fletcher, Michael N C; Halim, Silvia; Prathalingam, Radhika; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B

    2016-08-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) locus is consistently the top hit in genome-wide association studies for oestrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer. Yet, its mode of action continues to be controversial. Here, we employ a systems biology approach to demonstrate that signalling via FGFR2 counteracts cell activation by oestrogen. In the presence of oestrogen, the oestrogen receptor (ESR1) regulon (set of ESR1 target genes) is in an active state. However, signalling by FGFR2 is able to reverse the activity of the ESR1 regulon. This effect is seen in multiple distinct FGFR2 signalling model systems, across multiple cells lines and is dependent on the presence of FGFR2. Increased oestrogen exposure has long been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We therefore hypothesized that risk variants should reduce FGFR2 expression and subsequent signalling. Indeed, transient transfection experiments assaying the three independent variants of the FGFR2 risk locus (rs2981578, rs35054928 and rs45631563) in their normal chromosomal context show that these single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) map to transcriptional silencer elements and that, compared with wild type, the risk alleles augment silencer activity. The presence of risk variants results in lower FGFR2 expression and increased oestrogen responsiveness. We thus propose a molecular mechanism by which FGFR2 can confer increased breast cancer risk that is consistent with oestrogen exposure as a major driver of breast cancer risk. Our findings may have implications for the clinical use of FGFR2 inhibitors. PMID:27236187

  11. Orbital Express Mission Operations Planning and Resource Management using ASPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Caroline; Knight, Russell; Jones, Grailing; Tran, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    As satellite equipment and mission operations become more costly, the drive to keep working equipment running with less man-power rises.Demonstrating the feasibility of autonomous satellite servicing was the main goal behind the Orbital Express (OE) mission. Planning the satellite mission operations for OE required the ability to create a plan which could be executed autonomously over variable conditions. The Automated-Scheduling and Planning Environment (ASPEN)tool, developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was used to create the schedule of events in each daily plan for the two satellites of the OE mission. This paper presents an introduction to the ASPEN tool, the constraints of the OE domain, the variable conditions that were presented within the mission, and the solution to operations that ASPEN provided. ASPEN has been used in several other domains, including research rovers, Deep Space Network scheduling research, and in flight operations for the ASE project's EO1 satellite. Related work is discussed, as are the future of ASPEN and the future of autonomous satellite servicing.

  12. Lung cancer multidisciplinary team meetings: a survey of participants at a national conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Multidisciplinary meetings (MDMs) are a useful aid for the development of comprehensive treatment plans for cancer patients. However, little is known about the requirements for effective MDM function. Attendees at a national lung cancer conference who participated at least weekly in lung cancer MDMs were surveyed. The survey addressed the attendees' perceptions regarding the aims of MDMs, and for their own institutional MDMs, the importance and need for improvement for each of: (i) the attendance of nine discipline groups; and (ii) 15 aspects related to MDM function derived from the literature. The survey also asked participants if MDMs met their needs. There was a general agreement on the aims of the meetings. There was also an agreement on the importance of various groups' attendance and each of the examined aspects of MDMs. However, many respondents reported their meetings required moderate or substantial improvements in one or more areas. More than 20% of the respondents indicated improvement was required for the attendance of three discipline groups (palliative care physicians, pathologists and cardiothoracic surgeons) and 10 of the 15 examined aspects (more than half in the case of computerised databases). Only 9% of the respondents reported that none of the features surveyed needed either moderate or substantial improvement. MDMs met the needs of 79% of the respondents. We found general agreement on the aims of the meetings, the importance of various groups' attendance at MDMs and each of the examined aspects of MDMs. However, moderate or substantial improvements were thought to be required by many respondents. The performance of individual institutions' MDMs and the resources they have available to achieve their aims should be assessed and periodically reviewed. The survey applied here may provide a framework for MDM members to do this.

  13. Consensus conference: multimodality management of early- and intermediate-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoni, Rodolfo

    2008-09-01

    Surgery is the mainstay of treatment in early- and intermediate-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), yet recurrences are frequent. Studies have documented the benefits of chemotherapy administered after resection, but a number of questions remain regarding how overall outcomes can be further improved. To provide the oncology community with direction on these issues, a consensus conference of leading experts in the NSCLC field was held at the Fifth Annual Atlanta Lung Cancer Symposium on October 25-27, 2007. The available scientific literature is presented and when such literature is lacking, clinical experience is provided to support the following conclusions. Preoperative staging should be done in accordance with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, but endoscopic fine needle aspiration of enlarged mediastinal nodes can be used, and if histology is positive for malignancy, mediastinoscopy can be avoided. Neoadjuvant systemic therapy is not generally recommended but can be considered to downstage an unresectable patient. There is currently no role for preoperative radiation or chemoradiation. Adjuvant systemic therapy is not recommended for stage IA and IB patients; however, adverse prognostic factors are acceptable reasons to consider adjuvant systemic therapy in the latter. Adjuvant systemic therapy is recommended for stage IIA, IIB, and IIIA patients, consistent with recent American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines. A cisplatin-based regimen should be started within 60 days after surgery, but if relatively contraindicated, carboplatin is an acceptable alternative. Adjuvant radiation therapy is not recommended for N0 and N1 patients, but is used in N2 patients to decrease local recurrence. PMID:18779538

  14. MRP1 expression in CTCs confers resistance to irinotecan-based chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Emne Ali; Fanelli, Marcello Ferretti; Souza E Silva, Virgílio; Machado Netto, Marcelo Calil; Gasparini Junior, José Luiz; Araújo, Daniel Vilarim; Ocea, Luciana Menezes Mendonça; Buim, Marcilei Eliza Cavicchioli; Tariki, Milena Shizue; Alves, Vanessa da Silva; Piana de Andrade, Victor; Dettino, Aldo Lourenço Abbade; Abdon Lopes de Mello, Celso; Chinen, Ludmilla Thomé Domingos

    2016-08-15

    Circulating tumor cells are important markers of tumor progression and can reflect tumor behavior in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Identification of proteins that confer resistance to treatment is an important step to predict response and better selection of treatment for patients. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and Multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) play a role in irinotecan-resistance, and Excision Repair Cross-Complementation group 1 (ERCC1) expression can confer resistance to platinum compounds. Here, we included 34 patients with mCRC and most of them received FOLFIRI or FOLFOX chemotherapy (91.1%). CTCs were isolated by ISET(®) Technology and identified in 30 patients (88.2%), with a median of 2.0 CTCs/mL (0-31.0). We analyzed the immunocytochemical expression of MRP1, MRP4 and ERCC1 only in patients who had previously detectable CTCs, accordingly to treatment received (n = 19, 15 and 13 patients, respectively). Among patients treated with irinotecan-based chemotherapy, 4 out of 19 cases with MRP1 positive CTCs showed a worse progression free survival (PFS) in comparison to those with MRP1 negative CTCs (2.1 months vs. 9.1 months; p = 0.003). None of the other proteins studied in CTCs had significant association with PFS. We analyzed also histological sections of primary tumors and metastases by immunohistochemistry, and found no association with clinicopathological characteristics or with PFS. Our results show MRP1 as a potential biomarker of resistance to treatment with irinotecan when found in CTCs from mCRC patients. This is a small proof-of-principle study and these early findings need to be validated in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:26950035

  15. Populations of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) with different evolutionary histories differ in their climate occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Burke T; Still, Christopher; Howe, Glenn T; Tague, Christina; Roberts, Dar A

    2016-05-01

    Quaking aspens (Populus tremuloides Michx.) are found in diverse habitats throughout North America. While the biogeography of aspens' distribution has been documented, the drivers of the phenotypic diversity of aspen are still being explored. In our study, we examined differences in climate between northern and southwestern populations of aspen, finding large-scale differences between the populations. Our results suggest that northern and southwestern populations live in distinct climates and support the inclusion of genetic and phenotypic data with species distribution modeling for predicting aspens' distribution. PMID:27217950

  16. 76 FR 69279 - Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Quaking Aspen Wind Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Aspen Wind Energy Project, Wyoming, and Notice of Segregation of Public Lands AGENCY: Bureau of Land... prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Quaking Aspen Wind Energy Project (Quaking Aspen..._Aspen_Wind_Energy_WY@blm.gov ; or Mail: 280 Highway 191 N., Rock Springs, WY 82901. Documents...

  17. Radiation regime and canopy architecture in a boreal aspen forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was part of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS). It took place in a mature aspen forest in Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada. The aspen trees were 21.5 m high with a 2–3 m high hazelnut understory. The objectives were: (1) to compare the radiation regime beneath the overstory before and after leaf emergence; (2) to infer the structural characteristics of the aspen canopy leaf inclination and clumping; (3) to determine the seasonal course of the leaf area index (L) for both the overstory and understory. Above-stand radiation measurements were made on a 39m walk-up tower, and understory radiation measurements were made on a tram which moved horizontally back and forth at 0.10 m s−1 on a pair of steel cables 65m in length suspended 4 m above the ground. In addition, several LI-COR LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzers were used to determine the effective leaf area index and the zenith angle dependent extinction coefficient (G(θ)) for both the aspen and the hazelnut throughout the growing season. These measurements were supplemented with destructive sampling of the hazelnut at the peak of the growing season. Before leaf emergence, the ratios of below- to above-aspen solar radiation (S), photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and net radiation (Rn) during most of the day were 0.58, 0.55 and 0.47, respectively. By midsummer, these ratios had fallen to 0.33, 0.26 and 0.26, respectively. The aspen G(θ) was relatively invariant with θ, within ±0.05 of 0.5 throughout the growing season, indicating a spherical distribution of leaf inclination angles (i.e. the leaves were randomly inclined). The hazelnut G(θ) has a cosine response with respect to θ, which was consistent with the generally planophile leaf distribution for hazelnut. Using canopy gap size distribution theories developed by Chen and Black (1992b, Agric. For. Meteorol., 60: 249–266) and Chen and Cihlar (1995a, Appl. Opt., 34: 6211–6222) based on Miller and Norman

  18. Second St. Gallen European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Gastrointestinal Cancer Conference: consensus recommendations on controversial issues in the primary treatment of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Manfred P; Zalcberg, John R; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Ruers, Theo; Ducreux, Michel; Arnold, Dirk; Aust, Daniela; Brown, Gina; Bujko, Krzysztof; Cunningham, Christopher; Evrard, Serge; Folprecht, Gunnar; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Haustermans, Karin; Holm, Torbjörn; Kuhlmann, Koert F; Lordick, Florian; Mentha, Gilles; Moehler, Markus; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Puciarelli, Salvatore; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Sorbye, Halfdan; Van Cutsem, Eric; Weitz, Jürgen; Otto, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Primary treatment of rectal cancer was the focus of the second St. Gallen European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Gastrointestinal Cancer Conference. In the context of the conference, a multidisciplinary international expert panel discussed and voted on controversial issues which could not be easily answered using published evidence. Main topics included optimal pretherapeutic imaging, indication and type of neoadjuvant treatment, and the treatment strategies in advanced tumours. Here we report the key recommendations and summarise the related evidence. The treatment strategy for localised rectal cancer varies from local excision in early tumours to neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCT) in combination with extended surgery in locally advanced disease. Optimal pretherapeutic staging is a key to any treatment decision. The panel recommended magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or MRI + endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) as mandatory staging modalities, except for early T1 cancers with an option for local excision, where EUS in addition to MRI was considered to be most important because of its superior near-field resolution. Primary surgery with total mesorectal excision was recommended by most panellists for some early tumours with limited risk of recurrence (i.e. cT1-2 or cT3a N0 with clear mesorectal fascia on MRI and clearly above the levator muscles), whereas all other stages were considered for multimodal treatment. The consensus panel recommended long-course RCT over short-course radiotherapy for most clinical situations where neoadjuvant treatment is indicated, with the exception of T3a/b N0 tumours where short-course radiotherapy or even no neoadjuvant therapy were regarded to be an option. In patients with potentially resectable tumours and synchronous liver metastases, most panel members did not see an indication to start with classical fluoropyrimidine-based RCT but rather favoured preoperative short-course radiotherapy with systemic

  19. Orbital Express mission operations planning and resource management using ASPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Caroline; Knight, Russell; Jones, Grailing; Tran, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    As satellite equipment and mission operations become more costly, the drive to keep working equipment running with less labor-power rises. Demonstrating the feasibility of autonomous satellite servicing was the main goal behind the Orbital Express (OE) mission. Like a tow-truck delivering gas to a car on the road, the "servicing" satellite of OE had to find the "client" from several kilometers away, connect directly to the client, and transfer fluid (or a battery) autonomously, while on earth-orbit. The mission met 100% of its success criteria, and proved that autonomous satellite servicing is now a reality for space operations. Planning the satellite mission operations for OE required the ability to create a plan which could be executed autonomously over variable conditions. As the constraints for execution could change weekly, daily, and even hourly, the tools used create the mission execution plans needed to be flexible and adaptable to many different kinds of changes. At the same time, the hard constraints of the plans needed to be maintained and satisfied. The Automated Scheduling and Planning Environment (ASPEN) tool, developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was used to create the schedule of events in each daily plan for the two satellites of the OE mission. This paper presents an introduction to the ASPEN tool, an overview of the constraints of the OE domain, the variable conditions that were presented within the mission, and the solution to operations that ASPEN provided. ASPEN has been used in several other domains, including research rovers, Deep Space Network scheduling research, and in flight operations for the NASA's Earth Observing One mission's EO1 satellite. Related work is discussed, as are the future of ASPEN and the future of autonomous satellite servicing.

  20. [Pathological diagnosis, work-up and reporting of breast cancer. Recommendations of the 3rd Hungarian Consensus Conference on Breast Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cserni, Gábor; Kulka, Janina; Francz, Monika; Járay, Balázs; Kálmán, Endre; Kovács, Ilona; Krenács, Tibor; Udvarhelyi, Nóra; Vass, László

    2016-09-01

    There have been relevant changes in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer to implement the updating of the 2010 recommendations made during the 2nd national consensus conference on the disease. Following a wide interdisciplinary consultation, the present recommendations have been finalized after their public discussion at the 3rd Hungarian Consensus Conference on Breast Cancer. The recommendations cover non-operative and intraoperative diagnostics, the work-up of operative specimens, the determination of prognostic and predictive markers and the content of the cytology and histology reports. Furthermore, it touches some special issues such as the current status of multigene molecular markers, the role of pathologists in clinical trials and prerequisites for their involvement, some relevant points about the future. PMID:27579721

  1. ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles W. White III

    2003-09-30

    ASPEN Plus simulations have been created for a CO{sub 2} capture process based on adsorption by monoethanolamine (MEA). Three separate simulations were developed, one each for the flue gas scrubbing, recovery, and purification sections of the process. Although intended to work together, each simulation can be used and executed independently. The simulations were designed as template simulations to be added as a component to other more complex simulations. Applications involving simple cycle or hybrid power production processes were targeted. The default block parameters were developed based on a feed stream of raw flue gas of approximately 14 volume percent CO{sub 2} with a 90% recovery of the CO{sub 2} as liquid. This report presents detailed descriptions of the process sections as well as technical documentation for the ASPEN simulations including the design basis, models employed, key assumptions, design parameters, convergence algorithms, and calculated outputs.

  2. A flexible model for biomass fast pyrolysis in Aspen+

    OpenAIRE

    Kohl, Thomas; Laukkanen, Timo; Järvinen, Mika

    2012-01-01

    In order to estimate the heat of condensation of fast pyrolysis product of woody biomass a model to be used in the chemical process simulation software Aspen+ has been developed based on the composition of wood fast pyrolysis product. A simulation model for biomass fast pyrolysis was developed. The results obtained are in good accordance with values found in the literature. With more specific data (e.g. from measurements) it should be possible to adjust the flexible model to other data. ...

  3. Elevated Rocky Mountain elk numbers prevent positive effects of fire on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David Solance; Fettig, Stephen M.; Bowker, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) is the most widespread tree species in North America and has supported a unique ecosystem for tens of thousands of years, yet is currently threatened by dramatic loss and possible local extinctions. While multiple factors such as climate change and fire suppression are thought to contribute to aspen’s decline, increased browsing by elk (Cervus elaphus), which have experienced dramatic population increases in the last ∼80 years, may severely inhibit aspen growth and regeneration. Fires are known to favor aspen recovery, but in the last several decades the spatial scale and intensity of wildfires has greatly increased, with poorly understood ramifications for aspen growth. Here, focusing on the 2000 Cerro Grande fire in central New Mexico – one of the earliest fires described as a “mega-fire” - we use three methods to examine the impact of elk browsing on aspen regeneration after a mega-fire. First, we use an exclosure experiment to show that aspen growing in the absence of elk were 3× taller than trees growing in the presence of elk. Further, aspen that were both protected from elk and experienced burning were 8.5× taller than unburned trees growing in the presence of elk, suggesting that the combination of release from herbivores and stimulation from fire creates the largest aspen growth rates. Second, using surveys at the landscape level, we found a correlation between elk browsing intensity and aspen height, such that where elk browsing was highest, aspen were shortest. This relationship between elk browsing intensity and aspen height was stronger in burned (r = −0.53) compared to unburned (r = −0.24) areas. Third, in conjunction with the landscape-level surveys, we identified possible natural refugia, microsites containing downed logs, shrubs etc. that may inhibit elk browsing by physically blocking aspen from elk or by impeding elk’s ability to move through the forest patch. We did not find any

  4. Analysis of Cryogenic Cycle with Process Modeling Tool: Aspen HYSYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, D. M.; Patel, H. K.

    2015-10-01

    Cryogenic engineering deals with the development and improvement of low temperature techniques, processes and equipment. A process simulator such as Aspen HYSYS, for the design, analysis, and optimization of process plants, has features that accommodate the special requirements and therefore can be used to simulate most cryogenic liquefaction and refrigeration processes. Liquefaction is the process of cooling or refrigerating a gas to a temperature below its critical temperature so that liquid can be formed at some suitable pressure which is below the critical pressure. Cryogenic processes require special attention in terms of the integration of various components like heat exchangers, Joule-Thompson Valve, Turbo expander and Compressor. Here, Aspen HYSYS, a process modeling tool, is used to understand the behavior of the complete plant. This paper presents the analysis of an air liquefaction plant based on the Linde cryogenic cycle, performed using the Aspen HYSYS process modeling tool. It covers the technique used to find the optimum values for getting the maximum liquefaction of the plant considering different constraints of other parameters. The analysis result so obtained gives clear idea in deciding various parameter values before implementation of the actual plant in the field. It also gives an idea about the productivity and profitability of the given configuration plant which leads to the design of an efficient productive plant.

  5. Analysis of Cryogenic Cycle with Process Modeling Tool: Aspen HYSYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryogenic engineering deals with the development and improvement of low temperature techniques, processes and equipment. A process simulator such as Aspen HYSYS, for the design, analysis, and optimization of process plants, has features that accommodate the special requirements and therefore can be used to simulate most cryogenic liquefaction and refrigeration processes. Liquefaction is the process of cooling or refrigerating a gas to a temperature below its critical temperature so that liquid can be formed at some suitable pressure which is below the critical pressure. Cryogenic processes require special attention in terms of the integration of various components like heat exchangers, Joule-Thompson Valve, Turbo expander and Compressor. Here, Aspen HYSYS, a process modeling tool, is used to understand the behavior of the complete plant. This paper presents the analysis of an air liquefaction plant based on the Linde cryogenic cycle, performed using the Aspen HYSYS process modeling tool. It covers the technique used to find the optimum values for getting the maximum liquefaction of the plant considering different constraints of other parameters. The analysis result so obtained gives clear idea in deciding various parameter values before implementation of the actual plant in the field. It also gives an idea about the productivity and profitability of the given configuration plant which leads to the design of an efficient productive plant

  6. AACR Special Conference: Advances in Breast Cancer Research – Genetics, Biology, and Clinical Implications, Huntington Beach, California, USA, 8–12 October 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Welm, Alana L.

    2003-01-01

    The recent meeting 'Advances in Breast Cancer Research – Genetics, Biology, and Clinical Implications' was an American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Special Conference in Cancer Research, for which the underwriting sponsor was the Avon Foundation. Presentations were made from prominent scientists on several relevant basic science and clinic-oriented topics, including mammary stem cells and development, steroid receptors, matrix and stromal–epithelial interactions, oncogene signaling ...

  7. Genetic Variation in Functional Traits Influences Arthropod Community Composition in Aspen (Populus tremula L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Kathryn M; Pär K Ingvarsson; Jansson, Stefan; Albrectsen, Benedicte R.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a study of natural variation in functional leaf traits and herbivory in 116 clones of European aspen, Populus tremula L., the Swedish Aspen (SwAsp) collection, originating from ten degrees of latitude across Sweden and grown in a common garden. In surveys of phytophagous arthropods over two years, we found the aspen canopy supports nearly 100 morphospecies. We identified significant broad-sense heritability of plant functional traits, basic plant defence chemistry, and arthropod ...

  8. Aquatic Ecosystem Response to Timber Harvesting for the Purpose of Restoring Aspen

    OpenAIRE

    Bobette E Jones; Monika Krupa; Kenneth W Tate

    2013-01-01

    The removal of conifers through commercial timber harvesting has been successful in restoring aspen, however many aspen stands are located near streams, and there are concerns about potential aquatic ecosystem impairment. We examined the effects of management-scale conifer removal from aspen stands located adjacent to streams on water quality, solar radiation, canopy cover, temperature, aquatic macroinvertebrates, and soil moisture. This 8-year study (2003-2010) involved two projects located ...

  9. Restoring Aspen Riparian Stands With Beaver on the Northern Yellowstone Winter Range

    OpenAIRE

    McColley, Samuel D; Tyers, Dan B; Sowell, Bok F

    2011-01-01

    Aspen (Populus tremuloides) on the Gardiner Ranger District, Gallatin National Forest, have declined over the last half-century. In an attempt to reverse this trend, beaver (Castor canadensis) were reintroduced in Eagle Creek in 1991. In 2005, we assessed the long-term effects of beaver on aspen stands and the associated riparian area in the Eagle Creek drainage. Aspen recovery was estimated by comparing vegetative changes among control sites with (n = 5), active beaver sites (n = 6), sites a...

  10. Design and simulation of heat exchangers using Aspen HYSYS, and Aspen exchanger design and rating for paddy drying application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaun, J.; Kamin, N. H.; Wong, K. H.; Tham, H. J.; Kong, V. V.; Farajpourlar, M.

    2016-06-01

    Air heating unit is one of the most important parts in paddy drying to ensure the efficiency of a drying process. In addition, an optimized air heating unit does not only promise a good paddy quality, but also save more for the operating cost. This study determined the suitable and best specifications heating unit to heat air for paddy drying in the LAMB dryer. In this study, Aspen HYSYS v7.3 was used to obtain the minimum flow rate of hot water needed. The resulting data obtained from Aspen HYSYS v7.3 were used in Aspen Exchanger Design and Rating (EDR) to generate heat exchanger design and costs. The designs include shell and tubes and plate heat exchanger. The heat exchanger was designed in order to produce various drying temperatures of 40, 50, 60 and 70°C of air with different flow rate, 300, 2500 and 5000 LPM. The optimum condition for the heat exchanger were found to be plate heat exchanger with 0.6 mm plate thickness, 198.75 mm plate width, 554.8 mm plate length and 11 numbers of plates operating at 5000 LPM air flow rate.

  11. Using Aspen plus in thermodynamics instruction a step-by-step guide

    CERN Document Server

    Sandler, Stanley I

    2015-01-01

    A step-by-step guide for students (and faculty) on the use of Aspen in teaching thermodynamics Used for a wide variety of important engineering tasks, Aspen Plus software is a modeling tool used for conceptual design, optimization, and performance monitoring of chemical processes. After more than twenty years, it remains one of the most popular and powerful chemical engineering simulation programs used both industrially and academically. Using Aspen Plus in Thermodynamics Instruction: A Step by Step Guide introduces the reader to the use of Aspen Plus in courses in thermodynamics. It prov

  12. PREFACE: 1st Nano-IBCT Conference 2011 - Radiation Damage of Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bernd A.; Malot, Christiane; Domaracka, Alicja; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2012-07-01

    The 1st Nano-IBCT Conference entitled 'Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy' was held in Caen, France, in October 2011. The Meeting was organised in the framework of the COST Action MP1002 (Nano-IBCT) which was launched in December 2010 (http://fias.uni-frankfurt.de/nano-ibct). This action aims to promote the understanding of mechanisms and processes underlying the radiation damage of biomolecular systems at the molecular and nanoscopic level and to use the findings to improve the strategy of Ion Beam Cancer Therapy. In the hope of achieving this, participants from different disciplines were invited to represent the fields of physics, biology, medicine and chemistry, and also included those from industry and the operators of hadron therapy centres. Ion beam therapy offers the possibility of excellent dose localization for treatment of malignant tumours, minimizing radiation damage in normal healthy tissue, while maximizing cell killing within the tumour. Several ion beam cancer therapy clinical centres are now operating in Europe and elsewhere. However, the full potential of such therapy can only be exploited by better understanding the physical, chemical and biological mechanisms that lead to cell death under ion irradiation. Considering a range of spatio-temporal scales, the proposed action therefore aims to combine the unique experimental and theoretical expertise available within Europe to acquire greater insight at the nanoscopic and molecular level into radiation damage induced by ion impact. Success in this endeavour will be both an important scientific breakthrough and give great impetus to the practical improvement of this innovative therapeutic technique. Ion therapy potentially provides an important advance in cancer therapy and the COST action MP1002 will be very significant in ensuring Europe's leadership in this field, providing the scientific background, required data and mechanistic insight which

  13. SU-C-303-01: Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Confers Cancer Resistance to Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in malignant cell resistance to radiation therapy. Methods: We first developed several small devices that could be used to adopt radiation beams from clinical high dose rate brachy therapy (HDR) or linac-based megavoltage machines to perform pre-clinical cell and mouse experiments. Then we used these devices to deliver radiation to AID-positive and AID-silenced cancer cells or tumors formed by these cells in mice. Cells and mice bearing tumors received the same dose under the same experimental conditions. For cells, we observed the apoptosis and the cell survival rate over time. For mice bearing tumors, we measured and recorded the tumor sizes every other day for 4 weeks. Results: For cell experiments, we found that the AID-positive cells underwent much less apoptosis compared with AID-silenced cells upon radiation. And for mouse experiments, we found that AID-positive tumors grew significantly faster than the AID-silenced tumors despite of receiving the same doses of radiation. Conclusion: Our study suggests that AID may confer cancer resistance to radiation therapy, and AID may be a significant biomarker predicting cancer resistance to radiation therapy for certain cancer types

  14. Ecology, management, and use of aspen and balsam poplar in the Prairie Provinces, Canada. Special report No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, E.B.; Peterson, N.M.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes information on the ecology, management, and use of aspen and balsam poplar in the ecosystems of the main zone of commercially important aspen-balsam poplar from southern Manitoba to northeastern British Columbia.

  15. Modelling and Simulation of Gas Engines Using Aspen HYSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Ekwonu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper gas engine model was developed in Aspen HYSYS V7.3 and validated with Waukesha 16V275GL+ gas engine. Fuel flexibility, fuel types and part load performance of the gas engine were investigated. The design variability revealed that the gas engine can operate on poor fuel with low lower heating value (LHV such as landfill gas, sewage gas and biogas with biogas offering potential integration with bottoming cycles when compared to natural gas. The result of the gas engine simulation gave an efficiency 40.7% and power output of 3592kW.

  16. Tank SY-102 remediation project summary report: ASPEN modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. As a part of this program, personnel at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed and demonstrated a flow sheet to remediate tank SY-102, which is located in the 200 West Area and contains high-level radioactive waste. In the conceptual design report issued earlier, an ASPEN plus trademark computer model of the flow sheet was presented. This report documents improvements in the flow sheet model after additional thermodynamic data for the actinide species were incorporated

  17. 76 FR 77591 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Aspen American Insurance Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... Supplement No. 3 to the Treasury Department Circular 570, 2011 Revision, published July 1, 2011, at 76 FR... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Aspen American Insurance Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Aspen American Insurance Company (NAIC 43460). Business Address:...

  18. Simulation of Quaking Aspen Potential Fire Behavior in Northern Utah, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Justin DeRose

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Current understanding of aspen fire ecology in western North America includes the paradoxical characterization that aspen-dominated stands, although often regenerated following fire, are “fire-proof”. We tested this idea by predicting potential fire behavior across a gradient of aspen dominance in northern Utah using the Forest Vegetation Simulator and the Fire and Fuels Extension. The wind speeds necessary for crowning (crown-to-crown fire spread and torching (surface to crown fire spread were evaluated to test the hypothesis that predicted fire behavior is influenced by the proportion of aspen in the stand. Results showed a strong effect of species composition on crowning, but only under moderate fire weather, where aspen-dominated stands were unlikely to crown or torch. Although rarely observed in actual fires, conifer-dominated stands were likely to crown but not to torch, an example of “hysteresis” in crown fire behavior. Results support the hypothesis that potential crown fire behavior varies across a gradient of aspen dominance and fire weather, where it was likely under extreme and severe fire weather, and unlikely under moderate and high fire weather. Furthermore, the “fire-proof” nature of aspen stands broke down across the gradient of aspen dominance and fire weather.

  19. Using user models in Matlab® within the Aspen Plus® interface with an Excel® link

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Fontalvo Alzate

    2014-01-01

    Process intensification and new technologies require tools for process design that can be integrated into well-known simulation software, such as Aspen Plus®. Thus, unit operations that are not included in traditional Aspen Plus software packages can be simulated with Matlab® and integrated within the Aspen Plus interface. In this way, the user can take advantage of all of the tools of Aspen Plus, such as optimization, sensitivity analysis and cost estimation. This paper gives a detailed desc...

  20. Contrasting the patterns of aspen forest and sagebrush shrubland gross ecosystem exchange in montane Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, A.; Flerchinger, G. N.; Seyfried, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the environmental controls on Gross Ecosystem Exchange (GEE) at an aspen forest and a sagebrush shrubland in southwest Idaho. The two sites were situated within a mosaic of vegetation that included temperate deciduous trees, shrublands, and evergreen conifer trees. The distribution of vegetation was presumably linked to water availability; aspen were located in wetter high-elevations sites, topographic drainages, or near snow drifts. Local temperatures have increased by ~2-3 °C over the past 50 years and less precipitation has arrived as snow. These ongoing changes in weather may impact snow water redistribution, plant-water availability, and plant-thermal stress, with associated impacts on vegetation health and production. We used eddy covariance to measure the exchange of water and carbon dioxide above the two sites and partitioned the net carbon flux to determine GEE. The sagebrush record was from 2003-2007 and the aspen record was from 2007-12. The region experienced a modest-to-severe drought in 2007, with ~73% of typical precipitation. We found that aspen were local "hotspots" for carbon exchange; peak rates of aspen GEE were ~ 60% greater than the peak rates of sagebrush GEE. Light, temperature, and water availability were dominant controls on the seasonality of GEE at both sites. Sagebrush and aspen were dormant during winter, limited by cold temperatures during winter and early spring, and water availability during mid-late summer. The onset of summer drought was typically later in the aspen than in the sagebrush. Drifting snow, lateral water redistribution, or increased rooting depths may have increased water availability in the aspen stand. Seasonal patterns of observed soil moisture and evaporation indicated aspen were rooted to >= 1 m. The sagebrush and aspen both responded strongly to the 2007 drought; peak GEE decreased by ~75%, peak GEE shifted to earlier parts of the year, and mid-summer GEE was decreased. We consider potential

  1. Modeling water/lithium bromide absorption chillers in ASPEN Plus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Single- and double-effect water/lithium bromide absorption chiller designs are numerically modeled using ASPEN. → The modeling procedure is described and the results are compared to published modeling data to access prediction accuracy. → Predictions for the single- and double-effect designs are within 3% and 5%, respectively of published data for all cycle parameters of interest. → The absorption cycle models presented allow investigation of using absorption chillers for waste heat utilization in the oil and gas industry. -- Abstract: Absorption chillers are a viable option for providing waste heat-powered cooling or refrigeration in oil and gas processing plants, thereby improving energy efficiency. In this paper, single- and double-effect water/lithium bromide absorption chiller designs are numerically modeled using ASPEN. The modeling procedure is described and the results are compared to published modeling data to access prediction accuracy. Predictions for the single- and double-effect designs are within 3% and 5%, respectively of published data for all cycle parameters of interest. The absorption cycle models presented not only allow investigation into the benefits of using absorption chillers for waste heat utilization in the oil and gas industry, but are also generically applicable to a wide range of other applications.

  2. Conditions for NIR fluorescence-guided tumor resectioning in preclinical lung cancer model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minji; Quan, Yuhua; Choi, Byeong Hyun; Choi, Yeonho; Kim, Hyun Koo; Kim, Beop-Min

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary nodule could be identified by intraoperative fluorescence imaging system from systemic injection of indocyanine green (ICG) which achieves enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effects. This study was performed to evaluate optimal injection time of ICG for detecting cancer during surgery in rabbit lung cancer model. VX2 carcinoma cell was injected in rabbit lung under fluoroscopic computed tomography-guidance. Solitary lung cancer was confirmed on positron emitting tomography with CT (PET/CT) 2 weeks after inoculation. ICG was administered intravenously and fluorescent intensity of lung tumor was measured using the custom-built intraoperative color and fluorescence merged imaging system (ICFIS) for 15 hours. Solitary lung cancer was resected through thoracoscopic version of ICFIS. ICG was observed in all animals. Because Lung has fast blood pulmonary circulation, Fluorescent signal showed maximum intensity earlier than previous studies in other organs. Fluorescent intensity showed maximum intensity within 6-9 hours in rabbit lung cancer. Overall, Fluorescent intensity decreased with increasing time, however, all tumors were detectable using fluorescent images until 12 hours. In conclusion, while there had been studies in other organs showed that optimal injection time was at least 24 hours before operation, this study showed shorter optimal injection time at lung cancer. Since fluorescent signal showed the maximum intensity within 6-9 hours, cancer resection could be performed during this time. This data informed us that optimal injection time of ICG should be evaluated in each different solid organ tumor for fluorescent image guided surgery.

  3. Identification of early cancerous lesion of esophagus with endoscopic images by hyperspectral image technique (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Chen, Shih-Hua; Chen, Weichung; Wu, I.-Chen; Wu, Ming Tsang; Kuo, Chie-Tong; Wang, Hsiang-Chen

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a method to identify early esophageal cancer within endoscope using hyperspectral imaging technology. The research samples are three kinds of endoscopic images including white light endoscopic, chromoendoscopic, and narrow-band endoscopic images with different stages of pathological changes (normal, dysplasia, dysplasia - esophageal cancer, and esophageal cancer). Research is divided into two parts: first, we analysis the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images with different stages to know the spectral responses by pathological changes. Second, we identified early cancerous lesion of esophagus by principal component analysis (PCA) of the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images. The results of this study show that the identification of early cancerous lesion is possible achieve from three kinds of images. In which the spectral characteristics of NBI endoscopy images of a gray area than those without the existence of the problem the first two, and the trend is very clear. Therefore, if simply to reflect differences in the degree of spectral identification, chromoendoscopic images are suitable samples. The best identification of early esophageal cancer is using the NBI endoscopic images. Based on the results, the use of hyperspectral imaging technology in the early endoscopic esophageal cancer lesion image recognition helps clinicians quickly diagnose. We hope for the future to have a relatively large amount of endoscopic image by establishing a hyperspectral imaging database system developed in this study, so the clinician can take this repository more efficiently preliminary diagnosis.

  4. Conservation and yield aspects of old European aspen Populus tremula L. in Swedish forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazell, Per [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Management and Products

    1999-06-01

    Biodiversity issues are becoming integrated parts of Swedish forest management. In this context, the amount and distribution of broadleaved species, including aspen, are important. This thesis summarises results of two studies in which species from the rich epiphytic flora on aspen were used to evaluate important features of aspens, and two studies relating these features to production losses due to retention of aspen. The presence and abundance of four epiphytic, bark-living bryophytes in relation to stand and host-tree characteristics, were investigated in four mixed forest stands in central Sweden. There was no general and consistent relation between aspen density and bryophyte presence. Large diameter and rough bark of the aspen host, together with site factors and stand density around the host, were important. On 35 clearfelled areas, the bryophyte Antitrichia curtipendula (Hedw.) Brid. and the lichen Lobaria pulmonaria (L.) Hoffm., species considered sensitive to clearfelling, were transplanted on retained aspen stems. As a reference, transplants were made on aspens in adjacent old stands. After two years the bryophyte showed its highest vitality in the forest, but was also vigorous on the north side of retained trees. The lichen thrived best on the clearfelled areas, on the north side of trees retained in groups. For conservation purposes, aspen are best retained in groups. Qualitative and quantitative aspects of retained large aspens (diameter 49.6{+-}7.0 cm and height 29.4{+-}1.0 m) were studied in a 110-year-old aspen stand. Twelve trees were destructively analysed to establish allometric equations relating stem, bark and branch biomass and current annual stem increment (CAI{sub s}) to diameter at breast height. Biomass of the mean tree was 1172 kg, of which 80% was stemwood. CAI{sub s} was 1.5% of total stem biomass. Finally, the yield of a 44-year-old Norway spruce stand under an aspen overstorey was compared with that of pure Norway spruce, estimated

  5. Novel variants in MLL confer to bladder cancer recurrence identified by whole-exome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqiang; Huang, Yi; Liu, Huan; Li, Feida; He, Luyun; Sun, Da; Yu, Yuan; Li, Qiaoling; Huang, Peide; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Xin; Bi, Tengteng; Zhuang, Xuehan; Zhang, Liyan; Lu, Jingxiao; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Fangjian; Liu, Chunxiao; Yang, Guosheng; Hou, Yong; Fan, Zusen; Cai, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is distinguished by high rate of recurrence after surgery, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we performed the whole-exome sequencing of 37 BC individuals including 20 primary and 17 recurrent samples in which the primary and recurrent samples were not from the same patient. We uncovered that MLL, EP400, PRDM2, ANK3 and CHD5 exclusively altered in recurrent BCs. Specifically, the recurrent BCs and bladder cancer cells with MLL mutation displayed increased histone H3 tri-methyl K4 (H3K4me3) modification in tissue and cell levels and showed enhanced expression of GATA4 and ETS1 downstream. What's more, MLL mutated bladder cancer cells obtained with CRISPR/Cas9 showed increased ability of drug-resistance to epirubicin (a chemotherapy drug for bladder cancer) than wild type cells. Additionally, the BC patients with high expression of GATA4 and ETS1 significantly displayed shorter lifespan than patients with low expression. Our study provided an overview of the genetic basis of recrudescent bladder cancer and discovered that genetic alterations of MLL were involved in BC relapse. The increased modification of H3K4me3 and expression of GATA4 and ETS1 would be the promising targets for the diagnosis and therapy of relapsed bladder cancer. PMID:26625313

  6. Ruffed grouse feeding behavior and its relationship to secondary metabolites of quaking aspen flower buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubas, W J; Gullion, G W; Clausen, T P

    1989-06-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) staminate flower buds and the extended catkins are primary food resources for ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus). Winter feeding observations indicate that ruffed grouse select specific trees or clones of quaking aspen to feed in. Flower buds and catkins of quaking aspen were analyzed for secondary compounds (tannins, alkaloids, and phenolics) that might cause ruffed grouse to avoid trees with high levels of these compounds. Coniferyl benzoate, a compound that has not been previously found in quaking aspen, exists in significantly higher concentrations in buds from trees with no feeding history as compared to ruffed grouse feeding trees. Aspen catkins were also significantly lower in coniferyl benzoate than buds from the same tree. Ruffed grouse feeding preference was not related to the tannin or total phenolic levels found in buds or catkins. Buds from feeding trees had higher protein levels than trees with no feeding history; however, catkins did not differ from buds in protein concentration. The high use of extended catkins in the spring by ruffed grouse is probably due to a lower percentage of bud scale material in the catkin as opposed to the dormant bud. Bud scales contain almost all of the nontannin phenolics in catkins and dormant buds. A feeding strategy where bud scales are avoided may exist for other bird species that feed on quaking aspen. Dormant flower buds are significantly lower in protein-precipitable tannins than catkins and differ in secondary metabolite composition from other aspen foliage. PMID:24272191

  7. Up-regulation of REG3A in colorectal cancer cells confers proliferation and correlates with colorectal cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Ying; Xiao, Ling; Wang, Su-Juan; Yue, Wei; Yin, Qiao-Shan; Sun, Meng-Yao; Xia, Wei; Shao, Zhi-Yi; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in the world. Previous studies have investigated the altered expression of regenerating islet-derived 3 alpha (REG3A) in various cancers. We aimed at exploring the biological function and the underlying molecular mechanism of REG3A in CRC. In this study, REG3A was found elevated in CRC compared with normal tissues. Further, high REG3A expression level was correlated with bigger tumor size, poorer differentiation, higher tumor stag...

  8. Inventory of aspen trees in spruce dominated stands in conservation area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matti Maltamo; Annukka Pesonen; Lauri Korhonen; Jari Kouki; Mikko Vehmas; Kalle Eerikinen

    2015-01-01

    Background:The occurrence of aspen trees increases the conservation value of mature conifer dominated forests. Aspens typically occur as scattered individuals among major tree species, and therefore the inventory of aspens is challenging. Methods:We characterized aspen populations in a boreal nature reserve using diameter distribution, spatial pattern, and forest attributes:volume, number of aspens, number of large aspen stems and basal area median diameter. The data were collected from three separate forest stands in Koli National Park, eastern Finland. At each site, we measured breast height diameter and coordinates of each aspen. The comparison of inventory methods of aspens within the three stands was based on simulations with mapped field data. We mimicked stand level inventory by locating varying numbers of fixed area circular plots both systematically and randomly within the stands. Additionally, we also tested if the use of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data as auxiliary information would improve the accuracy of the stand level inventory by applying the probability proportional to size sampling to assist the selection of field plot locations. Results:The results showed that aspens were always clustered, and the diameter distributions indicated different stand structures in the three investigated forest stands. The reliability of the volume and number of large aspen trees varied from relative root mean square error figures above 50%with fewer sample plots (5–10) to values of 25%–50%with 10 or more sample plots. Stand level inventory estimates were also able to detect spatial pattern and the shape of the diameter distribution. In addition, ALS-based auxiliary information could be useful in guiding the inventories, but caution should be used when applying the ALS-supported inventory technique. Conclusions:This study characterized European aspen populations for the purposes of monitoring and management of boreal conservation areas. Our results suggest that

  9. Inventory of aspen trees in spruce dominated stands in conservation area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Maltamo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The occurrence of aspen trees increases the conservation value of mature conifer dominated forests. Aspens typically occur as scattered individuals among major tree species, and therefore the inventory of aspens is challenging. Methods We characterized aspen populations in a boreal nature reserve using diameter distribution, spatial pattern, and forest attributes: volume, number of aspens, number of large aspen stems and basal area median diameter. The data were collected from three separate forest stands in Koli National Park, eastern Finland. At each site, we measured breast height diameter and coordinates of each aspen. The comparison of inventory methods of aspens within the three stands was based on simulations with mapped field data. We mimicked stand level inventory by locating varying numbers of fixed area circular plots both systematically and randomly within the stands. Additionally, we also tested if the use of airborne laser scanning (ALS data as auxiliary information would improve the accuracy of the stand level inventory by applying the probability proportional to size sampling to assist the selection of field plot locations. Results The results showed that aspens were always clustered, and the diameter distributions indicated different stand structures in the three investigated forest stands. The reliability of the volume and number of large aspen trees varied from relative root mean square error figures above 50% with fewer sample plots (5–10 to values of 25%–50% with 10 or more sample plots. Stand level inventory estimates were also able to detect spatial pattern and the shape of the diameter distribution. In addition, ALS-based auxiliary information could be useful in guiding the inventories, but caution should be used when applying the ALS-supported inventory technique. Conclusions This study characterized European aspen populations for the purposes of monitoring and management of boreal conservation areas. Our

  10. Orbital Express Mission Operations Planning and Resource Management using ASPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Caroline; Knight, Russell; Jones, Grailing; Tran, Danny

    2008-01-01

    The Orbital Express satellite servicing demonstrator program is a DARPA program aimed at developing "a safe and cost-effective approach to autonomously service satellites in orbit". The system consists of: a) the Autonomous Space Transport Robotic Operations (ASTRO) vehicle, under development by Boeing Integrated Defense Systems, and b) a prototype modular next-generation serviceable satellite, NEXTSat, being developed by Ball Aerospace. Flexibility of ASPEN: a) Accommodate changes to procedures; b) Accommodate changes to daily losses and gains; c) Responsive re-planning; and d) Critical to success of mission planning Auto-Generation of activity models: a) Created plans quickly; b) Repetition/Re-use of models each day; and c) Guarantees the AML syntax. One SRP per day vs. Tactical team

  11. Simulation of IGFC power generation system by Aspen Plus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Rosendahl, Lasse; Sayem, Abu Sadahat;

    2010-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a promising technology for electricity generation. Sulfur free syngas from the gas cleaning unit serves as a fuel for SOFC in IGFC (Integrated gasification Fuel cell) power plant. It converts the chemical energy of the fuel gas directly to electric energy and...... therefore, very high efficiencies can be achieved. The outputs from SOFC can be utilized by HRSG which drives steam turbine for electricity production. The SOFC stack model developed using the process flow sheet simulator Aspen Plus which is of equilibrium type. The results indicate there must be tread off...... efficiency and power with respect to a variety of SOFC inputs. HRSG which is located after the SOFC is also included in current simulation study with various operating parameters. This paper also describes for the IGFC Power Plants, the optimization of the Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) is of...

  12. Aqueous electrolyte modeling in ASPEN PLUS{trademark}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomingburg, G.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Simonson, J.M.; Moore, R.C.; Mesmer, R.E.; Cochran, H.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The presence of electrolytes in aqueous solutions has long been recognized as contributing to significant departures from thermodynamic ideality. The presence of ions in process streams can greatly add to the difficulty of predicting process behavior. The difficulties are increased as temperatures and pressures within a process are elevated. Because many chemical companies now model their processes with chemical process simulators it is important that such codes be able to accurately model electrolyte behavior under a variety of conditions. Here the authors examine the electrolyte modeling capability of ASPEN PLUS{trademark}, a widely used simulator. Specifically, efforts to model alkali metal halide and sulfate systems are presented. The authors show conditions for which the models within the code work adequately and how they might be improved for conditions where the simulator models fail.

