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Sample records for aspartate mediates dopamine

  1. Single exposure to cocaine impairs aspartate uptake in the pre-frontal cortex via dopamine D1-receptor dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathler, Matheus Figueiredo; Stutz, Bernardo; Martins, Robertta Silva; Dos Santos Pereira, Maurício; Pecinalli, Ney Roner; Santos, Luis E; Taveira-da-Silva, Rosilane; Lowe, Jennifer; de Freitas, Isis Grigorio; de Melo Reis, Ricardo Augusto; Manhães, Alex C; Kubrusly, Regina C C

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine and glutamate play critical roles in the reinforcing effects of cocaine. We demonstrated that a single intraperitoneal administration of cocaine induces a significant decrease in [(3)H]-d-aspartate uptake in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC). This decrease is associated with elevated dopamine levels, and requires dopamine D1-receptor signaling (D1R) and adenylyl cyclase activation. The effect was observed within 10min of cocaine administration and lasted for up to 30min. This rapid response is related to D1R-mediated cAMP-mediated activation of PKA and phosphorylation of the excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3. We also demonstrated that cocaine exposure increases extracellular d-aspartate, l-glutamate and d-serine in the PFC. Our data suggest that cocaine activates dopamine D1 receptor signaling and PKA pathway to regulate EAATs function and extracellular EAA level in the PFC. PMID:27208619

  2. Corticosterone enhances N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor signaling to promote isolated ventral tegmental area activity in a reconstituted mesolimbic dopamine pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jennifer N; Saunders, Meredith A; Sharrett-Field, Lynda J; Reynolds, Anna R; Bardo, Michael T; Pauly, James R; Prendergast, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Elevations in circulating corticosteroids during periods of stress may influence activity of the mesolimbic dopamine reward pathway by increasing glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor expression and/or function in a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent manner. The current study employed organotypic co-cultures of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) to examine the effects of corticosterone exposure on NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal viability. Co-cultures were pre-exposed to vehicle or corticosterone (CORT; 1 μM) for 5 days prior to a 24 h co-exposure to NMDA (200 μM). Co-cultures pre-exposed to a non-toxic concentration of corticosterone and subsequently NMDA showed significant neurotoxicity in the VTA only. This was evidenced by increases in propidium iodide uptake as well as decreases in immunoreactivity of the neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN). Co-exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-7-phosphonovaleric acid (APV; 50 μM) or the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist mifepristone (10 μM) attenuated neurotoxicity. In contrast, the combination of corticosterone and NMDA did not produce any significant effects on either measure within the NAcc. Cultures of the VTA and NAcc maintained without synaptic contact showed no response to CORT or NMDA. These results demonstrate the ability to functionally reconstitute key regions of the mesolimbic reward pathway ex vivo and to reveal a GR-dependent enhancement of NMDA receptor-dependent signaling in the VTA. PMID:26631585

  3. Dopamine receptor-mediated regulation of neuronal "clock" gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbesi, M; Yildiz, S; Dirim Arslan, A; Sharma, R; Manev, H; Uz, T

    2009-01-23

    Using a transgenic mice model (i.e. "clock" knockouts), clock transcription factors have been suggested as critical regulators of dopaminergic behaviors induced by drugs of abuse. Moreover, it has been shown that systemic administration of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine regulates the striatal expression of clock genes. However, it is not known whether dopamine receptors mediate these regulatory effects of psychostimulants at the cellular level. Primary striatal neurons in culture express dopamine receptors as well as clock genes and have been successfully used in studying dopamine receptor functioning. Therefore, we investigated the role of dopamine receptors on neuronal clock gene expression in this model using specific receptor agonists. We found an inhibitory effect on the expression of mClock and mPer1 genes with the D2-class (i.e. D2/D3) receptor agonist quinpirole. We also found a generalized stimulatory effect on the expression of clock genes mPer1, mClock, mNPAS2 (neuronal PAS domain protein 2), and mBmal1 with the D1-class (i.e. D1) receptor agonist SKF38393. Further, we tested whether systemic administration of dopamine receptor agonists causes similar changes in striatal clock gene expression in vivo. We found quinpirole-induced alterations in mPER1 protein levels in the mouse striatum (i.e. rhythm shift). Collectively, our results indicate that the dopamine receptor system may mediate psychostimulant-induced changes in clock gene expression. Using striatal neurons in culture as a model, further research is needed to better understand how dopamine signaling modulates the expression dynamics of clock genes (i.e. intracellular signaling pathways) and thereby influences neuronal gene expression, neuronal transmission, and brain functioning. PMID:19017537

  4. N-methyl-d-aspartate-evoked release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine in striatal compartments of the rat: regulatory roles of dopamine and GABA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowinski, J.; Perez, S.; Desban, M.; Gauchy, C.; Kemel, M.L.; Blanchet, F. [Chaire de Neuropharmacologie, INSERM U114, College de France, 11 place Marcelin Berthelot, 75231 Paris (France)

    1997-08-26

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate-evoked release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine previously formed from [{sup 3}H]choline was estimated in striosome- (identified by [{sup 3}H]naloxone binding) or matrix-enriched areas of the rat striatum using an in vitro microsuperfusion procedure. Experiments were performed in either the absence or the presence of dopaminergic and/or GABAergic receptor antagonists. Although the cell bodies of the cholinergic interneurons were mainly found in the matrix, in the absence of magnesium, N-methyl-d-aspartate (50 {mu}M) stimulated the release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine in both striatal compartments. These responses were blocked by either magnesium, dizocilpine maleate, 7-chlorokynurenate or tetrodotoxin. N-Methyl-d-aspartate responses were concentration-dependent, but the 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate response was higher in striosomes than in the matrix. The co-application of d-serine (10 {mu}M) enhanced the 10 {mu}M N-methyl-d-aspartate response in both compartments, but reduced those induced by 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate, this reduction being higher in striosomes. The blockade of dopaminergic transmission with the D{sub 2} and D{sub 1} dopaminergic receptor antagonists, (-)-sulpiride (1 {mu}M) and SCH23390 (1 {mu}M), was without effect on the 50 {mu}M N-methyl-d-aspartate-evoked release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine, but markedly enhanced the 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate + d-serine-evoked response in striosomes and to a lesser extent in the matrix. Disinhibitory responses of similar amplitude were observed not only in striosomes but also in the matrix when (-)-sulpiride was used alone, while SCH23390 alone enhanced the 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate + d-serine response only in striosomes and to a lower extent than (-)-sulpiride. These results indicate that D{sub 2} receptors are mainly involved in the inhibitory effect of dopamine on the 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate + d-serine-evoked release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine. They also show that the stimulation of D{sub 1

  5. Voltammetric determination of dopamine and norepinphrine on a glassy carbon electrode modified with poly (L-aspartic acid)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhangyu Yu; Xiaochun Li; Xueliang Wang; Xinying Ma; Xia Li; Kewei Cao

    2012-03-01

    A convenient and useful method for the voltammetric determination of dopamine (DA) and norepinphrine (NE) based on poly(L-aspartic acid) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is reported in this paper. The modified electrode exhibits excellent electro-catalytic activities for the oxidation-reduction of DA and NE, as well as eliminating the interference of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). Factors influencing the detection processes are optimized and the kinetic parameters are calculated. Under the optimal conditions, the anodic peak currents of DA and NE are linear with their concentration and the detection limits (S/N = 3) are 1.0 × 10−9 mol L-1 for DA and 4.31 10−9 mol L-1 for NE, respectively. The practical application of this method is demonstrated by determining the concentration of NE and DA in injection which is commercially available with satisfactory results. Compared with other electrochemical methods, this method is simple, highly selective and sensitive.

  6. Inhibitory and potentiating influences of glycine on N-methyl-D-aspartate-evoked dopamine release from cultured rat mesencephalic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presence of 1.2 mM Mg2+, glycine (30-100 microM) inhibited [3H]dopamine ([3H]DA) release stimulated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), in fetal rat mesencephalic cell cultures. Strychnine (1 microM) blocked the inhibitory effect of 100 microM glycine, indicating an action via strychnine-sensitive inhibitory glycine receptors. A higher concentration of strychnine (100 microM), by itself, inhibited NMDA-evoked [3H]DA release in the presence or absence of Mg2+. Spontaneous [3H]DA release and [3H]DA release stimulated by kainate and quisqualate were unaffected by glycine (less than or equal to 100 microM) or strychnine (less than or equal to 100 microM), indicating that glycine and strychnine modulatory effects are only associated with the NMDA receptor subtype. [3H]DA release evoked by K+ (56 mM) was unaffected by glycine (less than or equal to 100 microM) but was attenuated by a high concentration of strychnine (100 microM). In the absence of exogenous Mg2+, glycine (30-100 microM) potentiated NMDA-evoked [3H]DA release by a strychnine-insensitive mechanism. A selective antagonist of the NMDA-associated glycine receptor, 7-chlorokynurenate (10 microM), attenuated NMDA-evoked [3H]DA release in the absence of Mg2+. The effect of 10 microM 7-chlorokynurenate was overcome by 1 microM glycine. Also, when tested in the presence of 1.2 nM Mg2+ and 1 microM strychnine, 100 microM 7-chlorokynurenate inhibited NMDA-evoked [3H]DA release, and this antagonism was overcome by 30 to 100 microM glycine. These results indicate that two distinct glycine receptors modulate NMDA-stimulated [3H]DA release from mesencephalic cells in culture. Manipulation of extracellular Mg2+ permits the differentiation of a strychnine-sensitive glycine response (inhibition of NMDA-evoked [3H]DA release) from a strychnine-insensitive glycine response

  7. Estrogen mediated inhibition of dopamine transport in the striatum: regulation by G alpha i/o.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Tina L; Certain, Matthew E

    2005-03-28

    In the current study, the interaction between estrogen priming and dopamine D2 receptor activation on dopamine uptake in the striatum of ovariectomized female rats was investigated. Basal ADP-[(32)P(i)]ribosylation of G(i/o) was examined in synaptosomal membranes prepared from ovariectomized, estrogen primed or N-p-(isothiocyanatophenethyl) spiperone (NIPS) treated rats. [(32)P(i)]-incorporation was significantly increased (141%) in tissue from NIPS treated animals but attenuated (57%) in tissue from estrogen primed animals. Dopamine uptake kinetics were measured in vivo following manipulation of the heterotrimeric G-protein by pertussis toxin (0.5 microg, 48 h). Pertussis toxin significantly inhibited dopamine uptake at all concentrations of dopamine examined. Co-treatment with estrogen and pertussis toxin resulted in a further attenuation of dopamine transport at high but not low dopamine concentrations. These data are consistent with an estrogen mediated alteration of G-protein activity and support the hypothesis that estrogen may alter transporter activity through a modulation of dopamine D2 autoreceptor/G alpha(i/o) protein coupling. PMID:15792779

  8. Dopamine D1 receptor-mediated NMDA receptor insertion depends on Fyn but not Src kinase pathway in prefrontal cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jian-Li

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between dopamine and glutamate in the prefrontal cortex are essential for cognitive functions such as working memory. Modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor functions by dopamine D1 receptor is believed to play a critical role in these functions. The aim of the work reported here is to explore the signaling pathway underlying D1 receptor-mediated trafficking of NMDA receptors in cultured rat prefrontal cortical neurons. Results Activation of D1 receptor by selective agonist SKF-81297 significantly increased the expression of NR2B subunits. This effect was completely blocked by small interfering RNA knockdown of Fyn, but not Src. Under control conditions, neither Fyn nor Src knockdown exhibited significant effect on basal NR2B expression. D1 stimulation significantly enhanced NR2B insertion into plasma membrane in cultured PFC neurons, a process obstructed by Fyn, but not Src, knockdown. Conclusions Dopamine D1 receptor-mediated increase of NMDA receptors is thus Fyn kinase dependent. Targeting this signaling pathway may be useful in treating drug addiction and schizophrenia.

  9. Methamphetamine exposure antagonizes N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated neurotoxicity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Katherine J.; Self, Rachel L.; Butler, Tracy R.; Mullins, Michael M.; Ghayoumi, Layla; Holley, Robert C.; Littleton, John M.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Glutamatergic systems have been increasingly recognized as mediators of methamphetamine’s (METH) pharmacological effects though little is known about the means by which METH interacts with glutamate receptors. The present studies examined effects of METH (0.1–100 μM) on [3H]MK-801 binding to membranes prepared from adult rat cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, as well as the neurotoxicity produced by 24-h exposure to N-methyl-D-aspartate (5–10 μM; NMDA) employing organotypic hippocampal slice...

  10. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-12-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H)choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine less than or equal to SKF(R)82526 < SKF 85174 < SKF(R)38393 less than or equal to pergolide less than or equal to dopamine (EC50 = 4.5 microM) < SKF(S)82526 less than or equal to SKF(S)38393. Dopamine receptor antagonists inhibited the dopamine-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) < (+)-butaclamol less than or equal to cis-flupenthixol < fluphenazine < perphenazine < trans-flupenthixol < R-sulpiride. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the dopamine receptor mediating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8).

  11. Dopamine-Mediated Sclerotization of Regenerated Chitin in Ionic Liquid

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    Dongyeop X. Oh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chitin is a promising structural material for biomedical applications, due to its many advantageous properties and abundance in nature. However, its usage and development in the biomedical field have been stagnant, because of chitin’s poor mechanical properties in wet conditions and the difficulties in transforming it into an applicable form. To overcome these challenges, we created a novel biomimetic chitin composite. This regenerated chitin, prepared with ionic liquid, showed improved mechanical properties in wet conditions by mimicking insect cuticle and squid beak sclerotization, i.e., catechol-meditated cross-linking. By ionic liquid-based heat treatment, dopamine oxidation produced melanin-like compounds and dopamine-meditated cross-links without any solvent evaporation and oxidant utilization. The dopamine-meditated sclerotization increased the ultimate tensile strength (UTS of the regenerated chitin by 2.52-fold, measured after six weeks of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS submersion. In addition, the linear swelling ratio (LSR of the chitin film was reduced by about 22%. This strategy raises a possibility of using regenerated chitin as an artificial hard tissue in wet conditions.

  12. TFEB-mediated autophagy rescues midbrain dopamine neurons from α-synuclein toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decressac, Mickael; Mattsson, Bengt; Weikop, Pia;

    2013-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein plays a major role in Parkinson disease (PD) pathogenesis. Recent evidence suggests that defects in the autophagy-mediated clearance of α-synuclein contribute to the progressive loss of nigral dopamine neurons. Using an in vivo model of α-synuclein toxicity, we show...

  13. Resilience to chronic stress is mediated by noradrenergic regulation of dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isingrini, Elsa; Perret, Léa; Rainer, Quentin; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Guma, Elisa; Tanti, Arnaud; Martin, Garance; Robinson, Jennifer; Moquin, Luc; Marti, Fabio; Mechawar, Naguib; Williams, Sylvain; Gratton, Alain; Giros, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) help mediate stress susceptibility and resilience. However, upstream mechanisms controlling these neurons remain unknown. Noradrenergic (NE) neurons in the locus coeruleus, implicated in the pathophysiology of depression, have direct connections within the VTA. Here we demonstrate that NE neurons regulate vulnerability to social defeat through inhibitory control of VTA DA neurons. PMID:26878672

  14. Dopamine receptor-mediated regulation of neuronal “clock” gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Imbesi, Marta; Yildiz, Sevim; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Sharma, Rajiv; Manev, Hari; Uz, Tolga

    2008-01-01

    Using transgenic mice model (i.e., “clock” knockouts), clock transcription factors have been suggested as critical regulators of dopaminergic behaviors induced by drugs of abuse. Moreover, it has been shown that systemic administration of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine regulate the striatal expression of clock genes. However, it is not known whether dopamine receptors mediate these regulatory effects of psychostimulants at the cellular level. Primary striatal neurons in...

  15. Impaired dopamine D1 receptor-mediated vasorelaxation of mesenteric arteries in obese Zucker rats

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Jinjuan; Han, Yu; Wang, Hongyong; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Yukai; Chen, Xingjian; Cai, Yue; Guan, Weiwei; Yang, Di; Asico, Laureano D.; ZHOU, Lin; Jose, Pedro A; Zeng, Chunyu

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Renal dopamine D1-like receptor-mediated diuresis and natriuresis are impaired in the obese Zucker rat, an obesity-related hypertensive rat model. The role of arterial D1 receptors in the hypertension of obese Zucker rats is not clear. Methods Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations and blood pressure were measured. The vasodilatory response of isolated mesenteric arteries was evaluated using a small vessel myog...

  16. Src, a Molecular Switch Governing Gain Control of Synaptic Transmission Mediated by N-methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xian-Min; Salter, Michael W.

    1999-07-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a principal subtype of glutamate receptor mediating fast excitatory transmission at synapses in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and other regions of the central nervous system. NMDA receptors are crucial for the lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission that occurs both physiologically and in pathological conditions such as chronic pain. Over the past several years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the activity of NMDA receptors is regulated by the protein tyrosine kinase, Src. Recently it has been discovered that, by means of up-regulating NMDA receptor function, activation of Src mediates the induction of the lasting enhancement of excitatory transmission known as long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Also, Src has been found to amplify the up-regulation of NMDA receptor function that is produced by raising the intracellular concentration of sodium. Sodium concentration increases in neuronal dendrites during high levels of firing activity, which is precisely when Src becomes activated. Therefore, we propose that the boost in NMDA receptor function produced by the coincidence of activating Src and raising intracellular sodium may be important in physiological and pathophysiological enhancement of excitatory transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and elsewhere in the central nervous system.

  17. The pathophysiological functions mediated by D-1 dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter describes some behavioral responses which might be mediated by D1 and D2 DA receptors, and the authors discuss their clinical relevance. It was of considerable interest to determine whether a selective D1 DA antagonist, such as SCH 23390, will induce catalepsy and whether this behavior is mediated by D1, or by both D1 and D2 DA receptors. Rats were used in the experiments. The authors examined whether the addition of the S2 antagonist ketanserin affects the displacement of 3H-Spi by SCH 23390. Induction of self-mutilating biting (SMB) behavior in monkeys with unilateral ventromedial tegmental (VMT) lesions by DA agonists and its prevention by DA antagonists is examined. The authors also discuss the possible relationships between abnormal guanine nucleotide metabolism and dopaminergic neuronal function through the implications in LeschNyhan syndrome and in some mental disorders

  18. Methamphetamine produces bidirectional, concentration-dependent effects on dopamine neuron excitability and dopamine-mediated synaptic currents

    OpenAIRE

    Branch, Sarah Y.; Beckstead, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Amphetamine-like compounds are commonly used to enhance cognition and to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, but they also function as positive reinforcers and are self-administered at doses far exceeding clinical relevance. Many of these compounds (including methamphetamine) are substrates for dopamine reuptake transporters, elevating extracellular dopamine by inhibiting uptake and promoting reverse transport. This produces an increase in extracellular dopamine that inhibits dopa...

  19. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and 3H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by α-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S2 episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. 3H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system

  20. Methamphetamine exposure antagonizes N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated neurotoxicity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine J; Self, Rachel L; Butler, Tracy R; Mullins, Michael M; Ghayoumi, Layla; Holley, Robert C; Littleton, John M; Prendergast, Mark A

    2007-07-01

    Glutamatergic systems have been increasingly recognized as mediators of methamphetamine's (METH) pharmacological effects though little is known about the means by which METH interacts with glutamate receptors. The present studies examined effects of METH (0.1-100 microM) on [3H]MK-801 binding to membranes prepared from adult rat cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, as well as the neurotoxicity produced by 24-h exposure to N-methyl-D-aspartate (5-10 microM; NMDA) employing organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of neonatal rat. Co-incubation of [3H]MK-801 with METH (0.1-100 microM) did not reduce dextromethorphan (1 mM)-displaceable ligand binding. Exposure of slice cultures to NMDA for 24-h produced increases in uptake of the non-vital fluorescent marker propidium iodide (PI) of 150-500% above control levels, most notably, in the CA1 region pyramidal cell layer. Co-exposure to METH (>1.0 microM) with NMDA (5 microM) reduced PI uptake by approximately 50% in each subregion, though the CA1 pyramidal cell layer was markedly more sensitive to the protective effects of METH exposure. In contrast, METH exposure did not reduce PI uptake stimulated by 24-h exposure to 10 microM NMDA. Co-exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (20 microM) prevented toxicity produced by exposure to 5 or 10 microM NMDA. These findings indicate that the pharmacological effects of short-term METH exposure involve inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal signaling, not reflective of direct channel inhibition at an MK-801-sensitive site. PMID:17524372

  1. Metabotropic glutamate receptors depress glutamate-mediated synaptic input to rat midbrain dopamine neurones in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Wigmore, Mark A; Lacey, Michael G

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate (AMPA receptor-mediated) excitatory postsynaptic potentials (e.p.s.ps.), evoked by electrical stimulation rostral to the recording site, were examined by intracellular microelectrode recording from dopamine neurones in parasagittal slices of rat ventral midbrain.The e.p.s.p. was depressed by the group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonist L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4; 0.01–30 μM) by up to 60% with an EC50 of 0.82 μM. The depression induced by L-AP4 (3 μM) wa...

  2. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2-mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  3. Mercury-induced toxicity of rat cortical neurons is mediated through N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Fenglian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is a well-known neurotoxin implicated in a wide range of neurological or psychiatric disorders including autism spectrum disorders, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, depression, mood disorders and tremor. Mercury-induced neuronal degeneration is thought to invoke glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we examine the effects of various mercury concentrations (including pathological levels present in human plasma or cerebrospinal fluid on cultured, rat cortical neurons. Results We found that inorganic mercuric chloride (HgCl2 –at 0.025 to 25 μM not only caused neuronal degeneration but also perturbed neuronal excitability. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons revealed that HgCl2 not only enhanced the amplitude and frequency of synaptic, inward currents, but also increased spontaneous synaptic potentials followed by sustained membrane depolarization. HgCl2 also triggered sustained, 2–5 fold rises in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i. The observed increases in neuronal activity and [Ca2+]i were substantially reduced by the application of MK 801, a non-competitive antagonist of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA receptors. Importantly, our study further shows that a pre incubation or co-application of MK 801 prevents HgCl2-induced reduction of cell viability and a disruption of β-tubulin. Conclusions Collectively, our data show that HgCl2-induced toxic effects on central neurons are triggered by an over-activation of NMDA receptors, leading to cytoskeleton instability.

  4. Interactions of Dopamine D1 and N-methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors are Required for Acute Cocaine-Evoked Nitric Oxide Efflux in the Dorsal Striatum

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong Kun; Ahn, Sung Min; Shim, Yoon-Bo; Koh, Wei Choon Alvin; Shim, Insop; Choe, Eun Sang

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in nitric oxide (NO) release in response to psychostimulants in the striatum cause a plastic change contributing to the development and expression of addiction. In this study, regulation of NO efflux evoked by acute cocaine in the dorsal striatum was investigated using real-time detection of NO in vivo. We found that acute systemic injection of cocaine (20 mg/kg) increased NO efflux, which was reduced by the intrastriatal infusion of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390 (...

  5. Multiple signaling pathways mediated by dopamine and calcium ionophore A23187 in human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism(s) of platelet aggregation induced by the synergistic action of dopamine (DA) and a Ca/sup +2/-ionophore, A23187. DA showed non significant effect on platelet aggregation over a wide range of concentrations (up to 500 micro M), but did potentiate the aggregation response of A23187. Aggregation induced by A23187 was inhibited by calcium channel blockers (diltiazem and verpamil), receptor blockers (chlorpromazine and haloperidol) and a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin). However, the inhibitory effect of these blockers was more pronounced (with a selectivity ratio of 1.5-28) in the aggregation induced by synergistic effect of A23187 and DA. A phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (P1 3-Kinase) inhibitor, wortmanin (1C/sub 50/. 25-30 nM), inhibited aggregation induced by either A23187 or DA and act synergistically. This synergistic effect on platelet aggregation is mediated through multiple signaling pathways. (author)

  6. A Role for Dopamine-Mediated Learning in the Pathophysiology and Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff A. Beeler

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine contributes to corticostriatal plasticity and motor learning. Dopamine denervation profoundly alters motor performance, as in Parkinson’s disease (PD; however, the extent to which these symptoms reflect impaired motor learning is unknown. Here, we demonstrate a D2 receptor blockade-induced aberrant learning that impedes future motor performance when dopamine signaling is restored, an effect diminished by coadministration of adenosine antagonists during blockade. We hypothesize that an inappropriate corticostriatal potentiation in striatopallidal cells of the indirect pathway underlies aberrant learning. We demonstrate synaptic potentiation in striatopallidal neurons induced by D2 blockade and diminished by application of an adenosine antagonist, consistent with behavioral observations. A neurocomputational model of the basal ganglia recapitulates the behavioral pattern and further links aberrant learning to plasticity in the indirect pathway. Thus, D2-mediated aberrant learning may contribute to motor deficits in PD, suggesting new avenues for the development of therapeutics.

  7. Dopamine-mediated oxidation of methionine 127 in α-synuclein causes cytotoxicity and oligomerization of α-synuclein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Nakaso

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies. Many recent studies focused on the interaction between α-synuclein (α-syn and dopamine in the pathogenesis of PD, and fluorescent anisotropy suggested that the C-terminal region of α-syn may be a target for modification by dopamine. However, it is not well understood why PD-related pathogenesis occurs selectively in dopaminergic neurons. We investigated the interaction between dopamine and α-syn with regard to cytotoxicity. A soluble oligomer was formed by co-incubating α-syn and dopamine in vitro. To clarify the effect of dopamine on α-syn in cells, we generated PC12 cells expressing human α-syn, as well as the α-syn mutants, M116A, Y125D, M127A, S129A, and M116A/M127A, in a tetracycline-inducible manner (PC12-TetOFF-α-syn. Overexpression of wildtype α-syn in catecholaminergic PC12 cells decreased cell viability in long-term cultures, while a competitive inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase blocked this vulnerability, suggesting that α-syn-related cytotoxicity is associated with dopamine metabolism. The vulnerabilities of all mutant cell lines were lower than that of wildtype α-syn-expressing cells. Moreover, α-syn containing dopamine-mediated oxidized methionine (Met(O was detected in PC12-TetOFF-α-syn. Met(O was lower in methionine mutant cells, especially in the M127A or M116A/M127A mutants, but also in the Y125D and S129A mutants. Co-incubation of dopamine and the 125YEMPS129 peptide enhanced the production of H2O2, which may oxidize methionine residues and convert them to Met(O. Y125- or S129-lacking peptides did not enhance the dopamine-related production of H2O2. Our results suggest that M127 is the major target for oxidative modification by dopamine, and that Y125 and S129 may act as enhancers of this modification. These results may describe a mechanism of dopaminergic neuron

  8. α4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulated by galantamine on nigrostriatal terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated rotational behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inden, Masatoshi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shimohama, Shun; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    Galantamine, an acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor used to treat dementia symptoms, also acts as an allosteric potentiating ligand (APL) at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study was designed to evaluate the allosteric effect of galantamine on nAChR regulation of nigrostrial dopaminergic neuronal function in the hemiparkinsonian rat model established by unilateral nigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection. Methamphetamine, a dopamine releaser, induced ipsilateral rotation, whereas dopamine agonists apomorphine (a non-selective dopamine receptor agonist), SKF38393 (a selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist), and quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist) induced contralateral rotation. When 6-OHDA-injected rats were co-treated with nomifensine, a dopamine transporter inhibitor, a more pronounced and a remarkable effect of nicotine and galantamine was observed. Under these conditions, the combination of nomifensine with nicotine or galantamine induced the ipsilateral rotation similar to the methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior, indicating that nicotine and galantamine also induce dopamine release from striatal terminals. Both nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotations were significantly blocked by flupenthixol (an antagonist of both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors) and mecamylamine (an antagonist of nAChRs), suggesting that galantamine modulation of nAChRs on striatal dopaminergic terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated movement. Immunohistochemical staining showed that α4 nAChRs were highly expressed on striatal dopaminergic terminals, while no α7 nAChRs were detected. Pretreatment with the α4 nAChR antagonist dihydroxy-β-erythroidine significantly inhibited nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotational behaviors, whereas pretreatment with the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine was ineffective. Moreover, the α4 nAChR agonist ABT-418 induced ipsilateral rotation, while the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 had no

  9. Novel neuroprotective mechanisms of pramipexole, an anti-Parkinson drug, against endogenous dopamine-mediated excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yasuhiko; Sawada, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Kume, Toshiaki; Katsuki, Hiroshi; Shimohama, Shun; Akaike, Akinori

    2007-02-28

    Parkinson disease is characterized by selective degeneration of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons, and endogenous dopamine may play a pivotal role in the degenerative processes. Using primary cultured mesencephalic neurons, we found that glutamate, an excitotoxin, caused selective dopaminergic neuronal death depending on endogenous dopamine content. Pramipexole, a dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist used clinically in the treatment of Parkinson disease, did not affect glutamate-induced calcium influx but blocked dopaminergic neuronal death induced by glutamate. Pramipexole reduced dopamine content but did not change the levels of total or phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. The neuroprotective effect of pramipexole was independent of dopamine receptor stimulation because it was not abrogated by domperidone, a dopamine D2-type receptor antagonist. Moreover, both active S(-)- and inactive R(+)-enantiomers of pramipexole as a dopamine D2-like receptor agonist equally suppressed dopaminergic neuronal death. These results suggest that pramipexole protects dopaminergic neurons from glutamate neurotoxicity by the reduction of intracellular dopamine content, independently of dopamine D2-like receptor activation. PMID:17161393

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptors depress glutamate-mediated synaptic input to rat midbrain dopamine neurones in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigmore, M A; Lacey, M G

    1998-02-01

    1. Glutamate (AMPA receptor-mediated) excitatory postsynaptic potentials (e.p.s.ps.), evoked by electrical stimulation rostral to the recording site, were examined by intracellular microelectrode recording from dopamine neurones in parasagittal slices of rat ventral midbrain. 2. The e.p.s.p. was depressed by the group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonist L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4; 0.01-30 microM) by up to 60% with an EC50 of 0.82 microM. The depression induced by L-AP4 (3 microM) was reversed by the group III preferring mGlu receptor antagonist, alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG; 250 microM). 3. The group I and II mGlu agonist, 1S,3R-aminocyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (ACPD; 3-30 microM) also depressed the e.p.s.p. in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of ACPD (10 microM) was reversed by (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG; 1 mM; 4 cells). This effect of ACPD was also partially antagonized (by 50.3+/-15.7%, 4 cells) by MPPG (250 microM). 4. The selective agonist at group I mGlu receptors, dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG; 100 microM), decreased e.p.s.p. amplitude by 27.1+/-8.2% (7 cells), as did the group II mGlu receptor-selective agonist (1S,1R,2'R,3'R)-2-(2,3-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV; 1 microM) by 26.7+/-4.3% (5 cells). 5. DHPG (10-100 microM) caused a depolarization of the recorded cell, as did ACPD (3-30 microM), whereas no such postsynaptic effect of either L-AP4 or DCG-IV was observed. 6. These results provide evidence for the presence of presynaptic inhibitory metabotropic glutamate autoreceptors from the mGlu receptor groups II and III on descending glutamatergic inputs to midbrain dopamine neurones. Group I mGlu receptors mediate a postsynaptic depolarization, and can also depress glutamatergic transmission, but may not necessarily be localized presynaptically. These sites represent novel drug targets for treatment of schizophrenia and movement disorders of basal ganglia origin. PMID

  11. Increased desensitization of dopamine D₂ receptor-mediated response in the ventral tegmental area in the absence of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hasani, R; Foster, J D; Metaxas, A; Ledent, C; Hourani, S M O; Kitchen, I; Chen, Y

    2011-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptors interact to provide additional regulatory mechanisms for neurotransmitter signaling. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are expressed at a high density in striatal neurons, where they closely interact with dopamine D₂ receptors and modulate effects of dopamine and responses to psychostimulants. A(2A) receptors are expressed at much lower densities in other forebrain neurons but play a more prominent yet opposing role to striatal receptors in response to psychostimulants in mice. It is, therefore, possible that A(2A) receptors expressed at low levels elsewhere in the brain may also regulate neurotransmitter systems and modulate neuronal functions. Dopamine D₂ receptors play an important role in autoinhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dopamine release in other brain areas. Here, we examined the effect of A(2A) receptor deletion on D₂ receptor-mediated inhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons in the VTA. Spontaneous activity of dopamine neurons was recorded in midbrain slices, and concentration-dependent effects of the dopamine D₂ receptor agonist, quinpirole, was compared between wild-type and A(2A) knockout mice. The potency of quinpirole applied in single concentrations and the expression of D₂ receptors were not altered in the VTA of the knockout mice. However, quinpirole applied in stepwise escalating concentrations caused significantly reduced maximal inhibition in A(2A) knockout mice, indicating an enhanced agonist-induced desensitization of D₂ receptors in the absence of A(2A) receptors. The A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS21680, did not exert any effect on dopamine neuron firing or response to quinpirole, revealing a novel non-pharmacological interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors and dopaminergic neurotransmission in midbrain dopamine neurons. Altered D₂ receptor desensitization may result in changes in dopamine neuron firing rate and pattern and dopamine

  12. PKA-mediated responses in females' estrous cycle affect cocaine-induced responses in dopamine-mediated intracellular cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, J; Sun, W Lun; Zhou, L; Kreiter, C M; Jenab, S; Quiñones-Jenab, V

    2009-07-01

    An extensive body of literature provides evidence for both sexual dimorphism and menstrual cycle effects in drug abuse patterns and behavioral responses. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying sexually dimorphic responses to and hormonal effects on cocaine use remain unclear. We hypothesized that endogenous hormonal fluctuations during the estrous cycle of rats modulate cocaine's effects on dopamine- and PKA-mediated intracellular responses. To test this hypothesis, intact female rats at different stages of their cycle received a single injection of saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg) and were sacrificed after 15 or 60 min. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate putamen (CPu) were dissected and analyzed via Western blot for total and phosphorylated (p-thr34) dopamine- and 3'-5'-cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein with molecular weight 32 kDa (DARPP-32), PP1, PP2B (CNA1 and CNB1 subunits), PKA, CREB, cFOS, and Delta-FosB. Our results show that saline-treated rats had estrous cycle-related differences in protein levels of pCREB, DARPP-32, p-thr34-DARPP-32, PP1, and CNA1. Saline-treated female rats in the estrus stage had higher levels of pCREB in the NAc, but cocaine-treatment lowered pCREB levels. The estrous cycle also significantly affected the magnitude of change for p-thr34-DARPP-32 protein levels in both the NAc and CPu. Sixty minutes of cocaine administration increased p-thr34-DARPP-32 levels in the NAc of rats during estrus and proestrus and in the CPu of rats in diestrus. Furthermore, cocaine-induced changes in PP1 protein levels in the NAc were also affected by the stage of the cycle; 60 min of cocaine administration increased PP1 levels in the NAc of rats during diestrus, whereas PP-1 levels decreased in rats during estrus. Taken together, these novel findings suggest that hormonal fluctuations during the estrous cycle may contribute to the previously reported sex differences in the PKA pathway and in behavioral responses to cocaine. PMID:19348873

  13. Effects of cysteamine on dopamine-mediated behaviors: evidence for dopamine-somatostatin interactions in the striatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Iverson, M.T.; Radke, J.M.; Vincent, S.R.

    1986-06-01

    The effects of prior treatment with cysteamine, a drug which appears to deplete selectively the neuropeptide somatostatin, on apomorphine-induced stereotypy and amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and conditioned place preferences were investigated. Twelve hours following systemic cysteamine injections apomorphine-induced stereotypy was attenuated and striatal somatostatin levels were reduced by half. Systemic cysteamine also decreased the motor stimulant effects of amphetamine, without influencing the rewarding properties as determined by the conditioned place preference procedure. Direct injections of cysteamine into the nucleus accumbens also decreased the locomotor response to amphetamine, and produced a local reduction in somatostatin levels in the accumbens. Cysteamine did not appear to alter monoamine turnover in the striatum after either systemic or intra-accumbens injections. These results suggest that somatostatin in the nucleus accumbens and caudate-putamen modulates the motor, but not the reinforcing properties of dopaminergic drugs, possibly via an action postsynaptic to dopamine-releasing terminals. Furthermore, it is evident from these results that cysteamine is an important tool with which to study the central actions of somatostatin.

  14. An inverse correlation between apparent rate of dopamine clearance and tonic autoinhibition in subdomains of the rat striatum: a possible role of transporter-mediated dopamine efflux

    OpenAIRE

    Moquin, Keith F.; Michael, Adrian C.

    2011-01-01

    The dopaminergic terminal field in the rat striatum is compartmentalized into subdomains that exhibit distinct dynamics of electrically evoked dopamine release. The fast striatal domains, where dopamine release is predominantly vesicular, exhibit conventional dopaminergic activity. However, vesicular dopamine release is tonically autoinhibited in the slow domains, which suggests that dopamine reaches the autoreceptors via a non-vesicular route. Hence, it appears that the domains use distinct ...

  15. Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 is involved in /N-methyl-D-aspartate-mediated neuronal injury in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian DING; Er-qing WEI; Yan-jun ZHANG; Wei-ping ZHANG; Zhong CHEN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1 receptor) is involved in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced excitotoxic injury in the mouse brain. Methods: Brain injury was induced by NMDA microinjection (50-150 nmol in 0.5 μL) into the cerebral cortex. The changes in CysLT1 receptor expression 24 h after NMDA injection and the effects of a CysLT1 receptor antagonist, pranlukast (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg), an NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine (30 mg/kg), and an antioxidant, edaravone (9 mg/kg) were observed. Results: In the NMDA-injured brain, the CysLT1 receptor mRNA, and protein expression were upregulated, and the receptor was mainly localized in the neurons and not in the astrocytes. Pranlukast, ketamine and edaravone decreased NMDA-induced injury;pranlukast (0.1 mg/kg) and ketamine inhibited the upregulated expression of the CysLT1 receptor. Conclusion: CysLT1 receptor expression in neurons is upregulated after NMDA injection, and NMDA-induced responses are inhibited by CysLT1 receptor antagonists, indicating that the increased CysLT1 receptor is involved in NMDA excitotoxicity.

  16. Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Protein Cry6Aa Triggers Caenorhabditis elegans Necrosis Pathway Mediated by Aspartic Protease (ASP-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjuan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell death plays an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Crystal proteins (toxins are essential components of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt biological pesticides because of their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. However, the mode of action by which crystal toxins to induce cell death is not completely understood. Here we show that crystal toxin triggers cell death by necrosis signaling pathway using crystal toxin Cry6Aa-Caenorhabditis elegans toxin-host interaction system, which involves an increase in concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium, lysosomal lyses, uptake of propidium iodide, and burst of death fluorescence. We find that a deficiency in the necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Cry6Aa toxin. Intriguingly, the necrosis pathway is specifically triggered by Cry6Aa, not by Cry5Ba, whose amino acid sequence is different from that of Cry6Aa. Furthermore, Cry6Aa-induced necrosis pathway requires aspartic protease (ASP-1. In addition, ASP-1 protects Cry6Aa from over-degradation in C. elegans. This is the first demonstration that deficiency in necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Bt crystal protein, and that Cry6A triggers necrosis represents a newly added necrosis paradigm in the C. elegans. Understanding this model could lead to new strategies for nematode control.

  17. Mesolimbic dopamine neurons in the brain reward circuit mediate susceptibility to social defeat and antidepressant action

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jun-Li; Covington, Herbert E.; Friedman, Allyson K.; Wilkinson, Matthew B.; Walsh, Jessica J.; Cooper, Donald C.; Nestler, Eric J.; Han, Ming-Hu

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that the activity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is a key determinant of behavioral susceptibility vs. resilience to chronic social defeat stress. However, this was based solely on ex vivo measurements, and the in vivo firing properties of VTA dopamine neurons in susceptible and resilient mice, as well as the effects of antidepressant treatments, remain completely unknown. Here, we show that chronic (10-day) social defeat stress signi...

  18. Opposite function of dopamine D1 and NMDA receptors in striatal cannabinoid-mediated signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Daigle, Tanya L.; Wetsel, William C.; Caron, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that the cannabinoid and dopamine systems interact at various levels to regulate basal ganglia function. While it is well known that acute administration of cannabinoids to mice can modify dopamine-dependent behaviors, an understanding of the intraneuronal signaling pathways employed by these agents in the striatum is not well understood. Here we use knockout (KO) mouse models to examine the regulation of striatal ERK1/2 signaling by behaviorally relevant doses of canna...

  19. Food Restriction Increases Glutamate Receptor-Mediated Burst Firing of Dopamine Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Branch, Sarah Y.; Goertz, R. Brandon; Sharpe, Amanda L.; Pierce, Janie; Roy, Sudip; Ko, Daijin; Paladini, Carlos A; Beckstead, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Restriction of food intake increases the acquisition of drug abuse behavior and enhances the reinforcing efficacy of those drugs. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms responsible for the interactions between feeding state and drug use are largely unknown. Here we show that chronic mild food restriction increases the burst firing of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra. Dopamine neurons from food-restricted mice exhibited increased burst firing in vivo, an effect that was enhanced by...

  20. Changes in synaptic and extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated currents at early-stage epileptogenesis in adult mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juegang Ju; Sheng-tian Li

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are extensively involved in epilepsy genesis and recurrence.Recent studies have shown that synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play different, or even opposing, roles in various signaling pathways, including synaptic plasticity and neuronal death.The present study analyzed changes in synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated currents during epilepsy onset.Mouse models of lithium chloride pilocarpine-induced epilepsy were established, and hippocampal slices were prepared at 24 hours after the onset of status epilepticus.Synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory post-synaptic currents (NMDA-EPSCs) were recorded in CA1 pyramidal neurons by whole-cell patch clamp technique.Results demonstrated no significant difference in rise and delay time of synaptic NMDA-EPSCs compared with normal neurons.Peak amplitude, area-to-peak ratio,and rising time of extrasynaptic NMDA-EPSCs remained unchanged, but decay of extrasynaptic NMDA-EPSCs was faster than that of normal neurons.These results suggest that extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play a role in epileptogenesis.

  1. Proerectile Effects of Dopamine D2-Like Agonists Are Mediated by the D3 Receptor in Rats and Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Gregory T; Truccone, Andrew; Haji-Abdi, Faiza; Newman, Amy Hauck; Grundt, Peter; Rice, Kenner C.; Husbands, Stephen M.; Greedy, Benjamin M.; Enguehard-Gueiffier, Cecile; Gueiffier, Alain; Chen, Jianyong; Wang, Shaomeng; Katz, Jonathan L.; Grandy, David K.; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2009-01-01

    Dopamine D2-like agonists induce penile erection (PE) and yawning in a variety of species, effects that have been suggested recently to be specifically mediated by the D4 and D3 receptors, respectively. The current studies were aimed at characterizing a series of D2, D3, and D4 agonists with respect to their capacity to induce PE and yawning in the rat and the proerectile effects of apomorphine [(R)-(-)-5,6,6a,7-tetrahydro-6-methyl-4H-dibenzo-[de,g]quinoline-10,11-...

  2. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in nucleus accumbens plays a more important role than that in dorsal striatum in cognitive flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuekun eDing

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive flexibility is a critical ability for adapting to an ever-changing environment in humans and animals. Deficits in cognitive flexibility are observed in most schizophrenia patients. Previous studies reported that the medial prefrontal cortex-to-ventral striatum and orbital frontal cortex-to-dorsal striatum circuits play important roles in extra- and intra-dimensional strategy switching, respectively. However, the precise function of striatal subregions in flexible behaviors is still unclear. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs are major glutamate receptors in the striatum that receive glutamatergic projections from the frontal cortex. The membrane insertion of Ca2+-permeable α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs depends on NMDAR activation and is required in learning and memory processes. In the present study, we measured set-shifting and reversal learning performance in operant chambers in rats and assessed the effects of blocking NMDARs and Ca2+-permeable AMPARs in striatal subregions on behavioral flexibility. The blockade of NMDARs in the nucleus accumbens (NAc core by AP5 impaired set-shifting ability by causing a failure to modify prior learning. The suppression of NMDAR-mediated transmission in the NAc shell induced a deficit in set-shifting by disrupting the learning and maintenance of novel strategies. During reversal learning, infusions of AP5 into the NAc shell and core impaired the ability to learn and maintain new strategies. However, behavioral flexibility was not significantly affected by blocking NMDARs in the dorsal striatum. We also found that the blockade of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs by NASPM in any subregion of the striatum did not affect strategy switching. These findings suggest that NMDAR-mediated glutamate transmission in the NAc contributes more to cognitive execution compared with the dorsal striatum.

  3. Methamphetamine Increases Locomotion and Dopamine Transporter Activity in Dopamine D5 Receptor-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashizaki, Seiji; Hirai, Shinobu; Ito, Yumi; Honda, Yoshiko; Arime, Yosefu; Sora, Ichiro; Okado, Haruo; Kodama, Tohru; Takada, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine regulates the psychomotor stimulant activities of amphetamine-like substances in the brain. The effects of dopamine are mediated through five known dopamine receptor subtypes in mammals. The functional relevance of D5 dopamine receptors in the central nervous system is not well understood. To determine the functional relevance of D5 dopamine receptors, we created D5 dopamine receptor-deficient mice and then used these mice to assess the roles of D5 dopamine receptors in the behaviora...

  4. Dopamine-induced amylase secretion from rat parotid salivary gland in vitro: an effect mediated via noradrenergic and cholinergic nerves.

    OpenAIRE

    Hata, F.; Ishida, H.; Kondo, E.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of dopamine on amylase secretion by rat parotid tissue was examined in vitro. Dopamine induced marked amylase secretion from the tissue in a dose-dependent manner. Its EC50 value was about 4 microM and the maximal response was obtained at a concentration of 100 microM. The dopamine-induced secretion was inhibited by the dopamine-antagonists haloperidol, (+)-butaclamol and spiroperidol. Atropine reduced the dopamine-induced secretion significantly, and physostigmine enhanced the sec...

  5. Electrical release of dopamine and levodopa mediated by amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins immobilized on polycrystalline gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foschi, Giulia; Leonardi, Francesca; Scala, Angela; Biscarini, Fabio; Kovtun, Alessandro; Liscio, Andrea; Mazzaglia, Antonino; Casalini, Stefano

    2015-12-21

    Vesicles of cationic amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins have been immobilized on polycrystalline gold by exploiting the chemical affinity between their amino groups and Au atoms. The presence of cyclodextrins has been widely investigated by means of AFM, XPS, kelvin probe and electrochemical measurements. This multi-functional coating confers distinct electrochemical features such as pH-dependent behavior and partial/total blocking properties towards electro-active species. The host-guest properties of β-cyclodextrins have been successfully exploited in order to trap drugs, like dopamine and levodopa. The further release of these drugs was successfully achieved by providing specific electrical stimuli. This proof-of-concept led us to fabricate an electronic device (i.e. an organic transistor) capable of dispensing both dopamine and levodopa in aqueous solution. PMID:26565988

  6. Distinct dopamine neurons mediate reward signals for short- and long-term memories

    OpenAIRE

    Yamagata, N; T. Ichinose; Aso, Y; Placais, P.; Friedrich, A.; Sima, R.; Preat, T.; Rubin, G; Tanimoto, H.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster can acquire a stable appetitive olfactory memory when the presentation of a sugar reward and an odor are paired. However, the neuronal mechanisms by which a single training induces long-term memory are poorly understood. Here we show that two distinct subsets of dopamine neurons in the fly brain signal reward for short-term (STM) and long-term memories (LTM). One subset induces memory that decays within several hours, whereas the other induces memory that gradually dev...

  7. Neurotensin Induces Presynaptic Depression of D2 Dopamine Autoreceptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Piccart, Elisabeth; Courtney, Nicholas A.; Branch, Sarah Y.; Ford, Christopher P.; Beckstead, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Increased dopaminergic signaling is a hallmark of severe mesencephalic pathologies such as schizophrenia and psychostimulant abuse. Activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons is under strict control of inhibitory D2 autoreceptors. Application of the modulatory peptide neurotensin (NT) to midbrain dopaminergic neurons transiently increases activity by decreasing D2 dopamine autoreceptor function, yet little is known about the mechanisms that underlie long-lasting effects. Here, we performed pat...

  8. Electrical release of dopamine and levodopa mediated by amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins immobilized on polycrystalline gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foschi, Giulia; Leonardi, Francesca; Scala, Angela; Biscarini, Fabio; Kovtun, Alessandro; Liscio, Andrea; Mazzaglia, Antonino; Casalini, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Vesicles of cationic amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins have been immobilized on polycrystalline gold by exploiting the chemical affinity between their amino groups and Au atoms. The presence of cyclodextrins has been widely investigated by means of AFM, XPS, kelvin probe and electrochemical measurements. This multi-functional coating confers distinct electrochemical features such as pH-dependent behavior and partial/total blocking properties towards electro-active species. The host-guest properties of β-cyclodextrins have been successfully exploited in order to trap drugs, like dopamine and levodopa. The further release of these drugs was successfully achieved by providing specific electrical stimuli. This proof-of-concept led us to fabricate an electronic device (i.e. an organic transistor) capable of dispensing both dopamine and levodopa in aqueous solution.Vesicles of cationic amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins have been immobilized on polycrystalline gold by exploiting the chemical affinity between their amino groups and Au atoms. The presence of cyclodextrins has been widely investigated by means of AFM, XPS, kelvin probe and electrochemical measurements. This multi-functional coating confers distinct electrochemical features such as pH-dependent behavior and partial/total blocking properties towards electro-active species. The host-guest properties of β-cyclodextrins have been successfully exploited in order to trap drugs, like dopamine and levodopa. The further release of these drugs was successfully achieved by providing specific electrical stimuli. This proof-of-concept led us to fabricate an electronic device (i.e. an organic transistor) capable of dispensing both dopamine and levodopa in aqueous solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Kelvin probe, AFM and electrochemical data are reported. Furthermore, the chemical backbone of both types of cyclodextrins are shown. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05405b

  9. Redox-Mediated Indirect Fluorescence Immunoassay for the Detection of Disease Biomarkers Using Dopamine-Functionalized Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Ma, Wei; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-05-17

    Here, we report a redox-mediated indirect fluorescence immunoassay (RMFIA) for the detection of the disease biomarker α-fetoprotein (AFP) using dopamine (DA)-functionalized CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). In this immunoassay, tyrosinase was conjugated with the detection antibody and acted as a bridge connecting the fluorescence signals of the QDs with the concentration of the disease biomarkers. The tyrosinase label used for RMFIA catalyzed the enzymatic oxidation of DAs on the surface of functionalized QDs and caused fluorescence quenching in the presence of the analyte. Using this technique, we obtained a limit of detection as low as 10 pM for AFP. This assay's potential for clinical analysis was demonstrated by detecting the real sera of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study makes the first use of RMFIA for the rapid detection of AFP, opening up a new pathway for the detection of disease biomarkers. PMID:27086777

  10. alpha. sub 2 -mediated effect of dopamine on the motility of the chicken esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Costa, G.; Benedito, S.; Garcia-Sacristan, L.R.A.; Orensanz, L. M. (Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain))

    1990-01-01

    Dopamine (DA), apomorphine and B-HT 933 produced dose related contractions on isolated longitudinal strips of chicken esophagus, whereas phenylephrine elicited no effect. DA induced contractions of myogenic origin, these contractions were insensitive to DA antagonists and were partially suppressed by yohimbine, which suggested an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic implication in this DA effect. This hypothesis was further investigated by performing binding experiments, in which B-HT 933 displaced the binding of ({sup 3}H) DA to esophageal homogenates. The results suggest the participation of an {alpha}{sub 2} - adrenergic receptor in the contractile response elicited by DA in the isolated chicken esophagus.

  11. Electrophysiological and biochemical studies of slow responses to serotonin and dopamine of snail identified neurons. Mediating role of the cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research thesis, the electrophysiological study of slow incoming currents induced in some identified neurons of the Helix aspersa snail by serotonin and dopamine shows that they are associated with a decrease of a potassium conductance involved in the modulation of the action potential duration. By means of enzymatic tests performed on a single cell, and of electrophysiological experiments, the author shows that the cyclic AMP is an intracellular mediator involved in the genesis of these slow responses. Moreover, the obtained results show that serotonin and dopamine act by binding to specific receptors, and that these receptors activate the adenylate-cyclase through a GTP binding protein

  12. Dopamine-mediated reinforcement learning signals in the striatum and ventromedial prefrontal cortex underlie value-based choices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jocham, G.; Klein, T.A.; Ullsperger, M.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of evidence exists on the role of dopamine in reinforcement learning. Less is known about how dopamine shapes the relative impact of positive and negative outcomes to guide value-based choices. We combined administration of the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist amisulpride with functional

  13. Exploration of sex differences in Rhes effects in dopamine mediated behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintero GC

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel C Quintero1,2, Daniela Spano31INDICASAT AIP, Centro de Neurociencias, Panamá, 2Department of Psychology, University of New Orleans, N Orleans, Louisiana, USA; 3CEINGE Biotechnologie Avanzate, Naples, ItalyAbstract: Studies have shown that Ras homolog enriched in striatum (Rhes proteins are highly expressed in areas of the central nervous system that have high dopaminergic innervation. In this study, we used Rhes mutant mice (Wild type, Rhes KO, Rhes Heterozygous of both sexes to explore differences in the effects of Rhes protein levels in basal levels of activity, anxiety, and stereotypy, in relation to sex. Adult male and female mice were evaluated in an open field test for measuring basal levels of activity and anxiety for 5 consecutive days, and they were tested in the apomorphine-induced stereotypy paradigm. Rhes protein levels affected basal levels of activity but it was not found to be related to sex differences. Moreover, a decrease in Rhes protein levels was linked to a nonsignificant anxiolytic effect, mainly in female mice. Finally, a decrease in Rhes protein levels does not affect dopamine D1 and D2 receptor (D1/D2 synergism in female or male mice. Together, these results suggest that Rhes protein levels affect locomotion activity, and have an influence in anxiety depending on sex; Rhes protein levels do not affect D1/D2 synergism in both sexes.Keywords: behavior, dopamine receptor, Rhes protein, mutant mice, sexes

  14. Dopamine-Mediated Autocrine Inhibitory Circuit Regulating Human Insulin Secretion in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Norman; Maffei, Antonella; Freeby, Matthew; Burroughs, Steven; Freyberg, Zachary; Javitch, Jonathan; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a negative feedback autocrine regulatory circuit for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in purified human islets in vitro. Using chronoamperometry and in vitro glucose-stimulated insulin secretion measurements, evidence is provided that dopamine (DA), which is loaded into insulin-containing secretory granules by vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 in human β-cells, is released in response to glucose stimulation. DA then acts as a negative regulator of insulin secretion via its action on D2R, which are also expressed on β-cells. We found that antagonism of receptors participating in islet DA signaling generally drive increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These in vitro observations may represent correlates of the in vivo metabolic changes associated with the use of atypical antipsychotics, such as increased adiposity. PMID:22915827

  15. Mediating effect of dopamine D3 receptors on Jak2 and GABAAα1 expression in mouse brains induced by cocaine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Nu-yun; ZHANG Lu; ZHANG Lin; WANG Xiao-ning

    2007-01-01

    Background Cocaine addiction may involve complex neuroadaptations, including many changes of genes expression.Dopamine D3 receptors play an important role in cocaine addiction; however, its role in cocaine induced gene expression change is poorly understood. To identify the changes in gene expression induced by repeated cocaine exposure through D3 dopamine receptors, we compared the expression of four molecules: Janus kinase 2 (Jak2), g-aminobutanoic acid receptor subunit alpha 1 (GABAAα1), glutamate receptor AMPA3 alpha 3 (GluR 3) and stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1). These four have been implicated in mediating the actions of cocaine in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudoputamen (CPu) in mice after acute and repeated cocaine exposure.Methods For the acute and repeated injections, the mice were divided into four groups: 30 mg/kg cocaine, nafadotride 0.5 mg/kg + cocaine 30 mg/kg, nafadotride 0.5 mg/kg, and saline as the basal group. The expression of Jak2, GABAAα1,GluR 3 and SDF1 were assayed by Western blot, quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry.Results Twenty-four hours after seven consecutive days of repeated cocaine exposure, the expression of GABAAα1 decreased in cocaine group compared with basal line and further decreased in the cocaine + nafadotride group and remained at basal level in the nafadotride group. Similarly, the Jak2 expression decreased in cocaine group compared with base line. However, the levels of Jak2 increased in cocaine + nafadotride group compared with cocaine group, while remained at basal level in nafadotride group.Conclusions GABAAα1 and Jak2 may be involved in chronic cocaine induced neuroadaptations. D3 dopaminereceptors play an important role in the expression of these genes.

  16. Nucleus Accumbens and Dopamine-Mediated Turning Behavior of the Rat: Role of Accumbal Non-dopaminergic Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, H.; KAMEI, J.; N. Koshikawa; Cools, A R

    2012-01-01

    Accumbal dopamine plays an important role in physiological responses and diseases such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and depression. Since the nucleus accumbens contains different neurotransmitters, it is important to know how they interact with dopaminergic function: this is because modifying accumbal dopamine has far-reaching consequences for the treatment of diseases in which accumbal dopamine is involved. This review provides a summary of these interactions, and our current knowl...

  17. M5 Muscarinic Receptors Mediate Striatal Dopamine Activation by Ventral Tegmental Morphine and Pedunculopontine Stimulation in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Steidl, Stephan; Miller, Anthony D.; Blaha, Charles D.; Yeomans, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Opiates, like other addictive drugs, elevate forebrain dopamine levels and are thought to do so mainly by inhibiting GABA neurons near the ventral tegmental area (VTA), in turn leading to a disinhibition of dopamine neurons. However, cholinergic inputs from the laterodorsal (LDT) and pedunculopontine (PPT) tegmental nucleus to the VTA and substantia nigra (SN) importantly contribute, as either LDT or PPT lesions strongly attenuate morphine-induced forebrain dopamine elevations. Pharmacologica...

  18. A Role for Dopamine-Mediated Learning in the Pathophysiology and Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jeff A. Beeler; Michael J. Frank; John McDaid; Erin Alexander; Susie Turkson; Maria Sol Bernandez; Daniel S. McGehee; Xiaoxi Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine contributes to corticostriatal plasticity and motor learning. Dopamine denervation profoundly alters motor performance, as in Parkinson’s disease (PD); however, the extent to which these symptoms reflect impaired motor learning is unknown. Here, we demonstrate a D2 receptor blockade-induced aberrant learning that impedes future motor performance when dopamine signaling is restored, an effect diminished by coadministration of adenosine antagonists during blockade. We hypothesize that ...

