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Sample records for asialoglycoprotein receptor deficiency

  1. Cellular distribution of 111In-LDTPA galactose BSA in normal and asialoglycoprotein receptor-deficient mouse liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    111In-LDTPA galactose BSA (bovine serum albumin) was used to evaluate the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) system in both normal and ASGPR-deficient mice. The radiolabeled glycoprotein had complete liver uptake in both normal and ASGPR-deficient mice. Metabolism and hepatic cell-type distribution studies were performed. The normal mouse excreted greater than 60% of the hepatic activity, while the ASGPR-deficient mouse excreted less than 40% of the hepatic activity. 111In-LDTPA galactose BSA was metabolized to 111In-LDTPA-L-lysine in both mouse types. Normal mice showed 70% of the radioactivity in the hepatocyte, whereas the homozygous ASGPR-deficient mouse had equal activity in the hepatocyte and the hepatic endothelial cell

  2. Impact of asialoglycoprotein receptor deficiency on the development of liver injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Serene ML Lee; Carol A Casey; Benita L McVicker

    2009-01-01

    The asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor is a wellcharacterized hepatic receptor that is recycled via the common cellular process of receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME). The RME process plays an integral part in the proper trafficking and routing of receptors and ligands in the healthy cell. Thus, the missorting or altered transport of proteins during RME is thought to play a role in several diseases associated with hepatocyte and liver dysfunction. Previously,we examined in detail alterations that occur in hepatocellular RME and associated receptor functions as a result of one particular liver injury, alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The studies revealed profound ethanolmediated impairments to the ASGP receptor and the RME process, indicating the importance of this receptor and the maintenance of proper endocytic events in normal tissue. To further clarify these observations,studies were performed utilizing knockout mice (lacking a functional ASGP receptor) to which were administered several liver toxicants. In addition to alcohol, we examined the effects following administration of anti-Fas (CD95) antibody, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/galactosamine. The results of these studies demonstrated that the knockout mice sustained enhanced liver injury in response to all of the treatments, as shown by increased indices of liver damage, such as enhancement of serum enzyme levels,histopathological scores, as well as hepatocellular death.Overall, the work completed to date suggests a possible link between hepatic receptors and liver injury. In particular, adequate function and content of the ASGP receptor may provide protection against various toxinmediated liver diseases.

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the asialoglycoprotein receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor undergoes constitutive endocytosis through the coated pit/coated vesicle pathway in hepatocytes. Studies on HepG2 cells have shown that the receptor is phosphorylated at serine under control conditions and following protein kinase C stimulation. This study examined whether the ASGP receptor could also serve as a substrate for a tyrosine kinase in HepG2 cells. 32P labeling was performed in membrane preparations, in permeabilized cells at 4 degrees C, and in intact cells at 37 degrees C. The phosphorylated ASGP receptor was isolated by immunoprecipitation, hydrolyzed in 6 N HCl at 110 degrees C, and analyzed by two-dimensional high voltage electrophoresis. The receptor isolated from a membrane preparation incubated in vitro with [gamma-32P]ATP incorporated radiolabel predominantly (greater than 90%) into phosphotyrosine. ASGP receptor phosphorylation at both tyrosine and serine was detected in intact cells incubated with phosphatase inhibitors for 60 min at 37 degrees C. The presence of both phenylarsine oxide (20 microM) and sodium orthovanadate (200 microM) was required for tyrosine phosphorylation. Use of these inhibitors together resulted in a 16.4-fold increase in phosphorylation of the immunoprecipitated ASGP receptor, whereas phosphorylation of total HepG2 membrane proteins was not significantly augmented by this procedure. Selective proteolytic digestion of ASGP receptors in isolated vesicles demonstrated that the phosphorylation site identified in these studies is located at tyrosine 5 in the cytoplasmic tail

  4. Asialoglycoprotein receptor targeted imaging using Tc-99m galactosylated chitosan

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    Kim, E. M.; Jeong, H. J.; Kim, B. C.; Kim, C. K [Wonkang University College of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) is expressed on liver hepatocytes. Chitosan conjugates of galactose have shown to be specifically taken up by liver parenchymal cells via ASGP-R. In this study, Tc-99m hydrazino nicotinamide (HYNIC)-galactosylated chitosan (HYNIC-GC) was synthesized and evaluated as a targeted agent for the imaging of hepatocytes. GC was obtained after coupling of lactobionic acid as the galactose moiety and coupled with HYNIC. HYNIC-GC was radiolabeled with Tc-99m using stannous chloride and tricine as reducing agent and coligand respectively. Hepatic uptake property of Tc-99m HYNIC-GC was studied in female Balb/C mouse. Tc-99m HYNIC--GC and Tc-99m HYNIC-Chitosan as a control were intravenously injected into mice. Receptor binding was identified by coinjection with 50 mM and 80mM free galactose respectively. Biodistribution was determined at three different time points. The level of galactose substitution was 7.6%. Labeling efficiency was >90% both in vitro and serum up to 24 h. Tc-99m HYNIC-GC injected via tail vein of mice showed high selectivity of liver. On the other hands, Tc-99m HC without galactose group showed low uptake (Fig. 1A, 1B). Hepatic uptake of Tc-99m HYNIC-GC was dramatically blocked by 50 mM and 80 mM free galactose coinjection (Fig. 1C, 1D). The liver accumulated about 14 percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g) up to 120 min after injection. Tc-99m HYNIC-GC showed specific and rapid targeting to liver. It is a promising specific radiopharmaceutical with potential applications in the imaging of liver parenchymal cells.

  5. Asialoglycoprotein receptor targeted imaging using Tc-99m galactosylated chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) is expressed on liver hepatocytes. Chitosan conjugates of galactose have shown to be specifically taken up by liver parenchymal cells via ASGP-R. In this study, Tc-99m hydrazino nicotinamide (HYNIC)-galactosylated chitosan (HYNIC-GC) was synthesized and evaluated as a targeted agent for the imaging of hepatocytes. GC was obtained after coupling of lactobionic acid as the galactose moiety and coupled with HYNIC. HYNIC-GC was radiolabeled with Tc-99m using stannous chloride and tricine as reducing agent and coligand respectively. Hepatic uptake property of Tc-99m HYNIC-GC was studied in female Balb/C mouse. Tc-99m HYNIC--GC and Tc-99m HYNIC-Chitosan as a control were intravenously injected into mice. Receptor binding was identified by coinjection with 50 mM and 80mM free galactose respectively. Biodistribution was determined at three different time points. The level of galactose substitution was 7.6%. Labeling efficiency was >90% both in vitro and serum up to 24 h. Tc-99m HYNIC-GC injected via tail vein of mice showed high selectivity of liver. On the other hands, Tc-99m HC without galactose group showed low uptake (Fig. 1A, 1B). Hepatic uptake of Tc-99m HYNIC-GC was dramatically blocked by 50 mM and 80 mM free galactose coinjection (Fig. 1C, 1D). The liver accumulated about 14 percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g) up to 120 min after injection. Tc-99m HYNIC-GC showed specific and rapid targeting to liver. It is a promising specific radiopharmaceutical with potential applications in the imaging of liver parenchymal cells

  6. Galactosylated manganese ferrite nanoparticles for targeted MR imaging of asialoglycoprotein receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer cells can express specific biomarkers, such as cell membrane proteins and signaling factors. Thus, finding biomarkers and delivering diagnostic agents are important in the diagnosis of cancer. In this study, we investigated a biomarker imaging agent for the diagnosis of hepatic cancers. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPr) was selected as a biomarker for hepatoma cells and the ASGPr-targetable imaging agent bearing a galactosyl group was prepared using manganese ferrite nanoparticles (MFNP) and galactosylgluconic acid. The utility of the ASGPr-targetable imaging agent, galactosylated MFNP (G-MFNP) was assessed by several methods in ASGPr-expressing HepG2 cells as target cells and ASGPr-deficient MCF7 cells. Physical and chemical properties of G-MFNP were examined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. No significant cytotoxicity was observed in either cell line. Targeting ability was assessed using flow cytometry, magnetic resonance imaging, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, absorbance analysis, dark-field microscopy, Prussian blue staining, and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrated that G-MFNP target successfully and bind to ASGPr-expressing HepG2 cells specifically. We suggest that these results will be useful in strategies for cancer diagnoses based on magnetic resonance imaging. (paper)

  7. Asialoglycoprotein receptor and liposome synergistically mediate the gene transfer into primary rat hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李崇辉; 温守明; 翟海峰; 孙曼霁

    1999-01-01

    Gene transfer into primary rat hepatocytes was performed by employing cationic liposome as DNA carrier and the specific ligand of hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), asialofetuin, as liver-targeting ligand. The resuits showed that asialofetuin, when added to the gene transfer complexes, could significantly increase the hepatocyte transfeetion efficiency, and alleviate the cellular toxicity of Lipofectin. Several synthetic ligands of ASGPR (galactosyl albumin) could also increase the transfection efficiency of hepatocyte like asialofetuin. It was proved that ASGPR and cationic liposome could synergistically mediate the gene transfer into primary rat hepatoeytes. This novel gene delivery system provided a safer, more simple and efficient gene transfer method for primary hepatocytes, and showed prospecting application in hepatic gene therapy.

  8. Ga-68-labeled neolactosylated human serum albumin (LSA) for PET imaging of hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was the development of 68Ga-labeled neolactosylated human serum albumin (LSA) for imaging asialoglycoprotein receptors in the liver by using positron emission tomography (PET), which would enable functional imaging with higher resolution than single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods: LSA was synthesized by conjugating α-lactose to human serum albumin (HSA) by reductive amination. LSA was conjugated with 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (SCN-NOTA) and the resultant NOTA-LSA was labeled with 68Ga at room temperature. The labeling efficiency of NOTA-LSA was evaluated as a function of pH and time. The stability of 68Ga-NOTA-LSA in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and human serum at 37 °C was determined. Biodistribution and PET studies of 68Ga-NOTA-LSA were performed in mice following tail vein injection of radiotracer. Results: The numbers of lactose and NOTA units per HSA were determined to be 31.7 and 4.6, respectively. When the reaction was done at room temperature, the labeling efficiency of NOTA-LSA was higher than 99% at pH 4.8 and 96% at pH 6. More than 95% of the detected radioactivity was associated with the intact molecule for at least the 4 h following synthesis when incubated in PBS or human serum at 37 °C. Biodistribution and animal PET studies showed specific retention of 68Ga-NOTA-LSA in liver following intravenous administration. Conclusion: 68Ga-NOTA-LSA was successfully developed for imaging asialoglycoprotein receptors in the liver with a simple labeling method, high labeling efficiency, and high stability

  9. Constant serum levels of secreted asialoglycoprotein receptor sH2a and decrease with cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ron Benyair; Maria Kondratyev; Elena Veselki; Sandra Tolchinsky; Marina Shenkman; Yoav Lurie; Gerardo Z Lederkremer

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the existence and levels of sH2a, a soluble secreted form of the asialoglycoprotein receptor in human serum.METHODS: Production of recombinant sH2a and development of a monoclonal antibody and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).This assay was used to determine the presence and concentration of sH2a in human sera of individuals of both sexes and a wide range of ages.RESULTS: The recombinant protein was produced successfully and a specific ELISA assay was developed. The levels of sH2a in sera from 62 healthy individuals varied minimally (147 ± 19 ng/mL).In contrast, 5 hepatitis C patients with cirrhosis showed much decreased sH2a levels (50 ± 9 ng/mL).CONCLUSION: Constant sH2a levels suggest constitutive secretion from hepatocytes in healthy individuals.This constant level and the decrease with cirrhosis suggest a diagnostic potential.

  10. Cloning, Expression and Polyclonal Antibody Preparation of the Asialoglycoprotein Receptor of Marmota Himalayan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yan; HUANG Huang; ZHANG Zhenghua; WANG Baoju; TIAN Yongjun; LU Mengji; YANG Dongliang

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is to express the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) H1 and H2 subunits of Marmota himalayan in vitro, and develop polyclonal antibodies against the recombinant proteins. RT-PCR was used to amplify ASGPR CRDH1 and CRDH2 from the liver tissue of Marmota himalayan. The products of amplification were subcloned into prokaryotic expression vector pRSET-B, and expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3)plysS. The recombinant proteins were purified using Ni-NTA spin column. The purified proteins were inoculated into BALB/c mice to develop polyclonal antibodies. The sensitivity and specificity of antibodies were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining (IHC). The polyclonal antibodies showed high sensitivity and specificity against both denaturated and native ASGPR proteins. We successfully amplified and expressed the ASGPR CRDs of Marmota himalayan. The nucleic sequences of ASGPR CRDH1 and CRDH2 of Marmota himalayan have been submitted to Genbank and the sequence ID are DQ 845465 and DQ845466, respectively. The proteins and antibodies prepared can be used for targeting gene therapy in a new animal model-Marmota himalayan-for the research of infectious diseases of hepatitis viruses and liver cancer treatment.

  11. Compartmental analysis of asialoglycoprotein receptor scintigraphy for quantitative measurement of liver function: a multicentre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multicentre study on multicompartmental analysis of hepatic scintigraphy using technetium-99m labelled galactosyl serum albumin (GSA), which binds to the asialoglycoprotein receptor, was carried out at seven institutions in Japan. Seventy-four patients with liver disease received 3 mg (185 MBq) of 99mTc-GSA by intravenous injection. Sequential scanning was performed 30 min after injection to obtain anterior images of the heart and liver, followed by single-photon emission tomography (SPET). The indices included in this analysis were hepatic blood flow (Q) and maximal receptor binding rate (Rmax), which showed a good correlation with semiquantitative ratio indices for 99mTc-GSA, namely the retention rate in blood (HH15) and the hepatic uptake rate (LHL15). Q and Rmaxalso showed a significant correlation with other measures of hepatic function. When patients were grouped according to the severity of chronic liver damage (hepatocellular functional damage), Q was reduced in the moderate and severe groups, while R maxwas reduced in proportion to the functional stage. Both parameters showed no inter-institution difference using analysis of co-variance with the functional stage as a co-variant. With regard to the hepatic uptake rate, anterior planar images and SPET images gave similar results for Q and R max. Acquisition times of 15 or 30 min provided the same results. The multicompartmental model analysis permitted comparable results to be obtained at institutions using different gamma cameras, and is therefore considered a universally applicable method. These results indicate that Q and R maxare useful general indices for evaluating the functional reserve capacity of the liver. (orig.). With 8 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Flow cytometric analysis of asialoglycoprotein receptor expression predicts hepatic functional reserve after hepatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To validate a cheaper and more accessible flow cytometry-based method of assessing Asialoglycoprotein Receptor (ASGPR) expression for hepatic functional reserve. Study Design: A retrospective analysis. Place and Duration of Study: Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, from January 2011 to October 2013. Methodology: Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) undergoing major hepatectomy at Beijing Ditan Hospital, during the study period were retrospectively studied. The fraction of hepatocytes expressing ASGPR in liver tissues was assessed by flow cytometry. Patients were grouped according to the presence or absence of postoperative hepatic dysfunction. The correlation between ASGPR expression and pre-operative liver function parameters with the outcomes of hepatectomy were analyzed. Results: Fewer hepatocytes from patients with postoperative hepatic dysfunction expressed ASGPR (63.3 (57.3 - 68.2)) than from patients without postoperative hepatic dysfunction (72.4 (70.6 - 76.3), p = 0.001). Multiple logistic regression demonstrated ASGPR levels to be independently correlated with postoperative hepatic dysfunction (Odds ratio 3.34, 95% CI: 2.61-6.02, p = 0.001), and the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve for prediction of postoperative liver dysfunction at 68.95% ASGPR+ hepatocytes achieved a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90.6%. The ROC curve for prediction of postoperative liver failure related death at 58.53% ASGPR+ hepatocytes achieved a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 99%. Conclusion: Flow cytometric assessment of ASGPR expression may be a useful predictor of liver dysfunction following major hepatectomy for HCC in Chinese patients. (author)