  13. Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection from radiation-induced DNA damage and maintain centrosome stability in colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Myung Park

    Full Text Available Beclin 1 interacts with UV-irradiation-resistance-associated gene (UVRAG to form core complexes that induce autophagy. While cells with defective autophagy are prone to genomic instability that contributes to tumorigenesis, it is unknown whether Beclin1 or UVRAG can regulate the DNA damage/repair response to cancer treatment in established tumor cells. We found that siRNA knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG can increase radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, shown by pATM and γH2Ax, and promote colorectal cancer cell death. Furthermore, knockdown of Beclin 1, UVRAG or ATG5 increased the percentage of irradiated cells with nuclear foci expressing 53BP1, a marker of nonhomologous end joining but not RAD51 (homologous recombination, compared to control siRNA. Beclin 1 siRNA was shown to attenuate UVRAG expression. Cells with a UVRAG deletion mutant defective in Beclin 1 binding showed increased radiation-induced DSBs and cell death compared to cells with ectopic wild-type UVRAG. Knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG, but not ATG5, resulted in a significant increase in centrosome number (γ-tubulin staining in irradiated cells compared to control siRNA. Taken together, these data indicate that Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection against radiation-induced DNA DSBs and may maintain centrosome stability in established tumor cells.

  14. Evaluation of the colorectal cancer risk conferred by rare UNC5C alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küry, Sébastien; Garrec, Céline; Airaud, Fabrice; Breheret, Flora; Guibert, Virginie; Frenard, Cécile; Jiao, Shuo; Bonneau, Dominique; Berthet, Pascaline; Bossard, Céline; Ingster, Olivier; Cauchin, Estelle; Bezieau, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the risk associated with variants of the UNC5C gene recently suspected to predispose to familial colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS: We screened patients with familial CRC forms as well as patients with sporadic CRCs. In a first time, we analyzed exon 11 of the UNC5C gene in 120 unrelated patients with suspected hereditary CRC, 58 patients with suspected Lynch-associated cancer or polyposis, and 132 index cases of Lynch syndrome families with a characterized mutation in a DNA mismatch repair (MMR). Next, 1023 patients with sporadic CRC and 1121 healthy individuals were screened for the variants identified in patients with familial cancer. RESULTS: Of 120 patients with familial CRC of unknown etiology, one carried the previously reported mis-sense mutation p.Arg603Cys (R603C) and another exhibited the unreported variant of unknown significance p.Thr617Ile (T617I). The p.Ala628Lys (A628K) mutation previously described as the main UNC5C risk variant for familial CRC was not detected in any cases of familial CRC of unknown etiology, but was present in a patient with familial gastric cancer and in two Lynch syndrome patients in co-occurrence with MMR mutations. A statistically non-significant increase in cancer risk was identified in familial CRC and/or other Lynch-associated cancers (1/178 patients vs 2/1121 healthy controls, OR = 3.2, 95%CI: 0.29-35.05, P = 0.348) and in sporadic CRCs (4/1023 patients vs 2/1121 healthy controls, OR = 2.2, 95%CI: 0.40-12.02, P = 0.364). CONCLUSION: We confirm that UNC5C mutations are very rare in familial and sporadic CRCs, but further investigations are needed to justify routine UNC5C testing for diagnostic purposes. PMID:24415873

  15. Radiation damage of bio-molecular systems: Nano-scale insights into ion-beam cancer therapy. 2nd Nano-IBCT conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference was attended by ninety five participants, 30% of whom were female, from twenty countries and fifty different institutions. The conference hosted twelve thematic sessions, devoted to the topics defined within the five working groups of the COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) action (WG1: Ion Propagation, WG2: Primary ionization in the medium, direct damage and production of secondary species, WG3: Propagation of secondary species, WG4: Electron attack on DNA, WG5: Radiobiological scale effects), as well as broad range of related matters, covering such topics as the interaction of plasma with biological molecules or instrumental development for cancer diagnosis and treatment

  16. A truncating mutation of HDAC2 in human cancers confers resistance to histone deacetylase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropero, S; Fraga, MF; Ballestar, E;

    2006-01-01

    Disruption of histone acetylation patterns is a common feature of cancer cells, but very little is known about its genetic basis. We have identified truncating mutations in one of the primary human histone deacetylases, HDAC2, in sporadic carcinomas with microsatellite instability and in tumors a...

  17. Upregulation of AKT3 Confers Resistance to the AKT Inhibitor MK2206 in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stottrup, Casey; Tsang, Tiffany; Chin, Y Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    Acquired resistance to molecular targeted therapy represents a major challenge for the effective treatment of cancer. Hyperactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently observed in virtually all human malignancies, and numerous PI3K and AKT inhibitors are currently under clinical evaluation. However, mechanisms of acquired resistance to AKT inhibitors have yet to be described. Here, we use a breast cancer preclinical model to identify resistance mechanisms to a small molecule allosteric AKT inhibitor, MK2206. Using a step-wise and chronic high-dose exposure, breast cancer cell lines harboring oncogenic PI3K resistant to MK2206 were established. Using this model, we reveal that AKT3 expression is markedly upregulated in AKT inhibitor-resistant cells. Induction of AKT3 is regulated epigenetically by the bromodomain and extra terminal domain proteins. Importantly, knockdown of AKT3, but not AKT1 or AKT2, in resistant cells restores sensitivity to MK2206. AKT inhibitor-resistant cells also display an epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype as assessed by alterations in the levels of E-Cadherin, N-Cadherin, and vimentin, as well as enhanced invasiveness of tumor spheroids. Notably, the invasive morphology of resistant spheroids is diminished upon AKT3 depletion. We also show that resistance to MK2206 is reversible because upon drug removal resistant cells regain sensitivity to AKT inhibition, accompanied by reexpression of epithelial markers and reduction of AKT3 expression, implying that epigenetic reprogramming contributes to acquisition of resistance. These findings provide a rationale for developing therapeutics targeting AKT3 to circumvent acquired resistance in breast cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1964-74. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27297869

  18. Advances in caring for the older cancer patient:a report from the 2015 conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rob Stepney

    2016-01-01

    A paradox in cancer research is that the majority of patients enrolled in clinical trials are relatively young and fit while typical patients in daily practice are elderly and have comorbidities and impaired organ function. Given these differences, many major studies provide an imperfect guide to optimizing the treatment of the majority of patients. Since cancer incidence is highly correlated with age, and since the world's population is rapidly ageing, this problem can only increase. For this reason, oncologists and geriatricians need to collaborate in developing tools to systematically assess the health status of elderly patients and their fitness to receive cancer therapies of various intensity. Tailoring anti-cancer treatments and supportive care to individual needs should be seen as part of the move towards personalized medicine. Achieving this goal is as much of a challenge to developing and middle-income countries as it is to western nations. The 2015 annual conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) held in Prague, Czech Republic, November 2015 and had a global focus on advancing the science of geriatric oncology and supportive care. Central to this approach is the systematic assessment of life expectancy, independent functioning, and the physical and psychological health of older cancer patients. The assumption behind comprehensive geriatric assessment is that elderly cancer patients have complex needs. The implication is that effective intervention will require a multidisciplinary team. Examples of effective geriatric assessment, multidisciplinary working and supportive care were presented at the SIOG conference.

  19. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling. - Highlights: • PAUF confers resistance against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection. • PAUF enhances the expression of IFNAR in Panc-1 cells. • Increased activation of Tyk2 or Stat1 by PAUF provides resistance to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. • Constitutive inhibition of PAUF enhances parvovirus H-1-mediated oncolysis of Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells

  20. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok [BK21+, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ho Young [Department of Microbiology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Manbok [Department of Medical Science, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok [Department of Biological Sciences, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa, E-mail: younghc@pusan.ac.kr [BK21+, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling. - Highlights: • PAUF confers resistance against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection. • PAUF enhances the expression of IFNAR in Panc-1 cells. • Increased activation of Tyk2 or Stat1 by PAUF provides resistance to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. • Constitutive inhibition of PAUF enhances parvovirus H-1-mediated oncolysis of Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells.

  1. Best Practices Case Study: Shaw Construction Burlingame Ranch Ph.1, Aspen, CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    Shaw Construction built 84 energy efficient, affordable condominiums forthe City of Aspen that achieved HERS scores of less than 62 with help from Building America’s research team lead Building Science Corporation.

  2. ASPEN: A Framework for Automated Planning and Scheduling of Spacecraft Control and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, David; Fukunaga, Alex S.; Rabideau, Gregg; Chien, Steve

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we describe ASPEN (Automated Planning/Scheduling Environment), a modular, reconfigurable application framework which is capable of supporting a wide variety of planning and scheduling applications.

  3. Coal conversion systems design and process modeling. Volume 1: Application of MPPR and Aspen computer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The development of a coal gasification system design and mass and energy balance simulation program for the TVA and other similar facilities is described. The materials-process-product model (MPPM) and the advanced system for process engineering (ASPEN) computer program were selected from available steady state and dynamic models. The MPPM was selected to serve as the basis for development of system level design model structure because it provided the capability for process block material and energy balance and high-level systems sizing and costing. The ASPEN simulation serves as the basis for assessing detailed component models for the system design modeling program. The ASPEN components were analyzed to identify particular process blocks and data packages (physical properties) which could be extracted and used in the system design modeling program. While ASPEN physical properties calculation routines are capable of generating physical properties required for process simulation, not all required physical property data are available, and must be user-entered.

  4. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P;

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before the...

  5. A germline variant in the TP53 polyadenylation signal confers cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacey, Simon N; Sulem, Patrick; Jonasdottir, Aslaug;

    2011-01-01

    ' untranslated region of TP53 and changes the AATAAA polyadenylation signal to AATACA, resulting in impaired 3'-end processing of TP53 mRNA. Investigation of other tumor types identified associations of this SNP with prostate cancer (OR = 1.44, P = 2.4 × 10(-6)), glioma (OR = 2.35, P = 1.0 × 10......(-5)) and colorectal adenoma (OR = 1.39, P = 1.6 × 10(-4)). However, we observed no effect for breast cancer, a common Li-Fraumeni syndrome tumor (OR = 1.06, P = 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.88-1.27).......To identify new risk variants for cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, we performed a genome-wide association study of 16 million SNPs identified through whole-genome sequencing of 457 Icelanders. We imputed genotypes for 41,675 Illumina SNP chip-typed Icelanders and their relatives. In the discovery...

  6. Adapting biomodulatory strategies for treatment in new contexts: pancreatic and oral cancers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbil, Sriram R.; Rizvi, Imran; Khan, Amjad P.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Biomodulation of cancer cell metabolism represents a promising approach to overcome tumor heterogeneity and poor selectivity, which contribute significantly to treatment resistance. To date, several studies have demonstrated that modulation of cell metabolism including the heme synthesis pathway serves as an elegant approach to improve the efficacy of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) based photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, the ability of biomodulation-enhanced PDT to improve outcomes in low resource settings and to address challenges in treating lethal tumors with exogenous photosensitizers remains underexplored. The ability of vitamin D or methotrexate to enhance PDT efficacy in a carcinogen-induced hamster cheek pouch model of oral squamous cell carcinoma and in 3D cell-based models for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is evaluated. Challenges associated with adapting PDT regimens to low resource settings, understanding the effects of biomodulatory agents on the metabolism of cancer cells, and the differential effects of biomodulatory agents on tumor and stromal cells will be discussed.

  7. High-throughput autofluorescence flow cytometry of breast cancer metabolism (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amy T.; Cannon, Taylor M.; Higginbotham, Jim N.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-02-01

    Tumor heterogeneity poses challenges for devising optimal treatment regimens for cancer patients. In particular, subpopulations of cells can escape treatment and cause relapse. There is a need for methods to characterize tumor heterogeneity of treatment response. Cell metabolism is altered in cancer (Warburg effect), and cells use the autofluorescent cofactor NADH in numerous metabolic reactions. Previous studies have shown that microscopy measurements of NADH autofluorescence are sensitive to treatment response in breast cancer, and these techniques typically assess hundreds of cells per group. An alternative approach is flow cytometry, which measures fluorescence on a single-cell level and is attractive for characterizing tumor heterogeneity because it achieves high-throughput analysis and cell sorting in millions of cells per group. Current applications for flow cytometry rely on staining with fluorophores. This study characterizes flow cytometry measurements of NADH autofluorescence in breast cancer cells. Preliminary results indicate flow cytometry of NADH is sensitive to cyanide perturbation, which inhibits oxidative phosphorylation, in nonmalignant MCF10A cells. Additionally, flow cytometry is sensitive to higher NADH intensity for HER2-positive SKBr3 cells compared with triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. These results agree with previous microscopy studies. Finally, a mixture of SKBr3 and MDA-MB-231 cells were sorted into each cell type using NADH intensity. Sorted cells were cultured, and microscopy validation showed the expected morphology for each cell type. Ultimately, flow cytometry could be applied to characterize tumor heterogeneity based on treatment response and sort cell subpopulations based on metabolic profile. These achievements could enable individualized treatment strategies and improved patient outcomes.

  8. Partial wave spectroscopic microscopy can predict prostate cancer progression and mitigate over-treatment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Graff, Taylor; Crawford, Susan; Subramanian, Hariharan; Thompson, Sebastian; Derbas, Justin R.; Lyengar, Radha; Roy, Hemant K.; Brendler, Charles B.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-02-01

    Prostate Cancer (PC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American men. While prostate specific antigen (PSA) test has been widely used for screening PC, >60% of the PSA detected cancers are indolent, leading to unnecessary clinical interventions. An alternative approach, active surveillance (AS), also suffer from high expense, discomfort and complications associated with repeat biopsies (every 1-3 years), limiting its acceptance. Hence, a technique that can differentiate indolent from aggressive PC would attenuate the harms from over-treatment. Combining microscopy with spectroscopy, our group has developed partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy, which can quantify intracellular nanoscale organizations (e.g. chromatin structures) that are not accessible by conventional microscopy. PWS microscopy has previously been shown to predict the risk of cancer in seven different organs (N ~ 800 patients). Herein we use PWS measurement of label-free histologically-normal prostatic epithelium to distinguish indolent from aggressive PC and predict PC risk. Our results from 38 men with low-grade PC indicated that there is a significant increase in progressors compared to non-progressors (p=0.002, effect size=110%, AUC=0.80, sensitivity=88% and specificity=72%), while the baseline clinical characteristics were not significantly different. We further improved the diagnostic power by performing nuclei-specific measurements using an automated system that separates in real-time the cell nuclei from the remaining prostate epithelium. In the long term, we envision that the PWS based prognostication can be coupled with AS without any change to the current procedure to mitigate the harms caused by over-treatment.

  9. Enhancement of production of eugenol and its glycosides in transgenic aspen plants via genetic engineering.

    OpenAIRE

    Koeduka, Takao; Suzuki, Shiro; Iijima, Yoko; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; SUZUKI Hideyuki; Watanabe, Bunta; Shibata, Daisuke; UMEZAWA, Toshiaki; Pichersky, Eran; Hiratake, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Eugenol, a volatile phenylpropene found in many plant species, exhibits antibacterial and acaricidal activities. This study attempted to modify the production of eugenol and its glycosides by introducing petunia coniferyl alcohol acetyltransferase (PhCFAT) and eugenol synthase (PhEGS) into hybrid aspen. Gas chromatography analyses revealed that wild-type hybrid aspen produced small amount of eugenol in leaves. The heterologous overexpression of PhCFAT alone resulted in up to 7-fold higher eug...

  10. Continental-scale assessment of genetic diversity and population structure in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides)

    OpenAIRE

    Callahan, Colin M.; Rowe, Carol A.; Ryel, Ronald J.; Shaw, John D.; Madritch, Michael D.; Mock, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) has the largest natural distribution of any tree native to North America. The primary objectives of this study were to characterize range-wide genetic diversity and genetic structuring in quaking aspen, and to assess the influence of glacial history and rear-edge dynamics. Location: North America. Methods: Using a sample set representing the full longitudinal and latitudinal extent of the species’ distribution, we examined geographical patterns o...

  11. Radiation cancer analysis and low dose risk estimation: new developments and perspectives - conference to be held Feb 2002. Final technical report for period November 1, 2001--October 31, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Proceedings of the 20th LH Gray Conference on Radiation Cancer Analysis and Low Dose Risk Estimation: New Developments and Perspectives (17-21 February 2002, Ede, the Netherlands) comprises 32 peer-reviewed papers on invited and proffered contributions to the conference with a preface by the guest editors. The on-going discussion of low dose radiation risk; the issue of the linear, non-threshold extrapolation; and the anticipated new recommendations, e.g. from BEIR and ICRP, provided the back-drop for the conference. The meeting dealt with topics such as basic mechanisms and bystander effects, cancer modeling, cancer genetics, radon exposure and lung cancer risk, cancer after medical exposure, cancer risk estimation, dose-effect relationships, and application to radiation protection

  12. Genetic variation in functional traits influences arthropod community composition in aspen (Populus tremula L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Robinson

    Full Text Available We conducted a study of natural variation in functional leaf traits and herbivory in 116 clones of European aspen, Populus tremula L., the Swedish Aspen (SwAsp collection, originating from ten degrees of latitude across Sweden and grown in a common garden. In surveys of phytophagous arthropods over two years, we found the aspen canopy supports nearly 100 morphospecies. We identified significant broad-sense heritability of plant functional traits, basic plant defence chemistry, and arthropod community traits. The majority of arthropods were specialists, those coevolved with P. tremula to tolerate and even utilize leaf defence compounds. Arthropod abundance and richness were more closely related to plant growth rates than general chemical defences and relationships were identified between the arthropod community and stem growth, leaf and petiole morphology, anthocyanins, and condensed tannins. Heritable genetic variation in plant traits in young aspen was found to structure arthropod community; however no single trait drives the preferences of arthropod folivores among young aspen genotypes. The influence of natural variation in plant traits on the arthropod community indicates the importance of maintaining genetic variation in wild trees as keystone species for biodiversity. It further suggests that aspen can be a resource for the study of mechanisms of natural resistance to herbivores.

  13. Managed Mixtures of Aspen and White Spruce 21 to 25 Years after Establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kabzems

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intimate mixtures of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx. and white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench Voss are a key feature of western Canadian boreal forests. These mixtures have the potential to produce high yields of merchantable fibre and provide numerous ecological services. Achievement of this potential has been difficult, and often expensive, to realize as a regeneration goal in managed forests. We report 21 to 25 year results of managed mixtures on two study sites where the white spruce was planted, and the density of aspen natural regeneration manipulated within five years of the stand initiation disturbance. On both sites, white spruce mortality did not increase with increasing aspen density. While height and diameter growth of white spruce declined with increasing aspen density, the effect was not entirely consistent across the two sites. Abrasion from aspen branches was the most common source of damage to spruce crowns. Mixed stands had greater merchantable volume production than pure spruce stands based on model projections. Application of aspen harvest at year 60, while protecting the spruce component for a second harvest entry at year 90, was projected to optimize combined yield for the mixedwood stands.

  14. Common genetic variants associated with telomere length confer risk for neuroblastoma and other childhood cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kyle M; Whitehead, Todd P; de Smith, Adam J; Smirnov, Ivan V; Park, Minsun; Endicott, Alyson A; Francis, Stephen S; Codd, Veryan; Samani, Nilesh J; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant telomere lengthening is an important feature of cancer cells in adults and children. In addition to somatic mutations, germline polymorphisms in telomere maintenance genes impact telomere length. Whether these telomere-associated polymorphisms affect risk of childhood malignancies remains largely unexplored. We collected genome-wide data from three groups with pediatric malignancies [neuroblastoma (N = 1516), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (N = 958) and osteosarcoma (N = 660)] and three control populations (N = 6892). Using case-control comparisons, we analyzed eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes definitively associated with interindividual variation in leukocyte telomere length (LTL) in prior genome-wide association studies: ACYP2, TERC, NAF1, TERT, OBFC1, CTC1, ZNF208 and RTEL1 Six of these SNPs were associated (P < 0.05) with neuroblastoma risk, one with leukemia risk and one with osteosarcoma risk. The allele associated with longer LTL increased cancer risk for all these significantly associated SNPs. Using a weighted linear combination of the eight LTL-associated SNPs, we observed that neuroblastoma patients were predisposed to longer LTL than controls, with each standard deviation increase in genotypically estimated LTL associated with a 1.15-fold increased odds of neuroblastoma (95%CI = 1.09-1.22; P = 7.9×10(-7)). This effect was more pronounced in adolescent-onset neuroblastoma patients (OR = 1.46; 95%CI = 1.03-2.08). A one standard deviation increase in genotypically estimated LTL was more weakly associated with osteosarcoma risk (OR = 1.10; 95%CI = 1.01-1.19; P = 0.017) and leukemia risk (OR = 1.07; 95%CI = 1.00-1.14; P = 0.044), specifically for leukemia patients who relapsed (OR = 1.19; 95%CI = 1.01-1.40; P = 0.043). These results indicate that genetic predisposition to longer LTL is a newly identified risk factor for neuroblastoma and potentially for other cancers of childhood. PMID:27207662

  15. Spatiotemporally synchronized cancer combination therapy using photo-activated nanoparticle drug delivery systems (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    This talk will introduce a new nanotechnology platform for cancer combination therapy that utilizes near infrared light activation not only for photodynamic damage but also as an extrinsic mechanism to initiate release of complimentary drugs to suppress dynamic bursts in molecular signaling networks that promote tumor cell survival and treatment escape. The goal is to achieve co-delivery with concomitant activity of photodynamic, molecular inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents, selectively within the tumor. This approach overcomes challenges in achieving synergistic interactions using sequential drug delivery. Conventional drug delivery is compromised by the differential pharmacokinetics of individual agents and potentially antagonistic effects—such as vascular shutdown by one agent that limits delivery of the second. Here, photodynamic damage—which efficiently kills drug-resistant cells via damage of common proteins involved in drug-resistance (such as anti-apoptosis factors and drug-efflux transporters)—is synchronized spatially and temporally with the photo-initiated release of complimentary agents—to enable full interaction amongst the individual therapies. This spatiotemporal synchronization offers new prospects for exploiting time-sensitive synergistic interactions. Specific implementations of these concepts will be presented in preclinical models of cancer. Strategies to enable molecular-targeting of cancer cells via site-specific attachment of targeting moieties to the outer lipid shell of these nanovehicles will also be discussed. If successful in humans, this new paradigm for synchronized, tumor-focused combination therapy will ultimately supersede the present use of chronic drug injection by increasing efficacy per cycle whilst reducing systemic exposure to toxic drugs.

  16. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide1826 combined with radioresistant cancer cell vaccine confers significant antitumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, X B; Xing, N; Zhang, Q; Yuan, S J; Chen, W; Qiao, T K

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a hot issue in cancer research over the years and tumor cell vaccine is one of the increasing number of studies. Although the whole tumor cell vaccine can provide the best source of immunizing antigens, there is still a limitation that most tumors are not naturally immunogenic. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs), synthetic oligonucleotides containing a cytosine-phosphate-guanine(CpG) motif, was shown to enhance immune responses to a wide variety of antigens. In this study, we generated the radioresistant Lewis lung cancer cell by repeated X-ray radiation and inactivated it as a whole tumor cell vaccine to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cell vaccine. Mice were subcutaneously immunized with this inactivated vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 and then inoculated with autologous Lewis lung cancer (LLC) to estimate the antitumor efficacy. The results showed that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 could significantly inhibit tumor growth, increased survival of the mice and with 20% of the mice surviving tumor free in vivo compared with the unimmunized mice bearing LLC tumor. A significant increase of apoptosis was also observed in the tumor prophylactically immunized with vaccine of inactivated radioresistant tumor cell plus CpG ODN1826. The potent antitumor effect correlated with higher secretion levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α) and lower levels of interleukin-10(IL-10) concentration in serum. Furthermore, the results suggested that the antitumor mechanism was probably depended on the decreased level of programmed death ligand-1(PD-L1) which plays an important role in the negative regulation of immune response by the inhibition of tumor antigen-specific T cell activation. These findings clearly demonstrated that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 as an appropriate adjuvant could induce effective antitumor immunity in vivo. PMID:26458317

  17. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about rectal cancer clinical management: The radiation oncologist’s expert review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: Although rectal and colon cancer management has progressed greatly in the last few decades clinical outcomes still need to be optimized. Furthermore, consensus is required on several issues as some of the main international guidelines provide different recommendations. The European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA) drew up documents to standardize management and care in Europe and aid in decision-making. Material and Methods: In the present section the panel of experts reviews and discusses data from the literature on rectal cancer, focusing on recommendations for selecting between short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and long-course radio-chemotherapy (LCRTCT) as preoperative treatment as well as on the controversies about adjuvant treatment in patients who had received a pre-operative treatment. Results: The starting-point of the present EURECCA document is that adding SCRT or LCRTCT to TME improved loco-regional control but did not increase overall survival in any single trial which, in any case, had improved with the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) into clinical practice. Moderate consensus was achieved for cT3 anyNM0 disease. In this frame, agreement was reached on either SCRT followed by immediate surgery or LCRTCT with delayed surgery for mesorectal fascia (MRF) negative tumors at presentation. LCRTCT was recommended for tumor shrinkage in MRF+ at presentations but if patients were not candidates for chemotherapy, SCRT with delayed surgery is an option/alternative. LCRTCT was recommended for cT4 anycNM0. SCRT offers the advantages of less acute toxicity and lower costs, and LCRTCT tumor shrinkage and down-staging, with 13–36% pathological complete response (pCR) rates. To improve the efficacy of preoperative treatment both SCRT and LCRTCT have been, or are being, associated with diverse schedules of chemotherapy and even new targeted therapies but without any definitive evidence of benefit. Nowadays, standard

  18. Pluripotent Stem Cell Protein Sox2 Confers Sensitivity to LSD1 Inhibition in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene amplification of Sox2 at 3q26.33 is a common event in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs of the lung and esophagus, as well as several other cancers. Here, we show that the expression of LSD1/KDM1 histone demethylase is significantly elevated in Sox2-expressing lung SCCs. LSD1-specific inhibitors selectively impair the growth of Sox2-expressing lung SCCs, but not that of Sox2-negative cells. Sox2 expression is associated with sensitivity to LSD1 inhibition in lung, breast, ovarian, and other carcinoma cells. Inactivation of LSD1 reduces Sox2 expression, promotes G1 cell-cycle arrest, and induces genes for differentiation by selectively modulating the methylation states of histone H3 at lysines 4 (H3K4 and 9 (H3K9. Reduction of Sox2 further suppresses Sox2-dependent lineage-survival oncogenic potential, elevates trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27 and enhances growth arrest and cellular differentiation. Our studies suggest that LSD1 serves as a selective epigenetic target for therapy in Sox2-expressing cancers.

  19. Mechanistic exploration of a bi-directional PDT-based combination in pancreatic cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huang-Chiao; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Liu, Joyce; Chiang, Chun-Te; Mai, Zhiming; Goldschmidt, Ruth; Rizvi, Imran; Ebrahim-Zadeh, Neema; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly evident that the most effective cancer treatments will involve interactive regimens that target multiple non-overlapping pathways, preferably such that each component enhances the others to improve outcomes while minimizing systemic toxicities. Toward this goal, we developed a combination of photodynamic therapy and irinotecan, which mechanistically cooperate with each other, beyond their individual tumor destruction pathways, to cause synergistic reduction in orthotopic pancreatic tumor burden. A three-way mechanistic basis of the observed the synergism will be discussed: (i) PDT downregulates drug efflux transporters to increase intracellular irinotecan levels. (ii) Irinotecan reduces the expression of hypoxia-induced marker, which is upregulated by PDT. (iii) PDT downregulates irinotecan-induced survivin expression to amplify the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects. The clinical translation potential of the combination will also be highlighted.

  20. ISOCT study of collagen crosslinking of collagen in cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Graham; Young, Scott T.; Yi, Ji; Shea, Lonnie D.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The role of extracellular matrix modification and signaling in cancer progression is an increasingly recognized avenue for the progression of the disease. Previous study of field effect carcinogenesis with Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (ISOCT) has revealed pronounced changes in the nanoscale-sensitive mass fractal dimension D measured from field effect tissue when compared to healthy tissue. However, the origin of this difference in tissue ultrastructure in field effect carcinogenesis has remained poorly understood. Here, we present findings supporting the idea that enzymatic crosslinking of the extracellular matrix is an effect that presents at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. We use a model of collagen gel with crosslinking induced by lysyl oxidase (LOXL4) to recapitulate the difference in D previously reported from healthy and cancerous tissue biopsies. Furthermore, STORM imaging of this collagen gel model verifies the morphologic effects of enzymatic crosslinking at length scales as small as 40 nm, close to the previously reported lower length scale sensitivity threshold of 35 nm for ISOCT. Analysis of the autocorrelation function from STORM images of collagen gels and subsequent fitting to the Whittle-Matérn correlation function shows a similar effect of LOXL4 on D from collagen measured with ISOCT and STORM. We extend this to mass spectrometric study of tissue to directly measure concentrations of collagen crosslink residues. The validation of ISOCT as a viable tool for non-invasive rapid quantification of collagen ultrastructure lends it to study other physiological phenomena involving ECM restructuring such as atherosclerotic plaque screening or cervical ripening during pregnancy.

  1. HIF-1α/MDR1 pathway confers chemoresistance to cisplatin in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Guan, Zhenfeng; Liang, Liang; Cheng, Yongyi; Zhou, Jiancheng; Li, Jing; Xu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) is the 9th most common malignant tumor and the 13th leading cause of death due to cancer. The development of surgery and target drugs bring new challenges for the traditional concept for BCa therapy, and chemotherapy is still the final option for many BCa patients, and cisplatin-containing regimen the most effective one. However, the ubiquitous application of cisplatin-containing regimen in BCa results in the cisplatin-resistance, in addition, the cisplatin‑resistant BCa manifests enhanced malignant behavior, the mechanism of which is unclear. In the present study, we used BCa cell lines to to clarify this point. BCa cell lines T24/J82 were pretreated with cisplatin >3 months to construct stable cisplatin-resistant cell lines (tagged T24Cis-R and J82Cis-R), which manifested as enhanced capacity of proliferation and malignant behavior in vivo and in vitro, accompanied by cisplatin, and even doxorubicin resistance. The following mechanism dissection revealed that prolonged treatment time of T24/J82 cells led to elevated expression of HIF-1α, which targeted the increased expression of MDR1 on the one hand, and contributed to BCa cell proliferation, migration/invasion on the other hand. Finally, IHC staining of human BCa tissue supported our conclusion that the expression of HIF-1α and MDR1 was higher in chemoresistant tissue vs. chemosensitive tissue. Our results provided a new view of HIF-1α in chemotherapy. PMID:26717965

  2. Synergistic interactions among flavonoids and acetogenins in Graviola (Annona muricata) leaves confer protection against prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunhua; Gundala, Sushma Reddy; Mukkavilli, Rao; Vangala, Subrahmanyam; Reid, Michelle D; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-06-01

    Phytochemical complexity of plant extracts may offer health-promoting benefits including chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive effects. Isolation of 'most-active fraction' or single constituents from whole extracts may not only compromise the therapeutic efficacy but also render toxicity, thus emphasizing the importance of preserving the natural composition of whole extracts. The leaves of Annona muricata, commonly known as Graviola, are known to be rich in flavonoids, isoquinoline alkaloids and annonaceous acetogenins. Here, we demonstrate phytochemical synergy among the constituents of Graviola leaf extract (GLE) compared to its flavonoid-enriched (FEF) and acetogenin-enriched (AEF) fractions. Comparative quantitation of flavonoids revealed enrichment of rutin (~7-fold) and quercetin-3-glucoside (Q-3-G, ~3-fold) in FEF compared to GLE. In vivo pharmacokinetics and in vitro absorption kinetics of flavonoids revealed enhanced bioavailability of rutin in FEF compared to GLE. However, GLE was more effective in inhibiting in vitro prostate cancer proliferation, viability and clonogenic capacity compared to FEF. Oral administration of 100mg/kg bw GLE showed ~1.2-fold higher tumor growth-inhibitory efficacy than FEF in human prostate tumor xenografts although the concentration of rutin and Q-3-G was more in FEF. Contrarily, AEF, despite its superior in vitro and in vivo efficacy, resulted in death of the mice due to toxicity. Our data indicate that despite lower absorption and bioavailability of rutin, maximum efficacy was achieved in the case of GLE, which also comprises of other phytochemical groups including acetogenins that make up its natural complex environment. Hence, our study emphasizes on evaluating the nature of interactions among Graviola leaf phytochemcials for developing favorable dose regimen for prostate cancer management to achieve optimal therapeutic benefits. PMID:25863125

  3. Aspen Simulation of Diesel-Biodiesel Blends Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Sánchez Armando

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a fuel produced by transesterification of vegetable oils or animal fats, which currently is gaining attention as a diesel substitute. It represents an opportunity to reduce CO2, SO2, CO, HC, PAH and PM emissions and contributes to the diversification of fuels in Mexico's energetic matrix. The results of the simulation of the combustion process are presented in this paper with reference to an engine specification KUBOTA D600-B, operated with diesel-biodiesel blends. The physicochemical properties of the compounds and the operating conditions of equipment were developed using the simulator Aspen® and supplementary information. The main aspects of the engine working conditions were considered such as diesel-biodiesel ratio, air/fuel mixture, temperature of the combustion gases and heat load. Diesel physicochemical specifications were taken from reports of PEMEX and SENER. Methyl esters corresponding to the transesterification of fatty acids that comprise castor oil were regarded as representative molecules of biodiesel obtained from chromatographic analysis. The results include CO2, water vapor, combustion efficiency, power and lower calorific value of fuels.

  4. Are wolves saving Yellowstone's aspen? A landscape-level test of a behaviorally mediated trophic cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Matthew J; Brodie, Jedediah F; Jules, Erik S

    2010-09-01

    Behaviorally mediated trophic cascades (BMTCs) occur when the fear of predation among herbivores enhances plant productivity. Based primarily on systems involving small-bodied predators, BMTCs have been proposed as both strong and ubiquitous in natural ecosystems. Recently, however, synthetic work has suggested that the existence of BMTCs may be mediated by predator hunting mode, whereby passive (sit-and-wait) predators have much stronger effects than active (coursing) predators. One BMTC that has been proposed for a wide-ranging active predator system involves the reintroduction of wolves (Canis lupus) to Yellowstone National Park, USA, which is thought to be leading to a recovery of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) by causing elk (Cervus elaphus) to avoid foraging in risky areas. Although this BMTC has been generally accepted and highly popularized, it has never been adequately tested. We assessed whether wolves influence aspen by obtaining detailed demographic data on aspen Stands using tree rings and by monitoring browsing levels in experimental elk exclosures arrayed across a gradient of predation risk for three years. Our study demonstrates that the historical failure of aspen to regenerate varied widely among stands (last recruitment year ranged from 1892 to 1956), and our data do not indicate an abrupt cessation of recruitment. This pattern of recruitment failure appears more consistent with a gradual increase in elk numbers rather than a rapid behavioral shift in elk foraging following wolf extirpation. In addition, our estimates of relative survivorship of young browsable aspen indicate that aspen are not currently recovering in Yellowstone, even in the presence of a large wolf population. Finally, in an experimental test of the BMTC hypothesis we found that the impacts of elk browsing on aspen demography are not diminished in sites where elk are at higher risk of predation by wolves. These findings suggest the need to further evaluate how trophic

  5. Are wolves saving Yellowstone's aspen? A landscape-level test of a behaviorally mediated trophic cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Matthew J.; Brodie, Jedediah F.; Jules, Erik S.

    2010-01-01

    Behaviorally mediated trophic cascades (BMTCs) occur when the fear of predation among herbivores enhances plant productivity. Based primarily on systems involving small-bodied predators, BMTCs have been proposed as both strong and ubiquitous in natural ecosystems. Recently, however, synthetic work has suggested that the existence of BMTCs may be mediated by predator hunting mode, whereby passive (sit-and-wait) predators have much stronger effects than active (coursing) predators. One BMTC that has been proposed for a wide-ranging active predator system involves the reintroduction of wolves (Canis lupus) to Yellowstone National Park, USA, which is thought to be leading to a recovery of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) by causing elk (Cervus elaphus) to avoid foraging in risky areas. Although this BMTC has been generally accepted and highly popularized, it has never been adequately tested. We assessed whether wolves influence aspen by obtaining detailed demographic data on aspen stands using tree rings and by monitoring browsing levels in experimental elk exclosures arrayed across a gradient of predation risk for three years. Our study demonstrates that the historical failure of aspen to regenerate varied widely among stands (last recruitment year ranged from 1892 to 1956), and our data do not indicate an abrupt cessation of recruitment. This pattern of recruitment failure appears more consistent with a gradual increase in elk numbers rather than a rapid behavioral shift in elk foraging following wolf extirpation. In addition, our estimates of relative survivorship of young browsable aspen indicate that aspen are not currently recovering in Yellowstone, even in the presence of a large wolf population. Finally, in an experimental test of the BMTC hypothesis we found that the impacts of elk browsing on aspen demography are not diminished in sites where elk are at higher risk of predation by wolves. These findings suggest the need to further evaluate how trophic

  6. Forest stand structure, productivity, and age mediate climatic effects on aspen decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Because forest stand structure, age, and productivity can mediate the impacts of climate on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality, ignoring stand-scale factors limits inference on the drivers of recent sudden aspen decline. Using the proportion of aspen trees that were dead as an index of recent mortality at 841 forest inventory plots, we examined the relationship of this mortality index to forest structure and climate in the Rocky Mountains and Intermountain Western United States. We found that forest structure explained most of the patterns in mortality indices, but that variation in growing-season vapor pressure deficit and winter precipitation over the last 20 years was important. Mortality index sensitivity to precipitation was highest in forests where aspen exhibited high densities, relative basal areas, quadratic mean diameters, and productivities, whereas sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit was highest in young forest stands. These results indicate that the effects of drought on mortality may be mediated by forest stand development, competition with encroaching conifers, and physiological vulnerabilities of large trees to drought. By examining mortality index responses to both forest structure and climate, we show that forest succession cannot be ignored in studies attempting to understand the causes and consequences of sudden aspen decline.

  7. The yield of natural trembling aspen (populus tremula L.) stands (northern and eastern anatolia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trembling aspen (Populus tremula L.) is one of the most resistant to cold natural species in Turkey. In spite of its importance, there is no research on the yield. Hence, site productivity was determined and yield Table for undisturbed natural trembling aspen stands in Turkey was developed. Data were obtained from a total of 46 plots ranging in age from 17 to 82 years. Yield Table indicates that trembling aspen is very slow growing in young and middle age and Current Annual Increment (CAI) and Mean Annual Increment (MAI) values do not reach its maximum value, even at age 70. This is a proof that trembling aspen is not a fast growing species as expected. The reason for its slow growth is attributed to very short period of growth at very high altitudes. However, in the event of 50 years rotation age, mean annual volume increments of 8.0, 3.6 and 1.1 m3 are estimated for trembling aspen for site classes I, II and III, respectively. At extended rotations, trees of pole sizes could be obtained on all site classes. (author)

  8. Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    Lack of aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment and canopy replacement of aspen stands that grow on the edges of grasslands on the low-elevation elk (Cervus elaphus) winter range of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) in Colorado has been a cause of concern for more than 70 years (Packard, 1942; Olmsted, 1979; Stevens, 1980; Hess, 1993; R.J. Monello, T.L. Johnson, and R.G. Wright, Rocky Mountain National Park, 2006, written commun.). These aspen stands are a significant resource since they are located close to the park's road system and thus are highly visible to park visitors. Aspen communities are integral to the ecological structure of montane and subalpine landscapes because they contain high native species richness of plants, birds, and butterflies (Chong and others, 2001; Simonson and others, 2001; Chong and Stohlgren, 2007). These low-elevation, winter range stands also represent a unique component of the park's plant community diversity since most (more than 95 percent) of the park's aspen stands grow in coniferous forest, often on sheltered slopes and at higher elevations, while these winter range stands are situated on the low-elevation ecotone between the winter range grasslands and some of the park's drier coniferous forests.

  9. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT29 and SW620 express higher levels of a splice variant of

  10. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paquet Éric R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Methods Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Results Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT

  11. Integration of photothermal therapy and synergistic chemotherapy by a porphyrin self-assembled micelle confers chemosensitivity in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shishuai; Ding, Yanping; Li, Yiye; Wu, Yan; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-02-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is a malignant cancer type with a high risk of early recurrence and distant metastasis. Unlike other breast cancers, triple-negative breast cancer is lack of targetable receptors and, therefore, patients largely receive systemic chemotherapy. However, inevitable adverse effects and acquired drug resistance severely constrain the therapeutic outcome. Here we tailor-designed a porphyrin-based micelle that was self-assembled from a hybrid amphiphilic polymer comprising polyethylene glycol, poly (d, l-lactide-co-glycolide) and porphyrin. The bilayer micelles can be simultaneously loaded with two chemotherapeutic drugs with synergistic cytotoxicity and distinct physiochemical properties, forming a uniform and spherical nanostructure. The drug-loaded micelles showed a tendency to accumulate in the tumor and can be internalized by tumor cells for drug release in acidic organelles. Under near-infrared laser irradiation, high density of self-quenched porphyrins in the hydrophobic layer absorbed light efficiently and converted into an excited state, leading to the release of sufficient heat for photothermal therapy. The integration of localized photothermal effect and synergistic chemotherapy conferred great chemosensitivity to cancer cells and achieved tumor regression using about 1/10 of traditional drug dosage. As a result, chemotherapy-associated adverse effects were successfully avoided. Our present study established a novel porphyrin-based nanoplatform with photothermal activity and expanded drug loading capacity, providing new opportunities for challenging conventional chemotherapy and fighting against stubborn triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:26708642

  12. 76 FR 15306 - Aspen Merchant Energy LP; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Aspen Merchant Energy LP; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...-referenced proceeding of Aspen Merchant Energy LP's application for market-based rate authority, with...

  13. Wood Quality and Growth Characterization across Intra- and Inter-Specific Hybrid Aspen Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn D. Mansfield

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx. is one of the most abundant poplar species in North America; it is native, displays substantial breadth in distribution inhabiting several geographical and climatic ecoregions, is notable for its rapid growth, and is ecologically and economically important. As the demand for raw material continues to increase rapidly, there is a pressing need to improve both tree quality and growth rates via breeding efforts. Hybridization is considered one of the most promising options to simultaneously accelerate these tree characteristics, as it takes advantage of heterosis. Two aspen species showing particular promise for hybridization with trembling aspen are European aspen (P. tremula and Chinese aspen (P. davidiana because their native climates are similar to that of P. tremuloides and are also very easy to hybridize. In 2003, aspen clones were planted in Athabasca, Alberta from the following species crosses: open pollinated (OP P. tremuloides (NN, OP P. davidiana (CC, P. tremula × P. tremula (EE, P. tremula × P. tremuloides (EN, and P. tremuloides × P. davidiana (CN. In November 2010, growth measurements and core samples were taken from seven-year field grown clones. Comparisons of the mean growth and cell wall traits were made between crosses using generalized linear model least squares means tests for stem volume, fiber length, fiber width, coarseness, wood density, microfibril angle, total cell wall carbohydrate and lignin content, and lignin composition. The results clearly indicated that the inter-specific crosses offer a means to breed for more desirable wood characteristics than the intra-specific Populus spp. crosses.

  14. Stem and merchantable volume equations for hybrid aspen growing on farmland in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Tord

    2014-01-01

    In this study, stem volume models for hybrid aspen were developed. The study was based on 29 stands located in middle and southern Sweden (latitudes 55 – 60° N.). The mean total age of the hybrid aspen was 22 years (range 15 – 50 years) with a mean stand density of 1006 stems ha-1 (90 – 2402) and a mean diameter at breast height (over bark) of 19.7 cm (8.5 – 40.8 cm). A number of equations were assessed for modeling stem volume. Standing volume was examined in relation to soil type. Multiple ...

  15. Synergetic hydrothermal co-liquefaction of crude glycerol and aspen wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Helmer; Jasiunas, Lukas; Casamassima, Luca; Singh, Shashank; Jensen, Thomas; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup

    2015-01-01

    Crude glycerol-assisted hydrothermal co-liquefaction of aspen wood was studied in batch micro-reactors. An experimental matrix of 14 experiments was defined to investigate the effects of three different process parameters on the yields of biocrude and char, and on biocrude quality. Co-processing ......Crude glycerol-assisted hydrothermal co-liquefaction of aspen wood was studied in batch micro-reactors. An experimental matrix of 14 experiments was defined to investigate the effects of three different process parameters on the yields of biocrude and char, and on biocrude quality. Co...