  19. Antidepressant treatments: effects in rodents on dose-response curves of 5-hydroxytryptamine- and dopamine-mediated behaviours and 5-HT2 receptor number in frontal cortex.

    OpenAIRE

    Green, A. R.; Heal, D. J.; Johnson, P.; Laurence, B. E.; Nimgaonkar, V. L.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of repeated electroconvulsive shock (ECS) administration, repeated desmethylimipramine injection (5 mg kg-1, twice daily for 14 days) and acute administration of the beta-adrenoceptor, clenbuterol, on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)- and dopamine-mediated behaviours in mice have been examined. All three treatments enhanced the carbidopa/5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)-induced head-twitch response at all doses of 5-HTP examined, producing a parallel shift in the dose-response curve. A singl...

  20. The Dopamine D4 Receptor (DRD4) Gene Exon III Polymorphism, Problematic Alcohol Use, and Novelty Seeking: Direct and Mediated Genetic Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, Lara A.; MacKillop, James; Hesterberg, Kirstin; Bryan, Angela; McGeary, John; Hutchison, Kent E.

    2008-01-01

    The present study sought to integrate convergent lines of research on the associations among the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene, novelty seeking, and drinking behaviors with the overall goal of elucidating genetic influences on problematic drinking in young adulthood. Specifically, this study tested a model in which novelty seeking mediated the relationship between DRD4 VNTR genotype and problematic alcohol use. Participants (N = 90, 40 females) were heavy drinking college students. Analyse...

  1. Glucocorticoid receptor mediated the propofol self-administration by dopamine D1 receptor in nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binbin; Liang, Yuyuan; Dong, Zhanglei; Chen, Zhichuan; Zhang, Gaolong; Lin, Wenxuan; Wang, Sicong; Wang, Benfu; Ge, Ren-Shan; Lian, Qingquan

    2016-07-22

    Propofol, a widely used anesthetic, can cause addictive behaviors in both human and experimental animals. In the present study, we examined the involvement of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling in the molecular process by which propofol may cause addiction. The propofol self-administration model was established by a fixed ratio 1 (FR1) schedule of reinforced dosing over successive 14days in rats. On day 15, the rats were treated with dexamethasone, a GR agonist (10-100μg/kg), or RU486, a GR antagonist (10-100μg/kg) at 1h prior to the last training. The animal behaviors were recorded automatically by the computer. The expression of dopamine D1 receptor in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was examined by Western blot and the concentrations of plasma corticosterone were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To further examine the specificity of GR in the process, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, spironolactone, and dexamethasone plus MR agonist, aldosterone, were also tested. Administration of dexamethasone (100μg/kg) or RU486 (⩾10mg/kg) significantly attenuated the rate of propofol maintained active nose-poke responses and infusions, which were accompanied by reductions in both plasma corticosterone level and the expression of D1 receptor in the NAc. Neither spironolactone alone nor dexamethasone combined with aldosterone affected the propofol-maintaining self-administrative behavior, indicating GR, but not MR, modulates the propofol reward in rats. In addition, neither the food-maintaining sucrose responses under FR1 schedule nor the locomotor activity was affected by any doses of dexamethasone or RU486 tested. These findings provide evidence that GR signaling may play an important role in propofol reward. PMID:27126557

  2. Acute Ethanol Exposure Prevents PMA-mediated Augmentation of N-methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Function in Primary Cultured Cerebellar Granule Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reneau, Jason; Reyland, Mary E.; Popp, R. Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Many intracellular proteins and signaling cascades contribute to the ethanol sensitivity of native N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). One putative protein is the serine / threonine kinase, Protein kinase C (PKC). The purpose of this study was to assess if PKC modulates the ethanol sensitivity of native NMDARs expressed in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). With the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we assessed if ethanol inhibition of NMDA-induced currents (INMDA) (100 μM...

  3. D1 dopamine receptor-mediated LTP at GABA synapses encodes motivation to self-administer cocaine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Michal; Mason, Xenos; DeBacker, Julian; Sharma, Robyn; Normandeau, Catherine P; Hawken, Emily R; Di Prospero, Cynthia; Chiang, Cindy; Martinez, Audrey; Jones, Andrea A; Doudnikoff, Évelyne; Caille, Stephanie; Bézard, Erwan; Georges, François; Dumont, Éric C

    2013-07-17

    Enhanced motivation to take drugs is a central characteristic of addiction, yet the neural underpinning of this maladaptive behavior is still largely unknown. Here, we report a D1-like dopamine receptor (DRD1)-mediated long-term potentiation of GABAA-IPSCs (D1-LTPGABA) in the oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis that was positively correlated with motivation to self-administer cocaine in rats. Likewise, in vivo intra-oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis DRD1 pharmacological blockade reduced lever pressing for cocaine more effectively in rats showing enhanced motivation toward cocaine. D1-LTPGABA resulted from enhanced function and expression of G-protein-independent DRD1 coupled to c-Src tyrosine kinases and required local release of neurotensin. There was no D1-LTPGABA in rats that self-administered sucrose, in those with limited cocaine self-administration experience, or in those that received cocaine passively (yoked). Therefore, our study reveals a novel neurophysiological mechanism contributing to individual motivation to self-administer cocaine, a critical psychobiological element of compulsive drug use and addiction. PMID:23864683

  4. Progressive neurodegenerative and behavioural changes induced by AAV-mediated overexpression of α-synuclein in midbrain dopamine neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decressac, M; Mattsson, Bente; Lundblad, M;

    2012-01-01

    have failed to show a consistent behavioural phenotype and pronounced dopamine neurodegeneration. Using a more efficient adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector construct, which includes a WPRE enhancer element and uses the neuron-specific synapsin-1 promoter to drive the expression of human wild-type α......Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by the progressive loss of nigral dopamine neurons and the presence of synucleinopathy. Overexpression of α-synuclein in vivo using viral vectors has opened interesting possibilities to model PD-like pathology in rodents. However, the attempts made so far......-synuclein, we have now been able to achieve increased levels of α-synuclein in the transduced midbrain dopamine neurons sufficient to induce profound deficits in motor function, accompanied by reduced expression of proteins involved in dopamine neurotransmission and a time-dependent loss of nigral dopamine...

  5. Hypocretin/Orexin Regulation of Dopamine Signaling and Cocaine Self-Administration Is Mediated Predominantly by Hypocretin Receptor 1

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, Courtney D.; Rau, Andrew R; Yorgason, Jordan T.; España, Rodrigo A.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive evidence suggests that the hypocretins/orexins influence cocaine reinforcement and dopamine signaling via actions at hypocretin receptor 1. By comparison, the involvement of hypocretin receptor 2 in reward and reinforcement processes has received relatively little attention. Thus, although there is some evidence that hypocretin receptor 2 regulates intake of some drugs of abuse, it is currently unclear to what extent hypocretin receptor 2 participates in the regulation of dopamine s...

  6. Proerectile effects of dopamine D2-like agonists are mediated by the D3 receptor in rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gregory T; Truccone, Andrew; Haji-Abdi, Faiza; Newman, Amy Hauck; Grundt, Peter; Rice, Kenner C; Husbands, Stephen M; Greedy, Benjamin M; Enguehard-Gueiffier, Cecile; Gueiffier, Alain; Chen, Jianyong; Wang, Shaomeng; Katz, Jonathan L; Grandy, David K; Sunahara, Roger K; Woods, James H

    2009-04-01

    Dopamine D(2)-like agonists induce penile erection (PE) and yawning in a variety of species, effects that have been suggested recently to be specifically mediated by the D(4) and D(3) receptors, respectively. The current studies were aimed at characterizing a series of D(2), D(3), and D(4) agonists with respect to their capacity to induce PE and yawning in the rat and the proerectile effects of apomorphine [(R)-(-)-5,6,6a,7-tetrahydro-6-methyl-4H-dibenzo-[de,g]quinoline-10,11-diol hydrochloride] in wild-type and D(4) receptor (R) knockout (KO) mice. All D(3) agonists induced dose-dependent increases in PE and yawning over a similar range of doses, whereas significant increases in PE or yawning were not observed with any of the D(4) agonists. Likewise, D(2), D(3), and D(4) antagonists were assessed for their capacity to alter apomorphine- and pramipexole (N'-propyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzothiazole-2,6-diamine dihydrochloride)-induced PE and yawning. The D(3) antagonist, PG01037 [N-{4-[4-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-trans-but-2-enyl}-4-pyridine-2-yl-benzamide hydrochloride], inhibited the induction of PE and yawning, whereas the D(2) antagonist, L-741,626 [3-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-l-yl]methyl-1H-indole], reversed the inhibition of PE and yawning observed at higher doses. The D(4) antagonist, L-745,870 [3-(4-[4-chlorophenyl]piperazin-1-yl)-methyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine trihydrochloride], did not alter apomorphine- or pramipexole-induced PE or yawning. A role for the D(3) receptor was further supported because apomorphine was equipotent at inducing PE in wild-type and D(4)RKO mice, effects that were inhibited by the D(3) antagonist, PG01037, in both wild-type and D(4)R KO mice. Together, these studies provide strong support that D(2)-like agonist-induced PE and yawning are differentially mediated by the D(3) (induction) and D(2) (inhibition) receptors. These studies fail to support a role for the D(4) receptor in the regulation of PE or

  7. Insulin aspart pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Roge, Rikke Meldgaard; Ma, Zhulin;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insulin aspart (IAsp) is used by many diabetics as a meal-time insulin to control postprandial glucose levels. As is the case with many other insulin types, the pharmacokinetics (PK), and consequently the pharmacodynamics (PD), is associated with clinical variability, both between and...

  8. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  9. NK3 Receptors mediate an increase in firing rate of midbrain dopamine neurons of the rat and the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.R. Werkman; A.C. McCreary; C.G. Kruse; W.J. Wadman

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study investigates and compares the effects of NK3 receptor ligands on the firing rate of rat and guinea pig midbrain dopamine neurons. The findings are discussed in the light of choosing suitable animal models for investigating pharmacological properties of NK3 receptor antagonists, w

  10. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) mediates L-glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release via swelling-activated anion channels in cultured neonatal rodent astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Darius J R; Lawen, Alfons

    2013-03-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbate) plays important neuroprotective and neuromodulatory roles in the mammalian brain. Astrocytes are crucially involved in brain ascorbate homeostasis and may assist in regenerating extracellular ascorbate from its oxidised forms. Ascorbate accumulated by astrocytes can be released rapidly by a process that is stimulated by the excitatory amino acid, L-glutamate. This process is thought to be neuroprotective against excitotoxicity. Although of potential clinical interest, the mechanism of this stimulated ascorbate-release remains unknown. Here, we report that primary cultures of mouse and rat astrocytes release ascorbate following initial uptake of dehydroascorbate and accumulation of intracellular ascorbate. Ascorbate-release was not due to cellular lysis, as assessed by cellular release of the cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, and was stimulated by L-glutamate and L-aspartate, but not the non-excitatory amino acid L-glutamine. This stimulation was due to glutamate-induced cellular swelling, as it was both attenuated by hypertonic and emulated by hypotonic media. Glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release was also sensitive to inhibitors of volume-sensitive anion channels, suggesting that the latter may provide the conduit for ascorbate efflux. Glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release was not recapitulated by selective agonists of either ionotropic or group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, but was completely blocked by either of two compounds, TFB-TBOA and UCPH-101, which non-selectively and selectively inhibit the glial Na(+)-dependent excitatory amino acid transporter, GLAST, respectively. These results suggest that an impairment of astrocytic ascorbate-release may exacerbate neuronal dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders and acute brain injury in which excitotoxicity and/or GLAST deregulation have been implicated. PMID:22886112

  11. Potentiation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated neuronal injury during methamphetamine withdrawal in vitro requires co-activation of IP3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine J; Butler, Tracy R; Self, Rachel L; Braden, Brittany B; Prendergast, Mark A

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that methamphetamine (METH) functions acutely to inhibit N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor function. Protracted withdrawal from METH exposure may increase the sensitivity of NMDA receptors to agonist exposure, promoting neuronal excitability. However, the relevance of METH effects on NMDA receptor activity with regard to neuronal viability has not been fully studied. The present studies examined the effects of protracted METH exposure (6 or 7 days; 1.0-100 microM) and withdrawal (1 or 7 days) on NMDA receptor-dependent neurotoxicity, determined with use of the non-vital fluorescent marker propidium iodide, in organotypic slice cultures of male and female rats. Prolonged exposure to METH (100 microM) produced only modest toxicity in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Withdrawal from METH exposure (1 or 7 days) did not produce overt neuronal injury in any region of slice cultures. Exposure to NMDA (5 microM) produced marked neurotoxicity in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Neither co-exposure to METH nor 1 day of METH withdrawal in combination with NMDA exposure altered NMDA-induced neurotoxicity. In contrast, protracted withdrawal from METH exposure (7 days) was associated with a marked (approximately 400%) increase in NMDA-induced neurotoxicity in CA1 region pyramidal cells. This potentiation of neurotoxicity was prevented by co-exposure to the selective NMDA receptor antagonist 5-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (20 microM) and was markedly attenuated by co-exposure of slices to xestospongin C (1 microM), an antagonist of IP(3) receptors. The results of the present studies suggest that long-term METH withdrawal functionally sensitizes the NMDA receptor to agonist exposure and requires the co-activation of NMDA and IP(3) receptors. PMID:18021755

  12. Mechanisms responsible for the effect of median nerve electrical stimulation on traumatic brain injury-induced coma: orexin-A-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhen; Du, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the median nerve is a noninvasive technique that facilitates awakening from coma. In rats with traumatic brain injury-induced coma, median nerve stimulation markedly enhances prefrontal cortex expression of orexin-A and its receptor, orexin receptor 1. To further understand the mechanism underlying wakefulness mediated by electrical stimulation of the median nerve, we evaluated its effects on the expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 in the prefrontal cortex in rat models of traumatic brain injury-induced coma, using immunohistochemistry and western blot assays. In rats with traumatic brain injury, NR1 expression increased with time after injury. Rats that underwent electrical stimulation of the median nerve (30 Hz, 0.5 ms, 1.0 mA for 15 minutes) showed elevated NR1 expression and greater recovery of consciousness than those without stimulation. These effects were reduced by intracerebroventricular injection of the orexin receptor 1 antagonist SB334867. Our results indicate that electrical stimulation of the median nerve promotes recovery from traumatic brain injury-induced coma by increasing prefrontal cortex NR1 expression via an orexin-A-mediated pathway.

  13. Ghrelin receptor activity amplifies hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-mediated postsynaptic currents and increases phosphorylation of the GluN1 subunit at Ser896 and Ser897.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Brandon G; Isokawa, Masako

    2015-12-01

    Although ghrelin and its cognate receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a) are highly localized in the hypothalamic nuclei for the regulation of metabolic states and feeding, GHSR1a is also highly localized in the hippocampus, suggesting its involvement in extra-hypothalamic functions. Indeed, exogenous application of ghrelin has been reported to improve hippocampal learning and memory. However, the underlying mechanism of ghrelin regulation of hippocampal functions is poorly understood. Here, we report ghrelin-promoted phosphorylation of GluN1 and amplified N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents in the CA1 pyramidal cells of the hippocampus in slice preparations. The ghrelin-induced responses were sensitive to a GHSR1a antagonist and inverse agonist, and were absent in GHSR1a homozygous knock-out mice. These results indicated that activation of GHSR1a was critical in the ghrelin-induced enhancement of the NMDAR function. Interestingly, heterozygous mouse hippocampi were also insensitive to ghrelin treatment, suggesting that a slight reduction in the availability of GHSR1a may be sufficient to negate the effect of ghrelin on GluN1 phosphorylation and NMDAR channel activities. In addition, NMDAR-mediated spike currents, which are of dendritic origin, were blocked by the GHSR1a antagonist, suggesting the presence of GHSR1a on the pyramidal cell dendrites in physical proximity to NMDAR. Together with our findings on the localization of GHSR1a in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, which was shown by fluorescent ghrelin binding, immunoreactivity, and enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene expression, we conclude that the activation of GHSR1a favours rapid modulation of the NMDAR-mediated glutamatergic synaptic transmission by phosphorylating GluN1 in the hippocampus. PMID:26490687

  14. Corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptors mediate the motivation for voluntary wheel running in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebada, Mohamed Elsaed; Kendall, David A; Pardon, Marie-Christine

    2016-09-15

    Physical exercise can improve cognition but whether this is related to motivation levels is unknown. Voluntary wheel running is a rewarding activity proposed as a model of motivation to exercise. To question the potential effects of exercise motivation on subsequent behaviour, we used a pharmacological approach targeting some reward mechanisms. The stress hormone corticosterone has rewarding effects mediated by activation of low affinity glucocorticoid receptors (GR). To investigate whether corticosterone synthesis motivates exercise via activation of GRs and subsequently, impacts on behaviour, we treated C57BL/6J mice acutely with the inhibitor of corticosterone synthesis metyrapone (35mg/kg) or repeatedly with the GR antagonist mifepristone (30mg/kg) prior to 1-h running wheel sessions. To investigate whether reducing motivation to exercise impacts on behaviour, we antagonised running-induced dopamine D2/D3 receptors activation with sulpiride (25 or 50mg/kg) and assessed locomotor, anxiety-related and memory performance after 20 running sessions over 4 weeks. We found that corticosterone synthesis contributes to running levels, but the maintenance of running behaviour was not mediated by activation of GRs. Intermittent exercise was not associated with changes in behavioural or cognitive performance. The persistent reduction in exercise levels triggered by sulpiride also had limited impact on behavioural performance, although the level of performance for some behaviours was related to the level of exercise. Altogether, these findings indicate that corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptor activation contribute to the motivation for wheel running, but suggest that motivation for exercise is not a sufficient factor to alter behaviour in healthy mice. PMID:27233827

  15. On the mechanism of aluminum ion-induced neurotoxicity: The effects of aluminum species on G-protein-mediated processes and on drug interactions with the N-methyl-D-aspartate modulated ionophore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish what effects Al3+ may have on G-protein mediate signal transduction, the effects of Al3+ on the signal-coupling G-protein from retinal rod outer segments (Gt or transducin) have been investigated as a model for the effects of Al3+ on signal transduction by G-proteins in general. In this investigation, we have studied the effects of Al3+ on the isolated, light-dependent rhodopsin catalyzed GTP-GDP exchange on Gt; the light-dependent GTPase activity of Gt; the light-independent cGMP hydrolysis by PDE; and the light activated, rhodopsin catalyzed, cGMP hydrolysis by PDE in vitro. To determine the effects of two defined species of aluminum on N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor-channel modulation we utilized a specific radioligand binding assay. This allowed us to compare the effects of aluminum to other metal ions on specific [3H]MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor-channel complex. This complex is involved in long-term potentiation, which is currently being investigated as the mechanism by which learning and memory occur and has been implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. We have investigated the effects of two different species of aluminum, as well as Ca2+, Zn2+, Mg2+, and Li+ on the specific binding of [3H]MK-801 to the NMDA receptor-channel complex under depolarized conditions

  16. Prenatal L-DOPA exposure produces lasting changes in brain dopamine content, cocaine-induced dopamine release and cocaine conditioned place preference

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Jia-Qian; Jiang, Yan; WANG, Zhihui; McCarthy, Deirdre; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M.; Tropea, Thomas F.; Kosofsky, Barry E.; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine, its receptors and transporter are present in the brain beginning from early in the embryonic period. Dopamine receptor activation can influence developmental events including neurogenesis, neuronal migration and differentiation raising the possibility that dopamine imbalance in the fetal brain can alter development of the brain and behavior. We examined whether elevated dopamine levels during gestation can produce persisting changes in brain dopamine content and dopamine-mediated be...

  17. Interval timing, dopamine, and motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Balcı, Fuat

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine clock hypothesis suggests that the dopamine level determines the speed of the hypothetical internal clock. However, dopaminergic function has also been implicated for motivation and thus the effect of dopaminergic manipulations on timing behavior might also be independently mediated by altered motivational state. Studies that investigated the effect of motivational manipulations on peak responding are reviewed in this paper. The majority of these studies show that a higher reward...

  18. Regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced cellular response during chronic hypoxia in differentiated rat PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of chronic hypoxia on N-methyl-D-aspartate-mediated cellular responses in differentiated PC12 cells. PC12 cells were differentiated by treatment with nerve growth factor. Patch-clamp analysis in differentiated PC12 cells showed that extracellularly applied N-methyl-D-aspartate induced an inward current that was abolished by the presence of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801. Results from Ca(2+) imaging experiments showed that N-methyl-D-aspartate induced an elevation in intracellular free Ca(2+) which was also abolished by MK-801. We also examined the effect of hypoxia on the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced current in nerve growth factor-treated cells. We found that the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced inward current and the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced elevation in intracellular free Ca(2+) were markedly attenuated by chronic hypoxia. We next examined the possibility that the reduced N-methyl-D-aspartate responsiveness was due to down-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor levels. Northern blot and immunoblot analyses showed that both messenger RNA and protein levels for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 were markedly decreased during hypoxia. However, the messenger RNA for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2C was increased, whereas the protein level for subunit 2C did not change. Our results indicate that differentiated PC12 cells express functional N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and that chronic exposure to hypoxia attenuates the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced Ca(2+) accumulation in these cells via down-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1. This mechanism may play an important role in protecting PC12 cells against hypoxic stress. PMID:11113364

  19. Time-dependent effects of repeated THC treatment on dopamine D2/3 receptor-mediated signalling in midbrain and striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournier, Benjamin B; Tsartsalis, Stergios; Dimiziani, Andrea; Millet, Philippe; Ginovart, Nathalie

    2016-09-15

    This study examined the time-course of alterations in levels and functional sensitivities of dopamine D2/3 receptors (D2/3R) during the course and up to 6 weeks following cessation of chronic treatment with Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in rats. THC treatment led to an increase in D2/3R levels in striatum, as assessed using [(3)H]-(+)-PHNO, that was readily observable after one week of treatment, remained stably elevated during the subsequent 2 weeks of treatment, but fully reversed within 2 weeks of THC discontinuation. THC-induced D2/3R alterations were more pronounced and longer lasting in the dopamine cell body regions of the midbrain, wherein [(3)H]-(+)-PHNO binding was still elevated at 2 weeks but back to control values at 6 weeks after THC cessation. Parallel analyses of the psychomotor effects of pre- and post-synaptic doses of quinpirole also showed a pattern of D2/3R functional supersensitivity indicative of more rapid subsidence in striatum than in midbrain following drug cessation. These results indicate that chronic THC is associated with a biochemical and functional sensitization of D2/3R signaling, that these responses show a region-specific temporal pattern and are fully reversible following drug discontinuation. These results suggest that an increased post-synaptic D2/3R function and a decreased DA presynaptic signaling, mediated by increased D2/3R autoinhibition, may predominate during distinct phases of withdrawal and may contribute both to the mechanisms leading to relapse and to cannabinoid withdrawal symptoms. The different rates of normalization of D2/3R function in striatum and midbrain may be critical information for the development of new pharmacotherapies for cannabis dependence. PMID:27233824

  20. Generation of Two Noradrenergic-Specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase-FLPo Knock-In Mice Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeting in Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny J Sun

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 mediated DNA double strand cutting is emerging as a powerful approach to increase rates of homologous recombination of large targeting vectors, but the optimization of parameters, equipment and expertise required remain barriers to successful mouse generation by single-step zygote injection. Here, we sought to apply CRISPR/Cas9 methods to traditional embryonic stem (ES cell targeting followed by blastocyst injection to overcome the common issues of difficult vector construction and low targeting efficiency. To facilitate the study of noradrenergic function, which is implicated in myriad behavioral and physiological processes, we generated two different mouse lines that express FLPo recombinase under control of the noradrenergic-specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH gene. We found that by co-electroporating a circular vector expressing Cas9 and a locus-specific sgRNA, we could target FLPo to the DBH locus in ES cells with shortened 1 kb homology arms. Two different sites in the DBH gene were targeted; the translational start codon with 6-8% targeting efficiency, and the translational stop codon with 75% targeting efficiency. Using this approach, we established two mouse lines with DBH-specific expression of FLPo in brainstem catecholaminergic populations that are publically available on MMRRC (MMRRC_041575-UCD and MMRRC_041577-UCD. Altogether, this study supports simplified, high-efficiency Cas9/CRISPR-mediated targeting in embryonic stem cells for production of knock-in mouse lines in a wider variety of contexts than zygote injection alone.

  1. Generation of Two Noradrenergic-Specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase-FLPo Knock-In Mice Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeting in Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jenny J.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 mediated DNA double strand cutting is emerging as a powerful approach to increase rates of homologous recombination of large targeting vectors, but the optimization of parameters, equipment and expertise required remain barriers to successful mouse generation by single-step zygote injection. Here, we sought to apply CRISPR/Cas9 methods to traditional embryonic stem (ES) cell targeting followed by blastocyst injection to overcome the common issues of difficult vector construction and low targeting efficiency. To facilitate the study of noradrenergic function, which is implicated in myriad behavioral and physiological processes, we generated two different mouse lines that express FLPo recombinase under control of the noradrenergic-specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH) gene. We found that by co-electroporating a circular vector expressing Cas9 and a locus-specific sgRNA, we could target FLPo to the DBH locus in ES cells with shortened 1 kb homology arms. Two different sites in the DBH gene were targeted; the translational start codon with 6–8% targeting efficiency, and the translational stop codon with 75% targeting efficiency. Using this approach, we established two mouse lines with DBH-specific expression of FLPo in brainstem catecholaminergic populations that are publically available on MMRRC (MMRRC_041575-UCD and MMRRC_041577-UCD). Altogether, this study supports simplified, high-efficiency Cas9/CRISPR-mediated targeting in embryonic stem cells for production of knock-in mouse lines in a wider variety of contexts than zygote injection alone. PMID:27441631

  2. Generation of Two Noradrenergic-Specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase-FLPo Knock-In Mice Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeting in Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jenny J; Ray, Russell

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 mediated DNA double strand cutting is emerging as a powerful approach to increase rates of homologous recombination of large targeting vectors, but the optimization of parameters, equipment and expertise required remain barriers to successful mouse generation by single-step zygote injection. Here, we sought to apply CRISPR/Cas9 methods to traditional embryonic stem (ES) cell targeting followed by blastocyst injection to overcome the common issues of difficult vector construction and low targeting efficiency. To facilitate the study of noradrenergic function, which is implicated in myriad behavioral and physiological processes, we generated two different mouse lines that express FLPo recombinase under control of the noradrenergic-specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH) gene. We found that by co-electroporating a circular vector expressing Cas9 and a locus-specific sgRNA, we could target FLPo to the DBH locus in ES cells with shortened 1 kb homology arms. Two different sites in the DBH gene were targeted; the translational start codon with 6-8% targeting efficiency, and the translational stop codon with 75% targeting efficiency. Using this approach, we established two mouse lines with DBH-specific expression of FLPo in brainstem catecholaminergic populations that are publically available on MMRRC (MMRRC_041575-UCD and MMRRC_041577-UCD). Altogether, this study supports simplified, high-efficiency Cas9/CRISPR-mediated targeting in embryonic stem cells for production of knock-in mouse lines in a wider variety of contexts than zygote injection alone. PMID:27441631

  3. Melittin stimulates fatty acid release through non-phospholipase-mediated mechanisms and interacts with the dopamine transporter and other membrane spanning proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Dove J; Eshleman, Amy J; Janowsky, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 releases the fatty acid arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids. We used the purported phospholipase A2 stimulator, melittin, to examine the effects of endogenous arachidonic acid signaling on dopamine transporter function and trafficking. In HEK-293 cells stably transfected with the dopamine transporter, melittin reduced uptake of [3H]dopamine. Additionally, measurements of fatty acid content demonstrated a melittin-induced release of membrane-incorporated arachidonic a...

  4. Modulation of dopamine-mediated facilitation at the neuromuscular junction of Wistar rats: A role for adenosine A1/A2A receptors and P2 purinoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnozahi, Neveen A; AlQot, Hadir E; Mohy El-Din, Mahmoud M; Bistawroos, Azza E; Abou Zeit-Har, Mohamed S

    2016-06-21

    This study aims to understand how dopamine and the neuromodulators, adenosine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) modulate neuromuscular transmission. Adenosine and ATP are well-recognized for their regulatory effects on dopamine in the central nervous system. However, if similar interactions occur at the neuromuscular junction is unknown. We hypothesize that the activation of adenosine A1/A2A and/or P2 purinoceptors may influence the action of dopamine on neuromuscular transmission. Using the rat phrenic nerve hemi-diaphragm, we assessed the influence of dopamine, adenosine and ATP on the height of nerve-evoked muscle twitches. We investigated how the selective blockade of adenosine A1 receptors (2.5nM DPCPX), adenosine A2A receptors (50nM CSC) and P2 purinoceptors (100μM suramin) modified the effects of dopamine. Dopamine alone increased indirect muscle contractions while adenosine and ATP either enhanced or depressed nerve-evoked muscle twitches in a concentration-dependent manner. The facilitatory effects of 256μM dopamine were significantly reduced to 29.62±2.79% or 53.69±5.45% in the presence of DPCPX or CSC, respectively, relative to 70.03±1.57% with dopamine alone. Alternatively, the action of 256μM dopamine was potentiated from 70.03±1.57, in the absence of suramin, to 86.83±4.36%, in the presence of suramin. It can be concluded that the activation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and P2 purinoceptors potentially play a central role in the regulation of dopamine effects at the neuromuscular junction. Clinically this study offers new insights for the indirect manipulation of neuromuscular transmission for the treatment of disorders characterized by motor dysfunction. PMID:27060487

  5. [Interactions between dopamine receptor and NMDA/type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Ying; Wei, Ting-Jia; Weng, Jing-Jin; Qin, Jiang-Yuan; Huang, Xi; Su, Ji-Ping

    2016-04-25

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are the major inhibitory and excitatory receptors in the central nervous system, respectively. Co-expression of the receptors in the synapse may lead to functional influence between receptors, namely receptor interaction. The interactions between GABAAR and NMDAR can be either positive or negative. However, the mechanisms of interaction between the two receptors remain poorly understood, and potential mechanisms include (1) through a second messenger; (2) by receptors trafficking; (3) by direct interaction; (4) by a third receptor-mediation. Dopamine is the most abundant catecholamine neurotransmitter in the brain, and its receptors, dopamine receptors (DR) can activate multiple signaling pathways. Earlier studies on the interaction between DR and GABAAR/NMDAR have shown some underlying mechanisms, suggesting that DR could mediate the interaction between GABAAR and NMDAR. This paper summarized some recent progresses in the studies of the interaction between DR and NMDAR/GABAAR, providing a further understanding on the interaction between NMDAR and GABAAR mediated by DR. PMID:27108906

  6. Food restriction alters N'-propyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzothiazole-2,6-diamine dihydrochloride (pramipexole)-induced yawning, hypothermia, and locomotor activity in rats: evidence for sensitization of dopamine D2 receptor-mediated effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gregory T; Calinski, Diane M; Newman, Amy Hauck; Grundt, Peter; Woods, James H

    2008-05-01

    Food restriction enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of a variety of drugs of abuse including opiates, nicotine, and psychostimulants. Food restriction has also been shown to alter a variety of behavioral and pharmacological responses to dopaminergic agonists, including an increased sensitivity to the locomotor stimulatory effects of direct- and indirect-dopamine agonists, elevated extracellular dopamine levels in responses to psychostimulants, as well as suppression of agonist-induced yawning. Behavioral and molecular studies suggest that augmented dopaminergic responses observed in food-restricted animals result from a sensitization of the dopamine D2 receptor; however, little is known about how food restriction affects dopamine D3 receptor function. The current studies were aimed at better defining the effects of food restriction on D2 and D3 receptor function by assessing the capacity of N'-propyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzothiazole-2,6-diamine dihydrochloride (pramipexole) to induce yawning, penile erection (PE), hypothermia, and locomotor activity in free-fed and food-restricted rats. Food restriction resulted in a suppression of pramipexole-induced yawning, a sensitized hypothermic response, and an enhanced locomotor response to pramipexole, effects that are suggestive of an enhanced D2 receptor activity; no effect on pramipexole-induced PE was observed. Antagonist studies further supported a food restriction-induced enhancement of the D2 receptor activity because the D2 antagonist 3-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-l-yl]methyl-1H-indole (L741,626) recovered pramipexole-induced yawning to free-fed levels, whereas yawning and PE were suppressed following pretreatment with the D3 antagonist N-{4-[4-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-trans-but-2-enyl}-4-pyridine-2-yl-benzamide hydrochloride (PG01037). The results of the current studies suggest that food restriction sensitized rats to the D2-mediated effects of pramipexole while having no effect

  7. Roles of adrenergic α1 and dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in the mediation of the desynchronization effects of modafinil in a mouse EEG synchronization model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Rui Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Synchronized electroencephalogram (EEG activity is observed in pathological stages of cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Modafinil, known to increase the release of catecholamines, is a potent wake-promoting agent, and has shown some abilities to desynchronize EEG,but its receptor mechanisms by which modafinil induces desynchoronization remain to be elucidated. Here we used a pharmacological EEG synchronization model to investigate the involvement of adrenergic α1 receptors (R, α1R and dopamine (DA D1 and D2 receptors (D1Rs and D2Rs on modafinil-induced desynchronization in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were treated with cholinergic receptor antagonist scopolamine and monoamine depletor reserpine to produce experimental EEG synchronization characterized by continuous large-amplitude synchronized activity, with prominent increased delta and decreased theta, alpha, and beta power density. The results showed that modafinil produced an EEG desynchronization in the model. This was characterized by a general decrease in amplitude of all the frequency bands between 0 and 20 Hz, a prominent reduction in delta power density, and an increase in theta power density. Adrenergic α1R antagonist terazosin (1 mg/kg, i.p. completely antagonized the EEG desynchronization effects of modafinil at 90 mg/kg. However, DA D1R and D2R blockers partially attenuated the effects of modafinil. The modafinil-induced decrease in the amplitudes of the delta, theta, alpha, and beta waves and in delta power density were completely abolished by pretreatment with a combination of the D1R antagonist SCH 23390 (30 µg/kg and the D2R antagonist raclopride (2 mg/kg, i.p.. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that modafinil-mediated desynchronization may be attributed to the activation of adrenergic α1R, and dopaminergic D1R and D2R in a model of EEG synchronization.

  8. Food restriction alters pramipexole-induced yawning, hypothermia, and locomotor activity in rats: Evidence for sensitization of dopamine D2 receptor-mediated effects

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Gregory T; Calinski, Diane M.; Newman, Amy Hauck; Grundt, Peter; Woods, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Food restriction enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of a variety of drugs of abuse including opiates, nicotine, and psychostimulants. Food restriction has also been shown to alter a variety of behavioral and pharmacological responses to dopaminergic agonists including an increased sensitivity to the locomotor stimulatory effects of direct- and indirect-dopamine agonists, elevated extracellular dopamine levels in responses to psychostimulants, as well as suppression of agonist-ind...

  9. Ring Substituents on Substituted Benzamide Ligands Indirectly Mediate Interactions with Position 7.39 of Transmembrane Helix 7 of the D4 Dopamine Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Ericksen, Spencer S.; Cummings, David F.; Teer, Michael E.; Amdani, Shahnawaz; Schetz, John A.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to delineate how specific molecular interactions of dopamine receptor ligand classes vary between D2-like dopamine receptor subtypes, a conserved threonine in transmembrane (TM) helix 7 (Thr7.39), implicated as a key ligand interaction site with biogenic amine G protein-coupled receptors, was substituted with alanine in D2 and D4 receptors. Interrogation of different ligand chemotypes for sensitivity to this substitution revealed enhanced affinity in the D4, but not the D2 recept...

  10. Cav 1.3 L-type Ca ( 2+) channels mediate long-term adaptation in dopamine D2L-mediated GluA1 trafficking in the dorsal striatum following cocaine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierberl, Kathryn; Giordano, Thomas; Satpute, Shirish; Hao, Jin; Kaur, Gagandeep; Hofmann, Franz; Moosmang, Sven; Striessnig, Joerg; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali

    2012-01-01

    AMPA receptor (AMPAR) plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in the mesostriatal dopaminergic pathway has been implicated in persistent cocaine-induced behavioral responses; however, the precise mechanism underlying these changes remains unknown. Utilizing cocaine psychomotor sensitization in mice we find that repeated cocaine results in a basal reduction of Ser 845 GluA1 and cell surface GluA1 levels in the dorsal striatum (dStr) following a protracted withdrawal period, an adaptation that is dependent on Cav 1.3 channels but not those expressed in the VTA. We find that the basally-induced decrease in this phosphoprotein is the result of recruitment of the striatal dopamine D2 pathway, as evidenced by enhanced levels of D2 receptor (D2R) mRNA expression and D2R function as examined using the D2R antagonist, eticlopride, as well as alterations in the phosphorylation status of several downstream molecular targets of D2R's, including CREB, DARPP-32, Akt and GSK3β. Taken together with our recently published findings examining similar phenomena in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), these results underscore the utilization of divergent molecular mechanisms in the dStr, in mediating cocaine-induced persistent behavioral changes. PMID:22419037

  11. Inhibition of alpha-synuclein fibrillization by dopamine is mediated by interactions with five C-terminal residues and with E83 in the NAC region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando E Herrera

    Full Text Available The interplay between dopamine and alpha-synuclein (AS plays a central role in Parkinson's disease (PD. PD results primarily from a severe and selective devastation of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. The neuropathological hallmark of the disease is the presence of intraneuronal proteinaceous inclusions known as Lewy bodies within the surviving neurons, enriched in filamentous AS. In vitro, dopamine inhibits AS fibril formation, but the molecular determinants of this inhibition remain obscure. Here we use molecular dynamic (MD simulations to investigate the binding of dopamine and several of its derivatives onto conformers representative of an NMR ensemble of AS structures in aqueous solution. Within the limitations inherent to MD simulations of unstructured proteins, our calculations suggest that the ligands bind to the (125YEMPS(129 region, consistent with experimental findings. The ligands are further stabilized by long-range electrostatic interactions with glutamate 83 (E83 in the NAC region. These results suggest that by forming these interactions with AS, dopamine may affect AS aggregation and fibrillization properties. To test this hypothesis, we investigated in vitro the effects of dopamine on the aggregation of mutants designed to alter or abolish these interactions. We found that point mutations in the (125YEMPS(129 region do not affect AS aggregation, which is consistent with the fact that dopamine interacts non-specifically with this region. In contrast, and consistent with our modeling studies, the replacement of glutamate by alanine at position 83 (E83A abolishes the ability of dopamine to inhibit AS fibrillization.

  12. Effect of dopamine-related drugs on duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine or propionitrile: prevention and aggravation may not be mediated by gastrointestinal secretory changes in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, G.; Brown, A.; Szabo, S.

    1987-03-01

    Dose- and time-response studies have been performed with dopamine agonists and antagonists using the cysteamine and propionitrile duodenal ulcer models in the rat. The experiments demonstrate that the chemically induced duodenal ulcer is prevented by bromocriptine, lergotrile and reduced by apomorphine or L-dopa. Aggravation of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer was seen especially after (-)-butaclamol, (-)-sulpiride, haloperidol and, less effectively, after other dopaminergic antagonists. The duodenal antiulcerogenic action of dopamine agonists was more prominent after chronic administration than after a single dose, whereas the opposite was found concerning the proulcerogenic effect of dopamine antagonists. In the chronic gastric fistula rat, both the antiulcerogens bromocriptine or lergotrile and the proulcerogens haloperidol, pimozide or (-)-N-(2-chlorethyl)-norapomorphine decreased the cysteamine- or propionitrile-induced gastric secretion. No correlation was apparent between the influence of these drugs on duodenal ulcer development and gastric and duodenal (pancreatic/biliary) secretions. In the chronic duodenal fistula rat, decreased acid content was measured in the proximal duodenum after haloperidol, and diminished duodenal pepsin exposure was recorded after bromocriptine. Furthermore, the aggravation by dopamine antagonists of experimental duodenal ulcer probably involves a peripheral component. The site of dopamine receptors and physiologic effects which modulate experimental duodenal ulcer remain to be identified, but their elucidation may prove to be an important element in the pathogenesis and treatment of duodenal ulcer.

  13. Effect of dopamine-related drugs on duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine or propionitrile: prevention and aggravation may not be mediated by gastrointestinal secretory changes in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose- and time-response studies have been performed with dopamine agonists and antagonists using the cysteamine and propionitrile duodenal ulcer models in the rat. The experiments demonstrate that the chemically induced duodenal ulcer is prevented by bromocriptine, lergotrile and reduced by apomorphine or L-dopa. Aggravation of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer was seen especially after (-)-butaclamol, (-)-sulpiride, haloperidol and, less effectively, after other dopaminergic antagonists. The duodenal antiulcerogenic action of dopamine agonists was more prominent after chronic administration than after a single dose, whereas the opposite was found concerning the proulcerogenic effect of dopamine antagonists. In the chronic gastric fistula rat, both the antiulcerogens bromocriptine or lergotrile and the proulcerogens haloperidol, pimozide or (-)-N-(2-chlorethyl)-norapomorphine decreased the cysteamine- or propionitrile-induced gastric secretion. No correlation was apparent between the influence of these drugs on duodenal ulcer development and gastric and duodenal (pancreatic/biliary) secretions. In the chronic duodenal fistula rat, decreased acid content was measured in the proximal duodenum after haloperidol, and diminished duodenal pepsin exposure was recorded after bromocriptine. Furthermore, the aggravation by dopamine antagonists of experimental duodenal ulcer probably involves a peripheral component. The site of dopamine receptors and physiologic effects which modulate experimental duodenal ulcer remain to be identified, but their elucidation may prove to be an important element in the pathogenesis and treatment of duodenal ulcer

  14. Dopamine receptor activation increases HIV entry into primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Gaskill

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers.

  15. A C-terminal PDZ domain-binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar;

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling dopamine transporter levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. The dopamine transporters contain a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain-binding sequenc...

  16. Structural Analysis of the Ligand-Binding Domain of the Aspartate Receptor Tar from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mise, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    The Escherichia coli cell-surface aspartate receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni(2+). These signals are transmitted from the extracellular region of Tar to the cytoplasmic region via the transmembrane domain. The mechanism by which extracellular signals are transmitted into the cell through conformational changes in Tar is predicted to involve a piston displacement of one of the α4 helices of the homodimer. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by an attractant, the three-dimensional structures of the E. coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate, Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively, were determined. Of the two ligand-binding sites, only one site was occupied, and it clearly showed the electron density of an aspartate. The slight changes in conformation and the electrostatic surface potential around the aspartate-binding site were observed. In addition, the presence of an aspartate stabilized residues Phe-150' and Arg-73. A pistonlike displacement of helix α4b' was also induced by aspartate binding as predicted by the piston model. Taken together, these small changes might be related to the induction of Tar activity and might disturb binding of the second aspartate to the second binding site in E. coli. PMID:27292793

  17. Antagonism of presynaptic dopamine receptors by phenothiazine drug metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrically evoked release of dopamine from the caudate nucleus is reduced by the dopamine receptor agonists, apomorphine and bromocriptine, and facilitated by neuroleptic drugs, which act as dopamine autoreceptor antagonists. The potencies of chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, levomepromazine and their hydroxy-metabolites in modulating electrically evoked release of dopamine were examined by superfusion of rabbit caudate nucleus slices pre-incubated with 3H-dopamine. O-Desmethyl levomepromazine, 3-hydroxy- and 7-hydroxy metabolites of chlorpromazine and levomepromazine facilitated electrically evoked release of 3H-dopamine, having potencies similar to that of the parent compounds. 7-Hydroxy fluphenazine was less active than fluphenazine in this system. These results indicate that phenolic metabolites of chlorpromazine and levomepromazine, but not of fluphenazine, may contribute to effects of the drugs mediated by presynaptic dopamine receptors

  18. NEUROTRANSMITTERS AND IMMUNITY: 1. DOPAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hritcu

    2007-08-01

    role for dopamine in modulating, mainly suppressing immune functions (Qui et al., 1994. Animals treated with bromocriptine, a dopamine agonist, also showed suppression of antibody production to SRBC and LPS (Besedovsky and del Ray, 1996 and suppressed activities of lymphocytes in mixed lymphocyte culture (Hiestand et al., 1986. Moreover, the interest regarding the role of dopamine on immune system becomes more relevant when some of important neurological disease like Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia with hypo- and hyperactivity (Birtwistle et al., 1988 of central dopamine system are well-correlated with severe abnormalities of immune functions (Muller et al., 1993. Therefore, in the present review, we have evaluated information from our laboratory as well as from others regarding the role of dopamine on immune function in both human and experimental animals in order to understand the current status of dopamine-mediated control of the immunological surveillance system.

  19. Dopamine, Behavioral Economics, and Effort

    OpenAIRE

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M.; Nunes, Eric J; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involve...

  20. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort

    OpenAIRE

    Salamone, John D; Merce Correa; Farrar, Andrew M.; Nunes, Eric J; Marta Pardo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upo...

  1. Dopamine Oxidation and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease remain unclear. Currently, there is a general agreement that mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein aggregation, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and impaired protein degradation are involved in the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin in Parkinson's disease. Aminochrome has been proposed to play an essential role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, the formation of neurotoxic α-synuclein protofibrils, and impaired protein degradation. Here, we discuss the relationship between the oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin, and the role of dopamine oxidation to aminochrome in autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons. Aminochrome induces the following: (i the formation of α-synuclein protofibrils that inactivate chaperone-mediated autophagy; (ii the formation of adducts with α- and β-tubulin, which induce the aggregation of the microtubules required for the fusion of autophagy vacuoles and lysosomes.

  2. The dopamine transporter: role in neurotoxicity and human disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane transport protein expressed exclusively within a small subset of CNS neurons. It plays a crucial role in controlling dopamine-mediated neurotransmission and a number of associated behaviors. This review focuses on recent data elucidating the role of the dopamine transporter in neurotoxicity and a number of CNS disorders, including Parkinson disease, drug abuse, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

  3. Functional characterization of dopamine transporter in vivo using Drosophila melanogaster behavioral assays

    OpenAIRE

    Taro eUeno; Kazuhiko eKume

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine mediates diverse functions such as motivation, reward, attention, learning/memory and sleep/arousal. Recent studies using model organisms including the fruit fly, have elucidated various physiological functions of dopamine, and identified specific neural circuits for these functions. Flies with mutations in the Drosophila dopamine transporter (dDAT) gene show enhanced dopamine signaling, and short sleep and memory impairment phenotypes. However, understanding the mechanism by which d...

  4. The NOP (ORL1) receptor antagonist Compound B stimulates mesolimbic dopamine release and is rewarding in mice by a non-NOP-receptor-mediated mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Koizumi, Miwako; Sakoori, Kazuto; Midorikawa, Naoko; Murphy, Niall P.

    2004-01-01

    Compound B (1-[(3R, 4R)-1-cyclooctylmethyl-3-hydroxymethyl-4-piperidyl]-3-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one, CompB) is a nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) antagonist showing high selectivity for the NOP (ORL1) receptor over classical opioid receptors. We studied the effect of subcutaneous CompB administration on the release of mesolimbic dopamine (DA) and the expression of hedonia in mice.CompB (0.3–30 mg kg−1) dose dependently stimulated mesolimbic DA release as measured by in vivo freely...

  5. Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated Akt/PKB signalling: initiation by the D2S receptor and role in quinpirole-induced behavioural activation

    OpenAIRE

    Jin‑Chung Chen; Nan‑Yu Ruan; Tzu‑Yung Lin; Han‑Ting Chen

    2012-01-01

    The short and long isoforms of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S and D2L respectively) are highly expressed in the striatum. Functional D2 receptors activate an intracellular signalling pathway that includes a cAMP-independent route involving Akt/GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3). To investigate the Akt/GSK3 response to the seldom-studied D2S receptor, we established a rat D2S receptor-expressing cell line [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293/rD2S]. We found that in HEK-293/rD2S cells, the D2/D3 ago...

  6. Responses of in vivo renal microvessels to dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhausen, M; Weis, S; Fleming, J; Dussel, R; Parekh, N

    1986-09-01

    The split hydronephrotic kidney preparation was used to directly observe the effects of locally applied dopamine on the in vivo diameters of renal vessels. Dopamine (1 X 10(-6) to 3 X 10(-5) M) produced a concentration-dependent dilation of the arcuate and interlobular arteries and afferent arterioles. Efferent arterioles near the glomeruli also dilated to dopamine but the dilation was less than that of the preglomerular vessels. Higher dopamine concentrations (3 X 10(-4) and 1 X 10(-3) M) produced more variable effects, with a tendency for the arcuate and interlobular arteries and the afferent and efferent arterioles away from the glomeruli to decrease in diameter. After pretreatment with haloperidol, dopamine (1 X 10(-6) to 1 X 10(-4) M) did not dilate any pre- or postglomerular vascular segment, but the tendency for pre- and postglomerular constrictions with higher dopamine concentrations were not abolished. Pretreatment with phentolamine and propranolol enhanced the dilator response of the pre- and postglomerular vessels (except the afferent arterioles near glomeruli and efferent arterioles near welling points) to dopamine (3 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-4) M), and abolished the reductions in diameter produced by the high dopamine levels. These data indicate that the dilator effect of dopamine is mediated by interactions with specific dopaminergic receptors, while alpha and beta adrenergic receptors appear to mediate a constrictor influence observed with high dopamine concentrations. The overall effect of dopamine on the renal vessel diameters thus appears to depend on the balance of dilator and constrictor stimuli mediated by multiple receptors. PMID:3023735

  7. Screening of aspartate dehydrogenase of bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Shoko; Okamura, Tokumitsu; Yasumasa, Izumi; Takeno, Tomomi; Ohsugi, Masahiro

    2001-01-01

    Fifty-two strains of bacteria cultured under aerobic conditions and 12 strains of bacteria cultured under anaerobic conditions demonstrated high activity staining of aspartate dehydrogenase with NAD^+. Four strains of bacteria cultured under aerobic conditions and 7 strains of bacteria cultured under anaerobic conditions demonstrated high activity staining of aspartate dehydrogenase with NADP^+. Seven strains of bacteria cultured under aerobic conditions and 4 strains of bacteria cultured und...

  8. Dopamine transporters govern diurnal variation in extracellular dopamine tone

    OpenAIRE

    Ferris, Mark J.; España, Rodrigo A.; Locke, Jason L.; Konstantopoulos, Joanne K.; Rose, Jamie H.; Chen, Rong; Jones, Sara R.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism for diurnal (i.e., light/dark) oscillations in extracellular dopamine tone in mesolimbic and nigrostriatal systems is unknown. This is because, unlike other neurotransmitter systems, variation in dopamine tone does not correlate with variation in dopamine cell firing. The current research pinpoints the dopamine transporter as a critical governor of diurnal variation in both extracellular dopamine tone and the intracellular availability of releasable dopamine. These data describe...

  9. Differential Roles for Dopamine D1-Like and D2-Like Receptors in Mediating the Reinforcing Effects of Cocaine: Convergent Evidence from Pharmacological and Genetic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranita, Takato; Collins, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    A series of studies by Drs. Barak Caine, James Woods, Gregory Collins, Jonathan Katz and Takato Hiranita demonstrated a novel and unique reinforcing effect using dopamine (DA) D2-like receptor [D2-like R: D2, D3, and D4 receptor subtypes (respectively, D2R, D3R, and D4R)] agonists in rats and genetically modified mice. In order to understand how important their findings are, a comparison was made regarding the reinforcing effects of DA D2-like R full agonists with those of DA uptake inhibitors and of a DA D1-like receptor [D1-like R, D1 and D5 receptor subtypes (D1R and D5R)] full agonist (±)-SKF 82958.

  10. A pivotal role of FOS-mediated BECN1/Beclin 1 upregulation in dopamine D2 and D3 receptor agonist-induced autophagy activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Da; Cao, Yu-Lan; Li, Qian; Yang, Ya-Ping; Jin, Mengmeng; Chen, Dong; Wang, Fen; Wang, Guang-Hui; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). BECN1/Beclin 1 acts as a critical regulator of autophagy and other cellular processes; yet, little is known about the function and regulation of BECN1 in PD. In this study, we report that dopamine D2 and D3 receptor (DRD2 and DRD3) activation by pramipexole and quinpirole could enhance BECN1 transcription and promote autophagy activation in several cell lines, including PC12, MES23.5 and differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, and also in tyrosine hydroxylase positive primary midbrain neurons. Moreover, we identified a novel FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog) binding sequence (5′-TGCCTCA-3′) in the rat and human Becn1/BECN1 promoter and uncovered an essential role of FOS binding in the enhancement of Becn1 transcription in PC12 cells in response to the dopamine agonist(s). In addition, we demonstrated a critical role of intracellular Ca2+ elevation, followed by the enhanced phosphorylation of CAMK4 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) and CREB (cAMP responsive element binding protein) in the increases of FOS expression and autophagy activity. More importantly, pramipexole treatment ameliorated the SNCA/α-synuclein accumulation in rotenone-treated PC12 cells that overexpress wild-type or A53T mutant SNCA by promoting autophagy flux. This effect was also demonstrated in the substantia nigra and the striatum of SNCAA53T transgenic mice. The inhibition of SNCA accumulation by pramipexole was attenuated by cotreatment with the DRD2 and DRD3 antagonists and Becn1 siRNAs. Thus, our findings suggest that DRD2 and DRD3 agonist(s) may induce autophagy activation via a BECN1-dependent pathway and have the potential to reduce SNCA accumulation in PD. PMID:26649942

  11. Central actions of a novel and selective dopamine antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Receptors for the neurotransmitter dopamine traditionally have been divided into two subgroups: the D1 class, which is linked to the stimulation of adenylate cyclase-activity, and the D2 class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D2 class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D2 dopamine receptor that mediates the physiological and behavioral actions of dopamine in the intact animal. However, the benzazepine SCH23390 is a dopamine antagonist which has potent behavioral actions while displaying apparent neurochemical selectivity for the D1 class of dopamine receptors. The purpose of this dissertation was to (1) confirm and characterize this selectivity, and (2) test certain hypothesis related to possible modes of action of SCH233390. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase by SCH23390 occurred via an action at the dopamine receptor only. A radiolabeled analog of SCH23390 displayed the receptor binding properties of a specific high-affinity ligand, and regional receptor densities were highly correlated with dopamine levels. The subcellular distribution of [3H]-SCH23390 binding did not correspond completely with that of dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase. The neurochemical potency of SCH23390 as a D1 receptor antagonist was preserved following parental administration. A variety of dopamine agonists and antagonists displayed a high correlation between their abilities to compete for [3H]-SCH23390 binding in vitro and to act at an adenylate cyclase-linked receptor. Finally, the relative affinities of dopamine and SCH23390 for both D1 receptors and [3H]-SCH23390 binding sites were comparable. It is concluded that the behavioral effects of SCH23390 are mediated by actions at D1 dopamine receptors only, and that the physiological importance of this class of receptors should be reevaluated

  12. Cellular regulation of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft and is a target for widely abused psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Nonetheless, little is known about the cellular distribution and trafficking of natively expressed DAT. DAT and its trafficking...... single-membrane spanning protein Tac, thereby creating an extracellular antibody epitope. Upon expression in HEK293 cells this TacDAT fusion protein displayed functional properties similar to the wild type transporter. In an ELISA based internalization assay, TacDAT intracellular accumulation was...

  13. Searsia species with affinity to the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäger, Anna; Knap, D.M.; Nielsen, Birgitte;

    2012-01-01

    Species of Searsia are used in traditional medicine to treat epilepsy. Previous studies on S. dentata and S. pyroides have shown that this is likely mediated via the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor. Ethanolic extracts of leaves of six Searsia species were tested in a binding assay for...... accessible Searsia species can be used in traditional medicine....

  14. N-Acetylation of L-aspartate in the nervous system: differential distribution of a specific enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truckenmiller, M.E.; Namboodiri, M.A.; Brownstein, M.J.; Neale, J.H.

    1985-11-01

    L-Aspartate N-acetyltransferase, a nervous system enzyme that mediates the synthesis of N-acetyl-L-aspartic acid, has been characterized. In the presence of acetyl-CoA, L-aspartate was acetylated 10-fold more efficiently than L-glutamate, and the acetylation of aspartylglutamate was not detectable. Within the nervous system, a 10-fold variation in the enzyme activity was observed, with the brainstem and spinal cord exhibiting the highest activity and retina the lowest detectable activity. No enzyme activity was detected in pituitary, heart, liver, or kidney. The enzyme activity was found to be membrane-associated and was solubilized by treatment with Triton X-100.

  15. Dopamins renale virkninger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    1990-01-01

    which are possible not exclusively secondary to alterations in the renal haemodynamics but may also be due to specific tubular effects. Recent investigations have revealed that dopamine does not increase RBF and GFR in patients with chronic renal failure if GFR is less than 60 ml/minute. Dopamine in low...... doses is frequently employed in cases of acute oliguric renal failure but the results available concerning the therapeutic effect are frequently retrospective and uncontrolled. The results suggest that early treatment with 1-3 micrograms/kg/min dopamine combined with furosemide can postpone or possibly......Dopamine is an endogenic catecholamine which, in addition to being the direct precursor of noradrenaline, has also an effect on peripheral dopaminergic receptors. These are localized mainly in the heart, splanchnic nerves and the kidneys. Dopamine is produced in the kidneys and the renal metabolism...