  13. Evaluation of the residual functional reserve and the early regeneration after the hepatic resection using asialoglycoprotein receptor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99mTc-DTPA-galactosyl human serum albumin (99mTc-GSA) is a newly developed liver imaging ligand which specifically binds to asialoglycoprotein receptor on the hepatic cell surface. We investigated whether 99mTc-GSA scintigraphy could be used as indexes for the residual functional reserve and the early regeneration of the hepatocyte after hepatic resection. Four patients with metastatic liver cancer, 3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, and 1 patient with cholangiocellular carcinoma were studied. Each patient was examined 4 times. Immediately after iv injection of 185 MBq (3 mg) of 99mTc-GSA, serial images and dynamic data were obtained. Serial changes of HH15, as an index of blood clearance of the tracer calculated from the uptake ratio of heart at 15 min to that at 3 min, and LHL15, as an index of hepatic accumulation calculated from the uptake ratio of liver to liver plus heart at 15 min after the injection were analyzed before and after hepatectomy. Three out of 4 lobectomy patients which showed increased HH15, and decreased LHL15 as compared with the preoperative data were considered to be decreased residual hepatic functional reserve. The remaining one lobectomy patient showed increased HH15, but increased LHL15 inversely. One patient of two partial resections of hepatocellular carcinoma with liver cirrhosis demonstrated transiently decreased HH15, and increased LHL15. Two patients with metastatic liver cancer (one partial resection, 6 partial resections) showed decreased HH15, and increased LHL15. Postoperatively increased hepatic accumulation was presumed to be increased functioning hepatocyte or transiently increased asialoglycoprotein receptor on the cell surface by up-regulation. 99mTc-GSA scintigraphy might be helpful for non-invasive method to detect the residual functional reserve and the early regeneration of the hepatocyte after the hepatic resection. (author)

  14. A new liver function test using the asialoglycoprotein-receptor system on the liver cell membrane, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the validity of a new radionuclide liver imaging method using an asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor system on the cell membrane. Neoglycoprotein was labeled with 99mTc using SnCl2 as a reductant and administered into normal rats and those with 3'-metyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene induced liver cancer. This protein is physiologically equivalent to ASGP and thus binds to ASGP receptors, and is taken up by the liver. In the normal rats, liver images obtained with this new method were as clear as those obtained with 99mTc-Sn colloid. In the rats with liver cancer, lesions (10 mm in diameter) were visualized as accumulated defects showing a distinct contrast to the surrounding tissues. These defects were consistent with the macroscopic observations, and also were supported by the absence of ASGP receptor activity in lesions confirmed by measurements in cancerous and non-cancerous areas. The results indicate the usefulness of labeled neoglycoprotein as radiopharmaceutical for liver RI imaging. (author)

  15. Clinical application of asialoglycoprotein receptor-mediated liver scintigraphy using 99mTc-DTPA-galactosyl-human serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-galactosyl-human serum albumin (99mTc-GSA) is a new liver scintigraphy agent which binds to asialoglycoprotein receptors on the hepatocytes. Studies were performed in three normal volunteers and 19 patients with chronic liver diseases. Serial scintigrams and time-activity curves of heart and liver were obtained for 60 min following a single intravenous injection of 99mTc-GSA (1 mg/185 MBq). %Injected dose (%ID) in the blood at 60 min after injection and that in the liver were determined. Excellent hepatic images were obtained for 60 min in normal subjects, and neither blood pool image nor extrahepatic uptake was recognized. In the studies of patients, however, blood pools were also visualized in various degrees suggesting altered receptor quantity, although the livers were visualized clearly. The %ID in the blood at 60 min after the injection showed significant correlations with serum albumin levels (r=-0.741, p99mTc-GSA liver scintigraphy is useful in evaluating the liver function. (author)

  16. Electrochemical evidence for asialoglycoprotein receptor – mediated hepatocyte adhesion and proliferation in three dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasanthan, Kirthanashri S.; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Parthasarathy, Meera, E-mail: meera_p@scbt.sastra.edu

    2015-08-26

    Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is one of the recognition motifs on the surface of hepatocytes, which promote their adhesion to extracellular matrix in liver tissue and appropriate artificial surfaces. ASGPR-mediated adhesion is expected to minimize trans-differentiation of hepatocytes in vitro that is generally observed in integrin-mediated adhesion. The aim of the present study is to verify the role of ASGPR in hepatocyte adhesion and proliferation in scaffolds for hepatic tissue engineering. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) is emerging as a suitable non-invasive analytical tool due to its high sensitivity and capability to correlate the morphology and activity of live cells. HepG2 cells and rat primary hepatocytes cultured in Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/Gelatin hydrogel scaffolds with and without galactose (a ligand for ASGPR) modification are studied using SECM. Systematic investigation of live cells cultured for different durations in scaffolds of different compositions (9:1 and 8:2 PVA:Gelatin with and without galactose) reveals significant improvement in cell–cell communication and proliferation on galactose incorporated scaffolds, thereby demonstrating the positive influence of ASGPR-mediated adhesion. In this work, we have also developed a methodology to quantify the respiratory activity and intracellular redox activity of live cells cultured in porous tissue engineering scaffolds. Using this methodology, SECM results are compared with routine cell culture assays viz., MTS ((1-Oxyl-2,2,5,5,-tetramethyl-Δ3-pyrroline-3-methyl) Methanethiosulfonate) and Albumin assays to demonstrate the better sensitivity of SECM. In addition, the present study demonstrates SECM as a reliable and sensitive tool to monitor the activity of live cells cultured in scaffolds for tissue engineering, which could be used on a routine basis. - Highlights: • A methodology for electrochemical imaging of polymer scaffolds is proposed. • The new methodology allows

  17. Radiolabelled 153Sm-chelates of glycoconjugates: multivalence and topology effects on the targeting of the asialoglycoprotein receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we report and discuss the biodistribution studies with Wistar rats of a series of 153Sm(III)-glycoconjugates, based on DO3A and DO2A(cis) scaffolds (DO3A = 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane; DO2A(cis) = 1,4-bis(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane). The effects of changing the sugar type (galactose, lactose and glucose), valency (mono and divalent) and topology on the targeting ability of the liver asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) are evaluated. Divalent glycoconjugates with different topologies were generated by a pendant glycodendrimeric (generation 1) architecture on a DO3A scaffold and by a linear DO2A(cis)-bis derivative. The results show that the galactose conjugates are more target efficient than the lactose analogues, while the glucose conjugates have no liver targeting ability. Divalent galactose conjugates are more efficiently targeted to the liver than the monovalent ones, while the dendrimeric topology of DO3A-Gal2 has higher targeting efficiency than that of the DO2A(cis)-Gal2. (orig.)

  18. Radiolabelled {sup 153}Sm-chelates of glycoconjugates: multivalence and topology effects on the targeting of the asialoglycoprotein receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, S. [Centro de Quimica, Campus de Gualtar, Univ. do Minho, Braga (Portugal); Martins, J.A.; Andre, J.P.; Neves, M. [Inst. Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem (Portugal); Santos, A.C.; Prata, M.I.M. [Servico de Biofisica, IBILI, Univ. de Coimbra (Portugal); Geraldes, C.F.G.C. [Dept. de Bioquimica, Centro de Espectroscopia RMN e Centro de Neurociencias e Biologia Celular, Univ. de Coimbra (Portugal)

    2007-07-01

    In this paper we report and discuss the biodistribution studies with Wistar rats of a series of {sup 153}Sm(III)-glycoconjugates, based on DO3A and DO2A(cis) scaffolds (DO3A = 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane; DO2A(cis) = 1,4-bis(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane). The effects of changing the sugar type (galactose, lactose and glucose), valency (mono and divalent) and topology on the targeting ability of the liver asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) are evaluated. Divalent glycoconjugates with different topologies were generated by a pendant glycodendrimeric (generation 1) architecture on a DO3A scaffold and by a linear DO2A(cis)-bis derivative. The results show that the galactose conjugates are more target efficient than the lactose analogues, while the glucose conjugates have no liver targeting ability. Divalent galactose conjugates are more efficiently targeted to the liver than the monovalent ones, while the dendrimeric topology of DO3A-Gal{sub 2} has higher targeting efficiency than that of the DO2A(cis)-Gal{sub 2}. (orig.)

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 18F-FB-NGA as a hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor PET imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) is a hepatic membrane receptor that uniquely exists on the surface of mammalian hepatocytes, and has been used as target of liver functional imaging agents for many years. We labeled the Galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) with 18F to get a PET molecular probe 18F-FB-NGA and evaluated its ability as a liver functional PET imaging agent. The 18F-FB-NGA was prepared with NGA by conjugation with N- succinimidyl-4-18F-fluorobenzoate (18F-SFB) and purified with PD-10 desalting column. The radiolabeling yield and radiochemical purity of 18F-FB-NGA were determined by radio-HPLC. Starting with 18F-F-, the total time for '18F-FB -NGA was about 120±310 min. The decay-corrected radiochemical yield is about 25-30%. The radiochemical purity of purified 18F-FB-NGA was more than 98%. Labeled with 185-1850 MBq 18F-SFB, the specific activity of 18F-FB- NGA was estimated to be 7.83-78.3 TBq/mmol. Biodistribution of 18F-FB-NGA in normal mice was investigated after injection through the tail vein. The results showed that the liver accumulated 39.4 7±3.42 and 12.12±6.11% ID/g at 10 and 30 min after injection, respectively. Dynamic MicroPET images in mice were acquired with and without block after injection of the radiotracer, respectively. High liver activity accumulation was observed at 5 min after injection in normal group. On the contrary, the liver accumulation was significantly lower after block, indicating the specific binding to ASGP-R. 18F-FB-NGA is probably a potential PET liver imaging agent. (authors)

  20. A new splice variant of the major subunit of human asialoglycoprotein receptor encodes a secreted form in hepatocytes.

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    Jia Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR is composed of two polypeptides, designated H1 and H2. While variants of H2 have been known for decades, the existence of H1 variants has never been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified two splice variants of ASGPR H1 transcripts, designated H1a and H1b, in human liver tissues and hepatoma cells. Molecular cloning of ASGPR H1 variants revealed that they differ by a 117 nucleotide segment corresponding to exon 2 in the ASGPR genomic sequence. Thus, ASGPR variant H1b transcript encodes a protein lacking the transmembrane domain. Using an H1b-specific antibody, H1b protein and a functional soluble ASGPR (sASGPR composed of H1b and H2 in human sera and in hepatoma cell culture supernatant were identified. The expression of ASGPR H1a and H1b in Hela cells demonstrated the different cellular loctions of H1a and H1b proteins at cellular membranes and in intracellular compartments, respectively. In vitro binding assays using fluorescence-labeled sASGPR or the substract ASOR revealed that the presence of sASGPR reduced the binding of ASOR to cells. However, ASOR itself was able to enhance the binding of sASGPR to cells expressing membrane-bound ASGPR. Further, H1b expression is reduced in liver tissues from patients with viral hepatitis. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that two naturally occurring ASGPR H1 splice variants are produced in human hepatocytes. A hetero-oligomeric complex sASGPR consists of the secreted form of H1 and H2 and may bind to free substrates in circulation and carry them to liver tissue for uptake by ASGPR-expressing hepatocytes.

  1. Asialoglycoprotein-receptor-targeted hepatocyte imaging using {sup 99m}Tc galactosylated chitosan

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    Kim, Eun-Mi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University School of Medicine, Jeonju, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hwan-Jeong [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University School of Medicine, Jeonju, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jayjeong@chonbuk.ac.kr; Kim, Se-Lim [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University School of Medicine, Jeonju, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Myung-Hee [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University School of Medicine, Jeonju, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Nah, Jae-Woon [Division of Applied Materials Engineering, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sunchon National University, Sunchon, Jeonnam (Korea, Republic of); Bom, Hee-Seung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, In-Kyu [School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chong-Su [School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    This study investigated the usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc hydrazinonicotinamide-galactosylated chitosan (HGC) in hepatocyte imaging. HGC was obtained by coupling the galactose moiety of both lactobionic acid and succinimidyl 6-hydrazinonicotinate hydrochloride (succinimidyl HYNIC). The coupled product was then radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc using stannous chloride and tricine as reducing agent and coligand, respectively. Labeling efficiency was >90% both in room temperature and in serum up to 24 h after injection. The hepatic uptake properties of {sup 99m}Tc HGC were studied in Balb/C mice. {sup 99m}Tc HGC and {sup 99m}Tc hydrazinonicotinamide chitosan (HC) were intravenously injected into mice, with receptor binding identified by coinjection with 9 and 14 mg of free galactose. Images were acquired with a {gamma}-camera. After injection via the tail vein of the mice, {sup 99m}Tc HGC showed high selectivity for the liver, while {sup 99m}Tc HC without a galactose group showed low liver uptake. In addition, the hepatic uptake of {sup 99m}Tc HGC was blocked by coinjection of free galactose. Tissue distribution was determined at three different times (10, 60 and 120 min). The liver accumulated 13.16{+-}2.72%, 16.11{+-}5.70% and 16.55{+-}2.28% of the injected dose per gram at 10, 60 and 120 min after injection, respectively. {sup 99m}Tc HGC showed specific and rapid targeting of hepatocytes. It is a promising receptor-specific radiopharmaceutical with potential applications in liver imaging for the evaluation of hepatocytic function.