  16. Physical property parameter set for modeling ICPP aqueous wastes with ASPEN electrolyte NRTL model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aqueous waste evaporators at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are being modeled using ASPEN software. The ASPEN software calculates chemical and vapor-liquid equilibria with activity coefficients calculated using the electrolyte Non-Random Two Liquid (NRTL) model for local excess Gibbs free energies of interactions between ions and molecules in solution. The use of the electrolyte NRTL model requires the determination of empirical parameters for the excess Gibbs free energies of the interactions between species in solution. This report covers the development of a set parameters, from literature data, for the use of the electrolyte NRTL model with the major solutes in the ICPP aqueous wastes

  17. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok; Kang, Ho Young; Kim, Manbok; Koh, Sang Seok; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling. PMID:25727013

  18. Up-regulation of Hsp27 by ERα/Sp1 facilitates proliferation and confers resistance to apoptosis in human papillary thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiao-Mei; Li, Li; Zhu, Ping; Dai, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Ting-Ting; Liao, Ling-Yao; Chen, George G; Liu, Zhi-Min

    2016-08-15

    17β-estradiol (E2) has been suggested to play a role in the development and progression of papillary thyroid cancer. Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is a member of the Hsp family that is responsible for cell survival under stressful conditions. Previous studies have shown that the 5'-promoter region of Hsp27 gene contains a specificity protein-1 (Spl) and estrogen response element half-site (ERE-half), which contributes to Hsp27 induction by E2 in breast cancer cells. However, it is unclear whether Hsp27 can be up-regulated by E2 and which estrogen receptor (ER) isoform and tethered transcription factor are involved in this regulation in papillary thyroid cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that Hsp27 can be effectively up-regulated by E2 at mRNA and protein levels in human K1 and BCPAP papillary thyroid cancer cells which have more than two times higher level of ERα than that of ERβ. The up-regulation of Hsp27 by E2 is mediated by ERα/Sp1 and ERβ has repressive effect on this ERα/Sp1-mediated up-regulation of Hsp27. Moreover, we showed that the up-regulation of Hsp27 by ERα/Sp1 facilitates proliferation and confers resistance to apoptosis through interaction with procaspase-3. Targeting this pathway may be a potential strategy for therapy of papillary thyroid cancer. PMID:27179757

  19. The BRAFT1799A mutation confers sensitivity of thyroid cancer cells to the BRAFV600E inhibitor PLX4032 (RG7204)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Exciting therapeutic potential has been recently reported for the BRAFV600E inhibitor PLX4032 in melanoma. → We tested the effects of PLX4032 on the growth of thyroid cancer cells which often harbor the BRAFV600E mutation. → We observed a potent BRAFV600E-dependent inhibition of thyroid cancer cells by PLX4032. → We thus demonstrated an important therapeutic potential of PLX4032 for thyroid cancer. -- Abstract: Aberrant signaling of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK (MAP kinase) pathway driven by the mutant kinase BRAFV600E, as a result of the BRAFT1799A mutation, plays a fundamental role in thyroid tumorigenesis. This study investigated the therapeutic potential of a BRAFV600E-selective inhibitor, PLX4032 (RG7204), for thyroid cancer by examining its effects on the MAP kinase signaling and proliferation of 10 thyroid cancer cell lines with wild-type BRAF or BRAFT1799A mutation. We found that PLX4032 could effectively inhibit the MAP kinase signaling, as reflected by the suppression of ERK phosphorylation, in cells harboring the BRAFT1799A mutation. PLX4032 also showed a potent and BRAF mutation-selective inhibition of cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. PLX4032 displayed low IC50 values (0.115-1.156 μM) in BRAFV600E mutant cells, in contrast with wild-type BRAF cells that showed resistance to the inhibitor with high IC50 values (56.674-1349.788 μM). Interestingly, cells with Ras mutations were also sensitive to PLX4032, albeit moderately. Thus, this study has confirmed that the BRAFT1799A mutation confers cancer cells sensitivity to PLX4032 and demonstrated its specific potential as an effective and BRAFT1799A mutation-selective therapeutic agent for thyroid cancer.

  20. ASPEN+ and economic modeling of equine waste utilization for localized hot water heating via fast pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASPEN Plus based simulation models have been developed to design a pyrolysis process for the on-site production and utilization of pyrolysis oil from equine waste at the Equine Rehabilitation Center at Morrisville State College (MSC). The results indicate that utilization of all available Equine Reh...

  1. ASPEN Plus in the Chemical Engineering Curriculum: Suitable Course Content and Teaching Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockstraw, David A.

    2005-01-01

    An established methodology involving the sequential presentation of five skills on ASPEN Plus to undergraduate seniors majoring in ChE is presented in this document: (1) specifying unit operations; (2) manipulating physical properties; (3) accessing variables; (4) specifying nonstandard components; and (5) applying advanced features. This…

  2. New dimension analyses with error analysis for quaking aspen and black spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, K. D.; Botkin, D. B.; Feiveson, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    Dimension analysis for black spruce in wetland stands and trembling aspen are reported, including new approaches in error analysis. Biomass estimates for sacrificed trees have standard errors of 1 to 3%; standard errors for leaf areas are 10 to 20%. Bole biomass estimation accounts for most of the error for biomass, while estimation of branch characteristics and area/weight ratios accounts for the leaf area error. Error analysis provides insight for cost effective design of future analyses. Predictive equations for biomass and leaf area, with empirically derived estimators of prediction error, are given. Systematic prediction errors for small aspen trees and for leaf area of spruce from different site-types suggest a need for different predictive models within species. Predictive equations are compared with published equations; significant differences may be due to species responses to regional or site differences. Proportional contributions of component biomass in aspen change in ways related to tree size and stand development. Spruce maintains comparatively constant proportions with size, but shows changes corresponding to site. This suggests greater morphological plasticity of aspen and significance for spruce of nutrient conditions.

  3. Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-04-15

    The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

  4. Risk Communication, Metacommunication, and Rhetorical Stases in the Aspen-EPA Superfund Controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratman, James F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Explores the relationship between current theoretical definitions of risk communication, the unique national role that EPA plays in defining health and environmental risks, and possible explanations for EPA's inability to persuade Aspen, Colorado, to accept a cleanup plan. Explores ownership messages conveyed through metacommunication conflict…

  5. 75 FR 13805 - Aspen Group Resources Corp., Commercial Concepts, Inc., Desert Health Products, Inc., Equalnet...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Aspen Group Resources Corp., Commercial Concepts, Inc., Desert Health Products, Inc., Equalnet Communications Corp., Geneva Steel Holdings Corp., Orderpro Logistics, Inc. (n/k/a Securus Renewable Energy, Inc.), and Sepragen Corp.; Order...

  6. Using user models in Matlab® within the Aspen Plus® interface with an Excel® link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fontalvo Alzate

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Process intensification and new technologies require tools for process design that can be integrated into well-known simulation software, such as Aspen Plus®. Thus, unit operations that are not included in traditional Aspen Plus software packages can be simulated with Matlab® and integrated within the Aspen Plus interface. In this way, the user can take advantage of all of the tools of Aspen Plus, such as optimization, sensitivity analysis and cost estimation. This paper gives a detailed description of how to implement this integration. The interface between Matlab and Aspen Plus is accomplished by sending the relevant information from Aspen Plus to Excel, which feeds the information to a Matlab routine. Once the Matlab routine processes the information, it is returned to Excel and to Aspen Plus. This paper includes the Excel and Matlab template files so the reader can implement their own simulations. By applying the protocol described here, a hybrid distillation-vapor permeation system has been simulated as an example of the applications that can be implemented. For the hybrid system, the effect of membrane selectivity on membrane area and reboiler duty for the partial dehydration of ethanol is studied. Very high selectivities are not necessarily required for an optimum hybrid distillation and vapor permeation system.

  7. A simple and efficient transient transformation for hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × P. tremuloides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takata Naoki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Populus is accepted as a model system for molecular tree biology. To investigate gene functions in Populus spp. trees, generating stable transgenic lines is the common technique for functional genetic studies. However, a limited number of genes have been targeted due to the lengthy transgenic process. Transient transformation assays complementing stable transformation have significant advantages for rapid in vivo assessment of gene function. The aim of this study is to develop a simple and efficient transient transformation for hybrid aspen and to provide its potential applications for functional genomic approaches. Results We developed an in planta transient transformation assay for young hybrid aspen cuttings using Agrobacterium-mediated vacuum infiltration. The transformation conditions such as the infiltration medium, the presence of a surfactant, the phase of bacterial growth and bacterial density were optimized to achieve a higher transformation efficiency in young aspen leaves. The Agrobacterium infiltration assay successfully transformed various cell types in leaf tissues. Intracellular localization of four aspen genes was confirmed in homologous Populus spp. using fusion constructs with the green fluorescent protein. Protein-protein interaction was detected in transiently co-transformed cells with bimolecular fluorescence complementation technique. In vivo promoter activity was monitored over a few days in aspen cuttings that were transformed with luciferase reporter gene driven by a circadian clock promoter. Conclusions The Agrobacterium infiltration assay developed here is a simple and enhanced throughput method that requires minimum handling and short transgenic process. This method will facilitate functional analyses of Populus genes in a homologous plant system.

  8. Drought characteristics drive patterns in widespread aspen forest mortality across the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, W.; Anderegg, L.; Abatzoglou, J. T.; Berry, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread drought-induced forest mortality has been documented across the globe in the last few decades and influences land-atmosphere interactions, biodiversity, carbon sequestration, and biophysical and biogeochemical feedbacks to climate change. These rapid mortality events are currently not well-captured in current vegetation models, limiting the ability to predict them. While many studies have focused on the plant physiological mechanisms that mediate vegetation mortality, the characteristics of drought seasonality, sequence, severity and duration that drive mortality events have received much less attention. These characteristics are particularly relevant in light of changing precipitation regimes, changes to snowpack and snowmelt, and increasing temperature stress associated with climate change. We examine the characteristics of drought associated with the recent widespread mortality of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) across much of the western United States. We combine a regional model of watershed-level aspen mortality with in situ tissue isotopic analysis of water source to analyze the roles of drought seasonality, severity, and duration in this mortality event, including raw climate variables, derived drought indices, and variables generated by a climate envelope approach. We found that variables pertaining to spring temperatures and spring-summer water deficit, especially during the peak severity of drought, best capture regional mortality patterns, though multi-year drought variables did improve the model. Field water isotopic analysis of aspen water source over a growing season and during moderate seasonal water stress corroborate the regional model by indicating that aspen clones generally utilize surface water with little plasticity during drought stress. These results suggest that drought characteristics can play an important role in mediating widespread forest mortality and have implications for the future vulnerability of trembling aspen

  9. Spring frost and decay fungi are implicated in suppressing aspen re-growth following partial cleaning in juvenile stands

    OpenAIRE

    Wolken, Jane M; Lieffers, Victor J.; Landhausser, Simon M; Mulak, Tara

    2009-01-01

    Aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) regenerates at high densities following manual cleaning. Ten-year-old stands located near Lac La Biche and Peace River, Alberta were manually cleaned to three densities (0, 500 or 1 500 stems ha−1 ) at three times (bud set, dormancy or bud flush) to test the hypothesis that maintaining residual aspen reduces regeneration. At Lac La Biche up to 98% of the aspen regeneration died in the partially-cleaned plots compared to 67% at Peace River five years post-tre...

  10. The 4th Bi-annual international African-Caribbean Cancer Consortium conference: building capacity to address cancer health disparities in populations of African descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Elizabeth; Campbell, Jasmine; Bowen, Carlene; Delmoor, Ernestine; Jean-Louis, Gilda; Noumbissi, Raphiatou; O'Garro, Yvonne; Richards-Waritay, Oni; Straughter, Stanley; Tolbert, Vera; Wilson, Barbara; Ragin, Camille

    2014-01-01

    This is a brief summary of the 4(th) International Meeting of the African-Caribbean Cancer Consortium (AC3), organized and sponsored by Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC), and held on July 21-22, 2012 at the Lincoln University Graduate Center, Lincoln Plaza, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. AC3 investigators gathered in Philadelphia, PA to present the results of our ongoing collaborative research efforts throughout the African Diaspora. The general theme addressed cancer health disparities and presentations represented all cancer types. However, there was particular emphasis on women's cancers, related to human papillomavirus (HPV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. PMID:26422007

  11. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P; Rosell, R; Stahel, R; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before the...... treatment of first-line, and second-line/third-line therapy in metastatic NSCLC are reported in this article. The recommendations detailed here are based on an expert consensus after careful review of published data. All participants have approved this final update....

  12. The Tumor-Associated Glycosyltransferase ST6Gal-I Regulates Stem Cell Transcription Factors and Confers a Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Matthew J; Holdbrooks, Andrew T; Chakraborty, Asmi; Grizzle, William E; Landen, Charles N; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Conner, Michael G; Arend, Rebecca C; Yoon, Karina J; Klug, Christopher A; Bullard, Daniel C; Kesterson, Robert A; Oliver, Patsy G; O'Connor, Amber K; Yoder, Bradley K; Bellis, Susan L

    2016-07-01

    The glycosyltransferase ST6Gal-I, which adds α2-6-linked sialic acids to substrate glycoproteins, has been implicated in carcinogenesis; however, the nature of its pathogenic role remains poorly understood. Here we show that ST6Gal-I is upregulated in ovarian and pancreatic carcinomas, enriched in metastatic tumors, and associated with reduced patient survival. Notably, ST6Gal-I upregulation in cancer cells conferred hallmark cancer stem-like cell (CSC) characteristics. Modulating ST6Gal-I expression in pancreatic and ovarian cancer cells directly altered CSC spheroid growth, and clonal variants with high ST6Gal-I activity preferentially survived in CSC culture. Primary ovarian cancer cells from patient ascites or solid tumors sorted for α2-6 sialylation grew as spheroids, while cells lacking α2-6 sialylation remained as single cells and lost viability. ST6Gal-I also promoted resistance to gemcitabine and enabled the formation of stably resistant colonies. Gemcitabine treatment of patient-derived xenograft tumors enriched for ST6Gal-I-expressing cells relative to pair-matched untreated tumors. ST6Gal-I also augmented tumor-initiating potential. In limiting dilution assays, subcutaneous tumor formation was inhibited by ST6Gal-I knockdown, whereas in a chemically induced tumor initiation model, mice with conditional ST6Gal-I overexpression exhibited enhanced tumorigenesis. Finally, we found that ST6Gal-I induced expression of the key tumor-promoting transcription factors, Sox9 and Slug. Collectively, this work highlighted a previously unrecognized role for a specific glycosyltransferase in driving a CSC state. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3978-88. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27216178

  13. Transcriptome responses to aluminum stress in roots of aspen (Populus tremula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grisel Nadine

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ionic aluminum (mainly Al3+ is rhizotoxic and can be present in acid soils at concentrations high enough to inhibit root growth. Many forest tree species grow naturally in acid soils and often tolerate high concentrations of Al. Previously, we have shown that aspen (Populus tremula releases citrate and oxalate from roots in response to Al exposure. To obtain further insights into the root responses of aspen to Al, we investigated root gene expression at Al conditions that inhibit root growth. Results Treatment of the aspen roots with 500 μM Al induced a strong inhibition of root growth within 6 h of exposure time. The root growth subsequently recovered, reaching growth rates comparable to that of control plants. Changes in gene expression were determined after 6 h, 2 d, and 10 d of Al exposure. Replicated transcriptome analyses using the Affymetrix poplar genome array revealed a total of 175 significantly up-regulated and 69 down-regulated genes, of which 70% could be annotated based on Arabidopsis genome resources. Between 6 h and 2 d, the number of responsive genes strongly decreased from 202 to 26, and then the number of changes remained low. The responses after 6 h were characterized by genes involved in cell wall modification, ion transport, and oxidative stress. Two genes with prolonged induction were closely related to the Arabidopsis Al tolerance genes ALS3 (for Al sensitive 3 and MATE (for multidrug and toxin efflux protein, mediating citrate efflux. Patterns of expression in different plant organs and in response to Al indicated that the two aspen genes are homologs of the Arabidopsis ALS3 and MATE. Conclusion Exposure of aspen roots to Al results in a rapid inhibition of root growth and a large change in root gene expression. The subsequent root growth recovery and the concomitant reduction in the number of responsive genes presumably reflect the success of the roots in activating Al tolerance mechanisms. The

  14. How to Create, Modify, and Interface Aspen In-House and User Databanks for System Configuration 1:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, D W

    2000-10-27

    The goal of this document is to provide detailed instructions to create, modify, interface, and test Aspen User and In-House databanks with minimal frustration. The level of instructions are aimed at a novice Aspen Plus simulation user who is neither a programming nor computer-system expert. The instructions are tailored to Version 10.1 of Aspen Plus and the specific computing configuration summarized in the Title of this document and detailed in Section 2. Many details of setting up databanks depend on the computing environment specifics, such as the machines, operating systems, command languages, directory structures, inter-computer communications software, the version of the Aspen Engine and Graphical User Interface (GUI), and the directory structure of how these were installed.

  15. Techniques for thyroid FNA: a synopsis of the National Cancer Institute Thyroid Fine-Needle Aspiration State of the Science Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Martha Bishop; Abele, John; Ali, Syed Z; Duick, Dan; Elsheikh, Tarik M; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Powers, Celeste N; Randolph, Gregory; Renshaw, Andrew; Scoutt, Leslie

    2008-06-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored the NCI Thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA) State of the Science Conference on October 22-23, 2007 in Bethesda, MD. The 2-day meeting was accompanied by a permanent informational website and several on-line discussion periods between May 1 and December 15, 2007 (http://thyroidfna.cancer.gov). This document summarizes matters addressing manual and ultrasound guided FNA technique and related issues. Specific topics covered include details regarding aspiration needles, devices, and methods, including the use of core needle biopsy; the pros and cons of anesthesia; the influence of thyroid lesion location, size, and characteristics on technique; the role of ultrasound in the FNA of a palpable thyroid nodule; the advantages and disadvantages of various specialists performing a biopsy; the optimal number of passes and tissue preparation methods; sample adequacy criteria for solid and cystic nodules, and management of adverse reactions from the procedure. (http://thyroidfna.cancer.gov/pages/info/agenda/) PMID:18478608

  16. Identifying and Characterizing Important Trembling Aspen Competitors with Juvenile Lodgepole Pine in Three South-Central British Columbia Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa A. Newsome

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical height ratios for predicting competition between trembling aspen and lodgepole pine were identified in six juvenile stands in three south-central British Columbia ecosystems. We used a series of regression analyses predicting pine stem diameter from the density of neighbouring aspen in successively shorter relative height classes to identify the aspen-pine height ratio that maximized R2. Critical height ratios varied widely among sites when stands were 8–12 years old but, by age 14–19, had converged at 1.25–1.5. Maximum R2 values at age 14–19 ranged from 13.4% to 69.8%, demonstrating that the importance of aspen competition varied widely across a relatively small geographic range. Logistic regression also indicated that the risk of poor pine vigour in the presence of aspen varied between sites. Generally, the degree of competition, risk to pine vigour, and size of individual aspen contributing to the models declined along a gradient of decreasing ecosystem productivity.

  17. The efficacy of six elite isolates of the fungus Chondrostereum purpureum against the sprouting of European aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberg, Leena; Hantula, Jarkko

    2016-04-15

    The sprouting of broad-leaved trees after cutting is problematic in forest regeneration areas, along roads and railways, under electric power and above gas pipe lines. In Finland, one of the most difficult species to control in these areas is the European aspen (Populus tremula), which produces both stump sprouts and root suckers after saplings have been cut. In this study, we investigated whether a decay fungus of broad-leaved trees, Chondrostereum purpureum, could be used as a biological control agent against aspen sprouting. The efficacy of six elite strains of C. purpureum (improved earlier in a breeding process) was investigated on aspen for three years. The most efficient C. purpureum strain, R53, tested earlier on birch (Betula pendula and B. pubescens), was efficient in causing mortality of aspen stumps and preventing the development of root suckers. With this strain, stump mortality was 78%, while significantly lower in control stumps which were cut only (47%). Aspen trees in the vicinity of the treatments (within a 10 m radius around each sapling) decreased the efficacy of C. purpureum. This study shows that the decay fungus C. purpureum can successfully be used in the sprout control of aspen saplings. PMID:26899306

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media Media Contacts Multicultural Media Outreach Program Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Cancer Currents ... 2011 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Cancer Currents ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Outreach Program Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Cancer Currents Blog Research Findings Drug Approvals ... Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contacts Multicultural Media Outreach Program Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Cancer Currents Blog Research ... Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Cancer Currents Blog About ...

  1. Modeling and optimization of a regenerative fuel cell system using the ASPEN process simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Thomas M.; Leibecki, Harold F.

    1990-01-01

    The Hydrogen-Oxygen Regenerative Fuel Cell System was identified as a key component for energy storage in support of future lunar missions. Since the H2-O2 regenerative electrochemical conversion technology has not yet been tested in space applications, it is necessary to implement predictive techniques to develop initial feasible system designs. The ASPEN simulation software furnishes a constructive medium for analyzing and optimizing such systems. A rudimentary regenerative fuel cell system design was examined using the ASPEN simulator and this modular approach allows for easy addition of supplementary ancillary components and easy integration with life support systems. The modules included in the preliminary analyses may serve as the fundamental structure for more complicated energy storage systems.

  2. Effects of Nitrogen Supplements on Degradation of Aspen Wood Lignin and Carbohydrate Components by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, I D

    1983-03-01

    A supplement of KH(2)PO(4), MgSO(4), CaCl(2), trace elements, and thiamine accelerated the initial rate of aspen wood decay by Phanerochaete chrysosporium but did not increase the extent of lignin degradation. Asparagine, casein hydrolysate, and urea supplements (1% added N) strongly inhibited lignin degradation and weight loss. The complex nitrogen sources peptone and yeast extract stimulated lignin degradation and weight loss. Albumen and NH(4)Cl had intermediate effects. Conversion of [C]lignin to CO(2) and water-soluble materials underestimated lignin degradation in the presence of the complex N sources. The highest ratio of lignin degradation to total weight loss and the largest increase in cellulase digestibility occurred during the decay of unsupplemented wood. Rotting of aspen wood by P. chrysosporium gives smaller digestibility increases than have been found with some other white-rot fungi. PMID:16346246

  3. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Order Review and Parenteral Nutrition Preparation, Including Compounding: The ASPEN Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullata, Joseph I; Holcombe, Beverly; Sacks, Gordon; Gervasio, Jane; Adams, Stephen C; Christensen, Michael; Durfee, Sharon; Ayers, Phil; Marshall, Neil; Guenter, Peggi

    2016-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a high-alert medication with a complex drug use process. Key steps in the process include the review of each PN prescription followed by the preparation of the formulation. The preparation step includes compounding the PN or activating a standardized commercially available PN product. The verification and review, as well as preparation of this complex therapy, require competency that may be determined by using a standardized process for pharmacists and for pharmacy technicians involved with PN. An American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) standardized model for PN order review and PN preparation competencies is proposed based on a competency framework, the ASPEN-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines, and is intended for institutions and agencies to use with their staff. PMID:27317615

  4. PHYSICS FOR HEALTH: CONFERENCE

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    ICTR-PHE 2016 - International Conference on Translational Research in Radio-Oncology and Physics for Health -, co organized by CERN, aims at developing new strategies to better diagnose and treat cancer, by uniting biology and physics with clinics. Through the various sessions and symposia, the scientific programme offers the delegates the opportunity to discuss, in a friendly atmosphere, the latest progress in physics breakthroughs for health applications. The third edition of this conference took place at CICG (Centre International de Conférence Genève) from 15 to 19 Feb 2016.

  5. The Effect of Air Preheating in a Biomass CFB Gasifier using ASPEN Plus Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Wayne; Reynolds, Anthony; Kennedy, David

    2009-01-01

    In the context of climate change, increasing efficiency and energy security, biomass gasification is likely to play an important role in energy production. Atmospheric circulating fluidised bed (CFB) technology was selected for the current study. The primary objective of this research is to develop a computer simulation model of a CFB biomass gasifier that can accurately predict gasifier performance under various operating conditions. An original model was developed using ASPEN Plus (Advan...

  6. Bryophyte species richness on retention aspens recovers in time but community structure does not.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oldén

    Full Text Available Green-tree retention is a forest management method in which some living trees are left on a logged area. The aim is to offer 'lifeboats' to support species immediately after logging and to provide microhabitats during and after forest re-establishment. Several studies have shown immediate decline in bryophyte diversity after retention logging and thus questioned the effectiveness of this method, but longer term studies are lacking. Here we studied the epiphytic bryophytes on European aspen (Populus tremula L. retention trees along a 30-year chronosequence. We compared the bryophyte flora of 102 'retention aspens' on 14 differently aged retention sites with 102 'conservation aspens' on 14 differently aged conservation sites. We used a Bayesian community-level modelling approach to estimate the changes in bryophyte species richness, abundance (area covered and community structure during 30 years after logging. Using the fitted model, we estimated that two years after logging both species richness and abundance of bryophytes declined, but during the following 20-30 years both recovered to the level of conservation aspens. However, logging-induced changes in bryophyte community structure did not fully recover over the same time period. Liverwort species showed some or low potential to benefit from lifeboating and high potential to re-colonise as time since logging increases. Most moss species responded similarly, but two cushion-forming mosses benefited from the logging disturbance while several weft- or mat-forming mosses declined and did not re-colonise in 20-30 years. We conclude that retention trees do not function as equally effective lifeboats for all bryophyte species but are successful in providing suitable habitats for many species in the long-term. To be most effective, retention cuts should be located adjacent to conservation sites, which may function as sources of re-colonisation and support the populations of species that require old

  7. Genetic Augmentation of Syringyl Lignin in Low-lignin Aspen Trees, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung-Jui Tsai; Mark F. Davis; Vincent L. Chiang

    2004-11-10

    As a polysaccharide-encrusting component, lignin is critical to cell wall integrity and plant growth but also hinders recovery of cellulose fibers during the wood pulping process. To improve pulping efficiency, it is highly desirable to genetically modify lignin content and/or structure in pulpwood species to maximize pulp yields with minimal energy consumption and environmental impact. This project aimed to genetically augment the syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratio in low-lignin transgenic aspen in order to produce trees with reduced lignin content, more reactive lignin structures and increased cellulose content. Transgenic aspen trees with reduced lignin content have already been achieved, prior to the start of this project, by antisense downregulation of a 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase gene (Hu et al., 1999 Nature Biotechnol 17: 808- 812). The primary objective of this study was to genetically augment syringyl lignin biosynthesis in these low-lignin trees in order to enhance lignin reactivity during chemical pulping. To accomplish this, both aspen and sweetgum genes encoding coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase (Osakabe et al., 1999 PNAS 96: 8955-8960) were targeted for over-expression in wildtype or low-lignin aspen under control of either a constitutive or a xylem-specific promoter. A second objective for this project was to develop reliable and cost-effective methods, such as pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry and NMR, for rapid evaluation of cell wall chemical components of transgenic wood samples. With these high-throughput techniques, we observed increased syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratios in the transgenic wood samples, regardless of the promoter used or gene origin. Our results confirmed that the coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase gene is key to syringyl lignin biosynthesis. The outcomes of this research should be readily applicable to other pulpwood species, and promise to bring direct economic and environmental benefits to the pulp and paper industry.

  8. Aquatic ecosystem response to timber harvesting for the purpose of restoring aspen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobette E Jones

    Full Text Available The removal of conifers through commercial timber harvesting has been successful in restoring aspen, however many aspen stands are located near streams, and there are concerns about potential aquatic ecosystem impairment. We examined the effects of management-scale conifer removal from aspen stands located adjacent to streams on water quality, solar radiation, canopy cover, temperature, aquatic macroinvertebrates, and soil moisture. This 8-year study (2003-2010 involved two projects located in Lassen National Forest. The Pine-Bogard Project consisted of three treatments adjacent to Pine and Bogard Creeks: (i Phase 1 in January 2004, (ii Phase 2 in August 2005, and (iii Phase 3 in January 2008. The Bailey Project consisted of one treatment adjacent to Bailey Creek in September 2006. Treatments involved whole tree removal using track-laying harvesters and rubber tire skidders. More than 80% of all samples analyzed for NO₃-N, NH₄-N, and PO₄-P at Pine, Bogard, and Bailey Creeks were below the detection limit, with the exception of naturally elevated PO₄-P in Bogard Creek. All nutrient concentrations (NO₃-N, NH₄-N, PO₄-P, K, and SO₄-S showed little variation within streams and across years. Turbidity and TSS exhibited annual variation, but there was no significant increase in the difference between upstream and downstream turbidity and TSS levels. There was a significant decrease in stream canopy cover and increase in the potential fraction of solar radiation reaching the streams in response to the Pine-Bogard Phase 3 and Bailey treatments; however, there was no corresponding increase in stream temperatures. Macroinvertebrate metrics indicated healthy aquatic ecosystem conditions throughout the course of the study. Lastly, the removal of vegetation significantly increased soil moisture in treated stands relative to untreated stands. These results indicate that, with careful planning and implementation of site-specific best management

  9. Aquatic ecosystem response to timber harvesting for the purpose of restoring aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bobette E; Krupa, Monika; Tate, Kenneth W

    2013-01-01

    The removal of conifers through commercial timber harvesting has been successful in restoring aspen, however many aspen stands are located near streams, and there are concerns about potential aquatic ecosystem impairment. We examined the effects of management-scale conifer removal from aspen stands located adjacent to streams on water quality, solar radiation, canopy cover, temperature, aquatic macroinvertebrates, and soil moisture. This 8-year study (2003-2010) involved two projects located in Lassen National Forest. The Pine-Bogard Project consisted of three treatments adjacent to Pine and Bogard Creeks: (i) Phase 1 in January 2004, (ii) Phase 2 in August 2005, and (iii) Phase 3 in January 2008. The Bailey Project consisted of one treatment adjacent to Bailey Creek in September 2006. Treatments involved whole tree removal using track-laying harvesters and rubber tire skidders. More than 80% of all samples analyzed for NO₃-N, NH₄-N, and PO₄-P at Pine, Bogard, and Bailey Creeks were below the detection limit, with the exception of naturally elevated PO₄-P in Bogard Creek. All nutrient concentrations (NO₃-N, NH₄-N, PO₄-P, K, and SO₄-S) showed little variation within streams and across years. Turbidity and TSS exhibited annual variation, but there was no significant increase in the difference between upstream and downstream turbidity and TSS levels. There was a significant decrease in stream canopy cover and increase in the potential fraction of solar radiation reaching the streams in response to the Pine-Bogard Phase 3 and Bailey treatments; however, there was no corresponding increase in stream temperatures. Macroinvertebrate metrics indicated healthy aquatic ecosystem conditions throughout the course of the study. Lastly, the removal of vegetation significantly increased soil moisture in treated stands relative to untreated stands. These results indicate that, with careful planning and implementation of site-specific best management practices

  10. Quaking Aspen in the Residential-Wildland Interface: Elk Herbivory Hinders Forest Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Paul C. Rogers; Jones, Allison; Catlin, James C; Shuler, James; Morris, Arthur; Kuhns, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) forests are experiencing numerous impediments across North America. In the West, recent drought, fire suppression, insects, diseases, climate trends, inappropriate management, and ungulate herbivory are impacting these high biodiversity forests. Additionally, ecological tension zones are sometimes created where the above factors intermingle with jurisdictional boundaries. The public-private land interface may result in stress to natural areas where g...

  11. Aspen Increase Soil Moisture, Nutrients, Organic Matter and Respiration in Rocky Mountain Forest Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, Joshua R.; Samuel B. St. Clair

    2012-01-01

    Development and change in forest communities are strongly influenced by plant-soil interactions. The primary objective of this paper was to identify how forest soil characteristics vary along gradients of forest community composition in aspen-conifer forests to better understand the relationship between forest vegetation characteristics and soil processes. The study was conducted on the Fishlake National Forest, Utah, USA. Soil measurements were collected in adjacent forest stands that were c...

  12. Analysis of aspen-and-birch separated small woods’ vegetation in North Steppe of Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    N. M. Nazarenko; I. M. Loza

    2010-01-01

    Conducted analysis of forest vegetation has allowed selecting and specifying classification and typological units of the aspen-and-birch separated small woods, which have statistically significant difference of ecotopic and coenotic parameters. Those parameters of studied forest ecosystems are characterised. Existence of the lines of hygrogenic and edaphogenic substitution, and succession rows are described. Phytoindication description of ecological factors’ pivotal conditions is presented. D...

  13. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  14. DECAY RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF OIL HEAT TREATED ASPEN WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Bazyar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The decay resistance of oil-heat treated aspen wood (Populus tremula l. against white rot fungi (Coriolus versicolor and brown rot fungi (Coniophora puteana was investigated. Three different temperature stages and two time levels for oil heat treatment for the selection of optimum conditions were determined. Linseed oil as a heating medium was used. The mass loss of treated samples that were exposed to both fungi was significantly lower than that of the control samples. Results also showed improvement in dimensional stability after oil heat treatment. Decay resistance and dimensional stability of aspen wood were increased significantly with temperature increasing, but time seemed to have no effect on those properties. Oil heat treatment is a suitable method to improve decay resistance of aspen wood as it reduced the mass loss by 71% and 77% against Coriolus versicolor and Coniophora puteana compared with control samples, respectively. On the other hand, oil heat treatment improved the dimensional stability by about 20.5%.

  15. SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS BETWEEN BIRCH CHEMICAL MECHANICAL PULPS AND ASPEN BLEACHED KRAFT PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric C. Xu; Yajun Zhou

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, two different grades of birch chemical mechanical (P-RC APMP) pulps and aspen market bleached kraft pulp were compared by low consistency refining of the pulps separately and in different combinations. In addition, the separately refined pulps were also combined to compare with the pulps from the co-refined pulp blend. The results showed that in both cases there were synergistic effects between the two types of pulps: adding the birch P-RC APMP pulp to the aspen kraft pulp improved pulp properties, and the resultant pulp blends had a higher fiber bonding strength (tensile and tensile energy absorption) than the sum of weighted contributions from the individual components. Understanding this synergistic effect between chemical mechanical (P-RC APMP) and kraft pulps can help to improve their applications and performances in various papermaking processes.The results also showed that introducing, at least up to certain percentage of, the birch P-RC APMP pulp into the aspen bleached kraft pulp not only improves optical and bulk properties, but also maintains or improves tensile strength, even though the P-RC APMP pulp used has lower tensile than the kraft pulp.

  16. SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS BETWEEN BIRCH CHEMICAL MECHANICAL PULPS AND ASPEN BLEACHED KRAFT PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EricC.Xu; YajunZhou

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, two different grades of birch chemical mechanical (P-RC APMP) pulps and aspen market bleached kraft pulp were compared by low consistency refining of the pulps separately and in different combinations. In addition, the separately refined pulps were also combined to compare with the pulps from the co-refined pulp blend. The results showed that in both cases there were synergistic effects between the two types of pulps: adding the birch P-RC APMP pulp to the aspen kraft pulp improved pulp properties, and the resultant pulp blends had a higher fiber bonding strength (tensile and tensile energy absorption) than the sum of weighted contributions from the individual components. Understanding this synergistic effect between chemical mechanical (P-RC APMP) and kraft pulps can help to improve their applications and performances in various papermaking processes. The results also showed that introducing, at least up to certain percentage of, the birch P-RC APMP pulp into the aspen bleached kraft pulp not only improves optical and bulk properties, but also maintains or improves tensile strength, even though the P-RC APMP pulp used has lower tensile than the kraft pulp.

  17. Methods to inventory and strip thin in dense stands of aspen root suckers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Headlee WL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aspen and their hybrids have demonstrated high biomass productivity and can produce abundant regeneration in the form of root suckers. This makes aspen particularly intriguing for bio-energy production, because replanting costs can be avoided and additional biomass can be obtained by thinning the regenerating stands. Mechanical strip thinning (removal of stems in parallel strips has been proposed as a fast and efficient method for capturing biomass that would otherwise be lost to mortality in such stands. However, determining the appropriate width for the residual rows is challenging, due to the difficulty of conducting inventories with traditional sampling tools and the variability in gap sizes between root suckers in the residual rows. In this study, we describe the development and testing of a simple inventory tool that may be used to conduct either fixed-area or variable-radius sampling in these stands. Also described is the development and testing of an equation that uses such inventory data along with Poisson distribution theory to predict the size of the largest gap between root suckers within residual rows, which in turn can be used to inform strip thinning operations. Based on the promising results of our limited tests, we encourage further evaluation of these methods with regeneration from planted and natural aspen stands, as well as other root suckering species.

  18. EFFECT OF THERMAL TREATMENT ON THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BIRCH AND ASPEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Kocaefe

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature treatment of wood is one of the alternatives to chemical treatment. During this process, the wood is heated to higher temperatures than those of conventional drying. The wood structure changes due to decomposition of hemicelluloses, ramification of lignin, and crystallization of cellulose. The wood becomes less hygroscopic. These changes improve the dimensional stability of wood, increase its resistance to micro-organisms, darken its color, and modify its hardness. However, wood also might loose some of its elasticity. Consequently, the heat treatment conditions have to be optimized. Therefore, it is important to understand the transformation of the chemical structure of wood caused by the treatment. In this study, the modification of the surface composition of the wood was followed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and inverse gas chromatography (IGC under different experimental conditions. The effect of maximum treatment temperatures on the chemical composition of Canadian birch and aspen as well as the correlations between their chemical transformation and different mechanical properties are presented. FTIR analysis results showed that the heat treatment affected the chemical composition of birch more compared to that of aspen. The results of IGC tests illustrated that the surfaces of the aspen and birch became more basic with heat treatment. The mechanical properties were affected by degradation of hemicellulose, ramification of lignin and cellulose crystallization.

  19. Folate-Chitosan Nanoparticles Loaded with Ursolic Acid Confer Anti-Breast Cancer Activities in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hua; Pi, Jiang; Yang, Fen; Jiang, Jinhuan; Wang, Xiaoping; Bai, Haihua; Shao, Mingtao; Huang, Lei; Zhu, Haiyan; Yang, Peihui; Li, Lihua; Li, Ting; Cai, Jiye; Chen, Zheng W.

    2016-01-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) has proved to have broad-spectrum anti-tumor effects, but its poor water solubility and incompetent targeting property largely limit its clinical application and efficiency. Here, we synthesized a nanoparticle-based drug carrier composed of chitosan, UA and folate (FA-CS-UA-NPs) and demonstrated that FA-CS-UA-NPs could effectively diminish off-target effects and increase local drug concentrations of UA. Using MCF-7 cells as in vitro model for anti-cancer mechanistic studies, we found that FA-CS-UA-NPs could be easily internalized by cancer cells through a folate receptor-mediated endocytic pathway. FA-CS-UA-NPs entered into lysosome, destructed the permeability of lysosomal membrane, and then got released from lysosomes. Subsequently, FA-CS-UA-NPs localized into mitochondria but not nuclei. The prolonged retention of FA-CS-UA-NPs in mitochondria induced overproduction of ROS and destruction of mitochondrial membrane potential, and resulted in the irreversible apoptosis in cancer cells. In vivo experiments showed that FA-CS-UA-NPs could significantly reduce breast cancer burden in MCF-7 xenograft mouse model. These results suggested that FA-CS-UA-NPs could further be explored as an anti-cancer drug candidate and that our approach might provide a platform to develop novel anti-cancer drug delivery system. PMID:27469490

  20. Folate-Chitosan Nanoparticles Loaded with Ursolic Acid Confer Anti-Breast Cancer Activities in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hua; Pi, Jiang; Yang, Fen; Jiang, Jinhuan; Wang, Xiaoping; Bai, Haihua; Shao, Mingtao; Huang, Lei; Zhu, Haiyan; Yang, Peihui; Li, Lihua; Li, Ting; Cai, Jiye; Chen, Zheng W.

    2016-07-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) has proved to have broad-spectrum anti-tumor effects, but its poor water solubility and incompetent targeting property largely limit its clinical application and efficiency. Here, we synthesized a nanoparticle-based drug carrier composed of chitosan, UA and folate (FA-CS-UA-NPs) and demonstrated that FA-CS-UA-NPs could effectively diminish off-target effects and increase local drug concentrations of UA. Using MCF-7 cells as in vitro model for anti-cancer mechanistic studies, we found that FA-CS-UA-NPs could be easily internalized by cancer cells through a folate receptor-mediated endocytic pathway. FA-CS-UA-NPs entered into lysosome, destructed the permeability of lysosomal membrane, and then got released from lysosomes. Subsequently, FA-CS-UA-NPs localized into mitochondria but not nuclei. The prolonged retention of FA-CS-UA-NPs in mitochondria induced overproduction of ROS and destruction of mitochondrial membrane potential, and resulted in the irreversible apoptosis in cancer cells. In vivo experiments showed that FA-CS-UA-NPs could significantly reduce breast cancer burden in MCF-7 xenograft mouse model. These results suggested that FA-CS-UA-NPs could further be explored as an anti-cancer drug candidate and that our approach might provide a platform to develop novel anti-cancer drug delivery system.

  1. In vivo detection of oral epithelial cancer using endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging: a pilot human study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Javier A.; Hwang, Dae Yon; Palma, Jorge; Cheng, Shuna; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Malik, Bilal; Jabbour, Joey; Cheng, Lisa; Wright, John; Maitland, Kristen

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) provides direct access to the concomitant functional and biochemical changes accompanying tissue transition from benign to precancerous and cancerous. Since FLIM can noninvasively measure different and complementary biomarkers of precancer and cancer, we hypothesize that it will aid in clinically detecting early oral epithelial cancer. Our group has recently demonstrated the detection of benign from premalignant and malignant lesions based on endogenous multispectral FLIM in the hamster cheek-pouch model. Encouraged by these positive preliminary results, we have developed a handheld endoscope capable of acquiring multispectral FLIM images in real time from the oral mucosa. This novel FLIM endoscope is being used for imaging clinically suspicious pre-malignant and malignant lesions from patients before undergoing tissue biopsy for histopathological diagnosis of oral epithelial cancer. Our preliminary results thus far are already suggesting the potential of endogenous FLIM for distinguishing a variety of benign lesions from advanced dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To the best of out knowledge, this is the first in vivo human study aiming to demonstrate the ability to predict the true malignancy of clinically suspicious lesions using endogenous FLIM. If successful, the resulting clinical tool will allow noninvasive real-time detection of epithelial precancerous and cancerous lesions in the oral mucosa and could potentially be used to assist at every step involved on the clinical management of oral cancer patients, from early screening and diagnosis, to treatment and monitoring of recurrence.

  2. Nostradamus conference

    CERN Document Server

    Rössler, Otto; Snášel, Václav; Abraham, Ajith; Corchado, Emilio; Nostradamus: Modern Methods of Prediction, Modeling and Analysis of Nonlinear Systems

    2013-01-01

    This proceeding book of Nostradamus conference (http://nostradamus-conference.org) contains accepted papers presented at this event in 2012. Nostradamus conference was held in the one of the biggest and historic city of Ostrava (the Czech Republic, http://www.ostrava.cz/en), in September 2012. Conference topics are focused on classical as well as modern methods for prediction of dynamical systems with applications in science, engineering and economy. Topics are (but not limited to): prediction by classical and novel methods, predictive control, deterministic chaos and its control, complex systems, modelling and prediction of its dynamics and much more.

  3. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  4. Development of InCVAX as a novel in situ autologous vaccine for metastatic cancers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hode, Tomas; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Raker, Joseph; Lam, Samuel Siu Kit; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2016-03-01

    A novel method, an in situ autologous whole-cell cancer vaccine (inCVAX), is being developed by Immunophotonics, Inc., for the treatment of metastatic cancers. inCVAX combines phototherapy and immunotherapy to potentially induce a systemic anti-tumor immune response in the hosts. Immunophotonics and its academic partners have spent years conducting nonclinical research, developing CMC techniques and conducting clinical research. In 2015 the company initiated a late-stage (II/III) clinical trial in South America for advanced breast cancer patients. The process of developing the inCVAX approach from a laboratory setting into clinical trials requires significant efforts from a group of dedicated engineers, scientists, and physicians. The growth of the company and its business advances demonstrated the determination of a group of visionary investors, entrepreneurs, and business leaders. This talk will chronicle the milestones of the scientific achievement, medical progress, and business development of Immunophotonics.

  5. Modeling extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer by multiphoton excited fabrication of stromal models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Ajeti, Visar; Lara, Jorge; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Patankar, Mansh

    2016-04-01

    A profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs in human ovarian cancer but it unknown how this affects tumor growth, where this understanding could lead to better diagnostics and therapeutic approaches. We investigate the role of these ECM alterations by using multiphoton excited (MPE) polymerization to fabricate biomimetic models to investigate operative cell-matrix interactions in invasion/metastasis. First, we create nano/microstructured gradients mimicking the basal lamina to study adhesion/migration dynamics of ovarian cancer cells of differing metastatic potential. We find a strong haptotactic response that depends on both contact guidance and ECM binding cues. While we found enhanced migration for more invasive cells, the specifics of alignment and directed migration also depend on cell polarity. We further use MPE fabrication to create collagen scaffolds with complex, 3D submicron morphology. The stromal scaffold designs are derived directly from "blueprints" based on SHG images of normal, high risk, and malignant ovarian tissues. The models are seeded with different cancer cell lines and this allows decoupling of the roles of cell characteristics (metastatic potential) and ECM structure and composition (normal vs cancer) on adhesion/migration dynamics. We found the malignant stroma structure promotes enhanced migration and proliferation and also cytoskeletal alignment. Creating synthetic models based on fibers patterns further allows decoupling the topographic roles of the fibers themselves vs their alignment within the tissue. These models cannot be synthesized by other conventional fabrication methods and we suggest the MPE image-based fabrication method will enable a variety of studies in cancer biology.