  16. Involvement of estrogen receptors in the resveratrol-mediated increase in dopamine transporter in human dopaminergic neurons and in striatum of female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Liberto, Valentina; Mäkelä, Johanna; Korhonen, Laura; Olivieri, Melania; Tselykh, Timofey; Mälkiä, Annika; Do Thi, Hai; Belluardo, Natale; Lindholm, Dan; Mudò, Giuseppa

    2012-02-01

    Treatment with resveratrol (RSV) has been shown to protect vulnerable neurons after various brain injuries and in neurodegenerative diseases. The mechanisms for the effects of RSV in brain are not fully understood, but RSV may affect the expression of various gene products. RSV is structurally related to the synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol so the effects of RSV may be gender-specific. Here we studied the role of RSV in the regulation of dopamine transporter (DAT) in the striatum using male and female mice. The basic levels of DAT in the striatum showed no sex difference, but the levels increased significantly by RSV (20 mg/kg i.p.) in female but not in male mice. Pretreatment of mice with the selective estrogen receptor (ER), ERα- and ERβ antagonist ICI 182,780, led to a complete block of RSV effect on DAT protein levels, suggesting that ERs are involved in the up-regulation of DAT by RSV. Similar data was also obtained in culture using human MESC2.10 and mouse SN4741 dopaminergic cells after treatment with RSV. Data further showed that RSV specifically induced gene transcription of DAT in the dopaminergic cells. These results show that estrogen receptors are involved in the up-regulation of DAT by RSV in the dopaminergic neurons, demonstrating a sex-dependent effect of RSV in the brain that may be of clinical importance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder'. PMID:22041555

  17. The NOP (ORL1) receptor antagonist Compound B stimulates mesolimbic dopamine release and is rewarding in mice by a non-NOP-receptor-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Miwako; Sakoori, Kazuto; Midorikawa, Naoko; Murphy, Niall P

    2004-09-01

    1. Compound B (1-[(3R, 4R)-1-cyclooctylmethyl-3-hydroxymethyl-4-piperidyl]-3-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one, CompB) is a nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) antagonist showing high selectivity for the NOP (ORL1) receptor over classical opioid receptors. We studied the effect of subcutaneous CompB administration on the release of mesolimbic dopamine (DA) and the expression of hedonia in mice. 2. CompB (0.3-30 mg kg(-1)) dose dependently stimulated mesolimbic DA release as measured by in vivo freely moving microdialysis, without any change in locomotor activity. However, intracerebroventricular administered N/OFQ (endogenous agonist of the NOP receptor, 6 nmol) did not influence CompB- (10 mg kg(-1)) induced DA release, despite clearly suppressing release when administered alone. 3. Studies using NOP receptor knockout mice and no-net-flux microdialysis revealed mildly, but not statistically significantly higher endogenous DA levels in mice lacking the NOP receptor compared to wild-type mice. Administration of CompB (10 mg kg(-1)) induced identical increases in mesolimbic DA release in wild-type and NOP receptor knockout mice. 4. CompB was rewarding in approximately the same dose range in which CompB induced major increases in mesolimbic DA release when assayed using a conditioned place preference paradigm. The rewarding effect of CompB (30 mg kg(-1)) was maintained in NOP receptor knockout mice. 5. These results show that CompB stimulates mesolimbic DA release and is rewarding by an action independent of the NOP receptor, the precise site of which is unclear. Consequently, caution should be exercised when interpreting the results of studies using this drug, particularly when administered by a peripheral route. PMID:15289286

  18. Functional characterization of dopamine transporter in vivo using Drosophila melanogaster behavioral assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Taro; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine mediates diverse functions such as motivation, reward, attention, learning/memory and sleep/arousal. Recent studies using model organisms including the fruit fly, have elucidated various physiological functions of dopamine, and identified specific neural circuits for these functions. Flies with mutations in the Drosophila dopamine transporter (dDAT) gene show enhanced dopamine signaling, and short sleep and memory impairment phenotypes. However, understanding the mechanism by which dopamine signaling causes these phenotypes requires an understanding of the dynamics of dopamine release. Here we report the effects of dDAT expression on behavioral traits. We show that dDAT expression in a subset of dopaminergic neurons is sufficient for normal sleep. dDAT expression in other cell types such as Kenyon cells and glial cells can also rescue the short sleep phenotype of dDAT mutants. dDAT mutants also show a down-regulation of the D1-like dopamine receptor dDA1, and this phenotype is rescued when dDAT is expressed in the same cell types in which it rescues sleep. On the other hand, dDAT overexpression in mushroom bodies, which are the target of memory forming dopamine neurons, abolishes olfactory aversive memory. Our data demonstrate that expression of extrasynaptic dopamine transporters can rescue some aspects of dopamine signaling in dopamine transporter mutants. These results provide novel insights into regulatory systems that modulate dopamine signaling. PMID:25232310

  19. Intracellular aspartic protease of Candida albicans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bauerová, Václava; Pichová, Iva; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga

    Mátraháza : -, 2007. s. 43. [Alexander Von Humboldt Workshop on Structure Based Approaches Towards Disease Control. 22.05.2007-27.05.2007, Mátraháza] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Candida parapsilosis * intracellular * aspartic protease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  20. Action of aspartate on the /sup 32/Pi incorporation into phospholipids of cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Scarnati, O.C.; Sato, M.; De Robertis, E.

    1982-02-01

    The effect of L-aspartate on the /sup 32/Pi incorporation of phospholipids, was studied on slices of rat cerebral cortex. This amino acid produced an inhibitory effect in concentrations 0.01-10 mM, which was more evident at 120 min. This effect was not stereospecific and did not imply a change in Pi uptake and in nucleotides approximating P precursors. The inhibition was present in PS, PC, PE and to a lesser extent in Pi. On liver slices 1 mM L-aspartate had the opposite effect, stimulating the incorporation of /sup 32/Pi into total phospholipids. Our results suggest that the effect of L-aspartate is by a non-specific mechanism, probably not mediated by a receptor.

  1. Action of aspartate on the 32Pi incorporation into phospholipids of cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of L-aspartate on the 32Pi incorporation of phospholipids, was studied on slices of rat cerebral cortex. This amino acid produced an inhibitory effect in concentrations 0.01-10 mM, which was more evident at 120 min. This effect was not stereospecific and did not imply a change in Pi uptake and in nucleotides approximating P precursors. The inhibition was present in PS, PC, PE and to a lesser extent in Pi. On liver slices 1 mM L-aspartate had the opposite effect, stimulating the incorporation of 32Pi into total phospholipids. Our results suggest that the effect of L-aspartate is by a non-specific mechanism, probably not mediated by a receptor

  2. RalA employs GRK2 and β-arrestins for the filamin A-mediated regulation of trafficking and signaling of dopamine D2 and D3 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mei; Zhang, Xiaohan; Sun, NingNing; Min, Chengchun; Zhang, Xiaowei; Kim, Kyeong-Man

    2016-08-01

    Filamin A (FLNA) is known to act as platform for the signaling and intracellular trafficking of various GPCRs including dopamine D2 and D3 receptors (D2R, D3R). To understand molecular mechanisms involved in the FLNA-mediated regulation of D2R and D3R, comparative studies were conducted on the signaling and intracellular trafficking of the D2R and D3R in FLNA-knockdown cells, with a specific focus on the roles of the proteins that interact with FLNA and the D2R and D3R. Lowering the level of cellular FLNA caused an elevation in RalA activity and resulted in selective interference with the normal intracellular trafficking and signaling of the D2R and D3R, through GRK2 and β-arrestins, respectively. Knockdown of FLNA or coexpression of active RalA interfered with the recycling of the internalized D2R and resulted in the development of receptor tolerance. Active RalA was found to interact with GRK2 to sequester it from D2R. Knockdown of FLNA or coexpression of active RalA prevented D3R from coupling with G protein. The selective involvement of GRK2- and β-arrestins in the RalA-mediated cellular processes of the D2R and D3R was achieved via their different modes of interactions with the receptor and their distinct functional roles in receptor regulation. Our results show that FLNA is a multi-functional protein that acts as a platform on which D2R and D3R can interact with various proteins, through which selective regulation of these receptors occurs in combination with GRK2 and β-arrestins. PMID:27188791

  3. Highly sensitive isotope-dilution liquid-chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem-mass spectrometry approach to study the drug-mediated modulation of dopamine and serotonin levels in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Fabian; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Kleuser, Burkhard; Gulbins, Erich; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Aschner, Michael; Bornhorst, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (SRT) are monoamine neurotransmitters that play a key role in regulating the central and peripheral nervous system. Their impaired metabolism has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and depression. Consequently, it is imperative to monitor changes in levels of these low-abundant neurotransmitters and their role in mediating disease. For the first time, a rapid, specific and sensitive isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantification of DA and SRT in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). This model organism offers a unique approach for studying the effect of various drugs and environmental conditions on neurotransmitter levels, given by the conserved DA and SRT biology, including synaptic release, trafficking and formation. We introduce a novel sample preparation protocol incorporating the usage of sodium thiosulfate in perchloric acid as extraction medium that assures high recovery of the relatively unstable neurotransmitters monitored. Moreover, the use of both deuterated internal standards and the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique allows for unequivocal quantification. Thereby, to the best of our knowledge, we achieve a detection sensitivity that clearly exceeds those of published DA and SRT quantification methods in various matrices. We are the first to show that exposure of C. elegans to the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor selegiline or the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor tolcapone, in order to block DA and SRT degradation, resulted in accumulation of the respective neurotransmitter. Assessment of a behavioral output of the dopaminergic system (basal slowing response) corroborated the analytical LC-MS/MS data. Thus, utilization of the C. elegans model system in conjunction with our analytical method is well-suited to investigate drug-mediated modulation of the DA and

  4. Effects of the NMDA receptor antagonists on deltamethrin-induced striatal dopamine release in conscious unrestrained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Takuya; Furuhama, Kazuhisa

    2009-08-01

    To better understand the neurotoxicity caused by the pyrethroid pesticide, we examined the effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists MK-801, a non-competitive cation channel blocker, and 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV), a competitive Na(+) channel blocker, on extracellular dopamine levels in male Sprague-Dawley rats receiving the type II pyrethroid deltamethrin using an in vivo microdialysis system. Deltamethrin (60 mg/kg, i.p.) evidently increased striatal dopamine levels with a peak time of 120 min, and the local infusion (i.c.) of either MK-801(650 muM) or APV (500 muM) completely blocked these actions. The fluctuation in the dopamine metabolite 3-MT also resembled that in dopamine. Our results suggest that dopamine-releasing neurons would be modulated via the NMDA receptor by the excitatory glutamatergic neurons after deltamethrin treatment. PMID:19721373

  5. BMI Modulates Calorie-Dependent Dopamine Changes in Accumbens from Glucose Intake

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Tomasi, Dardo; Convit, Antonio; Logan, Jean; Wong, Christopher T.; Shumay, Elena; Fowler, Joanna S.; Volkow, Nora D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dopamine mediates the rewarding effects of food that can lead to overeating and obesity, which then trigger metabolic neuroadaptations that further perpetuate excessive food consumption. We tested the hypothesis that the dopamine response to calorie intake (independent of palatability) in striatal brain regions is attenuated with increases in weight. Method We used positron emission tomography with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine changes triggered by calorie intake by contrastin...

  6. The Dopamine Augmenter L-DOPA Does Not Affect Positive Mood in Healthy Human Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Liggins, John; Pihl, Robert O.; Benkelfat, Chawki; Leyton, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission influences approach toward rewards and reward-related cues. The best cited interpretation of this effect proposes that dopamine mediates the pleasure that commonly accompanies reward. This hypothesis has received support in some animal models and a few studies in humans. However, direct assessments of the effect of transiently increasing dopamine neurotransmission have been largely limited to the use of psychostimulant drugs, which elevate brain levels of multiple n...

  7. Antagonizing Effects of Aspartic Acid against Ultraviolet A-Induced Downregulation of the Stemness of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangseon Jung

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet A (UVA irradiation is responsible for a variety of changes in cell biology. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of aspartic acid on UVA irradiation-induced damages in the stemness properties of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs. Furthermore, we elucidated the UVA-antagonizing mechanisms of aspartic acid. The results of this study showed that aspartic acid attenuated the UVA-induced reduction of the proliferative potential and stemness of hAMSCs, as evidenced by increased proliferative activity in the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and upregulation of stemness-related genes OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 in response to the aspartic acid treatment. UVA-induced reduction in the mRNA level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α was also significantly recovered by aspartic acid. In addition, the antagonizing effects of aspartic acid against the UVA effects were found to be mediated by reduced production of PGE2 through the inhibition of JNK and p42/44 MAPK. Taken together, these findings show that aspartic acid improves reduced stemness of hAMSCs induced by UVA and its effects are mediated by upregulation of HIF-1α via the inhibition of PGE2-cAMP signaling. In addition, aspartic acid may be used as an antagonizing agent to mitigate the effects of UVA.

  8. Dopamine agonists rescue Aβ-induced LTP impairment by Src-family tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan Xiang, PingAn; Janc, Oliwia; Grochowska, Katarzyna M; Kreutz, Michael R; Reymann, Klaus G

    2016-04-01

    Soluble forms of oligomeric amyloid beta (AβO) are involved in the loss of synaptic plasticity and memory, especially in early phases of Alzheimer's disease. Stimulation of dopamine D1/D5 receptors (D1R/D5R) is known to increase surface expression of synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate subtype glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype glutamate receptors and facilitates the induction of the late phase of long-term potentiation (LTP), probably via a related mechanism. In this study, we show that the D1/D5R agonist SKF38393 protects LTP of hippocampal CA1 synapses from the deleterious action of oligomeric amyloid beta. Unexpectedly, the D1R/D5R-mediated recovery of LTP is independent of protein kinase A or phospholipase C pathways. Instead, we found that the inhibition of Src-family tyrosine kinases completely abolished the protective effects of D1R/D5R stimulation in a cellular model of learning and memory. PMID:26973108

  9. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities in the arcuate-median eminence complex and their link to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Romero-Fernandez

    2014-07-01

    and differentially modulate the activity and /or Dopamine synthesis of substantial numbers of tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons at the somatic and terminal level. The immunohistochemical work also gives support to the view that dopamine D1 receptors and/or dopamine D2 receptors in the lateral palisade zone by mediating dopamine volume transmission may contribute to the inhibition of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone release from nerve terminals in this region.

  10. Maternal Immune Activation Disrupts Dopamine System in the Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchicchi, Antonio; Lecca, Salvatore; Melis, Miriam; De Felice, Marta; Cadeddu, Francesca; Frau, Roberto; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Fadda, Paola; Devoto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background: In utero exposure to maternal viral infections is associated with a higher incidence of psychiatric disorders with a supposed neurodevelopmental origin, including schizophrenia. Hence, immune response factors exert a negative impact on brain maturation that predisposes the offspring to the emergence of pathological phenotypes later in life. Although ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons and their target regions play essential roles in the pathophysiology of psychoses, it remains to be fully elucidated how dopamine activity and functionality are disrupted in maternal immune activation models of schizophrenia. Methods: Here, we used an immune-mediated neurodevelopmental disruption model based on prenatal administration of the polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid in rats, which mimics a viral infection and recapitulates behavioral abnormalities relevant to psychiatric disorders in the offspring. Extracellular dopamine levels were measured by brain microdialysis in both the nucleus accumbens shell and the medial prefrontal cortex, whereas dopamine neurons in ventral tegmental area were studied by in vivo electrophysiology. Results: Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid-treated animals, at adulthood, displayed deficits in sensorimotor gating, memory, and social interaction and increased baseline extracellular dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens, but not in the prefrontal cortex. In polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid rats, dopamine neurons showed reduced spontaneously firing rate and population activity. Conclusions: These results confirm that maternal immune activation severely impairs dopamine system and that the polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid model can be considered a proper animal model of a psychiatric condition that fulfills a multidimensional set of validity criteria predictive of a human pathology. PMID:26819283

  11. Zinc Potentiates an Uncoupled Anion Conductance Associated with the Dopamine Transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Sitte, Harald H; Gether, Ulrik

    2004-01-01

    Binding of Zn(2+) to an endogenous binding site in the dopamine transporter (DAT) leads to inhibition of dopamine (DA) uptake and enhancement of carrier-mediated substrate efflux. To elucidate the molecular mechanism for this dual effect, we expressed the DAT and selected mutants in Xenopus laevis...

  12. Dopamine, Affordance and Active Inference

    OpenAIRE

    Friston, Karl J.; Tamara Shiner; Thomas FitzGerald; Galea, Joseph M.; Rick Adams; Harriet Brown; Dolan, Raymond J.; Rosalyn Moran; Klaas Enno Stephan; Sven Bestmann

    2012-01-01

    The role of dopamine in behaviour and decision-making is often cast in terms of reinforcement learning and optimal decision theory. Here, we present an alternative view that frames the physiology of dopamine in terms of Bayes-optimal behaviour. In this account, dopamine controls the precision or salience of (external or internal) cues that engender action. In other words, dopamine balances bottom-up sensory information and top-down prior beliefs when making hierarchical inferences (prediction...

  13. Diversity in anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: case-based evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Pinho, J; Rocha, J.; Rodrigues, M.; Pereira, J.; Maré, R; Ferreira, C; Lourenço, E; Beleza, P

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies against N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) are identified in the form of immune-mediated encephalitis in which typical manifestations include neuropsychiatric symptoms, seizures, abnormal movements, dysautonomia and hypoventilation. The authors report two cases of anti-NMDAR encephalitis with different presentations and patterns of progression. The first patient presented with status epilepticus and later developed psychosis, pyramidal signs and diffuse encephalopathy. The secon...

  14. Amphetamine elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine via an action potential-dependent mechanism that is modulated by endocannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Dan P; Bunner, Kendra D; Schuweiler, Douglas R; Cheer, Joseph F; Garris, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    The reinforcing effects of abused drugs are mediated by their ability to elevate nucleus accumbens dopamine. Amphetamine (AMPH) was historically thought to increase dopamine by an action potential-independent, non-exocytotic type of release called efflux, involving reversal of dopamine transporter function and driven by vesicular dopamine depletion. Growing evidence suggests that AMPH also acts by an action potential-dependent mechanism. Indeed, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that AMPH activates dopamine transients, reward-related phasic signals generated by burst firing of dopamine neurons and dependent on intact vesicular dopamine. Not established for AMPH but indicating a shared mechanism, endocannabinoids facilitate this activation of dopamine transients by broad classes of abused drugs. Here, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry coupled to pharmacological manipulations in awake rats, we investigated the action potential and endocannabinoid dependence of AMPH-induced elevations in nucleus accumbens dopamine. AMPH increased the frequency, amplitude and duration of transients, which were observed riding on top of slower dopamine increases. Surprisingly, silencing dopamine neuron firing abolished all AMPH-induced dopamine elevations, identifying an action potential-dependent origin. Blocking cannabinoid type 1 receptors prevented AMPH from increasing transient frequency, similar to reported effects on other abused drugs, but not from increasing transient duration and inhibiting dopamine uptake. Thus, AMPH elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine by eliciting transients via cannabinoid type 1 receptors and promoting the summation of temporally coincident transients, made more numerous, larger and wider by AMPH. Collectively, these findings are inconsistent with AMPH eliciting action potential-independent dopamine efflux and vesicular dopamine depletion, and support endocannabinoids facilitating phasic dopamine signalling as a common action in drug reinforcement

  15. Dopamine hypothesis of mania

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, John

    2013-01-01

    s­of­the­Speakers­/­Konuşmacı­leriThe discovery of dopamine and its pathwaysDopamine (DA) was first synthesized in 1910 from 3,4-dihydroxy phenyl alanine (DOPA) by Barger and Ewens at Wellcome Laboratories in London. It is a cathecholamine and in the 1940s Blaschko in Cambridge proposed that DA was a precursor in synthesis of the cat-echolamine neurotransmitters noradrenaline (norepinephrine) and adrenaline (epinephrine). In 1957 it was shown to be present in the brain with other catecholamin...

  16. Effect of Orthodontic Tooth Movement on Salivary Aspartate Aminotransferase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiven Adhitya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 72 1024x768 Aspartate aminotransferase is one of biological indicator in gingival crevicular fluid (CGF. Force orthodontic application could increase activity of aspartate aminotransferase in CGF. However, the increase activity of aspartate aminotransferase in saliva due to orthodontic force and its correlation between aspartate aminotransferase activity and tooth movement remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate application orthodontic force on the aspartate aminotransferase activity in saliva based on the duration of force and finding correlation between tooth movement and aspartate aminotransferase activity. Methods: Twenty saliva samples collected before extraction of first premolar, at the time of force application for canine retraction and after force application. The canines retraction used 100 grams of interrupted force (module chain for thirty days. The collection of saliva and the measurement of tooth movement were carried out 1 day, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days, and 28 days after force application. The measurement of aspartate aminotransferase activity in saliva was done using spectrophotometer. Results: Application of orthodontic force influences the salivary aspartate aminotransferase activity (F=25.290, p=0.000. Furthermore, tooth movement correlated with aspartate aminotransferase activity (F=0.429, p=0.000. Conclusion: Aspartate aminotransferase activity could be used as tooth movement indicator that related to the duration of force application.DOI : 10.14693/jdi.v20i1.128

  17. What is the role of dopamine in reward: hedonic impact, reward learning, or incentive salience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, K C; Robinson, T E

    1998-12-01

    What roles do mesolimbic and neostriatal dopamine systems play in reward? Do they mediate the hedonic impact of rewarding stimuli? Do they mediate hedonic reward learning and associative prediction? Our review of the literature, together with results of a new study of residual reward capacity after dopamine depletion, indicates the answer to both questions is 'no'. Rather, dopamine systems may mediate the incentive salience of rewards, modulating their motivational value in a manner separable from hedonia and reward learning. In a study of the consequences of dopamine loss, rats were depleted of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and neostriatum by up to 99% using 6-hydroxydopamine. In a series of experiments, we applied the 'taste reactivity' measure of affective reactions (gapes, etc.) to assess the capacity of dopamine-depleted rats for: 1) normal affect (hedonic and aversive reactions), 2) modulation of hedonic affect by associative learning (taste aversion conditioning), and 3) hedonic enhancement of affect by non-dopaminergic pharmacological manipulation of palatability (benzodiazepine administration). We found normal hedonic reaction patterns to sucrose vs. quinine, normal learning of new hedonic stimulus values (a change in palatability based on predictive relations), and normal pharmacological hedonic enhancement of palatability. We discuss these results in the context of hypotheses and data concerning the role of dopamine in reward. We review neurochemical, electrophysiological, and other behavioral evidence. We conclude that dopamine systems are not needed either to mediate the hedonic pleasure of reinforcers or to mediate predictive associations involved in hedonic reward learning. We conclude instead that dopamine may be more important to incentive salience attributions to the neural representations of reward-related stimuli. Incentive salience, we suggest, is a distinct component of motivation and reward. In other words, dopamine systems are necessary

  18. [Dopamine slows phagocytosis of rods from bovine pigment epithelium in vitro trough D1 receptor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, H; Goureau, O; Hecquet, C; Simon, A; Nguyen-Legros, J

    1996-08-01

    Photoreceptor disc shedding and their phagocytosis by the retinal pigment epithelium undergo a daily rhythm entrained by an intrinsic oscillator involving melatonin and dopamine in non-mammals. Such a mechanism is not demonstrated in mammals, but the rhythm of photoreceptor renewal can be modulated by exogenous melatonin and dopamine. The present experiments were designed to show whether a direct action of DA occurs on pigment epithelial cells, and to identify the receptor mediating this action. Primary cultures of bovine retinal pigment epithelium were incubated with bovine rod outer segments in the presence of dopamine, D1 and D2 agonists, D1 antagonist and forskolin. Dopamine, D1 agonist and forskolin decreased phagocytosis, while D2 agonist was inactive. Thus dopamine slows pigment epithelium phagocytosis in vitro through a D1 receptor. Increased phagocytosis following blockade of the receptor by an antagonist suggests a more complex modulation of phagocytosis by dopamine. PMID:8949392

  19. Dopamine and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södersten, P; Bergh, C; Leon, M; Zandian, M

    2016-01-01

    We have suggested that reduced food intake increases the risk for anorexia nervosa by engaging mesolimbic dopamine neurons, thereby initially rewarding dieting. Recent fMRI studies have confirmed that dopamine neurons are activated in anorexia nervosa, but it is not clear whether this response is due to the disorder or to its resulting nutritional deficit. When the body senses the shortage of nutrients, it rapidly shifts behavior toward foraging for food as a normal physiological response and the mesolimbic dopamine neurons may be involved in that process. On the other hand, the altered dopamine status of anorexics has been suggested to result from a brain abnormality that underlies their complex emotional disorder. We suggest that the outcomes of the treatments that emerge from that perspective remain poor because they target the mental symptoms that are actually the consequences of the food deprivation that accompanies anorexia. On the other hand, a method that normalizes the disordered eating behavior of anorexics results in much better physiological, behavioral, and emotional outcomes. PMID:26608248

  20. Biocatalytic Enantioselective Synthesis of N-Substituted Aspartic Acids by Aspartate Ammonia Lyase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiner, Barbara; Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Janssen, Dick B.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    The gene encoding aspartate ammonia lyase (aspB) from Bacillus sp. YM55-1 has been cloned and overexpressed, and the recombinant enzyme containing a C-terminal His6 tag has been purified to homogeneity and subjected to kinetic characterization. Kinetic studies have shown that the His6 tag does not a

  1. Firing properties of dopamine neurons in freely moving dopamine-deficient mice: Effects of dopamine receptor activation and anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Siobhan; Smith, David M.; Mizumori, Sheri J. Y.; Palmiter, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    To examine the regulation of midbrain dopamine neurons, recordings were obtained from single neurons of freely moving, genetically engineered dopamine-deficient (DD) mice. DD mice were tested without dopamine signaling (basal state) and with endogenous dopamine signaling (after L-dopa administration). In the basal state, when dopamine concentration in DD mice is

  2. Antimalarial Synergy of Cysteine and Aspartic Protease Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Semenov, Andrey; Olson, Jed E.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that the Plasmodium falciparum cysteine protease falcipain and aspartic proteases plasmepsin I and plasmepsin II act cooperatively to hydrolyze hemoglobin as a source of amino acids for erythrocytic parasites. Inhibitors of each of these proteases have potent antimalarial effects. We have now evaluated the antimalarial effects of combinations of cysteine and aspartic protease inhibitors. When incubated with cultured P. falciparum parasites, cysteine and aspartic protease ...

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the periplasmic domain of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor Tar and its complex with aspartate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mise, Takeshi; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.; Maruyama, Ichiro N., E-mail: ichi@oist.jp [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Kunigami, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan)

    2014-08-27

    The periplasmic domain of the E. coli aspartate receptor Tar was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized with and without bound ligand. The crystals obtained diffracted to resolutions of 1.58 and 1.95 Å, respectively. The cell-surface receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni{sup 2+}. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by its ligands, the Escherichia coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate (Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively) were each crystallized in two different forms. Using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 2.10 and 2.40 Å, respectively. Alternatively, using sodium chloride as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 1.95 and 1.58 Å, respectively. Crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 adopted space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, while those of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 adopted space groups P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and C2, respectively.

  4. Dual role of medial A10 dopamine neurons in affective encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Shin, Rick; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the activation of medial A10 neurons mediates positive affective encoding. However, little is known about the functions of the inhibition of midbrain dopamine neurons. Here we show evidence suggesting that the inhibition of medial A10 neurons mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding, whereas blunting the activation of medial A10 neurons disrupts positive affective encoding involving food reward. We used a microinjection procedure, in which the D(2) dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was administered into the cell body region of the dopamine neurons, a procedure that reduces dopamine cell firing. Microinjections of quinpirole into the posteromedial ventral tegmental area, but not its more lateral counterparts, led to conditioned place aversion. Quinpirole administration to this site also decreased food intake and basal dopamine concentration in the ventromedial striatum, a major projection area of medial A10 neurons. In addition, moderate quinpirole doses that did not lead to conditioned place aversion or disrupt food intake abolished food-conditioned place preference, suggesting that blunting dopamine impulse activity in response to food reward disrupts positive affective encoding in associated external stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that activation of medial A10 dopamine neurons mediates a positive affective state, leading to positive affective encoding, while their inhibition mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding. Together with previous findings, we propose that medial A10 neurons are an important component of the mechanism via which animals learn to avoid negative incentive stimuli. PMID:18256592

  5. Amphetamine Paradoxically Augments Exocytotic Dopamine Release and Phasic Dopamine Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Daberkow, DP; Brown, HD; Bunner, KD; Kraniotis, SA; Doellman, MA; Ragozzino, ME; Garris, PA; Roitman, MF

    2013-01-01

    Drugs of abuse hijack brain reward circuitry during the addiction process by augmenting action potential-dependent phasic dopamine release events associated with learning and goal-directed behavior. One prominent exception to this notion would appear to be amphetamine (AMPH) and related analogs, which are proposed instead to disrupt normal patterns of dopamine neurotransmission by depleting vesicular stores and promoting non-exocytotic dopamine efflux via reverse transport. This mechanism of ...

  6. Neural Encoding of Cocaine Seeking Behavior is Coincident with Phasic Dopamine Release in the Accumbens Core and Shell

    OpenAIRE

    Owesson-White, Catarina A.; Ariansen, Jennifer; Stuber, Garret D.; Cleaveland, Nathan A.; Cheer, Joseph F.; Wightman, R. Mark; Carelli, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    Mesolimbic dopamine neurons projecting from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) are part of a complex circuit mediating cocaine-directed behaviors. However, the precise role of rapid (subsecond) dopamine release within the primary sub-regions of the NAc, the core and shell, and its relationship to NAc cell firing during this behavior remain unknown. Here, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) we report rapid dopamine signaling in both the core and shell, howeve...

  7. Dopamine and food addiction: lexicon badly needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Mercè

    2013-05-01

    Over the last few years, the concept of food addiction has become a common feature in the scientific literature, as well as the popular press. Nevertheless, the use of the term addiction to describe pathological aspects of food intake in humans remains controversial, and even among those who affirm the validity of the concept, there is considerable disagreement about its utility for explaining the increasing prevalence of obesity throughout much of the world. An examination of the literature on food addiction indicates that mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine systems often are cited as mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of food addiction. However, in reviewing this literature, it is important to have a detailed consideration of the complex nature of dopaminergic involvement in motivational processes. For example, although it is often stated that mesolimbic dopamine mediates reward, there is no standard or consistent technical meaning of this term. Moreover, there is a persistent tendency to link dopamine transmission with pleasure or hedonia, as opposed to other aspects of motivation or learning. The present article provides a critical discussion of some aspects of the food addiction literature, viewed through the lens of recent findings and current theoretical views of dopaminergic involvement in food motivation. Furthermore, compulsive food intake and binge eating will be considered from an evolutionary perspective, in terms of the motivational subsystems that are involved in adaptive patterns of food consumption and seeking behaviors and a consideration of how these could be altered in pathological conditions. PMID:23177385

  8. Urinary Dopamine as a Potential Index of the Transport Activity of Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion in the Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Moto; Ban, Tsuyoshi; Matsubara, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Masuda, Satohiro

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is a cationic natriuretic catecholamine synthesized in proximal tubular cells (PTCs) of the kidney before secretion into the lumen, a key site of its action. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying dopamine secretion into the lumen remain unclear. Multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) is a H+/organic cation antiporter that is highly expressed in the brush border membrane of PTCs and mediates the efflux of organic cations, including metformin and cisplatin, from the epithelial cells into the urine. Therefore, we hypothesized that MATE mediates dopamine secretion, a cationic catecholamine, into the tubule lumen, thereby regulating natriuresis. Here, we show that [3H]dopamine uptake in human (h) MATE1-, hMATE-2K- and mouse (m) MATE-expressing cells exhibited saturable kinetics. Fluid retention and decreased urinary excretion of dopamine and Na+ were observed in Mate1-knockout mice compared to that in wild-type mice. Imatinib, a MATE inhibitor, inhibited [3H]dopamine uptake by hMATE1-, hMATE2-K- and mMATE1-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. At clinically-relevant concentrations, imatinib inhibited [3H]dopamine uptake by hMATE1- and hMATE2-K-expressing cells. The urinary excretion of dopamine and Na+ decreased and fluid retention occurred in imatinib-treated mice. In conclusion, MATE transporters secrete renally-synthesized dopamine, and therefore, urinary dopamine has the potential to be an index of the MATE transporter activity. PMID:27483254

  9. Radioiodinated ligands for dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dopamine receptor system is important for normal brain function; it is also the apparent action site for various neuroleptic drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia and other metal disorders. In the past few years radioiodinated ligands for single photon emission tomography (SPECT) have been successfully developed and tested in humans: [123I]TISCH for D1 dopamine receptors; [123I]IBZM, epidepride, IBF and FIDA2, four iodobenzamide derivatives, for D2/D3 dopamine receptors. In addition, [123I]β-CIT (RTI-55) and IPT, cocaine derivatives, for the dopamine reuptake site are potentially useful for diagnosis of loss of dopamine neurons. The first iodinated ligand, (R)trans-7-OH-PIPAT, for D3 dopamine receptors, was synthesized and characterized with cloned cell lines (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) expressing the D2 and D3 dopamine receptors and with rat basal forebrain membrane preparations. Most of the known iodobenzamides displayed similar potency in binding to both D2 and D3 dopamine receptors expressed in the cell lines. Initial studies appear to suggest that by fine tuning the structures it may be possible to develop agents specific for D2 and D3 dopamine receptors. It is important to investigate D2/D3 selectivity for this series of potent ligands

  10. Dopamine modulation of avoidance behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans requires the NMDA receptor NMR-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin Baidya

    Full Text Available The nematode C. elegans utilizes a relatively simple neural circuit to mediate avoidance responses to noxious stimuli such as the volatile odorant octanol. This avoidance behavior is modulated by dopamine. cat-2 mutant animals that are deficient in dopamine biosynthesis have an increased response latency to octanol compared to wild type animals, and this defect can be fully restored with the application of exogenous dopamine. Because this avoidance behavior is mediated by glutamatergic signaling between sensory neurons and premotor interneurons, we investigated the genetic interactions between dopaminergic signaling and ionotropic glutamate receptors. cat-2 mutant animals lacking either the GLR-1 or GLR-2 AMPA/kainate receptors displayed an increased response latency to octanol, which could be restored via exogenous dopamine. However, whereas cat-2 mutant animals lacking the NMR-1 NMDA receptor had increased response latency to octanol they were insensitive to exogenous dopamine. Mutants that lacked both AMPA/kainate and NMDA receptors were also insensitive to exogenous dopamine. Our results indicate that dopamine modulation of octanol avoidance requires NMR-1, consistent with NMR-1 as a potential downstream signaling target for dopamine.

  11. Medial temporal N-acetyl-aspartate in pediatric major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMaster, Frank P; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R

    2008-10-30

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD case-control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in the left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  12. Medial temporal N-acetyl aspartate in pediatric major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMaster, Frank P.; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S. Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD-case control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  13. Pramipexole inhibits MPTP toxicity in mice by dopamine D3 receptor dependent and independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Andres D; Wong, Stephen K-F; Menniti, Frank S

    2003-08-15

    The role of dopamine D3 receptors was investigated in mediating the neuroprotective effect of the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist (S)-2-amino-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-6-propylamine-benzothiazole (pramipexole) in vivo. Pramipexole retained the ability to inhibit 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced dopamine depletion in mice in which the dopamine D3 receptor had been deleted. However, the neuroprotective efficacy was reduced in the dopamine D3 receptor-deleted mice compared to that in littermates expressing the wildtype receptor. Furthermore, the dopamine D3 receptor selective antagonist 2-(3-[4-(2-tert-butyl-6-trifluoromethyl-4-pyrimidinyl)-1-piperazinyl]propylthio)-4-pyrimidinol (A-437203) partially inhibited the neuroprotective effect of pramipexole in dopamine D3 receptor expressing mice but not in receptor-deleted mice. These results indicate that pramipexole protects dopamine neurons from MPTP-induced toxicity by mechanisms that are both dependent and independent of an interaction with dopamine D3 receptors. PMID:12954356

  14. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Salamone

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements. Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders.

  15. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M; Nunes, Eric J; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders. PMID:19826615

  16. Requirement of Dopamine Signaling in the Amygdala and Striatum for Learning and Maintenance of a Conditioned Avoidance Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvas, Martin; Fadok, Jonathan P.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Two-way active avoidance (2WAA) involves learning Pavlovian (association of a sound cue with a foot shock) and instrumental (shock avoidance) contingencies. To identify regions where dopamine (DA) is involved in mediating 2WAA, we restored DA signaling in specific brain areas of dopamine-deficient (DD) mice by local reactivation of conditionally…

  17. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. PMID:25687923

  18. Developmental origins of brain disorders: roles for dopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli M Money

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, such as dopamine, participate in a wide range of behavioral and cognitive functions in the adult brain, including movement, cognition, and reward. Dopamine-mediated signaling plays a fundamental neurodevelopmental role in forebrain differentiation and circuit formation. These developmental effects, such as modulation of neuronal migration and dendritic growth, occur before synaptogenesis and demonstrate novel roles for dopaminergic signaling beyond neuromodulation at the synapse. Pharmacologic and genetic disruptions demonstrate that these effects are brain region- and receptor subtype-specific. For example, the striatum and frontal cortex exhibit abnormal neuronal structure and function following prenatal disruption of dopamine receptor signaling. Alterations in these processes are implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders, and emerging studies of neurodevelopmental disruptions may shed light on the pathophysiology of abnormal neuronal circuitry in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  19. Multicistronic lentiviral vector-mediated striatal gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and GTP cyclohydrolase I induces sustained transgene expression, dopamine production, and functional improvement in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Barber, Robert D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Carter, Emma E; Rohll, Jonathan B; Kingsman, Susan M; Kingsman, Alan J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2002-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This loss leads to complete dopamine depletion in the striatum and severe motor impairment. It has been demonstrated previously that a lentiviral vector system based on equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) gives rise to highly efficient and sustained transduction of neurons in the rat brain. Therefore, a dopamine replacement strategy using EIAV has been investigated as a treatment in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) animal model of PD. A self-inactivating EIAV minimal lentiviral vector that expresses tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic amino acid dopa decarboxylase (AADC), and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (CH1) in a single transcription unit has been generated. In cultured striatal neurons transduced with this vector, TH, AADC, and CH1 proteins can all be detected. After stereotactic delivery into the dopamine-denervated striatum of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat, sustained expression of each enzyme and effective production of catecholamines were detected, resulting in significant reduction of apomorphine-induced motor asymmetry compared with control animals (p < 0.003). Expression of each enzyme in the striatum was observed for up to 5 months after injection. These data indicate that the delivery of three catecholaminergic synthetic enzymes by a single lentiviral vector can achieve functional improvement and thus open the potential for the use of this vector for gene therapy of late-stage PD patients. PMID:12451130

  20. Pyrethroid pesticide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between pesticide exposure and the incidence of PD. Studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that certain pesticides increase levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of dopaminergic neurotransmission and a gateway for dopaminergic neurotoxins. Here, we report that repeated exposure (3 injections over 2 weeks) of mice to two commonly used pyrethroid pesticides, deltamethrin (3 mg/kg) and permethrin (0.8 mg/kg), increases DAT-mediated dopamine uptake by 31 and 28%, respectively. Using cells stably expressing DAT, we determined that exposure (10 min) to deltamethrin and permethrin (1 nM-100 μM) had no effect on DAT-mediated dopamine uptake. Extending exposures to both pesticides for 30 min (10 μM) or 24 h (1, 5, and 10 μM) resulted in significant decrease in dopamine uptake. This reduction was not the result of competitive inhibition, loss of DAT protein, or cytotoxicity. However, there was an increase in DNA fragmentation, an index of apoptosis, in cells exhibiting reduced uptake at 30 min and 24 h. These data suggest that up-regulation of DAT by in vivo pyrethroid exposure is an indirect effect and that longer-term exposure of cells results in apoptosis. Since DAT can greatly affect the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxicants, up-regulation of DAT by deltamethrin and permethrin may increase the susceptibility of dopamine neurons to toxic insult, which may provide insight into the association between pesticide exposure and PD

  1. Trans-blood brain barrier delivery of dopamine-loaded nanoparticles reverses functional deficits in parkinsonian rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahuja, Richa; Seth, Kavita; Shukla, Anshi; Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Saxena, Prem Narain; Arun, Jharna; Chaudhari, Bhushan Pradosh; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Sheelendra Pratap; Shukla, Rakesh; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2015-05-26

    Sustained and safe delivery of dopamine across the blood brain barrier (BBB) is a major hurdle for successful therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder. Therefore, in the present study we designed neurotransmitter dopamine-loaded PLGA nanoparticles (DA NPs) to deliver dopamine to the brain. These nanoparticles slowly and constantly released dopamine, showed reduced clearance of dopamine in plasma, reduced quinone adduct formation, and decreased dopamine autoxidation. DA NPs were internalized in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells and dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum, regions affected in PD. Treatment with DA NPs did not cause reduction in cell viability and morphological deterioration in SH-SY5Y, as compared to bulk dopamine-treated cells, which showed reduced viability. Herein, we report that these NPs were able to cross the BBB and capillary endothelium in the striatum and substantia nigra in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD. Systemic intravenous administration of DA NPs caused significantly increased levels of dopamine and its metabolites and reduced dopamine-D2 receptor supersensitivity in the striatum of parkinsonian rats. Further, DA NPs significantly recovered neurobehavioral abnormalities in 6-OHDA-induced parkinsonian rats. Dopamine delivered through NPs did not cause additional generation of ROS, dopaminergic neuron degeneration, and ultrastructural changes in the striatum and substantia nigra as compared to 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Interestingly, dopamine delivery through nanoformulation neither caused alterations in the heart rate and blood pressure nor showed any abrupt pathological change in the brain and other peripheral organs. These results suggest that NPs delivered dopamine into the brain, reduced dopamine autoxidation-mediated toxicity, and ultimately reversed neurochemical and neurobehavioral deficits in parkinsonian rats. PMID:25825926

  2. Occurrence of the malate-aspartate shuttle in various tumor types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, W V; Lehninger, A L

    1976-04-01

    The activity of the malate-aspartate shuttle for the reoxidation of cytoplasmic reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by mitochondria was assessed in six lines of rodent ascites tumor cells (two strains of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma, Krebs II carcinoma, Novikoff hepatoma, AS-30D hepatoma, and L1210 mouse leukemia). All the tumor cells examined showed mitochondrial reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH, as evidenced by the accumulation of pyruvate when the cells were incubated aerobically with L-lactate. Reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH thus generated was completely inhibited by the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetate. The involvement of the respiratory chain in the reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH was demonstrated by the action of cyanide, rotenone, and antimycin A, which strongly inhibited the formation of pyruvate from added L-lactate. Compounds that inhibit the carrier-mediated entry of malate into mitochondria, such as butylmalonate, benzenetricarboxylate, and iodobenzylmalonate, also inhibited the accumulation of pyruvate from added L-lactate by the tumor cells. The maximal rate of the malate-aspartate shuttle was established by addtion of arsenite to inhibit the mitochondrial oxidation of the pyruvate formed from added lactate. The capacity of the various tumor lines for the reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH via the malate-aspartate shuttle approaches 20% of the total respiratory rate of the cells and thus appears to be sufficient to account for the mitochondrial reoxidation of that fraction of glycolytic NADH not reoxidized by pyruvate and lactate dehydrognenase in the cytoplasm. PMID:177206

  3. Dopamine and oxytocin interactions underlying behaviors: potential contributions to behavioral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, Tracey A; Douglas, Alison J

    2010-06-01

    Dopamine is an important neuromodulator that exerts widespread effects on the central nervous system (CNS) function. Disruption in dopaminergic neurotransmission can have profound effects on mood and behavior and as such is known to be implicated in various neuropsychiatric behavioral disorders including autism and depression. The subsequent effects on other neurocircuitries due to dysregulated dopamine function have yet to be fully explored. Due to the marked social deficits observed in psychiatric patients, the neuropeptide, oxytocin is emerging as one particular neural substrate that may be influenced by the altered dopamine levels subserving neuropathologic-related behavioral diseases. Oxytocin has a substantial role in social attachment, affiliation and sexual behavior. More recently, it has emerged that disturbances in peripheral and central oxytocin levels have been detected in some patients with dopamine-dependent disorders. Thus, oxytocin is proposed to be a key neural substrate that interacts with central dopamine systems. In addition to psychosocial improvement, oxytocin has recently been implicated in mediating mesolimbic dopamine pathways during drug addiction and withdrawal. This bi-directional role of dopamine has also been implicated during some components of sexual behavior. This review will discuss evidence for the existence dopamine/oxytocin positive interaction in social behavioral paradigms and associated disorders such as sexual dysfunction, autism, addiction, anorexia/bulimia, and depression. Preliminary findings suggest that whilst further rigorous testing has to be conducted to establish a dopamine/oxytocin link in human disorders, animal models seem to indicate the existence of broad and integrated brain circuits where dopamine and oxytocin interactions at least in part mediate socio-affiliative behaviors. A profound disruption to these pathways is likely to underpin associated behavioral disorders. Central oxytocin pathways may serve as a

  4. Aspartate Aminotransferase in Alfalfa Root Nodules 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnham, Mark W.; Griffith, Stephen M.; Miller, Susan S.; Vance, Carroll P.

    1990-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) plays an important role in nitrogen metabolism in all plants and is particularly important in the assimilation of fixed N derived from the legume-Rhizoblum symbiosis. Two isozymes of AAT (AAT-1 and AAT-2) occur in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Antibodies against alfalfa nodule AAT-2 do not recognize AAT-1, and these antibodies were used to study AAT-2 expression in different tissues and genotypes of alfalfa and also in other legume and nonlegume species. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis indicated that nodules of 38-day-old alfalfa plants contained about eight times more AAT-2 than did nodules of 7-day-old plants, confirming the nodule-enhanced nature of this isozyme. AAT-2 was estimated to make up 16, 15, 5, and 8 milligrams per gram of total soluble protein in mature nodules, roots, stems, and leaves, respectively, of effective N2-fixing alfalfa. The concentration of AAT-2 in nodules of ineffective non-N2-fixing alafalfa genotypes was about 70% less than that of effective nodules. Western blots of soluble protein from nodules of nine legume species indicated that a 40-kilodalton polypeptide that reacts strongly with AAT-2 antibodies is conserved in legumes. Nodule AAT-2 immunoprecipitation data suggested that amide- and ureide-type legumes may differ in expression and regulation of the enzyme. In addition, Western blotting and immunoprecipitations of AAT activity demonstrated that antibodies against alfalfa AAT-2 are highly cross-reactive with AAT enzyme protein in leaves of soybean (Glycine max L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and maize (Zea mays L.) and in roots of maize, but not with AAT in soybean and wheat roots. Results from this study indicate that AAT-2 is structurally conserved and localized in similar tissues among diverse species. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16667896

  5. Effect of dopamine on pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow in dogs with gastric fistula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovendal, C P; Bech, K; Gottrup, F; Andersen, D

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of intravenously administered dopamine on dopamine receptors and adrenergic receptors in terms of its effect on gastric acid secretion, the kinetic mechanism, blood flow, and antral motility. Dopamine was used alone and in conjunction with...... selective blockade of alpha-, beta-, and dopaminergic receptors. A significant inhibition of gastric acid secretion was found with the highest dose of dopamine used (40 micrograms/kg/min). The kinetic study showed characteristics of a non-competitive type. The anti-secretory effect dopamine was...... significantly blocked by non-selective beta-blockade or by selective beta-blockade but not by alpha- or dopaminergic receptor blockade. This suggests that the inhibitory effect of dopamine on gastric secretion is mediated by beta-receptors. There was no significant effect on gastric mucosal blood flow, but the...

  6. Regulation of dopamine transporter activity by carboxypeptidase E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Heping

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dopamine transporter (DAT plays a critical role in terminating the action of dopamine by rapid reuptake into the presynaptic neuron. Previous studies have revealed that the DAT carboxyl terminus (DAT-CT can directly interact with other cellular proteins and regulate DAT function and trafficking. Results Here, we have identified that carboxypeptidase E (CPE, a prohormone processing exopeptidase and sorting receptor for the regulated secretory pathway, interacts with the DAT-CT and affects DAT function. Mammalian cell lines coexpressing CPE and DAT exhibited increased DAT-mediated dopamine uptake activity compared to cells expressing DAT alone. Moreover, coexpression of an interfering DAT-CT minigene inhibited the effects of CPE on DAT. Functional changes caused by CPE could be attributed to enhanced DAT expression and subsequent increase in DAT cell surface localization, due to decreased DAT degradation. In addition, CPE association could reduce the phosphorylation state of DAT on serine residues, potentially leading to reduced internalization, thus stabilizing plasmalemmal DAT localization. Conclusion Taken together, our results reveal a novel role for CPE in the regulation of DAT trafficking and DAT-mediated DA uptake, which may provide a novel target in the treatment of dopamine-governed diseases such as drug addiction and obesity.

  7. The involvement of nucleus accumbens dopamine in appetitive and aversive motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, J D

    1994-04-18

    In recent years, considerable emphasis has been placed upon the putative role of nucleus accumbens dopamine systems in appetitive motivation and positive reinforcement. However, considerable evidence indicates that brain dopamine in general, and nucleus accumbens dopamine in particular, is involved in aspects of aversive motivation. Administration of dopamine antagonists or localized interference with nucleus accumbens dopamine systems has been shown to disrupt active avoidance behavior. In addition, accumbens dopamine release and metabolism is activated by a wide variety of stressful conditions. A review of the literature indicates that there are substantial similarities between the characteristics of dopaminergic involvement in appetitive and aversive motivation. There is conflicting evidence about the role of dopamine in emotion, and little evidence to suggest that the profound and consistent changes in instrumental behavior produced by interference with DA systems are due to direct dopaminergic mediation of positive affective responses such as hedonia. It is suggested that nucleus accumbens dopamine is involved in aspects of sensorimotor functions that are involved in both appetitive and aversive motivation. PMID:8037860

  8. Adolescent social defeat alters N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor expression and impairs fear learning in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Andrew M; Mears, Mackenzie; Forster, Gina L; Lei, Yanlin; Tejani-Butt, Shanaz M; Watt, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Repeated social defeat of adolescent male rats results in adult mesocortical dopamine hypofunction, impaired working memory, and increased contextual anxiety-like behavior. Given the role of glutamate in dopamine regulation, cognition, and fear and anxiety, we investigated potential changes to N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors following adolescent social defeat. As both NMDA receptors and mesocortical dopamine are implicated in the expression and extinction of conditioned fear, a separate cohort of rats was challenged with a classical fear conditioning paradigm to investigate whether fear learning is altered by adolescent defeat. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure 3H-MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors in regions of the medial prefrontal cortex, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus. Assessment of fear learning was achieved using an auditory fear conditioning paradigm, with freezing toward the auditory tone used as a measure of conditioned fear. Compared to controls, adolescent social defeat decreased adult NMDA receptor expression in the infralimbic region of the prefrontal cortex and central amygdala, while increasing expression in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Previously defeated rats also displayed decreased conditioned freezing during the recall and first extinction periods, which may be related to the observed decreases and increases in NMDA receptors within the central amygdala and CA3, respectively. The alteration in NMDA receptors seen following adolescent social defeat suggests that dysfunction of glutamatergic systems, combined with mesocortical dopamine deficits, likely plays a role in the some of the long-term behavioral consequences of social stressors in adolescence seen in both preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26876136

  9. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Fitzgerald; Ray Dolan

    2015-01-01

    Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signalling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of b...

  10. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khursheed A Wani

    Full Text Available Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1 required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior.

  11. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Khursheed A; Catanese, Mary; Normantowicz, Robyn; Herd, Muriel; Maher, Kathryn N; Chase, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1) required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior. PMID:22629462

  12. Abolished cocaine reward in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Rong; Tilley, Michael R.; Wei, Hua; Zhou, Fuwen; Zhou, Fu-Ming; Ching, San; Quan, Ning; Stephens, Robert L.; Hill, Erik R.; Nottoli, Timothy; Han, Dawn D; Gu, Howard H.

    2006-01-01

    There are three known high-affinity targets for cocaine: the dopamine transporter (DAT), the serotonin transporter (SERT), and the norepinephrine transporter (NET). Decades of studies support the dopamine (DA) hypothesis that the blockade of DAT and the subsequent increase in extracellular DA primarily mediate cocaine reward and reinforcement. Contrary to expectations, DAT knockout (DAT-KO) mice and SERT or NET knockout mice still self-administer cocaine and/or display conditioned place prefe...

  13. Regulation of dopamine system responsivity and its adaptive and pathological response to stress

    OpenAIRE

    Belujon, Pauline; Grace, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Although, historically, the norepinephrine system has attracted the majority of attention in the study of the stress response, the dopamine system has also been consistently implicated. It has long been established that stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological mechanisms that mediate the stress response and its effect in psychiatric diseases are not well understood. The dopamine system can play distinct roles in stress and psychiat...

  14. Dopamine receptor 4 promoter polymorphism modulates memory and neuronal responses to salience

    OpenAIRE

    Strange, Bryan A; Gartmann, N.; Brenninkmeyer, Jessica; Haaker, Jan; Reif, Andreas; Kalisch, Raffael; Büchel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Animal models and human functional imaging data implicate the dopamine system in mediating enhanced encoding of novel stimuli into human memory. A separate line of investigation suggests an association between a functional polymorphism in the promoter region for the human dopamine 4 receptor gene (DRD4) and sensitivity to novelty. We demonstrate, in two independent samples, that the -521Cmayor queT DRD4 promoter polymorphism determines the magnitude of human memory enhancement for contextuall...

  15. Endogenous fatty acid ethanolamides suppress nicotine-induced activation of mesolimbic dopamine neurons through nuclear receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Melis, Miriam; Pillolla, Giuliano; Luchicchi, Antonio; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Yasar, Sevil; Goldberg, Steven R.; Pistis, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Nicotine stimulates the activity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons, which is believed to mediate the rewarding and addictive properties of tobacco use. Accumulating evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system might play a major role in neuronal mechanisms underlying the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. Here, we investigated the modulation of nicotine effects by the endocannabinoid system on dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area with electrophysiological ...

  16. How Dopamine Transporter Interacts with Dopamine: Insights from Molecular Modeling and Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2007-01-01

    By performing homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulations, we have developed three-dimensional (3D) structural models of both dopamine transporter and dopamine transporter-dopamine complex in the environment of lipid bilayer and solvent water. According to the simulated structure of dopamine transporter-dopamine complex, dopamine was orientated in a hydrophobic pocket at the midpoint of the membrane. The modeled 3D structures provide some detailed structural and m...

  17. Dopamine-1 and dopamine-2 mechanisms in the control of renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, R M; Siragy, H M; Ragsdale, N V; Howell, N L; Felder, R A; Peach, M J; Chevalier, R L

    1990-06-01

    Dopamine (DA), a catecholamine produced in the kidney, is a renal vasodilator and natriuretic substance, but its action at dopamine-1 (DA-1), dopamine-2 (DA-2) and alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors limits its effectiveness as a heuristic tool and pharmacologic agent. We have studied the effects of highly selective DA-1 and DA-2 receptor agonists and antagonists in normal human subjects and experimental animals to determine the precise physiological role of renal dopamine at DA-1 and DA-2 receptors within the kidney. We studied fenoldopam, a selective DA-1 agonist, in normal human subjects in metabolic balances at high (300 mEq/day) and low (10 mEq/day) sodium (Na) intake. Selective DA-1 receptor stimulation during high Na intake resulted in renal vasodilation, natriuresis and diuresis in a sustained manner for 3 hours. The natriuresis was mediated by a reduction in Na reabsorption at both proximal and distal tubular sites. In contrast, during low Na intake, DA-1 receptor stimulation did not engender a natriuretic or diuretic response. Thus, sodium depletion may inhibit the function of renal tubular cells in response to DA-1 stimulation. DA-1 receptors are present in the medial layer of the renal vasculature, proximal tubule and cortical collecting duct; DA-2 receptors are localized to the glomerulus, the renal nerves surrounding renal blood vessels and possibly the renal vascular endothelium. We have performed studies in conscious dogs with indwelling renal arterial catheters to identify the physiological role of renal DA to DA-1 and DA-2 receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1974444

  18. Dopamine signaling: target in glioblastoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2014), 1116-1117. ISSN 1949-2553 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Dopamine signaling * glioblastoma * MAPK Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.359, year: 2014

  19. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gillian A; Nieh, Edward H; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Halbert, Sarah A; Pradhan, Roma V; Yosafat, Ariella S; Glober, Gordon F; Izadmehr, Ehsan M; Thomas, Rain E; Lacy, Gabrielle D; Wildes, Craig P; Ungless, Mark A; Tye, Kay M

    2016-02-11

    The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26871628

  20. Mesolimbic dopamine signals the value of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Arif A; Pettibone, Jeffrey R; Mabrouk, Omar S; Hetrick, Vaughn L; Schmidt, Robert; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Kennedy, Robert T; Aragona, Brandon J; Berke, Joshua D

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine cell firing can encode errors in reward prediction, providing a learning signal to guide future behavior. Yet dopamine is also a key modulator of motivation, invigorating current behavior. Existing theories propose that fast (phasic) dopamine fluctuations support learning, whereas much slower (tonic) dopamine changes are involved in motivation. We examined dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens across multiple time scales, using complementary microdialysis and voltammetric methods during adaptive decision-making. We found that minute-by-minute dopamine levels covaried with reward rate and motivational vigor. Second-by-second dopamine release encoded an estimate of temporally discounted future reward (a value function). Changing dopamine immediately altered willingness to work and reinforced preceding action choices by encoding temporal-difference reward prediction errors. Our results indicate that dopamine conveys a single, rapidly evolving decision variable, the available reward for investment of effort, which is employed for both learning and motivational functions. PMID:26595651

  1. Dopamine, affordance and active inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl J Friston

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of dopamine in behaviour and decision-making is often cast in terms of reinforcement learning and optimal decision theory. Here, we present an alternative view that frames the physiology of dopamine in terms of Bayes-optimal behaviour. In this account, dopamine controls the precision or salience of (external or internal cues that engender action. In other words, dopamine balances bottom-up sensory information and top-down prior beliefs when making hierarchical inferences (predictions about cues that have affordance. In this paper, we focus on the consequences of changing tonic levels of dopamine firing using simulations of cued sequential movements. Crucially, the predictions driving movements are based upon a hierarchical generative model that infers the context in which movements are made. This means that we can confuse agents by changing the context (order in which cues are presented. These simulations provide a (Bayes-optimal model of contextual uncertainty and set switching that can be quantified in terms of behavioural and electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, one can simulate dopaminergic lesions (by changing the precision of prediction errors to produce pathological behaviours that are reminiscent of those seen in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We use these simulations to demonstrate how a single functional role for dopamine at the synaptic level can manifest in different ways at the behavioural level.

  2. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Gillian A.; Nieh, Edward H.; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Halbert, Sarah A.; Pradhan, Roma V.; Yosafat, Ariella S.; Glober, Gordon F.; Izadmehr, Ehsan M.; Thomas, Rain E.; Lacy, Gabrielle D.; Wildes, Craig P.; Ungless, Mark A.; Tye, Kay M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute ...

  3. Association between amygdala reactivity and a dopamine transporter gene polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, O.; Åhs, F; Furmark, T; Appel, L; Linnman, C; Faria, V; Bani, M; Pich, E M; Bettica, P; Henningsson, S; Manuck, S B; Ferrell, R E; Nikolova, Y S; Hariri, A R; Fredrikson, M.