  2. Asialoglycoprotein-receptor-targeted hepatocyte imaging using 99mTc galactosylated chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the usefulness of 99mTc hydrazinonicotinamide-galactosylated chitosan (HGC) in hepatocyte imaging. HGC was obtained by coupling the galactose moiety of both lactobionic acid and succinimidyl 6-hydrazinonicotinate hydrochloride (succinimidyl HYNIC). The coupled product was then radiolabeled with 99mTc using stannous chloride and tricine as reducing agent and coligand, respectively. Labeling efficiency was >90% both in room temperature and in serum up to 24 h after injection. The hepatic uptake properties of 99mTc HGC were studied in Balb/C mice. 99mTc HGC and 99mTc hydrazinonicotinamide chitosan (HC) were intravenously injected into mice, with receptor binding identified by coinjection with 9 and 14 mg of free galactose. Images were acquired with a γ-camera. After injection via the tail vein of the mice, 99mTc HGC showed high selectivity for the liver, while 99mTc HC without a galactose group showed low liver uptake. In addition, the hepatic uptake of 99mTc HGC was blocked by coinjection of free galactose. Tissue distribution was determined at three different times (10, 60 and 120 min). The liver accumulated 13.16±2.72%, 16.11±5.70% and 16.55±2.28% of the injected dose per gram at 10, 60 and 120 min after injection, respectively. 99mTc HGC showed specific and rapid targeting of hepatocytes. It is a promising receptor-specific radiopharmaceutical with potential applications in liver imaging for the evaluation of hepatocytic function

  3. Fluorine-18 labeled galactosylated chitosan for asialoglycoprotein-receptor-mediated hepatocyte imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenjiang; Mou, Tiantian; Guo, Wenyan; Jing, Huihui; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Xianzhong; Ma, Yunchuan; Liu, Boli

    2010-08-15

    Galactosylated chitosan (GC) was prepared by reacting lactobionic acid with water-soluble chitosan. GC was labeled with fluorine-18 by conjugation with N-succinimidyl-4-(18)F-fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) under a slightly basic condition. After rapid purification with HiTrap desalting column, [(18)F]FB-GC was obtained with high radiochemical purity (>97%) determined by radio-HPLC. The total reaction time for [(18)F]FB-GC was about 150 min. Typical decay-corrected radiochemical yield was about 4-8%. Ex vivo biodistribution in normal mice showed that [(18)F]FB-GC had moderate activity accumulation in liver with very good retention (11.13+/-1.63, 10.97+/-1.90 and 10.77+/-0.95%ID/g at 10, 60, 120 min after injection, respectively). The other tissues except kidney showed relative low radioactivity accumulation. The high liver/background ratio affords promising biological properties to get clear images. The specific binding of this radiotracer to the ASGP receptor was confirmed by blocking experiment in mice. Compared with the non-blocking group the hepatic uptake of [(18)F]FB-GC significantly declined in all selected time points. The better liver retention properties of [(18)F]FB-GC than that of albumin based imaging agents may improve imaging quality and simplify pharmacokinetic model of liver function in the future application with PET imaging. PMID:20634070

  4. Genetics Home Reference: leptin receptor deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions leptin receptor deficiency leptin receptor deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Leptin receptor deficiency is a condition that causes severe ...

  5. Simplified quantification method for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging of asialoglycoprotein receptor with 99mTc-p(VLA-co-VNI) to assess and stage hepatic fibrosis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Deliang; Guo, Zhide; Zhang, Pu; Li, Yesen; Su, Xinhui; You, Linyi; Gao, Mengna; Liu, Chang; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a noninvasive method of SPECT imaging to quantify and stage liver fibrosis with an Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) targeting tracer—99mTc-p(VLA-co-VNI). ASGP-Rs are well known to specifically express in the mammalian liver. Here, we demonstrated ASGP-R expression decreased in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced mouse model. ASGP-R expression correlated with liver fibrosis progression. ASGP-R could be a useful marker in the stage of liver fibrosis. Liv...

  6. Effect of size and conformation of the ligand on asialoglycoprotein receptor-mediated ligand internalization and degradation in rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rates of internalization and degradation of 125-I-labeled desialylated cyanogen bromide fragment I of orosomucoid (AS-CNBr-I) and its reduced and carboxymethylated derivative (AS-RC-CNBr-I) were compared with those of 125I-labeled asialoorosomucoid (ASOR) in rat hepatocytes. At 30 nM the rates of internalization and degradation of 125I-AS-CNBr-I were greater than those of 125I-ASOR. 125I-AS-RC-CNBr-I also had a lower rate of internalization and degradation. In contrast to 125I-ASOR, when degradation was inhibited by 5 μM colchicine there was a significant intracellular accumulation of the smaller ligands. At 40C the hepatocytes were found to bind the fragmented ligands more than 125I-ASOR. Incubation of the cells with bound ligand at 370 indicated that diacytosis of 125I-ASOR was greater than the smaller ligands. Colchincine markedly enhanced diacytosis of 125I-ASOR. On the other hand, there were marked accumulation of the smaller ligands by colchicine. These results suggest that the rates of internalization, degradation and diacytosis of the ligand are affected by the size and conformation of the ligand through different rates of receptor binding and intracellular transport

  7. Simplified quantification method for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging of asialoglycoprotein receptor with 99mTc-p(VLA-co-VNI) to assess and stage hepatic fibrosis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deliang; Guo, Zhide; Zhang, Pu; Li, Yesen; Su, Xinhui; You, Linyi; Gao, Mengna; Liu, Chang; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a noninvasive method of SPECT imaging to quantify and stage liver fibrosis with an Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) targeting tracer—99mTc-p(VLA-co-VNI). ASGP-Rs are well known to specifically express in the mammalian liver. Here, we demonstrated ASGP-R expression decreased in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced mouse model. ASGP-R expression correlated with liver fibrosis progression. ASGP-R could be a useful marker in the stage of liver fibrosis. Liver uptake value (LUV) derived by SPECT imaging was used to assess liver fibrosis in the CCl4-induced mouse model. LUV = [radioactivity (liver uptake)/radioactivity (injected)] × 100/liver volume. The LUV decreased along with the disease progression. The relationships between LUV and liver hydroxyproline (i.e. collagen), as well as Sirius Red were established and verified. A strong negative linear correlation was found between LUV and hydroxyproline levels (r = −0.83) as well as LUV and Sirius Red quantification (r = −0.83). In conclusion, SPECT imaging with 99mTc-p(VLA-co-VNI) is useful in evaluating and staging liver fibrosis in vivo. PMID:27150943

  8. Simplified quantification method for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging of asialoglycoprotein receptor with (99m)Tc-p(VLA-co-VNI) to assess and stage hepatic fibrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deliang; Guo, Zhide; Zhang, Pu; Li, Yesen; Su, Xinhui; You, Linyi; Gao, Mengna; Liu, Chang; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a noninvasive method of SPECT imaging to quantify and stage liver fibrosis with an Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) targeting tracer-(99m)Tc-p(VLA-co-VNI). ASGP-Rs are well known to specifically express in the mammalian liver. Here, we demonstrated ASGP-R expression decreased in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced mouse model. ASGP-R expression correlated with liver fibrosis progression. ASGP-R could be a useful marker in the stage of liver fibrosis. Liver uptake value (LUV) derived by SPECT imaging was used to assess liver fibrosis in the CCl4-induced mouse model. LUV = [radioactivity (liver uptake)/radioactivity (injected)] × 100/liver volume. The LUV decreased along with the disease progression. The relationships between LUV and liver hydroxyproline (i.e. collagen), as well as Sirius Red were established and verified. A strong negative linear correlation was found between LUV and hydroxyproline levels (r = -0.83) as well as LUV and Sirius Red quantification (r = -0.83). In conclusion, SPECT imaging with (99m)Tc-p(VLA-co-VNI) is useful in evaluating and staging liver fibrosis in vivo. PMID:27150943

  9. DEFICIENCY OF INTERLEUKIN-1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST RESPONSIVE TO ANAKINRA

    OpenAIRE

    SCHNELLBACHER, CHARLOTTE; CIOCCA, GIOVANNA; MENENDEZ, ROXANNA; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; DUARTE, ANAM.; RIVAS-CHACON, RAFAEL

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 3-month-old infant who presented to our institution with interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist deficiency (DIRA), which consists of neutrophilic pustular dermatosis, periostitis, aseptic multifocal osteomyelitis, and persistently high acutephase reactants. Skin findings promptly improved upon initiation of treatment with anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist), and the bony lesions and systemic inflammation resolved with continued therapy.

  10. α5GABAA receptor deficiency causes autism-like behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Agnieszka A; Kemp, Stephen W P; Aga, Zeenia; Walker, Susan; Milenkovic, Marija; Ramsey, Amy J; Sibille, Etienne; Scherer, Stephen W; Orser, Beverley A

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), which affect over 1% of the population, has increased twofold in recent years. Reduced expression of GABAA receptors has been observed in postmortem brain tissue and neuroimaging of individuals with ASDs. We found that deletion of the gene for the α5 subunit of the GABAA receptor caused robust autism-like behaviors in mice, including reduced social contacts and vocalizations. Screening of human exome sequencing data from 396 ASD subjects revealed potential missense mutations in GABRA5 and in RDX, the gene for the α5GABAA receptor-anchoring protein radixin, further supporting a α5GABAA receptor deficiency in ASDs. PMID:27231709

  11. Deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist responsive to anakinra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnellbacher, Charlotte; Ciocca, Giovanna; Menendez, Roxanna; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Duarte, Ana M; Rivas-Chacon, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 3-month-old infant who presented to our institution with interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist deficiency (DIRA), which consists of neutrophilic pustular dermatosis, periostitis, aseptic multifocal osteomyelitis, and persistently high acute-phase reactants. Skin findings promptly improved upon initiation of treatment with anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist), and the bony lesions and systemic inflammation resolved with continued therapy. PMID:22471702

  12. Role of sialic acid for platelet life span: exposure of beta-galactose results in the rapid clearance of platelets from the circulation by asialoglycoprotein receptor-expressing liver macrophages and hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Louise; Rumjantseva, Viktoria; Nayeb-Hashemi, Sara; Clausen, Henrik; Hartwig, John H; Wandall, Hans H; Hoffmeister, Karin M

    2009-01-01

    Although surface sialic acid is considered a key determinant for the survival of circulating blood cells and glycoproteins, its role in platelet circulation lifetime is not fully clarified. We show that thrombocytopenia in mice deficient in the St3gal4 sialyltransferase gene (St3Gal-IV(-/-) mice...

  13. Toll-like receptor signaling in primary immune deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J; Simchoni, Noa; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-11-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize common microbial or host-derived macromolecules and have important roles in early activation of the immune system. Patients with primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) affecting TLR signaling can elucidate the importance of these proteins to the human immune system. Defects in interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) lead to susceptibility to infections with bacteria, while mutations in nuclear factor-κB essential modulator (NEMO) and other downstream mediators generally induce broader susceptibility to bacteria, viruses, and fungi. In contrast, TLR3 signaling defects are specific for susceptibility to herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis. Other PIDs induce functional alterations of TLR signaling pathways, such as common variable immunodeficiency in which plasmacytoid dendritic cell defects enhance defective responses of B cells to shared TLR agonists. Dampening of TLR responses is seen for TLRs 2 and 4 in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Enhanced TLR responses, meanwhile, are seen for TLRs 5 and 9 in CGD, TLRs 4, 7/8, and 9 in XLA, TLRs 2 and 4 in hyper IgE syndrome, and for most TLRs in adenosine deaminase deficiency. PMID:25930993

  14. Impact of AT2 receptor deficiency on postnatal cardiovascular development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Biermann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The angiotensin II receptor subtype 2 (AT2 receptor is ubiquitously and highly expressed in early postnatal life. However, its role in postnatal cardiac development remained unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hearts from 1, 7, 14 and 56 days old wild-type (WT and AT2 receptor-deficient (KO mice were extracted for histomorphometrical analysis as well as analysis of cardiac signaling and gene expression. Furthermore, heart and body weights of examined animals were recorded and echocardiographic analysis of cardiac function as well as telemetric blood pressure measurements were performed. Moreover, gene expression, sarcomere shortening and calcium transients were examined in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from both genotypes. KO mice exhibited an accelerated body weight gain and a reduced heart to body weight ratio as compared to WT mice in the postnatal period. However, in adult KO mice the heart to body weight ratio was significantly increased most likely due to elevated systemic blood pressure. At postnatal day 7 ventricular capillarization index and the density of α-smooth muscle cell actin-positive blood vessels were higher in KO mice as compared to WT mice but normalized during adolescence. Echocardiographic assessment of cardiac systolic function at postnatal day 7 revealed decreased contractility of KO hearts in response to beta-adrenergic stimulation. Moreover, cardiomyocytes from KO mice showed a decreased sarcomere shortening and an increased peak Ca(2+ transient in response to isoprenaline when stimulated concomitantly with angiotensin II. CONCLUSION: The AT2 receptor affects postnatal cardiac growth possibly via reducing body weight gain and systemic blood pressure. Moreover, it moderately attenuates postnatal vascularization of the heart and modulates the beta adrenergic response of the neonatal heart. These AT2 receptor-mediated effects may be implicated in the physiological maturation process of the heart.

  15. Altered pupillary light reflex in PACAP receptor 1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Anna; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Harrison, Adrian Paul;

    2012-01-01

    The pupillary light reflex (PLR) is regulated by the classical photoreceptors, rods and cones, and by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin. IpRGCs receive input from rods and cones and project to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN......), which is the primary visual center involved in PLR. Mice lacking either the classical photoreceptors or melanopsin exhibit some changes in PLR, whereas the reflex is completely lost in mice deficient of all three photoreceptors. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP......) is co-stored with melanopsin in ipRGCs and mediates light signaling to the brain via the specific PACAP receptor 1 (PAC1R). Here, we examined the occurrence of PACAP and PAC1R in the mouse OPN, and studied if lack of PAC1R affected the PLR. PACAP-immunoreactive nerve fibers were shown in the mouse...

  16. Methamphetamine Increases Locomotion and Dopamine Transporter Activity in Dopamine D5 Receptor-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashizaki, Seiji; Hirai, Shinobu; Ito, Yumi; Honda, Yoshiko; Arime, Yosefu; Sora, Ichiro; Okado, Haruo; Kodama, Tohru; Takada, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine regulates the psychomotor stimulant activities of amphetamine-like substances in the brain. The effects of dopamine are mediated through five known dopamine receptor subtypes in mammals. The functional relevance of D5 dopamine receptors in the central nervous system is not well understood. To determine the functional relevance of D5 dopamine receptors, we created D5 dopamine receptor-deficient mice and then used these mice to assess the roles of D5 dopamine receptors in the behaviora...

  17. Toll-like receptor 2 or toll-like receptor 4 deficiency does not modify lupus in MRLlpr mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Freeley

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease with a high morbidity and nephritis is a common manifestation. Previous studies in murine lupus models have suggest a role for Toll-like receptor 2 and 4. We examined the role of these molecules in MRL lpr mice which is one of the most established and robust murine models. We compared disease parameters in Toll-like receptor 2 or Toll-like receptor 4 deficient mice with their littermate controls. We found no difference in the severity of glomerulonephritis as assessed by histology, serum creatinine and albuminuria when Toll-like receptor 2 or Toll-like receptor 4 deficient MRLlpr mice were compared with Toll-like receptor sufficient controls. We also found similar levels of anti-dsDNA and anti-ssDNA antibodies. These results show that Toll-like receptor 2 and Toll-like receptor 4 do not play a significant role in MRLlpr mice, and therefore they may not be important in human lupus.

  18. Abnormal Vascular Function and Hypertension in Mice Deficient in Estrogen Receptor β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Bian, Zhao; Lu, Ping; Karas, Richard H.; Bao, Lin; Cox, Daniel; Hodgin, Jeffrey; Shaul, Philip W.; Thorén, Peter; Smithies, Oliver; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Mendelsohn, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    Blood vessels express estrogen receptors, but their role in cardiovascular physiology is not well understood. We show that vascular smooth muscle cells and blood vessels from estrogen receptor β (ERβ)-deficient mice exhibit multiple functional abnormalities. In wild-type mouse blood vessels, estrogen attenuates vasoconstriction by an ERβ-mediated increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. In contrast, estrogen augments vasoconstriction in blood vessels from ERβ-deficient mice. Vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from ERβ-deficient mice show multiple abnormalities of ion channel function. Furthermore, ERβ-deficient mice develop sustained systolic and diastolic hypertension as they age. These data support an essential role for ERβ in the regulation of vascular function and blood pressure.