  6. Closing the loop: an interactive action-research conference format for delivering updated medical information while eliciting Latina patient/family experiences and psychosocial needs post-genetic cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Deborah J; Deri, Julia; Ricker, Charité; Perez, Martin A; Ogaz, Raquel; Feldman, Nancy; Viveros, Lori A; Paz, Benjamin; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Blazer, Kathleen R

    2012-09-01

    A patient/family-centered conference was conducted at an underserved community hospital to address Latinas' post-genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) medical information and psychosocial support needs, and determine the utility of the action research format. Latinas seen for GCRA were recruited to a half-day conference conducted in Spanish. Content was partly determined from follow-up survey feedback. Written surveys, interactive discussions, and Audience Response System (ARS) queries facilitated the participant-healthcare professional action research process. Analyses included descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. The 71 attendees (41 patients and 27 relatives/friends) were primarily non-US born Spanish-speaking females, mean age 43 years. Among patients, 73 % had a breast cancer history; 85 % had BRCA testing (49 % BRCA+). Nearly all (96 %) attendees completed the conference surveys and ARS queries; ≥48 % participated in interactive discussions. Most (95 %) agreed that the format met their personal interests and expectations and provided useful information and resources. Gaps/challenges identified in the GCRA process included pre-consult anxiety, uncertainty about reason for referral and expected outcomes, and psychosocial needs post-GCRA, such as absorbing and disseminating risk information to relatives and concurrently coping with a recent cancer diagnosis. The combined action research and educational conference format was innovative and effective for responding to continued patient information needs and addressing an important data gap about support needs of Latina patients and family members following genetic cancer risk assessment. Findings informed GCRA process improvements and provide a basis for theory-driven cancer control research. PMID:22678665

  7. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries of the 28. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 9. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; applications of nuclear technology; CANDU reactors; operational enhancements; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning/decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and radiation applications - medical and industrial

  8. The 20th L H Gray Conference - Radiation Cancer Analysis and Low Dose Risk Assessment: New Developments and Perspectives (Ede, the Netherlands, February 2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are few international venues where scientists in vastly different fields working on a common problem, or on a number of closely related problems, can get together in an intimate setting to present the results of their research and to discuss their approaches and views in a collegial atmosphere, and without the trappings of a huge convention with its conflicting parallel sessions and distracting events. Over the years, the L H Gray Conferences have provided an ideal setting for such intimate gatherings. This year the 20th L H Gray Conference, held in Ede, the Netherlands, was no exception. Convened for the first time outside the United Kingdom and hosted by the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM). Paramount in all the participants' minds was the emerging information from molecular radiation biology on the recently recognised 'new' processes such as genomic instability, bystander effects, hypersensitivity, and the adaptive response. A novel aspect this year was the introduction of the opportunity, both at the beginning and at the end of the meeting, to participate in a 'vote' on controversial subjects by answering electronically such questions as: 'does radiation hormesis occur at low doses?' and 'should an age-dependence of radiological risk be incorporated into recommendations for radiation protectionThere appears to be no evidence for radiation-induced genomic instability, at least in this tumour. If this model holds for other tumour types, it would suggest that there is no 'radiation fingerprint' and that no special mechanism lies behind radiation-induced cancer. The major social event of the meeting was an afternoon devoted to a delightful excursion to the renowned Kroeller-Mueller Museum in the nearby national park (De Hoge Veluwe). Our Dutch hosts were even able to order up some sunshine for the day. After an afternoon of strolling through the museum and surrounding park, we were bussed to a hotel on the precipitous

  9. Telomere-Binding Protein TPP1 Modulates Telomere Homeostasis and Confers Radioresistance to Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Yang; Wenbo Wang; Liu Hu; Xiaoxi Yang; Juan Zhong; Zheng Li; Hui Yang; Han Lei; Haijun Yu; ZhengKai Liao; Fuxiang Zhou; Conghua Xie; Yunfeng Zhou

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is one of the major therapeutic strategies in cancer treatment. The telomere-binding protein TPP1 is an important component of the shelterin complex at mammalian telomeres. Our previous reports showed that TPP1 expression was elevated in radioresistant cells, but the exact effects and mechanisms of TPP1 on radiosensitivity is unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we found that elevated TPP1 expression significantly correlated with radioresistance and longer telo...

  10. Telomere-Binding Protein TPP1 Modulates Telomere Homeostasis and Confers Radioresistance to Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Wenbo; Hu, Liu; Yang, Xiaoxi; Zhong, Juan; Li, Zheng; Yang, Hui; Lei, Han; Yu, Haijun; Liao, Zhengkai; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua; Zhou, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is one of the major therapeutic strategies in cancer treatment. The telomere-binding protein TPP1 is an important component of the shelterin complex at mammalian telomeres. Our previous reports showed that TPP1 expression was elevated in radioresistant cells, but the exact effects and mechanisms of TPP1 on radiosensitivity is unclear. Principal Findings In this study, we found that elevated TPP1 expression significantly correlated with radioresistance and longer telome...

  11. The Deubiquitinase USP28 Stabilizes LSD1 and Confers Stem-Cell-like Traits to Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadi Wu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available LSD1 is a critical chromatin modulator that controls cellular pluripotency and differentiation through the demethylation of H3K4me1/2. Overexpression of LSD1 has been observed in many types of tumors and is correlated with its oncogenic effects in tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism leading to LSD1 upregulation in tumors remains unclear. Using an unbiased siRNA screening against all the human deubiquitinases, we identified USP28 as a bona fide deubiquitinase of LSD1. USP28 interacted with and stabilized LSD1 via deubiquitination. USP28 overexpression correlated with LSD1 upregulation in multiple cancer cell lines and breast tumor samples. Knockdown of USP28 resulted in LSD1 destabilization, leading to the suppression of cancer stem cell (CSC-like characteristics in vitro and inhibition of tumorigenicity in vivo, which can be rescued by ectopic LSD1 expression. Our study reveals a critical mechanism underlying the epigenetic regulation by USP28 and provides another treatment approach against breast cancer.

  12. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. de; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Ares, L.P.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the Amst

  13. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. De; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Paz-Ares, L.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the

  14. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the A...

  15. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of ...

  16. Heterozygosity, gender, and the growth-defense trade-off in quaking aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Christopher T; Stevens, Michael T; Anderson, Jon E; Lindroth, Richard L

    2016-06-01

    Although plant growth is generally recognized to be influenced by allocation to defense, genetic background (e.g., inbreeding), and gender, rarely have those factors been addressed collectively. In quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), phenolic glycosides (PGs) and condensed tannins (CTs) constitute up to 30 % of leaf dry weight. To quantify the allocation cost of this chemical defense, we measured growth, defense chemistry, and individual heterozygosity (H obs at 16 microsatellite loci) for male and female trees in both controlled and natural environments. The controlled environment consisted of 12 juvenile genets grown for 3 years in a common garden, with replication. The natural environment consisted of 51 mature genets in wild populations, from which we sampled multiple ramets (trees) per genet. Concentrations of PGs and CTs were negatively correlated. PGs were uncorrelated with growth, but CT production represented a major cost. Across the range of CT levels found in wild-grown trees, growth rates varied by 2.6-fold, such that a 10 % increase in CT concentration occurred with a 38.5 % decrease in growth. H obs had a marked effect on aspen growth: for wild trees, a 10 % increase in H obs corresponded to a 12.5 % increase in growth. In wild trees, this CT effect was significant only in females, in which reproduction seems to exacerbate the cost of defense, while the H obs effect was significant only in males. Despite the lower growth rate of low-H obs trees, their higher CT levels may improve survival, which could account for the deficit of heterozygotes repeatedly found in natural aspen populations. PMID:26886130

  17. Detection of Aspens Using High Resolution Aerial Laser Scanning Data and Digital Aerial Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Eerikäinen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to use high resolution Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS data and aerial images to detect European aspen (Populus tremula L. from among other deciduous trees. The field data consisted of 14 sample plots of 30 m × 30 m size located in the Koli National Park in the North Karelia, Eastern Finland. A Canopy Height Model (CHM was interpolated from the ALS data with a pulse density of 3.86/m2, low-pass filtered using Height-Based Filtering (HBF and binarized to create the mask needed to separate the ground pixels from the canopy pixels within individual areas. Watershed segmentation was applied to the low-pass filtered CHM in order to create preliminary canopy segments, from which the non-canopy elements were extracted to obtain the final canopy segmentation, i.e. the ground mask was analysed against the canopy mask. A manual classification of aerial images was employed to separate the canopy segments of deciduous trees from those of coniferous trees. Finally, linear discriminant analysis was applied to the correctly classified canopy segments of deciduous trees to classify them into segments belonging to aspen and those belonging to other deciduous trees. The independent variables used in the classification were obtained from the first pulse ALS point data. The accuracy of discrimination between aspen and other deciduous trees was 78.6%. The independent variables in the classification function were the proportion of vegetation hits, the standard deviation of in pulse heights, accumulated intensity at the 90th percentile and the proportion of laser points reflected at the 60th height percentile. The accuracy of classification corresponded to the validation results of earlier ALS-based studies on the classification of individual deciduous trees to tree species.

  18. Interactions between Bacteria And Aspen Defense Chemicals at the Phyllosphere - Herbivore Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Charles J; Lowe-Power, Tiffany M; Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Lindroth, Richard L; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2016-03-01

    Plant- and insect-associated microorganisms encounter a diversity of allelochemicals, and require mechanisms for contending with these often deleterious and broadly-acting compounds. Trembling aspen, Populus tremuloides, contains two principal groups of defenses, phenolic glycosides (salicinoids) and condensed tannins, which differentially affect the folivorous gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, and its gut symbionts. The bacteria genus Acinetobacter is frequently associated with both aspen foliage and gypsy moth consuming that tissue, and one isolate, Acinetobacter sp. R7-1, previously has been shown to metabolize phenolic glycosides. In this study, we aimed to characterize further interactions between this Acinetobacter isolate and aspen secondary metabolites. We assessed bacterial carbon utilization and growth in response to different concentrations of phenolic glycosides and condensed tannins. We also tested if enzyme inhibitors reduce bacterial growth and catabolism of phenolic glycosides. Acinetobacter sp. R7-1 utilized condensed tannins but not phenolic glycosides or glucose as carbon sources. Growth in nutrient-rich medium was increased by condensed tannins, but reduced by phenolic glycosides. Addition of the P450 enzyme inhibitor piperonyl butoxide increased the effects of phenolic glycosides on Acinetobacter sp. R7-1. In contrast, the esterase inhibitor S,S,S,-tributyl-phosphorotrithioate did not affect phenolic glycoside inhibition of bacterial growth. Degradation of phenolic glycosides by Acinetobacter sp. R7-1 appears to alleviate the cytotoxicity of these compounds, rather than provide an energy source. Our results further suggest this bacterium utilizes additional, complementary mechanisms to degrade antimicrobial phytochemicals. Collectively, these results provide insight into mechanisms by which microorganisms contend with their environment within the context of plant-herbivore interactions. PMID:26961755

  19. Process simulation of oxy-combustion for maximization of energy output using ASPEN plus

    OpenAIRE

    Subhodeep Banerjee, Xiao Zhang, Suraj K. Puvvada, Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is a next-generation combustion technology that shows promise to address the need of low-cost carbon capture from fossil fueled power plants. Oxy-fuel combustion requires expensive pre-processing in an air separation unit to separate pure oxygen from air for the combustion process, which reduces the overall efficiency of the process. This paper employs ASPEN Plus process simulation software to model a simple oxy-fuel combustor and investigates the effect of various paramet...

  20. DEM modelling, vegetation characterization and mapping of aspen parkland rangeland using LIDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guangquan

    Detailed geographic information system (GIS) studies on plant ecology, animal behavior and soil hydrologic characteristics across spatially complex landscapes require an accurate digital elevation model (DEM). Following interpolation of last return LIDAR data and creation of a LIDAR-derived DEM, a series of 260 points, stratified by vegetation type, slope gradient and off-nadir distance, were ground-truthed using a total laser station, GPS, and 27 interconnected benchmarks. Despite an overall mean accuracy of +2 cm across 8 vegetation types, it created a RMSE (square root of the mean square error) of 1.21 m. DEM elevations were over-estimated within forested areas by an average of 20 cm with a RMSE of 1.05 m, under-estimated (-12 cm, RMSE = 1.36 m) within grasslands. Vegetation type had the greatest influence on DEM accuracy, while off-nadir distance (P = 0.48) and slope gradient (P = 0.49) did not influence DEM accuracy; however, the latter factors did interact (P physiognomy) including plant height, cover, and vertical or horizontal heterogeneity, are important factors influencing biodiversity. Vegetation over and understory were sampled for height, canopy cover, and tree or shrub density within 120 field plots, evenly stratified by vegetation formation (grassland, shrubland, and aspen forest). Results indicated that LIDAR data could be used for estimating the maximum height, cover, and density, of both closed and semi-open stands of aspen (P < 0.001). However, LIDAR data could not be used to assess understory (<1.5 m) height within aspen stands, nor grass height and cover. Recognition and mapping of vegetation types are important for rangelands as they provide a basis for the development and evaluation of management policies and actions. In this study, LIDAR data were found to be superior to digital classification schedules for their mapping accuracy in aspen forest and grassland, but not shrubland. No single classification schedule created a high classification

  1. Epothilone B Confers Radiation Dose Enhancement in DAB2IP Gene Knock-Down Radioresistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In metastatic prostate cancer, DOC-2/DAB2 interactive protein (DAB2IP) is often downregulated and has been reported as a possible prognostic marker to predict the risk of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa). Our preliminary results show that DAB2IP-deficient PCa cells are radioresistant. In this study, we investigated the anticancer drug Epothilone B (EpoB) for the modulation of radiosensitivity in DAB2IP-deficient human PCa cells. Methods and Materials: We used a stable DAB2IP-knock down human PCa cell line, PC3 shDAB2IP, treated with EpoB, ionizing radiation (IR), or the combined treatment of EpoB and IR. The modulation of radiosensitivity was determined by surviving fraction, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. For in vivo studies, the PC3shDAB2IP xenograft model was used in athymic nude mice. Results: Treatment with EpoB at IC50 dose (33.3 nM) increased cellular radiosensitivity in the DAB2IP-deficient cell line with a dose enhancement ratio of 2.36. EpoB delayed the DSB repair kinetics after IR and augmented the induction of apoptosis in irradiated cells after G2/M arrest. Combined treatment of EpoB and radiation enhanced tumor growth delay with an enhancement factor of 1.2. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a significant radiation dose enhancement using EpoB in DAB2IP-deficient prostate cancer cells. This radiosensitization can be attributed to delayed DSB repair, prolonged G2 block, and increased apoptosis in cells entering the cell cycle after G2/M arrest.

  2. International Conference on Risk Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Teresa; Rigas, Alexandros; Gulati, Sneh

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest results in the field of risk analysis. Presented topics include probabilistic models in cancer research, models and methods in longevity, epidemiology of cancer risk, engineering reliability and economical risk problems. The contributions of this volume originate from the 5th International Conference on Risk Analysis (ICRA 5). The conference brought together researchers and practitioners working in the field of risk analysis in order to present new theoretical and computational methods with applications in biology, environmental sciences, public health, economics and finance.

  3. Fast growing aspens in the development of a plant micropropagation system based on plant-produced ethylene action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Representatives of the genus Populus (poplars), such as Populus tremula L. (European aspen) and its fast-growing hybrids, are recognized as being among the most suitable tree species for short rotation coppicing in Northern Europe. Several technologies have been developed for fast propagation of selected aspen genotypes, including laboratory (in vitro) micropropagation, which is usually based on the action of exogenous plant hormones. Seeking to minimize the use of the latter, the present study was designed to test if the conditions suitable for increased accumulation of plant-produced gas, including the gaseous plant hormone ethylene, inside a culture vessel could contribute to commercially desirable changes in aspen development. Shoot cultures of several European and hybrid (Populus tremuloides Michx. × P. tremula) aspen genotypes were studied using two different types of culture vessels: tightly sealed Petri dishes (15 × 54 mm) designed to provide restricted gas exchange (RGE) conditions, and capped (but not sealed) test tubes (150 × 18 mm) providing control conditions. Under RGE conditions, not only the positive impact of the ethylene precursors 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic-acid (ACC) and ethephon on shoot proliferation was demonstrated but also a several-fold increase, compared to the control conditions, in the mean shoot number per explant was recorded even on the hormone-free nutrient medium. Moreover, the shoots developed under RGE conditions were distinguished by superior rooting ability in the subsequent culture. These results suggest that a plant micropropagation system based on the action of plant-produced ethylene rather than of exogenous hormones is possible. -- Highlights: ► Aspen in vitro cultures were grown in different vessels. ► Small-volume vessels were used for restriction of gas exchange. ► Aspen explants produced most shoots in small-volume vessels. ► Shoot proliferation was increased due to explant response to ethylene.

  4. An evaluation of steam-treated aspen as a substitute for corn silage in the rations of lactating cows

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, L J

    1980-01-01

    Fifteen lactating Holsteins were used to test processed aspen added to corn silage at the levels of 0, 10 and 20% (dry matter basis). The experiment was designed as a latin square with three experimental periods each 42 days in length. The forage mixtures were fed free choice to the cows, which were housed in a free-stall barn, and their individual feed intakes were recorded by using electronic doors. The processed aspen contained 45.4% dry matter, 73.7% acid detergent fiber and 0.54% protein...

  5. Monitoring cancer treatment response using photoacoustic and ultrasound spectral analysis in combination with oxygenation measurements (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysi, Eno; May, Jonathan P.; Wirtzfeld, Lauren; Undzys, Elijus; Li, Shyh-Dar; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    At clinically-relevant depths, the frequency content of photoacoustic signals encodes information about the size, concentration and spatial distribution of non-resolvable blood vessels. This study evaluates whether photoacoustics can detect cancer therapy-induced vascular perturbations. Photoacoustic/ultrasound (PA/US) spectral analysis was combined with functional, PA-based oxygenation and power Doppler (PD) perfusion estimates to assess treatment response. Co-registered, in-vivo US/PA/PD imaging of mice bearing breast cancer tumors was performed pre-treatment and 30m/2h/5h/24h/7d post-treatment (VevoLAZR, Fujifilm VisualSonics). Hyperthermia treatment (1h, 43C) was performed after systemic injections of doxorubicin-loaded thermosensitive liposomes (TSL, n=13) or free doxorubicin (DOX, n=11). Response was classified according to 2h, PA-based oxygenation drop and endpoint (>9d), caliper-based volume reduction. At all time-points/wavelengths (750/850nm), the spectral-slope (SS) was computed from the normalized US/PA power spectra using depth-matched reference phantoms. The percent-vascularity (PV) was estimated for the animal with the largest oxygenation-drop at 2h. TLS-treated responders decreased their PA-SS by 1.9x @750nm and 5.8x @850nm 30m post-treatment and remained constant for 24h; tumor oxygenation followed the same trend. Non-responding SS remained unchanged for 24h. The 750nm SS was 18.7x lower than 850nm suggesting the TSL is sensitive vessel oxygenation. Responder PV decreased 100% when the 30m oxygenation dropped 15% and increased 7x when the 7d oxygenation increased 20%. DOX-responders exhibited similar trends to TSL-responders although the 750nm PA-SS was 1.6x smaller and post-treatment PV was 50% higher. The US-SS remained unchanged until 7d post-treatment suggesting its sensitivity to tumor cell-death. These findings suggest that PA spectral analysis has potential in monitoring cancer treatment response.

  6. Genetic variant in CD44 confer susceptibility to acute skin reaction in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterogeneity in toxicity to normal tissue is observed in 10% of cancer patients after radiotherapy (RT) which limits the therapeutic outcome. Response to RT is manifested from alterations in gene of vivid pathways involving DNA damage-repair, inflammatory cytokine, cell cycle regulation, antioxidant response etc. Therefore, the common sequence variants in these radioresponsive genes may modify the severity of normal tissue toxicity and identification of the same may have clinical relevance as a predictive biomarker. The present study was aimed to evaluate the potential modifying role of genetic variants in NFE2L2, OGG1, NEIL3, RAD17, PTTG1, REV3L, ALAD, CD44, RAD9A, LIG3, SH3GL1, BAXS, XRCC1, MAD2L2 and TGFBR3 on the individual susceptibility to RT induced acute skin reactions. All the 132 breast cancer patients were treated with a total dose of 50 Gy in case of mastectomy and 60 Gy in breast conservation surgery. The severity of skin damage was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria and the toxicity scores were dichotomized as non-over-responders (NOR; RTOG<2) and over-responders (NOR;RTOG>2) for analysis. Out of the 132 subjects, 44 were ORs. Among the 20 studied SNPs of indicated genes, the rs8193 (CD44) polymorphism lying in the miRNA binding site was significantly (p<0.05) associated with the RT induced adverse skin reactions. The non-coding CD44 3'-UTR serves as a competitor for miRNA binding and subsequently inactivates miRNA functions, by freeing the target mRNAs from being repressed. Therefore, though the role of CD44 in radiosensitivity is unknown, the change in the miRNA binding to CD44mRNA transcripts may regulate expression of several genes involved in pathophysiology of normal tissue radiosensitivity leading to the observed outcome. (author)

  7. Wide-field optical coherence elastography for intraoperative assessment of tumour margins in breast cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2016-03-01

    Incomplete excision of tumour margins is a major issue in breast-conserving surgery. Currently 20 - 60% of cases require a second surgical procedure required as a result of cancer recurrence. A number of techniques have been proposed to assess margin status, including frozen section analysis and imprint cytology. However, the recurrence rate after using these techniques remains very high. Over the last several years, our group has been developing optical coherence elastography (OCE) as a tool for the intraoperative assessment of tumour margins in breast cancer. We have reported a feasibility study on 65 ex vivo samples from patients undergoing mastectomy or wide local excision demonstrates the potential of OCE in differentiating benign from malignant tissue. In this study, malignant tissue was readily distinguished from surrounding relative tissue by a distinctive heterogeneous pattern in micro-elastograms. To date the largest field of view for a micro-elastogram is 20 x 20mm, however, lumpectomy samples are typically ~50 x 50 x 30mm. For OCE to progress as a useful clinical tool, elastograms must be acquired over larger areas to allow a greater portion of the surface area of lumpectomies to be assessed. Here, we propose a wide-field OCE scanner that utilizes a piezoelectric transducer with an internal diameter of 65mm. In this approach partially overlapped elastograms are stitched together forming a mosaic with overall dimensions of 50 x 50mm in a total acquisition time of 15 - 30 minutes. We present results using this approach on both tissue-mimicking phantoms and tissue, and discuss prospects for shorter acquisitions times.

  8. New exposure-based metric approach for evaluating O(3) risk to North American aspen forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, K E; Nosal, M; Heilman, W; Dann, T; Sober, J; Legge, A H; Karnosky, D F

    2007-06-01

    The United States and Canada currently use exposure-based metrics to protect vegetation from O(3). Using 5 years (1999-2003) of co-measured O(3), meteorology and growth response, we have developed exposure-based regression models that predict Populus tremuloides growth change within the North American ambient air quality context. The models comprised growing season fourth-highest daily maximum 8-h average O(3) concentration, growing degree days, and wind speed. They had high statistical significance, high goodness of fit, include 95% confidence intervals for tree growth change, and are simple to use. Averaged across a wide range of clonal sensitivity, historical 2001-2003 growth change over most of the 26 Mha P. tremuloides distribution was estimated to have ranged from no impact (0%) to strong negative impacts (-31%). With four aspen clones responding negatively (one responded positively) to O(3), the growing season fourth-highest daily maximum 8-h average O(3) concentration performed much better than growing season SUM06, AOT40 or maximum 1h average O(3) concentration metrics as a single indicator of aspen stem cross-sectional area growth. PMID:17140714

  9. Urbanization-related changes in European aspen (Populus tremula L.): Leaf traits and litter decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated foliar and litter responses of European aspen (Populus tremula L.) to urbanization, including factors such as increased temperature, moisture stress and nitrogen (N) deposition. Leaf samples were collected in 2006-2008 from three urban and three rural forest stands in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area, southern Finland, and reciprocal litter transplantations were established between urban and rural sites. Urban leaves exhibited a higher amount of epicuticular waxes and N concentration, and a lower C:N ratio than rural ones, but there was no difference in specific leaf area. Urban litter had a slightly higher N concentration, lower concentrations of lignin and total phenolics, and was more palatable to a macrofaunal decomposer. Moreover, litter decay was faster at the urban site and for urban litter. Urbanization thus resulted in foliar acclimatization in terms of increased amount of epicuticular waxes, as well as in accelerated decomposition of the N-richer leaf litter. - Urbanization can modify leaf traits of aspen and accelerate litter decomposition through changes in litter traits as well as in environmental conditions at the decomposition site.

  10. Improving root-zone soil properties for Trembling Aspen in a reconstructed mine-site soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, M. F.; Sabbagh, P.; Bockstette, S.; Landhäusser, S.; Pinno, B.

    2014-12-01

    Surface mining activities have significantly depleted natural tree cover, especially trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides), in the Boreal Forest and Aspen Parkland Natural Regions of Alberta. The natural soil profile is usually destroyed during these mining activities and soil and landscape reconstruction is typically the first step in the reclamation process. However, the mine tailings and overburden materials used for these new soils often become compacted during the reconstruction process because they are subjected to high amounts of traffic with heavy equipment. Compacted soils generally have low porosity and low penetrability through increased soil strength, making it difficult for roots to elongate and explore the soil. Compaction also reduces infiltration capacity and drainage, which can cause excessive runoff and soil erosion. To improve the pore size distribution and water transmission, subsoil ripping was carried out in a test plot at Genesee Prairie Mine, Alberta. Within the site, six replicates with two treatments each, unripped (compacted) and ripped (decompacted), were established with 20-m buffers between them. The main objective of this research was to characterize the effects of subsoil ripping on soil physical properties and the longevity of those effects.as well as soil water dynamics during spring snowmelt. Results showed improved bulk density, pore size distribution and water infiltration in the soil as a result of the deep ripping, but these improvements appear to be temporary.

  11. Mendel conference

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected accepted papers of Mendel conference that has been held in Brno, Czech Republic in June 2015. The book contents three chapters which represent recent advances in soft computing including intelligent image processing and bio-inspired robotics.: Chapter 1: Evolutionary Computing, and Swarm intelligence, Chapter 2: Neural Networks, Self-organization, and Machine Learning, and Chapter3: Intelligent Image Processing, and Bio-inspired Robotics. The Mendel conference was established in 1995, and it carries the name of the scientist and Augustinian priest Gregor J. Mendel who discovered the famous Laws of Heredity. In 2015 we are commemorating 150 years since Mendel's lectures, which he presented in Brno on February and March 1865. The main aim of the conference was to create a periodical possibility for students, academics and researchers to exchange their ideas and novel research methods.  .

  12. Conference Notification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Roskill Information Services and Metal Events Ltd areorganizing the 2nd International Rare Earths Conference,which will be held at the Conrad Hotel in Hong Kong onFebruary 28 to March 2 2006.The program is structured tocover all the main aspects of the rare earths industry,including development of Chinese rare earth industry; trendsin rare earths demand; potential constraints on supply;research on potential capacity of rare earths supply chain.Global rare earths consumers will attend the conference.Registra...

  13. Leipzig Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showcase for a memorable year of progress in particle physics, the 22nd International Conference on High Energy Physics was held in Leipzig, German Democratic Republic, from 19-25 July. After a busy three days of parallel sessions (four streams), well over a thousand participants gathered in Leipzig's Kongresshalle for the plenary talks. As at the Brighton Conference last year, these began with presentations from the big UA1 and UA2 experiments at CERN's SPS proton-antiproton Collider, still the focus of world attention despite having taken no new data since last year

  14. Analysis of CO2 Separation by Selexol Based on Aspen Plus%基于Aspen Plus对Selexol分离CO2流程的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱朋华; 李丹丹; 徐宝龙; 呼姚; 杜昌帅; 吴少华

    2014-01-01

    整体煤气化联合循环发电系统可采取燃烧前捕集CO2的方法,处理的合成气量少,能耗低,且能够实现 CO2的近零排放,在 CO2脱除方面具有很大的优势。文中基于Aspen Plus 对 CO2/H2S 联合脱除和分别脱除流程建立了模型,对2流程的能耗、CO2及H2S的脱除效率以及Selexol溶液的再生性能进行了分析。得出:在出口 CO2纯度相同的情况下,CO2/H2S联合脱除流程的能耗仅占CO2/H2S分别脱除的21%左右,CO2脱除效率高于分别脱除流程,2流程Selexol溶液的再生性能相差不大,且H2S脱除效率也可达到95%以上,因此CO2/H2S联合脱除流程更经济。%Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)power generation system can adopt pre-combustion CO2 capture methods, handling with less syngas and have low energy consumption, which can achieve near-zero emissions of CO2, resulting in great advantages in terms of CO2 removal. Based on Aspen Plus, combined removal of CO2/H2S (CRCH) and separate removal of CO2/H2S (SRCH) were modeled . Energy consumption, capture efficiency of CO2 and H2S, as well as the regeneration performance of Selexol were analyzed by the two models. The results indicate that:while keeping the same CO2 purity in outlet stream, the energy consumption of CRCH accounts for only 21% of SRCH; the CO2 capture efficiency is higher than that of SRCH, the regeneration performance of Selexol is almost the same for the two processes, and the capture efficiency of H2S in the two processes can be higher than 95%. All those prove that CRCH is more economic than SRCH.

  15. Molecular Genetics of Cancer. Second joint conference of the American Association for Cancer Reserach and the European Association for Cancer Research. 9-13 Sept. 1997, Oxford University, UK.

    OpenAIRE

    Sigurður Ingvarsson 1956

    1997-01-01

    In this intense meeting, many exciting new molecular genetic approaches and findings in the cancer field were presented. It was obvious that much has been accomplished and the field of cancer molecular genetics will continue to provide new information and understanding regarding the complex nature of neoplastic disease. Some of these findings may lead to better diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  16. Consensus conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annika Porsborg; Lassen, Jesper

    , the differing perceptions are each in their own way rooted in an argument for democratic legitimacy. We therefore argue that national interpretations of consensus conferences, and of their ability to functions as a tool for public participation, depend to a great extent on the dominant ideals of...... democratic legitimacy embedded in national political cultures....

  17. Conference Hopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Annual conference outlines tasks for 2010 to solidify China’s economic recovery through rational investment and increasing consumptionc hina will adhere to a consistent and stable economic strategy, putting in place a proactive fiscal policy and an accommodative monetary policy for the 2010 fiscal year-the macro-economic course mapped out during China’s Central

  18. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented at this conference cover the fields of thermalhydraulics, nuclear plant design and operation, licensing, decontamination, restoration and dismantling of nuclear power facilities, services to the nuclear industry, new applications of nuclear technology, reactor physics and fuel cycles, accelerator-breeders, fusion research and lasers

  19. Latest advances in confocal microscopy of skin cancers toward guiding patient care: a Mohs surgeon's review and perspective (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehal, Kishwer S.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Latest advances in confocal microscopy of skin cancers toward guiding patient care: a Mohs surgeon's review and perspective About 350 publications worldwide have reported the ability of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging to detect melanocytic skin lesions in vivo with specificity of 84-88% and sensitivity of 71-92%, and non-melanocytic skin lesions with specificity of 85-97% and sensitivity 100-92%. Lentigo maligna melanoma can be detected with sensitivity of 93% and specificity 82%. While the sensitivity is comparable to that of dermoscopy, the specificity is 2X superior, especially for lightly- and non-pigmented lesions. Dermoscopy combined with RCM imaging is proving to be both highly sensitive and highly specific. Recent studies have reported that the ratio of equivocal (i.e., would have been biopsied) lesions to detected melanomas dropped by ~2X when guided by dermoscopy and RCM imaging, compared to that with dermoscopy alone. Dermoscopy combined with RCM imaging is now being implemented to guide noninvasive diagnosis (to rule out malignancy and biopsy) and to also guide treatment, with promising initial impact: thus far, about 3,000 patients have been saved from biopsies of benign lesions. These are currently under follow-up monitoring. With fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) mosaicing, residual basal cell carcinomas can be detected in Mohs surgically excised fresh tissue ex vivo, with sensitivity of 94-97% and specificity 89-94%. FCM mosaicing is now being implemented for guiding Mohs surgery. To date, about 600 Mohs procedures have been performed, guided with mosaicing, and with pathology being performed in parallel to confirm the final outcome. These latest advances demonstrate the promising ability of RCM and FCM to guide patient care.

  20. 77 FR 31351 - Adequacy Determination for Aspen PM10 and Fort Collins Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plans' Motor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... (69 FR 40004). In addition, in certain areas with monitored ambient carbon monoxide (CO) values... the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). The criteria by which we determine whether a SIP... AGENCY Adequacy Determination for Aspen PM and Fort Collins Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plans'...

  1. SIGEF Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Terceño-Gómez, Antonio; Ferrer-Comalat, Joan; Merigó-Lindahl, José; Linares-Mustarós, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected papers presented at the SIGEF conference, held at the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Girona (Spain), 06-08 July, 2015. This edition of the conference has been presented with the slogan “Scientific methods for the treatment of uncertainty in social sciences”. There are different ways for dealing with uncertainty in management. The book focuses on soft computing theories and their role in assessing uncertainty in a complex world. It gives a comprehensive overview of quantitative management topics and discusses some of the most recent developments in all the areas of business and management in soft computing including Decision Making, Expert Systems and Forgotten Effects Theory, Forecasting Models, Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy Sets, Modelling and Simulation Techniques, Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms and Optimization and Control. The book might be of great interest for anyone working in the area of management and business economics and might be es...

  2. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains summaries of 28 papers presented at the 27. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. These papers discuss the general situation of the Canadian nuclear industry and the CANDU reactor; dialogue with the public; the International Atomic Energy Agency; and economic goals and operating lessons. It also contains summaries of 70 papers presented at the 8. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, which discuss plant life extension; safety and the environment; reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; risk assessment; the CANDU spacer location and repositioning project; CANDU operations; safety research after Chernobyl; fuel channels; and nuclear technology developments. The individual papers are also available in INIS-mf--13673 (CNA), and INIS-mf--12909 (CNS). (L.L.)

  3. Simulation and validation of chemical-looping combustion using ASPEN plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhou, Zheming Zhang, Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale experimental studies have demonstrated that Chemical-Looping Combustion (CLC is an advanced technology which holds great potential for high-efficiency low-cost carbon capture. The generated syngas in CLC is subsequently oxidized to CO2 and H2O by reaction with an oxygen carrier. In this paper, process-level models of CLC are established in ASPEN Plus code for detailed simulations. The entire CLC process, from the beginning of coal gasification to reduction and oxidation of the oxygen carrier is modeled. The heat content of each major component such as fuel and air reactors and air/flue gas heat exchangers is carefully examined. Large amount of energy is produced in the fuel reactor, but energy needs to be supplied to the air reactor. The overall performance and efficiency of the modeled CLC systems are also evaluated.

  4. Simulation and validation of chemical-looping combustion using ASPEN plus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ling [Research Center of Fluid Machinery Engineering and Technology, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Zhang, Zheming; Agarwal, Ramesh K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Laboratory-scale experimental studies have demonstrated that Chemical-Looping Combustion (CLC) is an advanced technology which holds great potential for high-efficiency low-cost carbon capture. The generated syngas in CLC is subsequently oxidized to CO2 and H2O by reaction with an oxygen carrier. In this paper, process-level models of CLC are established in ASPEN Plus code for detailed simulations. The entire CLC process, from the beginning of coal gasification to reduction and oxidation of the oxygen carrier is modeled. The heat content of each major component such as fuel and air reactors and air/flue gas heat exchangers is carefully examined. Large amount of energy is produced in the fuel reactor, but energy needs to be supplied to the air reactor. The overall performance and efficiency of the modeled CLC systems are also evaluated.

  5. A simulation study of Solid Oxide fuel cell for IGCC power generation using Aspen Plus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Kim, Hyung Taek

    2010-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a promising technology for electricity generation. Sulfur free syngas from the gas cleaning unit serves as a fuel for SOFC in IGFC (Integrated gasification Fuel cell) power plant. It converts the chemical energy of the fuel gas directly to electric energy and...... more accurate fuel cell model giving an advantage over previous system studies based on simplified SOFC models. The objective of this work is to develop a simulation model of a SOFC for IGFC system, flexible enough for use in future development, capable of predicting system performance under various...... operating conditions and using diverse fuels. The SOFC stack model developed using the chemical process flow sheet simulator Aspen Plus which is of equilibrium type and is based on Gibbs free energy minimization. The SOFC model performs heat and mass balances and considers the ohmic, activation and...

  6. Continuous Hydrothermal Co-liquefaction of Aspen Wood and Glycerol with Water Phase Recirculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Helmer; Grigoras, Ionela; Hoffmann, Jessica;

    2016-01-01

    reactors, although a continuous and energy-efficient operation is paramount for such process to be feasible. In this work an experimental campaign in a continuous bench scale unit is presented. The campaign is based on glycerol-assisted hydrothermal liquefaction of aspen wood carried out with the presence...... having a higher heating value of 34.3 MJ/kg. The volatile fraction of the biocrude consisted mostly of compounds having number of carbon atoms in the C6–C12 range similar to gasoline. In terms of process feasibility, it was revealed that total organic carbon (TOC) and ash significantly accumulated in the...... water phase when such is recirculated for the proceeding batch. After four batches the TOC and the ash mass fraction of the water phase were 136.2 [g/L] and 12.6 [%], respectively. Water phase recirculation showed a slight increase in the biocrude quality in terms on an effective hydrogen...

  7. Three Stage Equilibrium Model for Coal Gasification in Entrained Flow Gasifiers Based on Aspen Plus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Xiangdong; ZHONG Weimin; DU Wenli; QIAN Feng

    2013-01-01

    A three stage equilibrium model is developed for coal gasification in the Texaco type coal gasifiers based on Aspen Plus to calculate the composition of product gas,carbon conversion,and gasification temperature.The model is divided into three stages including pyrolysis and combustion stage,char gas reaction stage,and gas phase reaction stage.Part of the water produced in the pyrolysis and combustion stage is assumed to be involved in the second stage to react with the unburned carbon.Carbon conversion is then estimated in the second stage by steam participation ratio expressed as a function of temperature.And the gas product compositions are calculated from gas phase reactions in the third stage.The simulation results are consistent with published experimental data.

  8. Process simulation of oxy-combustion for maximization of energy output using ASPEN plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhodeep Banerjee, Xiao Zhang, Suraj K. Puvvada, Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxy-fuel combustion is a next-generation combustion technology that shows promise to address the need of low-cost carbon capture from fossil fueled power plants. Oxy-fuel combustion requires expensive pre-processing in an air separation unit to separate pure oxygen from air for the combustion process, which reduces the overall efficiency of the process. This paper employs ASPEN Plus process simulation software to model a simple oxy-fuel combustor and investigates the effect of various parameters on the energy output. The composition of the flue gas is carefully examined. The results of this study provide a starting point for optimized oxy-fuel combustion operation for maximum energy output, which will be crucial for future deployment of oxy-fuel combustion technology.

  9. Modeling of a High Temperature Sulfuric Acid Loop using Aspen Plus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen energy needs are growing with increased demands for alternatives to fossil fuel. Recently, many researchers have been investigating into hydrogen production technologies from a renewable and a nuclear energy. Very High Temperature gas cooled nuclear Reactor (VHTR) is considered to be suitable for massive hydrogen production systems when it coupled with Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermo-chemical cycle. Kim et al. are developing a hybrid heat exchanger as a process heat exchanger for the sulfur trioxide decomposition. Hong et al. constructed and are operating a small scale sulfuric acid loop for the integrity and feasibility tests of a process heat exchanger coupled with VHTR and SI cycle. In this study, we performed preliminary analysis of small scale sulfuric acid test loop using Aspen Plus chemical process simulator. In addition, we studied the behavior of main component in the sulfuric acid loop on the basis of experimental results

  10. Conference information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Thermag Ⅳ- The 4th International Conference on Magnetic Refrigeration at Room Temperature of IIR Refrigeration technology is widely used today. However, traditional vapor compression/expansion refrigeration technology has some disadvantages, such as low conversion efficiency of vapor compressor, and emission of the ozonosphere depletion gas and greenhouse effect gas, etc. Magnetic refrigeration is a new cooling technology with huge potential application prospect, characterized by high efficiency, energy saving and environmental friendly.

  11. Effects of aspen harvesting on groundwater recharge and water table dynamics in a subhumid climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera-HernáNdez, J. J.; Mendoza, C. A.; Devito, K. J.; Petrone, R. M.; Smerdon, B. D.

    2011-05-01

    Numerical experiments were developed using different water table depths and soil textures to investigate the impact of aspen harvesting on hydrological processes on the Western Boreal Plain. The effect of harvesting on soil moisture dynamics, fluxes at the water table, and water table fluctuation were compared for different harvesting scenarios simulated under wet and dry climatic cycles. Strong interaction between shallow water tables (i.e., 2 m) and atmospheric variability is observed for all soil textures and is reduced as the vadose zone thickens, particularly after a dry cycle, as a series of positive net atmospheric fluxes are needed to reduce soil moisture storage in order for recharge to occur. Because of harvesting, the water table fluxes can increase by 50 mm month-1, while on a yearly basis, this increase can reach 200 mm yr-1, with rainfall events taking between 1 and 5 years to become recharge (i.e., time lag). Also, the water table is expected to rise between 1 and 3.5 m, with rainfall-water table rise time lags of 1-3 years; however, the peak manifestation of harvesting on water table elevation can take up to 7 years after harvesting. The effects of aspen harvesting are more pronounced during wet cycles, and the development of forestry activities in the Boreal Plain should consider not only preceding precipitation but also the preceding precipitation-reference evapotranspiration ratio, water table depth, and soil texture. The interaction of these factors needs to be considered in order to develop sustainable forestry plans and avoid waterlogging conditions.

  12. PHYSICS FOR HEALTH: CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Highlights of ICTR-PHE 2016 - International Conference on Translational Research in Radio-Oncology and Physics for Health -, co organized by CERN, aims at developing new strategies to better diagnose and treat cancer, by uniting biology and physics with clinics. Through the various sessions and symposia, the scientific programme offers the delegates the opportunity to discuss, in a friendly atmosphere, the latest progress in physics breakthroughs for health applications. The third edition of this conference took place at CICG (Centre International de Conférence Genève) from 15 to 19 Feb 2016.

  13. Conference Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is rapidly becoming a useful tool for simulating a variety of fluid flows. The 6. annual meeting of the Society in Quebec City discussed a wide variety of topics, organized into 15 sessions. Session titles included aerodynamics, shocks and detonations, geophysical and environmental flows, unsteady flows, multiphase flows, turbulence, natural convection, industrial applications, numerical techniques and simulations, heat and mass transfer, and moving boundary /interface problems. The use of CFD for mathematical modeling was demonstrated at this conference which included addresses by four guest speakers, 85 presentations, and 10 exhibits. refs., tabs., figs.

  14. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 113 papers presented at this conference covered the areas of 1) fuel design, development and production; 2) nuclear plant safety; 3) nuclear instrumentation; 4) public and regulatory matters; 5) developments and opportunities in fusion; 6) fuel behaviour under normal operating conditions; 7) nuclear plant design and operations; 8) materials science and technology; 9) nuclear power issues; 10) fusion technology; 11) fuel behaviour under accident conditions; 12) large scale fuel channel replacement programs; 13) thermalhydraulics experimental studies; 14) reactor physics and analysis; 15) applications of accelerators; 16) fission product release and severe fuel damage under accident conditions; 17) thermalhydraulics modeling and assessments; 18) waste management and the environment; and 20) new reactor concepts

  15. Models for the distribution of quaking aspen in geographic and potential evapotranspiration spaces relevant to the Book Cliffs (Utah), 2000-2002

    OpenAIRE

    Sexton, Joseph O.

    2003-01-01

    Quaking aspen is the most widely distributed tree species in North America and an asset to sociological, ecological, and hydrological land values in the western United States. In recognition of these values, land managers seek means to oppose a regional decline of aspen in the Intermountain West—a decline apparently in progress since the close of the Pleistocene and driven by climate change, fire suppression, and increasing ungulate densities. One location of special relevance to this decline...

  16. EGC Conferences

    CERN Document Server

    Ritschard, Gilbert; Pinaud, Bruno; Venturini, Gilles; Zighed, Djamel; Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Management

    This book is a collection of representative and novel works done in Data Mining, Knowledge Discovery, Clustering and Classification that were originally presented in French at the EGC'2012 Conference held in Bordeaux, France, on January 2012. This conference was the 12th edition of this event, which takes place each year and which is now successful and well-known in the French-speaking community. This community was structured in 2003 by the foundation of the French-speaking EGC society (EGC in French stands for ``Extraction et Gestion des Connaissances'' and means ``Knowledge Discovery and Management'', or KDM). This book is intended to be read by all researchers interested in these fields, including PhD or MSc students, and researchers from public or private laboratories. It concerns both theoretical and practical aspects of KDM. The book is structured in two parts called ``Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining'' and ``Classification and Feature Extraction or Selection''. The first part (6 chapters) deals with...

  17. Munich conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The Standard Model has survived impact for another year', declared Don Perkins of Oxford, summarizing the 24th International Conference on High Energy Physics held in Munich from 4-10 August. 'But is this a triumph or a frustration for physics?' he added. The twin pillars of the Standard Model, the electroweak unification of electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force, and the field theory (quantum chromodynamics) of the quark-gluon interactions responsible for the strong nuclear force, have not trembled since the electroweak unification went to the textbooks in 1983, but from time to time small cracks have appeared which might have gone on to shake the theory severely, if not undermine it. Major conference summarizers have got used to singing the praises of the Standard Model, but this year at Munich even detailed examination failed to reveal any serious cracks, while looking deeper into physics even some anomalous results hinting at gaps in understanding have either gone away or have diminished credibility

  18. NATO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, W

    1975-01-01

    The contents of this volume involve selection, emendation and up-dating of papers presented at the NATO Conference "Mathe­ matical Analysis of Decision problems in Ecology" in Istanbul, Turkey, July 9-13, 1973. It was sponsored by the System Sciences Division of NATO directed by Dr. B. Bayraktar with local arrange­ ments administered by Dr. Ilhami Karayalcin, professor of the Department of Industrial Engineering at the Technical University of Istanbul. It was organized by A. Charnes, University professor across the University of Texas System, and Walter R.Lynn, Di­ rector of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell Unjversity. The objective of the conference was to bring together a group of leading researchers from the major sciences involved in eco­ logical problems and to present the current state of progress in research of a mathematical nature which might assist in the solu­ tion of these problems. Although their presentations are not herein recorded, the key­ note address of Dr....

  19. The African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer and its conferences: a historical perspective and highlights of the Ninth International Conference, Durban, South Africa, 21–24 November 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Christopher KO; Cristina Stefan, D; Rawlinson, Fiona; Simbiri, Kenneth; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC), both at its inception in the early 1980s, and at its reactivation in 2000 following a decade of inactivity, included bringing the products of decades of advances in cancer research to African populations through international collaboration. The historical perspective provided in this report illustrates progress in achieving these objectives through successive continent-wide activities over a period of 30 ...

  20. Composition of cavity-nesting bird communities in montane aspen woodland fragments: The roles of landscape context and forest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, J.J.; Edwards, T.C., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    We compared cavity-nesting bird communities in aspen (Populus tremuloides) woodland fragments classified on the basis of vegetation structure (tree density) and landscape context (surrounding vegetation). We found very few cavity nesters in fragments predominantly surrounded by forests. Fragments adjacent to meadows contained more species and a greater abundance of cavity nesters. Species richness and abundance were higher in sparsely than in densely treed meadow fragments. Because secondary cavity nesters are often limited by cavity availability, we augmented natural cavities with nest boxes. Although only five boxes contained bird nests, these were all in sparse aspen fragments predominantly surrounded by meadows. However, we found 25 northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) nests in boxes, none of which were in sparse meadow fragments. In addition to high-lighting the importance of landscape context in avian and mammalian habitat relationships, our results suggest that predator or competitor interactions may help structure this cavity-nester community. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2002.