    2014-01-01

    Essential for detection of relevant external stimuli and for fear processing, the amygdala is under modulatory influence of dopamine (DA). The DA transporter (DAT) is of fundamental importance for the regulation of DA transmission by mediating reuptake inactivation of extracellular DA. This study examined if a common functional variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in the 3′ untranslated region of the DAT gene (SLC6A3) influences amygdala function during the processing of aversive emotio...

  4. Crystal structure of Clostridium acetobutylicum Aspartate kinase (CaAK): An important allosteric enzyme for amino acids production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjasetty, Babu A; Chance, Mark R; Burley, Stephen K; Panjikar, Santosh; Almo, Steven C

    2014-09-01

    Aspartate kinase (AK) is an enzyme which is tightly regulated through feedback control and responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-L-aspartate from L-aspartate. This intermediate step is at an important branch point where one path leads to the synthesis of lysine and the other to threonine, methionine and isoleucine. Concerted feedback inhibition of AK is mediated by threonine and lysine and varies between the species. The crystal structure of biotechnologically important Clostridium acetobutylicum aspartate kinase (CaAK; E.C. 2.7.2.4; Mw=48,030Da; 437aa; SwissProt: Q97MC0) has been determined to 3Å resolution. CaAK acquires a protein fold similar to the other known structures of AKs despite the low sequence identity (Clostridium tetani (64% sequence identity) suggesting the potential of the structure solved here to be applied for modeling drug interactions. CaAK structure may serve as a guide to better understand and engineer lysine biosynthesis for the biotechnology industry. PMID:25170437

  5. Regional specificity in the real-time development of phasic dopamine transmission patterns during acquisition of a cue-cocaine association

    OpenAIRE

    Aragona, Brandon J.; Day, Jeremy J.; Roitman, Mitchell F.; Cleaveland, Nathan A.; Wightman, R. Mark; Carelli, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    Drug seeking is significantly regulated by drug-associated cues and associative learning between environmental cues and cocaine reward is mediated by dopamine transmission within the nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, dopamine transmission during early acquisition of a cue-cocaine association has never been assessed because of the technical difficulties associated with resolving cue-evoked and cocaine-evoked dopamine release within the same conditioning trial. Here, we used fast-scan cyclic vo...

  6. Chlorpromazine, haloperidol, metoclopramide and domperidone release prolactin through dopamine antagonism at low concentrations but paradoxically inhibit prolactin release at high concentrations.

    OpenAIRE

    Besser, G M; Delitala, G; Grossman, A; Stubbs, W. A.; Yeo, T

    1980-01-01

    1. The effects of chlorpromazine, haloperidol, metoclopramide and domperidone on the release of prolactin from perfused columns of dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells were studied. 2. Chlorpromazine, haloperidol, metoclopramide and domperidone antagonized the dopamine-mediated inhibition of prolactin release at low concentrations. 3. Each dopamine antagonist displaced the dose-response curve for dopamine-induced suppression of prolactin release to the right in a parallel manner. 4. At high...

  7. D1 dopamine receptor activity of anti-parkinsonian drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fici, G J; Wu, H; VonVoigtlander, P F; Sethy, V H

    1997-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical investigations suggest that stimulation of D1 dopamine receptors may be responsible for dyskinesias induced by dopamine agonist treatment of Parkinson's Disease (PD), and that these dyskinesias may be decreased by treatment with a D1 antagonist (clozapine). Therefore, the effects of dopamine agonists and antagonists have been investigated in a primary cerebellar granule cell model of cAMP formation that seems to be highly responsive to the D1 receptors. SKF 38393, lisuride, apomorphine, pergolide, dopamine, bromocriptine and 7-OH-DPAT showed concentration-dependent increases in cAMP formation, with EC50s (in microM) of 0.013, 0.053, 0.25, 1.04, 2.18, 50.9 and 54.4, respectively. SKF 38393, apomorphine, dopamine and pergolide had similar intrinsic activity (100%), while the intrinsic activities of 7-OH-DPAT, bromocriptine and lisuride were 28.0%, 20.7% and 17.2%, respectively. SCH 23390, a selective D1 dopamine receptor antagonist, blocked an increase in cAMP formation produced by EC50 concentrations of all of the dopamine agonists investigated in this study. Clozapine concentration-dependently blocked pergolide-induced increases in cAMP and was approximately 1700-fold less potent than SCH 23390 (IC50: 0.97 microM and 0.56 nM, respectively). U-95666A (1-1000 microM), selective for the D2 receptors, showed no significant effect on cAMP, while pramipexole (0.1-100 microM), a D3 preferring agonist, did not elevate cAMP. These data suggest that primary cerebellar granule cell cultures are an excellent model for measuring D1 dopamine receptor-mediated changes in cellular cAMP. The results are discussed with reference to the relationship between the D1 receptor-stimulated increase in cAMP formation and the induction of dyskinesia in humans by these anti-parkinsonian drugs. PMID:9126882

  8. An updated view on the role of dopamine in myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldkaemper, Marita; Schaeffel, Frank

    2013-09-01

    A large body of data is available to support the hypothesis that dopamine (DA) is one of the retinal neurotransmitters involved in the signaling cascade that controls eye growth by vision. Initially, reduced retinal DA levels were observed in eyes deprived of sharp vision by either diffusers ("deprivation myopia", DM) or negative lenses ("lens induced myopia", LIM). Simulating high retinal DA levels by intravitreal application of a DA agonist can suppress the development of both DM and LIM. Also more recent studies using knock-out mouse models of DA receptors support the idea of an association between decreased DA levels and DM. There seem to be differences in the magnitude of the effects of DA on DM and LIM, with larger changes in DM but the degrees of image degradation by both treatments need to be matched to support this conclusion. Although a number of studies have shown that the inhibitory effects of dopamine agonists on DM and LIM are mediated through stimulation of the D2-receptor, there is also recent evidence that the balance of D2- and D1-receptor activation is important. Inhibition of D2-receptors can also slow the development of spontaneous myopia in albino guinea pigs. Retinal DA content displays a distinct endogenous diurnal, and partially circadian rhythm. In addition, retinal DA is regulated by a number of visual stimuli like retinal illuminance, spatial frequency content of the image, temporal contrast and, in chicks, by the light input from the pineal organ. A close interaction was found between muscarinergic and dopaminergic systems, and between nitric oxide and dopaminergic pathways, and there is evidence for crosstalk between the different pathways, perhaps multiple binding of the ligands to different receptors. It was shown that DA agonists interact with the immediate early signaling molecule ZENK which triggers the first steps in eye growth regulation. However, since long treatment periods were often needed to induce significant changes in

  9. Dopamine-dependent architecture of cortico-subcortical network connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David M; Oei, Nicole Y L; Soeter, Roelof P; Both, Stephanie; van Gerven, Joop M A; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Beckmann, Christian F

    2013-07-01

    Maladaptive dopaminergic mediation of reward processing in humans is thought to underlie multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including addiction, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. Mechanisms responsible for the development of such disorders may depend on individual differences in neural signaling within large-scale cortico-subcortical circuitry. Using a combination of functional neuroimaging and pharmacological challenges in healthy volunteers, we identified opposing dopamine agonistic and antagonistic neuromodulatory effects on distributed functional interactions between specific subcortical regions and corresponding neocortical "resting-state" networks, known to be involved in distinct aspects of cognition and reward processing. We found that, relative to a placebo, levodopa and haloperidol challenges, respectively, increased or decreased the functional connectivity between (1) the midbrain and a "default mode" network, (2) the right caudate and a right-lateralized frontoparietal network, and (3) the ventral striatum and a fronto-insular network. Further, we found drug-specific associations between brain circuitry reactivity to dopamine modulation and individual differences in trait impulsivity, revealing dissociable drug-personality interaction effects across distinct dopamine-dependent cortico-subcortical networks. Our findings identify possible systems underlying pathogenesis and treatment efficacy in disorders of dopamine deficiency. PMID:22645252

  10. Evaluation of animal models of obsessive-compulsive disorder: correlation with phasic dopamine neuron activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesia, Thibaut; Bizup, Brandon; Grace, Anthony A

    2013-07-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric condition defined by intrusive thoughts (obsessions) associated with compensatory and repetitive behaviour (compulsions). However, advancement in our understanding of this disorder has been hampered by the absence of effective animal models and correspondingly analysis of the physiological changes that may be present in these models. To address this, we have evaluated two current rodent models of OCD; repeated injection of dopamine D2 agonist quinpirole and repeated adolescent injection of the tricyclic agent clomipramine in combination with a behavioural paradigm designed to produce compulsive lever pressing. These results were then compared with their relative impact on the state of activity of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system using extracellular recoding of spontaneously active dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The clomipramine model failed to exacerbate compulsive lever pressing and VTA dopamine neurons in clomipramine-treated rats had mildly diminished bursting activity. In contrast, quinpirole-treated animals showed significant increases in compulsive lever pressing, which was concurrent with a substantial diminution of bursting activity of VTA dopamine neurons. Therefore, VTA dopamine activity correlated with the behavioural response in these models. Taken together, these data support the view that compulsive behaviours likely reflect, at least in part, a disruption of the dopaminergic system, more specifically by a decrease in baseline phasic dopamine signalling mediated by burst firing of dopamine neurons. PMID:23360787

  11. BMI modulates calorie-dependent dopamine changes in accumbens from glucose intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene-Jack Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Dopamine mediates the rewarding effects of food that can lead to overeating and obesity, which then trigger metabolic neuroadaptations that further perpetuate excessive food consumption. We tested the hypothesis that the dopamine response to calorie intake (independent of palatability in striatal brain regions is attenuated with increases in weight. METHOD: We used positron emission tomography with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine changes triggered by calorie intake by contrasting the effects of an artificial sweetener (sucralose devoid of calories to that of glucose to assess their association with body mass index (BMI in nineteen healthy participants (BMI range 21-35. RESULTS: Neither the measured blood glucose concentrations prior to the sucralose and the glucose challenge days, nor the glucose concentrations following the glucose challenge vary as a function of BMI. In contrast the dopamine changes in ventral striatum (assessed as changes in non-displaceable binding potential of [11C]raclopride triggered by calorie intake (contrast glucose - sucralose were significantly correlated with BMI (r = 0.68 indicating opposite responses in lean than in obese individuals. Specifically whereas in normal weight individuals (BMI <25 consumption of calories was associated with increases in dopamine in the ventral striatum in obese individuals it was associated with decreases in dopamine. CONCLUSION: These findings show reduced dopamine release in ventral striatum with calorie consumption in obese subjects, which might contribute to their excessive food intake to compensate for the deficit between the expected and the actual response to food consumption.

  12. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eFitzgerald

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signalling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about alternative actions, and thus controls the outcome-sensitivity of behaviour. We extend an active inference scheme for solving Markov decision processes to include learning, and show that simulated dopamine dynamics strongly resemble those actually observed during instrumental conditioning. Furthermore, simulated dopamine depletion impairs performance but spares learning, while simulated excitation of dopamine neurons drives reward learning, through aberrant inference about outcome states. Our formal approach provides a novel and parsimonious reconciliation of apparently divergent experimental findings.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome dopamine ...

  14. Dopamine gates sensory representations in cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Eshel, Neir; Tian, Ju

    2014-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) maintains information about relevant sensory stimuli, in a process thought to rely on dopamine release. In a recent paper, Jacob et al. (J Neurosci 33: 13724–13734, 2013) demonstrated one way in which dopamine might facilitate this process. The authors recorded from PFC neurons in monkeys during local application of dopamine. They found that dopamine increases the gain of sensory-evoked responses in putative pyramidal neurons in PFC, potentially by inhibiting local...

  15. Dopamine agents for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anders Ellekær; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Gluud, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present with extrapyramidal symptoms and changes in basal ganglia. These changes are similar to those seen in patients with Parkinson's disease. Dopamine agents (such as bromocriptine and levodopa, used for patients with Parkinson's disease) have...... therefore been assessed as a potential treatment for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of dopamine agents versus placebo or no intervention for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: Trials were identified through the Cochrane...... the trials followed participants after the end of treatment. Only one trial reported adequate bias control; the remaining four trials were considered to have high risk of bias. Random-effects model meta-analyses showed that dopamine agents had no beneficial or detrimental effect on hepatic...

  16. Drugs of abuse, dopamine, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders/HIV-associated dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Vishnudutt; Rapaka, Rao; Shurtleff, David

    2011-08-01

    Although the incidence of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) has declined, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain a significant health problem despite use of highly active antiretroviral therapy. In addition, the incidence and/or severity of HAND/HAD are increased with concomitant use of drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, marijuana, and methamphetamine. Furthermore, exposure to most drugs of abuse increases brain levels of dopamine, which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV. This review evaluates the potential role of dopamine in the potentiation of HAND/HAD by drugs of abuse. In the brain, multiplication of HIV in infected macrophages/microglia could result in the release of HIV proteins such as gp120 and Tat, which can bind to and impair dopamine transporter (DAT) functions, leading to elevated levels of dopamine in the dopaminergic synapses in the early asymptomatic stage of HIV infection. Exposure of HIV-infected patients to drugs of abuse, especially cocaine and methamphetamine, can further increase synaptic levels of dopamine via binding to and subsequently impairing the function of DAT. This accumulated synaptic dopamine can diffuse out and activate adjacent microglia through binding to dopamine receptors. The activation of microglia may result in increased HIV replication as well as increased production of inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and chemokines. Increased HIV replication can lead to increased brain viral load and increased shedding of HIV proteins, gp120 and Tat. These proteins, as well as TNF-alpha, can induce cell death of adjacent dopaminergic neurons via apoptosis. Autoxidation and metabolism of accumulated synaptic dopamine can lead to generation of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide), quinones, and semiquinones, which can also induce apoptosis of neurons. Increased cell death of dopaminergic neurons can eventually lead to dopamine deficit that may exacerbate the severity and

  17. Dopamine release dynamics change during adolescence and after voluntary alcohol intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Palm

    Full Text Available Adolescence is associated with high impulsivity and risk taking, making adolescent individuals more inclined to use drugs. Early drug use is correlated to increased risk for substance use disorders later in life but the neurobiological basis is unclear. The brain undergoes extensive development during adolescence and disturbances at this time are hypothesized to contribute to increased vulnerability. The transition from controlled to compulsive drug use and addiction involve long-lasting changes in neural networks including a shift from the nucleus accumbens, mediating acute reinforcing effects, to recruitment of the dorsal striatum and habit formation. This study aimed to test the hypothesis of increased dopamine release after a pharmacological challenge in adolescent rats. Potassium-evoked dopamine release and uptake was investigated using chronoamperometric dopamine recordings in combination with a challenge by amphetamine in early and late adolescent rats and in adult rats. In addition, the consequences of voluntary alcohol intake during adolescence on these effects were investigated. The data show a gradual increase of evoked dopamine release with age, supporting previous studies suggesting that the pool of releasable dopamine increases with age. In contrast, a gradual decrease in evoked release with age was seen in response to amphetamine, supporting a proportionally larger storage pool of dopamine in younger animals. Dopamine measures after voluntary alcohol intake resulted in lower release amplitudes in response to potassium-chloride, indicating that alcohol affects the releasable pool of dopamine and this may have implications for vulnerability to addiction and other psychiatric diagnoses involving dopamine in the dorsal striatum.

  18. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, U; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B;

    1996-01-01

    (R,S)-2-Amino-2-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)acetic acid [(R,S)-AMAA, 4] is a potent and selective agonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) subtype of excitatory amino acid receptors. Using the Ugi "four-component condensation" method, the two diastereomers (2R)- and (2S)-2-[3-(benzylox...

  19. Role of beta-arrestin 2 downstream of dopamine receptors in the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eDel'Guidice

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctional scaffolding protein beta-arrestins (βArr and the G protein receptor kinases (GRK are involved in the desensitization of several G protein coupled-receptors (GPCR. However, arrestins can also contribute to GPCR signaling independently from G proteins. In this review, we focus on the role of βArr in the regulation of dopamine receptor functions in the striatum. First, we present in vivo evidence supporting a role for these proteins in the regulation of dopamine receptor desensitization. Second, we provide an overview of the roles of βArr-2 in the regulation of ERK/MAPkinases and Akt/GSK3 signaling pathways downstream of the D1 and D2 dopamine receptors. Thereafter, we examine the possible involvement of βArr-mediated signaling in the action of dopaminergic drugs used for the treatment of mental disorders. Finally, we focus on different potential cellular proteins regulated by βArr-mediated signaling which could contribute to the regulation of behavioral responses to dopamine. Overall, the identification of a cell signaling function for βArr downstream of dopamine receptors underscores the intricate complexity of the intertwined mechanisms regulating and mediating cell signaling in the basal ganglia. Understanding these mechanisms may lead to a better comprehension of the several roles played by these structures in the regulation of mood and to the development of new psychoactive drugs having better therapeutic efficacy.

  20. SPECT imaging of D2 dopamine receptors and endogenous dopamine release in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) is important in the mediation of addiction. [123I]iodobenzamide (IBZM), a SPECT ligand for the D2R, has been used for in vivo studies of D2R availability in humans, monkeys, and rats. Although mouse models are important in the study of addiction, [123I]IBZM has not been used in mice SPECT studies. This study evaluates the use of [123I]IBZM for measuring D2R availability in mice. Pharmacokinetics of [123I]IBZM in mice were studied with pinhole SPECT imaging after intravenous (i.v.) injection of [123I]IBZM (20, 40, and 70 MBq). In addition, the ability to measure the release of endogenous dopamine after amphetamine administration with [123I]IBZM SPECT was investigated. Thirdly, i.v. administration, the standard route of administration, and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of [123I]IBZM were compared. Specific binding of [123I]IBZM within the mouse striatum could be clearly visualized with SPECT. Peak specific striatal binding ratios were reached around 90 min post-injection. After amphetamine administration, the specific binding ratios of [123I]IBZM decreased significantly (-27.2%; n=6; p=0.046). Intravenous administration of [123I]IBZM led to significantly higher specific binding than i.p. administration of the same dose. However, we found that i.v. administration of a dose of 70 MBq [123I]IBZM might result in acute ethanol intoxication because ethanol is used as a preparative aid for the routine production of [123I]IBZM. Imaging of D2R availability and endogenous dopamine release in mice is feasible using [123I]IBZM single pinhole SPECT. Using commercially produced [123I]IBZM, a dose of 40 MBq injected i.v. can be recommended. (orig.)

  1. DOPAMINE DEPLETION SLOWS RETINAL TRANSMISSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    In male hooded rats, depletion of norepinephrine and dopamine by a-methyl-paratyrosine (AMT) significantly increased the latencies of early peaks in flash-evoked potentials recorded from the visual cortex, lateral geniculate nucleus, and optic tract. These effects were not produc...

  2. Calmodulin kinase II interacts with the dopamine transporter C terminus to regulate amphetamine-induced reverse transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Jacob U; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Holy, Marion;

    2006-01-01

    Efflux of dopamine through the dopamine transporter (DAT) is critical for the psychostimulatory properties of amphetamines, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a key role in this efflux. CaMKIIalpha bound to the d...... response to the CaMKII inhibitor KN93. Our data suggest that CaMKIIalpha binding to the DAT C terminus facilitates phosphorylation of the DAT N terminus and mediates amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux....

  3. Calmodulin Kinase II Interacts with the Dopamine Transporter C Terminus to Regulate Amphetamine-Induced Reverse Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Jacob U; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Holy, Marion;

    2006-01-01

    Efflux of dopamine through the dopamine transporter (DAT) is critical for the psychostimulatory properties of amphetamines, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a key role in this efflux. CaMKIIalpha bound to the d...... response to the CaMKII inhibitor KN93. Our data suggest that CaMKIIalpha binding to the DAT C terminus facilitates phosphorylation of the DAT N terminus and mediates amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux....

  4. A C-terminal PDZ domain binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Rickhag, Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar; Strandfelt, Kristine Nørgaard; Andresen, Bjørn; Gotfryd, Kamil; Madsen, Kenneth L; Vestergaard-Klewe, Ib; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Eriksen, Jacob; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Gomeza, Jesus; Woldbye, David P.D.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling DAT levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. DAT contains a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain binding sequence believed to bind synaptic scaffolding proteins, but its functional significance is uncertain. Here we demonstrate that two different DAT knock-in mice with disrupted PDZ-binding motifs (DAT-AAA and DAT+Ala) are characterized by dr...

  5. Dopamine gene therapy for Parkinson's disease in a nonhuman primate without associated dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarraya, Béchir; Boulet, Sabrina; Ralph, G Scott; Jan, Caroline; Bonvento, Gilles; Azzouz, Mimoun; Miskin, James E; Shin, Masahiro; Delzescaux, Thierry; Drouot, Xavier; Hérard, Anne-Sophie; Day, Denise M; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Kingsman, Susan M; Hantraye, Philippe; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Palfi, Stéphane

    2009-10-14

    In Parkinson's disease, degeneration of specific neurons in the midbrain can cause severe motor deficits, including tremors and the inability to initiate movement. The standard treatment is administration of pharmacological agents that transiently increase concentrations of brain dopamine and thereby discontinuously modulate neuronal activity in the striatum, the primary target of dopaminergic neurons. The resulting intermittent dopamine alleviates parkinsonian symptoms but is also thought to cause abnormal involuntary movements, called dyskinesias. To investigate gene therapy for Parkinson's disease, we simulated the disease in macaque monkeys by treating them with the complex I mitochondrial inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, which induces selective degeneration of dopamine-producing neurons. In this model, we demonstrated that injection of a tricistronic lentiviral vector encoding the critical genes for dopamine synthesis (tyrosine hydroxylase, aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, and guanosine 5'-triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1) into the striatum safely restored extracellular concentrations of dopamine and corrected the motor deficits for 12 months without associated dyskinesias. Gene therapy-mediated dopamine replacement may be able to correct Parkinsonism in patients without the complications of dyskinesias. PMID:20368163

  6. Beyond the Dopamine Receptor: Regulation and Roles of Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven I Walaas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine plays an important modulatory role in the central nervous system, helping to control critical aspects of motor function and reward learning. Alteration in normal dopaminergic neurotransmission underlies multiple neurological diseases including schizophrenia, Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. Modulation of dopamine-regulated signaling pathways is also important in the addictive actions of most drugs of abuse. Our studies over the last 30 years have focused on the molecular actions of dopamine acting on medium spiny neurons, the predominant neurons of the neostriatum. Striatum-enriched phosphoproteins, particularly DARPP-32, RCS (Regulator of Calmodulin Signaling and ARPP-16, mediate pleiotropic actions of dopamine. Notably, each of these proteins, either directly or indirectly, regulates the activity of one of the three major subclasses of serine/threonine protein phosphatases, PP1, PP2B and PP2A, respectively. For example, phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Thr34 by protein kinase A results in potent inhibition of PP1, leading to potentiation of dopaminergic signaling at multiple steps from the dopamine receptor to the nucleus. The discovery of DARPP-32 and its emergence as a critical molecular integrator of striatal signaling will be discussed, as will more recent studies that highlight novel roles for RCS and ARPP-16 in dopamine-regulated striatal signaling pathways.

  7. Increased brain dopamine and dopamine receptors in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In postmortem samples of caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens from 48 schizophrenic patients, there were significant increases in both the maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) and the apparent dissociation constant (KD) for tritiated spiperone. The increase in apparent KD probably reflects the presence of residual neuroleptic drugs, but changes in Bmax for tritiated spiperone reflect genuine changes in receptor numbers. The increases in receptors were seen only in patients in whom neuroleptic medication had been maintained until the time of death, indicating that they may be entirely iatrogenic. Dopamine measurements for a larger series of schizophrenic and control cases (n greater than 60) show significantly increased concentrations in both the nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus. The changes in dopamine were not obviously related to neuroleptic medication and, unlike the receptor changes, were most severe in younger patients

  8. Three-dimensional hybrid networks based on aspartic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anupama Ghosh; R A Sanguramath

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional achiral coordination polymers of the general formula M2(D, L-NHCH (COO)CH2COO)2.C4H4N2 where M = Ni and Co and pyrazine acts as the linker molecule have been prepared under hydrothermal conditions starting with [M(L-NHCH(COO)CH2COO).3H2O] possessing a helical chain structure. A three-dimensional hybrid compound of the formula Pb2.5[N{CH(COO)CH2COO}22H2O] has also been prepared hydrothermally starting with aspartic acid and Pb(NO3)2. In this lead compound, where a secondary amine formed by the dimerisation of aspartic acid acts as the ligand, there is two-dimensional inorganic connectivity and one-dimensional organic connectivity.

  9. Excessive cocaine use results from decreased phasic dopamine signaling in the striatum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willuhn, Ingo; Burgeno, Lauren M; Groblewski, Peter A; Phillips, Paul E M

    2014-01-01

    Drug addiction is a neuropsychiatric disorder marked by escalating drug use. Dopamine neurotransmission in the ventromedial striatum (VMS) mediates acute reinforcing effects of abused drugs, but with protracted use the dorsolateral striatum is thought to assume control over drug seeking. We measured

  10. Opposite Actions of Dopamine on Aversive and Appetitive Memories in the Crab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klappenbach, Martin; Maldonado, Hector; Locatelli, Fernando; Kaczer, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of how the reinforcement is represented in the central nervous system during memory formation is a current issue in neurobiology. Several studies in insects provide evidence of the instructive role of biogenic amines during the learning and memory process. In insects it was widely accepted that dopamine (DA) mediates aversive…

  11. Free D-aspartate regulates neuronal dendritic morphology, synaptic plasticity, gray matter volume and brain activity in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errico, F; Nisticò, R; Di Giorgio, A; Squillace, M; Vitucci, D; Galbusera, A; Piccinin, S; Mango, D; Fazio, L; Middei, S; Trizio, S; Mercuri, N B; Teule, M A; Centonze, D; Gozzi, A; Blasi, G; Bertolino, A; Usiello, A

    2014-01-01

    D-aspartate (D-Asp) is an atypical amino acid, which is especially abundant in the developing mammalian brain, and can bind to and activate N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDARs). In line with its pharmacological features, we find that mice chronically treated with D-Asp show enhanced NMDAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and basal cerebral blood volume in fronto-hippocampal areas. In addition, we show that both chronic administration of D-Asp and deletion of the gene coding for the catabolic enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) trigger plastic modifications of neuronal cytoarchitecture in the prefrontal cortex and CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and promote a cytochalasin D-sensitive form of synaptic plasticity in adult mouse brains. To translate these findings in humans and consistent with the experiments using Ddo gene targeting in animals, we performed a hierarchical stepwise translational genetic approach. Specifically, we investigated the association of variation in the gene coding for DDO with complex human prefrontal phenotypes. We demonstrate that genetic variation predicting reduced expression of DDO in postmortem human prefrontal cortex is mapped on greater prefrontal gray matter and activity during working memory as measured with MRI. In conclusion our results identify novel NMDAR-dependent effects of D-Asp on plasticity and physiology in rodents, which also map to prefrontal phenotypes in humans. PMID:25072322

  12. A superactive insulin: [B10-aspartic acid]insulin(human).

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, G P; Burke, G. T.; Katsoyannis, P G

    1987-01-01

    The genetic basis for a case of familial hyperproinsulinemia has been elucidated recently. It involves a single point mutation in the proinsulin gene resulting in the substitution of aspartic acid for histidine-10 of the B chain of insulin. We have synthesized a human insulin analogue, [AspB10]insulin, corresponding to the mutant proinsulin and evaluated its biological activity. [AspB10]Insulin displayed a binding affinity to insulin receptors in rat liver plasma membranes that was 534 +/- 14...

  13. Directed evolution of an aspartate aminotransferase with new substrate specificities

    OpenAIRE

    Yano, Takato; Oue, Shinya; Kagamiyama, Hiroyuki

    1998-01-01

    The substrate specificity of aspartate aminotransferase was successfully modified by directed molecular evolution using a combination of DNA shuffling and selection in an auxotrophic Escherichia coli strain. After five rounds of selection, one of the evolved mutants showed a 105-fold increase in the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) for β-branched amino and 2-oxo acids and a 30-fold decrease in that for the native substrates compared with the wild-type enzyme. The mutant had 13 amino acid substi...

  14. Dopamine D2/D3 but not dopamine D1 receptors are involved in the rapid antidepressant-like effects of ketamine in the forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhu, Zhuo R; Ou, Bao C; Wang, Ya Q; Tan, Zhou B; Deng, Chang M; Gao, Yi Y; Tang, Ming; So, Ji H; Mu, Yang L; Zhang, Lan Q

    2015-02-15

    Major depressive disorder is one of the most prevalent and life-threatening forms of mental illnesses. The traditional antidepressants often take several weeks, even months, to obtain clinical effects. However, recent clinical studies have shown that ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, exerts rapid antidepressant effects within 2h and are long-lasting. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether dopaminergic system was involved in the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine. The acute administration of ketamine (20 mg/kg) significantly reduced the immobility time in the forced swim test. MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg), the more selective NMDA antagonist, also exerted rapid antidepressant-like effects. In contrast, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) did not significantly reduced the immobility time in the forced swim test after 30 min administration. Notably, pretreatment with haloperidol (0.15 mg/kg, a nonselective dopamine D2/D3 antagonist), but not SCH23390 (0.04 and 0.1 mg/kg, a selective dopamine D1 receptor antagonist), significantly prevented the effects of ketamine or MK-801. Moreover, the administration of sub-effective dose of ketamine (10 mg/kg) in combination with pramipexole (0.3 mg/kg, a dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist) exerted antidepressant-like effects compared with each drug alone. In conclusion, our results indicated that the dopamine D2/D3 receptors, but not D1 receptors, are involved in the rapid antidepressant-like effects of ketamine. PMID:25449845

  15. Regulation of dopamine D1 receptor dynamics within the postsynaptic density of hippocampal glutamate synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Ladepeche

    Full Text Available Dopamine receptor potently modulates glutamate signalling, synaptic plasticity and neuronal network adaptations in various pathophysiological processes. Although key intracellular signalling cascades have been identified, the cellular mechanism by which dopamine and glutamate receptor-mediated signalling interplay at glutamate synapse remain poorly understood. Among the cellular mechanisms proposed to aggregate D1R in glutamate synapses, the direct interaction between D1R and the scaffold protein PSD95 or the direct interaction with the glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR have been proposed. To tackle this question we here used high-resolution single nanoparticle imaging since it provides a powerful way to investigate at the sub-micron resolution the dynamic interaction between these partners in live synapses. We demonstrate in hippocampal neuronal networks that dopamine D1 receptors (D1R laterally diffuse within glutamate synapses, in which their diffusion is reduced. Disrupting the interaction between D1R and PSD95, through genetical manipulation and competing peptide, did not affect D1R dynamics in glutamatergic synapses. However, preventing the physical interaction between D1R and the GluN1 subunit of NMDAR abolished the synaptic stabilization of diffusing D1R. Together, these data provide direct evidence that the interaction between D1R and NMDAR in synapses participate in the building of the dopamine-receptor-mediated signalling, and most likely to the glutamate-dopamine cross-talk.

  16. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced excitotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaorong Yang; Ping Sun; Huaping Qin; Rui Wang; Ye Wang; Ruihong Shi; Xin Zhao; Ce Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are involved in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated excitotoxicity. However, a systematic observation or analysis of the role of these various MAPK pathways in excitotoxicity processes does not exist. The present study further evaluated the role and contribution of three MAPK pathways extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK in an NMDA-mediated excitotoxicity model using MAPK-specific inhibitor. Results demonstrated that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125 and/or p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 inhibited NMDA-induced reduction in cell viability, as well as reduced NMDA-induced lactate dehydrogenase leakage and reactive oxygen species production. However, PD98059, an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, did not influence this model. Results demonstrated an involvement of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 MAPK, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase, in NMDA-mediated excitotoxicity in cortical neurons.

  17. Coexpression of N-methyl-D-aspartate and phencyclidine receptors in Xenopus oocytes injected with rat brain mRNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Kushner, L; Lerma, J.; Zukin, R S; Bennett, M V

    1988-01-01

    Recent evidence suggest that the N-methyl-D-aspartate (N-Me-D-Asp) channel is functionally and structurally associated with the phencyclidine (PCP) receptor, which mediates the psychotomimetic effects of PCP, sigma opioids, and dioxalanes. To investigate the relationship between N-Me-D-Asp and PCP receptors on a molecular level, we injected mRNA isolated from adult rat brain into Xenopus oocytes. In injected oocytes N-Me-D-Asp application (with glycine) evoked a partially desentizing inward c...

  18. Crystal structure of Clostridium acetobutylicum aspartate kinase (CaAk: An important allosteric enzyme for amino acids production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu A. Manjasetty

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspartate kinase (AK is an enzyme which is tightly regulated through feedback control and responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-l-aspartate from l-aspartate. This intermediate step is at an important branch point where one path leads to the synthesis of lysine and the other to threonine, methionine and isoleucine. Concerted feedback inhibition of AK is mediated by threonine and lysine and varies between the species. The crystal structure of biotechnologically important Clostridium acetobutylicum aspartate kinase (CaAK; E.C. 2.7.2.4; Mw = 48,030 Da; 437aa; SwissProt: Q97MC0 has been determined to 3 Å resolution. CaAK acquires a protein fold similar to the other known structures of AKs despite the low sequence identity (<30%. It is composed of two domains: an N-terminal catalytic domain (kinase domain and a C-terminal regulatory domain further comprised of two small domains belonging to the ACT domain family. Pairwise comparison of 12 molecules in the asymmetric unit helped to identify the bending regions which are in the vicinity of ATP binding site involved in domain movements between the catalytic and regulatory domains. All 12 CaAK molecules adopt fully open T-state conformation leading to the formation of three tetramers unique among other similar AK structures. On the basis of comparative structural analysis, we discuss tetramer formation based on the large conformational changes in the catalytic domain associated with the lysine binding at the regulatory domains. The structure described herein is homologous to a target in wide-spread pathogenic (toxin producing bacteria such as Clostridium tetani (64% sequence identity suggesting the potential of the structure solved here to be applied for modeling drug interactions. CaAK structure may serve as a guide to better understand and engineer lysine biosynthesis for the biotechnology industry.

  19. Dopamine, uncertainty and TD learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duff Michael O

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Substantial evidence suggests that the phasic activities of dopaminergic neurons in the primate midbrain represent a temporal difference (TD error in predictions of future reward, with increases above and decreases below baseline consequent on positive and negative prediction errors, respectively. However, dopamine cells have very low baseline activity, which implies that the representation of these two sorts of error is asymmetric. We explore the implications of this seemingly innocuous asymmetry for the interpretation of dopaminergic firing patterns in experiments with probabilistic rewards which bring about persistent prediction errors. In particular, we show that when averaging the non-stationary prediction errors across trials, a ramping in the activity of the dopamine neurons should be apparent, whose magnitude is dependent on the learning rate. This exact phenomenon was observed in a recent experiment, though being interpreted there in antipodal terms as a within-trial encoding of uncertainty.

  20. Dual Role of Medial A10 Dopamine Neurons in Affective Encoding

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Shin, Rick; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the activation of medial A10 neurons mediates positive affective encoding. However, little is known about the functions of the inhibition of midbrain dopamine neurons. Here we show evidence suggesting that the inhibition of medial A10 neurons mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding, whereas blunting the activation of medial A10 neurons disrupts positive affective encoding involving food reward. We used a microinjection proc...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Dopamine beta (β)-hydroxylase deficiency is a condition that ...

  2. A pair of dopamine neurons target the D1-like dopamine receptor DopR in the central complex to promote ethanol-stimulated locomotion in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Kong

    Full Text Available Dopamine is a mediator of the stimulant properties of drugs of abuse, including ethanol, in mammals and in the fruit fly Drosophila. The neural substrates for the stimulant actions of ethanol in flies are not known. We show that a subset of dopamine neurons and their targets, through the action of the D1-like dopamine receptor DopR, promote locomotor activation in response to acute ethanol exposure. A bilateral pair of dopaminergic neurons in the fly brain mediates the enhanced locomotor activity induced by ethanol exposure, and promotes locomotion when directly activated. These neurons project to the central complex ellipsoid body, a structure implicated in regulating motor behaviors. Ellipsoid body neurons are required for ethanol-induced locomotor activity and they express DopR. Elimination of DopR blunts the locomotor activating effects of ethanol, and this behavior can be restored by selective expression of DopR in the ellipsoid body. These data tie the activity of defined dopamine neurons to D1-like DopR-expressing neurons to form a neural circuit that governs acute responding to ethanol.

  3. Phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor-associated neuronal nitric oxide synthase depends on estrogens and modulates hypothalamic nitric oxide production during the ovarian cycle.

    OpenAIRE

    Parkash, Jyoti; d'Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier; Bellefontaine, Nicole; Campagne, Celine; Mazure, Danièle; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Prevot, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Within the preoptic region, nitric oxide (NO) production varies during the ovarian cycle and has the ability to impact hypothalamic reproductive function. One mechanism for the regulation of NO release mediated by estrogens during the estrous cycle includes physical association of the calcium-activated neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) enzyme with the glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels via the postsynaptic density 95 scaffolding protein. Here we demonstrate that endogenous vari...

  4. Association Study of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Subunit 2B (GRIN2B) Polymorphisms and Schizophrenia Symptoms in the Han Chinese Population

    OpenAIRE

    Yongfeng Yang; Wenqiang Li; Hongxing Zhang; Ge Yang; Xiujuan Wang; Minli Ding; Tianzi Jiang; Luxian Lv

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a common and complex psychiatric disorder that has a significant genetic component. The glutamatergic system is the major excitatory neurotransmitter system in the central nervous system, and is mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Disturbances in this system have been hypothesized to play a major role in SZ pathogenesis. Several studies have revealed that the NMDA receptor subunit 2B (GRIN2B) potentially associates with SZ and its psychiatric symptoms. In ...

  5. Comparison of a soluble co-formulation of insulin degludec/insulin aspart vs biphasic insulin aspart 30 in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niskanen, Leo; Leiter, Lawrence A; Franek, Edward;

    2012-01-01

    Insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) is a soluble co-formulation of insulin degludec (70%) and insulin aspart (IAsp: 30%). Here, we compare the efficacy and safety of IDegAsp, an alternative IDegAsp formulation (AF: containing 45% IAsp), and biphasic IAsp 30 (BIAsp 30)....

  6. Alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity by opiates and the subsequent effect of this alteration on opiate tolerance and dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether there is an alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity following opiate administration, and whether this alteration has any influence on the development of opiate tolerance and dependence. Behavioral hypersensitivity to direct-acting dopamine agonists was observed in mice following acute or chronic morphine administration. Acute levorphanol administration also resulted in potentiation of dopamine agonist-induced behaviors. An increase in density of dopamine receptors, as measured by (/sup 3/H)butyrophenone binding accompanied the development of behavioral hypersensitivity. This increase was localized to the striatum, an area important in the mediation of dopamine-agonist induced behaviors. Naloxone or LiCl coadministered with the opiates prevented the development of hypersensitivity and the increase in density of dopamine receptors. Coadministration of lithium enhanced the development of acute and chronic tolerance. Lithium enhanced the development of dependence as determined by naloxone-induced hypothermia in chronically morphine-treated mice. Apomorphine enhanced naloxone-induced withdrawal in acutely dependent mice. This enhancement was blocked by coadministration of lithium with the opiates. These results suggest that dopamine receptor supersensitivity influences the degree of tolerance and dependence.

  7. Alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity by opiates and the subsequent effect of this alteration on opiate tolerance and dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether there is an alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity following opiate administration, and whether this alteration has any influence on the development of opiate tolerance and dependence. Behavioral hypersensitivity to direct-acting dopamine agonists was observed in mice following acute or chronic morphine administration. Acute levorphanol administration also resulted in potentiation of dopamine agonist-induced behaviors. An increase in density of dopamine receptors, as measured by [3H]butyrophenone binding accompanied the development of behavioral hypersensitivity. This increase was localized to the striatum, an area important in the mediation of dopamine-agonist induced behaviors. Naloxone or LiCl coadministered with the opiates prevented the development of hypersensitivity and the increase in density of dopamine receptors. Coadministration of lithium enhanced the development of acute and chronic tolerance. Lithium enhanced the development of dependence as determined by naloxone-induced hypothermia in chronically morphine-treated mice. Apomorphine enhanced naloxone-induced withdrawal in acutely dependent mice. This enhancement was blocked by coadministration of lithium with the opiates. These results suggest that dopamine receptor supersensitivity influences the degree of tolerance and dependence

  8. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate neurons in experimental carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured changes in nitric oxide (·NO) concentration in the cerebral cortex during experimental carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning and assessed the role for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), a glutamate receptor subtype, with progression of CO-mediated oxidative stress. Using microelectrodes, ·NO concentration was found to nearly double to 280 nM due to CO exposure, and elevations in cerebral blood flow, monitored as laser Doppler flow (LDF), were found to loosely correlate with ·NO concentration. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity was the cause of the ·NO elevation based on the effects of specific NOS inhibitors and observations in nNOS knockout mice. Activation of nNOS was inhibited by the NMDARs inhibitor, MK 801, and by the calcium channel blocker, nimodipine, thus demonstrating a link to excitatory amino acids. Cortical cyclic GMP concentration was increased due to CO poisoning and shown to be related to ·NO, versus CO, mediated guanylate cyclase activation. Elevations of ·NO were inhibited when rats were infused with superoxide dismutase and in rats depleted of platelets or neutrophils. When injected with MK 801 or 7-nitroindazole, a selective nNOS inhibitor, rats did not exhibit CO-mediated nitrotyrosine formation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) elevation (indicative of neutrophil sequestration), or impaired learning. Similarly, whereas CO-poisoned wild-type mice exhibited elevations in nitrotyrosine and myeloperoxidase, these changes did not occur in nNOS knockout mice. We conclude that CO exposure initiates perivascular processes including oxidative stress that triggers activation of NMDA neuronal nNOS, and these events are necessary for the progression of CO-mediated neuropathology

  9. Dopamine: burning the candle at both ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, John M; Platt, Michael L

    2013-09-01

    Dopamine neurons are well known for signaling reward-prediction errors. In this issue, Matsumoto and Takada (2013) show that some dopamine neurons also signal salient events during progression through a visual search task requiring working memory and sustained attention. PMID:24011998

  10. Computational systems analysis of dopamine metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Qi

    Full Text Available A prominent feature of Parkinson's disease (PD is the loss of dopamine in the striatum, and many therapeutic interventions for the disease are aimed at restoring dopamine signaling. Dopamine signaling includes the synthesis, storage, release, and recycling of dopamine in the presynaptic terminal and activation of pre- and post-synaptic receptors and various downstream signaling cascades. As an aid that might facilitate our understanding of dopamine dynamics in the pathogenesis and treatment in PD, we have begun to merge currently available information and expert knowledge regarding presynaptic dopamine homeostasis into a computational model, following the guidelines of biochemical systems theory. After subjecting our model to mathematical diagnosis and analysis, we made direct comparisons between model predictions and experimental observations and found that the model exhibited a high degree of predictive capacity with respect to genetic and pharmacological changes in gene expression or function. Our results suggest potential approaches to restoring the dopamine imbalance and the associated generation of oxidative stress. While the proposed model of dopamine metabolism is preliminary, future extensions and refinements may eventually serve as an in silico platform for prescreening potential therapeutics, identifying immediate side effects, screening for biomarkers, and assessing the impact of risk factors of the disease.

  11. Selective Impairment of Spatial Cognition Caused by Autoantibodies to the N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H. Chang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE experience cognitive abnormalities in multiple domains including processing speed, executive function, and memory. Here we show that SLE patients carrying antibodies that bind DNA and the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, termed DNRAbs, displayed a selective impairment in spatial recall. Neural recordings in a mouse model of SLE, in which circulating DNRAbs penetrate the hippocampus, revealed that CA1 place cells exhibited a significant expansion in place field size. Structural analysis showed that hippocampal pyramidal cells had substantial reductions in their dendritic processes and spines. Strikingly, these abnormalities became evident at a time when DNRAbs were no longer detectable in the hippocampus. These results suggest that antibody-mediated neurocognitive impairments may be highly specific, and that spatial cognition may be particularly vulnerable to DNRAb-mediated structural and functional injury to hippocampal cells that evolves after the triggering insult is no longer present.

  12. TRPV1 on astrocytes rescues nigral dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease via CNTF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jin H; Park, Eun S; Won, So-Yoon; Lee, Yu A; Kim, Kyoung I; Jeong, Jae Y; Baek, Jeong Y; Cho, Eun J; Jin, Minyoung; Chung, Young C; Lee, Byoung D; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Eung-Gook; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee; Woo, Dong Ho; Lee, C Justin; Kim, Sang R; Bok, Eugene; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Ahn, Tae-Beom; Ko, Hyuk Wan; Brahmachari, Saurav; Pletinkova, Olga; Troconso, Juan C; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Jin, Byung K

    2015-12-01

    Currently there is no neuroprotective or neurorestorative therapy for Parkinson's disease. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) on astrocytes mediates endogenous production of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), which prevents the active degeneration of dopamine neurons and leads to behavioural recovery through CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFRα) on nigral dopamine neurons in both the MPP(+)-lesioned or adeno-associated virus α-synuclein rat models of Parkinson's disease. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis of human post-mortem substantia nigra from Parkinson's disease suggests that this endogenous neuroprotective system (TRPV1 and CNTF on astrocytes, and CNTFRα on dopamine neurons) might have relevance to human Parkinson's disease. Our results suggest that activation of astrocytic TRPV1 activates endogenous neuroprotective machinery in vivo and that it is a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26490328

  13. Dopamine Activation Preserves Visual Motion Perception Despite Noise Interference of Human V5/MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Nada; Fu, Richard Z.; Abou-El-Ela Bourquin, Bilal; Bhrugubanda, Vamsee; Schultz, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    When processing sensory signals, the brain must account for noise, both noise in the stimulus and that arising from within its own neuronal circuitry. Dopamine receptor activation is known to enhance both visual cortical signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and visual perceptual performance; however, it is unknown whether these two dopamine-mediated phenomena are linked. To assess this, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to visual cortical area V5/MT to reduce the SNR focally and thus disrupt visual motion discrimination performance to visual targets located in the same retinotopic space. The hypothesis that dopamine receptor activation enhances perceptual performance by improving cortical SNR predicts that dopamine activation should antagonize TMS disruption of visual perception. We assessed this hypothesis via a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with the dopamine receptor agonists cabergoline (a D2 agonist) and pergolide (a D1/D2 agonist) administered in separate sessions (separated by 2 weeks) in 12 healthy volunteers in a William's balance-order design. TMS degraded visual motion perception when the evoked phosphene and the visual stimulus overlapped in time and space in the placebo and cabergoline conditions, but not in the pergolide condition. This suggests that dopamine D1 or combined D1 and D2 receptor activation enhances cortical SNR to boost perceptual performance. That local visual cortical excitability was unchanged across drug conditions suggests the involvement of long-range intracortical interactions in this D1 effect. Because increased internal noise (and thus lower SNR) can impair visual perceptual learning, improving visual cortical SNR via D1/D2 agonist therapy may be useful in boosting rehabilitation programs involving visual perceptual training. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we address the issue of whether dopamine activation improves visual perception despite increasing sensory noise in the visual cortex

  14. Initial d2 dopamine receptor sensitivity predicts cocaine sensitivity and reward in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E Merritt

    Full Text Available The activation of dopamine receptors within the mesolimbic dopamine system is known to be involved in the initiation and maintenance of cocaine use. Expression of the D2 dopamine receptor subtype has been implicated as both a predisposing factor and consequence of chronic cocaine use. It is unclear whether there is a predictive relationship between D2 dopamine receptor function and cocaine sensitivity that would enable cocaine abuse. Therefore, we exploited individual differences in behavioral responses to D2 dopamine receptor stimulation to test its relationship with cocaine-mediated behaviors. Outbred, male Sprague-Dawley rats were initially characterized by their locomotor responsiveness to the D2 dopamine receptor agonist, quinpirole, in a within-session ascending dose-response regimen (0, 0.1, 0.3 & 1.0 mg/kg, sc. Rats were classified as high or low quinpirole responders (HD2 and LD2, respectively by a median split of their quinpirole-induced locomotor activity. Rats were subsequently tested for differences in the psychostimulant effects of cocaine by measuring changes in cocaine-induced locomotor activity (5 and 15 mg/kg, ip. Rats were also tested for differences in the development of conditioned place preference to a low dose of cocaine (7.5 mg/kg, ip that does not reliably produce a cocaine conditioned place preference. Finally, rats were tested for acquisition of cocaine self-administration and maintenance responding on fixed ratio 1 and 5 schedules of reinforcement, respectively. Results demonstrate that HD2 rats have enhanced sensitivity to the locomotor stimulating properties of cocaine, display greater cocaine conditioned place preference, and self-administer more cocaine compared to LD2 animals. These findings suggest that individual differences in D2 dopamine receptor sensitivity may be predictive of cocaine sensitivity and reward.

  15. Dopamine Receptor Signaling in MIN6 β-Cells Revealed by Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Brittany; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W

    2016-08-01

    Insulin secretion defects are central to the development of type II diabetes mellitus. Glucose stimulation of insulin secretion has been extensively studied, but its regulation by other stimuli such as incretins and neurotransmitters is not as well understood. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the inhibition of insulin secretion by dopamine, which is synthesized in pancreatic β-cells from circulating L-dopa. Previous research has shown that this inhibition is mediated primarily by activation of the dopamine receptor D3 subtype (DRD3), even though both DRD2 and DRD3 are expressed in β-cells. To understand this dichotomy, we investigated the dynamic interactions between the dopamine receptor subtypes and their G-proteins using two-color fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) of mouse MIN6 β-cells. We show that proper membrane localization of exogenous G-proteins depends on both the Gβ and Gγ subunits being overexpressed in the cell. Triple transfections of the dopamine receptor subtype and Gβ and Gγ subunits, each labeled with a different-colored fluorescent protein (FP), yielded plasma membrane expression of all three FPs and permitted an FFS evaluation of interactions between the dopamine receptors and the Gβγ complex. Upon dopamine stimulation, we measured a significant decrease in interactions between DRD3 and the Gβγ complex, which is consistent with receptor activation. In contrast, dopamine stimulation did not cause significant changes in the interactions between DRD2 and the Gβγ complex. These results demonstrate that two-color FFS is a powerful tool for measuring dynamic protein interactions in living cells, and show that preferential DRD3 signaling in β-cells occurs at the level of G-protein release. PMID:27508444

  16. 'Serial review on clinical PET tracers'. Dopamine D2 receptor imaging by positron emission tomography with [11C]N-methylspiperone and [11C]raclopride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopamine D2 receptor binding is one of postsynaptic functions of dopaminergic neurotransmission system, and it can be estimated by positron emission tomography (PET) with [11C]raclopride and [11C]N-methylspiperone. The dopaminergic neurotransmission system is of central interest in pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g., Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. Measurement of binding potential (BPND) of [11C]raclopride to dopamine D2 receptors is useful for differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease from other neurodegenerative diseases. Effects of antipsychotic drugs have widely been considered to be mediated by blockade of dopamine D2 receptors, and occupancy of dopamine D2 receptor by antipsychotic drug can be calculated from BPND of [11C]raclopride at baseline and drug challenge studies. Measurement of dopamine D2 receptor occupancy is useful for evaluation of effects of antipsychotic drug. It can also be applied for optimal dose finding of new antipsychotic drug in clinical trials. (author)

  17. Dopamine-glutamate interactions in the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, W J

    1998-01-01

    In an attempt to formulate a working hypothesis of basal-ganglia functions, arguments are considered suggesting that the basal ganglia are involved in a process of response selection i.e. in the facilitation of "wanted" and in the suppression of "unwanted" behaviour. The meso-accumbal dopamine-system is considered to mediate natural and drug-induced reward and sensitization. The meso-striatal dopamine-system seems to fulfill similar functions: It may mediate reinforcement which strengthens a given behaviour when elicited subsequently, but which is not experienced as reward or hedonia. Glutamate as the transmitter of the corticofugal projections to the basal ganglia nuclei and of the subthalamic neurons is critically involved in basal ganglia functions and dysfunctions; for example Parkinson's disease can be considered to be a secondary hyperglutamatergic disease. Additionally, glutamate is an essential factor in the plasticity response of the basal-ganglia. However, opposite to previous suggestions, the NMDA-receptor blocker MK-801 does not prevent psychostimulant- nor morphine-induced day to day increase (sensitization) of locomotion. Also the day to day increase of haloperidol-induced catalepsy was not prevented by MK-801. PMID:9871434

  18. The mesolimbic dopamine system as a target for rapid antidepressant action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, P

    1997-07-01

    Chronic treatment with antidepressant drugs produces a variety of changes in dopaminergic neurotransmission, most notably a sensitization of behavioural responses to agonists acting at dopamine D2/D3 receptors within the nucleus accumbens. Evidence from animal models of depression (the forced swim test and the chronic mild stress procedure) indicates that these effects are crucial for the therapeutic effect of antidepressants in these models. Antidepressant-like effects in animal models are also seen with drugs that act directly on the dopaminergic system. Because of its prolonged time-course, the chronic mild stress procedure can be used to examine onset latencies. Some dopamine-active drugs (e.g. the catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitor tolcapone; D2/D3 agonists administered intermittently) are active in this procedure but have a time-course comparable to that of conventional antidepressants. Other dopamine-active drugs may have a more rapid onset; the evidence to date suggests this possibility for the D2/D3 agonist pramipexole and the preferential presynaptic antagonist amisulpride. In clinical studies, rapid-onset latencies have been claimed for the D2/D3 agonist roxindole, the preferential presynaptic antagonist sulpiride and the relatively selective dopamine-uptake inhibitor amineptine. The mechanisms that might give rise to a rapid onset of dopamine-mediated antidepressant effects are discussed. PMID:9347387

  19. Effects of dopamine medication on sequence learning with stochastic feedback in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazda Beigi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that the midbrain dopamine system plays a key role in reinforcement learning and disruption of the midbrain dopamine system in Parkinson's disease (PD may lead to deficits on tasks that require learning from feedback. We examined how changes in dopamine levels (‘ON’ and ‘OFF’ their dopamine medication affect sequence learning from stochastic positive and negative feedback using Bayesian reinforcement learning models. We found deficits in sequence learning in patients with PD when they were ‘ON’ and ‘OFF’ medication relative to healthy controls, but smaller differences between patients ‘OFF’ and ‘ON’. The deficits were mainly due to decreased learning from positive feedback, although across all participant groups learning was more strongly associated with positive than negative feedback in our task. The learning in our task is likely mediated by the relatively depleted dorsal striatum and not the relatively intact ventral striatum. Therefore, the changes we see in our task may be due to a strong loss of phasic dopamine signals in the dorsal striatum in PD.

  20. Identification of D1-like dopamine receptors on human blood platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopamine is able to inhibit the epinephrine-induced aggregation of human blood platelets, but the mechanism of action has not been elucidated. In this study the authors report that membranes from human blood platelets possess high affinity, saturable and stereoselective binding sites for the D1 dopamine receptor antagonist (3H)SCH 23390. (3H)SCH 23390 appeared to label a single class of binding sites with a B/sub max/ of 18.6 +- 1.6 fmolmg protein and a K/sub D/ of 0.8 nM. The potencies of different dopaminergic antagonists and agonists in displacing (3H)SCH 23390 from blood platelet membranes were similar to those obtained for striatal membranes. Unlike the classically defined D1 receptors, e.g. those in striatum, the D1 receptor sites on platelets appeared no to be coupled to the adenylate cyclase system, hence the term D1-like. The D1 agonist SKF 38393 was more potent than dopamine in inhibiting platelet aggregation induced by epinephrine, and the effects of dopamine and SKF 38393 were prevented by SCH 23390. These results suggest that the inhibitory action of dopamine on the epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation is mediated through these D1-like receptors

  1. Pramipexole, a dopamine D2 autoreceptor agonist, decreases the extracellular concentration of dopamine in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, A J; Müller, R E

    1991-07-23

    Pramipexole (SND 919) is a dopamine D2 autoreceptor agonist which is structurally related to talipexole (B-HT 920), a potential antipsychotic agent. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pramipexole on the extracellular concentration of dopamine in vivo. Dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid, were measured in the anterior striatum of freely moving rats by microdialysis and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Pramipexole (30 and 100 micrograms/kg) caused long-lasting decreases in the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites. Talipexole (30 micrograms/kg) produced similar effects. Sulpiride (5 mg/kg), a selective dopamine D2 antagonist, caused a transient increase in the concentration of dopamine and long-lasting increases in the concentrations of its metabolites; it also reversed the effects of pramipexole. SCH-23390 (100 micrograms/kg), a selective dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, caused a transient increase in the concentration of dopamine but did not affect the concentrations of the metabolites. SCH-23390 failed to reverse the effects of pramipexole. These results indicate that pramipexole reduces the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites in vivo through a reversible interaction with the dopamine D2 receptor. PMID:1685123

  2. Urinary dopamine in man and rat: effects of inorganic salts on dopamine excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, S G; Oats, N S; Lee, M R

    1978-08-01

    1. Plasma and urine free dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine) were measured in six normal male volunteer subjects and the urinary clearance of dopamine was calculated for each subject. 2. The excretion rates for free dopamine in man were greater than could be explained by simple renal clearance. It was concluded that free dopamine must, therefore, be formed in the kidney. 3. Changes in urinary dopamine excretion were studied in four groups of rats initially maintained on low sodium diet and then given equimolar dietary supplements of NaCl, NaHCO3, KCl or NH4Cl, to study the specificity of the previously observed increase in dopamine excretion after increased dietary NaCl. 4. The mean dopamine excretion increased significantly in rats given NaCl, KCl and NH4Cl, whereas dopamine excretion decreased in those given NaHCO3. 5. The failure of dopamine excretion to rise in response to loading with NaHCO3 was unexpected, and argues against a simple effect of volume expansion by the sodium ion. The increase in dopamine excretion with KCl and NH4Cl showed that this response was not specific to the sodium ion. PMID:28196

  3. Expression of dopamine receptors in the subthalamic nucleus of the rat: characterization using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analysed the expression of dopamine receptor subtypes in the subthalamic nucleus by means of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We also studied, using autoradiography, all pharmacologically characterized dopamine receptors in four subregions of the subthalamic nucleus. For comparison, dopamine receptor subtypes were also evaluated in brain regions where they are more abundant and well characterized. The radioligands used were: [3H]SCH-23390, [3H]emonapride and [3H]2-dipropylamino-7-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene for dopamine D1, D2 and D3 receptors, respectively; and [3H]YM-09151-2 in the presence of raclopride for dopamine D4 receptors. Finally, we also evaluated the effect of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine injection into the medial forebrain bundle on dopamine receptor levels expressed in the ipsilateral subthalamic nucleus. The lesion was estimated by decrease in the binding of [3H]WIN-35428, a specific dopamine transporter label. D1, D2 and D3 receptor messenger RNAs and binding sites were present in the subthalamic nucleus, but no messenger RNA for D4 receptors was found, although specific binding sites for these receptors were observed. As compared to the intact side, the 6-hydroxydopamine lesion did not change D1 receptors, increased D2 receptors, and decreased D3 receptors and the dopamine transporter. The results suggest that postsynaptic D1, D2 or D3 receptors can mediate the effect of dopamine on subthalamic nucleus neuronal activity. D4 receptors would mediate exclusively presynaptic effects.These results reinforce the idea that dopamine receptors in the subthalamic nucleus may play an important role in the physiology of the basal ganglia and in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senard Jean-Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS. Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance.