  19. Obesity and diabetes in TNF-alpha receptor- deficient mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Schreyer, S A; Chua, S C; LeBoeuf, R C

    1998-01-01

    TNF-alpha may play a role in mediating insulin resistance associated with obesity. This concept is based on studies of obese rodents and humans, and cell culture models. TNF elicits cellular responses via two receptors called p55 and p75. Our purpose was to test the involvement of TNF in glucose homeostasis using mice lacking one or both TNF receptors. C57BL/6 mice lacking p55 (p55(-)/-), p75, (p75(-)/-), or both receptors (p55(-)/-p75(-)/-) were fed a high-fat diet to induce obesity. Marked ...

  20. Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  1. Increased vascular sympathetic modulation in mice with Mas receptor deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Rabello Casali, K.; Ravizzoni Dartora, D.; Moura, M; Bertagnolli, M.; Bader, M; Haibara, A.; Alenina, N; Irigoyen, M.C.; Santos, R. A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin (Ang)-(1–7)/Mas axis could modulate the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure variabilities (BPV) which are important predictors of cardiovascular risk and provide information about the autonomic modulation of the cardiovascular system. Therefore we investigated the effect of Mas deficiency on autonomic modulation in wild type and Mas-knockout (KO) mice. Methods: Blood pressure was recorded at high sample rate (4000 Hz). Statio...

  2. Neuromedin U Receptor 2-Deficient Mice Display Differential Responses in Sensory Perception, Stress, and Feeding▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Hongkui; Gragerov, Alexander; Hohmann, John G.; Pavlova, Maria N.; Schimpf, Brian A.; Xu, Hui; Wu, Long-Jun; Toyoda, Hiroki; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Rohde, Alex D.; Gragerova, Galina; Onrust, Rene; Bergmann, John E.; Zhuo, Min; Gaitanaris, George A.

    2006-01-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) is a highly conserved neuropeptide with a variety of physiological functions mediated by two receptors, peripheral NMUR1 and central nervous system NMUR2. Here we report the generation and phenotypic characterization of mice deficient in the central nervous system receptor NMUR2. We show that behavioral effects, such as suppression of food intake, enhanced pain response, and excessive grooming induced by intracerebroventricular NMU administration were abolished in the NMUR2...

  3. Physiological roles revealed by ghrelin and ghrelin receptor deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin is a hormone made in the stomach and known primarily for its growth hormone releasing and orexigenic properties. Nevertheless, ghrelin through its receptor, the GHS-R1a, has been shown to exert many roles including regulation of glucose homeostasis, memory & learning, food addiction and neur...

  4. A Milk-Free Diet Downregulates Folate Receptor Autoimmunity in Cerebral Folate Deficiency Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaekers, Vincent T.; Sequeira, Jeffrey M.; Blau, Nenad; Quadros, Edward V.

    2008-01-01

    In cerebral folate deficiency syndrome, the presence of autoantibodies against the folate receptor (FR) explains decreased folate transport to the central nervous system and the clinical response to folinic acid. Autoantibody crossreactivity with milk FR from different species prompted us to test the effect of a milk-free diet. Intervention with a…

  5. Deficiency of the GPR39 receptor is associated with obesity and altered adipocyte metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Pia Steen; Jin, Chunyu; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard;

    2011-01-01

    GPR39, a constitutively active 7TM receptor important for glucose-induced insulin secretion and maturation of pancreatic ß-cell function, is up-regulated in adipose tissue on abstinence from food and chemically induced diabetes. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GPR39 deficiency...

  6. Vitamin D receptor deficiency impairs inner ear development in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hye-Joo

    2016-09-16

    The biological actions of vitamin D are largely mediated through binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, which regulates gene expression in a wide variety of tissues and cells. Mutations in VDR gene have been implicated in ear disorders (hearing loss and balance disorder) but the mechanisms are not well established. In this study, to investigate the role of VDR in inner ear development, morpholino-mediated gene knockdown approaches were used in zebrafish model system. Two paralogs for VDR, vdra and vdrb, have been identified in zebrafish. Knockdown of vdra had no effect on ear development, whereas knockdown of vdrb displayed morphological ear defects including smaller otic vesicles with malformed semicircular canals and abnormal otoliths. Loss-of-vdrb resulted in down-regulation of pre-otic markers, pax8 and pax2a, indicating impairment of otic induction. Furthermore, zebrafish embryos lacking vdrb produced fewer sensory hair cells in the ears and showed disruption of balance and motor coordination. These data reveal that VDR signaling plays an important role in ear development. PMID:27526995

  7. Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency in Inflammatory Bowel Disease by Transferrin Receptor-Ferritin Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abitbol, Vered; Borderie, Didier; Polin, Vanessa; Maksimovic, Fanny; Sarfati, Gilles; Esch, Anouk; Tabouret, Tessa; Dhooge, Marion; Dreanic, Johann; Perkins, Geraldine; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2015-07-01

    Iron deficiency is common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but can be difficult to diagnose in the presence of inflammation because ferritin is an acute phase reactant. The transferrin receptor-ferritin index (TfR-F) has a high sensitivity and specificity for iron deficiency diagnosis in chronic diseases. The diagnostic efficacy of TfR-F is little known in patients with IBD. The aim of the study was to assess the added value of TfR-F to iron deficiency diagnosis in a prospective cohort of patients with IBD.Consecutive IBD patients were prospectively enrolled. Patients were excluded in case of blood transfusion, iron supplementation, or lack of consent. IBD activity was assessed on markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, endoscopy, fecal calprotectin). Hemoglobin, ferritin, vitamin B9 and B12, Lactate dehydrogenase, haptoglobin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) were assayed. TfR-F was calculated as the ratio sTfR/log ferritin. Iron deficiency was defined by ferritin 2 in the presence of inflammation.One-hundred fifty patients with median age 38 years (16-78) and Crohn disease (n = 105), ulcerative colitis (n = 43), or unclassified colitis (n = 2) were included. Active disease was identified in 45.3%. Anemia was diagnosed in 28%. Thirty-six patients (24%) had ferritin 2. Overall, iron deficiency was diagnosed in 32.7% of the patients.TfR-F in addition to ferritin <30 ng/mL criterion increased by 36% diagnosis rates of iron deficiency. TfR-F appeared as a useful biomarker that could help physicians to diagnose true iron deficiency in patients with active IBD. PMID:26131803

  8. Genomic and epigenetic evidence for oxytocin receptor deficiency in autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worley Gordon

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism comprises a spectrum of behavioral and cognitive disturbances of childhood development and is known to be highly heritable. Although numerous approaches have been used to identify genes implicated in the development of autism, less than 10% of autism cases have been attributed to single gene disorders. Methods We describe the use of high-resolution genome-wide tilepath microarrays and comparative genomic hybridization to identify copy number variants within 119 probands from multiplex autism families. We next carried out DNA methylation analysis by bisulfite sequencing in a proband and his family, expanding this analysis to methylation analysis of peripheral blood and temporal cortex DNA of autism cases and matched controls from independent datasets. We also assessed oxytocin receptor (OXTR gene expression within the temporal cortex tissue by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results Our analysis revealed a genomic deletion containing the oxytocin receptor gene, OXTR (MIM accession no.: 167055, previously implicated in autism, was present in an autism proband and his mother who exhibits symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder. The proband's affected sibling did not harbor this deletion but instead may exhibit epigenetic misregulation of this gene through aberrant gene silencing by DNA methylation. Further DNA methylation analysis of the CpG island known to regulate OXTR expression identified several CpG dinucleotides that show independent statistically significant increases in the DNA methylation status in the peripheral blood cells and temporal cortex in independent datasets of individuals with autism as compared to control samples. Associated with the increase in methylation of these CpG dinucleotides is our finding that OXTR mRNA showed decreased expression in the temporal cortex tissue of autism cases matched for age and sex compared to controls. Conclusion Together, these data provide

  9. Urethral dysfunction in female mice with estrogen receptor β deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Hsiang Chen

    Full Text Available Estrogen has various regulatory functions in the growth, development, and differentiation of the female urogenital system. This study investigated the roles of ERβ in stress urinary incontinence (SUI. Wild-type (ERβ(+/+ and knockout (ERβ(-/- female mice were generated (aged 6-8 weeks, n = 6 and urethral function and protein expression were measured. Leak point pressures (LPP and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP were assessed in mice under urethane anesthesia. After the measurements, the urethras were removed for proteomic analysis using label-free quantitative proteomics by nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analysis. The interaction between these proteins was further analysed using MetaCore. Lastly, Western blot was used to confirm the candidate proteins. Compared with the ERβ(+/+ group, the LPP and MUCP values of the ERβ(-/- group were significantly decreased. Additionally, we identified 85 differentially expressed proteins in the urethra of ERβ(-/- female mice; 57 proteins were up-regulated and 28 were down-regulated. The majority of the ERβ knockout-modified proteins were involved in cell-matrix adhesion, metabolism, immune response, signal transduction, nuclear receptor translational regelation, and muscle contraction and development. Western blot confirmed the up-regulation of myosin and collagen in urethra. By contrast, elastin was down-regulated in the ERβ(-/- mice. This study is the first study to estimate protein expression changes in urethras from ERβ(-/- female mice. These changes could be related to the molecular mechanism of ERβ in SUI.

  10. Stromal endothelin B receptor-deficiency inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Binder, Claudia; Hagemann, Thorsten; Sperling, Swetlana; Schulz, Matthias; Pukrop, Tobias; Grimshaw, Matthew J; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2009-01-01

    The endothelin (ET) axis, often deregulated in cancers, is a promising target for anticancer strategies. While previous investigations have focussed mostly on ET action in malignant cells, we chose a model, allowing separate assessment of the effects of ETs and their receptors ETAR and ETBR in the tumor cells and the stromal compartment, which is increasingly recognized as a key player in cancer progression. In homozygous spotting lethal rats (sl/sl), a model of constitutive ETBR-deficiency, ...

  11. Familial hypercholesterolemia in a rhesus monkey pedigree: molecular basis of low density lipoprotein receptor deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    HUMMEL, M.; Li, Z G; Pfaffinger, D; Neven, L.; Scanu, A M

    1990-01-01

    We have recently identified a family of rhesus monkeys with members exhibiting a spontaneous hypercholesterolemia associated with a low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) deficiency. By using the polymerase chain reaction, we now show that the affected monkeys are heterozygous for a nonsense mutation in exon 6 of the LDLR gene. This mutation changes the sequence of the codon for amino acid 284 (tryptophan) from TGG to TAG, thereby generating a nonsense codon potentially resulting in a trunca...

  12. Working memory deficits in retinoid X receptor γ-deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wietrzych, Marta; Meziane, Hamid; Sutter, Anne; Ghyselinck, Norbert; Chapman, Paul F.; Chambon, Pierre; Krȩżel, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    Retinoid signaling has been recently shown to be required for mnemonic functions in rodents. To dissect the behavioral and molecular mechanisms involved in this requirement, we have analyzed the spatial and recognition working memory in mice carrying null mutations of retinoid receptors RARβ and RXRγ. Double mutants appeared deficient in spatial working memory as tested in spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze and delayed nonmatch to place (DNMTP) test in the T-maze. These mutant mice did acq...

  13. Citrullus lanatus `Sentinel' (Watermelon) Extract Reduces Atherosclerosis in LDL Receptor Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Poduri, Aruna; Rateri, Debra L.; Saha, Shubin K.; Saha, Sibu; Daugherty, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus or C. lanatus) has many potentially bioactive compounds including citrulline, which may influence atherosclerosis. In this study, we determined the effects of C. lanatus, provided as an extract of the cultivar `sentinel', on hypercholesterolemia-induced atherosclerosis in mice. Male LDL receptor deficient mice at 8 weeks old were given either C. lanatus `sentinel' extract (2% vol/vol; n=10) or a mixture of matching carbohydrates (2% vol/vol; n=8) as the control i...

  14. The Relationship Between Gene Polymorphism of Leptin and Leptin Receptor and Growth Hormone Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    He, Jinshui; Fang, Yanling; Lin, Xinfu; Zhou, Huowang; ZHU, SHAOBO; Zhang, Yugui; Yang, Huicong; Ye, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a major cause of congenital short stature. GHD patients have significantly decreased serum leptin levels, which are regulated by gene polymorphism of leptin and leptin receptor. This study thus investigated the relationship between gene polymorphism and susceptibility to GHD. Material/Methods A case-control study was performed using 180 GHD children in addition to 160 healthy controls. After the extraction of whole genomic DNA, the genotypes of l...

  15. Establishment and characterization of DB-1: a leptin receptor-deficient murine macrophage cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, Lea H; Ortega, M Teresa; Melgarejo, Tonatiuh; Chapes, Stephen K

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic and immune mediators activate many of the same signal transduction pathways. Therefore, molecules that regulate metabolism often affect immune responses. Leptin is an adipokine that exemplifies this interplay. Leptin is the body's major nutritional status sensor, but it also plays a key role in immune system regulation. To provide an in vitro tool to investigate the link between leptin and innate immunity, we immortalized and characterized a leptin receptor-deficient macrophage cell line, DB-1. The cell line was created using bone marrow cells from leptin receptor-deficient mice. Bone marrow cells were differentiated into macrophages by culturing them with recombinant mouse macrophage colony stimulating factor, and passaged when confluent for 6 months. The cells spontaneously immortalized at approximately passage 20. Cells were cloned twice by limiting dilution cloning prior to characterization. The macrophage cell line is diploid and grows at a linear rate for 4-5 days before reaching the growth plateau. The cells are MAC-2 and F4/80 positive and have phagocytic activity similar to primary macrophages from wild-type and leptin receptor-deficient mice. DB-1 cells were responsive to stimulation with interferon-γ as measured by increase in Nos2 transcript levels. In addition, DB-1 macrophages are not responsive to the chemotactic signaling of adipocyte conditioned media nor leptin when compared to primary WT macrophages. We believe that DB-1 cells provide a dependable tool to study the role of leptin or the leptin receptor in obesity-associated inflammation and immune system dysregulation. PMID:25599862

  16. Erythroblast transferrin receptors and transferrin kinetics in iron deficiency and various anemias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muta, K.; Nishimura, J.; Ideguchi, H.; Umemura, T.; Ibayashi, H.

    1987-06-01

    To clarify the role of transferrin receptors in cases of altered iron metabolism in clinical pathological conditions, we studied: number of binding sites; affinity; and recycling kinetics of transferrin receptors on human erythroblasts. Since transferrin receptors are mainly present on erythroblasts, the number of surface transferrin receptors was determined by assay of binding of /sup 125/I-transferrin and the percentage of erythroblasts in bone marrow mononuclear cells. The number of binding sites on erythroblasts from patients with an iron deficiency anemia was significantly greater than in normal subjects. Among those with an aplastic anemia, hemolytic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and polycythemia vera compared to normal subjects, there were no considerable differences in the numbers of binding sites. The dissociation constants (Kd) were measured using Scatchard analysis. The apparent Kd was unchanged (about 10 nmol/L) in patients and normal subjects. The kinetics of endocytosis and exocytosis of /sup 125/I-transferrin, examined by acid treatment, revealed no variations in recycling kinetics among the patients and normal subjects. These data suggest that iron uptake is regulated by modulation of the number of surface transferrin receptors, thereby reflecting the iron demand of the erythroblast.