  1. Simulation of a tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack using AspenPlusTM unit operation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a fuel cell system involves both optimization of the fuel cell stack and the balance of plant with respect to efficiency and economics. Many commercially available process simulators, such as AspenPlusTM, can facilitate the analysis of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. A SOFC system may include fuel pre-processors, heat exchangers, turbines, bottoming cycles, etc., all of which can be very effectively modelled in process simulation software. The current challenge is that AspenPlusTM or any other commercial process simulators do not have a model of a basic SOFC stack. Therefore, to enable performing SOFC system simulation using one of these simulators, one must construct an SOFC stack model that can be implemented in them. The most common approach is to develop a complete SOFC model in a programming language, such as Fortran, Visual Basic or C++, first and then link it to a commercial process simulator as a user defined model or subroutine. This paper introduces a different approach to the development of a SOFC model by utilizing existing AspenPlusTM functions and existing unit operation modules. The developed ''AspenPlusTM SOFC'' model is able to provide detailed thermodynamic and parametric analyses of the SOFC operation and can easily be extended to study the entire power plant consisting of the SOFC and the balance of plant without the requirement for linking with other software. Validation of this model is performed by comparison to a Siemens-Westinghouse 100 kW class tubular SOFC stack. Sensitivity analyses of major operating parameters, such as utilization factor (Uf), current density (Ic) and steam-carbon ratio (S/C), were performed using the developed model, and the results are discussed in this paper

  2. Organo-mineral interactions promote greater soil organic carbon stability under aspen in semi-arid montane forests in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Miegroet, H.; Roman Dobarco, M.

    2014-12-01

    Forest species influence soil organic carbon (SOC) storage through litter input, which in interaction with soil microclimate, texture and mineralogy, lead to different SOC stabilization and storage patterns. We sampled mineral soil (0-15 cm) across the ecotone between aspen (Populus tremuloides) and mixed conifers stands (Abies lasiocarpa and Pseudotsuga menziesii) in semi-arid montane forests from Utah, to investigate the influence of vegetation vs. site characteristics on SOC stabilization, storage and chemistry. SOC was divided into light fraction (LF), mineral-associated SOC in the silt and clay fraction (MoM), and a dense subfraction > 53 μm (SMoM) using wet sieving and electrostatic attraction. SOC decomposability and solubility was derived from long term laboratory incubations and hot water extractions (HWE). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study differences in chemical functional groups in LF and MoM. Vegetation cover did not affect SOC storage (47.0 ± 16.5 Mg C ha-1), SOC decomposability (cumulative CO2-C release of 93.2 ± 65.4 g C g-1 C), or SOC solubility (9.8 ± 7.2 mg C g-1 C), but MoM content increased with presence of aspen [pure aspen (31.2 ± 15.1 Mg C ha-1) > mixed (25.7 ± 8.8 Mg C ha-1) > conifer (22.8 ± 9.0 Mg C ha-1)]. Organo-mineral complexes reduced biological availability of SOC, indicated by the negative correlation between silt+clay (%) and decomposable SOC per gram of C (r = -0.48, p = 0.001) or soluble SOC (r = -0.59, p plant or microbial origin. FTIR spectra clustered by sites with similar parent material rather than by vegetation cover. This suggests that initial differences in litter chemistry between aspen and conifers converged into similar MoM chemistry within sites.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 (ERp29) confers radioresistance through the DNA repair gene, O6-methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase, in breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shaohua Chen; Yu Zhang; Daohai Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to radiotherapy is a major clinical problem in cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance to radiotherapy and identification of novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for cancer patients. Our previous studies have demonstrated a significant role of ERp29 in breast cancer cell survival against doxorubicin-induced genotoxic stress. We here reported that ERp29 expression in the triple negative MDA-MB-231 ...

  4. Exosomal transfer of stroma-derived miR21 confers paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer cells through targeting APAF1

    OpenAIRE

    Au Yeung, Chi Lam; Co, Ngai-Na; Tsuruga, Tetsushi; Yeung, Tsz-Lun; Kwan, Suet-Ying; Leung, Cecilia S.; LI, YONG; Lu, Edward S.; Kwan, Kenny; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Schmandt, Rosemarie; Lu, Karen H.; Mok, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ovarian cancer usually spreads to the visceral adipose tissue of the omentum. However, the omental stromal cell-derived molecular determinants that modulate ovarian cancer growth have not been characterized. Here, using next-generation sequencing technology, we identify significantly higher levels of microRNA-21 (miR21) isomiRNAs in exosomes and tissue lysates isolated from cancer-associated adipocytes (CAAs) and fibroblasts (CAFs) than in those from ovarian cancer cells. Functional ...

  5. Bioconcentration of zinc and cadmium in ectomycorrhizal fungi and associated aspen trees as affected by level of pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of Zn and Cd were measured in fruitbodies of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi and leaves of co-occurring accumulator aspen. Samples were taken on three metal-polluted sites and one control site. Fungal bioconcentration factors (BCF = fruitbody concentration: soil concentration) were calculated on the basis of total metal concentrations in surface soil horizons (BCFtot) and NH4NO3-extractable metal concentrations in mineral soil (BCFlab). When plotted on log-log scale, values of BCF decreased linearly with increasing soil metal concentrations. BCFlab for both Zn and Cd described the data more closely than BCFtot. Fungal genera differed in ZnBCF but not in CdBCF. The information on differences between fungi with respect to their predominant occurrence in different soil horizons did not improve relations of BCF with soil metal concentrations. Aspen trees accumulated Zn and Cd to similar concentrations as the ECM fungi. Apparently, the fungi did not act as an effective barrier against aspen metal uptake by retaining the metals. - Populus tremula and associated ectomycorrhizal fungi accumulate zinc and cadmium to similar concentrations

  6. Comparative simulation study of gas-phase propylene polymerization in fluidized bed reactors using aspen polymers and two phase models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamiria Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study describing gas-phase propylene polymerization in fluidized-bed reactors using Ziegler-Natta catalyst is presented. The reactor behavior was explained using a two-phase model (which is based on principles of fluidization as well as simulation using the Aspen Polymers process simulator. The two-phase reactor model accounts for the emulsion and bubble phases which contain different portions of catalysts with the polymerization occurring in both phases. Both models predict production rate, molecular weight, polydispersity index (PDI and melt flow index (MFI of the polymer. We used both models to investigate the effect of important polymerization parameters, namely catalyst feed rate and hydrogen concentration, on the product polypropylene properties, such as production rate, molecular weight, PDI and MFI. Both the two-phase model and Aspen Polymers simulator showed good agreement in terms of production rate. However, the models differed in their predictions for weight-average molecular weight, PDI and MFI. Based on these results, we propose incorporating the missing hydrodynamic effects into Aspen Polymers to provide a more realistic understanding of the phenomena encountered in fluidized bed reactors for polyolefin production.

  7. Hydraulic conductivity and aquaporin transcription in roots of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by Laccaria bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Cooke, Janice E K; Kemppainen, Minna; Pardo, Alejandro G; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2016-07-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi have been reported to increase root hydraulic conductivity (L pr) by altering apoplastic and plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP)-mediated cell-to-cell water transport pathways in associated roots, or to have little effect on root water transport, depending on the interacting species and imposed stresses. In this study, we investigated the water transport properties and PIP transcription in roots of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by the wild-type strain of Laccaria bicolor and by strains overexpressing a major fungal water-transporting aquaporin JQ585595. Inoculation of aspen seedlings with L. bicolor resulted in about 30 % colonization rate of root tips, which developed dense mantle and the Hartig net that was restricted in the modified root epidermis. Transcript abundance of the aspen aquaporins PIP1;2, PIP2;1, and PIP2;2 decreased in colonized root tips. Root colonization by JQ585595-overexpressing strains had no significant impact on seedling shoot water potentials, gas exchange, or dry mass; however, it led to further decrease in transcript abundance of PIP1;2 and PIP2;3 and the significantly lower L pr than in non-inoculated roots. These results, taken together with our previous study that showed enhanced root water hydraulics of L. bicolor-colonized white spruce (Picea glauca), suggest that the impact of L. bicolor on root hydraulics varies by the ectomycorrhiza-associated tree species. PMID:26861480

  8. Effectiveness of mycorrhizal inoculation in the nursery on root colonization, growth, and nutrient uptake of aspen and balsam poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quoreshi, A.M.; Khasa, D.P. [Symbiotech Research Inc. 201, 509-11 Avenue, Nisku, AB (Canada); Forest Biology Research Centre, University of Laval, Quebec (Canada)

    2008-05-15

    Aspen and balsam poplar seedlings were inoculated with six species of ectomycorrhizal fungi (Hebeloma longicaudum, Laccaria bicolor, Paxillus involutus, Pisolithus tinctorius, Rhizopogon vinicolor, and Suillus tomentosus), one species of endomycorrhizal fungus (Glomus intraradices), two species of bacteria (Agrobacterium sp. and Burkholderia cepacia), treated with a growth hormone (SR3), and co-inoculated with a combination of Paxillus and Burkholderia. The seedlings were grown in a greenhouse under three different fertility regimes. Bacterial inoculation alone did not affect seedling growth and nutrition as observed when co-inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungus. The biomass and root collar diameter of aspen and balsam poplar were significantly increased when adequate mycorrhizas are formed and more prominent when co-inoculated with P. involutus and B. cepacia and grown at the 67% fertilizer level. Except for R. vinicolor and S. tomentosus, the other four species of ectomycorrhizal fungi and G. intraradices formed symbiotic associations with both plant species. Both ectomycorrhizal and endomycorrhizal colonization were observed at all fertilizer levels and fertilizer applications did not affect the colonization rates. Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were significantly improved in both aspen and balsam poplar compared with control only when co-inoculated with P. involutus and B. cepacia. However, plant net nitrogen uptake (content) increased significantly in all successful inoculation treatments and co-inoculated treatment when compared with control. These results hold promise for incorporation of inoculation of Populus sp. with appropriate mycorrhizal fungi and selected bacteria into commercial nursery system to improve the establishment of Populus in various sites. (author)

  9. Growth, leaf traits and litter decomposition of roadside hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. x P. tremuloides Michx.) clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Road traffic contributes considerably to ground-level air pollution and is therefore likely to affect roadside ecosystems. Differences in growth and leaf traits among 13 hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides) clones were studied in relation to distance from a motorway. The trees sampled were growing 15 and 30 m from a motorway and at a background rural site in southern Finland. Litter decomposition was also measured at both the roadside and rural sites. Height and diameter growth rate and specific leaf area were lowest, and epicuticular wax amount highest in trees growing 15 m from the motorway. Although no significant distance x clone interactions were detected, clone-based analyses indicated differences in genotypic responses to motorway proximity. Leaf N concentration did not differ with distance from the motorway for any of the clones. Leaf litter decomposition was only temporarily retarded in the roadside environment, suggesting minor effects on nutrient cycling. - Highlights: → Roadside hybrid aspen displayed xeromorphic leaf traits and reduction in growth rate. → These responses were limited to trees close to the motorway and only to some clones. → Leaf litter decomposition was only temporarily retarded in the roadside environment. - Hybrid aspen had more xeromorphic leaves, displayed reduced growth, and showed retarded litter decomposition at an early stage in the roadside environment.

  10. MUSME Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Eusebio

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of MUSME 2014, held at Huatulco in Oaxaca, Mexico, October 2014. Topics include analysis and synthesis of mechanisms; dynamics of multibody systems; design algorithms for mechatronic systems; simulation procedures and results; prototypes and their performance; robots and micromachines; experimental validations; theory of mechatronic simulation; mechatronic systems; and control of mechatronic systems. The MUSME symposium on Multibody Systems and Mechatronics was held under the auspices of IFToMM, the International Federation for Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science, and FeIbIM, the Iberoamerican Federation of Mechanical Engineering. Since the first symposium in 2002, MUSME events have been characterised by the way they stimulate the integration between the various mechatronics and multibody systems dynamics disciplines, present a forum for facilitating contacts among researchers and students mainly in South American countries, and serve as a joint conference for the ...

  11. Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the unedited proceedings of the Second Annual Conference on Managing Electricity Price Volatility. There were a total of eleven papers presented, dealing with a variety of issues affecting price volatility. Subjects treated included: new power generation development in Alberta; an analysis of electricity supply and demand to predict future price volatility; the effect of government intervention in the Alberta electricity market; risk management in volatile energy markets; an analysis of Alberta's capacity to supply its own internal electric power needs; the impact of increased electricity import and export capacity on price fluctuation in Alberta; improving market liquidity in Alberta; using weather derivatives to offset price risk; the impact of natural gas prices on electricity price volatility; capitalizing on advancements in online trading; and strategies for businesses to keep operating through times of price volatility. In most cases only overhead viewgraphs are available

  12. ASPEN: A fully kinetic, reduced-description particle-in-cell model for simulating parametric instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fully kinetic, reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) model is presented in which deviations from quasineutrality, electron and ion kinetic effects, and nonlinear interactions between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities are modeled correctly. The model is based on a reduced description where the electromagnetic field is represented by three separate temporal envelopes in order to model parametric instabilities with low-frequency and high-frequency daughter waves. Because temporal envelope approximations are invoked, the simulation can be performed on the electron time scale instead of the time scale of the light waves. The electrons and ions are represented by discrete finite-size particles, permitting electron and ion kinetic effects to be modeled properly. The Poisson equation is utilized to ensure that space-charge effects are included. The RPIC model is fully three dimensional and has been implemented in two dimensions on the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) parallel computer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the resulting simulation code has been named ASPEN. The authors believe this code is the first particle-in-cell code capable of simulating the interaction between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities in multiple dimensions. Test simulations of stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and Langmuir decay instability are presented

  13. Thermochemical Equilibrium Model of Synthetic Natural Gas Production from Coal Gasification Using Aspen Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Barrera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of synthetic or substitute natural gas (SNG from coal is a process of interest in Colombia where the reserves-to-production ratio (R/P for natural gas is expected to be between 7 and 10 years, while the R/P for coal is forecasted to be around 90 years. In this work, the process to produce SNG by means of coal-entrained flow gasifiers is modeled under thermochemical equilibrium with the Gibbs free energy approach. The model was developed using a complete and comprehensive Aspen Plus model. Two typical technologies used in entrained flow gasifiers such as coal dry and coal slurry are modeled and simulated. Emphasis is put on interactions between the fuel feeding technology and selected energy output parameters of coal-SNG process, that is, energy efficiencies, power, and SNG quality. It was found that coal rank does not significantly affect energy indicators such as cold gas, process, and global efficiencies. However, feeding technology clearly has an effect on the process due to the gasifying agent. Simulations results are compared against available technical data with good accuracy. Thus, the proposed model is considered as a versatile and useful computational tool to study and optimize the coal to SNG process.

  14. How light, temperature, and measurement and growth [CO2] interactively control isoprene emission in hybrid aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Sun, Zhihong

    2015-02-01

    Plant isoprene emissions have been modelled assuming independent controls by light, temperature and atmospheric [CO2]. However, the isoprene emission rate is ultimately controlled by the pool size of its immediate substrate, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), and isoprene synthase activity, implying that the environmental controls might interact. In addition, acclimation to growth [CO2] can shift the share of the control by DMADP pool size and isoprene synthase activity, and thereby alter the environmental sensitivity. Environmental controls of isoprene emission were studied in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides) saplings acclimated either to ambient [CO2] of 380 μmol mol(-1) or elevated [CO2] of 780 μmol mol(-1). The data demonstrated strong interactive effects of environmental drivers and growth [CO2] on isoprene emissions. Light enhancement of isoprene emission was the greatest at intermediate temperatures and was greater in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants, indicating greater enhancement of the DMADP supply. The optimum temperature for isoprene emission was higher at lower light, suggesting activation of alternative DMADP sinks at higher light. In addition, [CO2] inhibition of isoprene emission was lost at a higher temperature with particularly strong effects in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. Nevertheless, DMADP pool size was still predicted to more strongly control isoprene emission at higher temperatures in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. We argue that interactive environmental controls and acclimation to growth [CO2] should be incorporated in future isoprene emission models at the level of DMADP pool size. PMID:25399006

  15. A Simulation Study of Downdraft Gasification of Oil-Palm Fronds using ASPEN PLUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Yusup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of biomass gasification for conversion of hydrocarbons to permanent fuel gas mainly composed of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, dates back to late 1700. However, the successful design and operation of gasifiers is not an easy task. No clear cut methods of performance prediction of gasifiers is yet available as the thermodynamics of gasifier operation is less understood and highly dependent on the specific biomass feedstock used. In this study, the performance study of downdraft gasification of oil-palm fronds, is carried out making use of ASPEN PLUS 0process simulator software, to study the effect of operating conditions (zone temperature, operating pressure, air fuel ratio and moisture content on syngas composition. In this study, the pyrolysis yield is calculated from the ultimate analysis (CHNS test values of the oil-palm fronds, rather than approximating typical yield distribution for pyrolysis products. The results of the simulation showed better agreement with the syngas composition results of other authors. From the simulation study it is shown that higher mass fraction of CO and CH4 can be obtained at lower air-fuel ratio and lower pressure (below 5 bars. The mass fraction of CO increases sharply with increase in the oxidation zone temperature, for the temperature range of 500-700C.

  16. Elevated CO{sub 2} response of photosynthesis depends on ozone concentration in aspen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noormets, Asko, E-mail: anoorme@ncsu.ed [Michigan Technological University, School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Kull, Olevi; Sober, Anu [University of Tartu, Institute of Botany and Ecology, Tartu, Estonia (United States); Kubiske, Mark E. [US Forest Service, Northern Research Lab, Rhinelander, WI 54501 (United States); Karnosky, David F. [Michigan Technological University, School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The effect of elevated CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} on apparent quantum yield (phi), maximum photosynthesis (P{sub max}), carboxylation efficiency (V{sub cmax}) and electron transport capacity (J{sub max}) at different canopy locations was studied in two aspen (Populus tremuloides) clones of contrasting O{sub 3} tolerance. Local light climate at every leaf was characterized as fraction of above-canopy photosynthetic photon flux density (%PPFD). Elevated CO{sub 2} alone did not affect phi or P{sub max}, and increased J{sub max} in the O{sub 3}-sensitive, but not in the O{sub 3}-tolerant clone. Elevated O{sub 3} decreased leaf chlorophyll content and all photosynthetic parameters, particularly in the lower canopy, and the negative impact of O{sub 3} increased through time. Significant interaction effect, whereby the negative impact of elevated O{sub 3} was exaggerated by elevated CO{sub 2} was seen in Chl, N and J{sub max}, and occurred in both O{sub 3}-tolerant and O{sub 3}-sensitive clones. The clonal differences in the level of CO{sub 2} x O{sub 3} interaction suggest a relationship between photosynthetic acclimation and background O{sub 3} concentration. - Photosynthetic acclimation to elevated CO{sub 2} depends on the background oxidant levels.

  17. Full employment and competition in the Aspen economic model: implications for modeling acts of terrorism.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprigg, James A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew

    2004-11-01

    Acts of terrorism could have a range of broad impacts on an economy, including changes in consumer (or demand) confidence and the ability of productive sectors to respond to changes. As a first step toward a model of terrorism-based impacts, we develop here a model of production and employment that characterizes dynamics in ways useful toward understanding how terrorism-based shocks could propagate through the economy; subsequent models will introduce the role of savings and investment into the economy. We use Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool developed at Sandia, to demonstrate for validation purposes that a single-firm economy converges to the known monopoly equilibrium price, output, and employment levels, while multiple-firm economies converge toward the competitive equilibria typified by lower prices and higher output and employment. However, we find that competition also leads to churn by consumers seeking lower prices, making it difficult for firms to optimize with respect to wages, prices, and employment levels. Thus, competitive firms generate market ''noise'' in the steady state as they search for prices and employment levels that will maximize profits. In the context of this model, not only could terrorism depress overall consumer confidence and economic activity but terrorist acts could also cause normal short-run dynamics to be misinterpreted by consumers as a faltering economy.

  18. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The summaries were derived from presentations, interviews and discussions at the conference. The summaries are given at two levels, overall for the conference and for specific sessions as follows: 1) Overall Conference: 'A Sound Scientific Basis for Serious Decisions; 2) Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues: 'Promoting Safety and Protecting Society'; 3) Session on P and T: 'Partitioning and Transmutation: A Technical Fix or Technical Training?'; 4) Sessions on Geological Disposal and Research Networking: 'No Technical Barriers to Geological Disposal'. First an overall summary of Euradwaste '04 is presented. Significant progress was made on the technical and scientific basis for geological disposal of radioactive waste during the European Commission's Fifth EURATOM Framework Programme for Research (FP5). Deep geological disposal is technically feasible now and can demonstrate the guarantees of long-term isolation and protection of the public. In parallel, socio-political studies have produced methodologies for constructive dialogue with potential host communities that reflect the honesty and openness expected by a democratic society. A harmonized legislative framework for nuclear safety and waste disposal across the enlarged European Union is currently being discussed. Disposal in deep (> 300 metre) geological repositories, the favoured strategy in Europe for long-lived high-level radioactive waste, is now possible. The Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues are summarized as follows. The opening day of Euradwaste '04 focused on European Commission policy, including the proposed Directives on disposal of radioactive waste and nuclear safety and socio-political aspects including governance and decision making, public perception/acceptance of waste disposal and its sustainability. A decision on the proposed package will now be made after Union enlargement. Public agreement on the siting of disposal facilities is controversial and more important

  19. Conference Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 18 papers were presented at the 2003 Annual Executive Conference of the Canadian Gas Association held at St. Andrews, NB, from June 25th to June 28th. Titles of the presentations were as follows: (1) 'Positioning natural gas in a transforming world' by Pierre Marcel Desjardins; (2) 'Positioning natural gas in a transforming world' by Jean-Paul Theoret; (3) 'Perceptions of natural gas' by Noel Sampson; (4) 'Energy efficiency as an opportunity for the natural gas industry' by Peter Love; (5) 'Natural gas R and D - NRCan perspective' by Graham R. Campbell; (6) 'Impact of earned media on corporate perceptions in the gas industry' by Michael Coates; (7) 'Moving forward with an initiative for natural gas technology innovation' by Emmanuel Morin; (8) 'Natural gas R and D - No more dodging the issue' by Chuck Szmurlo; (9) 'Meeting the technology needs of the gas industry and the gas consumer' by Stanley S. Borys; (10) 'Market signals' by John Wellard; (11) 'Future sources of Canadian natural gas' by Rick Hyndman; (12) 'The state of supply: Northeast U.S. perspective' by Tom Kiley; (13) 'AGA's priorities and perspectives' by Dick Reiten; (14) 'Global energy issues: Recent development in policy and business' by Gerald Doucet; (15) 'Keeping the distribution cart behind the horse: Why finding more offshore gas is much more important than completing the natural gas grid, including for New Brunswick' by Brian Lee Crowley; (16) 'Environmental opportunities and challenges for the gas industry' by Manfred Klein; (17) 'The potential for natural gas demand destruction' by Timothy Partridge; and (18) 'Pushing the envelope on gas supply' by Roland R. George. In most instances only speaking notes and view graphs are available

  20. Focus on quality of life, improve the patients' survival The 7th Conference of Chinese Cancer Rehabilitation and Palliative Care was held in Fuzhou, China%关注生活质量,改善患者生存——榕城举办第六届中国癌症康复与姑息医学大会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Cheng

    2012-01-01

    @@ From Nov.25th–27th, 2011, the 7th Conference of experts and clinicians participated in the conference, in-Chinese Cancer Rehabilitation and Palliative Care was cluding the civil servants of Ministry of Health, doctors, held in Fuzhou, China.The conference focused on the nurses and social workers.patients' quality of life, and the methods to improve their The opening ceremony was held in the evening of Nov.survival.The comprehensive therapy should be consid-25th.On the ceremony, some experts read poetry about ered at the beginning of the treatment, and the treatment the rehabilitation and palliative care.The poetry showed of rehabilitation and palliative care should be pursued the importance of rehabilitation and palliative care, the throughout all the anti-cancer therapeutic process.hope given to the patients and the decent life provided

  1. Estimation of Power Production Potential from Natural Gas Pressure Reduction Stations in Pakistan Using ASPEN HYSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Nazir Unar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pakistan is a gas rich but power poor country. It consumes approximately 1, 559 Billion cubic feet of natural gas annually. Gas is transported around the country in a system of pressurized transmission pipelines under a pressure range of 600-1000 psig exclusively operated by two state owned companies i.e. SNGPL (Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Limited and SSGCL (Sui Southern Gas Company Limited. The gas is distributed by reducing from the transmission pressure into distribution pressure up to maximum level of 150 psig at the city gate stations normally called SMS (Sales Metering Station. As a normal practice gas pressure reduction at those SMSs is accomplished in pressure regulators (PCVs or in throttle valves where isenthalpic expansion takes place without producing any energy. Pressure potential of natural gas is an untapped energy resource which is currently wasted by its throttling. This pressure reduction at SMS (pressure drop through SMS may also be achieved by expansion of natural gas in TE, which converts its pressure into the mechanical energy, which can be transmitted any loading device for example electric generator. The aim of present paper is to explore the expected power production potential of various Sales Metering Stations of SSGCL company in Pakistan. The model of sales metering station was developed in a standard flow sheeting software Aspen HYSYS®7.1 to calculate power and study other parameters when an expansion turbine is used instead of throttling valves. It was observed from the simulation results that a significant power (more than 140 KW can be produced at pressure reducing stations of SSGC network with gas flows more than 2.2 MMSCFD and pressure ration more than 1.3.

  2. Simulation of integrated pollutant removal (IPR) water-treatment system using ASPEN Plus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harendra, Sivaram; Oryshcyhn, Danylo [U.S. DOE/NETL; Ochs, Thomas [U.S. DOE/NETL; Gerdemann, Stephen; Clark, John

    2013-01-01

    Capturing CO2 from fossil fuel combustion provides an opportunity for tapping a significant water source which can be used as service water for a capture-ready power plant and its peripherals. Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have patented a process—Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR®)—that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO2 stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Water condensed from oxy-combustion flue gas via the IPR system has been analyzed for composition and an approach for its treatment—for in-process reuse and for release—has been outlined. A computer simulation model in ASPEN Plus has been developed to simulate water treatment of flue gas derived wastewater from IPR systems. At the field installation, water condensed in the IPR process contains fly ash particles, sodium (largely from spray-tower buffering) and sulfur species as well as heavy metals, cations, and anions. An IPR wastewater treatment system was modeled using unit operations such as equalization, coagulation and flocculation, reverse osmosis, lime softening, crystallization, and pH correction. According to the model results, 70% (by mass) of the inlet stream can be treated as pure water, the other 20% yields as saleable products such as gypsum (CaSO4) and salt (NaCl) and the remaining portion is the waste. More than 99% of fly ash particles are removed in the coagulation and flocculation unit and these solids can be used as filler materials in various applications with further treatment. Results discussed relate to a slipstream IPR installation and are verified experimentally in the coagulation/flocculation step.

  3. The effect of air preheating in a biomass CFB gasifier using ASPEN Plus simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doherty, Wayne; Reynolds, Anthony; Kennedy, David [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dublin Institute of Technology, Bolton Street, Dublin 1 (Ireland)

    2009-09-15

    In the context of climate change, efficiency and energy security, biomass gasification is likely to play an important role. Circulating fluidised bed (CFB) technology was selected for the current study. The objective of this research is to develop a computer model of a CFB biomass gasifier that can predict gasifier performance under various operating conditions. An original model was developed using ASPEN Plus. The model is based on Gibbs free energy minimisation. The restricted equilibrium method was used to calibrate it against experimental data. This was achieved by specifying the temperature approach for the gasification reactions. The model predicts syn-gas composition, conversion efficiency and heating values in good agreement with experimental data. Operating parameters were varied over a wide range. Parameters such as equivalence ratio (ER), temperature, air preheating, biomass moisture and steam injection were found to influence syn-gas composition, heating value, and conversion efficiency. The results indicate an ER and temperature range over which hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) are maximised, which in turn ensures a high heating value and cold gas efficiency (CGE). Gas heating value was found to decrease with ER. Air preheating increases H{sub 2} and CO production, which increases gas heating value and CGE. Air preheating is more effective at low ERs. A critical air temperature exists after which additional preheating has little influence. Steam has better reactivity than fuel bound moisture. Increasing moisture degrades performance therefore the input fuel should be pre-dried. Steam injection should be employed if a H{sub 2} rich syn-gas is desired. (author)

  4. Experimental Investigation and Aspen Plus Simulation of the MSW Pyrolysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansah, Emmanuel

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a potential feedstock for producing transportation fuels because it is readily available using an existing collection/transportation infrastructure and fees are provided by the suppliers or government agencies to treat MSW. North Carolina with a population of 9.4 millions generates 3.629 million metric tons of MSW each year, which contains about 113,396,356 TJs of energy. The average moisture content of MSW samples is 44.3% on a wet basis. About 77% of the dry MSW mass is combustible components including paper, organics, textile and plastics. The average heating values of MSW were 9.7, 17.5, and 22.7 MJ/kg on a wet basis, dry basis and dry combustible basis, respectively. The MSW generated in North Carolina can produce 7.619 million barrels of crude bio-oil or around 4% of total petroleum consumption in North Carolina. MSW can be thermally pyrolyzed into bio-oil in the absence of oxygen or air at a temperature of 500°C or above. As bio-oil can be easily stored and transported, compared to bulky MSW, landfill gas and electricity, pyrolysis offers significant logistical and economic advantages over landfilling and other thermal conversion processes such as combustion and gasification. Crude bio-oils produced from the pyrolysis of MSW can be further refined to transportation fuels in existing petroleum refinery facilities. The objective of this research is to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of pyrolyzing MSW into liquid transportation fuels. A combined thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) instrument, which can serve as a micro-scale pyrolysis reactor, was used to simultaneously determine the degradation characteristics of MSW during pyrolysis. An ASPEN Plus-based mathematical model was further developed to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of pyrolysing of MSW into liquid transportation fuels in fixed bed reactors at varying operating conditions

  5. Aspen Plus simulation of biomass integrated gasification combined cycle systems at corn ethanol plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) systems and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) systems are employed to provide heat and electricity to a 0.19 hm3 y−1 (50 million gallon per year) corn ethanol plant using different fuels (syrup and corn stover, corn stover alone, and natural gas). Aspen Plus simulations of BIGCC/NGCC systems are performed to study effects of different fuels, gas turbine compression pressure, dryers (steam tube or superheated steam) for biomass fuels and ethanol co-products, and steam tube dryer exhaust treatment methods. The goal is to maximize electricity generation while meeting process heat needs of the plant. At fuel input rates of 110 MW, BIGCC systems with steam tube dryers provide 20–25 MW of power to the grid with system thermal efficiencies (net power generated plus process heat rate divided by fuel input rate) of 69–74%. NGCC systems with steam tube dryers provide 26–30 MW of power to the grid with system thermal efficiencies of 74–78%. BIGCC systems with superheated steam dryers provide 20–22 MW of power to the grid with system thermal efficiencies of 53–56%. The life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction for conventional corn ethanol compared to gasoline is 39% for process heat with natural gas (grid electricity), 117% for BIGCC with syrup and corn stover fuel, 124% for BIGCC with corn stover fuel, and 93% for NGCC with natural gas fuel. These GHG emission estimates do not include indirect land use change effects. -- Highlights: •BIGCC and natural gas combined cycle systems at corn ethanol plants are simulated. •The best performance results in 25–30 MW power to grid. •The best performance results in 74–78% system thermal efficiencies. •GHG reduction for corn ethanol with BIGCC systems compared to gasoline is over 100%

  6. Simulation of the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] refrigeration system using the ASPEN/SP process simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SSC Magnet must maintain at a super conducting temperature of 4 K. The proposed refrigeration cooling processes consist of fairly simple closed cycles which take advantage of the Joule-Thompson effect via a series of expansions and compressions of helium gas which has been precooled by liquid nitrogen. The processes currently under consideration consist of three cycles, the 20 K shield cooling, the 45 K helium refrigerator and the helium liquefier. The process units which are to be employed are compressors, turbines, expanders, mixers, flashes, two stream heat exchangers and multiple stream heat exchangers. The cycles are to be operated at or near steady state. Due to the large number of competing cooling sector designs to be considered and the high capital and operating costs of the proposed processes, the SSC Laboratory requires a software tool for the validation and optimization of the individual designs and for the performance of cost-benefit analyses among competing designs. Since these processes are steady state flow processes involving primarily standard unit operations, a decision was made to investigate the application of a commercial process simulator to the task. Several months of internal evaluations by the SSC Laboratory revealed that while the overall structure and calculation approach of number of the commercial simulators were appropriate for this task, all were lacking essential capabilities in the areas of thermodynamic property calculations for cryogenic systems and modeling of complex, multiple stream heat exchangers. An acceptable thermodynamics model was provided and a series of simple, but representative benchmark problems developed. The model and problems were provided to three software vendors. Based on the results of the benchmark test, the ASPEN/SP process simulator was selected for future modeling work

  7. ASPEN Plus simulation of coal integrated gasification combined blast furnace slag waste heat recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An integrated system of coal gasification with slag waste heat recovery was proposed. • The goal of BF slag heat saving and emission reduction was achieved by this system. • The optimal parameters were obtained and the waste heat recovery rate reached 83.08%. • About 6.64 kmol/min syngas was produced when using one ton BF slag to provide energy. - Abstract: This article presented a model for the system of coal gasification with steam and blast furnace slag waste heat recovery by using the ASPEN Plus as the simulating and modeling tool. Constrained by mass and energy balance for the entire system, the model included the gasifier used to product syngas at the chemical equilibrium based on the Gibbs free energy minimization approach and the boiler used to recover the heat of the blast furnace slag (BF slag) and syngas. Two parameters of temperature and steam to coal ratio (S/C) were considered to account for their impacts on the Datong coal (DT coal) gasification process. The carbon gasification efficiency (CE), cold gasification efficiency (CGE), syngas product efficiency (PE) and the heating value of syngas produced by 1 kg pulverized coal (HV) were adopted as the indicators to examine the gasification performance. The optimal operating temperature and S/C were 800 °C and 1.5, respectively. At this condition, CE reached above 90% and the maximum values of the CGE, PE and HV were all obtained. Under the optimal operating conditions, 1000 kg/min BF slag, about 40.41 kg/min DT pulverized coal and 77.94 kg/min steam were fed into the gasifier and approximate 6.64 kmol/min syngas could be generated. Overall, the coal was converted to clean syngas by gasification reaction and the BF slag waste heat was also recovered effectively (reached up to 83.08%) in this system, achieving the objective of energy saving and emission reduction

  8. The effect of air preheating in a biomass CFB gasifier using ASPEN Plus simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of climate change, efficiency and energy security, biomass gasification is likely to play an important role. Circulating fluidised bed (CFB) technology was selected for the current study. The objective of this research is to develop a computer model of a CFB biomass gasifier that can predict gasifier performance under various operating conditions. An original model was developed using ASPEN Plus. The model is based on Gibbs free energy minimisation. The restricted equilibrium method was used to calibrate it against experimental data. This was achieved by specifying the temperature approach for the gasification reactions. The model predicts syn-gas composition, conversion efficiency and heating values in good agreement with experimental data. Operating parameters were varied over a wide range. Parameters such as equivalence ratio (ER), temperature, air preheating, biomass moisture and steam injection were found to influence syn-gas composition, heating value, and conversion efficiency. The results indicate an ER and temperature range over which hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) are maximised, which in turn ensures a high heating value and cold gas efficiency (CGE). Gas heating value was found to decrease with ER. Air preheating increases H2 and CO production, which increases gas heating value and CGE. Air preheating is more effective at low ERs. A critical air temperature exists after which additional preheating has little influence. Steam has better reactivity than fuel bound moisture. Increasing moisture degrades performance therefore the input fuel should be pre-dried. Steam injection should be employed if a H2 rich syn-gas is desired. (author)

  9. Estimation of power production potential from natural gas pressure reduction stations in pakistan using aspen hysys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakistan is a gas rich but power poor country. It consumes approximately 1, 559 Billion cubic feet of natural gas annually. Gas is transported around the country in a system of pressurized transmission pipelines under a pressure-range of 600-1 000 psig exclusively operated by two state owned companies i.e. SNGPL (Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Limited) and SSGCL (Sui Southern Gas Company Limited). The gas is distributed by reducing from the transmission pressure into distribution pressure up to maximum level of 150 psig at the city gate stations normally called SMS (Sales Metering Station). As a normal practice gas pressure reduction at those SMSs is accomplished in pressure regulators (PCVs or in of natural gas is an untapped energy resource which is currently wasted by its throttling. This pressure reduction at SMS (pressure drop through SMS) may also be achieved by expansion of natural gas in TE, which converts its pressure into the mechanical energy, which can be transmitted any loading device for example electric generator. The aim of present paper is to explore the expected power production potential of various Sales Metering Stations of SSGCL company in Pakistan. The model of sales metering station was developed in a standard flow sheeting software Aspen HYSYS at the rate 7.1 to calculate power and study other parameters when an expansion turbine is used instead of throttling valves. It was observed from the simulation results that a significant power (more than 140 KW) can be produced at pressure reducing stations of SSGC network with gas flows more than 2.2 MMSCFD and pressure ration more than 1.3. (author)

  10. Process optimization for bioethanol conversion to bioethylene using ASPEN PLUS%基于ASPEN PLUS平台的生物乙醇制生物乙烯的工艺优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王林; 崔国燊; 徐檬; 谭天伟

    2009-01-01

    生物乙醇与生物乙烯的过程耦合是降低生物乙烯成本的重要途径.在充分分析生物乙醇制乙烯工艺的特点后,以ASPEN PLUS模拟软件为平台,对乙醇分离与乙醇脱水反应过程的耦合进行了优化设计,优化后的工艺流程节省蒸汽73%,节省能耗6%.

  11. Prospective Integration of Cultural Consideration in Biomedical Research for Patients with Advanced Cancer: Recommendations from an International Conference on Malignant Bowel Obstruction in Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Fineberg, Iris Cohen; Grant, Marcia; Aziz, Noreen M.; Payne, Richard; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Dunn, Geoffrey P.; Kinzbrunner, Barry M.; Palos, Guadalupe; Shinagawa, Susan Matsuko; Krouse, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    In the setting of an international conference on malignant bowel obstruction as a model for randomized control trials (RCT) in palliative care, we discuss the importance of incorporating prospective cultural considerations in research design. The approach commonly used in biomedical research has traditionally valued the RCT as the ultimate “way of knowing” about how to best treat a medical condition. The foremost limitation of this approach is the lack of recognition of the impact of cultural...

  12. Elevated STAT3 Signaling-Mediated Upregulation of MMP-2/9 Confers Enhanced Invasion Ability in Multidrug-Resistant Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of multidrug resistance greatly impedes effective cancer therapy. Recent advances in cancer research have demonstrated that acquisition of multidrug resistance by cancer cells is usually accompanied by enhanced cell invasiveness. Several lines of evidence indicated that cross activation of other signaling pathways during development of drug resistance may increase invasive potential of multidrug-resistant (MDR cancer cells. However, the accurate mechanism of this process is largely undefined. In this study, to better understand the associated molecular pathways responsible for cancer progression induced by drug resistance, a MDR human breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3/EPR with P-glycoprotein overexpression was established using stepwise long-term exposure to increasing concentration of epirubicin. The SK-BR-3/EPR cell line exhibited decreased cell proliferative activity, but enhanced cell invasive capacity. We showed that the expression of metastasis-related matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2/9 was elevated in SK-BR-3/EPR cells. Moreover, SK-BR-3/EPR cells showed elevated activation of STAT3. Activation of STAT3 signaling is responsible for enhanced invasiveness of SK-BR-3/EPR cells through upregulation of MMP-2/9. STAT3 is a well-known oncogene and is frequently implicated in tumorigenesis and chemotherapeutic resistance. Our findings augment insight into the mechanism underlying the functional association between MDR and cancer invasiveness.

  13. Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Stability in the Aspen-Conifer Ecotone in Montane Forests in Utah, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Román Dobarco

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the potential impact of conifer encroachment on soil organic carbon (SOC dynamics and storage in montane aspen-conifer forests from the interior western US, we sampled mineral soils (0–15 cm across the aspen-conifer ecotones in southern and northern Utah and quantified total SOC stocks, stable SOC (i.e., mineral-associated SOC (MoM, labile SOC (i.e., light fraction (LF, decomposable (CO2 release during long-term aerobic incubations and soluble SOC (hot water extractable organic carbon (HWEOC. Total SOC storage (47.0 ± 16.5 Mg C ha−1 and labile SOC as LF (14.0 ± 7.10 Mg C ha−1, SOC decomposability (cumulative released CO2-C of 5.6 ± 3.8 g C g−1 soil or HWEOC (0.6 ± 0.6 mg C g−1 soil did not differ substantially with vegetation type, although a slight increase in HWEOC was observed with increasing conifer in the overstory. There were statistically significant differences (p = 0.035 in stable MoM storage, which was higher under aspen (31.2 ± 15.1 Mg C ha−1 than under conifer (22.8 ± 9.0 Mg C ha−1, with intermediate values under mixed (25.7 ± 8.8 Mg C ha−1. Texture had the greatest impact on SOC distribution among labile and stable fractions, with increasing stabilization in MoM and decreasing bio-availability of SOC with increasing silt + clay content. Only at lower silt + clay contents (40%–70% could we discern the influence of vegetation on MoM content. This highlights the importance of chemical protection mechanisms for long-term C sequestration.

  14. Conference this! Lead Pipers compare conference experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available As library travel budgets are increasingly slashed around the country, it’s a tough time for conference-going. In this group post, we compare notes about the conferences we’ve attended, which have been our favorites, and why. We hope this will generate creative ideas on good conferences (online or in-person to look forward to, and maybe offer [...

  15. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood tests (which look for chemicals such as tumor markers) Bone marrow biopsy (for lymphoma or leukemia) Chest ... the case with skin cancers , as well as cancers of the lung, breast, and colon. If the tumor has spread ...

  16. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  17. Functional analysis of androgen receptor mutations that confer anti-androgen resistance identified in circulating cell-free DNA from prostate cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lallous, Nada; Volik, Stanislav V.; Awrey, Shannon; LeBlanc, Eric; Tse, Ronnie; Murillo, Josef; Singh, Kriti; Azad, Arun A.; Wyatt, Alexander W.; LeBihan, Stephane; Chi, Kim N.; Gleave, Martin E.; Paul S. Rennie; Collins, Colin C; Cherkasov, Artem

    2016-01-01

    Background The androgen receptor (AR) is a pivotal drug target for the treatment of prostate cancer, including its lethal castration-resistant (CRPC) form. All current non-steroidal AR antagonists, such as hydroxyflutamide, bicalutamide, and enzalutamide, target the androgen binding site of the receptor, competing with endogenous androgenic steroids. Several AR mutations in this binding site have been associated with poor prognosis and resistance to conventional prostate cancer drugs. In orde...

  18. Spring leaf flush in aspen (Populus tremuloides) clones is altered by long-term growth at elevated carbon dioxide and elevated ozone concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Justin M., E-mail: jmcgrath@illinois.ed [Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 190 ERML, 1201 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Karnosky, David F., E-mail: karnosky@mtu.ed [School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Ainsworth, Elizabeth A., E-mail: lisa.ainsworth@ars.usda.go [Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 190 ERML, 1201 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); USDA ARS Photosynthesis Research Unit, 147 ERML, 1201 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Early spring leaf out is important to the success of deciduous trees competing for light and space in dense forest plantation canopies. In this study, we investigated spring leaf flush and how long-term growth at elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO{sub 2}]) and elevated ozone concentration ([O{sub 3}]) altered leaf area index development in a closed Populus tremuloides (aspen) canopy. This work was done at the Aspen FACE experiment where aspen clones have been grown since 1997 in conditions simulating the [CO{sub 2}] and [O{sub 3}] predicted for approx2050. The responses of two clones were compared during the first month of spring leaf out when CO{sub 2} fumigation had begun, but O{sub 3} fumigation had not. Trees in elevated [CO{sub 2}] plots showed a stimulation of leaf area index (36%), while trees in elevated [O{sub 3}] plots had lower leaf area index (-20%). While individual leaf area was not significantly affected by elevated [CO{sub 2}], the photosynthetic operating efficiency of aspen leaves was significantly improved (51%). There were no significant differences in the way that the two aspen clones responded to elevated [CO{sub 2}]; however, the two clones responded differently to long-term growth at elevated [O{sub 3}]. The O{sub 3}-sensitive clone, 42E, had reduced individual leaf area when grown at elevated [O{sub 3}] (-32%), while the tolerant clone, 216, had larger mature leaf area at elevated [O{sub 3}] (46%). These results indicate a clear difference between the two clones in their long-term response to elevated [O{sub 3}], which could affect competition between the clones, and result in altered genotypic composition in future atmospheric conditions. - Spring leaf flush is stimulated by elevated [CO{sub 2}] and suppressed by elevated [O{sub 3}] in aspen (Populus tremuloides).

  19. Aspen Plus Applications in Low Temperature Heat Recyling Technology of Tail Oil of Hydrocracking Unit%Aspen Plus在加氢裂化尾油低温热利用技术改造中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤秀伟; 单敏

    2012-01-01

    Recycling and energy consumption. In order using the to enlarge was used to simulate the tail oil heat for tower DA912 in 920 unit was low temperature heat was an important means in oil refining enterprise to reduce energy saving space to recovery the low temperature heat as possible, Aspen Plus exchange proposed in hydrocracking equipment, and the scheme of revamping the heat source to achieve the purpose of saving energy and reducing consumption. The eco- nomic benefit was remarkable, with annual savinz oroduction costs of 4.23 million vuan.%目前炼油企业低温热回收利用是降低能耗的一种重要手段[1]。扬子石化加氢裂化装置为了挖掘节能空间尽量回收低温热,利用Aspen Plus对尾油换热流程进行模拟分析,在此基础上提出了920单元DA912塔再沸器热源技术改造方案,达到了节能降耗的目的。每年可节约生产成本约423万元,经济效益显著。

  20. 羊城举办第六届中国癌症康复与姑息医学大会%The 6th Conference of Chinese Cancer Rehabilitation and Palliative Care was held in Guangzhou-Struggling for 20 years, the WHO three-step analgesic ladder need further promotion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ From December 17th-19th, 2010, the 6th Conference of Chinese Cancer Rehabilitation and Palliative Care was held in Guangzhou.It has been 20 years since the Chinese medical experts firstly carry out the WHO three-step analgesic ladder.Academician Yan Sun, from Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, and Professor Shiying Yu, chairman of CPRC and from Wuhan Tongji Hospital, said that in order to relieve more cancer pain, the Chinese medical staff should further promote the WHO three-step analgesic ladder in the future.