  5. Polypharmacology of dopamine receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butini, S; Nikolic, K; Kassel, S; Brückmann, H; Filipic, S; Agbaba, D; Gemma, S; Brogi, S; Brindisi, M; Campiani, G; Stark, H

    2016-07-01

    Most neurological diseases have a multifactorial nature and the number of molecular mechanisms discovered as underpinning these diseases is continuously evolving. The old concept of developing selective agents for a single target does not fit with the medical need of most neurological diseases. The development of designed multiple ligands holds great promises and appears as the next step in drug development for the treatment of these multifactorial diseases. Dopamine and its five receptor subtypes are intimately involved in numerous neurological disorders. Dopamine receptor ligands display a high degree of cross interactions with many other targets including G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes and ion channels. For brain disorders like Parkinsońs disease, schizophrenia and depression the dopaminergic system, being intertwined with many other signaling systems, plays a key role in pathogenesis and therapy. The concept of designed multiple ligands and polypharmacology, which perfectly meets the therapeutic needs for these brain disorders, is herein discussed as a general ligand-based concept while focusing on dopaminergic agents and receptor subtypes in particular. PMID:27234980

  6. Mechanisms of Inhibition of Rhizobium etli Pyruvate Carboxylase by l-Aspartate

    OpenAIRE

    Sirithanakorn, Chaiyos; Adina-Zada, Abdussalam; Wallace, John C.; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Attwood, Paul V.

    2014-01-01

    l-Aspartate is a regulatory feedback inhibitor of the biotin-dependent enzyme pyruvate carboxylase in response to increased levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Detailed studies of l-aspartate inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase have been mainly confined to eukaryotic microbial enzymes, and aspects of its mode of action remain unclear. Here we examine its inhibition of the bacterial enzyme Rhizobium etli pyruvate carboxylase. Kinetic studies demonstrated that l-aspartate binds to ...

  7. Dopamine-transporter SPECT and Dopamine-D2-receptor SPECT in basal ganglia diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basal ganglia comprise a group of subcortical nuclei, which are essential for motor control. Dysfunction of these areas, especially in dopaminergic transmission, results in disordered movement and neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, or Huntington disease. Positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have enhanced the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, but they much more contribute to the early differential diagnosis of patients suffering from Parkinsonian syndrome in routine care. The present article provides dopamine transporter and D2 receptor SPECT findings in selected movement disorders. (orig.)

  8. Structural view of the regulatory subunit of aspartate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Qingzhu; Yu, Kun; Yan, Liming; Li, Yuanyuan; Chen, Cheng; Li, Xuemei

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate kinase (AK) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) catalyzes the biosynthesis of aspartate family amino acids, including lysine, threonine, isoleucine and methionine. We determined the crystal structures of the regulatory subunit of aspartate kinase from Mtb alone (referred to as MtbAKβ) and in complex with threonine (referred to as MtbAKβ-Thr) at resolutions of 2.6 Å and 2.0 Å, respectively. MtbAKβ is composed of two perpendicular non-equivalent ACT domains [aspartate kinase, ch...

  9. Stereoselectivity of presynaptic autoreceptors modulating dopamine release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbilla, S.; Langer, S.Z. (Department of Biology, Laboratoires d' Etudes et de Recherches Synthelabo, Paris, France)

    1981-12-17

    The effects of the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol were studied on the spontaneous and field stimulation-evoked release of total radioactivity from slices of rabbit caudate nucleus prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)dopamine. (S)-Sulpiride in concentrations ranging from 0.01-1..mu..M enhanced the electrically evoked release of (/sup 3/H)dopamine while (R)-sulpiride was 10 times less potent than (S)-sulpiride. Exposure to (S)-butaclamol (0.1-1 ..mu..M) but not to (R)-butaclamol (0.1-10..mu..M) enhanced the field-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)dopamine. The facilitatory effects of (S)- and (R)-sulpiride and (S)-butaclamol on the stimulated release of the labelled neurotransmitter were observed under conditions in which these drugs did not modify the spontaneous outflow of radioactivity. Only the active enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol antagonized the inhibition by apomorphine (1..mu..M) of the stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)dopamine. Our results indicate that the presynaptic inhibitory dopamine autoreceptors modulating the stimulation-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)dopamine in the caudate nucleus are, like the classical postsynaptic dopamine receptors, chemically stereoselective.

  10. Hybridization of glutamate aspartate transaminase. Investigation of subunit interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, B; Martinez-Carrion, M

    1975-10-01

    Glutamate aspartate transaminase (EC 2.6.1.1) is a dimeric enzyme with identical subunits with each active site containing pyridoxal 5'-phosphate linked via an internal Shiff's base to a lysine residue. It is not known if these sites interact during catalysis but negative cooperativity has been reported for binding of the coenzyme (Arrio-Dupont, M. (1972), Eur. J. Biochem. 30, 307). Also nonequivalence of its subunits in binding 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate (Harris, H.E., and Bayley, P. M. (1975), Biochem. J. 145, 125), in modification of only a single tyrosine with full loss of activity (Christen, P., and Riordan, J.F. (1970), Biochemistry 9, 3025), and following modification with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (Cournil, I., and Arrio-Dupont, M. (1973), Biochemie 55, 103) has been reported. However, steady-state and transient kinetic methods as well as direct titration of the active site chromophore with substrates and substrate analogs have not revealed any cooperative phenomena (Braunstein, A. E. (1973), Enzymes, 3rd Ed. 9, 379). It was therefore decided that a more direct approach should be used to clarify the quistion of subunit interaction during the covalent phase of catalysis. To this end a hybrid method was devised in which a hybrid transaminase was prepared which contained one subunit with a functional active site while the other subunit has the internal Shiff's base reduced with NaBH4. The specific activities and amount of "actively bound" pyridoxal 5'-phosphate are both in a 2:1 ratio for the native and hybrid forms. Comparison of the steady-state kinetic properties of the hybrid and native enzyme forms shows that both forms gave parallel double reciprocal plots which is characteristic of the Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism of transamination. The Km values for the substrates L-aspartic acid and alpha-ketoglutaric acid are nearly identical while the Vmax value for the hybrid is one-half the value of the native transaminase. It therefore appears that

  11. The second sodium site in the dopamine transporter controls cation permeability and is regulated by chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Lars; Andreassen, Thorvald F; Shi, Lei;

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) belongs to the family of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) and controls dopamine (DA) homeostasis by mediating Na(+)- and Cl(-)-dependent reuptake of DA. Here we used two-electrode voltage clamp measurements in Xenopus oocytes together with targeted mutagene......The dopamine transporter (DAT) belongs to the family of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) and controls dopamine (DA) homeostasis by mediating Na(+)- and Cl(-)-dependent reuptake of DA. Here we used two-electrode voltage clamp measurements in Xenopus oocytes together with targeted...... mutagenesis to investigate the mechanistic relationship between DAT ion binding sites and transporter conductances. In Li(+), DAT displayed a cocaine-sensitive cation leak current ~10-fold larger than the substrate-induced current in Na(+). Mutation of Na(+)-coordinating residues in the first (Na1) and second...... (Na2) binding sites suggested that the Li(+) leak depends on Li(+) interaction with Na2 rather than Na1. DA caused a marked inhibition of the Li(+) leak, consistent with the ability of the substrate to interact with the Li(+)-occupied state of the transporter. The leak current in Li(+) was also...

  12. Occurrence of D-aspartic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid in rat neuroendocrine tissues and their role in the modulation of luteinizing hormone and growth hormone release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aniello, A; Di Fiore, M M; Fisher, G H; Milone, A; Seleni, A; D'Aniello, S; Perna, A F; Ingrosso, D

    2000-04-01

    Using two specific and sensitive fluorometric/HPLC methods and a GC-MS method, alone and in combination with D-aspartate oxidase, we have demonstrated for the first time that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), in addition to D-aspartate (D-Asp), is endogenously present as a natural molecule in rat nervous system and endocrine glands. Both of these amino acids are mostly concentrated at nmol/g levels in the adenohypophysis, hypothalamus, brain, and testis. The adenohypophysis maximally showed the ability to accumulate D-Asp when the latter is exogenously administered. In vivo experiments, consisting of the i.p. injection of D-Asp, showed that D-Asp induced both growth hormone and luteinizing hormone (LH) release. However, in vitro experiments showed that D-Asp was able to induce LH release from adenohypophysis only when this gland was co-incubated with the hypothalamus. This is because D-Asp also induces the release of GnRH from the hypothalamus, which in turn is directly responsible for the D-Asp-induced LH secretion from the pituitary gland. Compared to D-Asp, NMDA elicits its hormone release action at concentrations approximately 100-fold lower than D-Asp. D-AP5, a specific NMDA receptor antagonist, inhibited D-Asp and NMDA hormonal activity, demonstrating that these actions are mediated by NMDA receptors. NMDA is biosynthesized from D-Asp by an S-adenosylmethionine-dependent enzyme, which we tentatively denominated as NMDA synthase. PMID:10744627

  13. Renal dopamine receptors in health and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, P A; Eisner, G M; Felder, R A

    1998-11-01

    During the past decade, it has become evident that dopamine plays an important role in the regulation of renal function and blood pressure. Dopamine exerts its actions via a class of cell-surface receptors coupled to G-proteins that belong to the rhodopsin family. Dopamine receptors have been classified into two families based on pharmacologic and molecular cloning studies. In mammals, two D1-like receptors that have been cloned, the D1 and D5 receptors (known as D1A and D1B, respectively, in rodents), are linked to stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. Three D2-like receptors that have been cloned (D2, D3, and D4) are linked to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and Ca2+ channels and stimulation of K+ channels. All the mammalian dopamine receptors, initially cloned from the brain, have been found to be expressed outside the central nervous system, in such sites as the adrenal gland, blood vessels, carotid body, intestines, heart, parathyroid gland, and the kidney and urinary tract. Dopamine receptor subtypes are differentially expressed along the nephron, where they regulate renal hemodynamics and electrolyte and water transport, as well as renin secretion. The ability of renal proximal tubules to produce dopamine and the presence of receptors in these tubules suggest that dopamine can act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion; this action becomes most evident during extracellular fluid volume expansion. This renal autocrine/paracrine function is lost in essential hypertension and in some animal models of genetic hypertension; disruption of the D1 or D3 receptor produces hypertension in mice. In humans with essential hypertension, renal dopamine production in response to sodium loading is often impaired and may contribute to the hypertension. The molecular basis for the dopaminergic dysfunction in hypertension is not known, but may involve an abnormal post-translational modification of the dopamine receptor. PMID:9839770

  14. Endogenous Dopamine Suppresses Initiation of Swimming in Prefeeding Zebrafish Larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Thirumalai, Vatsala; Cline, Hollis T.

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine is a key neuromodulator of locomotory circuits, yet the role that dopamine plays during development of these circuits is less well understood. Here, we describe a suppressive effect of dopamine on swim circuits in larval zebrafish. Zebrafish larvae exhibit marked changes in swimming behavior between 3 days postfertilization (dpf) and 5dpf. We found that swim episodes were fewer and of longer durations at 3 than at 5dpf. At 3dpf, application of dopamine as well as bupropion, a dopamin...

  15. Dopamine: an old target in a new therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine, a molecule of joy and emotions, plays vital role in regulation cancer growth and tumor angiogenesis. Dopamine secrets from neural cells in brain and peripheral cells as well. Peripheral dopamine is associated with tumorigenic events. Recent publication [Sarkar et al. Int. J. Cancer: doi:10.1002/ijc.29414, 2014] suggests that dopamine can be an ideal substitute as an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) agent for the treatment tumor angiogenesis as dopamine is less expe...

  16. Striatal Presynaptic Dopamine in Schizophrenia, Part I: Meta-Analysis of Dopamine Active Transporter (DAT) Density

    OpenAIRE

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background: Striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission has been postulated to be fundamental to the emergence of key symptoms of schizophrenia, such as psychotic symptoms, and is targeted by currently available dopaminergic drugs. A specific marker of the integrity of presynaptic dopamine neurons in the striatum, the density of striatal dopamine terminals, can be quantified through molecular neuroimaging of the dopamine active transporter (DAT). However, the currently available results using thi...

  17. Effect of insulin on excitatory synaptic transmission onto dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area in a mouse model of hyperinsulinemia

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, S; Labouèbe, G; S. Karunakaran; Clee, S.M.; Borgland, S L

    2013-01-01

    Obesity has drastically increased over the last few decades. Obesity is associated with elevated insulin levels, which can gain access to the brain, including into dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a brain region critical for mediating reward-seeking behavior. Synaptic plasticity of VTA dopamine neurons is associated with altered motivation to obtain reinforcing substances such as food and drugs of abuse. Under physiological circumstances, insulin in the VTA can suppress e...

  18. Divergent allosteric patterns verify the regulatory paradigm for aspartate transcarbamylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, M E; Madison, L L; Glaser, S S; Wild, J R

    1999-12-17

    The native Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase, E.C. 2.1.3.2) provides a classic allosteric model for the feedback inhibition of a biosynthetic pathway by its end products. Both E. coli and Erwinia herbicola possess ATCase holoenzymes which are dodecameric (2(c3):3(r2)) with 311 amino acid residues per catalytic monomer and 153 and 154 amino acid residues per regulatory (r) monomer, respectively. While the quaternary structures of the two enzymes are identical, the primary amino acid sequences have diverged by 14 % in the catalytic polypeptide and 20 % in the regulatory polypeptide. The amino acids proposed to be directly involved in the active site and nucleotide binding site are strictly conserved between the two enzymes; nonetheless, the two enzymes differ in their catalytic and regulatory characteristics. The E. coli enzyme has sigmoidal substrate binding with activation by ATP, and inhibition by CTP, while the E. herbicola enzyme has apparent first order kinetics at low substrate concentrations in the absence of allosteric ligands, no ATP activation and only slight CTP inhibition. In an apparently important and highly conserved characteristic, CTP and UTP impose strong synergistic inhibition on both enzymes. The co-operative binding of aspartate in the E. coli enzyme is correlated with a T-to-R conformational transition which appears to be greatly reduced in the E. herbicola enzyme, although the addition of inhibitory heterotropic ligands (CTP or CTP+UTP) re-establishes co-operative saturation kinetics. Hybrid holoenzymes assembled in vivo with catalytic subunits from E. herbicola and regulatory subunits from E. coli mimick the allosteric response of the native E. coli holoenzyme and exhibit ATP activation. The reverse hybrid, regulatory subunits from E. herbicola and catalytic subunits from E. coli, exhibited no response to ATP. The conserved structure and diverged functional characteristics of the E. herbicola enzyme provides an opportunity

  19. Increased extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens of the rat during associative learning of neutral stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A M; Ahier, R G; Upton, R L; Joseph, M H; Gray, J A

    1998-04-01

    . Hypotheses of the behavioural function of the mesolimbic dopamine system centre on its role in mediating the effects of biological reinforcers, both rewarding and aversive, conditioned and unconditioned. The present results, showing increases in extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens when an association is formed between two stimuli of which neither is a biological reinforcer nor, prior to formation of the association, affects dopamine levels, suggest a role for accumbal dopamine in the modulation of associative learning in general, not only that involving reinforcement. PMID:9502256

  20. Comparison of the vasodilator action of dopamine and dopamine agonists in the renal and coronary beds of the dog.

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, W. J.; Woodman, O. L.

    1982-01-01

    1 The effects of dopamine and the dopamine receptor agonists, SK&F 38393 and bromocriptine, on renal and coronary blood flow in the anaesthetized dog were examined. Dopamine was found to dilate both vascular beds, whereas SK&F 38393 increased renal blood flow but did not have any dilator activity in the coronary vasculature. Bromocriptine did not cause vasodilatation in either vascular bed. 2 The vasodilator responses to dopamine and SK&F 38393 were significantly reduced by the dopamine recep...

  1. Diagnosing dopamine-responsive dystonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, N; Fletcher, N; Newman, E

    2015-10-01

    The clinical spectrum of dopamine-responsive dystonias (DRDs) has expanded over the last decade to comprise several distinct disorders. At the milder end of the clinical spectrum is the autosomal-dominant guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase deficiency syndrome (GTPCH-DRD), and at the more severe end is the much less common autosomal recessive tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency syndrome (TH-DRD), with intermediate forms in between. Understanding the pathophysiology of DRDs can help in their optimal diagnosis and management. These are conditions with the potential to be either underdiagnosed when not considered or overdiagnosed if there is an equivocal L-dopa (levo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) response. In this article, we discuss the clinical phenotypes of these disorders, and we outline how investigations can help in confirming the diagnosis. PMID:26045581

  2. Turning skin into dopamine neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malin Parmar; Johan Jakobsson

    2011-01-01

    The possibility to generate neurons from fibroblasts became a reality with the development of iPS technology a few years ago.By reprogramming somatic cells using transcription factor (TF) overexpression,it is possible to generate pluripotent stem cells that then can be differentiated into any somatic cell type including various subtypes of neurons.This raises the possibility of using donor-matched or even patientspecific cells for cell therapy of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD),Huntington's disease and stroke.Supporting this idea,dopamine neurons,which are the cells dying in PD,derived from human iPS cells have been demonstrated to survive transplantation and reverse motor symptoms in animal models of PD [1].

  3. Visualization and quantification of dopamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiperone is a potent antagonist of dopamine D2 receptors in the brain. 3-N-[11C] methylspiperone (11C-NMSP), a spiperone derivative, was synthesized by N-alkylation of spiperone with [11C] methyliodide for the visualization and quantification of dopamine receptors in the brain using PET. Age related decrease of 11C-NMSP binding to the striatum was studied in healthy normal volunteers and the binding capacity was also examined in patients with Parkinson's disease and striatonigral degeneration (SND). After intravenous injection of 11C-NMSP, 5 sequential 2 min scan followed by 16 sequential 5 min scan were performed using a PET system. Region of interests to the striatum, cerebral cortex and cerebellum were outlined in the brain image and were plotted against time. The radioactivity in the striatum, in which much D2 binding site exists, was the highest among the brain and gradually increased with time. On the other hand, that in the cerebellar cortex, in which only non-specific binding site exists, peaked within 10 min, followed by rapid decrease. The ratios between striatum and cerebellum, which correlate with specific binding of 11C-NMSP, increased with time and had a linear relationship against time. Quantification of specific binding was evaluated by taking receptor-ligand association rate constant 'K3' in 3 conpartment model. The constant K3 was evaluated from the slope of the striatum to cerebellum ratio vesus an equivalent time which was calculated by the radioactivity in the cerebellulm. Decrease of K3 value with increase of age was observed. The values in Parkinson's disease were almost the same or slightly higher than those in age-matched control, however, a significant decrease compated to the normal value was observed in SND. The possible explanations for unchange or slight increase in Parkinson's disease and the decrease in SND were discussed. (author)

  4. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-01

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems. PMID:26874213

  5. LRRK2 overexpression alters glutamatergic presynaptic plasticity, striatal dopamine tone, postsynaptic signal transduction, motor activity and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccano-Kelly, Dayne A; Volta, Mattia; Munsie, Lise N; Paschall, Sarah A; Tatarnikov, Igor; Co, Kimberley; Chou, Patrick; Cao, Li-Ping; Bergeron, Sabrina; Mitchell, Emma; Han, Heather; Melrose, Heather L; Tapia, Lucia; Raymond, Lynn A; Farrer, Matthew J; Milnerwood, Austen J

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (Lrrk2) are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder affecting 1-2% of those >65 years old. The neurophysiology of LRRK2 remains largely elusive, although protein loss suggests a role in glutamatergic synapse transmission and overexpression studies show altered dopamine release in aged mice. We show that glutamate transmission is unaltered onto striatal projection neurons (SPNs) of adult LRRK2 knockout mice and that adult animals exhibit no detectable cognitive or motor deficits. Basal synaptic transmission is also unaltered in SPNs of LRRK2 overexpressing mice, but they do exhibit clear alterations to D2-receptor-mediated short-term synaptic plasticity, behavioral hypoactivity and impaired recognition memory. These phenomena are associated with decreased striatal dopamine tone and abnormal dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32 kDa signal integration. The data suggest that LRRK2 acts at the nexus of dopamine and glutamate signaling in the adult striatum, where it regulates dopamine levels, presynaptic glutamate release via D2-dependent synaptic plasticity and dopamine-receptor signal transduction. PMID:25343991

  6. Dopamine signals mimic reward prediction errors

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenbaum, Geoffrey; Esber, Guillem R; Iordanova, Mihaela D.

    2013-01-01

    Modern theories of associative learning center on a prediction error. A study finds that artificial activation of dopamine neurons can substitute for missing reward prediction errors to rescue blocked learning.

  7. Modeling the dopamine system in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can be used to measure several steps in the synthesis, binding, and metabolism of dopamine in the normal or abnormal living human brain. Fluorodopa is a PET tracer of DOPA metabolism. Recent evidence suggests that only a fraction of striatal fluorodopamine accumulates in the large, static pool of dopamine. Hence, the accumulation of FDOPA-derived radioactivity in striatum reflects the dopamine turnover of this pool. Labeled L-deprenyl is a PET tracer of monoamine oxidase B. The accumulation in striatum and other regions of the human brain reflects the number of reactive sites on the enzyme. The densities of dopamine-binding neuroreceptors may be calculated from the accumulation of reversibly binding tracers by equilibrium kinetics or from the accumulation of irreversibly binding tracers by transient analysis. The reversible tracers include labeled SCH 23390 and raclopride. An irreversibly binding tracer is N- methylspiperone

  8. Neuropeptide Y infusion into the shell region of the rat nucleus accumbens increases extracellular levels of dopamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Wegener, Gregers; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen;

    2009-01-01

    Increases in extracellular dopamine in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens are centrally involved in mediating reinforcement of addictive drugs. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its receptors are present in the nucleus accumbens and have been implicated in addiction mechanisms. This study further e...

  9. Synthesis of 6-phosphofructose aspartic acid and some related Amadori compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Alexandar L; Behrman, Edward J

    2016-08-01

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of 6-phosphofructose-aspartic acid, an intermediate in the metabolism of fructose-asparagine by Salmonella. We also report improved syntheses of fructose-asparagine itself and of fructose-aspartic acid. PMID:27258673

  10. Properties of Copolymers of Aspartic Acid and Aliphatic Dicarboxylic Acids Prepared by Reactive Extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspartic acid may be prepared chemically or by the fermentation of carbohydrates. Currently, low molecular weight polyaspartic acids are prepared commercially by heating aspartic acid at high temperatures (greater than 220 degrees C) for several hours in the solid state. In an effort to develop a ...

  11. Binding of dopamine and 3-methoxytyramine as l-DOPA metabolites to human alpha(2)-adrenergic and dopaminergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alachkar, Amal; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Jones, Owen T

    2010-07-01

    The ability of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA), l-DOPA-methyl ester and their major metabolites, dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic (HVA), 3-O-methyldopa and 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) to bind to alpha(2) adrenergic and D1 and D2 dopamine receptors was assessed by radioligand binding to cloned human receptors expressed in cell lines. As anticipated, dopamine bound with high affinity to D1 (IC(50) 1.1 + or - 0.16 microM) and D2 (IC(50) 0.7 + or - 0.3 microM) dopamine receptors. However, dopamine also bound with high affinity to alpha(2A) (IC(50) was 2.6 + or - 0.5 microM), alpha(2C) (IC(50) 3.2 + or - 0.7 microM). 3-MT bound to alpha(2A) with high affinity (IC(50), 3.6 + or - 0.2 microM) though moderate affinity to alpha(2)c, D1 and D2 receptors (values of IC(50) were 55 + or - 14, 121 + or - 43, 36 + or - 14 microM, respectively). l-DOPA-methyl ester bound with high affinity to alpha(2) (IC(50) 17-36 microM) but not dopamine receptors (IC(50) 0.9-2.5 mM). l-DOPA, 3-O-methyldopa and DOPAC had no observable effect on binding to any of the receptors tested. These data suggest that the effects of l-DOPA in Parkinson's disease may result from actions of its metabolites dopamine and 3-MT on both dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic receptors. These findings may provide explanations for the differences between l-DOPA and dopamine receptor agonists in mediating anti-parkinsonian effects and propensity to be associated with dyskinesia and motor complications such as wearing-off and on-off. PMID:20302892

  12. Reductions in carotid chemoreceptor activity with low-dose dopamine improves baroreflex control of heart rate during hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, Michael T; Holbein, Walter W; Joyner, Michael J; Curry, Timothy B; Limberg, Jacqueline K

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the contribution of the carotid body chemoreceptors to changes in baroreflex control of heart rate with exposure to hypoxia. We hypothesized spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (scBRS) would be reduced with hypoxia and this effect would be blunted when carotid chemoreceptor activity was reduced with low-dose dopamine. Fifteen healthy adults (11 M/4 F) completed two visits randomized to intravenous dopamine or placebo (saline). On each visit, subjects were exposed to 5-min normoxia (~99% SpO2), followed by 5-min hypoxia (~84% SpO2). Blood pressure (intra-arterial catheter) and heart rate (ECG) were measured continuously and scBRS was assessed by spectrum and sequence methodologies. scBRS was reduced with hypoxia (P dopamine (P dopamine (P dopamine did not attenuate the decrease in baroreflex sensitivity to falling pressures (scBRS "down-down"; P > 0.05). Present findings are consistent with a reduction in scBRS with systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, we show this effect is partially mediated by the carotid body chemoreceptors, given the fall in scBRS is attenuated when activity of the chemoreceptors is reduced with low-dose dopamine. However, the improvement in scBRS with dopamine appears to be specific to rising blood pressures. These results may have important implications for impairments in baroreflex function common in disease states of acute and/or chronic hypoxemia, as well as the experimental use of dopamine to assess such changes. PMID:27418545

  13. Intramolecular cyclization of aspartic acid residues assisted by three water molecules: a density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspartic acid (Asp) residues in peptides and proteins (l-Asp) are known to undergo spontaneous nonenzymatic reactions to form l-β-Asp, d-Asp, and d-β-Asp residues. The formation of these abnormal Asp residues in proteins may affect their three-dimensional structures and hence their properties and functions. Indeed, the reactions have been thought to contribute to aging and pathologies. Most of the above reactions of the l-Asp residues proceed via a cyclic succinimide intermediate. In this paper, a novel three-water-assisted mechanism is proposed for cyclization of an Asp residue (forming a gem-diol precursor of the succinimide) by the B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) density functional theory calculations carried out for an Asp-containing model compound (Ace−Asp−Nme, where Ace = acetyl and Nme = NHCH3). The three water molecules act as catalysts by mediating ‘long-range’ proton transfers. In the proposed mechanism, the amide group on the C-terminal side of the Asp residue is first converted to the tautomeric iminol form (iminolization). Then, reorientation of a water molecule and a conformational change occur successively, followed by the nucleophilic attack of the iminol nitrogen on the carboxyl carbon of the Asp side chain to form the gem-diol species. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental energetics.

  14. Suppressed eye growth following diffuser removal from myopic birds is not due to increased dopamine release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Myopia can be induced in developing chickens by fitting a diffuser over the eye. If the diffuser is removed, the restoration of normal visual input results in rapid suppression of eye growth, with ultimate restoration of normal vision. We have investigated whether the suppression of eye growth after the removal of a diffuser from a myopic eye results from an increased rate of release of dopamine from the retina. Chickens were maintained on a 12:12 light-dark cycle, and were fitted with a diffuser from day 7 to day 21. After removal of the diffuser, the rate of dopamine release was then followed by measuring the kinetics of accumulation of DOPAC in the vitreous during the light phase. The rate of scleral glycosaminoglycan synthesis (SGS) was followed by measuring the rate of incorporation of 35S-sulphate into scleral buttons incubated in vitro. At the end of the period of development of form-deprivation myopia,dopamine release rates were very low in the myopic eyes compared to those in the contralateral control eyes. In contrast, SGS rates were higher in the sclera from myopic eyes. After removal of the diffusers, the rate of SGS declined rapidly to below that in the control eyes within 72h. In contrast, dopamine release rates remained low for up to 10 days after removal of the occluders. These results show that there is a correlation between reduced dopamine release and increased SGS during the development of myopia, but that there is not a symmetrical relationship during the suppression of SGS following occluder removal. These results therefore suggest that dopamine is not a crucial signalling molecule in the visually mediated control of eye growth. Copyright (2001) Australian Neuroscience Society

  15. Metabolism of N-acylated-dopamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Zajac

    Full Text Available N-oleoyl-dopamine (OLDA is a novel lipid derivative of dopamine. Its biological action includes the interaction with dopamine and the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1 receptors. It seems to be synthesized in a dopamine-like manner, but there has been no information on its degradation. The aim of the study was, therefore, to determine whether OLDA metabolism proceeds the way dopamine proper does. We addressed the issue by examining the occurrence of O-methylation of exogenously supplemented OLDA via catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions using rat brain tissue. The results show that OLDA was methylated by COMT in all conditions studied, yielding the O-methylated derivative. The methylation was reversed by tolcapone, a potent COMT inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that OLDA enters the metabolic pathway of dopamine. Methylation of OLDA may enhance its bioactive properties, such as the ability to interact with TRPV1 receptors.

  16. Dopamine versus noradrenaline in septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe ‘Surviving Sepsis’ Campaign guidelines recommend theuse of dopamine or noradrenaline as the first vasopressor inseptic shock. However, information that guides clinicians inchoosing between dopamine and noradrenaline as the firstvasopressor in patients with septic shock is limited.ObjectiveThis article presents a review of the literature regarding theuse of dopamine versus noradrenaline in patients with septicshock.ResultsTwo randomised controlled trials (RCT and two largeprospective cohort studies were analysed. RCT data showeddopamine was associated with increased arrhythmic events.One cohort study found dopamine was associated with higher30-day mortality. The other cohort study found noradrenalinewas associated with higher 28-day mortality.DiscussionData on the use of dopamine versus noradrenaline in patientswith septic shock is limited. Following the recent SOAP IIstudy, there is now strong evidence that the use of dopaminein septic shock is associated with significantly morecardiovascular adverse events, compared tonoradrenaline.ConclusionNoradrenaline should be used as the initial vasopressor inseptic shock to avoid the arrhythmic events associatedwith dopamine.

  17. Lack of Cocaine Self-Administration in Mice Expressing a Cocaine-Insensitive Dopamine Transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen, Morgane; Han, Dawn D; Gu, Howard H.; Caine, S. Barak

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a worldwide public health problem for which there are no established treatments. The dopamine transporter (DAT) is suspected as the primary target mediating cocaine's abuse-related effects based on numerous pharmacological studies. However, in a previous study, DAT knockout mice were reported to self-administer cocaine, generating much debate regarding the importance of the DAT in cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we show that mice expressing a “knockin” of a cocaine...

  18. A role for dopamine in the processing of drug cues in heroin dependent patients

    OpenAIRE

    Franken, Ingmar; Hendriks, Vincent; Stam, C.J.; Brink, Wim

    2004-01-01

    textabstractDrug and alcohol dependence are associated with enhanced attention for drug-related stimuli. This cognitive processing bias has been suggested to be related to craving and to represent one of the core mechanisms of addition. The present study tests the hypothesis that enhanced attention for heroin cues is mediated by the dopaminergic system using haloperidol as dopamine antagonist. In a double blind, randomized crossover design, 17 detoxified heroin dependent patients received a s...

  19. Dopamine and α-synuclein dysfunction in Smad3 null mice

    OpenAIRE

    Casarejos M José; Cuartero M Isabel; Giráldez-Pérez Rosa M; Tapia-González Silvia; Mena M Ángeles; Wang Xiao-Fan; Sánchez-Capelo Amelia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the substantia nigra (SN). Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) levels increase in patients with PD, although the effects of this increment remain unclear. We have examined the mesostriatal system in adult mice deficient in Smad3, a molecule involved in the intracellular TGF-β1 signalling cascade. Results Striatal monoamine oxidase (MAO)-mediated dopamine (DA) catabolism to 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl...

  20. Dopamine Does Not Appear to Affect Mental Rotation in Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Crucian, Gregory P.; Sheyan Armaghani; Avan Armaghani; Foster, Paul S.; Burks, David W.; Barry Skoblar; Valeria Drago; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) often have deficits with mental rotation (MR). The neuropathological factors underlying these deficits, however, remain to be elucidated. One hypothesis suggests that dopamine depletion in nigro-striatal systems adversely influences MR. Another hypothesis suggests that deterioration of cortical (fronto-temporo-parietal basal ganglia) networks that mediate this function are responsible for this deficit. The goal of this study was to test the dop...

  1. Insertion of tetracysteine motifs into dopamine transporter extracellular domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Navaroli

    Full Text Available The neuronal dopamine transporter (DAT is a major determinant of extracellular dopamine (DA levels and is the primary target for a variety of addictive and therapeutic psychoactive drugs. DAT is acutely regulated by protein kinase C (PKC activation and amphetamine exposure, both of which modulate DAT surface expression by endocytic trafficking. In order to use live imaging approaches to study DAT endocytosis, methods are needed to exclusively label the DAT surface pool. The use of membrane impermeant, sulfonated biarsenic dyes holds potential as one such approach, and requires introduction of an extracellular tetracysteine motif (tetraCys; CCPGCC to facilitate dye binding. In the current study, we took advantage of intrinsic proline-glycine (Pro-Gly dipeptides encoded in predicted DAT extracellular domains to introduce tetraCys motifs into DAT extracellular loops 2, 3, and 4. [(3H]DA uptake studies, surface biotinylation and fluorescence microscopy in PC12 cells indicate that tetraCys insertion into the DAT second extracellular loop results in a functional transporter that maintains PKC-mediated downregulation. Introduction of tetraCys into extracellular loops 3 and 4 yielded DATs with severely compromised function that failed to mature and traffic to the cell surface. This is the first demonstration of successful introduction of a tetracysteine motif into a DAT extracellular domain, and may hold promise for use of biarsenic dyes in live DAT imaging studies.

  2. Signal amplification of dopamine using lanthanum hexacyanoferrate-modified electrode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Selvaraju; R Ramaraj

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive and selective electrochemical sensor has been developed using an electroactive polynuclear lanthanum hexacyanoferrate (LaHCF) complex with counter alkali cation (Na+) deposited on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode (GC/LaHCF). The GC/LaHCF-modified electrode is found to be an excellent transducer in mediating the oxidation of neurotransmitter molecule such as dopamine (DA) at physiological pH 7.2. Interestingly, the GC/LaHCF-modified electrode amplifies a 50-fold enhancement in the oxidation of DA signal compared to the bare GC electrode. Besides, the GC/LaHCF-modified electrode shows excellent selectivity in the voltammetric oxidation of DA in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA). Under optimal conditions, the GC/LaHCF modified electrode shows a linear relationship in DA oxidation between 0.1 × 10−6 and 1.0 × 10−6M with the detection limit of 1 × 10−8M (10 nM). Importantly, practical utility of the modified electrode is good in studying the real sample analysis such as dopamine hydrochloride injection assay.

  3. 胖Zucker大鼠肠系膜动脉多巴胺D1受体介导的血管舒张功能受损及其机制%Impaired dopamine D1 receptor-mediated vasorelaxation of mesenteric arteries in obese Zucker rats and its underlying mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符金娟; 韩愈; 王震; 关蔚蔚; 刘渔凯; 杨迪; 黄河飞; 杨素菲; 曾春雨

    2014-01-01

    目的 观察多巴胺D1受体激动剂Fenoldopam介导的血管舒张反应性在胖、瘦Zucker大鼠中的差异.方法 取12~14周健康雄性胖、瘦Zucker大鼠(n=12),采用鼠尾动脉无创测压法测定血压;采用离体微血管张力测定系统,观察雄性胖、瘦Zucker大鼠肠系膜三级动脉在内皮完整与去除后,Fenoldopam(1×10-8~3×10-6 mol/L)对苯肾上腺素(PHE,1×10-5 mol/L)预收缩血管的舒张作用.用多巴胺D1受体拮抗剂SCH23390(10-7 mol/L)预孵育Zucker大鼠肠系膜动脉30 min,观察Fenoldopam通过多巴胺D1受体舒张血管的特异性.采用蛋白免疫印迹法测定胖、瘦Zucker大鼠肠系膜组织多巴胺D1受体表达量的差异.结果 与瘦Zucker大鼠相比,胖Zucker大鼠的血压增高.在Fenoldopam 3×10-6mol/L时,瘦Zucker大鼠肠系膜动脉的舒张效应明显强于胖Zucker大鼠[(63.43±13.79)%比(20.75±8.60)%,P<0.01].去内皮前后,胖、瘦Zucker大鼠肠系膜动脉对Fenoldopam的舒张效应比较,差异无统计学意义(均P>0.05).SCH23390可以拮抗Fenoldopam对胖、瘦Zucker大鼠血管的舒张效应.蛋白免疫印迹结果显示,瘦Zucker大鼠肠系膜组织多巴胺D1受体表达量高于胖Zucker大鼠[(1.26±0.04)%比(0.74±0.06)%,P<0.01].结论 与瘦Zucker大鼠相比,胖Zucker大鼠血压增高;增高的血压可能与肠系膜动脉多巴胺D1受体表达量下降引起的Fenoldopam的血管舒张效应下降有关.%Objective To investigate the difference of dopamine D1 receptor-mediated vasorelaxation of mesenteric arteries between obese and lean Zucker rats,as well as its underlying mechanisms.Methods The blood pressures of obese and lean Zucker rats (12-14 weeks) were measured at tail artery (n=12).In an in-vitro microvascular tension measurement system,the relaxation effect of Fenoldopam (1 × 10-8 to 3 × 10-6 mol/L) on mesenteric arteries from all rats,with or without intact endothelium,was evaluated in a setting of phenylephedrine (PHE,1

  4. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist dextromethorphan selectively reduces temporal summation of second pain in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D D; Mao, J; Frenk, H; Mayer, D J

    1994-11-01

    Oral doses of dextromethorphan (DM), a common cough suppressant and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, and their vehicle control were given on a double-blind basis to normal volunteer human subjects who rated intensities of first and second pain in response to repeated painful electric shocks and repeated 52 degrees C heat pulses. Doses of 30 and 45 mg, but not 15 mg, were effective in attenuating temporal summation of second pain, a psychophysical correlate of temporal summation of C afferent-mediated responses of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons, termed 'wind-up'. By contrast, neither first nor second pain evoked by the first stimulus in a train of stimuli were affected by any of these doses of DM. These results further confirm temporal summation of second pain as a psychophysical correlate of wind-up by providing evidence that DM selectively reduces temporal summation of second pain, as has been shown for wind-up. PMID:7892014

  5. Superactive insulin: [B10-aspartic acid]insulin(human)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetic basis for a case of familial hyperproinsulinemia has been elucidated recently. It involves a single point mutation in the proinsulin gene resulting in the substitution of aspartic acid for histidine-10 of the B chain of insulin. The authors have synthesized a human insulin analogue, [Asp/sup B10/] insulin, corresponding to the mutant proinsulin and evaluated its biological activity. [Asp/sup B10/] Insulin displayed a binding affinity to insulin receptors in rat liver plasma membranes that was 534 +- 146% relative to the natural hormone. In lipogenesis assays, the synthetic analogue exhibited a potency that was 435 +- 144% relative to insulin, which is statistically not different from its binding affinity. Reversed-phase HPLC indicated that the synthetic analogue is more apolar than natural insulin. They suggest that the observed properties reflect changes in the conformation of the analogue relative to natural insulin, which results in a stronger interaction with the insulin receptor. Thus, a single substitution of an amino acid residue of human insulin has resulted in a superactive hormone

  6. Superactive insulin: (B10-aspartic acid)insulin(human)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, G.P.; Burke, G.T.; Katsoyannis, P.G.

    1987-09-01

    The genetic basis for a case of familial hyperproinsulinemia has been elucidated recently. It involves a single point mutation in the proinsulin gene resulting in the substitution of aspartic acid for histidine-10 of the B chain of insulin. The authors have synthesized a human insulin analogue, (Asp/sup B10/) insulin, corresponding to the mutant proinsulin and evaluated its biological activity. (Asp/sup B10/) Insulin displayed a binding affinity to insulin receptors in rat liver plasma membranes that was 534 +- 146% relative to the natural hormone. In lipogenesis assays, the synthetic analogue exhibited a potency that was 435 +- 144% relative to insulin, which is statistically not different from its binding affinity. Reversed-phase HPLC indicated that the synthetic analogue is more apolar than natural insulin. They suggest that the observed properties reflect changes in the conformation of the analogue relative to natural insulin, which results in a stronger interaction with the insulin receptor. Thus, a single substitution of an amino acid residue of human insulin has resulted in a superactive hormone.

  7. The effect of postirradiation application of aspartic acid salts on hemopoietic recovery in sublethally X-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of aspartic acid salts, especially of K and Mg aspartates, on certain hematological changes in the peripheral blood and hemopoietic organs of sublethally X-irratiated male mice of the strain C57Bl/10 was investigated. Salts of aspartic acid were administered in tap water after irradiation. A favorable effect of aspartic acid salts on erythropoietic recovery and on regeneration of thymus weight was found during the first two weeks after irradiation. (orig.)

  8. Influence of increased aspartate availability on lysine formation by a recombinant strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum and utilization of fumarate.

    OpenAIRE

    Menkel, E; Thierbach, G; Eggeling, L; Sahm, H

    1989-01-01

    Aspartate availability was increased in Corynebacterium glutamicum strains to assess its influence on lysine production. Upon addition of fumarate to a strain with a feedback-resistant aspartate kinase, the lysine yield increased from 20 to 30 mM. This increase was accompanied by the excretion of malate and succinate. In this strain, fumaric acid was converted to aspartate by fumarate hydratase, malate dehydrogenase, and aspartate amino transferase activity. To achieve the direct conversion o...

  9. Preliminary studies with [18F]haloperidol: a radioligand for in vivo studies of the dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report a synthesis of [18F]haloperidol of sufficiently high specific activity to permit the mapping of dopamine receptors in vivo in man using PET. The preliminary work with this radioligand in vivo in monkeys clearly suggests that haloperidol enters brain from blood by means of carrier-mediated, facilitated diffusion rather than simple diffusion. This rather surprising observation not only assumes special importance in the interpretation of in vivo pharmacokinetic data on dopamine receptors in man or animals but may also be important in considerations of the possible mode of action of this drug on the central nervous system. (Auth.)

  10. Genetic disruption of dopamine production results in pituitary adenomas and severe prolactinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopamine release from tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons into the median eminence activates dopamine-D2 receptors in the pituitary gland where it inhibits lactotroph function. We have previously described genetic dopamine-deficient mouse models which lack the ability to synthesize dopamine. Because...

  11. Addiction: Beyond dopamine reward circuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.

    2011-09-13

    Dopamine (DA) is considered crucial for the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, but its role in addiction is much less clear. This review focuses on studies that used PET to characterize the brain DA system in addicted subjects. These studies have corroborated in humans the relevance of drug-induced fast DA increases in striatum [including nucleus accumbens (NAc)] in their rewarding effects but have unexpectedly shown that in addicted subjects, drug-induced DA increases (as well as their subjective reinforcing effects) are markedly blunted compared with controls. In contrast, addicted subjects show significant DA increases in striatum in response to drug-conditioned cues that are associated with self-reports of drug craving and appear to be of a greater magnitude than the DA responses to the drug. We postulate that the discrepancy between the expectation for the drug effects (conditioned responses) and the blunted pharmacological effects maintains drug taking in an attempt to achieve the expected reward. Also, whether tested during early or protracted withdrawal, addicted subjects show lower levels of D2 receptors in striatum (including NAc), which are associated with decreases in baseline activity in frontal brain regions implicated in salience attribution (orbitofrontal cortex) and inhibitory control (anterior cingulate gyrus), whose disruption results in compulsivity and impulsivity. These results point to an imbalance between dopaminergic circuits that underlie reward and conditioning and those that underlie executive function (emotional control and decision making), which we postulate contributes to the compulsive drug use and loss of control in addiction.

  12. Imaging dopamine transmission in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last ten years, several positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon computerized tomography (SPECT) studies of the dopamine (DA) system in patients with schizophrenia were performed to test the hypothesis that DA hyperactivity is associated with this illness. In this paper are reviewed the results of fifteen brain imaging studies comparing indices of DA function in drug naive or drug free patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls: thirteen studies included measurements of Da D2 receptor density, two studies compared amphetamine-induced DA release, and two studies measured DOPA decarboxylase activity, an enzyme involved in DA synthesis. It was conducted a meta-analysis of the studies measuring D2 receptor density parameters, under the assumption that all tracers labeled the same population of D2 receptors. This analysis revealed that, compared to healthy controls, patients with schizophrenia present a significant but mild elevation of D2 receptor density parameters and a significant larger variability of these indices. It was found no statistical evidence that studies performed with radiolabeled butyrophenones detected a larger increase in D2 receptor density parameters than studies performed with other radioligands, such as benzamides. Studies of presynaptic activity revealed an increase in DA transmission response to amphetamine challenge, and an increase in DOPA decarboxylase activity. Together, these data are compatible with both pre- and post-synaptic alterations of DA transmission in schizophrenia. Future studies should aim at a better characterization of these alterations, and at defining their role in the pathophysiology of the illness

  13. Addiction: Beyond dopamine reward circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopamine (DA) is considered crucial for the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, but its role in addiction is much less clear. This review focuses on studies that used PET to characterize the brain DA system in addicted subjects. These studies have corroborated in humans the relevance of drug-induced fast DA increases in striatum [including nucleus accumbens (NAc)] in their rewarding effects but have unexpectedly shown that in addicted subjects, drug-induced DA increases (as well as their subjective reinforcing effects) are markedly blunted compared with controls. In contrast, addicted subjects show significant DA increases in striatum in response to drug-conditioned cues that are associated with self-reports of drug craving and appear to be of a greater magnitude than the DA responses to the drug. We postulate that the discrepancy between the expectation for the drug effects (conditioned responses) and the blunted pharmacological effects maintains drug taking in an attempt to achieve the expected reward. Also, whether tested during early or protracted withdrawal, addicted subjects show lower levels of D2 receptors in striatum (including NAc), which are associated with decreases in baseline activity in frontal brain regions implicated in salience attribution (orbitofrontal cortex) and inhibitory control (anterior cingulate gyrus), whose disruption results in compulsivity and impulsivity. These results point to an imbalance between dopaminergic circuits that underlie reward and conditioning and those that underlie executive function (emotional control and decision making), which we postulate contributes to the compulsive drug use and loss of control in addiction.

  14. Endocannabinoid-dopamine interactions in striatal synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Neil Mathur

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The nigrostriatal dopaminergic system is implicated in action control and learning. A large body of work has focused on the contribution of this system to modulation of the corticostriatal synapse, the predominant synapse type in the striatum. Signaling through the D2 dopamine receptor is necessary for endocannabinoid-mediated depression of corticostriatal glutamate release. Here we review the known details of this mechanism and discuss newly discovered signaling pathways interacting with this system that ultimately exert dynamic control of cortical input to the striatum and striatal output. This topic is timely with respect to Parkinson’s disease given recent data indicating changes in the striatal endocannabinoid system in patients with this disorder.

  15. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Kolkata cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Majumder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Kolkata, India. Results: A total of 576 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 417, insulin detemir (n = 70, insulin aspart (n = 55, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 19 and other insulin combinations (n = 15. At baseline, glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 8.3% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 8.6% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −1.3%, insulin users: −1.4%. SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  16. Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the dorsal vagal complex lowers glucose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Carol K L; Chari, Madhu; Su, Brenda B; Cheung, Grace W C; Kokorovic, Andrea; Yang, Clair S; Wang, Penny Y T; Lai, Teresa Y Y; Lam, Tony K T

    2010-07-16

    Diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia due partly to increased hepatic glucose production. The hypothalamus regulates hepatic glucose production in rodents. However, it is currently unknown whether other regions of the brain are sufficient in glucose production regulation. The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is composed of NR1 and NR2 subunits, which are activated by co-agonist glycine and glutamate or aspartate, respectively. Here we report that direct administration of either co-agonist glycine or NMDA into the dorsal vagal complex (DVC), targeting the nucleus of the solitary tract, lowered glucose production in vivo. Direct infusion of the NMDA receptor blocker MK-801 into the DVC negated the metabolic effect of glycine. To evaluate whether NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor mediates the effect of glycine, NR1 in the DVC was inhibited by DVC NR1 antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid or DVC shRNA-NR1. Pharmacological and molecular inhibition of DVC NR1 negated the metabolic effect of glycine. To evaluate whether the NMDA receptors mediate the effects of NR2 agonist NMDA, DVC NMDA receptors were inhibited by antagonist D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (D-APV). DVC D-APV fully negated the ability of DVC NMDA to lower glucose production. Finally, hepatic vagotomy negated the DVC glycine ability to lower glucose production. These findings demonstrate that activation of NR1 and NR2 subunits of the NMDA receptors in the DVC is sufficient to trigger a brain-liver axis to lower glucose production, and suggest that DVC NMDA receptors serve as a therapeutic target for diabetes and obesity. PMID:20448042

  17. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Reinforcing Value of Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Caitlin B; Keyes, Alexandra; Renwick, Bethany; Leyton, Marco; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether dopaminergic systems are involved in the motivation to engage in behaviours associated with anorexia nervosa (AN), specifically, the drive to exercise. Women recovered from AN (AN REC, n = 17) and healthy controls (HC, n = 15) were recruited. The acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD) method was used to transiently decrease dopamine synthesis and transmission. The effect of dopamine precursor depletion on drive to exercise was measured using a progressive ratio (PR) exercise breakpoint task. Both groups worked for the opportunity to exercise, and, at baseline, PR breakpoint scores were higher in AN REC than HC. Compared to values on the experimental control session, APTD did not decrease PR breakpoint scores in AN REC, but significantly decreased scores in HC. These data show that women recovered from AN are more motivated to exercise than HC, although in both groups, activity is more reinforcing than inactivity. Importantly, decreasing dopamine does not reduce the motivation to exercise in people recovered from AN, but in contrast, does so in HC. It is proposed that in AN, drive to exercise develops into a behaviour that is largely independent of dopamine mediated reward processes and becomes dependent on cortico-striatal neurocircuitry that regulates automated, habit- or compulsive-like behaviours. These data strengthen the case for the involvement of reward, learning, habit, and dopaminergic systems in the aetiology of AN. PMID:26808920

  18. [Function of dopamine in mesenteric blood vessels of rats poisoned with lead and cadmium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoczyńska, A; Wróbel, J; Turczyn, B

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of combined exposure to lead and cadmium, used in hypertensive doses, on the reactivity of isolated mesenteric rat vessels to dopamine. Experiments were performed on 64 male Buffalo rats (195-245 g body weight) administered intragastrically with lead acetate (35 mg Pb/kg b.w.) and/or cadmium chloride (5 mg Cd/kg b.w.) once a week for seven weeks. The isolated mesenteric bed was prepared according to McGregor's method. Dopamine (800 micrograms) was injected before and during the infusion, one after the other, of angiotensin converting enzyme (0.0004 j/ml/min), ketoprofen (0.2 mg/ml/min), and losartan (0.05 mg/ml/min) or infusion of nitric oxide synthase blocker, N-omega-nitro-L-argine (22 micrograms/ml/min), verapamil (0.001 mg/ml/min), and then propranolol (0.3 mg/ml/min). The results show an unchanged, in comparison to controls, vascular effect of dopamine in lead and cadmium poisoned rats. However, these metals modified the reactivity of mesenteric vessels to endogenous angiotensin and prostaglandins mediated pressor action of dopamine. PMID:11199173

  19. Pharmacologic inhibition of L-tyrosine degradation ameliorates cerebral dopamine deficiency in murine phenylketonuria (PKU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Cary O; Winn, Shelley R; Gibson, K Michael; Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Grompe, Markus

    2014-09-01

    Monoamine neurotransmitter deficiency has been implicated in the etiology of neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with chronic hyperphenylalaninemia in phenylketonuria (PKU). Two proposed explanations for neurotransmitter deficiency in PKU include first, that chronically elevated blood L-phenylalanine (Phe) inhibits the transport of L-tyrosine (Tyr) and L-tryptophan (Trp), the substrates for dopamine and serotonin synthesis respectively, into brain. In the second hypothesis, elevated Phe competitively inhibits brain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activities, the rate limiting steps in dopamine and serotonin synthesis. Dietary supplementation with large neutral amino acids (LNAA) including Tyr and Trp has been recommended for individuals with chronically elevated blood Phe in an attempt to restore amino acid and monoamine homeostasis in brain. As a potential alternative treatment approach, we demonstrate that pharmacologic inhibition of Tyr degradation through oral administration of nitisinone (NTBC) yielded sustained increases in blood and brain Tyr, decreased blood and brain Phe, and consequently increased dopamine synthesis in a murine model of PKU. Our results suggest that Phe-mediated inhibition of TH activity is the likely mechanism of impaired dopamine synthesis in PKU. Pharmacologic inhibition of Tyr degradation may be a promising adjunct therapy for CNS monoamine neurotransmitter deficiency in hyperphenylalaninemic individuals with PKU. PMID:24487571

  20. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Reinforcing Value of Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin B O'Hara

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether dopaminergic systems are involved in the motivation to engage in behaviours associated with anorexia nervosa (AN, specifically, the drive to exercise. Women recovered from AN (AN REC, n = 17 and healthy controls (HC, n = 15 were recruited. The acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD method was used to transiently decrease dopamine synthesis and transmission. The effect of dopamine precursor depletion on drive to exercise was measured using a progressive ratio (PR exercise breakpoint task. Both groups worked for the opportunity to exercise, and, at baseline, PR breakpoint scores were higher in AN REC than HC. Compared to values on the experimental control session, APTD did not decrease PR breakpoint scores in AN REC, but significantly decreased scores in HC. These data show that women recovered from AN are more motivated to exercise than HC, although in both groups, activity is more reinforcing than inactivity. Importantly, decreasing dopamine does not reduce the motivation to exercise in people recovered from AN, but in contrast, does so in HC. It is proposed that in AN, drive to exercise develops into a behaviour that is largely independent of dopamine mediated reward processes and becomes dependent on cortico-striatal neurocircuitry that regulates automated, habit- or compulsive-like behaviours. These data strengthen the case for the involvement of reward, learning, habit, and dopaminergic systems in the aetiology of AN.

  1. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Reinforcing Value of Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hara, Caitlin B.; Keyes, Alexandra; Renwick, Bethany; Leyton, Marco; Campbell, Iain C.; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether dopaminergic systems are involved in the motivation to engage in behaviours associated with anorexia nervosa (AN), specifically, the drive to exercise. Women recovered from AN (AN REC, n = 17) and healthy controls (HC, n = 15) were recruited. The acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD) method was used to transiently decrease dopamine synthesis and transmission. The effect of dopamine precursor depletion on drive to exercise was measured using a progressive ratio (PR) exercise breakpoint task. Both groups worked for the opportunity to exercise, and, at baseline, PR breakpoint scores were higher in AN REC than HC. Compared to values on the experimental control session, APTD did not decrease PR breakpoint scores in AN REC, but significantly decreased scores in HC. These data show that women recovered from AN are more motivated to exercise than HC, although in both groups, activity is more reinforcing than inactivity. Importantly, decreasing dopamine does not reduce the motivation to exercise in people recovered from AN, but in contrast, does so in HC. It is proposed that in AN, drive to exercise develops into a behaviour that is largely independent of dopamine mediated reward processes and becomes dependent on cortico-striatal neurocircuitry that regulates automated, habit- or compulsive-like behaviours. These data strengthen the case for the involvement of reward, learning, habit, and dopaminergic systems in the aetiology of AN. PMID:26808920

  2. Dopamine Does Not Appear to Affect Mental Rotation in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P. Crucian

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePatients with Parkinson’s disease (PD often have deficits with mental rotation (MR. The neuropathological factors underlying these deficits, however, remain to be elucidated. One hypothesis suggests that dopamine depletion in nigro-striatal systems adversely influences MR. Another hypothesis suggests that deterioration of cortical (fronto-temporo-parietal basal ganglia networks that mediate this function are responsible for this deficit. The goal of this study was to test the dopamine hypothesis by determining if dopamine abstinence negatively influences MR performance. MethodsThirty three non-demented right-handed individuals with PD were assess for their ability to perform a pencil and paper MR test while “on” and “off” dopaminergic medications. Dopamine abstinence followed the typical overnight withdrawal procedures. ResultsNo differences in mental rotation abilities were found between “on” and “off” dopaminergic medications. ConclusionsThese results suggest that other neuropathological factors, such as cortical-basal ganglia neurodegeneration, or dysfunction of other neurotransmitters systems, might account for these cognitive deficits and future research will have to test these alternative hypotheses.