  17. Erythroblast transferrin receptors and transferrin kinetics in iron deficiency and various anemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify the role of transferrin receptors in cases of altered iron metabolism in clinical pathological conditions, we studied: number of binding sites; affinity; and recycling kinetics of transferrin receptors on human erythroblasts. Since transferrin receptors are mainly present on erythroblasts, the number of surface transferrin receptors was determined by assay of binding of 125I-transferrin and the percentage of erythroblasts in bone marrow mononuclear cells. The number of binding sites on erythroblasts from patients with an iron deficiency anemia was significantly greater than in normal subjects. Among those with an aplastic anemia, hemolytic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and polycythemia vera compared to normal subjects, there were no considerable differences in the numbers of binding sites. The dissociation constants (Kd) were measured using Scatchard analysis. The apparent Kd was unchanged (about 10 nmol/L) in patients and normal subjects. The kinetics of endocytosis and exocytosis of 125I-transferrin, examined by acid treatment, revealed no variations in recycling kinetics among the patients and normal subjects. These data suggest that iron uptake is regulated by modulation of the number of surface transferrin receptors, thereby reflecting the iron demand of the erythroblast

  18. Maternal profiling of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 deficient mice in association with restraint stress

    OpenAIRE

    D’Anna, Kimberly L.; Sharon A Stevenson; Gammie, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Mice deficient in corticotropin releasing factor receptor 2 (CRF2) (C57BL/6J:129Sv background) exhibit impaired maternal defense (protection of offspring) and are more reactive to stressors than wild-type mice. To further understand CRF2’s role in maternal behavior, we crossed the knockout mice with a line bred for high maternal defense that also has elevated maternal care relative to inbred lines. Maternal care was normal in knockout mice (relative to wild-type). Maternal defense was impaire...

  19. Emotional response in dopamine D2L receptor-deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hranilovic, Dubravka; Bucan, Maja; Wang, Yanyan

    2008-01-01

    The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) system has been implicated in emotional processing which is often impaired in neuropsychiatric disorders. The long (D2L) and the short (D2S) isoforms of D2R are generated by alternative splicing of the same gene. To study differential roles of the two D2R isoforms, D2L-deficient mice (D2L−/−) expressing functional D2S were previously generated. In this study the contribution of D2L isoform to emotional response was investigated by examining behaviors that reflec...

  20. Genetic NMDA receptor deficiency disrupts acute and chronic effects of cocaine but not amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Amy J; Laakso, Aki; Cyr, Michel; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Salahpour, Ali; Medvedev, Ivan O; Dykstra, Linda A; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Caron, Marc G

    2008-10-01

    NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission is required for several forms of neuronal plasticity. Its role in the neuronal responses to addictive drugs is an ongoing subject of investigation. We report here that the acute locomotor-stimulating effect of cocaine is absent in NMDA receptor-deficient mice (NR1-KD). In contrast, their acute responses to amphetamine and to direct dopamine receptor agonists are not significantly altered. The striking attenuation of cocaine's acute effects is not likely explained by alterations in the dopaminergic system of NR1-KD mice, since most parameters of pre- and postsynaptic dopamine function are unchanged. Consistent with the behavioral findings, cocaine induces less c-Fos expression in the striatum of these mice, while amphetamine-induced c-Fos expression is intact. Furthermore, chronic cocaine-induced sensitization and conditioned place preference are attenuated and develop more slowly in mutant animals, but amphetamine's effects are not altered significantly. Our results highlight the importance of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission specifically in cocaine actions, and support a hypothesis that cocaine and amphetamine elicit their effects through differential actions on signaling pathways. PMID:18185498

  1. The Relationship Between Gene Polymorphism of Leptin and Leptin Receptor and Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinshui; Fang, Yanling; Lin, Xinfu; Zhou, Huowang; Zhu, Shaobo; Zhang, Yugui; Yang, Huicong; Ye, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a major cause of congenital short stature. GHD patients have significantly decreased serum leptin levels, which are regulated by gene polymorphism of leptin and leptin receptor. This study thus investigated the relationship between gene polymorphism and susceptibility to GHD. MATERIAL AND METHODS A case-control study was performed using 180 GHD children in addition to 160 healthy controls. After the extraction of whole genomic DNA, the genotypes of leptin and leptin receptor gene loci were analyzed by sequencing for single-nucleotide polymorphism. RESULTS The frequency distribution of all alleles identified in leptin gene (loci rs7799039) and leptin receptor gene (loci rs1137100 and rs1137101) fit Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was a significant difference in allele frequency at loci rs7799039 or rs1137101, as individuals with heterozygous GA allele had lower (rs7799039) or higher (rs1137101) GHD risk. No significant difference in allele frequency was discovered at loci rs1137100 (p>0.05), which was unrelated to GHD susceptibility. CONCLUSIONS Gene polymorphism of leptin (loci rs7799039) and leptin receptor (loci rs1137101) are correlated with GHD susceptibility. PMID:26915772

  2. Airway bacteria drive a progressive COPD-like phenotype in mice with polymeric immunoglobulin receptor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Bradley W; Brucker, Robert M; Han, Wei; Du, Rui-Hong; Zhang, Yongqin; Cheng, Dong-Sheng; Gleaves, Linda; Abdolrasulnia, Rasul; Polosukhina, Dina; Clark, Peter E; Bordenstein, Seth R; Blackwell, Timothy S; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms driving persistent airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are incompletely understood. As secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) deficiency in small airways has been reported in COPD patients, we hypothesized that immunobarrier dysfunction resulting from reduced SIgA contributes to chronic airway inflammation and disease progression. Here we show that polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-deficient (pIgR(-/-)) mice, which lack SIgA, spontaneously develop COPD-like pathology as they age. Progressive airway wall remodelling and emphysema in pIgR(-/-) mice are associated with an altered lung microbiome, bacterial invasion of the airway epithelium, NF-κB activation, leukocyte infiltration and increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-12 and neutrophil elastase. Re-derivation of pIgR(-/-) mice in germ-free conditions or treatment with the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor roflumilast prevents COPD-like lung inflammation and remodelling. These findings show that pIgR/SIgA deficiency in the airways leads to persistent activation of innate immune responses to resident lung microbiota, driving progressive small airway remodelling and emphysema. PMID:27046438

  3. Resistance to diet-induced adiposity in cannabinoid receptor-1 deficient mice is not due to impaired adipocyte function

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Koolman, Anniek H; de Boer, Pieter T; Bos, Trijnie; Bleeker, Aycha; Bloks, Vincent W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Overactivity and/or dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) contribute to development of obesity. In vitro studies indicate a regulatory role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in adipocyte function and CB1-receptor deficient (CB1-/-) mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity. Whether this phenotype of CB1-/- mice is related to altered fat metabolism in adipose tissue is unknown. Methods: We evaluated adipose tissue differentiation/proliferation markers and q...

  4. Antidepressant activity of fluoxetine in the zinc deficiency model in rats involves the NMDA receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doboszewska, Urszula; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Młyniec, Katarzyna; Rafało, Anna; Ostachowicz, Beata; Lankosz, Marek; Nowak, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The zinc deficiency animal model of depression has been proposed; however, it has not been validated in a detailed manner. We have recently shown that depression-like behavior induced by dietary zinc restriction is associated with up-regulation of hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Here we examined the effects of chronic administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (FLX), on behavioral and biochemical alterations (within NMDAR signaling pathway) induced by zinc deficiency. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a zinc adequate diet (ZnA, 50mg Zn/kg) or a zinc deficient diet (ZnD, 3mg Zn/kg) for 4 weeks. Then, FLX treatment (10mg/kg, i.p.) begun. Following 2 weeks of FLX administration the behavior of the rats was examined in the forced swim test (FST) and the spontaneous locomotor activity test. Twenty four hours later tissue was harvested. The proteins of NMDAR (GluN1, GluN2A and GluN2B) or AMPAR (GluA1) subunits, p-CREB and BDNF in the hippocampus (Western blot) and serum zinc level (TXRF) were examined. Depression-like behavior induced by ZnD in the FST was sensitive to chronic treatment with FLX. ZnD increased levels of GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B and decreased pS485-GluA1, p-CREB and BDNF proteins. Administration of FLX counteracted the zinc restriction-induced changes in serum zinc level and hippocampal GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B and p-CREB but not BDNF or pS845-GluA1 protein levels. This finding adds new evidence to the predictive validity of the proposed zinc deficiency model of depression. Antidepressant-like activity of FLX in the zinc deficiency model is associated with NMDAR complex. PMID:25845739

  5. Reduced locomotor activity and exploratory behavior in CC chemokine receptor 4 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrée, Oliver; Klassen, Irene; Förster, Irmgard; Arolt, Volker; Scheu, Stefanie; Alferink, Judith

    2016-11-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are key regulators of immune cell trafficking and activation. Recent findings suggest that they may also play pathophysiological roles in psychiatric diseases like depression and anxiety disorders. The CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) and its two ligands, CCL17 and CCL22, are functionally involved in neuroinflammation as well as anti-infectious and autoimmune responses. However, their influence on behavior remains unknown. Here we characterized the functional role of the CCR4-CCL17 chemokine-receptor axis in the modulation of anxiety-related behavior, locomotor activity, and object exploration and recognition. Additionally, we investigated social exploration of CCR4 and CCL17 knockout mice and wild type (WT) controls. CCR4 knockout (CCR4(-/-)) mice exhibited fewer anxiety-related behaviors in the elevated plus-maze, diminished locomotor activity, exploratory behavior, and social exploration, while their recognition memory was not affected. In contrast, CCL17 deficient mice did not show an altered behavior compared to WT mice regarding locomotor activity, anxiety-related behavior, social exploration, and object recognition memory. In the dark-light and object recognition tests, CCL17(-/-) mice even covered longer distances than WT mice. These data demonstrate a mechanistic or developmental role of CCR4 in the regulation of locomotor and exploratory behaviors, whereas the ligand CCL17 appears not to be involved in the behaviors measured here. Thus, either CCL17 and the alternative ligand CCL22 may be redundant, or CCL22 is the main activator of CCR4 in these processes. Taken together, these findings contribute to the growing evidence regarding the involvement of chemokines and their receptors in the regulation of behavior. PMID:27469058

  6. [Treatment approach to congenital myasthenic syndrome in a patient with acetylcholine receptor deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Keiko; Murakami, Terumi; Ito, Yasushi; Yanagisawa, Akiko; Kodaira, Kayano; Shishikura, Keiko; Suzuki, Haruko; Hirayama, Yoshito; Osawa, Makiko

    2009-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are rare heterogeneous disorders of neurotransmission caused by genetic defects of neuromuscular junction molecules. While CMS patients have been reported worldwide, in Japan there have been only a few descriptions of adult CMS patients with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) deficiency and slow channel syndrome. Herein, we report a Japanese CMS patient with acetylcholine receptor (AChR) deficiency, diagnosed during childhood, and our treatment approach to the patient. This 13-year-old Japanese boy had had severe myasthenic symptoms since infancy. Ptosis, his first symptom, appeared at 5 months and nasal voice was recognized at 2 years of age. AchR and anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (Musk) antibody remained negative. A positive tensilon test and decremental response on electromyogram supported the diagnosis of sero-negative myasthenia gravis. Despite thymectomy and strong immunosuppressive therapy including steroid pulse and FK 506, he gradually deteriorated and became wheelchair bound. Genetic analyses for AchR, Rapsyn, Musk and AChE were negative. At age 11 years, a muscle biopsy was performed in the deltoid muscle for neuromuscular junction sampling. Electron microscopic and confocal microscopic analysis of endplates showed almost complete loss of AChR and the diagnosis of CMS with AChR deficiency was confirmed. All immunosuppressive therapies were discontinued. Instead, we started Ubretide and 3,4-diaminopyridine (DAP) after obtaining informed consent. Although not approved in Japan for this use, 3,4-DAP is reportedly effective in refractory cases of CMS. The patient experienced no side effects. Despite all of the objective data were improving, his subjective symptoms and ADL remained poor. There are still many challenges in the treatment of the patient. PMID:19172815

  7. Vitamin D receptor overexpression in osteoblasts and osteocytes prevents bone loss during vitamin D-deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Nga N; Triliana, Rahma; Sawyer, Rebecca K; Atkins, Gerald J; Morris, Howard A; O'Loughlin, Peter D; Anderson, Paul H

    2014-10-01

    There are several lines of evidence that demonstrate the ability of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3), acting via the vitamin D receptor (VDR) to mediate negative or positive effects in bone. Transgenic over-expression of VDR in osteoblasts and osteocytes in a mouse model (OSVDR) has been previously shown to inhibit processes of bone resorption and enhance bone formation, under conditions of adequate calcium intake. While these findings suggest that vitamin D signalling in osteoblasts and osteocytes promotes bone mineral accrual, the vitamin D requirement for this action is not well understood. In this study, 4 week old female OSVDR and wild-type (WT) mice were fed either a vitamin D-replete (1000IU/kg diet, D+) or vitamin D-deficient (D-) diet for 4 months to observe changes to bone mineral homeostasis. Tibial bone mineral volume was analysed by micro-CT and changes to bone cell activities were measured using standard dynamic histomorphometric techniques. While vitamin D-deplete WT mice demonstrated a reduction in periosteal bone accrual and overall bone mineral volume, OSVDR mice, however, displayed increased cortical and cancellous bone volume in mice which remained higher during vitamin D-depletion due to a reduced osteoclast number and increased bone formation rate. These data suggest that increased VDR-mediated activity in osteoblast and osteocytes prevents bone loss due to vitamin D-deficiency. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '16th Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:24434283

  8. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 deficiency attenuates trastuzumab (Herceptin induced cardiac injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif Nasser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac inflammation and generation of oxidative stress are known to contribute to trastuzumab (herceptin induced cardiac toxicity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a part of the innate immune system and are involved in cardiac stress reactions. Since TLR4 might play a relevant role in cardiac inflammatory signaling, we investigated whether or not TLR4 is involved in trastuzumab induced cardiotoxicity. Methods Seven days after a single injection of herceptin (2 mg/kg; i.p., left ventricular pressure volume loops were measured in HeN compotent (TLR4+/+ and HeJ mutant (TLR4-/- treated with trastuzumab and control mice. Immunofluorescent staining for monocyte infiltration and analyses of plasma by (ELISAs for different chemokines including: MCP-1and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, Western immunoblotting assay for ICAM-1, and used troponin I for cardiac injury marker. Results Trastuzumab injection resulted in an impairment of left ventricular function in TLR-4 competent (HeN, in contrast TLR4-/- trastuzumab mice showed improved left ventricular function EF%, CO; p -/-; p -/-, marked reduction of myocardial troponin-I levels in TLR4-deficient mice. Data are presented as means ± SE; n = 8 in each group p Conclusions Treatment with trastuzumab induces an inflammatory response that contributes to myocardial tissue TLR4 mediates chemokine expression (TNF-α, MCP-1and ICAM-1, so in experimental animals TLR4 deficiency improves left ventricular function and attenuates pathophysiological key mechanisms in trastuzumab induced cardiomyopathy.