  1. Conference summary: Experimnetal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference is the 1995 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems. The summary highlights research on the ''extended'' Doniach model, Kondo insulators, borocarbide superconductors, oxides (including cuprates), other phase transitions, and new materials

  2. Parameter Changes Which Characterize the Wear of the Cutting Tool in the Milling Process of Aspen Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andis ĀBELE

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to determine changesof parameters (cutting power, roughness of woodensurface and rounding of cutting edge whichcharacterize the wear of the cutting tool in the millingprocess of aspen wood (Populus tremula,depending on the rake angle of the cutting tool.The milling process was performed by meansof a computer numerical control milling machine andtwo cutterheads with a rake angle of the fixed cutterknife adjusted at 100, 150, 200 and 300. The cuttersmade of high speed steel and highly alloyed toolsteel. After reaching the definite length of the cuttingtrajectory, the cutting power and the roughness ofthe processed wood surface were measured, as wellas replicates of the cutting edge, by pressing it inlead sheet.By milling aspen wood with highly alloyed toolsteel cutter knives at rake angle of cutter 10º, theroughness of the processed wooden surface beganincreasing after 44 000m length of cutting trajectory,which corresponds to a cutting time of 15 hours.

  3. Modelling growth-competition relationships in trembling aspen and white spruce mixed boreal forests of Western Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Guo Huang

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of competition on stem growth of Picea glauca and Populus tremuloides in boreal mixedwood stands during the stem exclusion stage. We combined traditional approaches of collecting competition data with dendrochronology to provide retrospective measurements of stem diameter growth. Several competition indices including stand basal area (BA, the sum of stem diameter at breast height (SDBH, and density (N for the broadleaf and coniferous species, as well as similar indices considering only trees with diameters greater than each subject (BAGR, SDBHGR, and NGR, were evaluated. We used a nonlinear mixed model to characterize the basal area increment over the past 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 years as a function of growth of nearby dominant trees, the size of the subject trees, deciduous and coniferous competition indices, and ecoregions. SDBHGR and BAGR were better predictors for spruce, and SDBHGR and NGR were better for aspen, respectively, than other indices. Results showed strongest correlations with long-term stem growth, as the best models integrated growth for 10-25 years for aspen and ≥ 25 for spruce. Our model demonstrated a remarkable capability (adjusted R(2>0.67 to represent this complex variation in growth as a function of site, size and competition.

  4. miR-222 confers the resistance of breast cancer cells to Adriamycin through suppression of p27(kip1) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan-Dan; Li, Jian; Sha, Huan-Huan; Chen, Xiu; Yang, Su-Jin; Shen, Hong-Yu; Zhong, Shan-Liang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Tang, Jin-Hai

    2016-09-15

    Adriamycin (Adr) is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for chemotherapy of breast cancer patients. Despite impressive initial clinical responses, some developed drug resistance to Adr-based therapy and the mechanisms underlying breast cancer cells resistance to Adr are not well known. In our previous study, in vitro, we verified that miR-222 was upregulated in Adr-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/Adr) compared with the sensitive parental cells (MCF-7/S). Here, miR-222 inhibitors or mimics were transfected into MCF-7 cell lines. RT-qPCR and western blot were used to detect the expression of p27(kip1). Immunofluorescence showed that miR-222 altered the subcellular location of p27(kip1) in nucleus. MTT was employed to verify the sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines to Adr. Flow cytometry showed the apoptosis and cell cycles of the cells after adding Adr. The results showed that downregulation of miR-222 in MCF-7/Adr increased sensitivity to Adr and Adr-induced apoptosis, and arrested the cells in G1 phase, accompanied by more expressions of p27(kip1), especially in nucleus. Furthermore, overexpressed miR-222 in MCF-7/S had the inverse results. Taken together, the results found that miR-222 induced Adr-resistance at least in part via suppressing p27(kip1) expression and altering its subcellular localization, and miR-222 inhibitors could reverse Adr-resistance of breast cancer cells. These results disclosed that the future holds much promise for the targeted therapeutic in the treatment of Adr-resistant breast cancer. PMID:27282281

  5. The learning conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    are active professionals in search of inspiration, and they also want to share knowledge with their peers at the conference. A theory of the conference as a forum for mutual inspiration and human co-flourishing is proposed, as are four design principles for a learning conference: 1. Presentations must...

  6. INFCE plenary conference documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document consists of the reports to the First INFCE Plenary Conference (November 1978) by the Working Groups a Plenary Conference of its actions and decisions, the Communique of the Final INFCE Plenary Conference (February 1980), and a list of all documents in the IAEA depository for INFCE

  7. [Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  8. Early colonoscopy confers survival benefits on colon cancer patients with pre-existing iron deficiency anemia: a nationwide population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Lin Jerry Teng

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the prognostic significance of pre-existing iron deficiency anemia (IDA and the benefits of early colonoscopy in patients with colon cancer, since these have not been clearly established to date. Using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, we retrieved and retrospectively reviewed the records of patients aged ≥ 55 years who were diagnosed with colon cancer between 2000 and 2005. The patient cohort was divided into two groups: patients with (n = 1,260 or without (n = 15,912 an IDA diagnosis during ≤ 18 months preceding the date of colon cancer diagnosis. We found that diabetes (27.9% vs. 20.3%, p<0.0001, cardiovascular disease (61.6% vs. 54.7%, p<0.001, and chronic kidney disease (4.6% vs. 2.2%, p<0.0001 were more common among patients with IDA than among those without IDA. The median overall survival times for patients with IDA and those without IDA were 4.6 and 5.7 years, respectively (p = 0.002. Patients who underwent colonoscopy ≤ 30 days, 31-90, and ≥ 91 days after IDA diagnosis showed median overall survival times of 5.79, 4.43, and 4.04 years, respectively (p = 0.003. Delayed colonoscopy was an independent factor associated with poor overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.53; p = 0.01. In conclusion, colon cancer patients with IDA were more likely to experience comorbidities than were those without IDA. Pre-existing IDA was a poor prognostic factor in adult men and postmenopausal women who had colon cancer. Early colonoscopy could improve overall survival possibly by facilitating early diagnosis and treatment.

  9. International Conference on Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    OMICS International, (conference series) the World Class Open Access Publisher and Scientific Event Organizer is hosting “International Conference on physics” which is going to be the biggest conference dedicated to Physics. The theme “Highlighting innovations and challenges in the field of Physics” and it features a three day conference addressing the major breakthroughs, challenges and the solutions adopted. The conference will be held during June 27-29, 2016 at New Orleans, USA. Will be published in: http://physics.conferenceseries.com/

  10. Prospective integration of cultural consideration in biomedical research for patients with advanced cancer: recommendations from an international conference on malignant bowel obstruction in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineberg, Iris Cohen; Grant, Marcia; Aziz, Noreen M; Payne, Richard; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Dunn, Geoffrey P; Kinzbrunner, Barry M; Palos, Guadalupe; Shinagawa, Susan Matsuko; Krouse, Robert S

    2007-07-01

    In the setting of an international conference on malignant bowel obstruction as a model for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in palliative care, we discuss the importance of incorporating prospective cultural considerations into research design. The approach commonly used in biomedical research has traditionally valued the RCT as the ultimate "way of knowing" about how to best treat a medical condition. The foremost limitation of this approach is the lack of recognition of the impact of cultural viewpoints on research outcomes. We propose that interest relevant to cultural viewpoints should be emphasized in conceptualizing and interpreting research questions, designs, and results. In addition to recognizing our cultural biases as individuals and researchers, we recommend two major shifts in designing and implementing RCTs: 1) inclusion of a multidisciplinary team of researchers to inform the diversity of perspectives and expertise brought to the research, and 2) use of mixed methods of inquiry, reflecting both deductive and inductive modes of inference. PMID:17532174

  11. Wood properties of trembling aspen and paper birch after 5 years of exposure to elevated concentrations of CO(2) and O(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiainen, Katri; Kaakinen, Seija; Warsta, Elina; Kubiske, Mark E; Nelson, Neil D; Sober, Jaak; Karnosky, David F; Saranpää, Pekka; Vapaavuori, Elina

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the interactive effects of elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide ([CO(2)]) and ozone ([O(3)]) on radial growth, wood chemistry and structure of five 5-year-old trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) clones and the wood chemistry of paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.). Material for the study was collected from the Aspen FACE (free-air CO(2) enrichment) experiment in Rhinelander, WI, where the saplings had been exposed to four treatments: control, elevated [CO(2)] (560 ppm), elevated [O(3)] (1.5 x ambient) and their combination for five growing seasons. Wood properties of both species were altered in response to exposure to the treatments. In aspen, elevated [CO(2)] decreased uronic acids (constituents of, e.g., hemicellulose) and tended to increase stem diameter. In response to elevated [O(3)] exposure, acid-soluble lignin concentration decreased and vessel lumen diameter tended to decrease. Elevated [O(3)] increased the concentration of acetone-soluble extractives in paper birch, but tended to decrease the concentration of these compounds in aspen. In paper birch, elevated [CO(2)] decreased and elevated [O(3)] increased starch concentration. The responses of wood properties to 5 years of fumigation differed from those previously reported after 3 years of fumigation. PMID:18316312

  12. Bisphenol A at Low Nanomolar Doses Confers Chemoresistance in Estrogen Receptor-α–Positive and –Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    LaPensee, Elizabeth W.; Traci R Tuttle; Fox, Sejal R; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2008-01-01

    Background Resistance to chemotherapy is a major problem facing breast cancer patients, and identifying potential contributors to chemoresistance is a critical area of research. Bisphenol A (BPA) has long been suspected to promote carcinogenesis, but the high doses of BPA used in many studies generated conflicting results. In addition, the mechanism by which BPA exerts its biological actions is unclear. Although estrogen has been shown to antagonize anticancer drugs, the role of BPA in chemor...

  13. Drug-drug interactions in older patients with cancer: a report from the 15th Conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, Prague, Czech Republic, November 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Stepney, Rob; Lichtman, Stuart M; Danesi, Romano

    2016-01-01

    Drugs taken for cancer can interact with each other, with agents taken as part of supportive care, with drugs taken for comorbid conditions (which are particularly common in the elderly patients), and with herbal supplements and complementary medicines. We tend to focus on the narrow therapeutic window of cytotoxics, but the metabolism of tyrosine kinase inhibitors by the cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme (CYP3A4) makes some TKIs particularly prone to interference with or from other agents sharing t...

  14. Process simulation of oxy-fuel combustion for a 300 MW pulverized coal-fired power plant using Aspen Plus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: This paper studied the combustion processes of pulverized coal in a 300 MW power plant using Aspen Plus software. The amount of each component in flue gas in coal-fired processes with air or O2/CO2 as oxidizer was obtained. The differences between the two processes were identified, and the parameter influences of temperature, excess oxygen ratio and molar fraction of O2/CO2 on the proportions of different components in flue gas were examined by sensitivity analysis. - Highlights: • Combustion processes were studied with Aspen Plus for a 300 MW pulverized coal power plant. • The amount of each flue gas component in coal-fired processes with air or O2/CO2 as oxidizer was obtained. • Differences between the two process models were identified. • The influences of operation parameters on the flue gas components were examined. - Abstract: This work focuses on the amounts and components of flue gas for oxy-fuel combustion in a coal-fired power plant (CFPP). The combustion process of pulverized coal in a 300 MW power plant is studied using Aspen Plus software. The amount of each component in flue gas in coal-fired processes with air or O2/CO2 as oxidizer is obtained. The differences between the two processes are identified, and the influences of temperature, excess oxygen ratio and molar fraction of O2/CO2 on the proportions of different components in flue gas are examined by sensitivity analysis. The process simulation results show that replacing atmospheric air by a 21%O2/79%CO2 mixture leads the decrease of the flame temperature from 1789 °C to 1395 °C. The equilibrium amount of NOx declines obviously but the SOx are still at the same level. The mass fraction of CO2 in flue gas increased from 21.3% to 81.5%. The amount of NOx is affected sensitively by the change of temperature and the excess oxygen ratio, but the change of O2/CO2 molar fraction has a little influence to the generation of NOx. With the increasing of O2 concentration, the

  15. Ecophysiology of Trembling Aspen in Response to Root-Zone Conditions and Competition on Reclaimed Mine Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockstette, S.; Landhäusser, S.; Pinno, B.; Dyck, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Reclaimed soils are typically characterized by increased bulk densities, penetration resistances and poor soil structure as well as associated problems with hydrology and aeration. As a result, available rooting space for planted tree seedlings is often restricted to a shallow layer of topsoil, which is usually of higher quality and is cultivated prior to planting. This may hinder the development of healthy root systems, thus drastically increasing the risk for plant stress by limiting access to soil resources such as water, nutrients and oxygen. These problems are exacerbated when herbaceous plants compete for the same resources within this limited root-zone. To understand how limited rooting space affects the physiology of young trees, we experimentally manipulated soil conditions and levels of competition at a reclaimed mine site in central Alberta, Canada. The site was characterized by heavily compacted, fine textured subsoil (~2.0 Mg ha-1), capped with 15 cm of topsoil (~1.5 Mg ha-1). In a replicated study (n=6) half the plots were treated with a subsoil plow to a depth of about 60 cm to increase available rooting spece. Subsequently, trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and smooth brome (Bromus inermis L.) were planted to create four vegetation covers: aspen (a), brome (b), aspen + brome (ab) and control (c) (no vegetation). Various soil properties, including texture, bulk density, penetration resistance and water availability, in conjunction with plant parameters such as root and shoot growth, leaf area development, sap flow, and stomatal conductance have since been monitored, both in-situ and through destructive sampling. Our results indicate that the soil treatment was effective in lowering bulk densities and penetration resistance, while improving moisture retention characteristics. Tree seedling growth and leaf area development were significantly greater without competition, but did not differ between soil treatments. The soil treatment generally

  16. AINSE's 40th anniversary conference. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of 40 years of activity of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) were the main focus of this conference. Topics covered include nuclear physics, plasma physics, radiation chemistry, radiation biology, neutron diffraction, nuclear techniques of analysis and other relevant aspects of nuclear science and technology. The conference handbook contains the summaries of the 78 papers and posters presented and the list of participants

  17. Blood test using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with colloidal silver nanoparticle substrate to detect polyps and colorectal cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbo; Feng, Shangyuan; Tai, Isabella T.; Chen, Guannan; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer and forth leading cause of cancer-related death. Early diagnosis is the key to long-term patient survival. Programmatic screening for the general population has shown to be cost-effective in reducing the incidence and mortality from CRC. Current CRC screening strategy relies on a broad range of test techniques such as fecal based tests and endoscopic exams. Occult blood tests like fecal immunochemical test is a cost effective way to detect CRC but have limited diagnostic values in detecting adenomatous polyp, the most treatable precursor to CRC. In the present work, we proposed the use of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with silver nanoparticles as substrate to analyze blood plasma for detecting both CRC and adenomatous polyps. Blood plasma samples collected from healthy subjects and patients diagnosed with adenomas and CRC were prepared with nanoparticles and measured using a real-time fiber optic probe based Raman system. The collected SERS spectra are analyzed with partial least squares-discriminant analysis. Classification of normal versus CRC plus adenomatous polyps achieved diagnostic sensitivity of 86.4% and specificity of 80%. This exploratory study suggests that blood plasma SERS analysis has potential to become a screening test for detecting both CRC and adenomas.

  18. Integrated model of G189A and Aspen-plus for the transient modeling of extravehicular activity atmospheric control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodney, Matthew; Conger, Bruce C.

    1990-01-01

    A computerized modeling tool, under development for the transient modeling of an extravehicular activity atmospheric control subsystem is described. This subsystem includes the astronaut, temperature control, moisture control, CO2 removal, and oxygen make-up components. Trade studies evaluating competing components and subsystems to guide the selection and development of hardware for lunar and Martian missions will use this modeling tool. The integrated modeling tool uses the Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) to accomplish pseudosteady-state simulations, and the general environmental thermal control and life support program (G189A) to manage overall control of the run and transient input output, as well as transient modeling computations and database functions. Flow charts and flow diagrams are included.

  19. Application of Aspen in Flare System Design%ASPEN在火炬排放系统设计的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛茂梅; 奚文杰; 曹枫; 沈红霞; 张世程

    2010-01-01

    火炬排放系统是石油化工及炼油装置不可缺少的安全配套设施.水力工况对系统的安全性有着莺要的影响.由于火炬排放工况的复杂性,水力计算也成为一个比较复杂的问题.本文介绍了Aspen Flare System Analyzer模拟软件及其特点和数学模型,并通过工程实例证明其在火炬排放系统设计中发挥的重要作用.

  20. p38 MAPK-induced MDM2 degradation confers paclitaxel resistance through p53-mediated regulation of EGFR in human lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Seong, Myeong-A; Lee, Ho-Young

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a chemotherapeutic agent that is used to treat a variety of cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the emergence of drug resistance limits the utility of PTX. This study determined the signaling pathway that contributes to PTX resistance. We first established PTX resistant cell lines (H460/R and 226B/R) using a dose-escalating maintenance of PTX. We found that p38 MAPK and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were constitutively activated in these cell lines. The inhibition of p38 MAPK activity by SB203580 treatment or the transfection of dominant-negative p38 MAPK sensitized both cell lines to PTX treatment. Erlotinib, an EGFR inhibitor, also increased PTX-induced apoptosis in PTX resistant cells, which suggests a role for p38 MAPK and EGFR in the development of PTX resistance. We demonstrated that p38 MAPK enhanced EGFR expression via the induction of the rapid degradation of mouse double-minute 2 homolog (MDM2) and the consequent stabilization of p53, a transcription factor of EGFR. These results suggest for the first time that the p38 MAPK/p53/EGFR axis is crucial for the facilitation of PTX resistance in NSCLCs. We also propose a mechanism for the role of the tumor-suppressor p53 in drug resistance. These results provide a foundation for the future development of potential therapeutic strategies to regulate the p38 MAPK/p53/EGFR pathway for the treatment of lung cancer patients with PTX resistance. PMID:26799187

  1. Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1), slow (exon 3, 113His) and fast (exon 4, 139Arg) alleles confer susceptibility to squamous cell esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes may alter risk of various cancers. Present case-control study evaluated the influence of EPHX1 genetic variations on squamous cell esophageal cancer (ESCC) susceptibility in 107 patients and 320 controls. EPHX1 polymorphic alleles were genotyped by direct sequencing (exon 3, Tyr113His) or PCR-RFLP (exon 4, His139Arg). Patients with exon 3 genotypes (Tyr113His, His113His) and 113His allele were at risk of ESCC (ORTyr113His 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2-3.4, p = 0.007; ORHis113His 2.3 95% CI = 1.0-5.2, p = 0.03 and ORHis 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0-2.1, p = 0.01). In contrast, individuals with exon 4, 139Arg allele were at low risk of cancer (OR 0.34, 95% CI = 0.20-0.56, p = 0.001). However, none of haplotype combinations of exon 3 (Tyr113His) and exon 4 (His139Arg) polymorphisms showed modulation of risk for ESCC. Sub-grouping of patients based on anatomical location of tumor predicted that patients with exon 3, His113His and Tyr113His genotypes were at higher risk for developing ESCC tumor at upper and middle third locations (OR 4.4, 95% CI = 1.0-18.5, p = 0.04; OR 2.5, 95% CI = 1.3-5.0, p = 0.005 respectively). The frequency of exon 4, His139Arg genotype was significantly lower in ESCC patients with lower third tumor location as compared to controls (14.8% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.02). In case-only study, gene-environment interaction of EPHX1 genotypes with tobacco, alcohol and occupational exposures did not appear to modulate the cancer susceptibility. In conclusion, exon 3, Tyr113His genotype was associated with higher risk of ESCC particularly at upper and middle-third anatomical locations of tumor. However, His139Arg genotype of exon 4, exhibited low risk for ESCC as well as its clinical characteristics

  2. Colocalization of low-methylesterified pectins and Pb deposits in the apoplast of aspen roots exposed to lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-methylesterified homogalacturonans have been suggested to play a role in the binding and immobilization of Pb in CW. Using root apices of hybrid aspen, a plant with a high phytoremediation potential, as a model, we demonstrated that the in situ distribution pattern of low-methylesterified homogalacturonan, pectin epitope (JIM5-P), reflects the pattern of Pb occurrence. The region which indicated high JIM5-P level corresponded with “Pb accumulation zone”. Moreover, JIM5-P was especially abundant in cell junctions, CWs lining the intercellular spaces and the corners of intercellular spaces indicating the highest accumulation of Pb. Furthermore, JIM5-P and Pb commonly co-localized. The observations indicate that low-methylesterified homogalacturonan is the CW polymer that determines the capacity of CW for Pb sequestration. Our results suggest a promising directions for CW modification for enhancing the efficiency of plant roots in Pb accumulation, an important aspect in the phytoremediation of soils contaminated with trace metals. - Highlights: • Co-localization of low-methylesterified pectins and Pb was analysed in situ. • The pattern of Pb accumulation matched low-methylesterified pectins distribution. • Low-methylesterified pectins and Pb commonly co-localized in cell walls. • Low-methylesterified pectins revealed an important compound in Pb sequestration. • We suggest a new direction in enhancing plant efficiency for phytoremediation. - The distribution of lead in developing tissues of aspen root tips exposed to short-term lead treatment mimics the distribution of low-methylesterified pectin epitope

  3. Short day-mediated cessation of growth requires the downregulation of AINTEGUMENTALIKE1 transcription factor in hybrid aspen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Karlberg

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Day length is a key environmental cue regulating the timing of major developmental transitions in plants. For example, in perennial plants such as the long-lived trees of the boreal forest, exposure to short days (SD leads to the termination of meristem activity and bud set (referred to as growth cessation. The mechanism underlying SD-mediated induction of growth cessation is poorly understood. Here we show that the AIL1-AIL4 (AINTEGUMENTALIKE transcription factors of the AP2 family are the downstream targets of the SD signal in the regulation of growth cessation response in hybrid aspen trees. AIL1 is expressed in the shoot apical meristem and leaf primordia, and exposure to SD signal downregulates AIL1 expression. Downregulation of AIL gene expression by SDs is altered in transgenic hybrid aspen plants that are defective in SD perception and/or response, e.g. PHYA or FT overexpressors. Importantly, SD-mediated regulation of growth cessation response is also affected by overexpression or downregulation of AIL gene expression. AIL1 protein can interact with the promoter of the key cell cycle genes, e.g. CYCD3.2, and downregulation of the expression of D-type cyclins after SD treatment is prevented by AIL1 overexpression. These data reveal that execution of SD-mediated growth cessation response requires the downregulation of AIL gene expression. Thus, while early acting components like PHYA and the CO/FT regulon are conserved in day-length regulation of flowering time and growth cessation between annual and perennial plants, signaling pathways downstream of SD perception diverge, with AIL transcription factors being novel targets of the CO/FT regulon connecting the perception of SD signal to the regulation of meristem activity.

  4. Different growth strategies determine the carbon gain and productivity of aspen collectives to be used in short-rotation plantations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Populus tremula is a favoured tree species in short-rotation forestry with a recognised large intraspecific variation in productivity. We compared the growth potential of 1-yr-old saplings of four Central European aspen collectives with different climate adaptation on a low-fertility site and searched for growth-determining physiological and morphological traits and their dependence on genetic constitution. Among the 35 investigated traits were photosynthetic capacity and mean assimilation rate, quantum yield and carboxylation efficiency, leaf water potential, leaf phaenology and the ratio of leaves lost to leaves produced (LP ratio), leaf size and total leaf area, axes length growth and canopy carbon gain as an estimate of productivity. The collectives differed by more than 30% in cumulative carbon gain with a large genotype effect, while mean assimilation rate and most photosynthetic and water status traits showed a relatively small intraspecific variation with no significant influence on the variation in C gain. The timing of the beginning of net leaf loss (leaf abscission > leaf production) in August differed between the four collectives and resulted in different maximum leaf areas and LP ratios, which were identified as key factors controlling C gain. Mean assimilation rate, though not related to cumulative C gain, was positively correlated with the light, CO2 and water use efficiencies of photosynthesis. We conclude that genotype selection for high-yielding aspen in short-rotation forestry at low-fertility sites should focus on the parameters leaf phaenology, LP ratio at the end of the growing season, and the resulting total leaf area as key traits.

  5. Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    From 2000 until 2010 with the support from the National Cancer Institute, the Mouse Models for Human Cancer Consortium, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute workshops and conferences to advance the understanding and use of animal models in colorectal cancer research have been organized .

  6. Ranking Operations Management Conferences

    OpenAIRE

    Steenhuis, Harm-Jan; Bruijn, de, P.J.A.; Gupta, Sushil; Laptaned, U.

    2007-01-01

    Several publications have appeared in the field of Operations Management which rank Operations Management related journals. Several ranking systems exist for journals based on , for example, perceived relevance and quality, citation, and author affiliation. Many academics also publish at conferences but we have not come across publications that rank conferences. Conference rankings are generally more complicated than journal rankings. Journal rankings are primarily for publishing purposes. Co...

  7. 15. European TRIGA Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 15th European TRIGA Conference was organised by the VTT Chemical Technology and held in June 15-17, 1998, in Espoo, Finland. The topics of the conference included: reactor operation and maintenance experience, developments and improvements of TRIGA components, safety aspects, licensing, radiation protection, fuel management, personnel, training programmes, and research programmes at TRIGA stations. The special topic of the conference was TRIGA reactors and the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

  8. BEAUTY'99 Conference Summary

    OpenAIRE

    Eerola, P.

    1999-01-01

    Investigations of B hadrons are expected to break new ground in measuring CP-violation effects. This series of BEAUTY conferences, originating from the 1993 conference in Liblice, has contributed significantly in developing ideas of CP-violation measurements using B hadrons and formulating and comparing critically the B-physics experiments. In the '99 conference in Bled we saw the ripening of the field and the first fruit emerging - Tevatron have produced beautiful B-physics results and more ...

  9. International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Cryocoolers 13

    2005-01-01

    This is the 13th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature super-capacitor applications.

  10. 15. European TRIGA Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmenhaara, S. (ed.)

    1999-12-15

    The 15th European TRIGA Conference was organised by the VTT Chemical Technology and held in June 15-17, 1998, in Espoo, Finland. The topics of the conference included: reactor operation and maintenance experience, developments and improvements of TRIGA components, safety aspects, licensing, radiation protection, fuel management, personnel, training programmes, and research programmes at TRIGA stations. The special topic of the conference was TRIGA reactors and the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

  11. Expectations for Cancun Conference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING ZHITAO

    2010-01-01

    Compared with the great hopes raised by the Copenhagen Climate Conference in 2009, the 2010 UN Climate Change Conference in Cancun aroused fewer expectations. However, the international community is still waiting for a positive outcome that will benefit humankind as a whole. The Cancun conference is another important opportunity for all the participants to advance the Bali Road Map negotiations after last year's meeting in Copenhagen, which failed to reach a legally binding treaty for the years beyond 2012.

  12. Conferences and Family Reunions

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Sutherland

    2012-01-01

    Professional associations and conferences have similarities with and differences from families and family reunions. This comparison can illustrate some ways professional associations can approach the integration of new members and the planning of conferences in order to facilitate membership development and leadership renewal. Unlike family reunions, professional conferences are not closed events that require a shared culture in order to fully participate; they are events that should show the...

  13. 1300 nm and 890 nm OCT images of oral cancer tissue engineered models and biopsy samples offer complimentary performance (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadi, Joseph; Byers, Robert A.; Fernandes, Jon; Mittar, Shweta; Hearnden, Vanessa; Lu, Zenghai; MacNeil, Sheila; Thornhill, Martin; Murdoch, Craig; Hunter, Keith D.; McKechnie, Alasdair; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-02-01

    OCT has demonstrated great potential to non-invasively detect oral epithelial cancers, potentially guiding biopsy and surgical resection. On non-ophthalmic tissues the preferred illumination wavelength is 1300 nm. Previous studies on skin have shown that useful image data can also be obtained at shorter wavelengths, with systems at 1060 nm and 820 nm offering reduced depth penetration but higher contrast. Here we apply a similar comparison to tissue engineered models of oral cancer and also to human biopsy samples, generally finding a similar trend. 1300 nm multi-beam OCT (Michelson Diagnostics EX1301) visualises stromal structures and surface keratin more clearly, providing useful image contrast down to around 1 mm. This system was compared with an ultra-high resolution home-built system operating at 890 nm (2.5 micron resolution vs 7.5 micron axial resolution for the EX1301). The UHR system reveals epithelial features more clearly, especially in the DOK pre-invasive cell line model and the biopsy samples. The relative effects of center wavelength vs axial resolution in generating the differential, wavelength-dependent contrast are assessed and the OCT biopsy images are compared with contemporary histology.

  14. Induction of cancer chemopreventive enzymes by coffee is mediated by transcription factor Nrf2. Evidence that the coffee-specific diterpenes cafestol and kahweol confer protection against acrolein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice fed diets containing 3% or 6% coffee for 5 days had increased levels of mRNA for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase class Alpha 1 (GSTA1) of between 4- and 20-fold in the liver and small intestine. Mice fed 6% coffee also had increased amounts of mRNA for UDP-glucuronosyl transferase 1A6 (UGT1A6) and the glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) subunit of between 3- and 10-fold in the small intestine. Up-regulation of these mRNAs was significantly greater in mice possessing Nrf2 (NF-E2 p45 subunit-related factor 2) than those lacking the transcription factor. Basal levels of mRNAs for NQO1, GSTA1, UGT1A6 and GCLC were lower in tissues from nrf2-/- mice than from nrf2+/+ mice, but modest induction occurred in the mutant animals. Treatment of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from nrf2+/+ mice with either coffee or the coffee-specific diterpenes cafestol and kahweol (C + K) increased NQO1 mRNA up to 9-fold. MEFs from nrf2-/- mice expressed less NQO1 mRNA than did wild-type MEFs, but NQO1 was induced modestly by coffee or C + K in the mutant fibroblasts. Transfection of MEFs with nqo1-luciferase reporter constructs showed that induction by C + K was mediated primarily by Nrf2 and required the presence of an antioxidant response element in the 5'-upstream region of the gene. Luciferase reporter activity did not increase following treatment of MEFs with 100 μmol/l furan, suggesting that this ring structure within C + K is insufficient for gene induction. Priming of nrf2+/+ MEFs, but not nrf2-/- MEFs, with C + K conferred 2-fold resistance towards acrolein

  15. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the full text or extended abstracts of papers number 61- to number 114

  16. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C.J. [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the full text or extended abstracts of papers number 61- to number 114

  17. Facilitating Learning at Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib; Elsborg, Steen

    2011-01-01

    learning, mutual inspiration and human flourishing. We offer five design principles that specify how conferences may engage participants more and hence increase their learning. In the research-and-development effort reported here, our team collaborated with conference organizers in Denmark to introduce and...

  18. Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketroser, Heidi

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the fifth annual Dr. Curtis C. Melnick Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference sponsored by the Greater Chicago (Illinois) Regional Office of the Anti-Defamation League of the B'nai B'rith. The day-long conference addressed issues of prejudice and allowed students and staff from various high schools to explore their concerns with…

  19. Hamburg Accelerator Conference (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 20-24 July, Hamburg welcomed the Fifteenth International Conference on High Energy Accelerators (HEACC). The HEACC Conference traditionally reviews the status of all major accelerator projects whether they are already running like clockwork, still in the construction phase, or waiting impatiently for financial approval

  20. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base

  1. The Conference Interpreter Results

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo-Ferrer, José Ramón

    2013-01-01

    Conjunto de datos relativo a la investigación realizada sobre el aprendizaje de terminología especializada en segundas lenguas con el videojuego The Conference Interpreter / Dataset from the study on L2 specialised vocabulary acquisition via The Conference Interpreter educational game.

  2. Radiation`96. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The conference program includes eight invited lectures which cover a range of contemporary topics in radiation science and technology. In addition, thirty-two oral papers were presented, along with forty-five posters. The conference handbook contains one-page precis or extended abstracts of all presentations, and is a substantial compendium of current radiation research in Australia.

  3. Radiation'96. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference program includes eight invited lectures which cover a range of contemporary topics in radiation science and technology. In addition, thirty-two oral papers were presented, along with forty-five posters. The conference handbook contains one-page precis or extended abstracts of all presentations, and is a substantial compendium of current radiation research in Australia

  4. Conference proceedings ISES 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Janne Winther; Peerstrup Ahrendt, Line; Malmkvist, Jens

    The 10th Internatinal Equitation Science Conference is held i Denmark from August 6th - 9th 2014. This book of proceedings contaions abstracts of 35 oral and 57 poster presentations within the conference themes Equine Stress, Learning and Training as well as free papers....

  5. ICCK Conference Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, William H. [MIT

    2013-05-28

    The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT’s Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase

  6. Living Beyond Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prosthesis Complementary Therapy Types of Complementary Therapy Acupuncture Art Therapy Diet, Nutrition and Exercise Expressive Writing Guided ... SIGN UP FOR OUR MAILING LIST SIGN UP Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Living Beyond Breast Cancer Conference ...

  7. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima;

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media Media Contacts Multicultural Media Outreach Program Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Cancer Currents Blog Research Findings Drug Approvals Precision Medicine Leadership Views 2017 ...

  9. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the foreword, technical program, the author index and of the papers (1-60) presented at the conference

  10. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C.J. [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the foreword, technical program, the author index and of the papers (1-60) presented at the conference.

  11. 基于Aspen Plus软件的循环流化床烟气脱硫模型%A model of flue gas desulfurization for circulating fluidized bed using Aspen Plus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜湘华; 朱廷钰; 王威; 何京东

    2009-01-01

    Model study and flow simulation of circulating fluidized bed flue gas desulfurization (CFB-FGD) were described in this pa-per. The mathematic model of flue gas desulfurization for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) was buih on the basis of element analysis for mass transfer of SO2. The enhancement of the desulfurization reaction in the process of mass transfer of SO2 was analyzed with the doub-le-membrane theory in the model. And the real formation process of slurry droplet was accounted with the theory of inertia collision. And then a simulation study of CFB-FGD was conducted based on Aspen Plus, where a module subroutine was programmed in FOR-TRAN based on this model. The influences of the key parameters such as calcium-to-sulfur ration (Ca/S), flux of spay water, concen-tration of sorbent particles and water drop size on the desulfurization efficiency were analyzed. The modeling results were compared with the experimental data and the comparing results showed that this model could preferably predict the real trends, This paper would help the application of CFB-FGD as references.%本文研究和模拟循环流化床烟气脱硫的流程和模型.以微元分析SO2的传质为基础,建立循环流化床烟气脱硫的数学模型,模型用双膜理论分析脱硫反应对SO2传质过程的增强影响,并采用惯性碰撞理论解释浆滴的形成过程.借助Aspen Plus过程模拟平台,用FORTRAN语言编写基于该模型的用户单元模块,模拟循环流化床烟气脱硫工艺,分析Ca/S、增湿水量、塔内颗粒物浓度、水滴粒径等参数对脱硫的影响,模拟计算结果和实验数据的对比显示模型能如实反映实际的趋势.本文为应用循环流化床烟气脱硫技术提供参考.

  12. 从愿望到行动,探索中国癌症康复与姑息治疗发展之路——第五届全国癌症康复与姑息医学大会发布"中国癌症姑息医学武汉宣言"%From desire to action, explore the palliative care of cancer development road in China——Announcement of "Wuhan Declaration of Chinese Cancer Palliative Medicine" in the 5th Academic Conference of CRPC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Mei; Hong Qiu; Yi Cheng; Yao Wei; Shiying Yu

    2010-01-01

    @@ The 5th Academic Conference of the Chinese Committee of Rehabilitation and Palliative Care (CRPC) is grandly convoked in Wuhan City from November 19 to November 21,taking "From desire to action,explore the palliative care of cancer development road in China" as the conference theme,including the progress of palliative therapy for cancer,dealting with the correlated symptoms of tumors,controlling the pain of cancers,bone metastasis and bone health,the construction of palliative medicine team,the evaluation of correlated symptoms of tumors,psychology of cancer,how to help advanced stage tumor patients to be aristogenesis and good death,community service and peaceful recreation service,and so on.

  13. Pre- and Post-Harvest Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from an Upland Boreal Aspen (Populus tremuloides) Forest in Western Boreal Plain, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Kayla

    The Utikuma Region Study Area (URSA) is located in north-central Alberta, Canada, in a region where aspen (Populus tremuloides) dominate the upland vegetation of the Western Boreal Plain Due to the heterogeneity of the surficial geology as well as the sub-humid climate where the water balance is dominated by evapotranspiration, the carbon balance across this landscape is highly variable. Moreover, the upland aspen regions represent significant stores of carbon. More recently, aspen stands have become valuable commercial resources for pulp and paper processing. These stands are harvested through a clear cutting process and are generally left to regenerate on their own, a process which occurs rapidly in clonal species like aspen. Since clonal species establish very quickly following harvest, information on the key ecohydrological controls on stand carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange from the years immediately following harvest are essential to understand the successional trajectory. However, most information currently available on these interactions are obtained several years following a disturbance. Thus, to determine the effects of harvest on aspen regeneration and productivity, ecosystem level fluxes of CO2 three years before and three years after timber harvest were analyzed. Prior to harvest, the ecosystem sequestered 1216 to 1286 g CO2 m-2period-1 over the growing season. Immediately after harvest, the ecosystem became a significant source of CO2 ranging from -874 to -1183 g CO2 m -2period-1, while the second growing season ranged from -233 to -577 g CO2 m-2period-1. The third growing season resulted in a net sink (76 g CO2 m -2period-1) over the same period, but if extrapolated over the whole year, the ecosystem would remain a source of carbon. The magnitude of Gross Ecosystem Productivity (GEP) returned pre-harvest range within two growing seasons. Ecosystem respiration (RE), on the other hand, increased year over year after harvest had taken place. Forest floor

  14. Consumption of argan oil (Morocco) with its unique profile of fatty acids, tocopherols, squalene, sterols and phenolic compounds should confer valuable cancer chemopreventive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallouki, F; Younos, C; Soulimani, R; Oster, T; Charrouf, Z; Spiegelhalder, B; Bartsch, H; Owen, R W

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fatty acids, tocopherols, squalene, sterols and phenolic antioxidants in three types of argan oil (Moroccan food, Moroccan aesthetic and a French commercial variety) along with a basic comparison with extra virgin olive and sunflower oil. The fatty acid profiles in the argan oils were very similar, with oleic acid (43%) and linoleic acid (36%) and their respective monoacylglycerols predominating. The major vitamer identified was -tocopherol with a mean of 483+/-11 mg/kg, in contrast to -tocopherol, which is the major vitamer in olive (190+/-1 mg/kg) and sunflower oil (532+/-6 mg/kg). The squalene content of the argan oils was very similar with a mean of 313+/-4 mg/100 g, which is lower than that of the olive oil (499 mg/100 g) but significantly higher than in the sunflower oil (6 mg/100 g). In contrast to olive and sunflower oils in which -sitosterol is predominant, the major sterols detected in the argan oils were schottenol (mean 147+/-10 mg/kg) and spinasterol (mean 122+/-10 mg/kg). The only phenolic compounds other than the tocopherol vitamers which could be readily detected and quantitated were vanillic, syringic and ferulic (probably conjugated to glucose) acids along with tyrosol. In contrast to the extra virgin olive oil (793 mg/kg), the concentration of total phenolic compounds is extremely low (argan oil with its high content of the vitamer -tocopherol, squalene and oleic acid is likely to enhance the cancer prevention effects of the Moroccan diet. PMID:12548113

  15. Intraspecific variation in root and leaf traits and leaf-root trait linkages in eight aspen demes (Populus tremula and P. tremuloides)

    OpenAIRE

    Hajek, Peter; Hertel, Dietrich; Leuschner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Leaf and fine root morphology and physiology have been found to vary considerably among tree species, but not much is known about intraspecific variation in root traits and their relatedness to leaf traits. Various aspen progenies (Populus tremula and P. tremuloides) with different growth performance are used in short-rotation forestry. Hence, a better understanding of the link between root trait syndromes and the adaptation of a deme to a particular environment is essential in order to impro...

  16. Ten-year results from the long-term soil productivity study in aspen ecosystems of the northern Great Lakes region

    OpenAIRE

    Voldseth, Richard; Palik, Brian; Elioff, John

    2011-01-01

    Impacts of organic matter removal and compaction on soil physical and chemical properties and forest productivity are reported from the first 10 years of the Long-Term Soil Productivity Study in Great Lakes aspen ecosystems. Organic matter removal treatments included main bole, total tree harvest, and total tree harvest with forest floor removal. Compaction treatments included no compaction beyond normal levels from harvest, moderate compaction, and heavy compaction. Main bole harvest with...

  17. Online community marketing of ski resorts : an in-depth best practice study of aspen/snowmass and breckenridge ski resort

    OpenAIRE

    Kráľ, Branislav

    2013-01-01

    Online brand community is a novel phenomenon that carries a number of benefits, but lack of clarity in antecedents of its effectiveness as a marketing alternative. Aspen/Snowmass and Breckenridge Ski Resort are two leading players in the ski industry, and this paper analyzes their activity in-depth in order to bring clarity by extracting implications on best practice. For the purpose, a tailor-made methodology is constructed. It consists of combining two analytical frameworks, interviews with...

  18. The effect of warming and enhanced ultraviolet radiation on gender-specific emissions of volatile organic compounds from European aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maja, Mengistu M; Kasurinen, Anne; Holopainen, Toini; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2016-03-15

    Different environmental stress factors often occur together but their combined effects on plant secondary metabolism are seldom considered. We studied the effect of enhanced ultraviolet (UV-B) (31% increase) radiation and temperature (ambient +2 °C) singly and in combination on gender-specific emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from 2-year-old clones of European aspen (Populus tremula L.). Plants grew in 36 experimental plots (6 replicates for Control, UV-A, UV-B, T, UV-A+T and UV-B+T treatments), in an experimental field. VOCs emitted from shoots were sampled from two (1 male and 1 female) randomly selected saplings (total of 72 saplings), per plot on two sampling occasions (June and July) in 2014. There was a significant UV-B×temperature interaction effect on emission rates of different VOCs. Isoprene emission rate was increased due to warming, but warming also modified VOC responses to both UV-A and UV-B radiation. Thus, UV-A increased isoprene emissions without warming, whereas UV-B increased emissions only in combination with warming. Warming-modified UV-A and UV-B responses were also seen in monoterpenes (MTs), sesquiterpenes (SQTs) and green leaf volatiles (GLVs). MTs showed also a UV × gender interaction effect as females had higher emission rates under UV-A and UV-B than males. UV × gender and T × gender interactions caused significant differences in VOC blend as there was more variation (more GLVs and trans-β-caryophyllene) in VOCs from female saplings compared to male saplings. VOCs from the rhizosphere were also collected from each plot in two exposure seasons, but no significant treatment effects were observed. Our results suggest that simultaneous warming and elevated-UV-radiation increase the emission of VOCs from aspen. Thus the contribution of combined environmental factors on VOC emissions may have a greater impact to the photochemical reactions in the atmosphere compared to the impact of individual factors acting alone. PMID

  19. CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kavoussi

    1973-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many carcinogenetic elements in industry and it is for this reason that study and research concerning the effect of these materials is carried out on a national and international level. The establishment and growth of cancer are affected by different factors in two main areas:-1 The nature of the human or animal including sex, age, point and method of entry, fat metabolism, place of agglomeration of carcinogenetic material, amount of material absorbed by the body and the immunity of the body.2 The different nature of the carcinogenetic material e.g. physical, chemical quality, degree of solvency in fat and purity of impurity of the element. As the development of cancer is dependent upon so many factors, it is extremely difficult to determine whether a causative element is principle or contributory. Some materials are not carcinogenetic when they are pure but become so when they combine with other elements. All of this creates an industrial health problem in that it is almost impossible to plan an adequate prevention and safety program. The body through its system of immunity protects itself against small amounts of carcinogens but when this amount increases and reaches a certain level the body is not longer able to defend itself. ILO advises an effective protection campaign against cancer based on the Well –equipped laboratories, Well-educated personnel, the establishment of industrial hygiene within factories, the regular control of safety systems, and the implementation of industrial health principles and research programs.

  20. Loss of the SxxSS motif in a human T-cell factor-4 isoform confers hypoxia resistance to liver cancer: an oncogenic switch in Wnt signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Koga

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Aberrantly activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling is important in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC development. Downstream gene expressions involving the Wnt/β-catenin cascade occur through T-cell factor (TCF proteins. Here, we show the oncogenic potential of human TCF-4 isoforms based on the expression of a single conserved SxxSS motif. METHODS: We investigated the TCF-4J and K isoform pair characterized by the presence (K or absence (J of the SxxSS motif. The mRNA expression profiles were examined in 47 pairs of human HCCs and adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues by RT-PCR. Proliferation, sphere assays and immunoblot analysis were performed under normoxia and hypoxia conditions. The ability of HCC cells overexpressing TCF-4J (J cells and K (K cells to grow as solid tumors in nude mice was explored. RESULTS: TCF-4J expression was significantly upregulated in HCC tumors compared to corresponding peritumor and normal liver and was preferentially expressed in poorly differentiated HCCs. In contrast, TCF-4K was downregulated in those same HCC tumors. TCF-4J-overexpressing HCC cells (J cells revealed a survival advantage under hypoxic conditions, high proliferation rate and formation of aggregates/spheres compared to overexpression of TCF-4K (K cells. The hypoxic J cells had high expression levels of HIF-2α and EGFR as possible mechanisms to promote tumorigenesis. Increased stability of HIF-2α under hypoxia in J cells was associated with a decreased level of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL protein, a known E3 ligase for HIF-αs. In a xenograft model, the J cells rapidly developed tumors compared to K cells. Tumor tissues derived from J cells exhibited high expression levels of HIF-2α and EGFR compared to the slow developing and small K cell derived tumors. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the specific TCF-4J isoform, which lacks a regulatory SxxSS motif, has robust tumor-initiating potential under hypoxic conditions.