  3. Dopamine-induced apoptosis in human neuronal cells: inhibition by nucleic acides antisense to the dopamine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human neuroblastoma NMB cells take up [3H]dopamine in a selective manner indicating that dopamine transporters are responsible for this uptake. These cells were therefore used as a model to study dopamine neurotoxicity, and to elucidate the role of dopamine transporters in controlling cell death. Treatment with 0.05-0.4 mM dopamine changed cells' morphology within 4 h, accompanied by retraction of processes, shrinkage, apoptosis-like atrophy, accumulation of apoptotic particles, DNA fragmentation and cell death. Cycloheximide inhibited dopamine's effect, suggesting that induction of apoptosis by dopamine was dependent upon protein synthesis. Dopamine cytotoxicity, monitored morphologically by flow cytometric analysis, and by lactate dehydrogenase released, was blocked by cocaine but not by the noradrenaline and serotonin uptake blockers desimipramine and imipramine, respectively. Attempting to inhibit dopamine transport and toxicity in a drug-free and highly selective way, three 18-mer dopamine transporter antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (numbers 1, 2 and 3) and a new plasmid vector expressing the entire rat dopamine transporter complementary DNA in the antisense orientation were prepared and tested. Antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide 3 inhibited [3H]dopamine uptake in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Likewise, transient transfection of NMB cells with the plasmid expressing dopamine transporter complementary DNA in the antisense orientation partially blocked [3H]dopamine uptake. Antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide 3 also decreased, dose-dependently, the toxic effect of dopamine and 6-hydroxydopamine. Western blot analysis with newly prepared anti-human dopamine transporter antibodies showed that antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide 3 decreased the transporter protein level. These studies contribute to better understand the mechanism of dopamine-induced apoptosis and neurotoxicity. (Copyright (c) 1996 Elsevier Science B

  4. Excitatory amino acid antagonists and endogenous aspartate and glutamate release from rat hippocampal slices.

    OpenAIRE

    Connick, J. H.; Stone, T. W.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of excitatory amino acid agonists and antagonists on the efflux of endogenous aspartate and glutamate from the rat hippocampus in vitro was studied. 2. None of the compounds tested had any effect on the basal efflux of endogenous aspartate and glutamate. 3. 2-Amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV), 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (APH) and MK-801 all reduced the potassium-evoked efflux of aspartate and glutamate by between 14.9% and 34.3% (P less than 0.05). 4. The depression of ...

  5. Brain May Compensate for Dopamine Neuron Loss Early in Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More Science News Brain May Compensate for Dopamine Neuron Loss Early in Parkinson’s - May 09 2014 Scientists ... at least 25 percent of the brain’s dopamine neurons already have been lost. So why do symptoms ...

  6. Cerebral vascular effects of hypovolemia and dopamine infusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst Hahn, Gitte; Heiring, Christian; Pryds, Ole;

    2012-01-01

    Despite widespread use, effects of volume boluses and dopamine in hypotensive newborn infants remain controversial. We aimed to elucidate if hypovolemia alone impairs cerebral autoregulation (CA) and if dopamine affects cerebral vasculature....

  7. Modeling dopamine system dysfunction in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quite a substantial number of human disorders have been associated with a primary or a secondary impairment of one or several of the dopaminergic pathways. Among disorders associated with a primary impairment of dopaminergic transmission are Parkinson's disease, striatonigral degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and possibly schizophrenia. Diseases of secondary dopamine dysfunction are chiefly represented by Huntington's disease in which dopaminergic transmission is being interrupted by progressive loss of the striatal neurons bearing the postsynaptic D1- and D2-dopamine receptors. Central dopaminergic systems have anatomical as well as organizational properties that render them unique by comparison to other neurotransmission systems, making them able to play a pivotal role in the modulation of various important brain functions such as locomotor activity, attention, and some cognitive abilities. These properties of dopamine neurons have obviously several implications in the clinical expression of human disorders involving dopamine neuron dysfunction. In addition, they can greatly influence the clinical/behavioral consequences of experimental lesions in animal models of dopamine dysfunctions

  8. Dopamine receptor regulating factor, DRRF: A zinc finger transcription factor

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Cheol Kyu; D'Souza, Ursula M.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Yajima, Shunsuke; Lammers, Claas-Hinrich; Yang, Young; Lee, Sang-Hyeon; Kim, Yong-Man; Nestler, Eric J.; Mouradian, M. Maral

    2001-01-01

    Dopamine receptor genes are under complex transcription control, determining their unique regional distribution in the brain. We describe here a zinc finger type transcription factor, designated dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF), which binds to GC and GT boxes in the D1A and D2 dopamine receptor promoters and effectively displaces Sp1 and Sp3 from these sequences. Consequently, DRRF can modulate the activity of these dopamine receptor promoters. Highest DRRF mRNA levels are found in ...

  9. Phasic dopamine release in appetitive behaviors and drug abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Wanat, Matthew J.; Willuhn, Ingo; Clark, Jeremy J.; Phillips, Paul E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Short phasic bursts of neuronal activity in dopamine neurons produce rapid and transient increases in extracellular dopamine concentrations throughout the mesocorticolimbic system, which are associated with the initiation of goal-directed behaviors. It is well established that acute exposure to many addictive drugs produce increases in tonic dopamine levels that occur on the order of minutes. However, recent studies suggest that abused drugs similarly enhance phasic dopamine release events th...

  10. L-aspartic acid transport by cat erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cat and dog red cells are unusual in that they have no Na/K ATPase and contain low K and high Na intracellularly. They also show significant Na dependent L-aspartate (L-asp) transport. The authors have characterized this system in cat RBCs. The influx of 3H-L-asp (typically 2μM) was measured in washed RBCs incubated for 60 s at 370C in medium containing 140 mM NaCl, 5 mM Kcl, 2 mM CaCl2, 15 mM MOPS pH 7.4, 5 mM glucose, and 14C-PEG as a space marker. The cells were washed 3 times in the medium immediately before incubation which was terminated by centrifuging the RBCs through a layer of dibutylphthalate. Over an L-asp concentration range of 0.5-1000μM, influx obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a small added linear diffusion component. The Kt and Jmax of the saturable component were 5.40 +/- 0.34 μM and 148.8 +/- 7.2 μmol 1. cell-1h-1 respectively. Replacement of Na with Li, K, Rb, Cs or choline reduce influx to diffusion. With the addition of asp analogues (4+M L-asp, 40+M inhibitor), the following sequence of inhibition was observed (range 80% to 40% inhib.): L-glutamate > L-cysteine sulfonate > D-asp > L-cysteic acid > D-glutamate. Other amino acids such as L-alanine, L-proline, L-lysine, L-cysteine, and taurine showed no inhibition (<5%). These data suggest that cat red cells contain a high-affinity Na dependent transport system for L-asp, glutamate, and closely related analogues which resembles that found in the RBCs of other carnivores and in neural tissues

  11. Imaging dopamine transmission in schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laruelle, M. [New York, Columbia Univ. College of Physicians and Surgeons, NY (United States). New York State Psychiatric Insitute. Brain Imaging Division

    1998-09-01

    Over the last ten years, several positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon computerized tomography (SPECT) studies of the dopamine (DA) system in patients with schizophrenia were performed to test the hypothesis that DA hyperactivity is associated with this illness. In this paper are reviewed the results of fifteen brain imaging studies comparing indices of DA function in drug naive or drug free patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls: thirteen studies included measurements of Da D{sub 2} receptor density, two studies compared amphetamine-induced DA release, and two studies measured DOPA decarboxylase activity, an enzyme involved in DA synthesis. It was conducted a meta-analysis of the studies measuring D{sub 2} receptor density parameters, under the assumption that all tracers labeled the same population of D{sub 2} receptors. This analysis revealed that, compared to healthy controls, patients with schizophrenia present a significant but mild elevation of D{sub 2} receptor density parameters and a significant larger variability of these indices. It was found no statistical evidence that studies performed with radiolabeled butyrophenones detected a larger increase in D{sub 2} receptor density parameters than studies performed with other radioligands, such as benzamides. Studies of presynaptic activity revealed an increase in DA transmission response to amphetamine challenge, and an increase in DOPA decarboxylase activity. Together, these data are compatible with both pre- and post-synaptic alterations of DA transmission in schizophrenia. Future studies should aim at a better characterization of these alterations, and at defining their role in the pathophysiology of the illness.

  12. No evidence of association between structural polymorphism at the dopamine D3 receptor locus and alcoholism in the Japanese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Susumu; Muramatsu, Taro; Matsushita, Sachio [National Institute on Alcoholism, Kanagawa (Japan); Murayama, Masanobu [Akagi Kougen Hospital, Gunma (Japan)

    1996-07-26

    Dopaminergic systems mediate reward mechanisms and are involved in reinforcing self-administration of dependence-forming substances, including alcohol. Studies have reported that polymorphisms of the dopamine D2 receptor, whose structure and function are similar to those of the dopamine D3 receptor, increase the susceptibility to alcoholism. The observations led to the examination of the possible association between a structural polymorphism of the D3 receptor gene and alcoholism. Genotyping results, employing a PCR-RFLP method, showed no difference in allele and genotype frequencies of the D3 BalI polymorphism (Ser{sup 9}/Gly{sup 9}) between Japanese alcoholics and controls. Moreover, these frequencies were not altered in alcoholics with inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2), a well-defined negative risk factor for alcoholism. These results strongly suggest that the dopamine D3 receptor is not associated with alcoholism. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Thyroid hormone and adrenergic signaling interact to control pineal expression of the dopamine receptor D4 gene (Drd4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jong-So; Bailey, Michael J; Weller, Joan L;

    2009-01-01

    Dopamine plays diverse and important roles in vertebrate biology, impacting behavior and physiology through actions mediated by specific G-protein-coupled receptors, one of which is the dopamine receptor D4 (Drd4). Here we present studies on the >100-fold daily rhythm in rat pineal Drd4 expression....... Our studies indicate that Drd4 is the dominant dopamine receptor gene expressed in the pineal gland. The gene is expressed in pinealocytes at levels which are approximately 100-fold greater than in other tissues, except the retina, in which transcript levels are similar. Pineal Drd4 expression is...... circadian in nature and under photoneural control. Whereas most rhythmically expressed genes in the pineal are controlled by adrenergic/cAMP signaling, Drd4 expression also requires thyroid hormone. This advance raises the questions of whether Drd4 expression is regulated by this mechanism in other systems...

  14. Excitatory neuromodulator reduces dopamine release, enhancing prolactin secretion

    OpenAIRE

    van den Pol, Anthony N.

    2010-01-01

    Hypothalamic dopamine neurons inhibit pituitary prolactin secretion. In this issue, Lyons et al provide evidence for a novel model, whereby the excitatory neuropeptide TRH depolarizes gap junction-coupled dopamine neurons, leading to a shift in the population pattern of action potentials from phasic burst firing to regular tonic firing, hypothetically reducing dopamine release while increasing total spike number.

  15. Progressive supranuclear palsy dopamine D2 receptor tomoscintigraphy to detect L-dopamine efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) may sometimes be misdiagnosed as Parkinson's disease in its early stages, hence an early positive diagnosis of PSP based on dopamine D2 receptor density could be extremely valuable. In the present case report, the absence of dopamine D2 receptors was clearly demonstrated in the striatum using 123I-iodobenzamide (IBZM) tomoscintigraphy. This illustrates the potential use of IBZM tomoscintigraphy to identify Parkinson-like's disease presenting with decreased dopamine D2 receptor density; and hence to predict L-Dopa effectiveness. Further studies are needed to evaluate the value of IBZM tomoscintigraphy in the different Parkinson's like diseases. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs

  16. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    OpenAIRE

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of ...

  17. NOVEL FLUORESCENT PROBES FOR THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, J; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Adkins, Erica;

    To enable visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) through fluorescence technologies we have synthesized a novel series of fluorescently tagged analogs of cocaine. Previous structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have demonstrated that the dopamine transporter (DAT) can tolerate...... untransfected control cells. The possibility of using these ligands for direct labeling of the DAT in living cells represents a new and important approach for understanding cellular targeting and trafficking of the DAT. Moreover, these fluorescent ligands might also provide the molecular tools for the...

  18. Dopamine transporter imaging in neurodegenerative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is responsible for the re-uptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft and is located on dopaminergic nerve terminals only. DAT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, therefore, offer the unique opportunity to study via striatal uptake the integrity of presynaptic dopaminergic nerve terminals in vivo. In recent years SPECT and PET using specific ligands binding to DAT have evolved as an useful tool for diagnosing and monitoring progression of neurodegenerative disorders affecting dopaminergic systems. This article briefly reviews the literature dealing with DTA SPECT and PET imaging in Parkinsonism and other neurodegenerative disorders

  19. Intersubunit communication in the dihydroorotase–aspartate transcarbamoylase complex of Aquifex aeolicus

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Hedeel Guy; Fernando, Roshini; Vaishnav, Asmita; Kotichukkala, Mahalakshmi; Heyl, Deborah; Hachem, Fatme; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Edwards, Brian FP; Evans, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Aspartate transcarbamoylase and dihydroorotase, enzymes that catalyze the second and third step in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, are associated in dodecameric complexes in Aquifex aeolicus and many other organisms. The architecture of the dodecamer is ideally suited to channel the intermediate, carbamoyl aspartate from its site of synthesis on the ATC subunit to the active site of DHO, which catalyzes the next step in the pathway, because both reactions occur within a large, internal solve...

  20. The Pathway of Product Release from the R State of Aspartate Transcarbamoylase

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, Kimberly R.; Kantrowitz, Evan R.

    2010-01-01

    The pathway of product release from the R state of aspartate transcarbamoylase has been determined here by solving the crystal structure of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) locked in the R-quaternary structure by specific introduction of disulfide bonds. ATCase displays ordered substrate binding and product release, remaining in the R state until substrates are exhausted. The structure reported here represents ATCase in the R state bound to the final product molecule, pho...

  1. Improved postprandial glycaemic control with insulin Aspart in type 2 diabetic patients treated with insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Thorsby, P; Kjems, L;

    2000-01-01

    The effect on postprandial blood glucose control of an immediately pre-meal injection of the rapid acting insulin analogue Aspart (IAsp) was compared with that of human insulin Actrapid injected immediately or 30 minutes before a test meal in insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients with residual...... that the improved glucose control previously demonstrated with insulin Aspart compared to human insulin in healthy subjects and type 1 diabetic patients also applies to insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients....

  2. Insulin Aspart in the Management of Diabetes Mellitus: 15 Years of Clinical Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Hermansen, Kjeld; Bohl, Mette; Schioldan, Anne Grethe

    2015-01-01

    Limiting excessive postprandial glucose excursions is an important component of good overall glycemic control in diabetes mellitus. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that insulin aspart, which is structurally identical to regular human insulin except for the replacement of a single proline amino acid with an aspartic acid residue, has a more physiologic time–action profile (i.e., reaches a higher peak and reaches that peak sooner) than regular human insulin. As expected with this improved ph...

  3. Motor axon synapses on renshaw cells contain higher levels of aspartate than glutamate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannette S Richards

    Full Text Available Motoneuron synapses on spinal cord interneurons known as Renshaw cells activate nicotinic, AMPA and NMDA receptors consistent with co-release of acetylcholine and excitatory amino acids (EAA. However, whether these synapses express vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs capable of accumulating glutamate into synaptic vesicles is controversial. An alternative possibility is that these synapses release other EAAs, like aspartate, not dependent on VGLUTs. To clarify the exact EAA concentrated at motor axon synapses we performed a quantitative postembedding colloidal gold immunoelectron analysis for aspartate and glutamate on motor axon synapses (identified by immunoreactivity to the vesicular acetylcholine transporter; VAChT contacting calbindin-immunoreactive (-IR Renshaw cell dendrites. The results show that 71% to 80% of motor axon synaptic boutons on Renshaw cells contained aspartate immunolabeling two standard deviations above average neuropil labeling. Moreover, VAChT-IR synapses on Renshaw cells contained, on average, aspartate immunolabeling at 2.5 to 2.8 times above the average neuropil level. In contrast, glutamate enrichment was lower; 21% to 44% of VAChT-IR synapses showed glutamate-IR two standard deviations above average neuropil labeling and average glutamate immunogold density was 1.7 to 2.0 times the neuropil level. The results were not influenced by antibody affinities because glutamate antibodies detected glutamate-enriched brain homogenates more efficiently than aspartate antibodies detecting aspartate-enriched brain homogenates. Furthermore, synaptic boutons with ultrastructural features of Type I excitatory synapses were always labeled by glutamate antibodies at higher density than motor axon synapses. We conclude that motor axon synapses co-express aspartate and glutamate, but aspartate is concentrated at higher levels than glutamate.

  4. Contribution of vesicular and cytosolic dopamine to the increased striatal dopamine efflux elicited by intrastriatal injection of dexamphetamine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watanabe, S.; Aono, Y.; Fusa, K.; Takada, K.; Saigusa, T.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Systemic administration of high doses of dexamphetamine induces a dopamine efflux that has its intracellular origin in both the vesicular, reserpine-sensitive dopamine pool and the cytosolic, alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive, newly synthesized dopamine pool. It remains unknown whether locally ad

  5. Fluctuation of the dopamine uptake inhibition potency of cocaine, but not amphetamine, at mammalian cells expressing the dopamine transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Ukairo, Okechukwu T.; Ramanujapuram, Suneetha; Surratt, Christopher K.

    2006-01-01

    Cocaine, amphetamines and other psychostimulants inhibit synaptic dopamine uptake by interfering with dopamine transporter (DAT) function. The resultant potentiation of dopaminergic neurotransmission is associated with psychostimulant addiction. Fluctuations in dopamine uptake inhibition potency (DUIP) were observed for classical DAT blockers including cocaine, mazindol, methylphenidate (Ritalin™) and benztropine in CHO cells expressing wildtype DAT; cocaine potency also decreased in DAT-expr...

  6. Role of DARPP-32 and ARPP-21 in the Emergence of Temporal Constraints on Striatal Calcium and Dopamine Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anu G; Bhalla, Upinder S; Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette

    2016-09-01

    In reward learning, the integration of NMDA-dependent calcium and dopamine by striatal projection neurons leads to potentiation of corticostriatal synapses through CaMKII/PP1 signaling. In order to elicit the CaMKII/PP1-dependent response, the calcium and dopamine inputs should arrive in temporal proximity and must follow a specific (dopamine after calcium) order. However, little is known about the cellular mechanism which enforces these temporal constraints on the signal integration. In this computational study, we propose that these temporal requirements emerge as a result of the coordinated signaling via two striatal phosphoproteins, DARPP-32 and ARPP-21. Specifically, DARPP-32-mediated signaling could implement an input-interval dependent gating function, via transient PP1 inhibition, thus enforcing the requirement for temporal proximity. Furthermore, ARPP-21 signaling could impose the additional input-order requirement of calcium and dopamine, due to its Ca2+/calmodulin sequestering property when dopamine arrives first. This highlights the possible role of phosphoproteins in the temporal aspects of striatal signal transduction. PMID:27584878

  7. Aspartate Aminotransferase in Alfalfa Root Nodules : III. Genotypic and Tissue Expression of Aspartate Aminotransferase in Alfalfa and Other Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnham, M W; Griffith, S M; Miller, S S; Vance, C P

    1990-12-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) plays an important role in nitrogen metabolism in all plants and is particularly important in the assimilation of fixed N derived from the legume-Rhizoblum symbiosis. Two isozymes of AAT (AAT-1 and AAT-2) occur in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Antibodies against alfalfa nodule AAT-2 do not recognize AAT-1, and these antibodies were used to study AAT-2 expression in different tissues and genotypes of alfalfa and also in other legume and nonlegume species. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis indicated that nodules of 38-day-old alfalfa plants contained about eight times more AAT-2 than did nodules of 7-day-old plants, confirming the nodule-enhanced nature of this isozyme. AAT-2 was estimated to make up 16, 15, 5, and 8 milligrams per gram of total soluble protein in mature nodules, roots, stems, and leaves, respectively, of effective N(2)-fixing alfalfa. The concentration of AAT-2 in nodules of ineffective non-N(2)-fixing alafalfa genotypes was about 70% less than that of effective nodules. Western blots of soluble protein from nodules of nine legume species indicated that a 40-kilodalton polypeptide that reacts strongly with AAT-2 antibodies is conserved in legumes. Nodule AAT-2 immunoprecipitation data suggested that amide- and ureide-type legumes may differ in expression and regulation of the enzyme. In addition, Western blotting and immunoprecipitations of AAT activity demonstrated that antibodies against alfalfa AAT-2 are highly cross-reactive with AAT enzyme protein in leaves of soybean (Glycine max L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and maize (Zea mays L.) and in roots of maize, but not with AAT in soybean and wheat roots. Results from this study indicate that AAT-2 is structurally conserved and localized in similar tissues among diverse species. PMID:16667896

  8. Characterization of the interaction between the dopamine D4 receptor, KLHL12 and β-arrestins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skieterska, Kamila; Shen, Ao; Clarisse, Dorien; Rondou, Pieter; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel Oscar; Lintermans, Béatrice; Fuxe, Kjell; Xiang, Yang Kevin; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors involved in regulation of cognition, learning, movement and endocrine signaling. The action of G protein-coupled receptors is highly regulated by multifunctional proteins, such as β-arrestins which can control receptor desensitization, ubiquitination and signaling. Previously, we have reported that β-arrestin 2 interacts with KLHL12, a BTB-Kelch protein which functions as an adaptor in a Cullin3-based E3 ligase complex and promotes ubiquitination of the dopamine D4 receptor. Here, we have investigated the molecular basis of the interaction between KLHL12 and β-arrestins and questioned its functional relevance. Our data demonstrate that β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2 bind constitutively to the most common dopamine D4 receptor polymorphic variants and to KLHL12 and that all three proteins can interact within a single macromolecular complex. Surprisingly, stimulation of the receptor has no influence on the association between these proteins or their cellular distribution. We found that Cullin3 also interacts with both β-arrestins but has no influence on their ubiquitination. Knockout of one of the two β-arrestins hampers neither interaction between the dopamine D4 receptor and KLHL12, nor ubiquitination of the receptor. Finally, our results indicate that p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation, the signaling pathway which is often regulated by β-arrestins is not influenced by KLHL12, but seems to be exclusively mediated by Gαi protein upon dopamine D4 receptor stimulation. PMID:27155323

  9. Inhibitory effects of ginseng total saponins on behavioral sensitization and dopamine release induced by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, BomBi; Yang, Chae Ha; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Hye-Jung; Han, Seung-Moo; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Shim, Insop

    2008-03-01

    Many studies have suggested that the behavioral and reinforcing effects of cocaine can be mediated by the central dopaminergic systems. It has been shown that repeated injections of cocaine produce an increase in locomotor activity, the expression of the immediate-early gene, c-fos, and the release of dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which is one of the main dopaminergic terminal areas. Several studies have shown that behavioral activation and changes in extracellular dopamine levels in the central nervous system induced by psychomotor stimulants are prevented by ginseng total saponins (GTS). In order to investigate the effects of GTS on the repeated cocaine-induced behavioral and neurochemical alterations, we examined the influence of GTS on the cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and on c-Fos expression in the brain using immunohistochemistry in rats repeatedly treated with cocaine. We also examined the effect of GTS on cocaine-induced dopamine release in the NAc of freely moving rats repeatedly treated with cocaine using an in vivo microdialysis technique. Pretreatment with GTS (100, 200, 400 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before the daily injections of cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited the repeated cocaine-induced increase in locomotor activity as well as the c-Fos expression in the core and shell in a dose-dependent manner. Also, pretreatment with GTS significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine release in the NAc. Our data demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of GTS on the repeated cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization were closely associated with the reduction of dopamine release and the postsynaptic neuronal activity. The results of the present study suggest that GTS may be effective for inhibiting the behavioral effects of cocaine by possibly modulating the central dopaminergic system. These results also suggest that GTS may prove to be a useful therapeutic agent for cocaine addiction. PMID:18310906

  10. Shifts in striatal responsivity evoked by chronic stimulation of dopamine and glutamate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, J J; Capper-Loup, C; Hu, D; Choe, E S; Upadhyay, U; Graybiel, A M

    2002-10-01

    Dopamine and glutamate are key neurotransmitters in cortico-basal ganglia loops affecting motor and cognitive function. To examine functional convergence of dopamine and glutamate neurotransmitter systems in the basal ganglia, we evaluated the long-term effects of chronic stimulation of each of these systems on striatal responses to stimulation of the other. First we exposed rats to chronic intermittent cocaine and used early-gene assays to test the responsivity of the striatum to subsequent acute motor cortex stimulation by application of the GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid alpha subunit) receptor antagonist, picrotoxin. Reciprocally, we studied the effects of chronic intermittent motor cortex stimulation on the capacity for subsequent acute dopaminergic treatments to induce early-gene activation in the striatum. Prior treatment with chronic intermittent cocaine induced motor sensitization and significantly potentiated the striatal expression of Fos-family early genes in response to stimulation of the motor cortex. Contrary to this, chronic intermittent stimulation of the motor cortex down-regulated cocaine-induced gene expression in the striatum, but enhanced striatal gene expression induced by a full D1 receptor agonist (SKF 81297) and did not change the early-gene response elicited by a D2 receptor antagonist (haloperidol). These findings suggests that repeated dopaminergic stimulation produces long-term enhancement of corticostriatal signalling from the motor cortex, amplifying cortically evoked modulation of the basal ganglia. By contrast, persistent stimulation of the motor cortex inhibits cocaine-stimulated signalling in the striatum, but not signalling mediated by individual dopamine receptor sites, suggesting that chronic cortical hyperexcitability produces long-term impairment of dopaminergic activity and compensation at the receptor level. These findings prompt a model of the basal ganglia function as being regulated by opposing homeostatic dopamine

  11. The roles of dopamine and serotonin in decision making: evidence from pharmacological experiments in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    Neurophysiological experiments in primates, alongside neuropsychological and functional magnetic resonance investigations in humans, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the neural architecture of decision making. In this review, I consider the more limited database of experiments that have investigated how dopamine and serotonin activity influences the choices of human adults. These include those experiments that have involved the administration of drugs to healthy controls, experiments that have tested genotypic influences upon dopamine and serotonin function, and, finally, some of those experiments that have examined the effects of drugs on the decision making of clinical samples. Pharmacological experiments in humans are few in number and face considerable methodological challenges in terms of drug specificity, uncertainties about pre- vs post-synaptic modes of action, and interactions with baseline cognitive performance. However, the available data are broadly consistent with current computational models of dopamine function in decision making and highlight the dissociable roles of dopamine receptor systems in the learning about outcomes that underpins value-based decision making. Moreover, genotypic influences on (interacting) prefrontal and striatal dopamine activity are associated with changes in choice behavior that might be relevant to understanding exploratory behaviors and vulnerability to addictive disorders. Manipulations of serotonin in laboratory tests of decision making in human participants have provided less consistent results, but the information gathered to date indicates a role for serotonin in learning about bad decision outcomes, non-normative aspects of risk-seeking behavior, and social choices involving affiliation and notions of fairness. Finally, I suggest that the role played by serotonin in the regulation of cognitive biases, and representation of context in learning, point toward a role in the cortically mediated cognitive

  12. Characterization of high affinity dopamine uptake into the dopamine neurons of the hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the authors have examined the uptake of tritiated dopamine into the nerve terminals of hypothalamic DA neurons, which were isolated pharmacologically from NE neurons using desmethylimipramine (DMI), an inhibitor of catecholamine uptake into NE neurons. (Auth.)

  13. The aspartic proteinase family of three Phytophthora species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ten Have Arjen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora species are oomycete plant pathogens with such major social and economic impact that genome sequences have been determined for Phytophthora infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum. Pepsin-like aspartic proteinases (APs are produced in a wide variety of species (from bacteria to humans and contain conserved motifs and landmark residues. APs fulfil critical roles in infectious organisms and their host cells. Annotation of Phytophthora APs would provide invaluable information for studies into their roles in the physiology of Phytophthora species and interactions with their hosts. Results Genomes of Phytophthora infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum contain 11-12 genes encoding APs. Nine of the original gene models in the P. infestans database and several in P. sojae and P. ramorum (three and four, respectively were erroneous. Gene models were corrected on the basis of EST data, consistent positioning of introns between orthologues and conservation of hallmark motifs. Phylogenetic analysis resolved the Phytophthora APs into 5 clades. Of the 12 sub-families, several contained an unconventional architecture, as they either lacked a signal peptide or a propart region. Remarkably, almost all APs are predicted to be membrane-bound. Conclusions One of the twelve Phytophthora APs is an unprecedented fusion protein with a putative G-protein coupled receptor as the C-terminal partner. The others appear to be related to well-documented enzymes from other species, including a vacuolar enzyme that is encoded in every fungal genome sequenced to date. Unexpectedly, however, the oomycetes were found to have both active and probably-inactive forms of an AP similar to vertebrate BACE, the enzyme responsible for initiating the processing cascade that generates the Aβ peptide central to Alzheimer's Disease. The oomycetes also encode enzymes similar to plasmepsin V, a membrane-bound AP that cleaves effector proteins of the malaria parasite

  14. Dopamine induces neutrophil apoptosis through a dopamine D-1 receptor-independent mechanism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sookhai, S

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: For the normal resolution of an acute inflammatory response, neutrophil (PMN) apoptosis is essential to maintain immune homeostasis and to limit inappropriate host tissue damage. A delay in PMN apoptosis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Dopamine, a biogenic amine with known cardiovascular and neurotransmitter properties, is used in patients with SIRS to maintain hemodynamic stability. We sought to determine whether dopamine may also have immunoregulatory properties capable of influencing PMN apoptosis, function, and activation state in patients with SIRS. METHODS: PMNs were isolated from healthy volunteers and patients with SIRS and treated with varying doses of dopamine and a dopamine D-1 receptor agonist, fenoldopam. PMN apoptosis was assessed every 6 hours with use of propidium iodide DNA staining and PMN function was assessed with use of respiratory burst activity, phagocytosis ability, and CD11a, CD11b, and CD18 receptor expression as functional markers. RESULTS: There was a significant delay in PMN apotosis in patients with SIRS compared with controls. Treatment of isolated PMNs from both healthy controls and patients with SIRS with 10 and 100 mumol\\/L dopamine induced apoptosis. PMN ingestive and cytocidal capacity were both decreased in patients with SIRS compared with controls. Treatment with dopamine significantly increased phagocytic function. Fenoldopam did not induce PMN apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate for the first time that dopamine induces PMN apoptosis and modulates PMN function both in healthy controls and in patients with SIRS. These results indicate that dopamine may be beneficial during SIRS through a nonhemodynamic PMN-dependent proapoptotic mechanism.

  15. The binding sites for benztropines and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Heidi Bisgaard; Larsen, M Andreas B; Mazier, Sonia;

    2011-01-01

    Analogs of benztropines (BZTs) are potent inhibitors of the dopamine transporter (DAT) but are less effective than cocaine as behavioral stimulants. As a result, there have been efforts to evaluate these compounds as leads for potential medication for cocaine addiction. Here we use computational...... with a larger decrease in the affinity for BZT than for JHW007. Summarized, our data suggest that BZTs display a classical competitive binding mode with binding sites overlapping those of cocaine and dopamine....

  16. A route to anionic hydrophilic films of copolymers of l-leucine, l-aspartic acid and l-aspartic acid esters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sederel, W.L.; Bantjes, A.; Feijen, J.

    1975-01-01

    A series of copolymers of l-leucine and β-benzyl-l-aspartate [Leu/Asp(OBz)] covering the range 30–70 mol % of l-leucine, was synthesized by the N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) method. The copolymers were characterized by elemental analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and viscometry. For all compositions high m

  17. Generation of an activating Zn(2+) switch in the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loland, Claus Juul; Norregaard, Lene; Litman, Thomas;

    2002-01-01

    Binding of Zn(2+) to the endogenous Zn(2+) binding site in the human dopamine transporter leads to potent inhibition of [(3)H]dopamine uptake. Here we show that mutation of an intracellular tyrosine to alanine (Y335A) converts this inhibitory Zn(2+) switch into an activating Zn(2+) switch, allowing...... Zn(2+)-dependent activation of the transporter. The tyrosine is part of a conserved YXX Phi trafficking motif (X is any residue and Phi is a residue with a bulky hydrophobic group), but Y335A did not show alterations in surface targeting or protein kinase C-mediated internalization. Despite wild...... of conformational states in the transport cycle upon mutation of Tyr-335. We propose that this shift is caused by disruption of intramolecular interactions important for stabilizing the transporter in a conformation in which extracellular substrate can bind and initiate transport, and accordingly that Tyr-335...

  18. The role of dopamine in a model of trigeminovascular nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, S; Goadsby, P J

    2005-07-01

    Migraine is a common, disabling problem with three phases: premonitory, main headache attack, and postdrome. The headache phase is thought to involve activation of trigeminal neurons, whereas the premonitory and postdrome phases may involve dopaminergic mechanisms. In animal studies, dopamine has been found to cause vasodilation of cranial arteries at very low doses. Using intravital microscopy, we examined the effect of dopamine receptor agonists on dural blood vessel caliber and the effect of dopamine and specific dopamine receptor antagonists on trigeminovascular neurogenic dural vasodilation. Dopamine hydrochloride caused a significant vasoconstriction (P blood pressure (P dopamine receptor antagonists. The D1 receptor agonist caused a vasoconstriction (P blood pressure increase (P dopamine receptor antagonists were able to attenuate neurogenic dural vasodilation. Dopamine hydrochloride infusion (P dopamine agonist infusion. This response may be due to the vasoconstrictor effects of the alpha2-adrenoceptor and an action at the D1 receptor. In the intravital model of trigeminal activation, it seems that dopamine receptors do not play a major role and may not present an acute treatment option. Our data do not exclude a role for dopamine receptor modulators in short- or long-term prevention. PMID:15778266

  19. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and L-DOPA reversible motor deficits

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud, ST; Vecchio, LM; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, MM; Nguyen, LT; Bermejo, MK; Kile, B; Sotnikova, TD; Siesser, WB; Gainetdinov, Rr; Wightman, RM; Caron, MG; Richardson, JR; Miller, GW; Ramsey, AJ

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown wheth...

  20. Imaging extrastriatal dopamine D(2) receptor occupancy by endogenous dopamine in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, M; Verhoeff, N P; Varrone, A; Zoghbi, S S; Baldwin, R M; Jatlow, P A; Anderson, G M; Seibyl, J P; Innis, R B

    2000-01-10

    The effect of endogenous dopamine on in vivo measurement of dopamine D(2) receptors in extrastriatal regions (thalamus and temporal cortex) was evaluated with single photon emission computed tomography and the high affinity ligand [123I]epidepride by comparing the binding potential before and after acute dopamine depletion. Dopamine depletion was achieved by per-oral administration of 5.5 g/70 kg body weight alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine given in 37 h. The alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine treatment increased the binding potential significantly in the temporal cortex (13+/-15%, P=0.036) but not in the thalamus (2+/-9%). The increase of the binding potential in the temporal cortex correlated strongly with the increase of dysphoric mood evaluated by the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS) (rho=0.88, P=0.004). These results imply that [123I]epidepride, coupled with acute dopamine depletion might provide estimates of synaptic dopamine concentration. PMID:10650158

  1. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Grattan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016 report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits.

  2. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, David R; Akopian, Armen N

    2016-04-26

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016) report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits. PMID:27119847

  3. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, David R.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016) report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits. PMID:27119847

  4. D1 dopamine receptor-induced cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation and potentiation of striatal glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, C J; Kim, P; Raymond, L A

    1999-12-01

    Dopamine receptor activation regulates cyclic AMP levels and is critically involved in modulating neurotransmission in the striatum. Others have shown that alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA)-type glutamate receptor-mediated current is potentiated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activation. We made whole-cell patch clamp recordings from cultured striatal neurons and tested whether D1-type dopamine receptor activation affected AMPA receptor-mediated currents. After a 5-min exposure to the D1 agonist SKF 81297 (1 microM), kainate-evoked current amplitude was enhanced in approximately 75% of cells to 121+/-2.5% of that recorded prior to addition of drug. This response was inhibited by the D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and mimicked by activators of PKA. Moreover, by western blot analysis using an antibody specific for the phosphorylated PKA site Ser845 of GluR1, we observed a marked increase in phosphorylated GluR1 following a 10-min exposure of striatal neurons to 1 microM SKF 81297. Our data demonstrate that activation of D1-type dopamine receptors on striatal neurons promotes phosphorylation of AMPA receptors by PKA as well as potentiation of current amplitude. These results elucidate one mechanism by which dopamine can modulate neurotransmission in the striatum. PMID:10582604

  5. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Rajasthan cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Rajasthan, India. Results: A total of 477 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 340, insulin detemir (n = 90, insulin aspart (n = 37, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 7 and other insulin combinations (n = 2. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 8.3% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 8.4% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −0.9%, insulin users: −1.2%. Major hypoglycaemic events decreased from 0.5 events/patient-year to 0.0 events/patient-year in insulin naïve group while no change from baseline (1.3 events/patients-year was observed for insulin users. SADRs were not reported in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  6. Differential striatal spine pathology in Parkinson's disease and cocaine addiction: a key role of dopamine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, R M; Smith, Y

    2013-10-22

    In the striatum, the dendritic tree of the two main populations of projection neurons, called "medium spiny neurons (MSNs)", are covered with spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the cerebral cortex and thalamus. In Parkinson's disease (PD), striatal MSNs undergo an important loss of dendritic spines, whereas aberrant overgrowth of striatal spines occurs following chronic cocaine exposure. This review examines the possibility that opposite dopamine dysregulation is one of the key factors that underlies these structural changes. In PD, nigrostriatal dopamine degeneration results in a significant loss of dendritic spines in the dorsal striatum, while rodents chronically exposed to cocaine and other psychostimulants, display an increase in the density of "thin and immature" spines in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). In rodent models of PD, there is evidence that D2 dopamine receptor-containing MSNs are preferentially affected, while D1-positive cells are the main targets of increased spine density in models of addiction. However, such specificity remains to be established in primates. Although the link between the extent of striatal spine changes and the behavioral deficits associated with these disorders remains controversial, there is unequivocal evidence that glutamatergic synaptic transmission is significantly altered in both diseased conditions. Recent studies have suggested that opposite calcium-mediated regulation of the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) function induces these structural defects. In conclusion, there is strong evidence that dopamine is a major, but not the sole, regulator of striatal spine pathology in PD and addiction to psychostimulants. Further studies of the role of glutamate and other genes associated with spine plasticity in mediating these effects are warranted. PMID:23867772

  7. N-methyl-D-aspartate preconditioning improves short-term motor deficits outcome after mild traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Tayana; Constantino, Leandra C; Mendonça, Bruna P; Pereira, Josimar G; Herculano, Bruno; Tasca, Carla I; Boeck, Carina R

    2010-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes impairment of fine motor functions in humans and nonhuman mammals that often persists for months after the injury occurs. Neuroprotective strategies for prevention of the sequelae of TBI and understanding the molecular mechanisms and cellular pathways are related to the glutamatergic system. It has been suggested that cellular damage subsequent to TBI is mediated by the excitatory neurotransmitters, glutamate and aspartate, through the excessive activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Thus, preconditioning with a low dose of NMDA was used as a strategy for protection against locomotor deficits observed after TBI in mice. Male adult mice CF-1 were preconditioned with NMDA (75 mg/kg) 24 hr before the TBI induction. Under anesthesia with O(2)/N(2)O (33%: 66%) inhalation, the animals were subjected to the experimental model of trauma that occurs by the impact of a 25 g weight on the skull. Sensorimotor gating was evaluated at 1.5, 6, or 24 hr after TBI induction by using footprint and rotarod tests. Cellular damage also was assessed 24 hr after occurrence of cortical trauma. Mice preconditioned with NMDA were protected against all motor deficits revealed by footprint tests, but not those observed in rotarod tasks. Although mice showed motor deficits after TBI, no cellular damage was observed. These data corroborate the hypothesis that glutamatergic excitotoxicity, especially via NMDA receptors, contributes to severity of trauma. They also point to a putative neuroprotective mechanism induced by a sublethal dose of NMDA to improve motor behavioral deficits after TBI. PMID:19998488

  8. Pregnenolone sulfate induces NMDA receptor dependent release of dopamine from synaptic terminals in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Matthew T; Gibbs, Terrell T; Farb, David H

    2008-10-01

    Neuromodulators that alter the balance between lower-frequency glutamate-mediated excitatory and higher-frequency GABA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission are likely to participate in core mechanisms for CNS function and may contribute to the pathophysiology of neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Pregnenolone sulfate (PS) modulates both ionotropic glutamate and GABA(A) receptor mediated synaptic transmission. The enzymes necessary for PS synthesis and degradation are found in brain tissue of several species including human and rat, and up to 5 nM PS has been detected in extracts of postmortem human brain. Here, we ask whether PS could modulate transmitter release from nerve terminals located in the striatum. Superfusion of a preparation of striatal nerve terminals comprised of mixed synaptosomes and synaptoneurosomes with brief-duration (2 min) pulses of 25 nM PS demonstrates that PS increases the release of newly accumulated [3H]dopamine ([3H]DA), but not [14C]glutamate or [3H]GABA, whereas pregnenolone is without effect. PS does not affect dopamine transporter (DAT) mediated uptake of [3H]DA, demonstrating that it specifically affects the transmitter release mechanism. The PS-induced [3H]DA release occurs via an NMDA receptor (NMDAR) dependent mechanism as it is blocked by D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid. PS modulates DA release with very high potency, significantly increasing [3H]DA release at PS concentrations as low as 25 pM. This first report of a selective direct enhancement of synaptosomal dopamine release by PS at picomolar concentrations via an NMDAR dependent mechanism raises the possibility that dopaminergic axon terminals may be a site of action for this neurosteroid. PMID:18710414

  9. Substrate specificity of the aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in reconstituted liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-08-19

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of L-aspartate(1-) with L-alanine(0). Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, L-aspartate(1-):L-alanine(0) antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His(6)-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (K(m) = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for L-aspartate, K(m) = 0.098 ± 0 mm for D-aspartate, K(m) = 26 ± 2 mm for L-alanine, K(m) = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for D-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of L-aspartate or L-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that L-cysteine selectively inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited L-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, L-serine selectively inhibited L-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs L-cysteine sulfinic acid, L-cysteic acid, and D-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange compared with L-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  10. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His6-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (Km = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for l-aspartate, Km = 0.098 ± 0 mm for d-aspartate, Km = 26 ± 2 mm for l-alanine, Km = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for d-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of l-aspartate or l-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that l-cysteine selectively inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited l-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, l-serine selectively inhibited l-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs l-cysteine sulfinic acid, l-cysteic acid, and d-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange compared with l-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  11. A neural network model with dopamine-like reinforcement signal that learns a spatial delayed response task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, R E; Schultz, W

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated how the simulated response of dopamine neurons to reward-related stimuli could be used as reinforcement signal for learning a spatial delayed response task. Spatial delayed response tasks assess the functions of frontal cortex and basal ganglia in short-term memory, movement preparation and expectation of environmental events. In these tasks, a stimulus appears for a short period at a particular location, and after a delay the subject moves to the location indicated. Dopamine neurons are activated by unpredicted rewards and reward-predicting stimuli, are not influenced by fully predicted rewards, and are depressed by omitted rewards. Thus, they appear to report an error in the prediction of reward, which is the crucial reinforcement term in formal learning theories. Theoretical studies on reinforcement learning have shown that signals similar to dopamine responses can be used as effective teaching signals for learning. A neural network model implementing the temporal difference algorithm was trained to perform a simulated spatial delayed response task. The reinforcement signal was modeled according to the basic characteristics of dopamine responses to novel stimuli, primary rewards and reward-predicting stimuli. A Critic component analogous to dopamine neurons computed a temporal error in the prediction of reinforcement and emitted this signal to an Actor component which mediated the behavioral output. The spatial delayed response task was learned via two subtasks introducing spatial choices and temporal delays, in the same manner as monkeys in the laboratory. In all three tasks, the reinforcement signal of the Critic developed in a similar manner to the responses of natural dopamine neurons in comparable learning situations, and the learning curves of the Actor replicated the progress of learning observed in the animals. Several manipulations demonstrated further the efficacy of the particular characteristics of the dopamine

  12. Sensitivity of binding of high-affinity dopamine receptor radioligands to increased synaptic dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatley, S J; Gifford, A N; Carroll, F I; Volkow, N D

    2000-12-15

    PET and SPECT studies have documented that D2 radioligands of moderate affinity, but not radioligands of high affinity, are sensitive to pharmacological challenges that alter synaptic dopamine levels. The objective of this work was to determine whether the brain kinetics of high-affinity radioligands for dopamine D1 ([(3)H]SCH 23390) and D2 ([(123)I]epidepride) receptors were altered by a prolonged elevation of synaptic dopamine induced by the potent cocaine analog RTI-55. Mice were injected intravenously with radioligands either 30 min after or 4 h before intraperitoneal administration of RTI-55 (2 mg/kg). In separate experiments, the pharmacological effects of RTI-55 were assessed biochemically by measuring uptake of dopamine in synaptosomes prepared from RTI-treated mice and behaviorally by monitoring locomotor activity. Consistent with the expected elevation of synaptic dopamine, RTI-55 induced a long-lasting decrement in dopamine uptake measured ex vivo, and a prolonged increase in locomotor activity. RTI-55 injected prior to the radioligands induced a significant (P epidepride at 15 min, relative to saline-treated controls, but there were no differences between the two groups at later time-points. For [(3)H]SCH 23390, both initial striatal uptake and subsequent clearance were slightly increased by preadministration of RTI-55. Administration of RTI-55 4 h after the radioligands (i.e., when it was presumed that a state of near equilibrium binding of the radioligands had been reached), was associated with a significant reduction of striatal radioactivity for both radiotracers. Our results are consistent with increased competition between dopamine and radioligand for binding to both D1 and D2 receptors after treatment with RTI-55. We suggest that the magnitude of the competition is reduced by failure of the receptor binding of high-affinity radioligands to rapidly attain equilibrium. PMID:11044896

  13. Optical suppression of drug-evoked phasic dopamine release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Edgar Mccutcheon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brief fluctuations in dopamine concentration (dopamine transients play a key role in behavior towards rewards, including drugs of abuse. Drug-evoked dopamine transients may result from actions at both dopamine cell bodies and dopamine terminals. Inhibitory opsins can be targeted to dopamine neurons permitting their firing activity to be suppressed. However, as dopamine transients can become uncoupled from firing, it is unknown whether optogenetic hyperpolarization at the level of the soma is able to suppress dopamine transients. Here, we used in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to record transients evoked by cocaine and raclopride in nucleus accumbens (NAc of urethane-anesthetized rats. We targeted halorhodopsin (NpHR specifically to dopamine cells by injecting Cre-inducible virus into ventral tegmental area (VTA of transgenic rats that expressed Cre recombinase under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-Cre+ rats. Consistent with previous work, co-administration of cocaine and raclopride led to the generation of dopamine transients in NAc shell. Illumination of VTA with laser strongly suppressed the frequency of transients in NpHR-expressing rats, but not in control rats. Laser did not have any effect on amplitude of transients. Thus, optogenetics can effectively reduce the occurrence of drug-evoked transients and is therefore a suitable approach for studying the functional role of such transients in drug-associated behavior.

  14. Interaction between L-aspartate and the brucite [Mg(OH)2]-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Charlene F.; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Pelletier, Manuel; Razafitianamaharavo, Angélina; Hazen, Robert M.

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of biomolecules at the mineral-water interface could have played a prominent role in the emergence of more complex organic species in life's origins. Serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal vents may have acted as a suitable environment for this process to occur, although little is known about biomolecule-mineral interactions in this system. We used batch adsorption experiments and surface complexation modeling to study the interaction of L-aspartate onto a thermodynamically stable product of serpentinization, brucite [Mg(OH)2], over a wide range of initial aspartate concentrations at four ionic strengths governed by [Mg2+] and [Ca2+]. We observed that up to 1.0 μmol of aspartate adsorbed per m2 of brucite at pH ∼ 10.2 and low Mg2+ concentrations (0.7 × 10-3 M), but surface adsorption decreased at high Mg2+ concentrations (5.8 × 10-3 M). At high Ca2+ concentrations (4.0 × 10-3 M), aspartate surface adsorption doubled (to 2.0 μmol m-2), with Ca2+ adsorption at 29.6 μmol m-2. We used the extended triple-layer model (ETLM) to construct a quantitative thermodynamic model of the adsorption data. We proposed three surface reactions involving the adsorption of aspartate (HAsp-) and/or Ca2+ onto brucite:

  15. Structural view of the regulatory subunit of aspartate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingzhu; Yu, Kun; Yan, Liming; Li, Yuanyuan; Chen, Cheng; Li, Xuemei

    2011-09-01

    The aspartate kinase (AK) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) catalyzes the biosynthesis of aspartate family amino acids, including lysine, threonine, isoleucine and methionine. We determined the crystal structures of the regulatory subunit of aspartate kinase from Mtb alone (referred to as MtbAKβ) and in complex with threonine (referred to as MtbAKβ-Thr) at resolutions of 2.6 Å and 2.0 Å, respectively. MtbAKβ is composed of two perpendicular non-equivalent ACT domains [aspartate kinase, chorismate mutase, and TyrA (prephenate dehydrogenase)] per monomer. Each ACT domain contains two α helices and four antiparallel β strands. The structure of MtbAKβ shares high similarity with the regulatory subunit of the aspartate kinase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (referred to as CgAKβ), suggesting similar regulatory mechanisms. Biochemical assays in our study showed that MtbAK is inhibited by threonine. Based on crystal structure analysis, we discuss the regulatory mechanism of MtbAK. PMID:21976064

  16. You are what you eat: influence of type and amount of food consumed on central dopamine systems and the behavioral effects of direct- and indirect-acting dopamine receptor agonists

    OpenAIRE

    Baladi, Michelle G; Daws, Lynette C.; France, Charles P.

    2012-01-01

    The important role of dopamine (DA) in mediating feeding behavior and the positive reinforcing effects of some drugs is well recognized. Less widely studied is how feeding conditions might impact the sensitivity of drugs acting on DA systems. Food restriction, for example, has often been the focus of aging and longevity studies; however, other studies have demonstrated that mild food restriction markedly increases sensitivity to direct- and indirect-acting DA receptor agonists. Moreover, it i...

  17. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis presenting with acute psychosis in a preteenage girl: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Maggina Paraskevi; Mavrikou Mersini; Karagianni Stavroula; Skevaki Chrysanthi L; Triantafyllidou Antigoni; Voudris Constantinos; Katsarou Eustathia; Stamogiannou Lela; Mastroyianni Sotiria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a rare, newly defined autoimmune clinical entity that presents with atypical clinical manifestations. Most patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis develop a progressive illness from psychosis into a state of unresponsiveness, with catatonic features often associated with abnormal movements and autonomic instability. This is the first report of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephal...

  18. Dopamine induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages in rat C6 glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Tian; Wang, Chenlong; Chen, Xuewei; Duan, Chenfan; Zhang, Xiaoyan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Jing [Animal Experimental Center of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chai, Hongyan [Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Tang, Tian [Department of Oncology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China); Chen, Honglei [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yue, Jiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Li, Ying, E-mail: lyying0@163.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu2013@163.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Dopamine (DA), a monoamine catecholamine neurotransmitter with antiangiogenic activity, stabilizes tumor vessels in colon, prostate and ovarian cancers, thus increases chemotherapeutic efficacy. Here, in the rat C6 glioma models, we investigated the vascular normalization effects of DA and its mechanisms of action. DA (25, 50 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth, while a precursor of DA (levodopa) prolonged the survival time of rats bearing orthotopic C6 glioma. DA improved tumor perfusion, with significant effects from day 3, and a higher level at days 5 to 7. In addition, DA decreased microvessel density and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression in tumor tissues, while increasing the coverage of pericyte. Conversely, an antagonist of dopamine receptor 2 (DR2) (eticlopride) but not DR1 (butaclamol) abrogated DA-induced tumor regression and vascular normalization. Furthermore, DA improved the delivery and efficacy of temozolomide therapy. Importantly, DA increased representative M1 markers (iNOS, CXCL9, etc.), while decreasing M2 markers (CD206, arginase-1, etc.). Depletion of macrophages by clodronate or zoledronic acid attenuated the effects of DA. Notably, DA treatment induced M2-to-M1 polarization in RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages, and enhanced the migration of pericyte-like cells (10T1/2), which was reversed by eticlopride or DR2-siRNA. Such changes were accompanied by the downregulation of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling. In summary, DA induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages. Thus, targeting the tumor microvasculature by DA represents a promising strategy for human glioma therapy. - Highlights: • Dopamine induces tumor growth inhibition and vascular normalization in rat C6 glioma. • Dopamine switches macrophage phenotype from M2 to M1. • Dopamine-induced vascular normalization is mediated by macrophage polarization. • Dopamine is a promising agent targeting the microvasculature in tumor

  19. Dopamine induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages in rat C6 glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopamine (DA), a monoamine catecholamine neurotransmitter with antiangiogenic activity, stabilizes tumor vessels in colon, prostate and ovarian cancers, thus increases chemotherapeutic efficacy. Here, in the rat C6 glioma models, we investigated the vascular normalization effects of DA and its mechanisms of action. DA (25, 50 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth, while a precursor of DA (levodopa) prolonged the survival time of rats bearing orthotopic C6 glioma. DA improved tumor perfusion, with significant effects from day 3, and a higher level at days 5 to 7. In addition, DA decreased microvessel density and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression in tumor tissues, while increasing the coverage of pericyte. Conversely, an antagonist of dopamine receptor 2 (DR2) (eticlopride) but not DR1 (butaclamol) abrogated DA-induced tumor regression and vascular normalization. Furthermore, DA improved the delivery and efficacy of temozolomide therapy. Importantly, DA increased representative M1 markers (iNOS, CXCL9, etc.), while decreasing M2 markers (CD206, arginase-1, etc.). Depletion of macrophages by clodronate or zoledronic acid attenuated the effects of DA. Notably, DA treatment induced M2-to-M1 polarization in RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages, and enhanced the migration of pericyte-like cells (10T1/2), which was reversed by eticlopride or DR2-siRNA. Such changes were accompanied by the downregulation of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling. In summary, DA induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages. Thus, targeting the tumor microvasculature by DA represents a promising strategy for human glioma therapy. - Highlights: • Dopamine induces tumor growth inhibition and vascular normalization in rat C6 glioma. • Dopamine switches macrophage phenotype from M2 to M1. • Dopamine-induced vascular normalization is mediated by macrophage polarization. • Dopamine is a promising agent targeting the microvasculature in tumor

  20. Interaction with Dopamine D2 Receptor Enhances Expression of Transient Receptor Potential Channel 1 at the Cell Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Hannan, Meredith A.; Kabbani, Nadine; Paspalas, Constantinos D.; Levenson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Receptor signaling is mediated by direct protein interaction with various types of cytoskeletal, adapter, effector, and additional receptor molecules. In brain tissue and in cultured neurons, activation of dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) has been found to impact cellular calcium signaling. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach, we have uncovered a direct physical interaction between the D2R and the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) subtypes 1, 4 and 5. The TRPC/D2R interaction was further ...

  1. Expression of dopamine receptors in the subthalamic nucleus of the rat: characterization using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, G.; Liang, J.J. [Instituto de Fisiologia, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apartado postal 406, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Sierra, A.; Martinez-Fong, D. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Biofisica y Neurociencias, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional de Mexico, Apartado postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico City (Mexico); Quirion, R. [McGill Center for Research in Schizophrenia, Douglas Hospital Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Aceves, J. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Biofisica y Neurociencias, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional de Mexico, Apartado postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico City (Mexico); Srivastava, L.K. [McGill Center for Research in Schizophrenia, Douglas Hospital Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    1999-06-01

    We analysed the expression of dopamine receptor subtypes in the subthalamic nucleus by means of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We also studied, using autoradiography, all pharmacologically characterized dopamine receptors in four subregions of the subthalamic nucleus. For comparison, dopamine receptor subtypes were also evaluated in brain regions where they are more abundant and well characterized. The radioligands used were: [{sup 3}H]SCH-23390, [{sup 3}H]emonapride and [{sup 3}H]2-dipropylamino-7-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene for dopamine D{sub 1}, D{sub 2} and D{sub 3} receptors, respectively; and [{sup 3}H]YM-09151-2 in the presence of raclopride for dopamine D{sub 4} receptors. Finally, we also evaluated the effect of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine injection into the medial forebrain bundle on dopamine receptor levels expressed in the ipsilateral subthalamic nucleus. The lesion was estimated by decrease in the binding of [{sup 3}H]WIN-35428, a specific dopamine transporter label. D{sub 1}, D{sub 2} and D{sub 3} receptor messenger RNAs and binding sites were present in the subthalamic nucleus, but no messenger RNA for D{sub 4} receptors was found, although specific binding sites for these receptors were observed. As compared to the intact side, the 6-hydroxydopamine lesion did not change D{sub 1} receptors, increased D{sub 2} receptors, and decreased D{sub 3} receptors and the dopamine transporter. The results suggest that postsynaptic D{sub 1}, D{sub 2} or D{sub 3} receptors can mediate the effect of dopamine on subthalamic nucleus neuronal activity. D{sub 4} receptors would mediate exclusively presynaptic effects.These results reinforce the idea that dopamine receptors in the subthalamic nucleus may play an important role in the physiology of the basal ganglia and in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. Aspartate buffer and divalent metal ions affect oxytocin in aqueous solution and protect it from degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avanti, Christina; Oktaviani, Nur Alia; Hinrichs, Wouther L.J.;

    2013-01-01

    favorable. These interactions may explain the protection of the disulfide bridge against intermolecular reactions that lead to dimerization.Mg or Zn, using 2D NOESY, TOCSY, H-C HSQC and H- N HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Almost all H, C and N resonances of oxytocin could be assigned using HSQC spectroscopy....... Furthermore, LC–MS (MS) measurements indicated that the combination of aspartate buffer and Zn2+ in particular suppressed intermolecular degradation reactions near the Cys1,6 disulfide bridge. These results lead to the hypothesis that in aspartate buffer, Zn2+ changes the conformation of oxytocin in such a...... way that the Cys1,6 disulfide bridge is shielded from its environment thereby suppressing intermolecular reactions involving this region of the molecule. To verify this hypothesis, we investigate here the conformation of oxytocin in aspartate buffer in the presence of Mg2+ or Zn2+, using 2D NOESY...

  3. [Effect of dopamine on the portal pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benko, H; Peschl, L; Schüller, J; Neumayr, A

    1975-01-01

    1. An infusion of 3 gamma/kg/min dopamine causes a significant increase in the renal plasma flow and the glomerulum filtration rate. This dosage does not cause a change of the mean systolic and arterial pressure. This effect may also be observed in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. 2. The wedged hepatic vein pressure, an indicator for the portal pressure, only shows a slight increase (9,46 +/- 9,41%) as compared to the initial pressure produced by the mentioned dose. Measurements of the spleen pulpa pressure, which likewise indicates the portal pressure, showed an increase of pressure up to 100% due to pressing or coughing. 3. If in the case of bleeding oesophageal varices acute renal failure might develop, the advantage of the effect of dopamine in stimulating the blood flow through the kidneys may be considered more important than the minute danger of a slight increase of the portal pressure, which might provoke haemorrhage. PMID:1220517

  4. Retroviral transfer of a human tyrosine hydroxylase cDNA in various cell lines: regulated release of dopamine in mouse anterior pituitary AtT-20 cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Horellou, P; Guibert, B; Leviel, V; Mallet, J

    1989-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular events mediating neurotransmitter release, a crucial step in synaptic transmission. In this paper, the biosynthesis and release of L-beta-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) and dopamine were analyzed in three heterologous cell lines after retroviral-mediated gene transfer of tyrosine hydroxylase (EC 1.14.16.2), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis. A recombinant retrovirus encoding human tyrosine hydroxylase type I as well as neomycin-resist...