  9. Serum transferrin receptor, serum ferritin and serum transferrin receptor-ferritin index in adults with iron deficiency anaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone marrow iron store has been considered the gold standard, but is invasive, painful and expensive and not suitable for everyone. serum transferrin receptor (stfr) which is the concentration of the soluble fragment of transferrin receptor in serum, is an important new haematological parameter. the ratio of stfr to log sf is known as stfr-sf index. this study was conducted to evaluate stfr, ferritin and stfr-f index in diagnosing and differentiating iron deficiency anaemia (ida) from anaemia of chronic disease (acd). methods: one hundred and sixteen (116) adult subjects (80 anaemic and 36 controls) who already had their bone marrow examination done for various reasons were included in the study. stfr, sf, and their index were measured and compared with bone marrow iron stores. absence of iron stores denoted ida whereas increased macrophage iron with decreased siderocytes and sideroblasts was diagnostic of acd. results: out of 80 anaemic patients, 47 were diagnosed as ida while 33 were diagnosed as acd. in case of ida the diagnostic accuracy of index was 91.57%, stfr had accuracy of 85.54% while sf had accuracy of 75.90%. in case of acd, the diagnostic accuracy of stfr was 91.30%, index 89.86%, while sf had accuracy of 79.71%. conclusion: stfr-sf index is a better parameter than stfr or ferritin alone but should only be used when the results of these parameters seem altered or a bone marrow aspiration is mandatory for diagnosis of acd. the estimation of stfr or index may offer a simple non invasive method that may enable more accurate assessments of iron status in such patients. (author)

  10. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) gene deficiency impairs urine concentration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Shizheng; Gao, Min; Liu, Jia; Jia, Xiao; Han, Qifei; Zheng, Senfeng; Miao, Yifei; Li, Shuo; Weng, Haoyu; Xia, Xuan; Du, Shengnan; Wu, Wanfu; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Guan, Youfei

    2014-02-11

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR is mainly expressed in liver and small intestine, where it plays an important role in bile acid, lipid, and glucose metabolism. The kidney also has a high FXR expression level, with its physiological function unknown. Here we demonstrate that FXR is ubiquitously distributed in renal tubules. FXR agonist treatment significantly lowered urine volume and increased urine osmolality, whereas FXR knockout mice exhibited an impaired urine concentrating ability, which led to a polyuria phenotype. We further found that treatment of C57BL/6 mice with chenodeoxycholic acid, an FXR endogenous ligand, significantly up-regulated renal aquaporin 2 (AQP2) expression, whereas FXR gene deficiency markedly reduced AQP2 expression levels in the kidney. In vitro studies showed that the AQP2 gene promoter contained a putative FXR response element site, which can be bound and activated by FXR, resulting in a significant increase of AQP2 transcription in cultured primary inner medullary collecting duct cells. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that FXR plays a critical role in the regulation of urine volume, and its activation increases urinary concentrating capacity mainly via up-regulating its target gene AQP2 expression in the collecting ducts. PMID:24464484

  11. Soluble transferrin receptor as an indicator of iron deficiency and febrile seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Iron deficiency (ID has a high incidence in Indonesia, and is a risk factor for febrile seizures. The most suitable assay to detect iron deficiency in the presence of inflammation has not yet been defined. An indicator of ID unaffected by inflammation is needed, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR may be such an indicator. Objective To evaluate ID as a risk factor for febrile seizures in children with inflammation by sTfR measurements. Method We conducted an age-matched, case-control study, focused on children experiencing on acute illnesses at the time. Subjects were 80 children matched by age (40 in the case group with febrile seizures, and 40 in the control group who were febrile without seizures aged 3 months to 5 years in Mohammad Hoesin Hospital, Palembang from February to August 2013. Subjects’ clinical data and sTfR levels were recorded. Risk factors were analyzed with odd ratios and 95% confident intervals. The sTfR level cut-off point as a predictor of febrile seizures was also defined. Other risk factors were analyzed with multivariate logistic regression test. Results Mean sTfR levels were 41.36 (SD 2.04 nmol/L in the case group and 33.09 (SD 1.02 nmol/L in the control group. Multivariate analysis revealed ID and iron deficient anemia (IDA, as measured by sTfR levels, to be risk factors for febrile seizures (adjusted OR=3.9; 95%CI 1.41 to 10.8; P=0.007 and OR 3.27; 95%CI 1.21 to 8.84; P=0.017, respectively. The sTfR level cut-off point that could be used as a predictor of febrile seizures was 37nmol/L. Conclusion Iron deficiency as measured by increased sTfR is a risk factor for febrile seizures in children. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:95-100].

  12. Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency leads to delayed exacerbation of ischemic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohacek Ivan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using a live imaging approach, we have previously shown that microglia activation after stroke is characterized by marked and long-term induction of the Toll-like receptor (TLR 2 biophotonic signals. However, the role of TLR2 (and potentially other TLRs beyond the acute innate immune response and as early neuroprotection against ischemic injury is not well understood. Methods TLR2−/− mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by different reperfusion times. Analyses assessing microglial activation profile/innate immune response were performed using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry analysis, flow cytometry and inflammatory cytokine array. The effects of the TLR2 deficiency on the evolution of ischemic brain injury were analyzed using a cresyl violet staining of brain sections with appropriate lesion size estimation. Results Here we report that TLR2 deficiency markedly affects post-stroke immune response resulting in delayed exacerbation of the ischemic injury. The temporal analysis of the microglia/macrophage activation profiles in TLR2−/− mice and age-matched controls revealed reduced microglia/macrophage activation after stroke, reduced capacity of resident microglia to proliferate as well as decreased levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 and consequently lower levels of CD45high/CD11b+ expressing cells as shown by flow cytometry analysis. Importantly, although acute ischemic lesions (24 to 72 h were smaller in TLR2−/− mice, the observed alterations in innate immune response were more pronounced at later time points (at day 7 after initial stroke, which finally resulted in delayed exacerbation of ischemic lesion leading to larger chronic infarctions as compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, our results revealed that TLR2 deficiency is associated with significant decrease in the levels of neurotrophic/anti-apoptotic factor Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1

  13. The usefulness of soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Se Hoon; Kim, Dong Sup; Yu, Seung Taek; Shin, Sae Ron; Choi, Du Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is a truncated extracellular form of the membrane transferrin receptor produced by proteolysis. Concentrations of serum sTfR are related to iron status and erythropoiesis in the body. We investigated whether serum sTfR levels can aid in diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in children. Methods Ninety-eight patients with IDA were enrolled and were classified according to age at diagnosis. Group 1 comprised 78 children, aged 6-59 mo...

  14. Deficiency of Angiotensin Type 1a Receptors in Adipocytes Reduces Differentiation and Promotes Hypertrophy of Adipocytes in Lean Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Putnam, Kelly; Batifoulier-Yiannikouris, Frederique; Bharadwaj, Kalyani G.; Lewis, Eboni; Karounos, Michael; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Adipocytes express angiotensin receptors, but the direct effects of angiotensin II (AngII) stimulating this cell type are undefined. Adipocytes express angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1aR) and AT2R, both of which have been implicated in obesity. In this study, we determined the effects of adipocyte AT1aR deficiency on adipocyte differentiation and the development of obesity in mice fed low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) diets. Mice expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the aP2 promoter w...

  15. Megalin is a receptor for apolipoprotein M, and kidney-specific megalin-deficiency confers urinary excretion of apolipoprotein M

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Kirsten; Hvidberg, Vibeke; Moestrup, Søren K; Dahlbäck, Björn; Nielsen, Lars Bo

    2006-01-01

    addition, apoM is expressed at high levels in the kidney tubule cells. In this study, we show that the multiligand receptor megalin, which is expressed in kidney proximal tubule cells, is a receptor for apoM and mediates its uptake in the kidney. To examine apoM binding to megalin, a recombinant apoM was...... examine the importance of apoM binding by megalin in vivo, we analyzed mice with a tissue-specific deficiency of megalin in the kidney. Megalin deficiency was associated with pronounced urinary excretion of apoM, whereas apoM was not detected in normal mouse, human, or rat urine. Gel filtration analysis...... showed that the urinary apoM-containing particles were small and devoid of apoA-I. The results suggest that apoM binds to megalin and that megalin-mediated endocytosis in kidney proximal tubules prevents apoM excretion in the urine....

  16. Abnormalities in osteoclastogenesis and decreased tumorigenesis in mice deficient for ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1 has been shown to be a proton sensing receptor in vitro. We have shown that OGR1 functions as a tumor metastasis suppressor gene when it is over-expressed in human prostate cancer cells in vivo. To examine the physiological functions of OGR1, we generated conditional OGR1 deficient mice by homologous recombination. OGR1 deficient mice were viable and upon gross-inspection appeared normal. Consistent with in vitro studies showing that OGR1 is involved in osteoclastogenesis, reduced osteoclasts were detected in OGR1 deficient mice. A pH-dependent osteoclasts survival effect was also observed. However, overall abnormality in the bones of these animals was not observed. In addition, melanoma cell tumorigenesis was significantly inhibited in OGR1 deficient mice. OGR1 deficient mice in the mixed background produced significantly less peritoneal macrophages when stimulated with thioglycolate. These macrophages also showed altered extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK activation and nitric oxide (NO production in response to lipopolysaccharide. OGR1-dependent pH responses assessed by cAMP production and cell survival in macrophages or brown fat cells were not observed, presumably due to the presence of other proton sensing receptors in these cells. Our results indicate that OGR1's role in osteoclastogenesis is not strong enough to affect overall bone development and its role in tumorigenesis warrants further investigation. The mice generated can be potentially used for several disease models, including cancers or osteoclast-related diseases.

  17. The transcobalamin receptor knockout mouse: a model for vitamin B12 deficiency in the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Shao-Chiang; Nakayama, Yasumi; Sequeira, Jeffrey M.; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Cabrera, Robert M.; Finnell, Richard H.; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Quadros, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    The membrane receptor (TCblR/CD320) for transcobalamin (TC)-bound cobalamin (Cbl) facilitates the cellular uptake of Cbl. A genetically modified mouse model involving ablation of the CD320 gene was generated to study the effects on cobalamin homeostasis. The nonlethal nature of this knockout and the lack of systemic cobalamin deficiency point to other mechanisms for cellular Cbl uptake in the mouse. However, severe cobalamin depletion in the central nervous system (CNS) after birth (P

  18. Deficiency of the B Cell-Activating Factor Receptor Results in Limited CD169+ Macrophage Function during Viral Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Haifeng C.; Huang, Jun; Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Grusdat, Melanie; Shinde, Prashant; McIlwain, David R.; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Gommerman, Jennifer; Löhning, Max; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Mak, Tak W; Pieper, Kathrin; Sic, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    The B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is critical for B cell development and humoral immunity in mice and humans. While the role of BAFF in B cells has been widely described, its role in innate immunity remains unknown. Using BAFF receptor (BAFFR)-deficient mice, we characterized BAFFR-related innate and adaptive immune functions following infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We identified a critical role for BAFFR signaling in the gener...

  19. Bile acids override steatosis in farnesoid X receptor deficient mice in a model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Weibin; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Xue, Ruyi [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai Institute of Liver Disease, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Ji, Lingling [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shen, Xizhong [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai Institute of Liver Disease, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen, She, E-mail: shechen@fudan.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhang, Si, E-mail: zhangsi@fudan.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-05-23

    Highlights: • FXR deficiency enhanced MCD diet-induced hepatic fibrosis. • FXR deficiency attenuated MCD diet-induced hepatic steatosis. • FXR deficiency repressed genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, and the pathogenesis is still not well known. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and plays an essential role in maintaining bile acid and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we study the role of FXR in the pathogenesis of NFALD. We found that FXR deficient (FXR{sup −/−}) mice fed methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet had higher serum ALT and AST activities and lower hepatic triglyceride levels than wild-type (WT) mice fed MCD diet. Expression of genes involved in inflammation (VCAM-1) and fibrosis (α-SMA) was increased in FXR{sup −/−} mice fed MCD diet (FXR{sup −/−}/MCD) compared to WT mice fed MCD diet (WT/MCD). Although MCD diet significantly induced hepatic fibrosis in terms of liver histology, FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice showed less degree of hepatic steatosis than WT/MCD mice. Moreover, FXR deficiency synergistically potentiated the elevation effects of MCD diet on serum and hepatic bile acids levels. The super-physiological concentrations of hepatic bile acids in FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice inhibited the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation, which may be an explanation for less steatosis in FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice in contrast to WT/MCD mice. These results suggest that hepatic bile acids accumulation could override simple steatosis in hepatic injury during the progression of NAFLD and further emphasize the role of FXR in maintaining hepatic bile acid homeostasis in liver disorders and in hepatic protection.

  20. Bile acids override steatosis in farnesoid X receptor deficient mice in a model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • FXR deficiency enhanced MCD diet-induced hepatic fibrosis. • FXR deficiency attenuated MCD diet-induced hepatic steatosis. • FXR deficiency repressed genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, and the pathogenesis is still not well known. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and plays an essential role in maintaining bile acid and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we study the role of FXR in the pathogenesis of NFALD. We found that FXR deficient (FXR−/−) mice fed methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet had higher serum ALT and AST activities and lower hepatic triglyceride levels than wild-type (WT) mice fed MCD diet. Expression of genes involved in inflammation (VCAM-1) and fibrosis (α-SMA) was increased in FXR−/− mice fed MCD diet (FXR−/−/MCD) compared to WT mice fed MCD diet (WT/MCD). Although MCD diet significantly induced hepatic fibrosis in terms of liver histology, FXR−/−/MCD mice showed less degree of hepatic steatosis than WT/MCD mice. Moreover, FXR deficiency synergistically potentiated the elevation effects of MCD diet on serum and hepatic bile acids levels. The super-physiological concentrations of hepatic bile acids in FXR−/−/MCD mice inhibited the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation, which may be an explanation for less steatosis in FXR−/−/MCD mice in contrast to WT/MCD mice. These results suggest that hepatic bile acids accumulation could override simple steatosis in hepatic injury during the progression of NAFLD and further emphasize the role of FXR in maintaining hepatic bile acid homeostasis in liver disorders and in hepatic protection

  1. Fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 deficiency sensitizes mice to the behavioral changes induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley Keith W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between fractalkine (CX3CL1 and fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 regulate microglial activation in the CNS. Recent findings indicate that age-associated impairments in CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 are directly associated with exaggerated microglial activation and an impaired recovery from sickness behavior after peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which an acute LPS injection causes amplified and prolonged microglial activation and behavioral deficits in CX3CR1-deficient mice (CX3CR1-/-. Methods CX3CR1-/- mice or control heterozygote mice (CX3CR1+/- were injected with LPS (0.5 mg/kg i.p. or saline and behavior (i.e., sickness and depression-like behavior, microglial activation, and markers of tryptophan metabolism were determined. All data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis Systems General Linear Model procedures and were subjected to one-, two-, or three-way ANOVA to determine significant main effects and interactions. Results LPS injection caused a prolonged duration of social withdrawal in CX3CR1-/- mice compared to control mice. This extended social withdrawal was associated with enhanced mRNA expression of IL-1β, indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO in microglia 4 h after LPS. Moreover, elevated expression of IL-1β and CD14 was still detected in microglia of CX3CR1-/- mice 24 h after LPS. There was also increased turnover of tryptophan, serotonin, and dopamine in the brain 24 h after LPS, but these increases were independent of CX3CR1 expression. When submitted to the tail suspension test 48 and 72 h after LPS, an increased duration of immobility was evident only in CX3CR1-/- mice. This depression-like behavior in CX3CR1-/- mice was associated with a persistent activated microglial phenotype in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Conclusions Taken together, these data indicate that a deficiency of CX3CR1