  1. Osteoblast-derived sphingosine 1-phosphate to induce proliferation and confer resistance to therapeutics to bone metastasis-derived prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizuela, Leyre; Martin, Claire; Jeannot, Pauline; Ader, Isabelle; Gstalder, Cécile; Andrieu, Guillaume; Bocquet, Magalie; Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Gomez-Brouchet, Anne; Malavaud, Bernard; Sabbadini, Roger A; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) plays important roles in cell proliferation, differentiation or survival mainly through its surface G-protein-coupled receptors S1P1-5. Bone represents the major site of metastasis for prostate cancer (CaP) cells, which rely on bone-derived factors to support their proliferation and resistance to therapeutics. In the present work we have found that conditioned medium (CM) from the MC3T3 osteoblastic cell line or primary murine and human osteoblast-like cells, as well as co-culture with MC3T3 stimulate proliferation of CaP lines in S1P-dependent manner. In addition, osteoblastic-derived S1P induces resistance of CaP cells to therapeutics including chemotherapy and radiotherapy. When S1P release from osteoblastic cells is decreased (inhibition of SphK1, knock-down of SphK1 or the S1P transporter, Spns2 by siRNA) or secreted S1P neutralized with anti-S1P antibody, the proliferative and survival effects of osteoblasts on CaP cells are abolished. Because of the paracrine nature of the signaling, we studied the role of the S1P receptors expressed on CaP cells in the communication with S1P secreted by osteoblasts. Strategies aimed at down-regulating S1P1, S1P2 or S1P3 (siRNA, antagonists), established the exclusive role of the S1P/S1P1 signaling between osteoblasts and CaP cells. Bone metastases from CaP are associated with osteoblastic differentiation resulting in abnormal bone formation. We show that the autocrine S1P/S1P3 signaling is central during differentiation to mature osteoblasts by regulating Runx2 level, a key transcription factor involved in osteoblastic maturation. Importantly, differentiated osteoblasts exhibited enhanced secretion of S1P and further stimulated CaP cell proliferation in a S1P-dependent manner. By establishing the dual role of osteoblast-borne S1P on both osteoblastic differentiation and CaP cell proliferation and survival, we uncover the importance of S1P in the bone metastatic microenvironment, which may open

  2. 基于Aspen Plus模拟的垃圾衍生燃料富氧燃烧研究%Simulation on oxygen-enriched combustion of refuse derived fuel by aspen plus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李延吉; 邹科威; 宋政刚; 李润东; 池涌

    2013-01-01

    利用Aspen Plus软件建立了垃圾衍生燃料(RDF)的富氧燃烧模型,对RDF在富氧和空气气氛下的燃烧产物生产进行了对比,研究了燃烧温度T和过氧系数δ对燃烧产物生成量的影响规律.结果表明:气氛对RDF燃烧后SOx及CO2生成量的影响较小;NOx生成量随燃烧温度T的升高和过氧系数δ的增大而逐渐增大;随燃烧温度T的升高SO2生成量逐渐增加而SO3生成量相应减少,而随过氧系数δ的增大二者呈现相反趋势;当燃烧温度T高于1 200℃时,CO生成量急剧增加,而当过氧系数δ大于1.0时,CO生成量急速减少.

  3. Simulation and experimental of refuse derived fuel pyrolysis based on aspen plus%基于aspen plus的垃圾衍生燃料热解模拟与实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李延吉; 姜璐; 邹科威; 赵宁; 李玉龙; 李润东; 池涌

    2013-01-01

    采用化工流程模拟软件aspen plus对垃圾衍生燃料(RDF)建立热解反应模型,得出RDF各热解产物产率及气体体积分数.在高温管式炉中进行RDF热解实验,利用气相色谱分析仪测出各气体体积分数.将模拟值与实验值进行比较,结果表明:热解终温增加,热解液和热解气产率增大,半焦产率下降H2体积分数增加,CO2体积分数下降;与添加废石灰的RDF相比,添加污泥的RDF热解液和半焦产率更低,热解气产率更高;生物质质量分数下降,CO2体积分数下降;与添加废石灰RDF相比,添加污泥的RDF的CO2体积分数下降.

  4. EVOLVE 2014 International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tantar, Emilia; Sun, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian; Schütze, Oliver; Emmerich, Michael; Legrand, Pierrick; Moral, Pierre; Coello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This volume encloses research articles that were presented at the EVOLVE 2014 International Conference in Beijing, China, July 1–4, 2014.The book gathers contributions that emerged from the conference tracks, ranging from probability to set oriented numerics and evolutionary computation; all complemented by the bridging purpose of the conference, e.g. Complex Networks and Landscape Analysis, or by the more application oriented perspective. The novelty of the volume, when considering the EVOLVE series, comes from targeting also the practitioner’s view. This is supported by the Machine Learning Applied to Networks and Practical Aspects of Evolutionary Algorithms tracks, providing surveys on new application areas, as in the networking area and useful insights in the development of evolutionary techniques, from a practitioner’s perspective. Complementary to these directions, the conference tracks supporting the volume, follow on the individual advancements of the subareas constituting the scope of the confe...

  5. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  6. Photos of the conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Åhman

    1984-05-01

    Full Text Available Birgitta  Åhman is the photographer of the series of pictures from the conference, also for the cover photo of the full paper edition showing Kongsvold Mountain Hut and Biological Station.

  7. Conference on radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    32 abstracts of contributions presented at the conference and covering all aspects of radioecology are included. The lecturers were mainly from Czechoslovakia; contributions from the USSR, France, Belgium, Hungary, Bulgaria, etc., however, were also presented. (P.A.)

  8. 2nd SUMO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume contains the conference proceedings of the Simulation of Urban Mobility (SUMO) conference 2014, Berlin. The included research papers cover a wide range of topics in traffic planning and simulation, including open data, vehicular communication, e-mobility, urban mobility, multimodal traffic as well as usage approaches. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.  

  9. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  10. Japan Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the international level, the high energy accelerator scene evolves rapidly and the International Conference on High Energy Accelerators is where its strong pulse can best be felt. This year, the Conference was held for the first time in Japan, with the 14th meeting in the series having been hosted in August by the Japanese KEK National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba. The venue was a recognition of the premier accelerator physics and technology status achieved by this diligent nation

  11. Dynamic characteristics of Oxy-CFB combustion system based on Aspen%基于Aspen平台的Oxy-CFB燃烧侧动态特性模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建新; 邵壮; 李崇; 司风琪; 徐治皋

    2014-01-01

    Taking an oxy-fuel circulating fluidized bed (Oxy-CFB )combustor pilot facility as the simulation object,a steady-state model for the Oxy-CFB combustion system was built with the plat-form of Aspen Plus.After modifying the steady-state model for the dynamic process simulation,a new dynamic model for the combustion system was built based on Aspen Dynamics and the results were validated by the test data.The simulation study on the responses of the bed temperature and the components,including carbon dioxide,oxygen,carbon monoxide,and nitrogen monoxide in the flue gas,was carried out.The research results show that the dynamic model based on Aspen pro-vides a new method to investigate the dynamic characteristics of the Oxy-CFB combustion system. The dynamic response characteristics of bed temperature and gas components for the coal feed and primary air step changes can provide valuable information for design and implementation of the con-trol system of the Oxy-CFB combustion system.%以某循环流化床富氧燃烧中试系统为模拟对象,借助Aspen Plus流程模拟软件搭建了Oxy-CFB燃烧系统的稳态模型。在此基础上针对动态过程模拟进行改进,并利用Aspen Dynam-ics平台建立了该燃烧系统的动态模型,利用试验数据对模拟结果进行了验证。基于动态模型对Oxy-CFB床温以及燃烧排放产物中二氧化碳、氧气、一氧化碳、一氧化氮等进行了仿真研究。研究表明,基于Aspen平台的动态过程模拟为Oxy-CFB锅炉燃烧系统的动态特性分析提供了新的研究手段,模拟所得的床温及烟气各组分随给煤量、一次风量阶跃变化的动态响应规律可为今后Oxy-CFB燃烧系统的控制设计提供重要依据。

  12. Simulation of Synthesis Gas Production from Steam Oxygen Gasification of Colombian Coal Using Aspen Plus®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Preciado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A steady state simulation of syngas production from a Steam Oxygen Gasification process using commercial technologies was performed using Aspen Plus®. For the simulation, the average proximate and ultimate compositions of bituminous coal obtained from the Colombian Andean region were employed. The simulation was applied to conduct sensitivity analyses in the O2 to coal mass ratio, coal slurry concentration, WGS operating temperature and WGS steam to dry gas molar ratio (SDG over the key parameters: syngas molar composition, overall CO conversion in the WGS reactors, H2 rich-syngas lower heating value (LHV and thermal efficiency. The achieved information allows the selection of critical operating conditions leading to improve system efficiency and environmental performance. The results indicate that the oxygen to carbon ratio is a key variable as it affects significantly both the LHV and thermal efficiency. Nevertheless, the process becomes almost insensitive to SDG values higher than 2. Finally, a thermal efficiency of 62.6% can be reached. This result corresponds to a slurry solid concentration of 0.65, a WGS process SDG of 0.59, and a LTS reactor operating temperature of 473 K. With these fixed variables, a syngas with H2 molar composition of 92.2% and LHV of 12 MJ Nm−3 was attained.

  13. Global modeling of Hanford tank waste pretreatment alternatives within a total cleanup system using ASPEN PLUS trademark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate and compare radionuclide separations/processing technologies being developed or considered as Hanford tank waste pretreatment alternatives. These technologies are integrated into a total cleanup system that includes tank waste retrieval, treatment, and disposal. Current Hanford flowsheets typically include only mature, developed technologies, not new technologies. Thus, this work examines the impact/benefits of inserting new technologies into Hanford flowsheets. Waste treatment must produce disposal fractions which are less troublesome than the original material. Researchers seeking effective treatment methods may lack the tools or expertise to fully understand the implications of their approach in terms of secondary and tertiary waste streams or the extent to which a unique new process will affect upstream or downstream processes. This work has developed and demonstrated mass balance methods that clarify the effect of including individual processes in an integrated waste treatment system, such as the Hanford cleanup system. The methods provide a measure of treatment effectiveness and a format for the researcher to understand waste stream interrelationships and determine how a particular treatment technology can best be used in a cleanup system. A description of the Hanford tank waste cleanup model developed using the ASPEN PLUS flowsheet simulation tool is given. Important aspects of the modeling approach are discussed along with a description of how performance measures were developed and integrated within the simulation to evaluate and compare various Hanford tank waste pretreatment alternatives

  14. Controls of the quantum yield and saturation light of isoprene emission in different-aged aspen leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Sun, Zhihong; Talts, Eero

    2015-12-01

    Leaf age alters the balance between the use of end-product of plastidic isoprenoid synthesis pathway, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), in prenyltransferase reactions leading to synthesis of pigments of photosynthetic machinery and in isoprene synthesis, but the implications of such changes on environmental responses of isoprene emission have not been studied. Because under light-limited conditions, isoprene emission rate is controlled by DMADP pool size (SDMADP ), shifts in the share of different processes are expected to particularly strongly alter the light dependency of isoprene emission. We examined light responses of isoprene emission in young fully expanded, mature and old non-senescent leaves of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides) and estimated in vivo SDMADP and isoprene synthase activity from post-illumination isoprene release. Isoprene emission capacity was 1.5-fold larger in mature than in young and old leaves. The initial quantum yield of isoprene emission (αI ) increased by 2.5-fold with increasing leaf age primarily as the result of increasing SDMADP . The saturating light intensity (QI90 ) decreased by 2.3-fold with increasing leaf age, and this mainly reflected limited light-dependent increase of SDMADP possibly due to feedback inhibition by DMADP. These major age-dependent changes in the shape of the light response need consideration in modelling canopy isoprene emission. PMID:26037962

  15. World Energy Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After making some general remarks about goals, tasks, and works of the World Energy Conference the topics and the frame of the 11th World Energy Conference which will take place in Munich from 8th to 12th September 1980 are outlined. This conference is held under the general topic 'energy for our world' and deals with the reciprocal relation between energy supply, environment, and society. The main part of the publication presented here is the German version of the most important sections of the investigation 'World Energy-Looking Ahead to 2020' by the Conservation Commission (CC) of the World Energy Conference. Added to this is the German original brief version of a report by the Mining-Research Company (Bergbau-Forschung GmbH) to the CC which deals with the estimation of the world's coal resources and their future availability. This report was presented on the 10th World Energy Conference in Istanbul together with the corresponding reports concerning the other energy sources. Finally, an introduction to the technical programme for the 11th World Energy Conference 1980 is given. (UA)

  16. 2nd Bozeman Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, John

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains a collection of papers delivered by the partici­ pants at the second Conference on Computation and Control held at Mon­ tana State University in Bozeman, Montana from August 1-7, 1990. The conference, as well as this proceedings, attests to the vitality and cohesion between the control theorist and the numerical analyst that was adver­ tised by the first Conference on Computation and Control in 1988. The proceedings of that initial conference was published by Birkhiiuser Boston as the first volume of this same series entitled Computation and Control, Proceedings of the Bozeman Conference, Bozeman, Montana, 1988. Control theory and numerical analysis are both, by their very nature, interdisciplinary subjects as evidenced by their interaction with other fields of mathematics and engineering. While it is clear that new control or es­ timation algorithms and new feedback design methodologies will need to be implemented computationally, it is likewise clear that new problems in computation...

  17. Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeau, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest Research Institute

    2013-11-25

    The 6th Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conference was held at the Minoa Palace Conference Center, Chania, Crete, Greece (16-21 June 2008). The Organizing Committee was composed of Joe Nadeau (CWRU, Cleveland), Rudi Balling (German Research Centre, Brauschweig), David Galas (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Lee Hood (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Diane Isonaka (Seattle), Fotis Kafatos (Imperial College, London), John Lambris (Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia),Harris Lewin (Univ. of Indiana, Urbana-Champaign), Edison Liu (Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore), and Shankar Subramaniam (Univ. California, San Diego). A total of 101 individuals from 21 countries participated in the conference: USA (48), Canada (5), France (5), Austria (4), Germany (3), Italy (3), UK (3), Greece (2), New Zealand (2), Singapore (2), Argentina (1), Australia (1), Cuba (1), Denmark (1), Japan (1), Mexico (1), Netherlands (1), Spain (1), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1). With respect to speakers, 29 were established faculty members and 13 were graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. With respect to gender representation, among speakers, 13 were female and 28 were male, and among all participants 43 were female and 58 were male. Program these included the following topics: Cancer Pathways and Networks (Day 1), Metabolic Disease Networks (Day 2), Day 3 ? Organs, Pathways and Stem Cells (Day 3), and Day 4 ? Inflammation, Immunity, Microbes and the Environment (Day 4). Proceedings of the Conference were not published.

  18. ASA conference on radiation and health: Coolfont 7: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings provide a summary of papers presented at the seventh annual ASA Conference on Radiation and Health, held at the Coolfont Conference Center in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. More than forty scientists, including statisticians, epidemiologists, biologists, and physicists, participated in the conference. The 1987 conference focused on lung cancer risks, especially lung cancer risks due to radon. The BEIR IV report, which addresses health risks of radon and other internally deposited alpha-emitters, was summarized early in the conference. Results of analyses of data on miners in Colorado and in New Mexico were presented, as well as analyses of combined data from several studies, which were used as the basis of estimates in the BEIR IV report. Statistical issues related to appropriate analysis of chronic exposure and of smoking data received considerable attention and discussion. Papers describing models for lung cancer risks based on exposure to cigarette smoke, radiation, and other substances provided insights into general understanding of lung cancer mechanisms. Carcinogenic models were also the subject of a presentation on radiation-induced skin cancer in humans and animals. In addition, relevant data on animal experiments involving radon exposure were summarized. Understanding risks requires relating them to dose, and thus the presentation on dosimetry, both for miner populations and for residents of US homes, made an important contribution to the conference. Presentations on current efforts at the state and national level to assess radon levels in US homes were also of considerable interest to the participants. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base

  19. American Institute for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order Publications Shop AICR Health @ Work Healthy Recipes Cancer Research Update AICR eNews AICR Newsletter ScienceNow CancerResource Where ... Patients and Survivors Materials for Health Professionals Our Cancer Research Research Grants Conference Continuous Update Project Research Progress ...

  20. Contagious cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, James S

    2011-01-01

    Although cancer can on occasion be caused by infectious agents such as specific bacteria, parasites, and viruses, it is not generally considered a transmissible disease. In rare circumstances, however, direct communication from one host to another has been documented. The Tasmanian devil is now threatened with extinction in the wild because of a fatal transmissible cancer, devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). Another example is canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT or Sticker's sarcoma) in dogs. There is a vast difference in prognosis between these two conditions. DFTD is often fatal within 6 months, whereas most cases of CTVT are eventually rejected by the host dog, who then is conferred lifelong immunity. In man, only scattered case reports exist about such communicable cancers, most often in the setting of organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplants and cancers arising during pregnancy that are transmitted to the fetus. In about one third of cases, transplant recipients develop cancers from donor organs from individuals who were found to harbor malignancies after the transplantation. The fact that two thirds of the time cancer does not develop, along with the fact that cancer very rarely is transmitted from person to person, supports the notion that natural immunity prevents such cancers from taking hold in man. These observations might hold invaluable clues to the immunobiology and possible immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:21212437

  1. Conferences and Family Reunions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Sutherland

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Professional associations and conferences have similarities with and differences from families and family reunions. This comparison can illustrate some ways professional associations can approach the integration of new members and the planning of conferences in order to facilitate membership development and leadership renewal. Unlike family reunions, professional conferences are not closed events that require a shared culture in order to fully participate; they are events that should show the constant change and development of practice that is representative of the profession – for both members and non-members. Some of the topics explored in the article are: making it easy for outsiders to contribute, considering the tastes of new members, making it easy to volunteer in a meaningful way, and remembering who the future of the organization is. These simple considerations will assist in opening professional associations to new participants and help them to maintain their relevance and vitality over time.

  2. The role of phytochrome A and gibberellins in growth under long and short day conditions: Studies in hybrid aspen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, M.E. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology

    2000-07-01

    This thesis addresses questions concerning the regulation of growth and, specifically, the cessation of growth in response to short days in deciduous tree species. The model tree used in the studies was hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. x P. tremuloides Michx.). We have exploited the possibility of transforming this species to modulate the level of expression of target genes using over-expression and antisense techniques. The target genes in the studies were the photoreceptor phytochrome A (phyA) and gibberellin 20-oxidase (GA 20-oxidase), the latter being a highly regulated enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of gibberellins (GAs). The photoreceptor phyA has been implicated in photoperiodic regulation of growth, while GAs may regulate the physiological response further downstream. The endogenous expression of these genes has been investigated in parallel with studies of various plants with ectopic and reduced levels of expression. The main focus has been on the early stages of induction of growth cessation and its physiological and molecular mechanisms. Studies of hybrid aspen plants with an increased or reduced expression of phyA, show this receptor to mediate the photoperiodic regulation of growth. Plants with ectopic expression could not stop growing despite drastically shortened photoperiods, while the antisense plants showed the reverse phenotype, with a higher sensitivity resulting in earlier cessation of growth. The role of GAs in growth inhibition was also addressed using plants with a reduction in GA levels. These plants showed early cessation of growth and dormancy, and thus an increased sensitivity toward daylength. Conversely, plants with increased rates of GA biosynthesis showed increased growth and stopped growing much later. Furthermore, increases in GA biosynthesis, resulting in high levels of GAs have a major impact on growth. Plants with high GA levels have increased elongation and diameter growth, due to higher rates of cell production in the

  3. Biomass growth and element uptake by young trembling aspen in relation to site treatments in Northern Ontario, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, I.K. [Canadian Forest Service, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-05-01

    A second-growth boreal mixed wood, consisting mainly of trembling aspen and balsam fir, with white spruce, balsam poplar and white birch admixed, defoliated in part by spruce budworm, was harvested in late autumn 1992 by conventional cut-and-skid, whole-tree logging. Four blocks, subdivided into 10-m by 10-m plots, separated by buffer strips, were laid out. The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy and environmental implications of screening (i.e. organic layer removal) versus high-speed mixing (using a prototype forestry rototiller), both applied in strips and across whole plots, versus no treatment (cut control) in terms of regrowth biomass production and nutrient uptake. All plots were quickly occupied by a verdant herbaceous regrowth and, depending upon treatment, hardwood shoots. Screefing generally increased numbers of hardwood shoots relative to the control, whereas mixing generally reduced numbers. Above-ground standing crops including tree and non-tree species by the middle of 1997 ranged from 9500 kgha{sup -1} on cut control plots to 4400 kgha{sup -1} on whole-area mixed plots. Nutrient contents in the aboveground vegetation varied commensurately, ranging up to 91 kgha{sup -1} for N, 11 for P, 79 for K, 94 for Ca, 18 for Mg and 8 for S. Leafy matter recovery on the most responsive treatment (harvest with no further site preparation) was ca. 70% complete within five years and the N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and S contents therein had reached or almost reached the same levels as the precut stand. This implies that nutrient cycling largely resumes within five years of harvest. (author)

  4. Bisphosphonate inhibitors reveal a large elasticity of plastidic isoprenoid synthesis pathway in isoprene-emitting hybrid aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasulov, Bahtijor; Talts, Eero; Kännaste, Astrid; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-06-01

    Recently, a feedback inhibition of the chloroplastic 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP)/2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid synthesis by end products dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP) and isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) was postulated, but the extent to which DMADP and IDP can build up is not known. We used bisphosphonate inhibitors, alendronate and zoledronate, that inhibit the consumption of DMADP and IDP by prenyltransferases to gain insight into the extent of end product accumulation and possible feedback inhibition in isoprene-emitting hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides). A kinetic method based on dark release of isoprene emission at the expense of substrate pools accumulated in light was used to estimate the in vivo pool sizes of DMADP and upstream metabolites. Feeding with fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of DXP reductoisomerase, alone or in combination with bisphosphonates was used to inhibit carbon input into DXP/MEP pathway or both input and output. We observed a major increase in pathway intermediates, 3- to 4-fold, upstream of DMADP in bisphosphonate-inhibited leaves, but the DMADP pool was enhanced much less, 1.3- to 1.5-fold. In combined fosmidomycin/bisphosphonate treatment, pathway intermediates accumulated, reflecting cytosolic flux of intermediates that can be important under strong metabolic pull in physiological conditions. The data suggested that metabolites accumulated upstream of DMADP consist of phosphorylated intermediates and IDP. Slow conversion of the huge pools of intermediates to DMADP was limited by reductive energy supply. These data indicate that the DXP/MEP pathway is extremely elastic, and the presence of a significant pool of phosphorylated intermediates provides an important valve for fine tuning the pathway flux. PMID:25926480

  5. International conference, ICPRAM 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, J; Fred, Ana; Pattern recognition : applications and methods : revised selected papers

    2013-01-01

    This edited book includes extended and revised versions of a set of selected papers from the First International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPRAM 2012), held in Vilamoura, Algarve, Portugal, from 6 to 8 February, 2012, sponsored by the Institute for Systems and Technologies of Information Control and Communication (INSTICC) and held in cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and Pattern Analysis, Statistical Modelling and Computational Learning (PASCAL2). The conference brought together researchers, engineers and practitioners interested on the areas of Pattern Recognition, both from theoretical and application perspectives.

  6. VMEbus in physics conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first conference ''VMEbus in Physics'' was held at CERN on 7th and 8th October 1985. The conference surveyed the applications of the VMEbus standards in physics, with special emphasis on particle physics and accelerator control. Developments in the definition of the standards and in the formation of users groups were discussed. Manufacturer's representatives were given the opportunity to appreciate the requirements of the fast-growing VMEbus market in the physics community. These proceedings contain the unedited text of the oral and poster presentations given on that occasion. (orig.)

  7. Five Conferences on Undecidability

    CERN Document Server

    Bouleau, Nicolas; Louveau, Alain

    1982-01-01

    These five lectures on undecidability were given to students with a good level in mathematics but with no special knowledge on logic. The first conference presents the formalization of mathematics with a short historical survey, the language of first order predicates and the axioms of set theory. The second and third lectures explain the incompleteness phenomena from the Hilbert program until Gödel's theorems with a presentation of the sequent calculus of Gentzen.The fourth talk deepens model theory reasoning in the case of the continuum hypothesis, and the last conference gives examples of effective computability results.

  8. Pancreatic cancer stroma: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Jesse; Korc, Murray

    2014-06-16

    Pancreatic cancer desmoplasia is thought to confer biological aggressiveness. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Özdemir and colleagues and Rhim and colleagues demonstrate that targeting the stroma results in undifferentiated, aggressive pancreatic cancer that responds to checkpoint blockade or antiangiogenic therapy, uncovering a protective role by stroma in this cancer. PMID:24937454

  9. Endogenous PttHb1 and PttTrHb, and heterologous Vitreoscilla vhb haemoglobin gene expression in hybrid aspen roots with ectomycorrhizal interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Jokipii, Soile; Häggman, Hely; Brader, Günter; Kallio, Pauli T.; Niemi, Karoliina

    2008-01-01

    Present knowledge on plant non-symbiotic class-1 (Hb1) and truncated (TrHb) haemoglobin genes is almost entirely based on herbaceous species while the corresponding tree haemoglobin genes are not well known. The function of these genes has recently been linked with endosymbioses between plants and microbes. In this work, the coding sequences of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula×tremuloides) PttHb1 and PttTrHb were characterized, indicating that the key residues of haem and ligand binding of both ...

  10. Comparative analysis of the effect of pretreating aspen wood with aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions of sulfuric and nitric acid on its reactivity during enzymatic hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dotsenko, Gleb; Osipov, D. O.; Zorov, I. N.;

    2016-01-01

    The effect of aspen wood pretreatment methods with the use of both aqueous solutions of sulfuric and nitric acids and aqueous-organic solutions (ethanol, butanol) of sulfuric acid (organosolv) on the limiting degree of conversion of this type of raw material into simple sugars during enzymatic...... hydrolysis are compared. The effects of temperature, acid concentration, composition of organic phase (for sulfuric acid), and pressure (for nitric acid) on the effectiveness of pretreatment were analyzed. It is shown that the use of organosolv with 0.5% sulfuric acid allows us to increase the reactivity of...

  11. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, Evan [American Institute of Chemical Engineers

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  12. The learning conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    little support amongst serious students of learning. The professional conference as a forum for knowledge sharing is in dire need of a new learning theory and a more enlightened practice. The notion of human flourishing is offered as basis for theory, and four simple design principles for the so...

  13. Microbicides 2006 conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGowan Ian

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current HIV/AIDS statistics show that women account for almost 60% of HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV prevention tools such as male and female condoms, abstinence and monogamy are not always feasible options for women due to various socio-economic and cultural factors. Microbicides are products designed to be inserted in the vagina or rectum prior to sex to prevent HIV acquisition. The biannual Microbicides conference took place in Cape Town, South Africa from 23–26 April 2006. The conference was held for the first time on the African continent, the region worst affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The conference brought together a record number of 1,300 scientists, researchers, policy makers, healthcare workers, communities and advocates. The conference provided an opportunity for an update on microbicide research and development as well as discussions around key issues such as ethics, acceptability, access and community involvement. This report discusses the current status of microbicide research and development, encompassing basic and clinical science, social and behavioural science, and community mobilisation and advocacy activities.

  14. Wire chamber conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet contains program and the abstracts of the papers presented at the conference, most of them dealing with performance testing of various types of wire chambers. The publication of proceedings is planned as a special issue of 'Nuclear instruments and methods' later on. All abstracts are in English. An author index for the book of abstracts is given. (A.N.)

  15. Hamburg Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 20-24 July, Hamburg welcomed the Fifteenth International Conference on High Energy Accelerators (HEACC). A natural highlight was the recent commissioning success of the HERA electron-proton collider at Hamburg's DESY Laboratory and its first high energy electron-proton collision data. This gave the meeting the feel of a family event celebrating a newborn

  16. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  17. Annual Conference Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  18. International Nuclear Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    We are pleased to announce that the 26th International Nuclear Physics Conference (INPC2016) will take place in Adelaide (Australia) from September 11-16, 2016. The 25th INPC was held in Firenze in 2013 and the 24th INPC in Vancouver, Canada, in 2010. The Conference is organized by the Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter at the University of Adelaide, together with the Australian National University and ANSTO. It is also sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and by a number of organisations, including AUSHEP, BNL, CoEPP, GSI and JLab. INPC 2016 will be held in the heart of Adelaide at the Convention Centre on the banks of the River Torrens. It will consist of 5 days of conference presentations, with plenary sessions in the mornings, up to ten parallel sessions in the afternoons, poster sessions and a public lecture. The Conference will officially start in the evening of Sunday 11th September with Registration and a Reception and will end late on the afternoon of ...

  19. Transactions: student conference, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers presented at this conference covered the topics of CANDU reactor physics, control systems and steam generators; imaging in neutron radiography; cooling systems for a SLOWPOKE reactor; accelerator breeders; the investigation of point defects using positrons; neutron and gamma detectors; fusion reaction kinetics; and heavy ion fusion

  20. Graphics Conference Calendar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    1. The 13th International Conference in Central Europe on Computer Graphics, Visualization and Computer Vision'2005, University of West Bohemia, Campus-Bory Plzen (very close to Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic)Czech Republic, January 31 - February 4, 2005. http://wscg.zcu.cz, skala@kiv.zcu.cz

  1. Vienna wirechamber conference 98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume of the Vienna wirechamber conference 1998 contains abstracts of lectures and abstracts of poster sessions of the following topics: high energy physics, gaseous detectors, radiation detectors, calorimetry, drift chambers, wire spark chambers, tracking chambers, neutron detectors, particle detection, muon spectrometry, nuclear medicine. (Suda)

  2. CELL VOLUME CONFERENCES

    OpenAIRE

    V. Štrbák

    2016-01-01

    This mini-review describes the history of cell volume conferences with the emphasis on the research of cell volume sensitive peptide exocytosis initiated by Prof. Monte A. Greer as well as the recent achievements on the study of the mechanisms of cell volume adjustment and their implications in the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cell proliferation and death.

  3. NPT review conference report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with Article VIII.3 of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, a Conference of the parties to the Treaty was held in Geneva from 5-30 May in order to review the operation of the Treaty with a view to assuring that the purposes of the Preamble and the provisions of the Treaty were being realized. The Conference was presided over by Mrs. Inga Thorsson of Sweden. Statements were made both by the Secretary-General of the United Nations and the Director General of the IAEA at the opening session. In its Final Declaration, adopted by consensus, the Conference expressed the view that the conclusion of a treaty banning all nuclear weapon tests was one of the most important measures to halt the nuclear arms race. It stressed the need to achieve the discontinuance of all test explosions of nuclear weapons for all time. The Conference also expressed its strong support for IAEA safeguards aimed at preventing the diversion of nuclear energy from peaceful uses to nuclear weapons or other explosive devices. Questions affecting the Agency arose chiefly in the review of Articles III, IV and V of the Treaty. The three sections of the Declaration which deal with the review of those Articles are reprinted in this issue. (author)

  4. Bioenergy 93 conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the presentations given in the Bioenergy 93 Conference are published. The papers are grouped as follows: Opening addresses, biomass implementation strategies, nordic bioenergy research programs, production, handling and conversion of biofuels, combustion technology of biofuels and bioenergy visions

  5. Cancer Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  6. Conference summaries. Canadian Nuclear Association 29. annual conference; Canadian Nuclear Society 10. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 papers from the twenty-ninth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. Abstracts were also prepared for the 102 papers from the tenth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society

  7. Polypropylene/aspen/liquid polybutadienes composites: Maximization of impact strength, tensile and modulus by statistical experimental design

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kokta, B. V.; Fortelný, Ivan; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Horák, Zdeněk; Michálková, Danuše

    Plzeň : Association of Composites Manufacturers, Dům techniky, 2005, s. 61-65. [Conference on Reinforced Plastics /23./. Karlovy Vary (CZ), 24.05.2005-26.05.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymer composites * polypropylene * cellulose Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  8. ¿Son las herramientas recomendadas por la ASPEN y la ESPEN equiparables en la valoración del estado nutricional? Are the tools recommended by ASPEN and ESPEN comparable for assessing the nutritional status?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.ª A. Valero

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: No existe un método de valoración nutricional universalmente aceptado. Los expertos de ASPEN (2002 sugieren utilizar la valoración subjetiva global (VSG, mientras que los de ESPEN (2002 recomiendan el sistema NRS-2002. Objetivos y ámbito: Este estudio transversal tiene como objetivos: 1 conocer la prevalencia de malnutrición al ingreso hospitalario en un hospital terciario y 2 conocer el grado de asociación entre dos herramientas utilizadas para valorar el estado de nutrición: la VSG y el sistema NRS-2002. Material y métodos: Se estudian 135 pacientes (42,2 % mujeres y 58,8 % varones, edad 62,1 ± 14,5 años en los tres primeros días del ingreso hospitalario, ingresados en camas de Medicina Interna y Cirugía. Se analizan diferentes variables del estado nutricional. Se compara las necesidades calóricas (Harris Benedict x factor de agresión y la ingesta calórica del día anterior al ingreso, mediante recordatorio de 24 horas. Se calcula la prevalencia de malnutrición al ingreso con dos herramientas de screening: VSG y el sistema NRS-2002. Resultados: El 42,2 % de los pacientes reconocen haber perdido peso y el 39,3 % ingieren una dieta inferior a sus necesidades al ingreso en el hospital. Según el método utilizado de valoración nutricional, la prevalencia de malnutrición es del 40,7 y del 45,1/100 pacientes ingresados con el VSG y el NRS-2002, respectivamente. Existe una asociación significativa entre los resultados obtenidos con ambas herramientas (p = 0,000. Los niveles de albúmina sérica y linfocitos totales son inferiores en los pacientes malnutridos. Conclusiones: La prevalencia de malnutrición al ingreso hospitalario es elevada. Existe una asociación estrecha entre los resultados obtenidos con la VSG y el sistema NRS-2002. Aunque en la práctica clínica cualquiera de los dos métodos puede ser utilizado para valorar el estado de nutrición, consideramos que el sistema NRS-2002, aunque más complejo, es

  9. European Conference on Health Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmivaara, Antti

    2010-12-01

    The biennial European Conference on Health Economics was held in Finland this year, at the Finlandia Hall in the centre of Helsinki. The European conferences rotate among European countries and fall between the biennial world congresses organized by the International Health Economics Association (iHEA). A record attendance of approximately 800 delegates from 50 countries around the world were present at the Helsinki conference. The theme of the conference was 'Connecting Health and Economics'. All major topics of health economics were covered in the sessions. For the first time, social care economics was included in the agenda of the European Conference as a session of its own. PMID:21155696

  10. The incorporation of an organic soil layer in the Noah-MP Land Surface Model and its evaluation over a Boreal Aspen Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Li, Y.; Chen, F.; Barr, A.; Barlage, M.; Wan, B.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the multi-parameterization version of the Noah land-surface model (Noah-MP) was used to investigate the impact of adding a forest-floor organic soil layer on the simulated surface energy and water cycle components at a boreal aspen forest. The test site selected is BERMS Old Aspen Flux (OAS) field station in central Saskatchewan, Canada. The selection of different parameterization schemes for each process within the current Noah-MP model significantly affected the simulation results. The best combination options without incorporating organic soil is referred as the control experiment (CTL). By including an organic-soil parameterization within the Noah-MP model for the first time, the verification results (OGN) against site show significantly improved performance of the model in surface energy fluxes and hydrology simulation due to the lower thermal conductivity and greater porosity of the organic soil. The effects of including an organic soil layer on soil temperature are not uniform throughout the soil depth and year, and those effects are more prominent in summer and in deep soils. For drought years, the OGN simulation substantially modified the partition between direct soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration. For wet years, the OGN simulated latent heat fluxes are similar to CTL except for spring season where OGN produced less evaporation. The impact of the organic soil on sub-surface runoff is substantive with much higher runoff throughout the season.

  11. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University; Zak, Donald R. [University of Michigan; Kubiske, Mark E. [USDA Forest Service; Pregitzer, Kurt S. [University of Idaho

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch

  12. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  13. XIX Edoardo Amaldi Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Abousahl, Said; Plastino, Wolfango

    2016-01-01

    This book, comprising contributions presented at the XIX Edoardo Amaldi Conference, examines important aspects of international cooperation aimed at enhancing nuclear safety, security, safeguards (the “3S”), and non-proliferation, thereby assisting in the development and maintenance of the verification regime and progress toward a nuclear weapon-free world. The Conference served as a forum where eminent scientists, diplomats, and policymakers could compare national perspectives and update international collaborations. The book opens by addressing the political, institutional, and legal dimensions of the 3S and non-proliferation; current challenges are discussed and attempts made to identify possible solutions and future improvements. Subsequent sections consider scientific developments that can contribute to increased effectiveness in the implementation of international regimes, particularly in critical areas, technology foresight, and the ongoing evaluation of current capabilities. The closing sections d...

  14. 2013 APPLEPIES Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a thorough overview of cutting-edge research on electronics applications relevant to industry, the environment, and society at large. A wide spectrum of application domains are covered, from automotive to space and from health to security, and special attention is devoted to the use of embedded devices and sensors for imaging, communication, and control. The book is based on the 2013 APPLEPIES Conference, held in Rome, which brought together researchers and stakeholders to consider the most significant current trends in the field of applied electronics and to debate visions for the future. Areas covered by the conference included information communication technology; biotechnology and biomedical imaging; space; secure, clean, and efficient energy; the environment; and smart, green, and integrated transport. As electronics technology continues to develop apace, constantly meeting previously unthinkable targets, further attention needs to be directed toward the electronics applications and th...

  15. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  16. 7th IAASS Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Rongier, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The 7th IAASS Conference, “Space Safety is No Accident” is an invitation to reflect and exchange information on a number of topics in space safety and sustainability of national and international interest. The conference is also a forum to promote mutual understanding, trust and the widest possible international cooperation in such matters. The once exclusive “club” of nations with autonomous sub-orbital and orbital space access capabilities is becoming crowded with fresh and ambitious new entrants. New commercial spaceports are starting operations and others are being built. In the manned spaceflight arena a commercial market is becoming a tangible reality with suborbital spaceflights and government use of commercial services for cargo and crew transportation to orbit. Besides the national ambitions in space, the international cooperation both civil and commercial is also gaining momentum. In the meantime robotic space exploration will accelerate and with it the need to internationally better regulat...

  17. Computational Intelligence : International Joint Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Rosa, Agostinho; Cadenas, José; Dourado, António; Madani, Kurosh; Filipe, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The present book includes a set of selected extended papers from the sixth International Joint Conference on Computational Intelligence (IJCCI 2014), held in Rome, Italy, from 22 to 24 October 2014. The conference was composed by three co-located conferences:  The International Conference on Evolutionary Computation Theory and Applications (ECTA), the International Conference on Fuzzy Computation Theory and Applications (FCTA), and the International Conference on Neural Computation Theory and Applications (NCTA). Recent progresses in scientific developments and applications in these three areas are reported in this book. IJCCI received 210 submissions, from 51 countries, in all continents. After a double blind paper review performed by the Program Committee, 15% were accepted as full papers and thus selected for oral presentation. Additional papers were accepted as short papers and posters. A further selection was made after the Conference, based also on the assessment of presentation quality and audience in...

  18. Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

  19. Madison Physics Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If there was no unexpected major development which emerged as the highlight of the 20th International Conference on High Energy Physics, held at the University of Wisconsin at Madison from 17 to 23 July, there was still something of interest for everybody. There was a large attendance at some of the early sessions on more ambitious theoretical ventures such as supersymmetry and grand unification, topics which contrast sharply with workaday parametrizations of experimental data

  20. COMBI2010 CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In October 2010, ”Contemporary Views on Business” highlighted not only current research but also the business opportunities and the future perspectives on the development, management and sustainable deployment of business operations. This international Conference actively sought to promote synergies between business and academia and raised awareness on the potential benefits of research for business activities. Combi2010 was an important forum for knowledge co-creation and intellectual exchan...

  1. Fusion11 Conference Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a summary account of the conference Fusion11, held in Saint Malo, France, May 2-6, 2011. There were 77 talks by experts in the field. The author comments on a few of the physics topics discussed during the presentations. His comments concern: new facilities, fusion cross-sections (particularly the barrier penetration model, optical potentials, the channel coupling, the barrier distribution, fusion hindrance and transfer channels), rare isotopes, clusters and superheavy elements

  2. Moldova. Historic regional conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshin, V

    1995-05-01

    The Directorate of Maternal and Child Health and the Family Planning Association of Moldova organized a regional conference, which was held October 18-19, 1994, in Kishinev, Moldova, with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). The conference,"Problems of Family Planning in Eastern Europe," was attended by approximately 400 Moldovan delegates of governmental and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and by 25 delegates from Romania, Russia, Belarus, the Ukraine, and Georgia. The President of Moldova and the Ministry of Public Health of Moldova gave their approval. The main objectives of the conference were to inform the public about the recommendations of the ICPD, to analyze the status of women's reproductive health and family planning in Eastern Europe, and to find ways of implementing the ICPD Plan of Action. Major problems identified during the conference were: 1) the social and economic problems facing most families; 2) the high rate of morbidity and mortality; 3) the decrease in birth rate; 4) the increase in abortions; 5) the rising incidence of venereal disease; and 6) the absence of an effective family planning system. It was agreed that cooperation between governments and NGOs is essential in designing population programs for each country. The following goals were set: 1) to provide populations with sufficient contraceptives; 2) to actively promote family planning concepts through the mass media; 3) to train specialists and to open family planning offices and centers; 4) to introduce sex education in the curricula of Pedagogical Institutes; and 5) to create national and regional statistical and sociological databases on population issues. PMID:12222268

  3. International Conference Medical Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The second edition of the international conference Medical radiation : research and applications which took place in Marrakech (Morocco) from 7 to 9 April 2010, was designed to bring together researchers and physicians from different countries who dedicated their talents and time to this endeavour. The conference's program defined goals were is to identify the most reliable techniques among the several tested so far and to establish the most practical standardized methodologies, taking into account such recent technological development in radiation medical research. The scientific objectives of this conference are as follows : present the state of the art of the various topics of the congress, give a progress report on the impact of the interaction of the various scientific and technical disciplinary fields (Medicine, Biology, Mathematics, Physics,..) on the applications of radiations in medicine, promote the interdisciplinary efforts of research among researchers, present new technologies and research and development tasks prepared in the field of medical radiations, contribute to the emergence of new ideas of research and development of new collaborations

  4. Chicago particle accelerator conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally, emphasis at the Particle Accelerator Conference in Chicago in March was on work in the US, just as the newly instituted European Particle Accelerator Conference places emphasis on work in the 'old continent'. All will come together at the international conference in Japan in August. The proposed US Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) was highlighted in the opening talk at Chicago. Progress on this inchoate project to explore the TeV (1000 GeV) energy region by colliding 20 TeV proton beams was reported by the recently-appointed Director of the SSC Laboratory, Roy Schwitters. He reviewed the physics challenges and described progress and plans towards full authorization of construction.This year, the SSC conceptual design will be transformed into a 'site specific' report, now that the location at Waxahachie in Ellis County, Texas, has been selected. The Central Design Group, based in Berkeley for the past few years, will soon move to the Waxahachie region. The top management structure is taking shape and an International Advisory Committee is being formed

  5. Conference on Logical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Remmel, Jeffrey; Shore, Richard; Sweedler, Moss; Progress in Computer Science and Applied Logic

    1993-01-01

    The twenty-six papers in this volume reflect the wide and still expanding range of Anil Nerode's work. A conference on Logical Methods was held in honor of Nerode's sixtieth birthday (4 June 1992) at the Mathematical Sciences Institute, Cornell University, 1-3 June 1992. Some of the conference papers are here, but others are from students, co-workers and other colleagues. The intention of the conference was to look forward, and to see the directions currently being pursued, in the development of work by, or with, Nerode. Here is a brief summary of the contents of this book. We give a retrospective view of Nerode's work. A number of specific areas are readily discerned: recursive equivalence types, recursive algebra and model theory, the theory of Turing degrees and r.e. sets, polynomial-time computability and computer science. Nerode began with automata theory and has also taken a keen interest in the history of mathematics. All these areas are represented. The one area missing is Nerode's applied mathematica...

  6. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  7. SALT Science Conference 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, David; Schroeder, Anja

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has seen great changes in the last years following the beginning of full time science operations in 2011. The three first generation instruments, namely the SALTICAM imager, the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) and its multiple modes and finally in 2014, the new High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS), have commissioned it. The SALT community now eagerly anticipate the installation and commissioning of the near-infrared arm of RSS, likely to commence in 2016. The the third "Science with SALT" conference was held at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study from 1-5 June 2015. The goals of this conference were to: -Present and discuss recent results from SALT observations; -Anticipate scientific programs that will be carried out with new SALT instrumentation such as RSS-NIR; -Provide a scientific environment in which to foster inter-institutional and inter-facility collaborations between scientists at the different SALT partners; -Provide an opportunity for students and postdocs to become more engaged in SALT science and operations; -Encourage the scientific strategic planning that will be necessary to insure an important role for SALT in an era of large astronomical facilities in the southern hemisphere such as MeerKAT, the SKA, LSST, and ALMA; -Consider options for future instrumentation and technical development of SALT; and, -Present, discuss, and engage in the SALT Collateral Benefits program led by SAAO. Conference proceedings editors: David Buckley and Anja Schroeder

  8. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  9. Aspen Code Development Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,; Cherry, Robert S. [INL; Richard, Boardman D. [INL

    2013-10-03

    Wyoming has a wealth of primary energy resources in the forms of coal, natural gas, wind, uranium, and oil shale. Most of Wyoming?s coal and gas resources are exported from the state in unprocessed form rather than as refined higher value products. Wyoming?s leadership recognizes the opportunity to broaden the state?s economic base energy resources to make value-added products such as synthetic vehicle fuels and commodity chemicals. Producing these higher value products in an environmentally responsible manner can benefit from the use of clean energy technologies including Wyoming?s abundant wind energy and nuclear energy such as new generation small modular reactors including the high temperature gas-cooled reactors.