  5. Trafficking of Dopamine Transporters in Psychostimulant Actions

    OpenAIRE

    Zahniser, Nancy R.; Sorkin, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Brain dopamine (DA) plays a pivotal role in drug addiction. Since the plasma membrane DA transporter (DAT) is critical for terminating DA neurotransmission, it is important to understand how DATs are regulated and this regulation impacts drug addiction. The number of cell surface DATs is controlled by constitutive and regulated endocytic trafficking. Psychostimulants impact this trafficking. Amphetamines, DAT substrates, cause rapid up-regulation and slower down-regulation of DAT whereas coca...

  6. Dopamine Signaling in reward-related behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Baik, Ja-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) regulates emotional and motivational behavior through the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway. Changes in DA mesolimbic neurotransmission have been found to modify behavioral responses to various environmental stimuli associated with reward behaviors. Psychostimulants, drugs of abuse, and natural reward such as food can cause substantial synaptic modifications to the mesolimbic DA system. Recent studies using optogenetics and DREADDs, together with neuron-specific or circuit-specifi...

  7. Dopamine Signaling in reward-related behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Ja-Hyun Baik

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) regulates emotional and motivational behavior through the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway. Changes in DAmesolimbic neurotransmission have been found to modify behavioral responses to various environmental stimuli associated with reward behaviors. Psychostimulants, drugs of abuse, and natural rewards such as food can cause substantial synaptic modifications to the mesolimbic DA system. Recent studies using optogenetics and DREADDs, together with neuron-specific or circuit-specifi...

  8. Dopamine Transporter Levels in Cocaine Dependent Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Newberg, Andrew; Wintering, Nancy; Ploessl, Karl; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; RING-KURTZ, SARAH; Gallop, Robert; Present, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine use is a significant problem in the US and it is well established that cocaine binds to the dopamine transporter (DAT) in the brain. This study was designed to determine if the DAT levels measured by 99mTc TRODAT SPECT brain scans are altered in cocaine dependent subjects and to explore clinical correlates of such alterations. SPECT brain scans were acquired on 21 cocaine dependent subjects and 21 healthy matched controls. There were significantly higher DAT levels in cocaine dependen...

  9. The Evolution of Dopamine Systems in Chordates

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe Vernier

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS) is found throughout chordates, and its emergence predates the divergence of chordates. Many of the molecular components of DA systems, such as biosynthetic enzymes, transporters, and receptors, are shared with those of other monoamine systems, suggesting the common origin of these systems. In the mammalian CNS, the DA neurotransmitter systems are diversified and serve for visual and olfactory perception, sensory–motor program...

  10. Response of Macroprolactinemia to Dopamine Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Tamer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Macroprolactinemia, defined as hyperprolactinemia with a predominance of the big big prolactin (macroprolactin isoform, is considered idiopathic and poorly symptomatic. Although macroprolactinemia has been considered to be a cause of apparent resistance to antiprolactinemic drugs, prolactin (PRL normalization with dopaminergic treatment cannot exclude macroprolactinemia.We report three cases with macroprolactinemia, whose PRL and macroprolactin levels were decreased and hyperprolactinemic symptoms were improved with dopamine agonists. Turk Jem 2008; 12: 83-5

  11. Dopamine Adsorption Configurations on Anatase (101) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stashans, Arvids; Marcillo, Freddy; Castillo, Darwin

    2015-05-01

    Present work is based on the density functional theory (DFT) and generalized gradient approximation studies. Different adsorption geometries of dopamine, C8H11O2N, on the anatase (101) surface have been considered and carefully investigated. Bidentate chelating configuration with two molecular oxygens binding to the same surface titanium has been found to be the equilibrium case. The Ti-O distances for this configuration are obtained to be equal to 2.23 and 2.37 Å, respectively.

  12. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Qatar cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hasan Daghash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Qatar. Results: A total of 91 patients were enrolled in the study. Two insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 88, insulin detemir (n = 2, and other insulin combinations (n = 1. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 10.9% and insulin users (mean HbA 1 c: 9.1% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, all the study groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −1.8%, insulin users: −1.3%. Major hypoglycaemia did not occur in the study patients. SADRs were reported in 1.4% of insulin users. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  13. Layered reward signalling through octopamine and dopamine in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Christopher J.; Huetteroth, Wolf; Owald, David; Perisse, Emmanuel; Krashes, Michael J.; Das, Gaurav; Gohl, Daryl; Silies, Marion; Certel, Sarah; Waddell, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine is synonymous with reward and motivation in mammals. However, only recently has dopamine been linked to motivated behaviour and rewarding reinforcement in fruitflies. Instead, octopamine has historically been considered to be the signal for reward in insects. Here we show, using temporal control of neural function in Drosophila, that only short-term appetitive memory is reinforced by octopamine. Moreover, octopamine-dependent memory formation requires signalling through dopamine neur...

  14. Dopamine Uptake Changes Associated with Cocaine Self-Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Oleson, Erik B.; Talluri, Sanjay; Childers, Steven R; Smith, James E.; Roberts, David C.S.; Bonin, Keith D.; Budygin, Evgeny A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was designed to reveal the relationship between cocaine-induced dopamine uptake changes and patterns of cocaine self-administration observed under a fixed ratio schedule. Cocaine was intravenously infused into anesthetized rats, according to inter-infusion intervals obtained from self-administering animals, and dopamine uptake changes (apparent Km ) were assessed in the nucleus accumbens using voltammetry. The data demonstrate that cocaine-induced dopamine transporter (DAT) ...

  15. Striatal dopamine and the interface between motivation and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Aarts, E.; Holstein, M.G.A. van; Cools, R.

    2011-01-01

    Brain dopamine has long been known to be implicated in the domains of appetitive motivation and cognition. Recent work indicates that dopamine also plays a role in the interaction between appetitive motivation and cognition. Here we review this work. Animal work has revealed an arrangement of spiraling connections between the midbrain and the striatum that subserves a mechanism by which dopamine can direct information flow from ventromedial to more dorsal regions in the striatum. In line with...

  16. Striatal Dopamine and the Interface between Motivation and Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    EstherAarts; Miekevan Holstein

    2011-01-01

    Brain dopamine has long been known to be implicated in the domains of appetitive motivation and cognition. Recent work indicates that dopamine also plays a role in the interaction between appetitive motivation and cognition. Here we review this work. Animal work has revealed an arrangement of spiraling connections between the midbrain and the striatum that subserves a mechanism by which dopamine can direct information flow from ventromedial to more dorsal regions in the striatum. In line with...

  17. Brain dopamine and kinematics of graphomotor functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Klaus W; Mecklinger, Lara; Walitza, Susanne; Becker, Georg; Gerlach, Manfred; Naumann, Markus; Tucha, Oliver

    2006-10-01

    Three experiments were performed in an attempt to achieve a better understanding of the effect of dopamine on handwriting. In the first experiment, kinematic aspects of handwriting movements were compared between healthy participants and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) on their usual dopaminergic treatment and following withdrawal of dopaminergic medication. In the second experiment, the writing performance of healthy participants with a hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra as detected by transcranial sonography (TCS) was compared with the performance of healthy participants with low echogenicity of the substantia nigra. The third experiment examined the effect of central dopamine reduction on kinematic aspects of handwriting movements in healthy adults using acute phenylalanine and tyrosine depletion (APTD). A digitising tablet was used for the assessment of handwriting movements. Participants were asked to perform a simple writing task. Movement time, distance, velocity, acceleration and measures of fluency of handwriting movements were measured. The kinematic analysis of handwriting movements revealed that alterations of central dopaminergic neurotransmission adversely affect movement execution during handwriting. In comparison to the automatic processing of handwriting movements displayed by control participants, participants with an altered dopaminergic neurotransmission shifted from an automatic to a controlled processing of movement execution. Central dopamine appears to be of particular importance with regard to the automatic execution of well-learned movements. PMID:16859791

  18. Changes in dopamine D2 and GluR-1 glutamate receptor mRNAs in the rat brain after treatment with phencyclidine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita,Hiroaki

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available In situ hybridization of slide-mounted brain sections from rats subjected to acute and chronic phencyclidine treatment was carried out using synthetic oligonucleotides complementary to dopamine D2-receptor and non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA glutamate-receptor-subunit (GluR-1 mRNAs. There was no significant difference in either the D2-receptor or the GluR-1 mRNA levels in any brain region of the acute phencyclidine (10 mg/kg-treated and control groups. However, chronic administration of phencyclidine (10 mg/kg/day, 14 days significantly decreased the dopamine D2-receptor mRNA level in the caudate-putamen (by 27%, P < 0.01 and significantly increased the GluR-1 mRNA level in the prefrontal cortex (by 29%, P < 0.001. These results suggest that the chronic pharmaco-behavioral effects of phencyclidine may involve expression of both dopamine- and non-NMDA glutamate-receptor mRNAs.

  19. N-Hydroxypyrazolyl glycine derivatives as selective N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius; Christensen, Caspar; Hansen, Kasper Bø;

    2008-01-01

    glycine (NHP5G) derivatives are selectively recognized by N-methyl- d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors and that the ( R)-enantiomers are preferred. Moreover, several of the compounds are able to discriminate between individual subtypes among the NMDA receptors, providing new pharmacological tools. For......A series of analogues based on N-hydroxypyrazole as a bioisostere for the distal carboxylate group of aspartate have been designed, synthesized, and pharmacologically characterized. Affinity studies on the major glutamate receptor subgroups show that these 4-substituted N-hydroxypyrazol-5-yl...

  20. Proton transfer pathways in an aspartate-water cluster sampled by a network of discrete states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidelbach, Marco; Betz, Fridtjof; Mäusle, Raquel Maya; Imhof, Petra

    2016-08-01

    Proton transfer reactions are complex transitions due to the size and flexibility of the hydrogen-bonded networks along which the protons may "hop". The combination of molecular dynamics based sampling of water positions and orientations with direct sampling of proton positions is an efficient way to capture the interplay of these degrees of freedom in a transition network. The energetically most favourable pathway in the proton transfer network computed for an aspartate-water cluster shows the pre-orientation of water molecules and aspartate side chains to be a pre-requisite for the subsequent concerted proton transfer to the product state.

  1. Atypical Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors that Provide Clues About Cocaine's Mechanism at the Dopamine Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck Newman, Amy; Katz, Jonathan L.

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) has been a primary target for cocaine abuse/addiction medication discovery. However predicted addiction liability and limited clinical evaluation has provided a formidable challenge for development of these agents for human use. The unique and atypical pharmacological profile of the benztropine (BZT) class of dopamine uptake inhibitors, in preclinical models of cocaine effects and abuse, has encouraged further development of these agents. Moreover, in vivo studies have challenged the original DAT hypothesis and demonstrated that DAT occupancy and subsequent increases in dopamine produced by BZT analogues are significantly delayed and long lasting, as compared to cocaine. These important and distinctive elements are critical to the lack of abuse liability among BZT analogues, and improve their potential for development as treatments for cocaine abuse and possibly other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  2. Possible role of dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptors in behavioural activation and evaluation of response efficacy in the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aquila, Paolo S; Galistu, Adriana

    2012-03-01

    Based on the different effects of the dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptor antagonists SCH 23390 and raclopride on the measures of licking microstructure in rats ingesting a sucrose solution, we suggested that the behavioural activation of reward-associated responses depends on dopamine D1-like receptor stimulation, and its level is updated, or "reboosted", on the basis of a dopamine D2-like receptor-mediated evaluation process. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis on the forced swimming test response. The effects of the dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptor antagonists SCH 23390 (0.01-0.04 mg/kg) and raclopride (0.025-0.25 mg/kg) administered before a 15-min exposure to forced swimming, and the response to a second session performed 24 h later, were examined. SCH 23390 dose-dependently reduced climbing scores in the first session and increased them in the second session, but the within-session decline of this measure was similar to that observed in the control group in both sessions. Raclopride-treated subjects showed a slightly reduced level of climbing scores at the beginning of the first session, but persisted in emitting this costly behavioural response up to the end of the session, while no effects were observed in the second session. These results, along with our results examining licking for sucrose, are consistent with the hypothesis that behavioural activation and response effort allocation are directly mediated by dopamine D1-like receptor stimulation, but the level of this activation is updated, or "reboosted", on the basis of a dopamine D2-like receptor-mediated mechanism of response efficacy evaluation. PMID:22155445

  3. Serotonin and dopamine play complementary roles in gambling to recover losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell-Meiklejohn, Daniel; Cooke, Jennifer; Wakeley, Judi;

    2011-01-01

    Continued gambling to recover losses - 'loss-chasing' - is a prominent feature of social and pathological gambling. However, little is known about which neuromodulators influence this behaviour. In 3 separate experiments, we investigated the role of serotonin activity, D2/D3 receptor activity, and...... losses surrendered. Propranolol markedly reduced heart rate but produced no significant changes in loss-chasing behaviour. Serotonin and dopamine play dissociable roles in the tendency of individuals to gamble to recover losses. Serotonergic activity mediates the persistence of loss-chasing behaviour...

  4. Influence of phasic and tonic dopamine release on receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Jakob Kristoffer Kisbye; Herrik, Kjartan F; Berg, Rune W; Hounsgaard, Jørn D

    2010-01-01

    Tonic and phasic dopamine release is implicated in learning, motivation, and motor functions. However, the relationship between spike patterns in dopaminergic neurons, the extracellular concentration of dopamine, and activation of dopamine receptors remains unresolved. In the present study, we...... develop a computational model of dopamine signaling that give insight into the relationship between the dynamics of release and occupancy of D(1) and D(2) receptors. The model is derived from first principles using experimental data. It has no free parameters and offers unbiased estimation of the...

  5. Several new imaging agents for central dopamine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    123I-β-CIT (2β-carbomethoxy-3β-[4-iodophenyl]-tropane), a promising agent for imaging central dopamine transporter, has been successfully used in clinical and differential diagnosis and assessment of the magnitude of degeneration of nigra-striatum in Parkinson's disease. However, due to its poor selectivity for dopamine transporter and prolonged imaging interval (usually 20h after injection), and therefore limits its clinical use. Several new imaging agents have been developed for dopamine transporter in recent years, and significantly improved the characterization for imaging dopamine transporter

  6. Carbon Dot Based Sensing of Dopamine and Ascorbic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Upama Baruah; Neelam Gogoi; Achyut Konwar; Manash Jyoti Deka; Devasish Chowdhury; Gitanjali Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate carbon dot based sensor of catecholamine, namely, dopamine and ascorbic acid. Carbon dots (CDs) were prepared from a green source: commercially available Assam tea. The carbon dots prepared from tea had particle sizes of ∼0.8 nm and are fluorescent. Fluorescence of the carbon dots was found to be quenched in the presence of dopamine and ascorbic acid with greater sensitivity for dopamine. The minimum detectable limits were determined to be 33 μM and 98 μM for dopamine and ascor...

  7. Dopamine receptor regulating factor, DRRF: a zinc finger transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, C K; D'Souza, U M; Eisch, A J; Yajima, S; Lammers, C H; Yang, Y; Lee, S H; Kim, Y M; Nestler, E J; Mouradian, M M

    2001-06-19

    Dopamine receptor genes are under complex transcription control, determining their unique regional distribution in the brain. We describe here a zinc finger type transcription factor, designated dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF), which binds to GC and GT boxes in the D1A and D2 dopamine receptor promoters and effectively displaces Sp1 and Sp3 from these sequences. Consequently, DRRF can modulate the activity of these dopamine receptor promoters. Highest DRRF mRNA levels are found in brain with a specific regional distribution including olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and frontal cortex. Many of these brain regions also express abundant levels of various dopamine receptors. In vivo, DRRF itself can be regulated by manipulations of dopaminergic transmission. Mice treated with drugs that increase extracellular striatal dopamine levels (cocaine), block dopamine receptors (haloperidol), or destroy dopamine terminals (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) show significant alterations in DRRF mRNA. The latter observations provide a basis for dopamine receptor regulation after these manipulations. We conclude that DRRF is important for modulating dopaminergic transmission in the brain. PMID:11390978

  8. Cross-hemispheric dopamine projections have functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Megan E; Mikhailova, Maria A; Bass, Caroline E; Takmakov, Pavel; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Budygin, Evgeny A; Wightman, R Mark

    2016-06-21

    Dopamine signaling occurs on a subsecond timescale, and its dysregulation is implicated in pathologies ranging from drug addiction to Parkinson's disease. Anatomic evidence suggests that some dopamine neurons have cross-hemispheric projections, but the significance of these projections is unknown. Here we report unprecedented interhemispheric communication in the midbrain dopamine system of awake and anesthetized rats. In the anesthetized rats, optogenetic and electrical stimulation of dopamine cells elicited physiologically relevant dopamine release in the contralateral striatum. Contralateral release differed between the dorsal and ventral striatum owing to differential regulation by D2-like receptors. In the freely moving animals, simultaneous bilateral measurements revealed that dopamine release synchronizes between hemispheres and intact, contralateral projections can release dopamine in the midbrain of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. These experiments are the first, to our knowledge, to show cross-hemispheric synchronicity in dopamine signaling and support a functional role for contralateral projections. In addition, our data reveal that psychostimulants, such as amphetamine, promote the coupling of dopamine transients between hemispheres. PMID:27298371

  9. [3H]dopamine release and dopamine receptor autoradiography in alcohol-preferring rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Given the reported importance of the A10 dopaminergic pathway in the reinforcement of many abused drugs, the objective of the present study was to examine the interaction of ethanol with dopamine neurotransmission, using an ethanol-preferring Fawn-Hooded (FH) strain of rats. [3H]Dopamine release was evoked from in vitro prisms of both FH and control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat nucleus accumbens. KC1-stimulated [3H]dopamine release was reproducible, although S2/S1 ratios significantly differed between FH and WKY rats (FH 1.13±0.05, WKY 0.89±0.04, p3H]dopamine release was dependent on the presence of calcium ions, as demonstrated by the significant reduction in S2/S1 ratios upon calcium exclusion (FH 0.53±0.03, WKY 0.53±0.05> p2/D3-agonist quinpirole (1, 3 and 10μM). Ethanol (0.3, 1 and 3% υ/υ) potentiated the KC1-evoked release of [3H] dopamine in a concentration-related manner. Autoradiography was employed to quantify dopamine D1- and D2- binding site densities in the limbic system of FH and WKY rats. FH rats possessed a significantly higher density of D1- binding sites in the nucleus accumbens (FH 688±21, WKY 582±49 dpm/mm2; p<0.05, n=4). These findings suggest differences in central dopaminergic mechanisms may underlie alcohol seeking behaviour in FH rats. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

  10. Dopamine Transporters in Striatum Correlate with Deactivation in the Default Mode Network during Visuospatial Attention

    OpenAIRE

    Dardo Tomasi; Volkow, Nora D.; Ruiliang Wang; Frank Telang; Gene-Jack Wang; Linda Chang; Thomas Ernst; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dopamine and dopamine transporters (DAT, which regulate extracellular dopamine in the brain) are implicated in the modulation of attention but their specific roles are not well understood. Here we hypothesized that dopamine modulates attention by facilitation of brain deactivation in the default mode network (DMN). Thus, higher striatal DAT levels, which would result in an enhanced clearance of dopamine and hence weaker dopamine signals, would be associated to lower deactivation i...

  11. The selective detection of dopamine at a polypyrrole film doped with sulfonated β-cyclodextrins

    OpenAIRE

    Harley, Claire C.; Rooney, A. Denise; Breslin, Carmel B.

    2010-01-01

    A highly selective dopamine sensor was fabricated by doping polypyrrole with a sulfonated β-cyclodextrin. This composite material enabled the selective sensing of dopamine in the presence of a large excess of ascorbic acid and prevented the regeneration of dopamine through the homogeneous catalytic reaction of the ascorbate anion with the dopamine-o-quinone. A single redox wave, corresponding to the oxidation of dopamine, was observed in dopamine/ascorbate mixtures, giving a truly se...

  12. Presence and function of dopamine transporter (DAT in stallion sperm: dopamine modulates sperm motility and acrosomal integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier A Urra

    Full Text Available Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT, serotonin (SERT and norepinephrine (NET transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylaminostyryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+, as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909 and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility.

  13. WO3 nanoparticles based direct electrochemical dopamine sensor in the presence of ascorbic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •This paper presents very simple and mediator-free dopamine detection using ovoid shaped WO3 NPs for the first time. •The fabricated sensor exhibits wide linear range (0.1–600 μmol L−1) with the lowest detection limit of 24 nmol L−1. •This novel sensor is highly selective towards the determination of DA even in the presence of 100 fold excess of AA. -- Abstract: Tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanoparticles with monoclinic (γ) and orthorhombic (β) structures were synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), UV–vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy studies. The γ-WO3 nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) showed an excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of dopamine (DA) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA) at pH 7.0. Electrochemical kinetic parameters of γ-WO3/GCE such as electroactive area A (0.045 cm2), electron transfer coefficient α (0.71) and electron transfer rate constant ks (1.121 s−1) were calculated and compared with that of β-WO3/GCE. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) studies of the γ-WO3 modified GCE exhibited a linear response over a wide concentration range of 0.1 μmol L−1–600 μmol L−1 of DA with the lowest detection limit of 24 nmol L−1. The fabricated dopamine sensor showed an excellent anti-interference ability against electroactive species and metal ions with good stability and reproducibility. Finally, the developed sensor was applied to determine DA concentration in dopamine hydrochloride injection which indicates that this electrode can be effectively used for real sample analysis

  14. Dopamine D3 receptor ligands for drug addiction treatment: update on recent findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Foll, Bernard; Collo, Ginetta; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Boileau, Isabelle; Merlo Pich, Emilio; Sokoloff, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor is located in the limbic area and apparently mediates selective effects on motivation to take drugs and drug-seeking behaviors, so that there has been considerable interest on the possible use of D3 receptor ligands to treat drug addiction. However, only recently selective tools allowing studying this receptor have been developed. This chapter presents an overview of findings that were presented at a symposium on the conference Dopamine 2013 in Sardinia in May 2013. Novel neurobiological findings indicate that drugs of abuse can lead to significant structural plasticity in rodent brain and that this is dependent on the availability of functional dopamine D3 autoreceptor, whose activation increased phosphorylation in the ERK pathway and in the Akt/mTORC1 pathway indicating the parallel engagement of a series of intracellular signaling pathways all involved in cell growth and survival. Preclinical findings using animal models of drug-seeking behaviors confirm that D3 antagonists have a promising profile to treat drug addiction across drugs of abuse type. Imaging the D3 is now feasible in human subjects. Notably, the development of (+)-4-propyl-9-hydroxynaphthoxazine ligand used in positron emission tomography (PET) studies in humans allows to measure D3 and D2 receptors based on the area of the brain under study. This PET ligand has been used to confirm up-regulation of D3 sites in psychostimulant users and to reveal that tobacco smoking produces elevation of dopamine at the level of D3 sites. There are now novel antagonists being developed, but also old drugs such as buspirone, that are available to test the D3 hypothesis in humans. The first results of clinical investigations are now being provided. Overall, those recent findings support further exploration of D3 ligands to treat drug addiction. PMID:24968784

  15. Engineering of the aspartate family biosynthetic pathway in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) by transformation with heterologous genes encoding feed-back-insensitive aspartate kinase and dihydrodipicolinate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Galili, G; Knudsen, S;

    1996-01-01

    In prokaryotes and plants the synthesis of the essential amino acids lysine and threonine is predominantly regulated by feed-back inhibition of aspartate kinase (AK) and dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHPS). In order to modify the flux through the aspartate family pathway in barley and enhance the...

  16. Pre- and Postsynaptic Role of Dopamine D2 Receptor DD2R in Drosophila Olfactory Associative Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cheng; Lee, Daewoo

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila play critical roles in diverse brain functions such as motor control, arousal, learning, and memory. Using genetic and behavioral approaches, it has been firmly established that proper dopamine signaling is required for olfactory classical conditioning (e.g., aversive and appetitive learning). Dopamine mediates its functions through interaction with its receptors. There are two different types of dopamine receptors in Drosophila: D1-like (dDA1, DAMB) and D2-like receptors (DD2R). Currently, no study has attempted to characterize the role of DD2R in Drosophila learning and memory. Using a DD2R-RNAi transgenic line, we have examined the role of DD2R, expressed in dopamine neurons (i.e., the presynaptic DD2R autoreceptor), in larval olfactory learning. The function of postsynaptic DD2R expressed in mushroom body (MB) was also studied as MB is the center for Drosophila learning, with a function analogous to that of the mammalian hippocampus. Our results showed that suppression of presynaptic DD2R autoreceptors impairs both appetitive and aversive learning. Similarly, postsynaptic DD2R in MB neurons appears to be involved in both appetitive and aversive learning. The data confirm, for the first time, that DD2R plays an important role in Drosophila olfactory learning. PMID:25422852

  17. Dopamine and serotonin genetic risk scores predicting substance and nicotine use in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenman, Annabeth P; Greven, Corina U; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Schellekens, Arnt; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Rommelse, Nanda; Hartman, Catharina A; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Luman, Marjolein; Franke, Barbara; Faraone, Stephen V; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Buitelaar, Jan K

    2016-07-01

    Individuals with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk of developing substance use disorders (SUDs) and nicotine dependence. The co-occurrence of ADHD and SUDs/nicotine dependence may in part be mediated by shared genetic liability. Several neurobiological pathways have been implicated in both ADHD and SUDs, including dopamine and serotonin pathways. We hypothesized that variations in dopamine and serotonin neurotransmission genes were involved in the genetic liability to develop SUDs/nicotine dependence in ADHD. The current study included participants with ADHD (n = 280) who were originally part of the Dutch International Multicenter ADHD Genetics study. Participants were aged 5-15 years and attending outpatient clinics at enrollment in the study. Diagnoses of ADHD, SUDs, nicotine dependence, age of first nicotine and substance use, and alcohol use severity were based on semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. Genetic risk scores were created for both serotonergic and dopaminergic risk genes previously shown to be associated with ADHD and SUDs and/or nicotine dependence. The serotonin genetic risk score significantly predicted alcohol use severity. No significant serotonin × dopamine risk score or effect of stimulant medication was found. The current study adds to the literature by providing insight into genetic underpinnings of the co-morbidity of ADHD and SUDs. While the focus of the literature so far has been mostly on dopamine, our study suggests that serotonin may also play a role in the relationship between these disorders. PMID:25752199

  18. Roles of octopamine and dopamine in appetitive and aversive memory acquisition studied in olfactory conditioning of maxillary palpi extension response in crickets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihiro-Sato Matsumoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Elucidation of reinforcing mechanisms for associative learning is an important subject in neuroscience. Based on results of our previous pharmacological studies in crickets, we suggested that octopamine and dopamine mediate reward and punishment signals, respectively, in associative learning. In fruit-flies, however, it was concluded that dopamine mediates both appetitive and aversive reinforcement, which differs from our suggestion in crickets. In our previous studies, the effect of conditioning was tested at 30 min after training or later, due to limitations of our experimental procedures, and thus the possibility that octopamine and dopamine were not needed for initial acquisition of learning was not ruled out. In this study we first established a conditioning procedure to enable us to evaluate acquisition performance in crickets. Crickets extended their maxillary palpi and vigorously swung them when they perceived some odors, and we found that crickets that received pairing of an odor with water reward or sodium chloride punishment exhibited an increase or decrease in percentages of maxillary palpi extension responses to the odor. Using this procedure, we found that octopamine and dopamine receptor antagonists impair acquisition of appetitive and aversive learning, respectively. This finding suggests that neurotransmitters mediating appetitive reinforcement differ in crickets and fruit-flies.

  19. N-methyl-D-aspartate promotes the survival of cerebellar granule cells: pharmacological characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen;

    1989-01-01

    The survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture is promoted by chronic exposure to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The effect is due to the stimulation of 'conventional' NMDA receptor-ionophore complex: it is concentration dependent, voltage dependent and blocked by the selective antagonists D-2...

  20. N-methyl-D-aspartate improved social recognition potency in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hliňák, Zdeněk; Krejčí, I.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 330, č. 3 (2002), s. 227-230. ISSN 0304-3940 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/00/1644 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : N-Metyl-D-aspartate * olfactory stimuly * short-term memory Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.100, year: 2002

  1. Strains of Lactococcus lactis with a partial pyrimidine requirement show sensitivity toward aspartic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadskov-Hansen, Steen Lyders Lerche; Martinussen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    that the partial pyrimidine requirement can be explained by a low specific activity of the pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes. In conclusion, L. lactis LM0230 during the process of plasmid- and prophage-curing has acquired a partial pyrimidine requirement resulting in sensitivity toward aspartic acid....

  2. An aspartic proteinase gene family in the filamentous fungus Botrytis cinerea contains members with novel features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten A.; Dekkers, E.; Kay, J.; Phylip, L.H.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2004-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea, an important fungal plant pathogen, secretes aspartic proteinase (AP) activity in axenic cultures. No cysteine, serine or metalloproteinase activity could be detected. Proteinase activity was higher in culture medium containing BSA or wheat germ extract, as compared to minimal medi

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of aspartate transcarbamoylase from the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspartate transcarbamoylase, the second enzyme of the de novo pyrimidine-biosynthetic pathway, from T. cruzi has been purified and crystallized for X-ray structure analysis. Aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase), the second enzyme of the de novo pyrimidine-biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes the production of carbamoyl aspartate from carbamoyl phosphate and l-aspartate. In contrast to Escherichia coli ATCase and eukaryotic CAD multifunctional fusion enzymes, Trypanosoma cruzi ATCase lacks regulatory subunits and is not part of the multifunctional fusion enzyme. Recombinant T. cruzi ATCase expressed in E. coli was purified and crystallized in a ligand-free form and in a complex with carbamoyl phosphate at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. Ligand-free crystals (space group P1, unit-cell parameters a = 78.42, b = 79.28, c = 92.02 Å, α = 69.56, β = 82.90, γ = 63.25°) diffracted X-rays to 2.8 Å resolution, while those cocrystallized with carbamoyl phosphate (space group P21, unit-cell parameters a = 88.41, b = 158.38, c = 89.00 Å, β = 119.66°) diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution. The presence of two homotrimers in the asymmetric unit (38 kDa × 6) gives VM values of 2.3 and 2.5 Å3 Da−1 for the P1 and P21 crystal forms, respectively

  4. Expression and characterization of plant aspartic protease nepenthesin-1 from Nepenthes gracilis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kádek, Alan; Tretyachenko, V.; Mrázek, Hynek; Ivanova, Ljubina; Halada, Petr; Rey, M.; Schriemer, D. C.; Man, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 95, MAR 2014 (2014), s. 121-128. ISSN 1046-5928 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/12/0503; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Plant aspartic protease * Nepenthesin * Protease characterization Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.695, year: 2014

  5. Pneumocystis Jirovecii Pneumonia in a Patient with Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Postherpetic Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Moreno, Jorge; Igartua Laraudogoitia, Jon; Montes Ros, Milagrosa

    2016-07-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is a neuroimmunologic disorder that has been increasingly diagnosed during the past 5 years. It provokes a predictable syndrome treated with several immunomodulatory agents, such as corticosteroids and/or biologics. We managed a child with this disease who developed Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia as a direct infectious complication of the use of rituximab. PMID:27093160

  6. The aspartic proteinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae folds its own inhibitor into a helix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, M; Phylip, L H; Lees, W E; Winther, Jakob R.; Dunn, B M; Wlodawer, A; Kay, J; Gustchina, A

    2000-01-01

    Aspartic proteinase A from yeast is specifically and potently inhibited by a small protein called IA3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although this inhibitor consists of 68 residues, we show that the inhibitory activity resides within the N-terminal half of the molecule. Structures solved at 2.2 a...

  7. N-methyl-D-aspartate prevented memory deficits induced by MK-801 in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hliňák, Zdeněk; Krejčí, I.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 6 (2003), s. 809-812. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/00/1644 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : N-methyl-D-aspartate * MK-801 * spatial memory Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2003

  8. Cloning and expression of the human N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR3A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Maria; Nilsson, Anna; Froelich-Fabre, Susanne;

    2002-01-01

    Native N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are heteromeric assemblies of four or five subunits. The NMDA receptor subunits, NR1, NR2A, NR2B, NR2C, and NR2D have been cloned in several species, including man. The NR3A subunit, which in rodents is predominantly expressed during early development,...

  9. A Green Polymerization of Aspartic Acid for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George D.

    2005-01-01

    The green polymerization of aspartic acid carried out during an organic-inorganic synthesis laboratory course for undergraduate students is described. The procedure is based on work by Donlar Corporation, a Peru, Illinois-based company that won a Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1996 in the Small Business category for preparing thermal…

  10. Secreted aspartate proteinases, a virulence factor of Candida spp.: Occurrence among clinical isolates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hamal, P.; Dostál, Jiří; Raclavský, V.; Krylová, M.; Pichová, Iva; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2004), s. 491-496. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA MZd NI6485 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : Candida spp. * aspartate proteinases * RAPD typing Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.034, year: 2004

  11. Aspartic acid in the hippocampus:a biomarker for postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Hu; Dong Huang; Jianbin Tong; Qin Liao; Zhonghua Hu; Wen Ouyang

    2014-01-01

    This study established an aged rat model of cognitive dysfunction using anesthesia with 2%iso-lfurane and 80%oxygen for 2 hours. Twenty-four hours later, Y-maze test results showed that isoflurane significantly impaired cognitive function in aged rats. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry results showed that isolfurane also signiifcantly increased the levels of N,N-diethy-lacetamide, n-ethylacetamide, aspartic acid, malic acid and arabinonic acid in the hippocampus of isolfurane-treated rats. Moreover, aspartic acid, N,N-diethylacetamide, n-ethylacetamide and malic acid concentration was positively correlated with the degree of cognitive dysfunction in the isolfurane-treated rats. It is evident that hippocampal metabolite changes are involved in the formation of cognitive dysfunction after isoflurane anesthesia. To further verify these results, this study cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, which were then treated with aspartic acid (100 µmol/L). Results suggested that aspartic acid concentration in the hippocampus may be a biomarker for predicting the occurrence and disease progress of cognitive dysfunction.

  12. Opioid analgesics as noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebert, B; Thorkildsen, C; Andersen, S; Christrup, Lona Louring; Hjeds, H

    1998-01-01

    Much evidence points to the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the development and maintainance of neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, there is generally involved a presumed opioid-insensitive component, which apparently can be blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists. However...

  13. Hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetic pregnancy: role of preconception insulin aspart treatment in a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Simon; Damm, Peter; Mersebach, Henriette;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A recent randomized trial compared prandial insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin in type 1 diabetic pregnancy. The aim of this exploratory analysis was to investigate the incidence of severe hypoglycemia during pregnancy and compare women enrolled preconception with women enrolled...

  14. Cloning and expression of genes of aspartate-family amino acid aiosynthesis from medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four of the amino acids that must be acquired in the human diet, lysine, threonine, methionine and isoleucine, are derived from a common precursor, aspartate, and are produced in a branched, highly-regulated, biosynthetic pathway. Moreover, the common dietary sources of plant proteins, cereals grain...

  15. Enzyme activity and allosteric characteristics of gamma-irradiated solid aspartate transcarbamylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspartate transcarbamylase purified from E. coli was lyophilized, irradiated in vacuo with γ radiation from a cesium-137 source, redissolved in buffer under a nitrogen atmosphere, and assayed for enzyme activity. Lyophilized and redissolved enzyme had normal catalytic and allosteric kinetic characteristics. The average D37 observed with saturating substrate, 25 mM aspartate, was 4.1 Mrad. With less than saturating substrate, 5 mM aspartate, the activity increases from zero to 1.6 Mrad and then decreases with a D37 of 7.2 Mrad. Inclusion of 1 mM CTP, an allosteric inhibitor, in the 5 mM aspartate assays results in a more pronounced maximum in the activity curve occurring at slightly higher dose, 2.2 Mrad. Inhibitability by CTP has a D37 of 2.3 Mrad with doses below the activity maximum. Enzyme lyophilized in the presence of 1 mM CTP has a D37 of 2.9 Mrad. ATCase activity changes caused by irradiation of lyophylized bacteria were qualitatively like the changes observed in the detailed studies with the purified enzyme. Apparent radiation sensitivities of ATCase in lyophilized bacteria were observed to vary with the technique used to disrupt the resuspended bacteria

  16. Genome-wide identification, evolutuionary and expression analysis of aspartic proteases gene superfamily in grape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspartic proteases (APs) are a large family of proteolytic enzymes in vertebrates, plants, yeast, nematodes, parasites, fungi, and viruses. In plants, they are involved in many biological processes, such as plant senescence, stress response, programmed cell death, and reproduction. Prior to the pr...

  17. Aspartate buffer and divalent metal ions affect oxytocin in aqueous solution and protect it from degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avanti, Christina; Oktaviani, Nur Alia; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Mulder, Frans A A

    2013-01-01

    Oxytocin is a peptide drug used to induce labor and prevent bleeding after childbirth. Due to its instability, transport and storage of oxytocin formulations under tropical conditions is problematic. In a previous study, we have found that the stability of oxytocin in aspartate buffered formulation

  18. Fabrication of GNPs/CDSH-Fc/nafion modified electrode for the detection of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel dopamine sensor was fabricated by forming the inclusion complex between mono-6-thio-β-cyclodextrin (CD-SH) and ferrocene (Fc) functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) films on a platinum electrode. The properties of the GNPs/CDSH-Fc nanocomposite were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemistry of dopamine (DA) was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammograms (DPV). The electrooxidation of dopamine could be catalyzed by Fc/Fc+ couple as a mediator and had a higher electrochemical response due to the unique performance of GNPs/CDSH-Fc. The anodic peaks of DA and ascorbic acid (AA) in their mixture can be well separated by the prepared electrode. Under optimum conditions linear calibration graphs were obtained over the DA concentration range 2.0 x 10-6 to 5.0 x 10-5 M with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 and a detection limit of 9.0 x 10-8 M (S/N = 3). The modified electrode had been effectively applied for the assay of DA in dopamine hydrochloride injections. This work provides a simple and easy approach to selectively detect DA in the presence of AA. - Research highlights: → The sensor of DA was constructed by using GNPs/CDSH-Fc as the building block. → Inclusion complex on the surface of GNPs decreased the leakage of mediator. → The electro-oxidation of DA could be catalyzed by Fc/Fc+ couple as a mediator. → This work provides a simple approach to selectively detect DA in the presence of AA.

  19. Fabrication of GNPs/CDSH-Fc/nafion modified electrode for the detection of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ming; Wei Xiujuan; Qian Hui; Diao Guowang, E-mail: gwdiao@yzu.edu.cn

    2011-10-10

    A novel dopamine sensor was fabricated by forming the inclusion complex between mono-6-thio-{beta}-cyclodextrin (CD-SH) and ferrocene (Fc) functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) films on a platinum electrode. The properties of the GNPs/CDSH-Fc nanocomposite were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemistry of dopamine (DA) was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammograms (DPV). The electrooxidation of dopamine could be catalyzed by Fc/Fc{sup +} couple as a mediator and had a higher electrochemical response due to the unique performance of GNPs/CDSH-Fc. The anodic peaks of DA and ascorbic acid (AA) in their mixture can be well separated by the prepared electrode. Under optimum conditions linear calibration graphs were obtained over the DA concentration range 2.0 x 10{sup -6} to 5.0 x 10{sup -5} M with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 and a detection limit of 9.0 x 10{sup -8} M (S/N = 3). The modified electrode had been effectively applied for the assay of DA in dopamine hydrochloride injections. This work provides a simple and easy approach to selectively detect DA in the presence of AA. - Research highlights: {yields} The sensor of DA was constructed by using GNPs/CDSH-Fc as the building block. {yields} Inclusion complex on the surface of GNPs decreased the leakage of mediator. {yields} The electro-oxidation of DA could be catalyzed by Fc/Fc{sup +} couple as a mediator. {yields} This work provides a simple approach to selectively detect DA in the presence of AA.

  20. Cocaine Inhibition of Nicotinic Acetylcholine ReceptorsInfluences Dopamine Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs potently regulate dopamine (DA release in the striatum and alter cocaine’s ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors.

  1. Neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic dopamine system and cocaine addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M J; Kalivas, P W; Shaham, Y

    2008-01-01

    The main characteristics of cocaine addiction are compulsive drug use despite adverse consequences and high rates of relapse during periods of abstinence. A current popular hypothesis is that compulsive cocaine use and cocaine relapse is due to drug-induced neuroadaptations in reward-related learning and memory processes, which cause hypersensitivity to cocaine-associated cues, impulsive decision making and abnormal habit-like learned behaviours that are insensitive to adverse consequences. Here, we review results from studies on the effect of cocaine exposure on selected signalling cascades, growth factors and physiological processes previously implicated in neuroplasticity underlying normal learning and memory. These include the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glutamate transmission, and synaptic plasticity (primarily in the form of long-term potentiation and depression, LTP and LTD). We also discuss the degree to which these cocaine-induced neuroplasticity changes in the mesolimbic dopamine system mediate cocaine psychomotor sensitization and cocaine-seeking behaviours, as assessed in animal models of drug addiction. Finally, we speculate on how these factors may interact to initiate and sustain cocaine psychomotor sensitization and cocaine seeking. PMID:18345022

  2. Dopamine regulates angiogenesis in normal dermal wound tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shome, Saurav; Rana, Tapasi; Ganguly, Subhalakshmi; Basu, Biswarup; Chaki Choudhury, Sandipan; Sarkar, Chandrani; Chakroborty, Debanjan; Dasgupta, Partha Sarathi; Basu, Sujit

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a normal physiological process and comprises different phases. Among these phases, angiogenesis or new blood vessel formation in wound tissue plays an important role. Skin is richly supplied by sympathetic nerves and evidences indicate the significant role of the sympathetic nervous system in cutaneous wound healing. Dopamine (DA) is an important catecholamine neurotransmitter released by the sympathetic nerve endings and recent studies have demonstrated the potent anti-angiogenic action of DA, which is mediated through its D(2) DA receptors. We therefore postulate that this endogenous catecholamine neurotransmitter may have a role in the neovascularization of dermal wound tissues and subsequently in the process of wound healing. In the present study, the therapeutic efficacy of D(2) DA receptor antagonist has been investigated for faster wound healing in a murine model of full thickness dermal wound. Our results indicate that treatment with specific D(2) DA receptor antagonist significantly expedites the process of full thickness normal dermal wound healing in mice by inducing angiogenesis in wound tissues. The underlined mechanisms have been attributed to the up-regulation of homeobox transcription factor HoxD3 and its target α5β1 integrin, which play a pivotal role in wound angiogenesis. Since D(2) DA receptor antagonists are already in clinical use for other disorders, these results have significant translational value from the bench to the bedside for efficient wound management along with other conventional treatment modalities. PMID:21949884

  3. Gene-sex interactions in schizophrenia: focus on dopamine neurotransmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Godar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder, with a highly complex and heterogenous clinical presentation. Our current perspectives posit that the pathogenic mechanisms of this illness lie in complex arrays of gene x environment interactions. Furthermore, several findings indicate that males have a higher susceptibility for schizophrenia, with earlier age of onset and overall poorer clinical prognosis. Based on these premises, several authors have recently begun exploring the possibility that the greater schizophrenia vulnerability in males may reflect specific gene x sex (GxS interactions. Our knowledge on such GxS interactions in schizophrenia is still rudimentary; nevertheless, the bulk of preclinical evidence suggests that the molecular mechanisms for such interactions are likely contributed by the neurobiological effects of sex steroids on dopamine (DA neurotransmission. Accordingly, several recent studies suggest a gender-specific association of certain DAergic genes with schizophrenia. These GxS interactions have been particularly documented for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT and monoamine oxidase (MAO, the main enzymes catalyzing DA metabolism. In the present review, we will outline the current evidence on the interactions of DA-related genes and sex-related factors, and discuss the potential molecular substrates that may mediate their cooperative actions in schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  4. Association between amygdala reactivity and a dopamine transporter gene polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, O; Åhs, F; Furmark, T; Appel, L; Linnman, C; Faria, V; Bani, M; Pich, E M; Bettica, P; Henningsson, S; Manuck, S B; Ferrell, R E; Nikolova, Y S; Hariri, A R; Fredrikson, M; Westberg, L; Eriksson, E

    2014-01-01

    Essential for detection of relevant external stimuli and for fear processing, the amygdala is under modulatory influence of dopamine (DA). The DA transporter (DAT) is of fundamental importance for the regulation of DA transmission by mediating reuptake inactivation of extracellular DA. This study examined if a common functional variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in the 3' untranslated region of the DAT gene (SLC6A3) influences amygdala function during the processing of aversive emotional stimuli. Amygdala reactivity was examined by comparing regional cerebral blood flow, measured with positron emission tomography and [(15)O]water, during exposure to angry and neutral faces, respectively, in a Swedish sample comprising 32 patients with social anxiety disorder and 17 healthy volunteers. In a separate US sample, comprising 85 healthy volunteers studied with blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, amygdala reactivity was assessed by comparing the activity during exposure to threatening faces and neutral geometric shapes, respectively. In both the Swedish and the US sample, 9-repeat carriers displayed higher amygdala reactivity than 10-repeat homozygotes. The results suggest that this polymorphism contributes to individual variability in amygdala reactivity. PMID:25093598

  5. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor's neglected subunit - GluN1 matters under normal and hyperbaric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliznyuk, Alice; Aviner, Ben; Golan, Hava; Hollmann, Michael; Grossman, Yoram

    2015-10-01

    Professional deep-water divers exposed to hyperbaric pressure (HP) above 1.1 MPa develop high-pressure neurological syndrome, which is associated with central nervous system hyperexcitability. It was previously reported that HP augments N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) synaptic responses, increases neuronal excitability, and potentially causes irreversible neuronal damage. In addition, we have reported that HP (10.1 MPa) differentially affects ionic currents, measured by the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, of eight specific NMDAR subtypes generated by the co-expression of GluN1-1a or GluN1-1b with one of the four GluN2(A-D) subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We now report that eight GluN1 splice variants, when co-expressed with GluN2A, mediate different ionic currents at normal and HP (5.1 MPa). These data, in conjunction with our previous results, indicate that both GluN1 and GluN2 subunits play a critical role in determining NMDAR currents under normal and HP conditions. These data, given the differential spatial distribution of the different NMDAR subtypes in the central nervous system, may offer a partial explanation for the mechanism governing the complex signs and symptoms of high-pressure neurological syndrome, and an explanation for the suspected long-term HP health decrement due to repetitive deep dives by professional divers. PMID:26202884

  6. Development of an Electrochemical-Based Aspartate Aminotransferase Nanoparticle Ir-C Biosensor for Screening of Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Chiun Liu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspartate aminotransaminase (AST is a hepatocelluar enzyme released into the bloodstream when hepatic cells are damaged, resulting in elevated blood levels of AST. A single use, disposable biosensor prototype, composed of catalytic iridium nano-particles dispersed on carbon paste, was developed to detect enzymatically-produced H2O2 in AST-mediated reactions. This biosensor is capable of measuring AST levels in a phosphate buffer and undiluted human serum over the concentration range of 0 to 0.89 μg/mL AST concentration (corresponding to 0–250 UL−1 specific activity. The biosensor operates at relatively low oxidation potential (+0.3 volt (V versus the printed Ag/AgCl, minimizing any potential chemical interference in human serum. The measurements of AST in human serum using the biosensor compared well with those measured by standard hospital spectrophotometric assays. This Ir-C biosensor may be useful for AST measurements in the clinical environment.

  7. Anxiolytic effects of dopamine receptor ligands: I. Involvement of dopamine autoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoszyk, G D

    1998-01-01

    The anxiolytic-like properties of dopamine agonists and antagonists with different receptor profiles were investigated in the ultrasonic vocalization test in rats after subcutaneous administration. Only dopamine D2 receptor agonists inhibited ultrasonic vocalization with the following ED50 values: apomorphine (0.07 mg/kg), quinelorane (0.01 mg/kg), quinpirole (0.04 mg/kg), pramipexole (0.09 mg/kg), roxindole (0.04 mg/kg), talipexole (0.04 mg/kg), (+/-)-7-OH-DPAT (0.05 mg/kg), (+/-)-PPHT (0.03 mg/kg), (-)-TNPA (0.06 mg/kg), PD128907 (0.13 mg/kg). The D2 antagonists haloperidol, mazapertine, raclopride, remoxipride, L745870, U99194A, U101958 and S(-)-DS121, the partial agonists PD143188 and preclamol, the selective D1 agonist R(+)-SKF38393 and the D1 antagonist SCH23390, and the uptake inhibitors GBR12909, GBR12935 and indatraline lacked significant inhibitory effects on ultrasonic vocalization. Because at least some of the D2 receptor agonists investigated have selectivity for dopamine autoreceptors, it is speculated that the dopamine autoreceptor may be a target for the development of new antianxiety drugs. PMID:9472724

  8. Insights into the behaviour of biomolecules on the early Earth: The concentration of aspartate by layered double hydroxide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Brian; Erastova, Valentina; Geatches, Dawn L.; Clark, Stewart J.; Greenwell, H. Christopher; Fraser, Donald G.

    2016-03-01

    The role of mineral surfaces in concentrating and facilitating the polymerisation of simple protobiomolecules during the Hadean and Archean has been the subject of much research in order to constrain the conditions that may have led to the origin of life on early Earth. Here we examine the adsorption of the amino acid aspartate on layered double hydroxide minerals, and use a combined computer simulation - experimental spectroscopy approach to gain insight into the resulting structures of the host-aspartate material. We show that the uptake of aspartate occurs in alkaline solution by anion exchange of the dianion form of aspartate, rather than by surface adsorption. Anion exchange only occurs at values of pH where a significant population of aspartate has the amino group deprotonated, and is then highly efficient up to the mineral anion exchange capacity.

  9. Structural Insights into the Activation and Inhibition of Histo-Aspartic Protease from Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Xiao, Huogen; Hidaka, Koushi; Gustchina, Alla; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Yada, Rickey Y.; Wlodawer, Alexander (Guelph); (Kyoto); (NCI)

    2012-09-17

    Histo-aspartic protease (HAP) from Plasmodium falciparum is a promising target for the development of novel antimalarial drugs. The sequence of HAP is highly similar to those of pepsin-like aspartic proteases, but one of the two catalytic aspartates, Asp32, is replaced with histidine. Crystal structures of the truncated zymogen of HAP and of the complex of the mature enzyme with inhibitor KNI-10395 have been determined at 2.1 and 2.5 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. As in other proplasmepsins, the propeptide of the zymogen interacts with the C-terminal domain of the enzyme, forcing the N- and C-terminal domains apart, thereby separating His32 and Asp215 and preventing formation of the mature active site. In the inhibitor complex, the enzyme forms a tight domain-swapped dimer, not previously seen in any aspartic proteases. The inhibitor is found in an unprecedented conformation resembling the letter U, stabilized by two intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Surprisingly, the location and conformation of the inhibitor are similar to those of the fragment of helix 2 comprising residues 34p-38p in the prosegments of the zymogens of gastric aspartic proteases; a corresponding helix assumes a vastly different orientation in proplasmepsins. Each inhibitor molecule is in contact with two molecules of HAP, interacting with the carboxylate group of the catalytic Asp215 of one HAP protomer through a water molecule, while also making a direct hydrogen bond to Glu278A' of the other protomer. A comparison of the shifts in the positions of the catalytic residues in the inhibitor complex presented here with those published previously gives further hints regarding the enzymatic mechanism of HAP.

  10. Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onstott, T. C. [Princeton University; Aubrey, A.D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Kieft, T L [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; Silver, B J [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Van Heerden, E. [University of the Free State; Opperman, D. J. [University of the Free State; Bada, J L. [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1 2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  11. Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstott, T C; Magnabosco, C; Aubrey, A D; Burton, A S; Dworkin, J P; Elsila, J E; Grunsfeld, S; Cao, B H; Hein, J E; Glavin, D P; Kieft, T L; Silver, B J; Phelps, T J; van Heerden, E; Opperman, D J; Bada, J L

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 °C and 1-2 years for 3 km depth and 54 °C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 °C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples. PMID:24289240

  12. Functional potencies of dopamine agonists and antagonists at human dopamine D₂ and D₃ receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadori, Yoshihiro; Forbes, Robert A; McQuade, Robert D; Kikuchi, Tetsuro

    2011-09-01

    We measured the functional agonist potencies of dopamine agonists including antiparkinson drugs, and functional antagonist potencies of antipsychotics at human dopamine D(2) and D(3) receptors. In vitro pharmacological assessment included inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation and the reversal of dopamine-induced inhibition in clonal Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing low and high densities of human dopamine D(2L) and D(2S) receptors (hD(2L)-Low, hD(2L)-High, hD(2S)-Low and hD(2S)-High, respectively) and human dopamine D(3) Ser-9 and D(3) Gly-9 receptors (hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9, respectively). Cabergoline, bromocriptine, pergolide, (±)-7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propyl-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT), talipexole, pramipexole, R-(+)-trans-3,4,4a,10b-tetrahydro-4-propyl-2H,5H-[1]benzopyrano[4,3-b]-1,4-oxazin-9-olhydrochloride (PD128907) and ropinirole behaved as dopamine D(2) and D(3) receptor full agonists and showed higher potencies in hD(2L)-High and hD(2S)-High compared to hD(2L)-Low and hD(2S)-Low. In hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9 compared to hD(2L)-Low and hD(2S)-Low, dopamine, ropinirole, PD128907, and pramipexole potencies were clearly higher; talipexole and 7-OH-DPAT showed slightly higher potencies; pergolide showed slightly lower potency; and, cabergoline and bromocriptine potencies were lower. Aripiprazole acted as an antagonist in hD(2L)-Low; a low intrinsic activity partial agonist in hD(2S)-Low; a moderate partial agonist in hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9; a robust partial agonist in hD(2L)-High; and a full agonist in hD(2S)-High. Amisulpride, sulpiride and perphenazine behaved as preferential antagonists; and chlorpromazine and asenapine behaved as modest preferential antagonists; whereas fluphenazine, haloperidol, and blonanserin behaved as non-preferential antagonists in hD(2S)-Low and hD(2S)-High compared to hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9. These findings may help to elucidate the basis of therapeutic benefit observed with these drugs, with

  13. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, S T; Vecchio, L M; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, M M; Nguyen, L T; Bermejo, M K; Kile, B; Sotnikova, T D; Siesser, W B; Gainetdinov, R R; Wightman, R M; Caron, M G; Richardson, J R; Miller, G W; Ramsey, A J; Cyr, M; Salahpour, A

    2015-02-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown whether increasing dopamine transporter activity will be detrimental to dopamine neurons that are inherently capable of storing and degrading dopamine. To address this issue, we characterized transgenic mice that over-express the dopamine transporter selectively in dopamine neurons. We report that dopamine transporter over-expressing (DAT-tg) mice display spontaneous loss of midbrain dopamine neurons that is accompanied by increases in oxidative stress markers, 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine and 5-S-cysteinyl-DOPAC. In addition, metabolite-to-dopamine ratios are increased and VMAT2 protein expression is decreased in the striatum of these animals. Furthermore, DAT-tg mice also show fine motor deficits on challenging beam traversal that are reversed with l-DOPA treatment. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that even in neurons that routinely handle dopamine, increased uptake of this neurotransmitter through the dopamine transporter results in oxidative damage, neuronal loss and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits. In addition, DAT over-expressing animals are highly sensitive to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. The effects of increased dopamine uptake in these transgenic mice could shed light on the unique vulnerability of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25447236

  14. Nucleus accumbens dopamine receptors in the consolidation of spatial memory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mele, A.; Avena, M.; Roullet, P.; Leonibus, E. de; Mandillo, S.; Sargolini, F.; Coccurello, R.; Oliverio, A.

    2004-01-01

    Nucleus accumbens dopamine is known to play an important role in motor activity and in behaviours governed by drugs and natural reinforcers, as well as in non-associative forms of learning. At the same time, activation of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors has been suggested to promote intracellular event

  15. Striatal dopamine and the interface between motivation and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, E.; Holstein, M.G.A. van; Cools, R.