  2. Citrullus lanatus 'sentinel' (watermelon) extract reduces atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduri, Aruna; Rateri, Debra L; Saha, Shubin K; Saha, Sibu; Daugherty, Alan

    2013-05-01

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus or C. lanatus) has many potentially bioactive compounds including citrulline, which may influence atherosclerosis. In this study, we determined the effects of C. lanatus, provided as an extract of the cultivar 'sentinel,' on hypercholesterolemia-induced atherosclerosis in mice. Male low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice at 8 weeks old were given either C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract (2% vol/vol; n=10) or a mixture of matching carbohydrates (2% vol/vol; n=8) as the control in drinking water while being fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 12 weeks ad libitum. Mice consuming C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract had significantly increased plasma citrulline concentrations. Systolic blood pressure was comparable between the two groups. Consumption of C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract led to lower body weight and fat mass without influencing lean mass. There were no differences in food and water intake and in urine output between the two groups. C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract administration decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations that were attributed to reductions of intermediate-/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Plasma concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interferon-gamma were decreased and those of interleukin-10 were increased in mice consuming C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract. Intake of C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract resulted in reductions of atherosclerosis in both aortic arch and thoracic regions. In conclusion, consumption of C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract led to reduced body weight gain, decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations, improved homeostasis of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and attenuated development of atherosclerosis without affecting systolic blood pressure in hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:22902326

  3. C5a receptor deficiency alters energy utilization and fat storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Roy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of whole body C5a receptor (C5aR deficiency on energy metabolism and fat storage. DESIGN: Male wildtype (WT and C5aR knockout (C5aRKO mice were fed a low fat (CHOW or a high fat high sucrose diet-induced obesity (DIO diet for 14 weeks. Body weight and food intake were measured weekly. Indirect calorimetry, dietary fatload clearance, insulin and glucose tolerance tests were also evaluated. Liver, muscle and adipose tissue mRNA gene expression were measured by RT-PCR. RESULTS: At week one and 12, C5aRKO mice on DIO had increased oxygen consumption. After 12 weeks, although food intake was comparable, C5aRKO mice had lower body weight (-7% CHOW, -12% DIO as well as smaller gonadal (-38% CHOW, -36% DIO and inguinal (-29% CHOW, -30% DIO fat pads than their WT counterparts. Conversely, in WT mice, C5aR was upregulated in DIO vs CHOW diets in gonadal adipose tissue, muscle and liver, while C5L2 mRNA expression was lower in C5aRKO on both diet. Furthermore, blood analysis showed lower plasma triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid levels in both C5aRKO groups, with faster postprandial triglyceride clearance after a fatload. Additionally, C5aRKO mice showed lower CD36 expression in gonadal and muscle on both diets, while DGAT1 expression was higher in gonadal (CHOW and liver (CHOW and DIO and PPARγ was increased in muscle and liver. CONCLUSION: These observations point towards a role (either direct or indirect for C5aR in energy expenditure and fat storage, suggesting a dual role for C5aR in metabolism as well as in immunity.

  4. Postprandial fatty acid uptake and adipocyte remodeling in angiotensin type 2 receptor-deficient mice fed a high-fat/high-fructose diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Christophe; Labbé, Sébastien M; Pinard, Sandra; Shum, Michael; Bilodeau, Lyne; Chouinard, Lucie; Phoenix, Serge; Lecomte, Roger; Carpentier, André C; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The role of the angiotensin type-2 receptor in adipose physiology remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether genetic angiotensin type-2 receptor-deficiency prevents or worsens metabolic and adipose tissue morphometric changes observed following a 6-week high-fat/high-fructose diet with injection of a small dose of streptozotocin. We compared tissue uptake of nonesterified fatty acid and dietary fatty acid in wild-type and angiotensin type-2 receptor-deficient mice by using the radiotracer 14(R,S)-[(1) (8)F]-fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid in mice fed a standard or high-fat diet. Postprandial fatty acid uptake in the heart, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney and adipose tissue was increased in wild-type mice after a high-fat diet and in angiotensin type-2 receptor-deficient mice on both standard and high-fat diets. Compared to the wild-type mice, angiotensin type-2 receptor-deficient mice had a lower body weight, an increase in fasting blood glucose and a decrease in plasma insulin and leptin levels. Mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited increased adipocyte size that was prevented by angiotensin type-2 receptor-deficiency. Angiotensin type-2 receptor-deficiency abolished the early hypertrophic adipocyte remodeling induced by a high-fat diet. The small size of adipocytes in the angiotensin type-2 receptor-deficient mice reflects their inability to store lipids and explains the increase in fatty acid uptake in non-adipose tissues. In conclusion, a genetic deletion of the angiotensin type-2 receptor is associated with metabolic dysfunction of white adipose depots, and indicates that adipocyte remodeling occurs before the onset of insulin resistance in the high-fat fed mouse model. PMID:27144096

  5. Kit formulated asialoglycoprotein receptor targeting tracer based on copolymer for liver SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Specific targeting of galactose-carrying molecule to ASGP-R in normal hepatocytes has been demonstrated before. In this study, galactosyl polystyrene was synthesized from controllable ratio of functional monomers and radio-labelled with 99mTc by formulated kit for SPECT imaging of hepatic function. Methods: p(VLA-co-VNI)(46:54) was synthesized by free-radical copolymerization initiated by AIBN, purified by dialysis, lyophilized to kit with Tricine and TPPTS as co-ligands for 99mTc labeling. Radiotracer 99mTc-p(VLA-co-VNI)(46:54)(Tricine)(TPPTS) was prepared and evaluated by in vitro stability, in vivo metabolism, ex vivo biodistribution and microSPECT/CT imaging in normal KM mice. MicroSPECT/CT and microMRI imaging were also performed in C57BL/b6 mice with xenograft hepatic carcinoma for hepatic function evaluation. Results: 99mTc-p(VLA-co-VNI)(46:54)(Tricine)(TPPTS) was obtained in high radio chemical purity (RCP) (> 99%) by using instant kit without further purification and excellent in vitro and in vivo stability. The result of biodistribution showed that liver had high uptake (90.49 ± 10.68 ID%/g) at 30 min after injection and was blocked significantly by cold copolymer. MicroSPECT imaging in normal KM mice at 1 h and 4 h after injection showed good liver retention and targeting properties. Significant defect of activity was observed in the tumor site which was confirmed by MRI imaging. Conclusion: 99mTc-p(VLA-co-VNI)(46:54)(Tricine)(TPPTS) with lower ratio of targeting moiety has no observable effect on the specific binding affinity and liver uptake. This makes it possible to introduce more imaging units for multi-modality imaging. Furthermore, the instant kit preparation of 99mTc-labeling provides great potential for the evaluation of hepatocyte function in clinical application

  6. Asialoglycoprotein receptor-magnetic dual targeting nanoparticles for delivery of RASSF1A to hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wan-Jiang; Feng, Ying; Wang, Fei; Guo, Yi-Bing; Li, Peng; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yi-Fei; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yu-Min; Mao, Qin-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    We developed a nanovector with double targeting properties for efficiently delivering the tumor suppressor gene RASSF1A specifically into hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells by preparing galactosylated-carboxymethyl chitosan-magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Gal-CMCS-Fe3O4-NPs). After conjugating galactose and CMCS to the surface of Fe3O4-NPs, we observed that Gal-CMCS-Fe3O4-NPs were round with a relatively stable zeta potential of +6.5 mV and an mean hydrodynamic size of 40.1 ± 5.3 nm. Gal-CMCS-Fe3O4-NPs had strong DNA condensing power in pH 7 solution and were largely nontoxic. In vitro experiments demonstrated that Gal-CMCS-Fe3O4-NPs were highly selective for HCC cells and liver cells. In vivo experiments showed the specific accumulation of Gal-CMCS-Fe3O4-NPs in HCC tissue, especially with the aid of an external magnetic field. Nude mice with orthotopically transplanted HCC received an intravenous injection of the Gal-CMCS-Fe3O4-NPs/pcDNA3.1(+)RASSF1A compound and intraperitoneal injection of mitomycin and had an external magnetic field applied to the tumor area. These mice had the smallest tumors, largest percentage of TUNEL-positive cells, and highest caspase-3 expression levels in tumor tissue compared to other groups of treated mice. These results suggest the potential application of Gal-CMCS-Fe3O4-NPs for RASSF1A gene delivery for the treatment of HCC.

  7. Asialoglycoprotein receptor-magnetic dual targeting nanoparticles for delivery of RASSF1A to hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Wan-Jiang Xue; Ying Feng; Fei Wang; Yi-Bing Guo; Peng Li; Lei Wang; Yi-Fei Liu; Zhi-Wei Wang; Yu-Min Yang; Qin-Sheng Mao

    2016-01-01

    We developed a nanovector with double targeting properties for efficiently delivering the tumor suppressor gene RASSF1A specifically into hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells by preparing galactosylated-carboxymethyl chitosan-magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Gal-CMCS-Fe3O4-NPs). After conjugating galactose and CMCS to the surface of Fe3O4-NPs, we observed that Gal-CMCS-Fe3O4-NPs were round with a relatively stable zeta potential of +6.5 mV and an mean hydrodynamic size of 40.1 ± 5.3 nm. Gal...

  8. Adipocyte (Pro)Renin-Receptor Deficiency Induces Lipodystrophy, Liver Steatosis and Increases Blood Pressure in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Hua; Mohammadmoradi, Shayan; Thompson, Joel; Su, Wen; Gong, Ming; Nguyen, Genevieve; Yiannikouris, Frédérique

    2016-07-01

    Adipose tissue dysfunction related to obesity is overwhelmingly associated with increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. In the setting of obesity, (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is increased in adipose tissue of mice. We sought to determine the physiological consequences of adipocyte-PRR deficiency using adiponectin-Cre mice. We report a unique model of adipocyte-PRR-deficient mice (PRR(Adi/Y)) with almost no detectable white adipose tissues. As a consequence, the livers of PRR(Adi/Y) mice were enlarged and demonstrated a marked accumulation of lipids. Adipocyte-specific deficiency of PRR increased systolic blood pressure and the concentration of soluble PRR in plasma. To determine whether adipocyte-PRR was involved in the development of obesity-induced hypertension, mice were fed a low-fat or a high-fat diet for 16 weeks. Adipocyte-PRR-deficient mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity. Both high-fat- and low-fat-fed PRR(Adi/Y) mice had elevated insulin levels. Interestingly, adipocyte-PRR deficiency improved glucose tolerance in high-fat-fed PRR(Adi/Y) mice. In response to feeding either low-fat or high-fat diets, systolic blood pressure was greater in PRR(Adi/Y) mice than in control mice. High-fat feeding elevated soluble PRR concentration in control and PRR(Adi/Y) mice. In vitro knockdown of PRR by siRNA significantly decreased mRNA abundance of PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma), suggesting an important role for PRR in adipogenesis. Our data indicate that adipocyte-PRR is involved in lipid homeostasis and glucose and insulin homeostasis, and that soluble PRR may be a predictor of metabolic disturbances and play a role in systolic blood pressure regulation. PMID:27185751

  9. Dopamine receptor D5 deficiency results in a selective reduction of hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit NR2B expression and impaired memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; González, Hugo; Ugalde, Valentina; Donoso-Ramos, Juan Pablo; Quintana-Donoso, Daisy; Lara, Marcelo; Morales, Bernardo; Rojas, Patricio; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacological evidence associates type I dopamine receptors, including subtypes D1 and D5, with learning and memory. Analyses using genetic approaches have determined the relative contribution of dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) in cognitive tasks. However, the lack of drugs that can discriminate between D1R and D5R has made the pharmacological distinction between the two receptors difficult. Here, we aimed to determine the role of D5R in learning and memory. In this study we tested D5R knockout mice and wild-type littermates in a battery of behavioral tests, including memory, attention, locomotion, anxiety and motivational evaluations. Our results show that genetic deficiency of D5R significantly impairs performance in the Morris water maze paradigm, object location and object recognition memory, indicating a relevant role for D5R in spatial memory and recognition memory. Moreover, the lack of D5R resulted in decreased exploration and locomotion. In contrast, D5R deficiency had no impact on working memory, anxiety and depressive-like behavior, measured using the spontaneous alternation, open-field, tail suspension test, and forced swimming test. Electrophysiological analyses performed on hippocampal slices showed impairment in long-term-potentiation in mice lacking D5R. Further analyses at the molecular level showed that genetic deficiency of D5R results in a strong and selective reduction in the expression of the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate the relevant contribution of D5R in memory and suggest a functional interaction of D5R with hippocampal glutamatergic pathways. PMID:26714288

  10. Leptin Increases Striatal Dopamine D2 Receptor Binding in Leptin-Deficient Obese (ob/ob) Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfaffly, J.; Michaelides, M.; Wang, G-J.; Pessin, J.E.; Volkow, N.D.; Thanos, P.K.

    2010-06-01

    Peripheral and central leptin administration have been shown to mediate central dopamine (DA) signaling. Leptin-receptor deficient rodents show decreased DA D2 receptor (D2R) binding in striatum and unique DA profiles compared to controls. Leptin-deficient mice show increased DA activity in reward-related brain regions. The objective of this study was to examine whether basal D2R-binding differences contribute to the phenotypic behaviors of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, and whether D2R binding is altered in response to peripheral leptin treatment in these mice. Leptin decreased body weight, food intake, and plasma insulin concentration in ob/ob mice but not in wild-type mice. Basal striatal D2R binding (measured with autoradiography [{sup 3}H] spiperone) did not differ between ob/ob and wild-type mice but the response to leptin did. In wild-type mice, leptin decreased striatal D2R binding, whereas, in ob/ob mice, leptin increased D2R binding. Our findings provide further evidence that leptin modulates D2R expression in striatum and that these effects are genotype/phenotype dependent.