  10. Vancouver Cyclotron Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although no longer on the high energy frontier, the cyclotron field is still a major scientific growth area. Its progress is highlighted at the international conference on cyclotron design, development and utilization held at intervals of about three years, under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). Vancouver, surrounded by mountains, water and some cyclotrons, provided a pleasant setting for the 13th Conference, held last summer. With over 200 cyclotrons in operation around the world, the attendance, 241 delegates and 26 industrial exhibitors, was a near record, reflecting the flourishing state of the field. The early sessions covered the initial operation of new or upgraded cyclotron facilities. Major facilities completed since the previous Conference in Berlin in May 1989 included the 400 MeV ring cyclotron at Osaka, the U400M cyclotron at Dubna which will be coupled to the U400 to give 20 MeV nucléon uranium beams, the 130 MeV cyclotron at Jyvaskyla (in Finland, the furthest north!), the 110 MeV JAERI machine in Japan, and the 65 MeV proton therapy cyclotron in Nice. Among the facility upgrades were the KFA cyclotron at Julich which will inject the 2.5 GeV storage ring COSY, and the addition of an FM mode to the K=200 CW mode at Uppsala to give protons up to 180 MeV. The impressive current of 1.5 mA at 72 MeV obtained from the PSI Injector II will soon be injected into the 590 MeV ring

  11. Computational Intelligence : International Joint Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Dourado, António; Rosa, Agostinho; Filipe, Joaquim; Kacprzyk, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    The present book includes a set of selected extended papers from the fifth International Joint Conference on Computational Intelligence (IJCCI 2013), held in Vilamoura, Algarve, Portugal, from 20 to 22 September 2013. The conference was composed by three co-located conferences:  The International Conference on Evolutionary Computation Theory and Applications (ECTA), the International Conference on Fuzzy Computation Theory and Applications (FCTA), and the International Conference on Neural Computation Theory and Applications (NCTA). Recent progresses in scientific developments and applications in these three areas are reported in this book. IJCCI received 111 submissions, from 30 countries, in all continents. After a double blind paper review performed by the Program Committee, only 24 submissions were accepted as full papers and thus selected for oral presentation, leading to a full paper acceptance ratio of 22%. Additional papers were accepted as short papers and posters. A further selection was made after ...

  12. Joint US/German Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gulledge, Thomas; Jones, Albert

    1993-01-01

    This proceedings volume contains selected and refereed contributions that were presented at the conference on "Recent Developments and New Perspectives of Operations Research in the Area of Production Planning and Control" in Hagen/Germany, 25. - 26. June 1992. This conference was organized with the cooperation of the FernuniversiHit Hagen and was jointly hosted by the "Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Operations Research (DGOR)" and the "Manufacturing Special Interest Group of the Operations Research Society of America (ORSA-SIGMA)". For the organization of the conference we received generous financial support from the sponsors listed at the end of this volume. We wish to express our appreciation to all supporters for their contributions. This conference was the successor of the JOInt ORSA/DGOR-conference in Gaithersburg/Maryland, USA, on the 30. and 31. July 1991. Both OR-societies committed themselves in 1989 to host joint conferences on special topics of interest from the field of operations research. This goal ...

  13. Beauty97 Conference Summary

    OpenAIRE

    Erhan, Samim

    1998-01-01

    CP-violation is one of the least understood phenomena in our field. There are major experimental programs in all high energy laboratories around the world which will hopefully remedy this within the next decade. The study of CP-violating effects in B meson decays will allow stringent tests of the Standard Model to be made and may point the way to New Physics. The Beauty97 conference provided a forum for these experiments to discuss their physics potential and experimental challenges relating ...

  14. Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The Executive Summary of this Conference is published as NASA CP-3297.

  15. Brighton Conference (Further report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first high energy proton-antiproton collisions had recently been observed in the CERN SPS collider. This year, at the International Europhysics Conference in Brighton (UK), it was reported on how experiments at the CERN collider had discovered the W and Z0 bosons which mediate the weak force. The spectacular progress made during this relatively short time underlines the imagination and foresight of those who proposed the project and pushed it through, and pays tribute to the skill and ingenuity of the machine specialists and physicists who implemented it and brought it to fruition

  16. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton (bar p) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, bar NN scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, bar N annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy bar p's, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with bar p (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new bar p facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime (≥ 2 GeV/c)

  17. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

  18. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

  19. Conference President's address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Conference is to promote the development of a coherent international policy on the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation and to foster information exchange on this subject. The organizers, the IAEA in cooperation with United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the European Commission (EC) and the International Union of Radioecology (IUR), as well as the hosts of the conference, the Government of Sweden through the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI), are pleased that so nearly 300 delegates from 53 countries have been nominated by their governments to attend this meeting. Another objective is to discuss the implications of the ICRP's proposal for a framework to assess radiation effects in the environment. A framework for radiological protection of the environment must be practical and simple, as should be international standards for discharges into the environment that take account of such an approach. This is a task for the IAEA, in cooperation with other international organizations. This conference therefore provides an opportunity for you to influence the development of both ICRP and IAEA policy in this area. The background session today will give information on the current situation as well as social and political drivers for change. A number of organizations will provide an insight to the present status of international policies on the radiological protection related to releases to the environment. During the course of the conference, there will be five topical sessions that will cover selected subjects related to protection of the environment, such as stakeholders' views, case studies, approaches for non-radioactive pollutants, the state of current scientific knowledge and, finally, the implications of ICRP proposals for international safety standards. Keynote speakers will address key issues within each topical session, and a rapporteur will summarize the

  20. Dynamical Systems Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gils, S; Hoveijn, I; Takens, F; Nonlinear Dynamical Systems and Chaos

    1996-01-01

    Symmetries in dynamical systems, "KAM theory and other perturbation theories", "Infinite dimensional systems", "Time series analysis" and "Numerical continuation and bifurcation analysis" were the main topics of the December 1995 Dynamical Systems Conference held in Groningen in honour of Johann Bernoulli. They now form the core of this work which seeks to present the state of the art in various branches of the theory of dynamical systems. A number of articles have a survey character whereas others deal with recent results in current research. It contains interesting material for all members of the dynamical systems community, ranging from geometric and analytic aspects from a mathematical point of view to applications in various sciences.

  1. (Update) HIV Conference to Be Held on February 25 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program (HIV DRP), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), will hold a conference on “Host Factors and Cofactors in HIV Infection” at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) campus in Frederick, Md., on Feb. 25, from 1:00 to 5:35 p.m.

  2. VIENNA INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES - FEBRUARY 2012

    OpenAIRE

    VIPCA

    2012-01-01

    VIPCA, the Vienna International Plant Conference Association, a non-commercial and non-profit organization consisting of academy and industry scientists from across the world, founded to support the international plant and agricultural science community by initiating several major conferences every year in Vienna. The Vienna International Plant Conference Association provides, on an international level, an opportunity for researchers to explore ideas for future innovations and collaborations....

  3. Conference Organisers' Perceptions of Helsinki

    OpenAIRE

    Bühler, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this Bachelor’s thesis is to identify whether conference organisers present Helsinki as a tourist destination or as a knowledge hub in their own field of expertise. The thesis was commissioned by the Helsinki Convention & Events Bureau. The research focuses on conferences that took place between 2013 and 2015. The theoretical framework explains destination images and their relation to business tourism. Furthermore, it introduces the essential definitions of conference and c...

  4. VIENNA INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES - FEBRUARY 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIPCA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available VIPCA, the Vienna International Plant Conference Association, a non-commercial and non-profit organization consisting of academy and industry scientists from across the world, founded to support the international plant and agricultural science community by initiating several major conferences every year in Vienna. The Vienna International Plant Conference Association provides, on an international level, an opportunity for researchers to explore ideas for future innovations and collaborations. The VIPCA is organizing 4 international conferences in 2012. Meetings will be held in Vienna, the capital of Austria. Topics will cover the hottest issues in current plant science. For more details please download the full text file.

  5. Asia. Vancouver Conference Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T

    1997-02-01

    The 1997 International AIDS Conference in Vancouver gave relatively little attention to the rapid spread of HIV/AIDS in most of the developing world. The popular press reported mainly prevention success stories from Thailand and Uganda, and the successes realized in reducing viral loads with combination drug therapies using protease inhibitors. Societal efforts in Thailand have dramatically reduced the rate of new infections, slowing the growth of the epidemic substantially. Few heard from the conference about how the HIV/AIDS epidemic is spreading rapidly and largely unchecked in much of the world, especially in Asia. Thailand, India, Myanmar, and Cambodia are the most heavily affected countries. Thailand and India, as well as Japan, were therefore heavily represented in the scientific program, while most other countries presented far fewer reports. With the exception of one report on a training course in Fiji, the Pacific Island nations were absent from the program. Vietnam, Malaysia, China, and Hong Kong have rapidly-evolving situations, while Japan, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Nepal, Singapore, Indonesia, Taiwan, Laos, South Korea, Mongolia, and Pakistan should be watched closely. The Asian epidemics are constantly evolving over time. PMID:9155914

  6. History of NAMES Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Lev

    2013-03-01

    -Russian International Centre was demonstrated. By the high standards of the reports presented, as well as by its overall organization, the second Seminar met the standards of an international conference. Reviews of state-of-the-art developments in materials science were given by leading scientists from Moscow and from the Lorraine region. The three days of the seminar were structured into four main themes: Functional Materials Coatings, Films and Surface Engineering Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies The Environment and three Round Table discussions: Defining practical means of carrying out Franco-Russian collaborations in technology transfer and innovation Materials science ARCUS: Lorraine-Russian collaboration in materials science and the environment 32 oral and 25 poster presentations within four sections were given by a total of 110 participants. NAMES 2007, the 3rd Franco-Russian Seminar on New Achievements in Materials and Environmental Sciences, took place in Metz, France on 7-9 November 2007. The conference highlights fundamentals and development of the five main themes connected to the Lorraine-Russia ARCUS project with possible extension to other topics. The five main subjects included in the ARCUS project are: Bulk-surface-interface material sciences Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies Environment and natural resources Plasma physics—ITER project Vibrational dynamics The first, second and third NAMES conferences were financially supported by the following organizations: Ambassade de France à Moscou Communauté Urbaine du Grand Nancy Région Lorraine Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine Université de Metz Université Henry Poincaré CNRS ANVAR Federal Agency on Science and Innovations of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation Moscow Committee on Science and Technologies Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys (Technological University) The 4th conference is supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of

  7. Calendar of Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-01

    8 - 18 August 1996 International Summer School on Plasma Physics and Technology La Jolla, CA, USA Contact: Mr V Stefan, Institute for Advanced Physics Studies, PO Box 2964, La Jolla, CA 92038, USA. Tel +1-619-456-5737. 26 - 30 August 1996 Joint Varenna - Lausanne International Workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 2 - 5 September 1996 EU - US Workshop on Transport in Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Further information: G Gorini, ISPP, 16 Via Celoria, I-20133 Milano, Italy. Tel +39-2-2392637, Fax +39-2-2392205, E-mail ggorini@mi.infn.it. Administrative contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 9 - 13 September 1996 International Conference on Plasma Physics Nagoya, Japan Contact: Conference Secretariat, c/o Prof. Hiromu Momota, National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01, Japan. Tel +81-52-789-4260, Fax +81-52-789-1037, E-mail icpp96@nifs.ac.jp. Abstract deadline: 31 March 1996. 16 - 20 September 1996 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology Lisbon, Portugal Contact: Professor Carlos Varandas, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, 1096 Lisboa Codex, Portugal. Fax +351-1-8417819, E-mail cvarandas@cfn.ist.utl.pt. General information will be available via WWW with URL http://www.cfn.ist.utl.pt. 25 - 29 September 1996 Summer University of Plasma Physics Garching, Germany Contact: Ms Ch Stahlberg, Max-Planck-Institut für PlasmaPhysik, Boltzmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany. Tel +49-89-3299-2232, Fax +49-89-3299-1001. 11 - 15 November 1996 38th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics, APS Denver, CO, USA Contact: Dr Richard Hazeltine, University of Texas, Institute for Fusion Studies, RLM 11.314, Austin, TX

  8. 20. AINSE plasma science and technology conference. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 20th AINSE plasma science and technology conference was held at Flinders University of South Australia on 13-14 February 1995. Topics under discussion included plasma physics studies, current status of rotamak devices, plasma processing and material studies. The handbook contains the conference program, 54 abstracts and a list of participants

  9. 20. AINSE plasma science and technology conference. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The 20th AINSE plasma science and technology conference was held at Flinders University of South Australia on 13-14 February 1995. Topics under discussion included plasma physics studies, current status of rotamak devices, plasma processing and material studies. The handbook contains the conference program, 54 abstracts and a list of participants.

  10. CONFERENCE REPORT: Code4Lib 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Ko

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Conference reports from the 4th Code4Lib conference, held in Providence, RI from February 23 to 26, 2009. The Code4Lib conference is a collective volunteer effort of the informal Code4Lib community of library technologists. Included are four brief reports on the conference from the recipients of conference scholarships.

  11. Conference Reports: Code4Lib 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohyun Kim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Conference reports from the 6th Code4Lib Conference, held in Bloomington, IN, from February 7 to 10, 2011. The Code4Lib conference is a collective volunteer effort of the Code4Lib community of library technologists. Included are two brief reports on the conference from some recipients of conference scholarships.

  12. CONFERENCE REPORT: Code4Lib 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birong Ho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Conference reports from the 5th Code4Lib Conference, held in Asheville, NC, from February 22 to 25, 2010. The Code4Lib conference is a collective volunteer effort of the Code4Lib community of library technologists. Included are three brief reports on the conference from the recipients of conference scholarships.

  13. Conference Reports: Code4Lib 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Bohyun Kim; Elias Tzoc

    2011-01-01

    Conference reports from the 6th Code4Lib Conference, held in Bloomington, IN, from February 7 to 10, 2011. The Code4Lib conference is a collective volunteer effort of the Code4Lib community of library technologists. Included are two brief reports on the conference from some recipients of conference scholarships.

  14. CONFERENCE REPORT: Code4Lib 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Birong Ho; Banurekha Lakshminarayanan; Vanessa Meireles

    2010-01-01

    Conference reports from the 5th Code4Lib Conference, held in Asheville, NC, from February 22 to 25, 2010. The Code4Lib conference is a collective volunteer effort of the Code4Lib community of library technologists. Included are three brief reports on the conference from the recipients of conference scholarships.

  15. Systems analysis of a closed loop ECLSS using the ASPEN simulation tool. Thermodynamic efficiency analysis of ECLSS components. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sharmista

    1993-01-01

    Our first goal in this project was to perform a systems analysis of a closed loop Environmental Control Life Support System (ECLSS). This pertains to the development of a model of an existing real system from which to assess the state or performance of the existing system. Systems analysis is applied to conceptual models obtained from a system design effort. For our modelling purposes we used a simulator tool called ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineering). Our second goal was to evaluate the thermodynamic efficiency of the different components comprising an ECLSS. Use is made of the second law of thermodynamics to determine the amount of irreversibility of energy loss of each component. This will aid design scientists in selecting the components generating the least entropy, as our penultimate goal is to keep the entropy generation of the whole system at a minimum.

  16. Initial soil respiration response to biomass harvesting and green-tree retention in aspen-dominated forests of the Great Lakes region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Valerie J.; Bradford, John B.; Slesak, Robert A.; D'Amato, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary forest management practices are increasingly designed to optimize novel objectives, such as maximizing biomass feedstocks and/or maintaining ecological legacies, but many uncertainties exist regarding how these practices influence forest carbon (C) cycling. We examined the responses of soil respiration (Rs) to biomass harvesting and green-tree retention in an effort to empirically assess their impacts on C cycling. We measured Rs and soil microclimatic variables over four growing seasons following implementation of these management practices using a fully replicated, operational-scale experiment in aspen-dominated forests in northern Minnesota. Treatments included three levels of biomass removal within harvested areas: whole-tree harvest (no slash deliberately retained), 20% slash retained, and stem-only harvest (all slash retained), and two levels of green-tree retention: 0.1 ha aggregate or none. The relative amount of biomass removed had a negligible effect on Rs in harvested areas, but treatment effects were probably obscured by heterogeneous slash configurations and rapid post-harvest regeneration of aspen in all of the treatments. Discrete measurements of Rs and soil temperature within green-tree aggregates were not discernible from surrounding harvested areas or unharvested control stands until the fourth year following harvest, when Rs was higher in unharvested controls than in aggregates and harvested stands. Growing season estimates of Rs showed that unharvested control stands had higher Rs than both harvested stands and aggregates in the first and third years following harvest. Our results suggest that retention of larger forest aggregates may be necessary to maintain ecosystem-level responses similar to those in unharvested stands. Moreover, they highlight the innate complexity of operational-scale research and suggest that the initial impacts of biomass harvest on Rs may be indiscernible from traditional harvest in systems where incidental

  17. Metabolism and cancer mix in Madrid

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Reuben J.

    2010-01-01

    The CNIO Cancer Conference ‘The Energy of Cancer' was a bridge between metabolic and cancer research, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of the field. The outlines of the main pathways involved in coordinating nutrient uptake and metabolism with cell growth have begun to emerge.

  18. Solar energy conference, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-24

    The conference attendance, publicity and press coverage, brochure mailing, presentations, displays, exhibitors, management seminar checklist, and seminar evaluation by attendees are presented. Also included are the proposal for funding of the conference, the list of attendees, keynote speeches, agenda, and feedback questionnaire. (MHR)

  19. Organization and planning of conferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author uses as an example of conference planning The First International Topical Conference on Electron Beam Research and Technology which was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 3-6, 1975. Guidelines are given through all phases of planning up to and during the meeting

  20. SLA at 100: Conference Preview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstein, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    When School Library Association (SLA) convenes its annual conference in Washington, DC, June 14-17, 2009, the association will be celebrating its 100th birthday. This occasion allows for grand gestures--the SLA Salutes! Awards and Leadership Reception will be held in the Library of Congress's Great Hall. The conference also draws upon Washington…

  1. Obesity, Inflammation, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tuo; Lyon, Christopher J; Bergin, Stephen; Caligiuri, Michael A; Hsueh, Willa A

    2016-05-23

    Obesity, a worldwide epidemic, confers increased risk for multiple serious conditions, including cancer, and is increasingly recognized as a growing cause of preventable cancer risk. Chronic inflammation, a well-known mediator of cancer, is a central characteristic of obesity, leading to many of its complications, and obesity-induced inflammation confers additional cancer risk beyond obesity itself. Multiple mechanisms facilitate this strong association between cancer and obesity. Adipose tissue is an important endocrine organ, secreting several hormones, including leptin and adiponectin, and chemokines that can regulate tumor behavior, inflammation, and the tumor microenvironment. Excessive adipose expansion during obesity causes adipose dysfunction and inflammation to increase systemic levels of proinflammatory factors. Cells from adipose tissue, such as cancer-associated adipocytes and adipose-derived stem cells, enter the cancer microenvironment to enhance protumoral effects. Dysregulated metabolism that stems from obesity, including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia, can further impact tumor growth and development. This review describes how adipose tissue becomes inflamed in obesity, summarizes ways these mechanisms impact cancer development, and discusses their role in four adipose-associated cancers that demonstrate elevated incidence or mortality in obesity. PMID:27193454

  2. The Haltenbanken Conference; Haltenbankenkonferansen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The publication includes a collection of papers from a conference on the development of Haltenbanken on the Norwegian continental shelf. Topics are as follow: Future perspectives for the Norwegian oil and gas activity; Haltenbanken - Saga`s new basic area; The Tyrihans field; The Njord field, from development to operation in 1997. The Ormen Lange field, feasibility of new technical solutions on great depths of water; The Norne field, experience from the commissioning of a production vessel; construction of hulls in Norway, self-reliance for the Norwegian industry; Experience of contractual concepts of maintenance and modification in Statoil; the Heidrun field, experience from the first working year and further challenges; Tjeldbergodden, small-scale utilization of gas; development of Tjeldbergodden as an industrial location. None of the papers are prepared. 38 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. ICPAQGP 2001: Conference summary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reinhard Stock

    2003-05-01

    I review recent progress in ultrarelativistic nucleus–nucleus collisions, and the connection of this field to modern QCD theory of deconfinement and/or chiral symmetry restoration. The talks at this Conference have shown a convergence of data and theory as far as the CERN SPS investigations at $\\sqrt{s}=17$ GeV are concerned; the parton–hadron phase boundary seems now located at = 170 ± 10 MeV. New data from RHIC and direct photon production results from CERN have been shown that point out the field’s future direction: analysis of partonic matter at > 200 MeV. Astrophysics analysis was shown to be linked crucially to further theoretical progress with non-perturbative QCD.

  4. International Logistics Science Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Hompel, Michael; Meier, J

    2014-01-01

    The importance of logistics in all its variations is still increasing. New technologies emerge, new planning methods and algorithms are developed, only to face a market with a growing complexity and the need of weighting monetary costs against ecological impact. Mastering these challenges requires a scientific viewpoint on logistics, but always with applications in mind. This volume presents up-to-date logistics research in all its diversity and interconnectedness. It grew out of the “International Logistics Science Conference” (ILSC) held in Dortmund in September 2013, bringing together leading scientists and young academics from nine different countries. The conference was jointly organized by the “Efficiency Cluster Logistics” and the “Fraunhofer Institute for Material Flow and Logistics”. The Program Committee used a double blind review process to choose the 12 strongest contributions, which were then grouped in four areas: - Sustainability logistics, including electric mobility, smart inform...

  5. Conference on Multibody Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Multibody Dynamics : Computational Methods and Applications

    2014-01-01

    By having its origin in analytical and continuum mechanics, as well as in computer science and applied mathematics, multibody dynamics provides a basis for analysis and virtual prototyping of innovative applications in many fields of contemporary engineering. With the utilization of computational models and algorithms that classically belonged to different fields of applied science, multibody dynamics delivers reliable simulation platforms for diverse highly-developed industrial products such as vehicle and railway systems, aeronautical and space vehicles, robotic manipulators, smart structures, biomechanical applications and nano-technologies. The chapters of this volume are based on the revised and extended versions of the selected scientific papers from amongst 255 original contributions that have been accepted to be presented within the program of the distinguished international ECCOMAS conference. It reflects state-of-the-art in the advances of multibody dynamics, providing excellent insight in the recen...

  6. International Conference UMC 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Hübner, Wolfgang; Rasing, Theo; Chantrell, Roy

    2015-01-01

    This volume on Ultrafast Magnetism is a collection of articles presented at the international “Ultrafast Magnetization Conference” held at the Congress Center in Strasbourg, France, from October 28th to November 1st, 2013. This first conference, which is intended to be held every two years, received a wonderful attendance and gathered scientists from 27 countries in the field of Femtomagnetism, encompassing many theoretical and experimental research subjects related to the spins dynamics in bulk or nanostructured materials. The participants appreciated this unique opportunity for discussing new ideas and debating on various physical interpretations of the reported phenomena. The format of a single session with many oral contributions as well as extensive time for poster presentations allowed researchers to have a detailed overview of the field. Importantly, one could sense that, in addition to studying fundamental magnetic phenomena, ultrafast magnetism has entered in a phase where applied physics and eng...

  7. Istanbul Bridge Conference 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Gülkan, Polat; Mahmoud, Khaled

    2016-01-01

      The book includes peer-reviewed contributions selected from presentations given at the Istanbul Bridge Conference 2014, held from August 11 – 13 in Istanbul, Turkey. It reports on the current challenges in bridge engineering faced by professionals around the globe, giving a special emphasis to recently developed techniques, innovations and opportunities. The book covers key topics in the field, including modeling and analysis methods; construction and erection techniques; design for extreme events and condition assessment and structural health monitoring. There is a balanced presentation of theory, research and practice. This book, which provides the readers with a comprehensive and timely reference guide on current practices in bridge engineering, is intended for professionals, academic researchers and students alike.

  8. Nostradamus conference 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guanrong; Rössler, Otto; Snasel, Vaclav; Abraham, Ajith; Nostradamus 2013: Prediction, Modeling and Analysis of Complex Systems

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of behavior of the dynamical systems, analysis and modeling of its structure is vitally important problem in engineering, economy and science today. Examples of such systems can be seen in the world around us and of course in almost every scientific discipline including such “exotic” domains like the earth’s atmosphere, turbulent fluids, economies (exchange rate and stock markets), population growth, physics (control of plasma), information flow in social networks and its dynamics, chemistry and complex networks. To understand such dynamics and to use it in research or industrial applications, it is important to create its models. For this purpose there is rich spectra of methods, from classical like ARMA models or Box Jenkins method to such modern ones like evolutionary computation, neural networks, fuzzy logic, fractal geometry, deterministic chaos and more. This proceeding book is a collection of the accepted papers to conference Nostradamus that has been held in Ostrava, Czech Republic. P...

  9. 11th radiochemical conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference met in four sesions which discussed: Separation methods, Radioanalytical methods, Labelled compounds and Miscellaneous. The first session discussed extraction methods, ion exchange and chromatographic separation of radioisotopes. The second session heard papers on the application of these methods, e.g., in geochemistry, on the use of radioactive tracers in radiochemical analysis and the use of activation analysis in the determination of trace elements. The third session heard papers on the preparation of labelled organic compounds with isotopes 3H, 14C, radioiodine and 32P, on the preparation of RIA kits and on the chemistry and radiopharmacology of technetium compounds. The other contributions which could not be heard in any of the three sessions discussed, e.g., the preparation of elements on the cyclotron and microtron, the production of a new 99mTc-generator, the participation of the IAEA in processing low- and medium-level radioactive wastes, etc. (E.S.)

  10. The Geometry Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Bárány, Imre; Vilcu, Costin

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents easy-to-understand yet surprising properties obtained using topological, geometric and graph theoretic tools in the areas covered by the Geometry Conference that took place in Mulhouse, France from September 7–11, 2014 in honour of Tudor Zamfirescu on the occasion of his 70th anniversary. The contributions address subjects in convexity and discrete geometry, in distance geometry or with geometrical flavor in combinatorics, graph theory or non-linear analysis. Written by top experts, these papers highlight the close connections between these fields, as well as ties to other domains of geometry and their reciprocal influence. They offer an overview on recent developments in geometry and its border with discrete mathematics, and provide answers to several open questions. The volume addresses a large audience in mathematics, including researchers and graduate students interested in geometry and geometrical problems.

  11. Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    The promotion of interaction among investigators of all oceanographic disciplines studying the eastern Pacific Ocean was the goal of the 1990 Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference (EPOC), held October 17-19 on the snow-covered slopes of Mt. Hood, Oreg. Thirty oceanographers representing all disciplines attended.Dick Barber, Duke University Marine Lab, Beaufort, N.C., chaired a session on the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, emphasizing issues related to biological activity. Steve Ramp of the Naval Postgraduate School in Montery, Calif., chaired a session on recent results from northern and central California experiments. On October 19, following an early morning earthquake, a business meeting and discussions regarding a collaboration in future experiments were held.

  12. COMPDYN 2011 Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Fragiadakis, Michalis; Plevris, Vagelis; Computational Methods in Earthquake Engineering

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an insight on advanced methods and concepts for the design and analysis of structures against earthquake loading. This second volume is a collection of 28 chapters written by leading experts in the field of structural analysis and earthquake engineering. Emphasis is given on current state-of-the-art methods and concepts in computing methods and their application in engineering practice. The book content is suitable for both practicing engineers and academics, covering a wide variety of topics in an effort to assist the timely dissemination of research findings for the mitigation of seismic risk. Due to the devastating socioeconomic consequences of seismic events, the topic is of great scientific interest and is expected to be of valuable help to scientists and engineers. The chapters of this volume are extended versions of selected papers presented at the COMPDYN 2011 conference, held in the island of Corfu, Greece, under the auspices of the European Community on Computational Methods in Ap...

  13. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  14. University to host student leadership conference

    OpenAIRE

    Broughton, Sandra S.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately one hundred delegates from 11 of the 12 Atlantic Coast Conference colleges and universities will gather on the Virginia Tech campus Feb. 20 through 22 for the Atlantic Coast Conference International Academic Collaborative (ACCIAC) Student Leadership Conference 2009.

  15. An educational intervention to improve hospital tumor conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, J G; Radecki, S E; Gates, J D; Abrahamson, S

    1995-01-01

    Hospital tumor conferences exist to improve patient care through the application of a multidisciplinary approach to cancer management decisions and to provide continuing medical education for physicians and other health professionals who participate in cancer care. Based on educational needs identified by means of direct observation of conference sessions, this study implemented an experimental intervention designed to increase the educational benefits associated with participation in these conferences. Participating hospitals were randomly assigned either to a study group that received an "educational case" intervention (emphasizing progressive disclosure of cases, an active leadership style, and use of educational principles such as stating objectives at the beginning of sessions) or to a control group receiving no intervention. Each of the nine experimental and nine control group hospitals had multiple tumor sessions and case presentations with sessions observed and coded before and after intervention. Results showed significant differences in the specific educational procedures emphasized in the educational case intervention, such as use of the progressive disclosure method of presentation, and quality of session leadership. No difference, however, was found in other factors such as participation rates by major categories of specialists. The study has thus shown that educational interventions of this type can have a significant impact on the clinical and educational effectiveness of ongoing hospital conferences. PMID:7669537

  16. ASPEN PLUS在氯碱工程设计中的应用——氯氢处理流程模拟开发%Application of ASPEN PLUS in chlorine- alkali engineering design —— Development of imitiative process of chlorine and hydrogen treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨萍; 邓敏

    2001-01-01

    The binary interaction parameters are derived from gas- liquid equilibrium regression by using the ASPEN PLUS 10. O. Main point in this paper is the introduction of the calculation of mass balance and heat balance in chlorine and hydrogen treatment process in ion - exchange membrane caustic soda production process with the above imitiative flow path software. The calcalation results are compared with actual data from plants,and agreeable results are obtained.%ASPEN PLUS 10.0版中有较为全面的气液平衡回归出来的二元交互作用参数,文中主要介绍了用该流程模拟软件对离子膜烧碱氯氢处理工序进行物料平衡和热量平衡的计算,并与工厂实际数据进行比较,获得满意的结果。

  17. Computational Biology Support: RECOMB Conference Series (Conference Support)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Waterman

    2006-06-15

    This funding was support for student and postdoctoral attendance at the Annual Recomb Conference from 2001 to 2005. The RECOMB Conference series was founded in 1997 to provide a scientific forum for theoretical advances in computational biology and their applications in molecular biology and medicine. The conference series aims at attracting research contributions in all areas of computational molecular biology. Typical, but not exclusive, the topics of interest are: Genomics, Molecular sequence analysis, Recognition of genes and regulatory elements, Molecular evolution, Protein structure, Structural genomics, Gene Expression, Gene Networks, Drug Design, Combinatorial libraries, Computational proteomics, and Structural and functional genomics. The origins of the conference came from the mathematical and computational side of the field, and there remains to be a certain focus on computational advances. However, the effective use of computational techniques to biological innovation is also an important aspect of the conference. The conference had a growing number of attendees, topping 300 in recent years and often exceeding 500. The conference program includes between 30 and 40 contributed papers, that are selected by a international program committee with around 30 experts during a rigorous review process rivaling the editorial procedure for top-rate scientific journals. In previous years papers selection has been made from up to 130--200 submissions from well over a dozen countries. 10-page extended abstracts of the contributed papers are collected in a volume published by ACM Press and Springer, and are available at the conference. Full versions of a selection of the papers are published annually in a special issue of the Journal of Computational Biology devoted to the RECOMB Conference. A further point in the program is a lively poster session. From 120-300 posters have been presented each year at RECOMB 2000. One of the highlights of each RECOMB conference is a

  18. ISMB Conference Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresa, Gaasterand [UCSD; Martin, Vingron

    2011-07-01

    This special issue comprises the papers accepted for presentation at the 19th Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology, joint with the 10th European Conference on Computational Biology, an official conference of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB; http://www.iscb.org). ISMB/ECCB 2011 (http://www.iscb.org/ismb2011/) will take place in Vienna, Austria, from July 17 through July 19, 2011; preceded during July 14–16 by eight 1- or 2- day Special Interest Group (SIG) meetings, three satellite meetings and nine half-day tutorials; and followed by two additional satellite meetings. The 48 papers in this volume were selected from 258 submitted papers. Submitted papers were assigned to 13 areas. Area Chairs led each topic area by selecting their area's program committee and overseeing the reviewing process. Many Area Chairs were new compared to 2010, and two completely new areas were added in 2011, ‘Data Visualization’ and ‘Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics’. Six papers for which Area Chairs were in conflict were reviewed under a ‘Conflicts Management’ section headed by the Proceedings Chairs; one such paper was accepted in ‘Bioimaging’. Areas, co-chairs and acceptance information are listed in Table 1. Compared to prior years, five mature topic areas had steady submissions, ‘Evolution and Comparative Genomics’, ‘Gene Regulation and Transcriptomics’, ‘Protein Structure and Function’, ‘Sequence Analysis’, ‘Text Mining’. Two areas newer to ISMB were underrepresented this year, ‘Bioimaging’ and ‘Disease Models and Epidemiology’. One area doubled, ‘Applied Bioinformatics’, renamed from last year's ‘Other Bioinformatics Applications’; and one tripled, ‘Protein Interactions and Molecular Networks’. Across the areas, 326 members of the bioinformatics community provided reviews. Most papers received three reviews and several received four or more. There was

  19. Mechanisms of Therapeutic Resistance in Cancer (Stem) Cells with Emphasis on Thyroid Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Natarajan, Suchitra; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Medapati, Manoj; PATHAK, ALOK; Ghavami, Saeid; Klonisch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The two main reasons for death of cancer patients, tumor recurrence and metastasis, are multi-stage cellular processes that involve increased cell plasticity and coincide with elevated resistance to anti-cancer treatments. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key contributor to metastasis in many cancer types, including thyroid cancer and is known to confer stem cell-like properties onto cancer cells. This review provides an overview of molecular mechanisms and factors known to con...

  20. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  1. PREFACE: The Irago Conference 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Adarsh; Okada, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    The Irago Conference 2012 - 360 degree outlook on critical scientific and technological challenges for a sustainable society Organized by the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology, the Irago Conference, held recently (15-16 November) in Aichi, Japan, aimed to enhance mutual understanding between scientists, engineers and policymakers. Over 180 participants tackled topics ranging from energy and natural resources to public health and disaster prevention. The 360-degree outlook of the conference impressed speakers and guests. ''This conference has been extremely informative,'' noted Robert Gellar from the University of Tokyo. ''A unique conference with experts from a range of backgrounds,'' agreed Uracha Ruktanonchai from the National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC) in Thailand. Similarly, G P Li, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California Irvine commented that he had been ''able to think the unthinkable'' as a range of topics came together. The conference was streamed live on Ustream to ensure that researchers from across the world could benefit from thought-provoking presentations examining global issues such as energy, disaster mitigation and nanotechnology. ''This was wonderful,'' said Oussama Khatib from Stanford University, ''A good recipe of speakers from such a range of backgrounds.'' Manuscripts submitted to the organizers were peer-reviewed, and the papers in this proceedings were accepted for Journal of Physics: Conference Series. In addition to the formal speaker programme, graduate-student sessions provided a platform for graduate students to describe their latest findings as oral presentations. A series of excursions to relevant locations, such as the Tahara megasolar region under construction and a local car-manufacturing factory, gave participants the opportunity to further consider practical applications of their research in industry

  2. 13th AINSE radiation biology conference: conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The forty one papers presented at this conference covered the areas of radiation induced lesions, apoptosis, genetics and radiobiological consequences of low level radiation exposure, clinical applications of radiation, mammalian cells radiosensitivity and radiation-activated proteins

  3. AINSE conference on radiation biology and chemistry. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference handbook contains 60 oral and poster presentations dealing with recent advances in radiation chemistry applied to biological studies, radiopharmaceuticals, radiosensitizers as well as to solid state chemical physics

  4. AINSE conference on radiation biology and chemistry. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The conference handbook contains 60 oral and poster presentations dealing with recent advances in radiation chemistry applied to biological studies, radiopharmaceuticals, radiosensitizers as well as to solid state chemical physics.

  5. International Conference on Cosmic Rays

    CERN Multimedia

    W.O. LOCK

    1964-01-01

    Towards the end of last year the 8th International conference on cosmic rays, held under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (I.U.P.A.P.) and the Department of Atomic Energy of the Government of India, was held at Jaipur, India. Among the participants was W.O. Lock, head of CERN's Emulsion Group, who gave an invited talk on recent work in the field of what is normally known as high-energy physics — though in the context of this conference such energies seem quite low. In this article, Dr. Lock gives a general review of the conference and of the subjects discussed.

  6. Conference on High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Conference on High Energy Physics (HEP 2016) will be held from August 24 to 26, 2016 in Xi'an, China. This Conference will cover issues on High Energy Physics. It dedicates to creating a stage for exchanging the latest research results and sharing the advanced research methods. HEP 2016 will be an important platform for inspiring international and interdisciplinary exchange at the forefront of High Energy Physics. The Conference will bring together researchers, engineers, technicians and academicians from all over the world, and we cordially invite you to take this opportunity to join us for academic exchange and visit the ancient city of Xi’an.

  7. The 9. European nuclear conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue gathers the abstracts of the papers presented at the ninth European nuclear conference (ENC-2005). The main part of the conference is split into 20 sessions. These sessions cover all technical aspects of nuclear power, from reactor design to waste management, without forgetting experimental and research reactors, reactor dismantling, economy, resources, safety, radioprotection and education issues. Perspectives of a nuclear renaissance are clearly visible in the world. This renaissance, mainly due to political, economical, societal and ecological factors, is fuelled by scientific and technical progress. This conference was the opportunity to present together these aspects of nuclear power and to analyze their mutual interactions

  8. International Conference on Algebraic Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Ralph; Miller, Haynes; Ravenel, Douglas

    1989-01-01

    These are proceedings of an International Conference on Algebraic Topology, held 28 July through 1 August, 1986, at Arcata, California. The conference served in part to mark the 25th anniversary of the journal Topology and 60th birthday of Edgar H. Brown. It preceded ICM 86 in Berkeley, and was conceived as a successor to the Aarhus conferences of 1978 and 1982. Some thirty papers are included in this volume, mostly at a research level. Subjects include cyclic homology, H-spaces, transformation groups, real and rational homotopy theory, acyclic manifolds, the homotopy theory of classifying spaces, instantons and loop spaces, and complex bordism.

  9. AINSE`s 40th anniversary conference. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Highlights of 40 years of activity of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) were the main focus of this conference. Topics covered include nuclear physics, plasma physics, radiation chemistry, radiation biology, neutron diffraction, nuclear techniques of analysis and other relevant aspects of nuclear science and technology. The conference handbook contains the summaries of the 78 papers and posters presented and the list of participants

  10. Proceedings of thirty second annual convention of Indian Association for Cancer Research: book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The convention had a broad theme on emerging trends in cancer research, road to prevention and cure and it was an international symposium on infection and cancer. The conference covered vast areas like cancer screening, early detection and prevention, caner genomics and proteonomics, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, molecular drug designing, cancer immunology and cancer vaccines, molecular epidemiology and clinical cancer research, cancer marker discovery, non-coding RNA regulation, cancer stem cells etc. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  11. 20th IAEA fusion energy conference 2004. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 20th International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) was held in Vilamoura, Portugal, from 1 to 6 November 2004. The Instituto Superior Tecnico through the Centro de Fusao Nuclear on behalf of the Portuguese Government and the Association EURATOM/IST hosted the conference. The IAEA wishes to express its gratitude to the host. More than 600 delegates representing 33 countries and three international organizations attended the Fusion Energy Conference 2004. The Programme Committee accepted a total of some 437 papers for presentation at the conference. The scientific experimental and theoretical papers have been grouped with respect to the following themes: Overview on magnetic and inertial fusion; Advanced Scenarios and Steady State; Edge Localized Modes; Fusion Technology; Transport Theory; Beta Limits; Hybrid Scenarios; H-mode and Transport; ITER; Alfven Modes and Wave Heating; Operational Limits and Momentum Transport; Energetic Particles and Stability; Neoclassical Tearing Modes; Transport and Turbulence; Inertial Fusion; Configuration Effects and Transport; and Plasma-wall Interaction. The conference adjourned with the announcement of the next IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, which will be held for the first time in the People's Republic of China, in the city of Chengdu, October 16-22, 2006

  12. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  13. Gas conference Paris 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This special issue of Gaz d'Aujourd'hui journal contains the proceedings of the 2013 edition of the annual French gas conference. These proceedings comprise 7 talks, 5 round-tables and 9 workshops: 1 - Opening talk (H. Malherbe); 2 - Defending the natural gas position in the energy mix (G. Mestralet); 3 - The new youth of natural gas (P. Sauquet); 4 - Round-table No.1: the natural gas market perspectives; 5 - Round-table No.2: natural gas in France's energy transition; 6 - Answering the energy transition challenges (B. Lescoeur); 7 - Round-table No.3: towards an integrated European market in 2014?; 8 - Building up the European gas market (P. de Ladoucette); 9 - Workshop No.1: the big client's strategies in the gas market; 10 - Workshop No.2: the fuel gas perspectives in terrestrial mobility; 11 - Workshop No.3: gas innovations; 12 - The 2030 and 2050 strategy of the European Union policy (B. Devlin); 13 - Round-table No.4: Decentralized production and local development; 14 - Workshop No.4: Gas and maritime transport; 15 - Workshop No.5: bio-methane, vector of the energy transition; 16 - Workshop No.6: Evolution of the storage activity; 17 - Workshop No.7: Dwellings renovation and natural gas development; 18 - Workshop No.8: Is the target model of gas a reality?; 19 - Workshop No.9: Non-conventional gases in the world; 20 - Round-table No.5: Actors' strategy; 21 - Closing talk (J. Ferrier)

  14. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  15. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  16. Washington Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the 1993 Particle Accelerator Conference, held in Washington in May, were picked out in the previous issue (page 18). Talks on the big hadron colliders reflected the sea-change in the accelerator world where the scale, complexity and cost of the front-line projects has slowed the pace of developments (not unlike the scene in particle physics itself). Speaking before the anti-SSC vote in the House of Representatives in June, Dick Briggs reviewed the situation at the SSC Superconducting Supercollider in Ellis County, Texas. The linac building is near completion and the Low Energy Booster will be ready to receive components early next year. Tunnelling for the Main Ring is advancing rapidly with four boring machines in action. Five miles of tunnel have been completed since January and the pace has now stepped up to nearly a mile each week. The superconducting magnet news is good. Following the successful initial string test of a half cell of the magnet lattice, a two-ring full cell with all associated services is being assembled. The mechanical robustness of the magnet design was confirmed when a dipole was taken to 9.7 T when cooled to 1.8 K. In the Magnet Test Lab itself, ten test stands are installed and equipped

  17. Conference OKs science budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the budget process all but complete for next fiscal year, the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration observers were saying that science had not done that badly in Congress, for an election year. NSF got half the budget increase it requested, NASA two-thirds. The Space Station did well, at the expense of environmental and social programs, which are funded by Congress from the same pot of money as NASA and NSF.A House-Senate conference finished work on a $59 billion appropriations bill for the Department of Housing and Urban Development and independent agencies, including EPA, NASA, and NSF, in early August. The House and Senate then quickly passed the measure before their recess; the President is expected to sign it soon. Included in the Fiscal Year 1989 spending bill are $1,885 billion for NSF, a 9.8% increase over FY 1988, and $10.7 billion for NASA, 18.5% more than the year before.

  18. Silencing of MicroRNA-21 confers the sensitivity to tamoxifen and fulvestrant by enhancing autophagic cell death through inhibition of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinfeng; Li, Ruilian; Shi, Wenna; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yufei; Li, Cong; Qu, Xianjun

    2016-02-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM) and fulvestrant (FUL) represent the major adjuvant therapy to estrogen receptor-alpha positive (ER(+)) breast cancer patients. However, endocrine resistance to TAM and FUL is a great impediment for successful treatment. We hypothesized that miR-21 might alter the sensitivity of breast cancer cells to TAM or FUL by regulating cell autophagy. Using the ER(+) breast cancer cells, we knockdown miR-21.by transfection with miR-21 inhibitor, then the cells were exposed to TAM or FUL and the percentages of apoptosis and autophagy were determined. Knockdown of miR-21 significantly increased the TAM or FUL-induced apoptosis in ER(+) breast cancer cells. Further, silencing of miR-21 in MCF-7 cells enhanced cell autophagy at both basal and TAM or FUL-induced level. The increase of autophagy in miR-21-knockdown MCF-7 cells was also indicated by increase of beclin-1, LC3-II and increased GFP-LC3 dots. Importantly, knockdown of miR-21 contributed to autophagic cell death, which is responsible for part of TAM induced cell death in miR-21 inhibitor-transfected cells. Further analysis suggested that miR-21 inhibitor enhance autophagic cell death through inhibition of PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway. MiR-21 coordinated the function of autophagy and apoptosis by targeting Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) through inhibition of PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway. In conclusion, silencing of miR-21 increased the sensitivity of ER(+) breast cancer cells to TAM or FUL by increasing autophagic cell death. Targeting autophagy-related miRNAs is a potential strategy for overcoming endocrine resistance to TAM and FUL. PMID:26796263

  19. 工业级催化重整装置的全流程模拟与优化%Modeling, Simulation and Optimization of a Whole Industrial Catalytic Naphtha Reforming Process on Aspen Plus Platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯卫锋; 苏宏业; 胡永有; 褚健

    2006-01-01

    A new 18-lump kinetic model for naphtha catalytic reforming reactions is discussed. By developing this model as a user module, a whole industrial continuous catalytic reforming process is simulated on Aspen plus plat form. The technique utilizes the strong databases, complete sets of modules, and flexible simulation tools of the Aspen plus system and retains the characteristics of the proposed kinetic model. The calculated results are in fair agreement with the actual operating data. Based on the model of the whole reforming process, the process is optimized and the optimization results are tested in the actual industrial unit for about two months. The test shows that the process profit increases about 1000yuan·h-1 averagely, which is close to the calculated result.

  20. 10. international mouse genome conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.