    2011-01-01

    Brain dopamine has long been known to be implicated in the domains of appetitive motivation and cognition. Recent work indicates that dopamine also plays a role in the interaction between appetitive motivation and cognition. Here we review this work. Animal work has revealed an arrangement of spiral

  16. Mesolimbic dopamine and its neuromodulators in obesity and binge eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naef, Lindsay; Pitman, Kimberley A; Borgland, Stephanie L

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic prevalence, and much research has focused on homeostatic and nonhomeostatic mechanisms underlying overconsumption of food. Mesocorticolimbic circuitry, including dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), is a key substrate for nonhomeostatic feeding. The goal of the present review is to compare changes in mesolimbic dopamine function in human obesity with diet-induced obesity in rodents. Additionally, we will review the literature to determine if dopamine signaling is altered with binge eating disorder in humans or binge eating modeled in rodents. Finally, we assess modulation of dopamine neurons by neuropeptides and peripheral peptidergic signals that occur with obesity or binge eating. We find that while decreased dopamine concentration is observed with obesity, there is inconsistency outside the human literature on the relationship between striatal D2 receptor expression and obesity. Finally, few studies have explored how orexigenic or anorexigenic peptides modulate dopamine neuronal activity or striatal dopamine in obese models. However, ghrelin modulation of dopamine neurons may be an important factor for driving binge feeding in rodents. PMID:26514168

  17. Dopamine modulates egalitarian behavior in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Ignacio; Zhu, Lusha; Set, Eric; Kayser, Andrew; Hsu, Ming

    2015-03-30

    Egalitarian motives form a powerful force in promoting prosocial behavior and enabling large-scale cooperation in the human species [1]. At the neural level, there is substantial, albeit correlational, evidence suggesting a link between dopamine and such behavior [2, 3]. However, important questions remain about the specific role of dopamine in setting or modulating behavioral sensitivity to prosocial concerns. Here, using a combination of pharmacological tools and economic games, we provide critical evidence for a causal involvement of dopamine in human egalitarian tendencies. Specifically, using the brain penetrant catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitor tolcapone [4, 5], we investigated the causal relationship between dopaminergic mechanisms and two prosocial concerns at the core of a number of widely used economic games: (1) the extent to which individuals directly value the material payoffs of others, i.e., generosity, and (2) the extent to which they are averse to differences between their own payoffs and those of others, i.e., inequity. We found that dopaminergic augmentation via COMT inhibition increased egalitarian tendencies in participants who played an extended version of the dictator game [6]. Strikingly, computational modeling of choice behavior [7] revealed that tolcapone exerted selective effects on inequity aversion, and not on other computational components such as the extent to which individuals directly value the material payoffs of others. Together, these data shed light on the causal relationship between neurochemical systems and human prosocial behavior and have potential implications for our understanding of the complex array of social impairments accompanying neuropsychiatric disorders involving dopaminergic dysregulation. PMID:25802148

  18. Increased dopamine transporter function as a mechanism for dopamine hypoactivity in the adult infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex following adolescent social stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Andrew M; Forster, Gina L; Hassell, James E; Davies, Daniel R; Scholl, Jamie L; Renner, Kenneth J; Watt, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    Being bullied during adolescence is associated with later mental illnesses characterized by deficits in cognitive tasks mediated by prefrontal cortex (PFC) dopamine (DA). Social defeat of adolescent male rats, as a model of teenage bullying victimization, results in medial PFC (mPFC) dopamine (DA) hypofunction in adulthood that is associated with increased drug seeking and working memory deficits. Increased expression of the DA transporter (DAT) is also seen in the adult infralimbic mPFC following adolescent defeat. We propose the functional consequence of this increased DAT expression is enhanced DA clearance and subsequently decreased infralimbic mPFC DA availability. To test this, in vivo chronoamperometry was used to measure changes in accumulation of the DA signal following DAT blockade, with increased DAT-mediated clearance being reflected by lower DA signal accumulation. Previously defeated rats and controls were pre-treated with the norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor desipramine (20 mg/kg, ip.) to isolate infralimbic mPFC DA clearance to DAT, then administered the selective DAT inhibitor GBR-12909 (20 or 40 mg/kg, sc.). Sole NET inhibition with desipramine produced no differences in DA signal accumulation between defeated rats and controls. However, rats exposed to adolescent social defeat demonstrated decreased DA signal accumulation compared to controls in response to both doses of GBR-12909, indicating greater DAT-mediated clearance of infralimbic mPFC DA. These results suggest that protracted increases in infralimbic mPFC DAT function represent a mechanism by which adolescent social defeat stress produces deficits in adult mPFC DA activity and corresponding behavioral and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26056032

  19. Glucocerebrosidase gene therapy prevents α-synucleinopathy of midbrain dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Emily M; Smith, Gaynor A; Park, Eric; Cao, Hongmei; Brown, Eilish; Hayes, Melissa A; Beagan, Jonathan; McLean, Jesse R; Izen, Sarah C; Perez-Torres, Eduardo; Hallett, Penelope J; Isacson, Ole

    2015-10-01

    Diminished lysosomal function can lead to abnormal cellular accumulation of specific proteins, including α-synuclein, contributing to disease pathogenesis of vulnerable neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) and related α-synucleinopathies. GBA1 encodes for the lysosomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase (GCase), and mutations in GBA1 are a prominent genetic risk factor for PD. Previous studies showed that in sporadic PD, and in normal aging, GCase brain activity is reduced and levels of corresponding glycolipid substrates are increased. The present study tested whether increasing GCase through AAV-GBA1 intra-cerebral gene delivery in two PD rodent models would reduce the accumulation of α-synuclein and protect midbrain dopamine neurons from α-synuclein-mediated neuronal damage. In the first model, transgenic mice overexpressing wildtype α-synuclein throughout the brain (ASO mice) were used, and in the second model, a rat model of selective dopamine neuron degeneration was induced by AAV-A53T mutant α-synuclein. In ASO mice, intra-cerebral AAV-GBA1 injections into several brain regions increased GCase activity and reduced the accumulation of α-synuclein in the substantia nigra and striatum. In rats, co-injection of AAV-GBA1 with AAV-A53T α-synuclein into the substantia nigra prevented α-synuclein-mediated degeneration of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons by 6 months. These neuroprotective effects were associated with altered protein expression of markers of autophagy. These experiments demonstrate, for the first time, the neuroprotective effects of increasing GCase against dopaminergic neuron degeneration, and support the development of therapeutics targeting GCase or other lysosomal genes to improve neuronal handling of α-synuclein. PMID:26392287

  20. Enhanced Dopamine Release by Dopamine Transport Inhibitors Described by a Restricted Diffusion Model and Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Alexander F; Spivak, Charles E; Lupica, Carl R

    2016-06-15

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using carbon fiber electrodes is widely used to rapidly monitor changes in dopamine (DA) levels in vitro and in vivo. Current analytical approaches utilize parameters such as peak oxidation current amplitude and decay times to estimate release and uptake processes, respectively. However, peak amplitude changes are often observed with uptake inhibitors, thereby confounding the interpretation of these parameters. To overcome this limitation, we demonstrate that a simple five-parameter, two-compartment model mathematically describes DA signals as a balance of release (r/ke) and uptake (ku), summed with adsorption (kads and kdes) of DA to the carbon electrode surface. Using nonlinear regression, we demonstrate that our model precisely describes measured DA signals obtained in brain slice recordings. The parameters extracted from these curves were then validated using pharmacological manipulations that selectively alter vesicular release or DA transporter (DAT)-mediated uptake. Manipulation of DA release through altering the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio or adding tetrodotoxin reduced the release parameter with no effect on the uptake parameter. DAT inhibitors methylenedioxypyrovalerone, cocaine, and nomifensine significantly reduced uptake and increased vesicular DA release. In contrast, a low concentration of amphetamine reduced uptake but had no effect on DA release. Finally, the kappa opioid receptor agonist U50,488 significantly reduced vesicular DA release but had no effect on uptake. Together, these data demonstrate a novel analytical approach to distinguish the effects of manipulations on DA release or uptake that can be used to interpret FSCV data. PMID:27018734

  1. Intramolecular signal transmission in enterobacterial aspartate transcarbamylases II. Engineering co-operativity and allosteric regulation in the aspartate transcarbamylase of Erwinia herbicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunin, R; Rani, C S; Van Vliet, F; Wild, J R; Wales, M

    1999-12-17

    The aspartate transcarbamylase (ATCase) from Erwinia herbicola differs from the other investigated enterobacterial ATCases by its absence of homotropic co-operativity toward the substrate aspartate and its lack of response to ATP which is an allosteric effector (activator) of this family of enzymes. Nevertheless, the E. herbicola ATCase has the same quaternary structure, two trimers of catalytic chains with three dimers of regulatory chains ((c3)2(r2)3), as other enterobacterial ATCases and shows extensive primary structure conservation. In (c3)2(r2)3 ATCases, the association of the catalytic subunits c3 with the regulatory subunits r2 is responsible for the establishment of positive co-operativity between catalytic sites for the binding of aspartate and it dictates the pattern of allosteric response toward nucleotide effectors. Alignment of the primary sequence of the regulatory polypeptides from the E. herbicola and from the paradigmatic Escherichia coli ATCases reveals major blocks of divergence, corresponding to discrete structural elements in the E. coli enzyme. Chimeric ATCases were constructed by exchanging these blocks of divergent sequence between these two ATCases. It was found that the amino acid composition of the outermost beta-strand of a five-stranded beta-sheet in the effector-binding domain of the regulatory polypeptide is responsible for the lack of co-operativity and response to ATP of the E. herbicola ATCase. A novel structural element involved in allosteric signal recognition and transmission in this family of ATCases was thus identified. PMID:10600394

  2. Dopamine D4 Receptors in Psychostimulant Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Di Ciano, Patricia; Grandy, David; Le Foll, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Since the cloning of the D4 receptor in the 1990s, interest has been building in the role of this receptor in drug addiction, given the importance of dopamine in addiction. Like the D3 receptor, the D4 receptor has limited distribution within the brain suggesting it may have a unique role in drug abuse. However, compared to the D3 receptor, few studies have evaluated the importance of the D4 receptor. This may be due, in part, to the relative lack of compounds selective for the D4 receptor; t...

  3. Novos agonistas dopaminérgicos

    OpenAIRE

    MATTOS JAMES PITÁGORAS DE; MATTOS VÂNIA MARIA DE B. CORRÊA

    1999-01-01

    Apresentamos breve revisão da literatura sobre os agonistas dopaminérgicos. Referimos os cinco receptores conhecidos e onde estão localizados, as vantagens e as desvantagens de sua utilização nos pacientes com a doença de Parkinson.Introduzidos com o objetivo principal de controlar as limitações da levodopa, aumentando a janela terapêutica, analisamos a farmacocinética, a eficácia e os efeitos colaterais da cabergolina, do ropinirole e do pramipexole.

  4. Elucidating the Biological Basis for the Reinforcing Actions of Alcohol in the Mesolimbic Dopamine System: The Role of Active Metabolites of Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Truitt

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of successful pharmacotherapeutics for the treatment of alcoholism is predicated upon understanding the biological action of alcohol. A limitation of the alcohol research field has been examining the effects of alcohol only and ignoring the multiple biological active metabolites of alcohol. The concept that alcohol is a ‘pro-drug’ is not new. Alcohol is readily metabolized to acetaldehyde within the brain. Acetaldehyde is a highly reactive compound that forms a number of condensation products, including salsolinol and iso-salsolinol (acetaldehyde and dopamine. Recent experiments have established that numerous metabolites of ethanol do have direct CNS action, and could, in part or whole, mediate the reinforcing actions of alcohol within the mesolimbic dopamine system. The mesolimbic dopamine system originates in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and projects to forebrain regions that include the nucleus accumbens (Acb and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and is thought to be the neurocircuitry governing the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse. Within this neurocircuitry there is convincing evidence that; 1 biologically active metabolites of alcohol can directly or indirectly increase the activity of VTA dopamine neurons, 2 alcohol and alcohol metabolites are reinforcing within the mesolimbic dopamine system, 3 inhibiting the alcohol metabolic pathway inhibits the biological consequences of alcohol exposure, 4 alcohol consumption can be reduced by inhibiting/attenuating the alcohol metabolic pathway in the mesolimbic dopamine system, 5 alcohol metabolites can alter neurochemical levels within the mesolimbic dopamine system, and 6 alcohol interacts with alcohol metabolites to enhance the actions of both compounds. The data indicate that there is a positive relationship between alcohol and alcohol metabolites in regulating the biological consequences of consuming alcohol and the potential of alcohol use escalating to

  5. A descending dopamine pathway conserved from basal vertebrates to mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryczko, Dimitri; Cone, Jackson J.; Alpert, Michael H.; Goetz, Laurent; Auclair, François; Dubé, Catherine; Parent, Martin; Roitman, Mitchell F.; Alford, Simon; Dubuc, Réjean

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine neurons are classically known to modulate locomotion indirectly through ascending projections to the basal ganglia that project down to brainstem locomotor networks. Their loss in Parkinson’s disease is devastating. In lampreys, we recently showed that brainstem networks also receive direct descending dopaminergic inputs that potentiate locomotor output. Here, we provide evidence that this descending dopaminergic pathway is conserved to higher vertebrates, including mammals. In salamanders, dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum or brainstem locomotor networks were partly intermingled. Stimulation of the dopaminergic region evoked dopamine release in brainstem locomotor networks and concurrent reticulospinal activity. In rats, some dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum also innervated the pedunculopontine nucleus, a known locomotor center, and stimulation of the dopaminergic region evoked pedunculopontine dopamine release in vivo. Finally, we found dopaminergic fibers in the human pedunculopontine nucleus. The conservation of a descending dopaminergic pathway across vertebrates warrants re-evaluating dopamine’s role in locomotion. PMID:27071118

  6. Early-life lead exposure recapitulates the selective loss of parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons and subcortical dopamine system hyperactivity present in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, K H; Ruby, K N; Soares, B D; McGlothan, J L; Liu, X; Guilarte, T R

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors have been associated with psychiatric disorders and recent epidemiological studies suggest an association between prenatal lead (Pb(2+)) exposure and schizophrenia (SZ). Pb(2+) is a potent antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and converging evidence indicates that NMDAR hypofunction has a key role in the pathophysiology of SZ. The glutamatergic hypothesis of SZ posits that NMDAR hypofunction results in the loss of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons (PVGI) in the brain. Loss of PVGI inhibitory control to pyramidal cells alters the excitatory drive to midbrain dopamine neurons increasing subcortical dopaminergic activity. We hypothesized that if Pb(2+) exposure in early life is an environmental risk factor for SZ, it should recapitulate the loss of PVGI and reproduce subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. We report that on postnatal day 50 (PN50), adolescence rats chronically exposed to Pb(2+) from gestation through adolescence exhibit loss of PVGI in SZ-relevant brain regions. PV and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 kDa (GAD67) protein were significantly decreased in Pb(2+) exposed rats with no apparent change in calretinin or calbindin protein levels suggesting a selective effect on the PV phenotype of GABAergic interneurons. We also show that Pb(2+) animals exhibit a heightened locomotor response to cocaine and express significantly higher levels of dopamine metabolites and D2-dopamine receptors relative to controls indicative of subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. Our results show that developmental Pb(2+) exposure reproduces specific neuropathology and functional dopamine system changes present in SZ. We propose that exposure to environmental toxins that produce NMDAR hypofunction during critical periods of brain development may contribute significantly to the etiology of mental disorders. PMID:25756805

  7. Antagonist properties of Conus parius peptides on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and their effects on CREB signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailaja Kunda

    Full Text Available Three members of a family of small neurotoxic peptides from the venom of Conus parius, conantokins (Con Pr1, Pr2, and Pr3, function as antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR. We report structural characterizations of these synthetic peptides, and also demonstrate their antagonistic properties toward ion flow through NMDAR ion channels in primary neurons. ConPr1 and ConPr2 displayed moderate increases in α-helicity after addition of Mg(2+. Native apo-ConPr3 possessed an α-helical conformation, and the helicity increased only slightly on addition of Mg(2+. Additionally, these peptides diminished NMDA/Gly-mediated currents and intracellular Ca(2+ (iCa(2+ influx in mature rat primary hippocampal neurons. Electrophysiological data showed that these peptides displayed slower antagonistic properties toward the NMDAR than conantokins from other species of cone snails, e.g., ConT and ConG. Furthermore, to demonstrate selectivity of the C. parius-derived conantokins towards specific NMDAR subunits, cortical neurons from GluN2A(-/- and GluN2B(-/- mice were utilized. Robust inhibition of NMDAR-mediated stimulation in GluN2A(-/--derived mouse neurons, as compared to those isolated from GluN2B(-/--mouse brains, was observed, suggesting a greater selectivity of these antagonists towards the GluN2B subunit. These C. parius conantokins mildly inhibited NMDAR-induced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser(133, suggesting that the peptides modulated iCa(2+ entry and, thereby, activation of CREB, a transcription factor that is required for maintaining long-term synaptic activity. Our data mechanistically show that while these peptides effectively antagonize NMDAR-directed current and iCa(2+ influx, receptor-coupled CREB signaling is maintained. The consequence of sustained CREB signaling is improved neuronal plasticity and survival during neuropathologies.

  8. Mediation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    David P. MacKinnon; Fairchild, Amanda J.; Fritz, Matthew S.

    2007-01-01

    Mediating variables are prominent in psychological theory and research. A mediating variable transmits the effect of an independent variable on a dependent variable. Differences between mediating variables and confounders, moderators, and covariates are outlined. Statistical methods to assess mediation and modern comprehensive approaches are described. Future directions for mediation analysis are discussed.

  9. Melanocortin 3 Receptor Signaling in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons Increases the Motivation for Food Reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Rahul; Omrani, Azar; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; de Vrind, Véronne A J; Van Rozen, Andrea J; Ophuis, Ralph J A Oude; Garner, Keith; Kallo, Imre; Ghanem, Alexander; Liposits, Zsolt; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; la Fleur, Susanne E; Adan, Roger A H

    2016-08-01

    The central melanocortin (MC) system mediates its effects on food intake via MC3 (MC3R) and MC4 receptors (MC4R). Although the role of MC4R in meal size determination, satiation, food preference, and motivation is well established, the involvement of MC3R in the modulation of food intake has been less explored. Here, we investigated the role of MC3R on the incentive motivation for food, which is a crucial component of feeding behavior. Dopaminergic neurons within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) have a crucial role in the motivation for food. We here report that MC3Rs are expressed on VTA dopaminergic neurons and that pro-opiomelanocortinergic (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (Arc) innervate these VTA dopaminergic neurons. Our findings show that intracerebroventricular or intra-VTA infusion of the selective MC3R agonist γMSH increases responding for sucrose under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement, but not free sucrose consumption in rats. Furthermore, ex vivo electrophysiological recordings show increased VTA dopaminergic neuronal activity upon γMSH application. Consistent with a dopamine-mediated effect of γMSH, the increased motivation for sucrose after intra-VTA infusion of γMSH was blocked by pretreatment with the dopamine receptor antagonist α-flupenthixol. Taken together, we demonstrate an Arc POMC projection onto VTA dopaminergic neurons that modulates motivation for palatable food via activation of MC3R signaling. PMID:26852738

  10. Cocaine-induced alterations in dopamine receptor signaling: implications for reinforcement and reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S M; Pierce, R C

    2005-06-01

    The transition from casual drug use to addiction, and the intense drug craving that accompanies it, has been postulated to result from neuroadaptations within the limbic system caused by repeated drug exposure. This review will examine the implications of cocaine-induced alterations in mesolimbic dopamine receptor signaling within the context of several widely used animal models of addiction. Extensive evidence indicates that dopaminergic mechanisms critically mediate behavioral sensitization to cocaine, cocaine-induced conditioned place preference, cocaine self-administration, and the drug prime-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. The propagation of the long-term neuronal changes associated with recurring cocaine use appears to occur at the level of postreceptor signal transduction. Repeated cocaine treatment causes an up-regulation of the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-signaling pathway within the nucleus accumbens, resulting in a dys-regulation of balanced D1/D2 dopamine-like receptor signaling. The intracellular events arising from enhanced D1-like postsynaptic signaling mediate both facilitatory and compensatory responses to the further reinforcing effects of cocaine. PMID:15922019

  11. Expression of human dopamine receptor in potato (Solanum tuberosum results in altered tuber carbon metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świędrych Anna

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though the catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine have been detected in plants their role is poorly documented. Correlations between norepinephrine, soluble sugars and starch concentration have been recently reported for potato plants over-expressing tyrosine decarboxylase, the enzyme mediating the first step of catecholamine synthesis. More recently norepinephrine level was shown to significantly increase after osmotic stress, abscisic acid treatment and wounding. Therefore, it is possible that catecholamines might play a role in plant stress responses by modulating primary carbon metabolism, possibly by a mechanism similar to that in animal cells. Since to date no catecholamine receptor has been identified in plants we transformed potato plants with a cDNA encoding human dopamine receptor (HD1. Results Tuber analysis of transgenic plants revealed changes in the activities of key enzymes mediating sucrose to starch conversion (ADP-glucose phosphorylase and sucrose synthase and sucrose synthesis (sucrose phosphate synthase leading to altered content of both soluble sugars and starch. Surprisingly the catecholamine level measured in transgenic plants was significantly increased; the reason for this is as yet unknown. However the presence of the receptor affected a broader range of enzyme activities than those affected by the massive accumulation of norepinephrine reported for plants over-expressing tyrosine decarboxylase. Therefore, it is suggested that the presence of the exogenous receptor activates catecholamine cAMP signalling in plants. Conclusions Our data support the possible involvement of catecholamines in regulating plant carbon metabolism via cAMP signalling pathway.

  12. Protective effect of zinc aspartate against acetaminophen induced hepato-renal toxicity in albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc is an essential nutrient that is required in humans and animals for many physiological functions, including antioxidant functions. The evidence to date indicates that zinc is an important element that links antioxidant system and tissue damage. Acetaminophen (AP), a widely used analgesic and antipyretic, produces hepatocyte and renal tubular necrosis in human and animals following overdose. In human, AP is one of the most common causes of acute liver failure as a result of accidental or deliberate overdose. Moreover, the initial event in AP toxicity is a toxic metabolic injury with the release of free radicals and subsequent cellular death by necrosis and apoptosis. This study was designed to evaluate the potential protective role of zinc aspartate in case of acetaminophen induced hepato-renal toxicity in rats. A total number of 32 adult male albino rats were divided into 4 equal groups: group I (control group), group II (zinc aspartate treated group), group III (acetaminophen treated group; by a single oral dose of 750 mg/kg body weight) and group IV acetaminophen plus zinc treated group; (zinc aspartate was intraperitoneally given one hour after acetaminophen administration in a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight). Serum levels of: alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, direct bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, uric acid, xanthine oxidase (XO), glutathione (GSH), malonaldehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) were assessed in all groups. The results of this study showed that treatment with acetaminophen alone (group III) produced a significant increase in serum levels of the liver enzymes and direct bilirubin. Moreover, in the same group there was a significant increase in the blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine compared to the control group. In addition, there was a significant increase in XO and MDA and a significant decrease in GSH and NO level. Injection of rats with zinc aspartate after acetaminophen treatment could produce a

  13. Synthesis and characterization of a series of diarylguanidines that are noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists with neuroprotective properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keana, J.F.W.; McBurney, R.N.; Scherz, M.W.; Fischer, J.B.; Hamilton, P.N.; Smith, S.M.; Server, A.C.; Finkbeiner, S.; Stevens, C.F.; Jahr, C.; Weber, E. (Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (USA))

    1989-07-01

    Four diarylguanidine derivatives were synthesized. These compounds were found to displace, at submicromolar concentrations, {sup 3}H-labeled 1-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)piperidine and (+)-({sup 3}H)MK-801 from phencyclidine receptors in brain membrane preparations. In electrophysiological experiments the diarylguanidines blocked N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-activated ion channels. These dairylguanidines also protected rat hippocampal neurons in vitro from glutamate-induced cell death. The results show that some diarylguanidines are noncompetitive antagonists of NMDA receptor-mediated responses and have the neuroprotective property that is commonly associated with blockers of the NMDA receptor-gated cation channel. Diarylguanidines are structurally unrelated to known blockers of NMDA channels and, therefore, represent a new compound series for the development of neuroprotective agents with therapeutic value in patients suffering from stroke, from brain or spinal cord trauma, from hypoglycemia, and possibly from brain ischemia due to heart attack.

  14. Topology of AspT, the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, Determined by Site-Directed Fluorescence Labeling▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Nanatani, Kei; Fujiki, Takashi; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ye, Liwen; WANG, XICHENG; Nakajima, Tasuku; Uchida, Takafumi; Maloney, Peter C.; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-01-01

    The gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-aspartate (Asp) with release of l-alanine (Ala) and CO2. The decarboxylation reaction consists of two steps: electrogenic exchange of Asp for Ala catalyzed by an aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) and intracellular decarboxylation of the transported Asp catalyzed by an l-aspartate-β-decarboxylase (AspD). AspT belongs to the newly classified aspartate:alanine exchanger family (transporter cla...

  15. Elevated dopamine concentration in light-adapted zebrafish retinas is correlated with increased dopamine synthesis and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Victoria P; Wetzell, Bradley; Arneson, Lynne S; DeLucia, Vittoria; Riley, Anthony L

    2015-10-01

    Probing zebrafish (Danio rerio) retinal cryostat sections, collected either 8 h into the light or dark cycle, with an antibody against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) identified a single population of immunopositive cells in the inner retina. However, the observed labeling patterns were not identical in both sets of tissues - label intensity was brighter in light-adapted tissue. This difference was quantified by probing western blots of retinal homogenates with the same TH antibody, which showed that TH expression increased by 42% in light-adapted tissue. High-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection revealed that the concentrations of both dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) are also elevated in light-adapted zebrafish retinal tissue. Dopamine levels increased by 14% and DOPAC levels increased by 25% when measured in retinal homogenates harvested during the light cycle. These results indicate that dopamine levels in zebrafish retina are significantly increased in light-adapted tissue. The increase in dopamine content is correlated with an increase in both TH and DOPAC, suggesting that changes in dopamine concentration are due to light-adaptive changes in the synthesis, release and metabolism of dopamine. Dopamine concentration is elevated in lighted-adapted zebrafish retinas. This increase is correlated with an increase in both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DOPAC (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid), suggesting that changes in dopamine concentration are due to light-adaptive changes in the synthesis, release and metabolism of dopamine. This is applicable to studies examining retinal mutants, the role of dopamine in disease or visual system development. PMID:26212704

  16. Stimulus-Dependent Dopamine Release in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikstrom, Sverker; Soderlund, Goran

    2007-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is related to an attenuated and dysfunctional dopamine system. Normally, a high extracellular dopamine level yields a tonic dopaminergic input that down-regulates stimuli-evoked phasic dopamine responses through autoreceptors. Abnormally low tonic extracellular dopamine in ADHD up-regulates the…

  17. Effect of processable polyindole and nanostructured domain on the selective sensing of dopamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of carboxylic acid functionality present in polymer backbone is reported on electrochemical sensing of dopamine (DA). The electropolymerized conducting polymers made from carboxylic acid substituted indole at positions − 5 and − 6 are found processable in aqueous medium and are compatible with suitable additives/precursors for fabricating polymer modified electrodes (PMEs). The modified electrodes are fabricated following two methods, i.e.: (1) the processable polymers are cast over glassy carbon electrode (GCE) using Nafion® followed by chemical modification using hydrophobic organic redox mediators and (2) the processable polymers are encapsulated within organically modified silicate (Ormosil) matrix along with the hydrophilic redox mediator followed by incorporation of silver and gold nanoparticles. The electrochemical performances of these modified electrodes show selective sensing of DA with major findings: (i) both polymers introduced selectivity in electrochemical sensing of DA with analogous sensitivity, (ii) sensitivity is enhanced when hydrophobic organic redox mediators are coupled with modified electrode matrix involving Nafion®, (iii) the polymers are suitable for encapsulation within ormosil matrix thus introducing nanostructured network for further improvement in sensitivity of DA analysis, (iv) the presence of gold and silver nanoparticles within ormosil matrix along with polymers caused > 100 fold increase in sensitivity of DA sensing with lowest detection limit to the order of 100 nM. - Highlights: ► We report electrochemical polymerization of carboxylic acid substituted indoles. ► The polymers of 5 and 6 substituted indoles are found processable in aqueous medium. ► The processable polymers are utilized for selective sensing of dopamine. ► Incorporation of electron transfer mediators resulted into tremendous improvement in sensitivity. ► Introduction of nanostructured domains further enhanced the performance of sensor.

  18. Molecular cloning and enzymological characterization of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate independent aspartate racemase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis DSM 5473.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Tsubasa; Kato, Shiro; Oikawa, Tadao

    2016-09-01

    We succeeded in expressing the aspartate racemase homolog gene from Thermococcus litoralis DSM 5473 in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) and found that the gene encodes aspartate racemase. The aspartate racemase gene consisted of 687 bp and encoded 228 amino acid residues. The purified enzyme showed aspartate racemase activity with a specific activity of 1590 U/mg. The enzyme was a homodimer with a molecular mass of 56 kDa and did not require pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a coenzyme. The enzyme showed aspartate racemase activity even at 95 °C, and the activation energy of the enzyme was calculated to be 51.8 kJ/mol. The enzyme was highly thermostable, and approximately 50 % of its initial activity remained even after incubation at 90 °C for 11 h. The enzyme showed a maximum activity at a pH of 7.5 and was stable between pH 6.0 and 7.0. The enzyme acted on L-cysteic acid and L-cysteine sulfinic acid in addition to D- and L-aspartic acids, and was strongly inhibited by iodoacetic acid. The site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme showed that the essential cysteine residues were conserved as Cys83 and Cys194. D-Forms of aspartic acid, serine, alanine, and valine were contained in T. litoralis DSM 5473 cells. PMID:27438592

  19. Modulation of dopamine transmission by 5HT2C and 5HT3 receptors: a role in the antidepressant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremencov, Eliyahu; Weizmann, Yifat; Kinor, Noa; Gispan-Herman, Iris; Yadid, Gal

    2006-02-01

    Dopaminergic mesolimbic and mesocortical systems are fundamental in hedonia and motivation. Therefore their regulation should be central in understanding depression treatment. This review highlights the dopaminergic activity in relation to depressive behavior and suggests two putative receptors as potential targets for research and development of future antidepressants. In this article we review data that describe the role of serotonin in regulating dopamine release, via 5HT2C and 5HT3 receptors. This action of serotonin appears to be linked to depressive-like behavior and to onset of behavioral effects of antidepressants in an animal model of depression. We suggest that drugs or strategies that decrease 5HT2C and increase 5HT3 receptor-mediated dopamine release in the limbic areas of the brain may provide a fast onset of therapeutic effect. Clinical and basic research data supporting this hypothesis are discussed. PMID:16475958

  20. Looking for reward in all the wrong places: dopamine receptor gene polymorphisms indirectly affect aggression through sensation-seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, David S; DeWall, C Nathan; Derefinko, Karen J; Estus, Steven; Lynam, Donald R; Peters, Jessica R; Jiang, Yang

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with genotypes that code for reduced dopaminergic brain activity often exhibit a predisposition toward aggression. However, it remains largely unknown how dopaminergic genotypes may increase aggression. Lower-functioning dopamine systems motivate individuals to seek reward from external sources such as illicit drugs and other risky experiences. Based on emerging evidence that aggression is a rewarding experience, we predicted that the effect of lower-functioning dopaminergic functioning on aggression would be mediated by tendencies to seek the environment for rewards. Caucasian female and male undergraduates (N = 277) were genotyped for five polymorphisms of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene; they reported their previous history of aggression and their dispositional reward-seeking. Lower-functioning DRD2 profiles were associated with greater sensation-seeking, which then predicted greater aggression. Our findings suggest that lower-functioning dopaminergic activity puts individuals at risk for violence because it motivates them to experience aggression's hedonically rewarding qualities. PMID:26592425

  1. Solvent-Free Polymerization of L-Aspartic Acid in the Presence of D-Sorbitol to Obtain Water Soluble or Network Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    L-aspartic acid was thermally polymerized in the presence of D-sorbitol with the goal of synthesizing new, higher molecular weight water soluble and absorbent copolymers. No reaction occurred when aspartic acid alone was heated at 170 or 200 degrees C. In contrast, heating sorbitol and aspartic ac...

  2. Dopamine D2-like receptor signaling suppresses human osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanami, Kentaro; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Okada, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kubo, Satoshi; Kondo, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2013-09-01

    Dopamine, a major neurotransmitter, transmits signals via five different seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors termed D1 to D5. Although the relevance of neuroendocrine system to bone metabolism has been emerging, the precise effects of dopaminergic signaling upon osteoclastogenesis remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human monocyte-derived osteoclast precursor cells express all dopamine-receptor subtypes. Dopamine and dopamine D2-like receptor agonists such as pramipexole and quinpirole reduced the formation of TRAP-positive multi-nucleated cells, cathepsin K mRNA expression, and pit formation area in vitro. These inhibitory effects were reversed by pre-treatment with a D2-like receptor antagonist haloperidol or a Gαi inhibitor pertussis toxin, but not with the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390. Dopamine and dopamine D2-like receptor agonists, but not a D1-like receptor agonist, suppressed intracellular cAMP concentration as well as RANKL-meditated induction of c-Fos and NFATc1 mRNA expression in human osteoclast precursor cells. Finally, the dopamine D2-like receptor agonist suppressed LPS-induced osteoclast formation in murine bone marrow culture ex vivo. These findings indicate that dopaminergic signaling plays an important role in bone homeostasis via direct effects upon osteoclast differentiation and further suggest that the clinical use of neuroleptics is likely to affect bone mass. PMID:23631878

  3. The Neurotropic Parasite Toxoplasma Gondii Increases Dopamine Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandovszky, Emese; Gaskell, Elizabeth; Martin, Heather; Dubey, J. P.; Webster, Joanne P.; McConkey, Glenn A.

    2011-01-01

    The highly prevalent parasite Toxoplasma gondii manipulates its host's behavior. In infected rodents, the behavioral changes increase the likelihood that the parasite will be transmitted back to its definitive cat host, an essential step in completion of the parasite's life cycle. The mechanism(s) responsible for behavioral changes in the host is unknown but two lines of published evidence suggest that the parasite alters neurotransmitter signal transduction: the disruption of the parasite-induced behavioral changes with medications used to treat psychiatric disease (specifically dopamine antagonists) and identification of a tyrosine hydroxylase encoded in the parasite genome. In this study, infection of mammalian dopaminergic cells with T. gondii enhanced the levels of K+-induced release of dopamine several-fold, with a direct correlation between the number of infected cells and the quantity of dopamine released. Immunostaining brain sections of infected mice with dopamine antibody showed intense staining of encysted parasites. Based on these analyses, T. gondii orchestrates a significant increase in dopamine metabolism in neural cells. Tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine synthesis, was also found in intracellular tissue cysts in brain tissue with antibodies specific for the parasite-encoded tyrosine hydroxylase. These observations provide a mechanism for parasite-induced behavioral changes. The observed effects on dopamine metabolism could also be relevant in interpreting reports of psychobehavioral changes in toxoplasmosis-infected humans. PMID:21957440

  4. The neurotropic parasite Toxoplasma gondii increases dopamine metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emese Prandovszky

    Full Text Available The highly prevalent parasite Toxoplasma gondii manipulates its host's behavior. In infected rodents, the behavioral changes increase the likelihood that the parasite will be transmitted back to its definitive cat host, an essential step in completion of the parasite's life cycle. The mechanism(s responsible for behavioral changes in the host is unknown but two lines of published evidence suggest that the parasite alters neurotransmitter signal transduction: the disruption of the parasite-induced behavioral changes with medications used to treat psychiatric disease (specifically dopamine antagonists and identification of a tyrosine hydroxylase encoded in the parasite genome. In this study, infection of mammalian dopaminergic cells with T. gondii enhanced the levels of K+-induced release of dopamine several-fold, with a direct correlation between the number of infected cells and the quantity of dopamine released. Immunostaining brain sections of infected mice with dopamine antibody showed intense staining of encysted parasites. Based on these analyses, T. gondii orchestrates a significant increase in dopamine metabolism in neural cells. Tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine synthesis, was also found in intracellular tissue cysts in brain tissue with antibodies specific for the parasite-encoded tyrosine hydroxylase. These observations provide a mechanism for parasite-induced behavioral changes. The observed effects on dopamine metabolism could also be relevant in interpreting reports of psychobehavioral changes in toxoplasmosis-infected humans.

  5. Dopamine modulates metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ueno

    Full Text Available Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shi(ts induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine, which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation.

  6. Dopamine uptake dynamics are preserved under isoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodnik, Zachary D; España, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-01

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is commonly used for measuring the kinetics of dopamine release and uptake. For experiments using an anesthetized preparation, urethane is preferentially used because it does not alter dopamine uptake kinetics compared to freely moving animals. Unfortunately, urethane is highly toxic, can induce premature death during experiments, and cannot be used for recovery surgeries. Isoflurane is an alternative anesthetic that is less toxic than urethane, produces a stable level of anesthesia over extended periods, and is often used for recovery surgeries. Despite these benefits, the effects of isoflurane on dopamine release and uptake have not been directly characterized. In the present studies, we assessed the utility of isoflurane for voltammetry experiments by testing dopamine signaling parameters under baseline conditions, after treatment with the dopamine uptake inhibitor cocaine, and after exposure to increasing concentrations of isoflurane. Our results indicate that surgical levels of isoflurane do not significantly alter terminal mechanisms of dopamine release and uptake over prolonged periods of time. Consequently, we propose that isoflurane is an acceptable anesthetic for voltammetry experiments, which in turn permits the design of studies in which dopamine signaling is examined under anesthesia prior to recovery and subsequent experimentation in the same animals. PMID:26321152

  7. Membrane topology of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter AspT of Tetragenococcus halophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanatani, Kei; Ohonishi, Fumito; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abe, Keietsu

    2005-03-01

    AspT is an electrogenic aspartate:alanine exchange protein that represents the vectorial component of a proton-motive metabolic cycle found in some strains of Tetragenococcus halophilus. AspT is the sole member of a new family, the Aspartate: Alanine Exchanger (AAE) family, in secondary transporters, according to the computational classification proposed by Saier et al. (http://www.biology.ucsd.edu/~msaier/transport/). We analyzed the topology of AspT biochemically, by using fusion methods in combination with alkaline phosphatase or beta-lactamase. These results suggested that AspT has a unique topology; 8 TMS, a large cytoplasmic loop (183 amino acids) between TMS5 and TMS6, and N- and C-termini that both face the periplasm. These results demonstrated a unique 2D-structure of AspT as the novel AAE family. PMID:15670744

  8. Seed-specific aspartic proteinase FeAP12 from buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timotijević Gordana S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartic proteinase gene (FeAP12 has been isolated from the cDNA library of developing buckwheat seeds. Analysis of its deduced amino acid sequence showed that it resembled the structure and shared high homology with typical plant aspartic proteinases (AP characterized by the presence of a plant-specific insert (PSI, unique among APs. It was shown that FeAP12 mRNA was not present in the leaves, roots, steam and flowers, but was seed-specifically expressed. Moreover, the highest levels of FeAP12 expression were observed in the early stages of seed development, therefore suggesting its potential role in nucellar degradation.

  9. A central role for bifunctional aspartate/prephenate aminotransferase in the biosynthesis of amino acids in plant plastids.

    OpenAIRE

    El-Azaz, Jorge; Cánovas, Francisco M.; de la Torre, Fernando; Ávila, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    A central role for bifunctional aspartate/prephenate aminotransferase in the biosynthesis of amino acids in plant plastids. Fernando de la Torre, Jorge El-Azaz, Concepción Ávila, Francisco M. Cánovas Departamento de Biología Molecular y Bioquímica. Universidad de Málaga. Bifunctional aspartate/prephenate aminotransferases (AAT/PAT) are plastid-located enzymes encoded by a single locus in all reported plants, which develop two different enzymatic activities: aspartate aminotransferas...

  10. Computational Study of Triterpenoids of Ganoderma lucidum with Aspartic Protease Enzymes for Discovering HIV-1 and Plasmepsin Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Devinna Kang; Mutakin Mutakin; Jutti Levita

    2015-01-01

    Rapid resistance development of HIV-1 and Plasmodium falciparum parasite requires discovery of more potent new drugs. Aspartic protease enzymes expressed by HIV-1 and P. falciparum could be used as important drug targets. The catalytic site is located at the bottom of a cleft in the enzyme surface and consists of triad Asp25, Thr26, Gly27. Important aspartic acids are Asp32 and Asp215. Aspartic proteases are inhibited by pepstatin-A, a naturally occurring peptide containing two statins, which...

  11. Differential Striatal Spine Pathology in Parkinson’s disease and Cocaine Addiction: A Key Role of Dopamine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, Rosa M.; Smith, Yoland

    2013-01-01

    In the striatum, the dendritic tree of the two main populations of projection neurons, called “Medium Spiny Neurons (MSNs)”, are covered with spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the cerebral cortex and thalamus. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), striatal MSNs undergo an important loss of dendritic spines, whereas aberrant overgrowth of striatal spines occurs following chronic cocaine exposure. This review examines the possibility that opposite dopamine dysregulation is one of the key factors that underlies these structural changes. In PD, nigrostriatal dopamine degeneration results in a significant loss of dendritic spines in the dorsal striatum, while rodents chronically exposed to cocaine and other psychostimulants, display an increase in the density of “thin and immature” spines in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). In rodent models of PD, there is evidence that D2 dopamine receptor-containing MSNs are preferentially affected, while D1-positive cells are the main targets of increased spine density in models of addiction. However, such specificity remains to be established in primates. Although the link between the extent of striatal spine changes and the behavioral deficits associated with these disorders remains controversial, there is unequivocal evidence that glutamatergic synaptic transmission is significantly altered in both diseased conditions. Recent studies have suggested that opposite calcium-mediated regulation of the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) function induces these structural defects. In conclusion, there is strong evidence that dopamine is a major, but not the sole, regulator of striatal spine pathology in PD and addiction to psychostimulants. Further studies of the role of glutamate and other genes associated with spine plasticity in mediating these effects are warranted. PMID:23867772

  12. Role of dopamine in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, P A; Eisner, G M; Felder, R A

    1999-04-01

    1. Dopamine, via different dopamine receptor subtypes, regulates cardiovascular functions by actions on the central and peripheral nervous systems, vascular smooth muscle, the heart and the kidney. The dopaminergic system in the central nervous system (CNS) may participate in the regulation of systemic blood pressure. 2. Dopamine 'D2-like' (D2, D3 and D4) receptors, rather than 'D1-like' (D1 and D5) receptors, are involved in the CNS regulation of blood pressure; post-synaptic D2-like receptors increase blood pressure, while presynaptic D2-like receptors (the predominant action) produce the opposite effect. 3. Outside the CNS, dopamine may regulate blood pressure via pressure controls that act with intermediate rapidity (e.g. stress relaxation, arginine vasopressin and renin-angiotensin vasoconstriction), as well as those systems related to the long-term control of body fluid volume. 4. Dopamine D1- and D2-like receptors have been described in resistance vessels, such as the renal, mesenteric, coronary, pulmonary and cerebral arteries. The ability of D1-like receptors to inhibit renal smooth muscle hypertrophy indicates their importance in longer-term regulation of blood pressure. 5. Aberrant dopaminergic regulation of aldosterone secretion, via D2-like receptors, has been reported to be involved in some forms of hyperaldosteronism and hypertension. Some forms of hypertension may also be caused by an aberrant renal dopaminergic system. Abnormalities of three aspects of the renal dopaminergic system may lead to hypertension: (i) renal production of dopamine; (ii) transduction of the renal vascular dopamine signal; and (iii) transduction of the renal tubular dopamine signal. 6. Thus, increased blood pressure occurs after either blockade of D1-like receptors or of dopamine production in rats or disruption of the D1 receptor or the D3 receptor gene in mice. PMID:10386248

  13. Dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome: implications for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirenberg, Melissa J

    2013-08-01

    Dopamine agonists are effective treatments for a variety of indications, including Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, but may have serious side effects, such as orthostatic hypotension, hallucinations, and impulse control disorders (including pathological gambling, compulsive eating, compulsive shopping/buying, and hypersexuality). The most effective way to alleviate these side effects is to taper or discontinue dopamine agonist therapy. A subset of patients who taper a dopamine agonist, however, develop dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome (DAWS), which has been defined as a severe, stereotyped cluster of physical and psychological symptoms that correlate with dopamine agonist withdrawal in a dose-dependent manner, cause clinically significant distress or social/occupational dysfunction, are refractory to levodopa and other dopaminergic medications, and cannot be accounted for by other clinical factors. The symptoms of DAWS include anxiety, panic attacks, dysphoria, depression, agitation, irritability, suicidal ideation, fatigue, orthostatic hypotension, nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, generalized pain, and drug cravings. The severity and prognosis of DAWS is highly variable. While some patients have transient symptoms and make a full recovery, others have a protracted withdrawal syndrome lasting for months to years, and therefore may be unwilling or unable to discontinue DA therapy. Impulse control disorders appear to be a major risk factor for DAWS, and are present in virtually all affected patients. Thus, patients who are unable to discontinue dopamine agonist therapy may experience chronic impulse control disorders. At the current time, there are no known effective treatments for DAWS. For this reason, providers are urged to use dopamine agonists judiciously, warn patients about the risks of DAWS prior to the initiation of dopamine agonist therapy, and follow patients closely for withdrawal symptoms during dopamine agonist taper. PMID:23686524

  14. The binding sites for cocaine and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beuming, Thijs; Kniazeff, Julie; Bergmann, Marianne L; Shi, Lei; Gracia, Luis; Raniszewska, Klaudia; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik; Løland, Claus Juul

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused substance with psychostimulant effects that are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT). We present molecular models for DAT binding of cocaine and cocaine analogs constructed from the high-resolution structure of the bacterial transporter homolog Leu......T. Our models suggest that the binding site for cocaine and cocaine analogs is deeply buried between transmembrane segments 1, 3, 6 and 8, and overlaps with the binding sites for the substrates dopamine and amphetamine, as well as for benztropine-like DAT inhibitors. We validated our models by detailed...... mutagenesis and by trapping the radiolabeled cocaine analog [3H]CFT in the transporter, either by cross-linking engineered cysteines or with an engineered Zn2+-binding site that was situated extracellularly to the predicted common binding pocket. Our data demonstrate the molecular basis for the competitive...

  15. Quantitative expression and localization of cysteine and aspartic proteases in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Lohoefer, Fabian; Reeps, Christian; Lipp, Christina; Rudelius, Martina; Haertl, Felix; Matevossian, Edouard; Zernecke, Alma; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Pelisek, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine and aspartic proteases possess high elastolytic activity and might contribute to the degradation of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall. The aim of this study was to analyze, in detail, the proteases (cathepsins B, D, K, L and S, and inhibitor cystatin C) found in human AAA and healthy aortic tissue samples. The vessel walls from AAA patients (n=36) and nonaneurysmal aortae (n=10) were retrieved using conventional surgical repair and autopsy methods. Serum samples from the same ...

  16. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor encephalitis: diagnosis, optimal management, and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Andrea P Mann,1 Elena Grebenciucova,2 Rimas V Lukas21Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, 2Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAObjective: Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor (NMDA-R) encephalitis is a new autoimmune disorder, often paraneoplastic in nature, presenting with complex neuropsychiatric symptoms. Diagnosed serologically, this disorder is often responsive to immunosuppressant treatment. The objective of this review is to educate clinicians...

  17. Selective Vulnerabilities of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) Receptors During Brain Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Magnusson, Kathy R.; Brenna L Brim; Das, Siba R.

    2010-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are present in high density within the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and play an important role in learning and memory. NMDA receptors are negatively affected by aging, but these effects are not uniform in many different ways. This review discusses the selective age-related vulnerabilities of different binding sites of the NMDA receptor complex, different subunits that comprise the complex, and the expression and functions of the receptor within differe...

  18. Cauliflower mosaic virus produces an aspartic proteinase to cleave its polyproteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Torruella, M; Gordon, K; Hohn, T

    1989-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), a plant pararetrovirus, produces polyproteins from its adjacent genes for the coat protein (ORF IV) and for enzymatic functions (ORF V). The N-terminal domain of the latter gene includes a sequence showing homology to the active site of other retroviral and acid proteases. We have now shown that this domain does indeed produce a functional aspartic protease that can process both the polyproteins. Mutations in the putative active site abolished virus infectivit...

  19. Young girl with abnormal behavior: Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor immune encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Vinit Suri; Sushma Sharma; Rohan Gupta; Nilesh Jadhao; Kunal Suri

    2013-01-01

    Anti N Methyl D Aspartate receptor immune encephalitis (Anti NMDARE) is a recently defined, under-recognized and often misdiagnosed disease, which typically occurs in young females and may be associated with an underlying tumor, usually ovarian teratoma. If diagnosed early, initiation of immunotherapy and tumor removal (if present) may result in recovery. We report a case of a 17 years old girl with Anti NMDARE who was initially misdiagnosed as Functional psychosis, Neuroleptic Malignant Synd...

  20. Cloning and expression of an active aspartic proteinase from Mucor circinelloides in Pichia pastoris

    OpenAIRE

    Gama Salgado, Jose Antonio; Kangwa, Martin; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracellular aspartic proteinase (MCAP) produced by Mucor circinelloides in solid state fermentations has been shown to possess milk clotting activity and represents a potential replacement for bovine chymosin in cheese manufacturing. Despite its prospects in the dairy industry, the molecular characteristics of this enzyme remain unknown. This work focuses on MCAP cloning and optimization of heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris, and characterization of the enzyme. Results Th...

  1. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis in Korea: Clinical Features, Treatment, and Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Kim, Soyun; Shin, Jung-Won; Moon, Jangsup; Byun, Jung-Ick; Kim, Tae-Joon; Shin, Yong-Won; Lee, Keon-Joo; Kim, Young-Su; Park, Kyung-Il; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is the most common type of autoimmune synaptic encephalitis and it often responds to treatment. We analyzed the clinical characteristics of anti-NMDAR encephalitis in Korea. Methods Serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of adult patients (aged ≥18 years) with encephalitis of undetermined cause were screened for anti-NMDAR antibodies using a cell-based indirect immunofluorescence assay. The patients came from ...

  2. Gender Differences in D-Aspartic Acid Content in Skull Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Torikoshi-Hatano, Aiko; Namera, Akira; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Arima, Yousuke; Toubou, Hirokazu; Ezaki, Jiro; Morikawa, Masami; Nagao, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    In forensic medicine, the personal identification of cadavers is one of the most important tasks. One method of estimating age at death relies on the high correlation between racemization rates in teeth and actual age, and this method has been applied successfully in forensic odontology for several years. In this study, we attempt to facilitate the analysis of racemized amino acids and examine the determination of age at death on the basis of the extent of aspartic acid (Asp) racemization in ...

  3. Insulin degludec and insulin aspart: novel insulins for the management of diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Atkin, Stephen; Javed, Zeeshan; Fulcher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus require insulin as disease progresses to attain or maintain glycaemic targets. Basal insulin is commonly prescribed initially, alone or with one or more rapid-acting prandial insulin doses, to limit mealtime glucose excursions (a basal–bolus regimen). Both patients and physicians must balance the advantages of improved glycaemic control with the risk of hypoglycaemia and increasing regimen complexity. The rapid-acting insulin analogues (insulin aspart, i...

  4. Crystal Structures of the Histo-Aspartic Protease (HAP) from Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Xiao, Huogen; Parr, Charity L.; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Yada, Rickey Y.; Wlodawer, Alexander; (Guelph); (Kyoto); (NCI)

    2009-08-07

    The structures of recombinant histo-aspartic protease (HAP) from malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium falciparum as apoenzyme and in complex with two inhibitors, pepstatin A and KNI-10006, were solved at 2.5-, 3.3-, and 3.05-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. In the apoenzyme crystals, HAP forms a tight dimer not seen previously in any aspartic protease. The interactions between the monomers affect the conformation of two flexible loops, the functionally important 'flap' (residues 70-83) and its structural equivalent in the C-terminal domain (residues 238-245), as well as the orientation of helix 225-235. The flap is found in an open conformation in the apoenzyme. Unexpectedly, the active site of the apoenzyme contains a zinc ion tightly bound to His32 and Asp215 from one monomer and to Glu278A from the other monomer, with the coordination of Zn resembling that seen in metalloproteases. The flap is closed in the structure of the pepstatin A complex, whereas it is open in the complex with KNI-10006. Although the binding mode of pepstatin A is significantly different from that in other pepsin-like aspartic proteases, its location in the active site makes unlikely the previously proposed hypothesis that HAP is a serine protease. The binding mode of KNI-10006 is unusual compared with the binding of other inhibitors from the KNI series to aspartic proteases. The novel features of the HAP active site could facilitate design of specific inhibitors used in the development of antimalarial drugs.

  5. Atomic resolution crystal structure of Sapp2p, a secreted aspartic protease from Candida parapsilosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostál, Jiří; Pecina, Adam; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Marečková, L.; Pichová, Iva; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Lepšík, Martin; Brynda, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 12 (2015), s. 2494-2504. ISSN 1399-0047 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23022S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : aspartic protease * Candida parapsilosis * Sapp2p * crystal structure * ultrahigh resolution * interaction energy * quantum mechanics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UMG-J) Impact factor: 2.674, year: 2014

  6. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis, an Underappreciated Disease in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Lasoff, Daniel R.; Corbett-Detig, Jimmy; Sell, Rebecca; Nolan, Matthew; Wardi, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor (NMDAR) Encephalitis is a novel disease discovered within the past 10 years. Antibodies directed at the NMDAR cause the patient to develop a characteristic syndrome of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Patients go on to develop autonomic dysregulation and often have prolonged hospitalizations and intensive care unit stays. There is little literature in the emergency medicine community regarding this disease process, so we report on a case we encountered in our emer...

  7. Age estimation in forensic sciences: Application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Ohtani, S; Yamamoto, T; Druid, H; Spalding, S L

    2009-11-02

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster, since the age at death, birth date and year of death, as well as gender, can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this paper we analyze teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that above-ground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) which have been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel and ten of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R2=0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 0.6 {+-} 04 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 {+-} 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  8. Modulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function by glycine transport

    OpenAIRE

    Bergeron, Richard; Meyer, Torsten M.; Coyle, Joseph T.; Greene, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    The recent discovery of glycine transporters in both the central nervous system and the periphery suggests that glycine transport may be critical to N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function by controlling glycine concentration at the NMDAR modulatory glycine site. Data obtained from whole-cell patch–clamp recordings of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, in vitro, demonstrated that exogenous glycine and glycine transporter type 1 (GLYT1) antagonist selectively enhanced the amplitude of the N...

  9. Blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation suppresses learning-induced synaptic elimination

    OpenAIRE

    Bock, Jörg; Braun, Katharina

    1999-01-01

    Auditory filial imprinting in the domestic chicken is accompanied by a dramatic loss of spine synapses in two higher associative forebrain areas, the mediorostral neostriatum/hyperstriatum ventrale (MNH) and the dorsocaudal neostriatum (Ndc). The cellular mechanisms that underlie this learning-induced synaptic reorganization are unclear. We found that local pharmacological blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the MNH, a manipulation that has been shown previously to impair aud...

  10. Endogenous neurotransmitter activates N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors on differentiating neurons in embryonic cortex.

    OpenAIRE

    Blanton, M G; Lo Turco, J J; Kriegstein, A R

    1990-01-01

    Before synapses form in embryonic turtle cerebral cortex, an endogenous neurotransmitter activates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) channels on neurons in the cortical plate. Throughout cortical development, these channels exhibit voltage-dependent Mg2+ blockade and are antagonized by D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid, a selective NMDA receptor antagonist. The activation in situ of these nonsynaptic NMDA channels demonstrates a potential physiological substrate for control of early neuronal differ...

  11. Visual responses in adult cat visual cortex depend on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, K. D.; Chapman, B; Stryker, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, a subtype of glutamate receptor, in the responses of cells in adult cat visual cortex. After intracortical infusion of the NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (DL-APV) for one day, iontophoretic responses to NMDA, to kainate, and to quisqualate revealed a receptor blockade specific to NMDA receptors and extending several millimeters from the cannula. In this region, neuronal responses to visual stim...

  12. Molecular docking and enzymatic evaluation to identify selective inhibitors of aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Luniwal, Amarjit; Wang, Lin; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Erhardt, Paul W.; Ronald E. Viola

    2012-01-01

    Microbes that have gained resistance against antibiotics pose a major emerging threat to human health. New targets must be identified that will guide the development of new classes of antibiotics. The selective inhibition of key microbial enzymes that are responsible for the biosynthesis of essential metabolites can be an effective way to counter this growing threat. Aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenases (ASADHs) produce an early branch point metabolite in a microbial biosynthetic pathway for...

  13. N-(Fluoren-9-ylmethoxycarbonyl-l-aspartic acid 4-tert-butyl ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Yamada

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The bond distances and bond angles of the title compound, C23H25NO6, are consistent with values typically found for fluoren-9-ylmethoxycarbonyl-protected amino acids. The conformations of the backbone and the side chain are slightly different from those of l-aspartic acid. The crystal structure exhibits two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, forming a two-dimensional sheet structure parallel to the ab plane.

  14. Evidence that Sleep Deprivation Downregulates Dopamine D2R in Ventral Striatum in the Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Volkow, Nora D.; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Telang, Frank; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Benveniste, Helene; Kim, Ron; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Ferré, Sergi

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine D2 receptors are involved with wakefulness but their role in the decreased alertness associated with sleep deprivation is unclear. We had shown that sleep deprivation reduced dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability (measured with PET and [11C]raclopride in controls) in striatum, but could not determine if this reflected dopamine increases ([11C]raclopride competes with dopamine for D2/D3 receptor binding) or receptor downregulation. To clarify this, we compared the dopamine increases in...

  15. Classic Studies on the Interaction of Cocaine and the Dopamine Transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter is responsible for recycling dopamine after release. Inhibitors of the dopamine transporter, such as cocaine, will stop the reuptake of dopamine and allow it to stay extracellularly, causing prominent changes at the molecular, cellular, and behavioral levels. There is much left to be known about the mechanism and site(s) of binding, as well as the effect that cocaine administration does to dopamine transporter-cocaine binding sites and gene expression which also plays...

  16. Characterization of Mouse Striatal Precursor Cell Lines Expressing Functional Dopamine Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Araki, Kiyomi Y.; Fujimura, Satoshi; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine and its receptors appear in the developing brain early in the embryonic period and dopamine receptor activation influences proliferation and differentiation of neuroepithelial precursor cells. Since dopamine D1 and D2 receptor activation produces opposing effects on precursor cell activity, dopamine's overall effects may correlate with relative numbers and activity of each receptor subtype on the precursor cells. Dopamine receptor expression and activity in individual precursor cells...

  17. The binding sites for cocaine and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    OpenAIRE

    Beuming, Thijs; Kniazeff, Julie; Bergmann, Marianne L; Shi, Lei; Gracia, Luis; Raniszewska, Klaudia; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused substance with psychostimulant effects that are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT). We present molecular models for DAT binding of cocaine and cocaine analogs constructed from the high-resolution structure of the bacterial transporter homolog LeuT. Our models suggest that the binding site for cocaine and cocaine analogs is deeply buried between transmembrane segments 1, 3, 6 and 8, and overlaps with the binding sites for the substrates dopami...

  18. Low or High Cocaine Responding Rats Differ in Striatal Extracellular Dopamine Levels and Dopamine Transporter Number

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Anna M.; Larson, Gaynor A.; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2009-01-01

    Both humans and animals exhibit marked individual differences in cocaine responsiveness. By using the median split of cocaine-induced locomotor activity, we have classified outbred male Sprague-Dawley rats as either low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs, respectively). LCR/HCR classification predicts differences in cocaine inhibition of striatal dopamine (DA) transporters (DATs), cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, cocaine-conditioned place preference, and motivation to self-admin...

  19. Understanding dopamine and reinforcement learning: The dopamine reward prediction error hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Glimcher, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    A number of recent advances have been achieved in the study of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Understanding these advances and how they relate to one another requires a deep understanding of the computational models that serve as an explanatory framework and guide ongoing experimental inquiry. This intertwining of theory and experiment now suggests very clearly that the phasic activity of the midbrain dopamine neurons provides a global mechanism for synaptic modification. These synaptic modif...

  20. Dopamine signaling in food addiction: role of dopamine D2 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ja-Hyun Baik

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) regulates emotional and motivational behavior through the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway. Changes in DA signaling in mesolimbic neurotransmission are widely believed to modify reward-related behaviors and are therefore closely associated with drug addiction. Recent evidence now suggests that as with drug addiction, obesity with compulsive eating behaviors involves reward circuitry of the brain, particularly the circuitry involving dopaminergic neural substrates. Increasing amou...