  11. Hyper-responsive Toll-like receptor 7 and 9 activation in NADPH oxidase-deficient B lymphoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLetchie, Shawna; Volpp, Bryan D; Dinauer, Mary C; Blum, Janice S

    2015-12-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency linked with mutations in the multi-subunit leucocyte NADPH oxidase. Myeloid-derived phagocytic cells deficient in NADPH oxidase fail to produce sufficient levels of reactive oxygen species to clear engulfed pathogens. In this study we show that oxidase also influences B-cell functions, including responses to single-stranded RNA or unmethylated DNA by endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 9. In response to TLR7/9 ligands, B-cell lines derived from patients with CGD with mutations in either the NADPH oxidase p40(phox) or p47(phox) subunits produced only low levels of reactive oxygen species. Remarkably, cytokine secretion and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by these oxidase-deficient B cells was significantly increased upon TLR7/9 activation when compared with oxidase-sufficient B cells. Increased TLR responsiveness was also detected in B cells from oxidase-deficient mice. NADPH oxidase-deficient patient-derived B cells also expressed enhanced levels of TLR7 and TLR9 mRNA and protein compared with the same cells reconstituted to restore oxidase activity. These data demonstrate that the loss of oxidase function associated with CGD can significantly impact B-cell TLR signalling in response to nucleic acids with potential repercussions for auto-reactivity in patients. PMID:26340429

  12. OSCAR is a collagen receptor that costimulates osteoclastogenesis in DAP12-deficient humans and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrow, Alexander David; Raynal, Nicolas; Levin Andersen, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    Osteoclasts are terminally differentiated leukocytes that erode the mineralized bone matrix. Osteoclastogenesis requires costimulatory receptor signaling through adaptors containing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs), such as Fc receptor common γ (FcRγ) and DNAX-activating pr...

  13. Validity of leptin receptor-deficiency (db/db) type 2 diabetes mellitus mice as a model of secondary osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Le; You, Yong-Ke; Zhu, Tracy Y.; Zheng, Li-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Chen, Hai-Yong; Yao, Dong; Lan, Hui-Yao; Qin, Ling

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the validation of the leptin receptor-deficient mice model for secondary osteoporosis associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at bone micro-architectural level. Thirty three 36-week old male mice were divided into four groups: normal control (db/m) (n = 7), leptin receptor-deficient T2DM (db/db) (n = 8), human C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic normal control (crp/db/m) (n = 7), and human CRP transgenic T2DM (crp/db/db) (n = 11). Lumber vertebrae (L5) and bilateral lower limbs were scanned by micro-CT to analyze trabecular and cortical bone quality. Right femora were used for three-point bending to analyze the mechanical properties. Trabecular bone quality at L5 was better in db/db or crp/db/db group in terms of bone mineral density (BMD), bone volume fraction, connectivity density, trabecular number and separation (all p  0.05). Maximum loading and energy yield in mechanical test were similar among groups while the elastic modulus in db/db and crp/db/db significantly lower than db/m. The leptin-receptor mice is not a proper model for secondary osteoporosis associated with T2DM.

  14. The transcobalamin receptor knockout mouse: a model for vitamin B12 deficiency in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shao-Chiang; Nakayama, Yasumi; Sequeira, Jeffrey M; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Cabrera, Robert M; Finnell, Richard H; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Quadros, Edward V

    2013-06-01

    The membrane receptor (TCblR/CD320) for transcobalamin (TC)-bound cobalamin (Cbl) facilitates the cellular uptake of Cbl. A genetically modified mouse model involving ablation of the CD320 gene was generated to study the effects on cobalamin homeostasis. The nonlethal nature of this knockout and the lack of systemic cobalamin deficiency point to other mechanisms for cellular Cbl uptake in the mouse. However, severe cobalamin depletion in the central nervous system (CNS) after birth (Pmouse model; however, it does provide a model with which to evaluate metabolic pathways and genes affected. PMID:23430977

  15. Dysbiosis caused by vitamin D receptor deficiency confers colonization resistance to Citrobacter rodentium through modulation of innate lymphoid cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jing; Waddell, Amanda; Lin, Yang-Ding; Cantorna, Margherita T.

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) knockout (KO) mice had fewer Citrobacter rodentium in the feces than wild-type (WT) mice and the kinetics of clearance was faster in VDR KO than WT mice. VDR KO mice had more IL-22 producing innate lymphoid cells (ILC), and more anti-bacterial peptides than WT mice. The increased ILC in the VDR KO mice was a cell autonomous effect of VDR deficiency on ILC frequencies. BM transplantation from VDR KO mice into WT resulted in higher ILC and colonization resistance of the...

  16. Galanin 3 receptor-deficient mice show no alteration in the oxazolone-induced contact dermatitis phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botz, Bálint; Brunner, Susanne M; Kemény, Ágnes; Pintér, Erika; McDougall, Jason J; Kofler, Barbara; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-09-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is an inflammatory skin disease induced by allergen exposure and characterized by erythema, oedema and immune cell infiltration. The sensory peptide galanin (GAL) and its three receptors (GAL1-3 ) are involved in regulating inflammation. As GAL and its receptors are expressed in human and murine skin and GAL expression is increased in oxazolone-induced contact allergy, it could play a role in dermatitis. As GAL reduces neurogenic plasma extravasation in the mouse skin via GAL3 activation, the role of GAL3 in the oxazolone-induced dermatitis model was explored. Following topical challenge with oxazolone, GAL3 gene-deficient mice showed a trend towards reduced ear thickness. Plasma extravasation and neutrophil infiltration increased considerably upon oxazolone challenge in both GAL3 knockout animals and wild-type controls without any observable effect of the gene deletion. We conclude that a lack of GAL3 does not influence oxazolone-induced ACD. PMID:27121264

  17. A lipidomics study reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong Yu; Quan, Chao; Hu, Chunxiu; Xie, Bingxian; Du, Yinan; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wei; Yang, Liu; Chen, Qiaoli; Shen, Bin; Hu, Bian; Zheng, Zhihong; Zhu, Haibo; Huang, Xingxu; Xu, Guowang; Chen, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) plays a critical role in the liver for the clearance of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Its deficiency causes hypercholesterolemia in many models. To facilitate the usage of rats as animal models for the discovery of cholesterol-lowering drugs, we took a genetic approach to delete the LDLR in rats aiming to increase plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C). An LDLR knockout rat was generated via zinc-finger nuclease technology, which harbors a 19-basepair deletion in the seventh exon of the ldlr gene. As expected, deletion of the LDLR elevated total cholesterol and total triglyceride in the plasma, and caused a tenfold increase of plasma LDL-C and a fourfold increase of plasma very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-C). A lipidomics analysis revealed that deletion of the LDLR affected hepatic lipid metabolism, particularly lysophosphatidylcholines, free fatty acids and sphingolipids in the liver. Cholesterol ester (CE) 20:4 also displayed a significant increase in the LDLR knockout rats. Taken together, the LDLR knockout rat offers a new model of hypercholesterolemia, and the lipidomics analysis reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor. PMID:27378433

  18. PX-RICS-deficient mice mimic autism spectrum disorder in Jacobsen syndrome through impaired GABAA receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Arima-Yoshida, Fumiko; Sakaue, Fumika; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Matsuura, Ken; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Mattson, Sarah N; Grossfeld, Paul D; Manabe, Toshiya; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare congenital disorder caused by a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. A subset of patients exhibit social behavioural problems that meet the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. PX-RICS is located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in JBS patients with autistic-like behaviour. Here we report that PX-RICS-deficient mice exhibit ASD-like social behaviours and ASD-related comorbidities. PX-RICS-deficient neurons show reduced surface γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) levels and impaired GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission. PX-RICS, GABARAP and 14-3-3ζ/θ form an adaptor complex that interconnects GABAAR and dynein/dynactin, thereby facilitating GABAAR surface expression. ASD-like behavioural abnormalities in PX-RICS-deficient mice are ameliorated by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission with a GABAAR agonist. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of PX-RICS in cognition and suggest a causal link between PX-RICS deletion and ASD-like behaviour in JBS patients. PMID:26979507

  19. Expression and regulation of neuromedin B in pituitary corticotrophs of male melanocortin 2 receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Hiraku; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Shimizu, Chikara; Nagai, So; Nakamura, Akinobu; Kondo, Takuma; Chida, Dai; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2014-07-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a major part of the neuroendocrine system that controls responses to stress, and has an important function in the regulation of various body processes. We previously created a mouse line deficient in the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R). MC2R-deficient mice (MC2R(-/-) mice) have high adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels because of undetectable corticosterone levels. Increased neuromedin B (NMB) expression was recently reported in the pituitary gland of adrenalectomized mice, a model for acute adrenal insufficiency. To investigate gene expression in the pituitary gland under chronic adrenal deficiency, we examined the pituitary gland of MC2R(-/-) mice, a model of chronic adrenal insufficiency. To understand the molecular background of pituitary cells under chronic adrenal deficiency, we first performed DNA microarray analyses using the pituitary glands of the MC2R(-/-) mice. The DNA microarray analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that NMB expression was higher in the MC2R(-/-) than in the wild-type (WT) mice. We detected NMB expression in the MC2R(-/-) pituitary corticotrophs by immunohistochemistry using the specific antibodies for ACTH and NMB. In addition, the plasma NMB concentration was significantly higher in the MC2R(-/-) mice than in the WT mice. Subcutaneous implantation of a sustained-release corticosterone pellet decreased the expression of NMB mRNA as well as pituitary proopiomelanocortin mRNA. In isolated anterior pituitary cells, NMB mRNA expression was increased by the administration of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and was suppressed by dexamethasone treatment. In this study, we first demonstrate NMB expression in corticotrophs and its regulation by CRH and glucocorticoids. Furthermore, corticotrophs seemed to secrete NMB into the systemic circulation. PMID:24742195

  20. FcgammaRIIB inhibits the development of atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Wigren, Maria; Dunér, Pontus; Kolbus, Daniel; Olofsson, Katarina E; Björkbacka, Harry; Nilsson, Jan; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin

    2010-03-01

    The immune processes associated with atherogenesis have received considerable attention during recent years. IgG FcRs (FcgammaR) are involved in activating the immune system and in maintaining peripheral tolerance. However, the role of the inhibitory IgG receptor FcgammaRIIB in atherosclerosis has not been defined. Bone marrow cells from FcgammaRIIB-deficient mice and C57BL/6 control mice were transplanted to low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice. Atherosclerosis was induced by feeding the recipient mice a high-fat diet for 8 wk and evaluated using Oil Red O staining of the descending aorta at sacrifice. The molecular mechanisms triggering atherosclerosis was studied by examining splenic B and T cells, as well as Th1 and Th2 immune responses using flow cytometry and ELISA. The atherosclerotic lesion area in the descending aorta was ~5-fold larger in mice lacking FcgammaRIIB than in control mice (2.75 +/- 2.57 versus 0.44 +/- 0.42%; p stimulation (proliferation index 30.26 +/- 8.81 versus 2.96 +/- 0.81%, p < 0.0001) and an enhanced expression of MHC class II on the B cells (6.65 +/- 0.64 versus 2.33 +/- 0.25%; p < 0.001). In accordance, an enlarged amount of CD25-positive CD4 T cells was found in the spleen (42.74 +/- 4.05 versus 2.45 +/- 0.31%; p < 0.0001). The plasma Ab and cytokine pattern suggested increased Th1 and Th2 immune responses, respectively. These results show that FcgammaRIIB inhibits the development of atherosclerosis in mice. In addition, they indicate that absence of the inhibiting IgG receptor cause disease, depending on an imbalance of activating and inhibiting immune cells. PMID:20097865

  1. Absence of serum growth hormone binding protein in patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron dwarfism).

    OpenAIRE

    Daughaday, W H; Trivedi, B

    1987-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that human serum contains a protein that specifically binds human growth hormone (hGH). This protein has the same restricted specificity for hGH as the membrane-bound GH receptor. To determine whether the GH-binding protein is a derivative of, or otherwise related to, the GH receptor, we have examined the serum of three patients with Laron-type dwarfism, a condition in which GH refractoriness has been attributed to a defect in the GH receptor. The binding of 12...

  2. Ghrelin receptor deficiency does not affect diet-induced atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk M. Habegger

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ghrelin, a stomach-derived, secreted peptide, and its receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHSR are known to modulate food intake and energy homeostasis. The ghrelin system is also expressed broadly in cardiovascular tissues. Since ghrelin has been associated with anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties, but is also well known to promote obesity and impair glucose metabolism, we investigated whether ghrelin has any impact on the development of atherosclerosis. The hypothesis that endogenous ghrelin signaling may be involved in atherosclerosis has not been tested previously Methods and Results: We crossed ghrelin receptor knockout mice (GHSr-/- into a low-density lipoprotein receptor-null (Ldlr-/- mouse line. In this model, atherosclerotic lesions were promoted by feeding a high-fat, high-cholesterol Western-type diet for 13 months, following a standard protocol. Body composition and glucose homeostasis were similar between Ldlr-/- and Ldlr/GHSR -/- ko mice throughout the study. Absence or presence of GHSr did not alter the apolipoprotein profile changes in response to diet exposure on an LDLRko background. Atherosclerotic plaque volume in the aortic arch and thoracic aorta were also not affected differentially in mice without ghrelin signaling due to GHSR gene disruption as compared to control LDLRko littermates. In light of the associations reported for ghrelin with cardiovascular disease in humans, the lack of a phenotype in these loss-of- function studies in mice suggests no directly functional role for endogenous ghrelin in either the inhibition or the promotion of diet-induced atherosclerosis.Conclusions: These data indicate that, surprisingly, the complex and multifaceted actions of endogenous ghrelin signaling on the cardiovascular system have minimal direct impact on atherosclerotic plaque progression as based on loss-of-function in a mouse model of the disease.

  3. Hypersensitivity to thromboxane receptor mediated cerebral vasomotion and CBF oscillations during acute NO-deficiency in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Horváth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low frequency (4-12 cpm spontaneous fluctuations of the cerebrovascular tone (vasomotion and oscillations of the cerebral blood flow (CBF have been reported in diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction. Since endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO suppresses constitutively the release and vascular effects of thromboxane A(2 (TXA(2, NO-deficiency is often associated with activation of thromboxane receptors (TP. In the present study we hypothesized that in the absence of NO, overactivation of the TP-receptor mediated cerebrovascular signaling pathway contributes to the development of vasomotion and CBF oscillations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Effects of pharmacological modulation of TP-receptor activation and its downstream signaling pathway have been investigated on CBF oscillations (measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry in anesthetized rats and vasomotion (measured by isometric tension recording in isolated rat middle cerebral arteries, MCAs both under physiological conditions and after acute inhibition of NO synthesis. Administration of the TP-receptor agonist U-46619 (1 µg/kg i.v. to control animals failed to induce any changes of the systemic or cerebral circulatory parameters. Inhibition of the NO synthesis by nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 mg/kg i.v. resulted in increased mean arterial blood pressure and a decreased CBF accompanied by appearance of CBF-oscillations with a dominant frequency of 148±2 mHz. U-46619 significantly augmented the CBF-oscillations induced by L-NAME while inhibition of endogenous TXA(2 synthesis by ozagrel (10 mg/kg i.v. attenuated it. In isolated MCAs U-46619 in a concentration of 100 nM, which induced weak and stable contraction under physiological conditions, evoked sustained vasomotion in the absence of NO, which effect could be completely reversed by inhibition of Rho-kinase by 10 µM Y-27632. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that hypersensitivity of the TP-receptor

  4. GABAB receptor deficiency causes failure of neuronal homeostasis in hippocampal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertkin, Irena; Styr, Boaz; Slomowitz, Edden; Ofir, Nir; Shapira, Ilana; Berner, David; Fedorova, Tatiana; Laviv, Tal; Barak-Broner, Noa; Greitzer-Antes, Dafna; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Lotan, Ilana; Slutsky, Inna

    2015-06-23

    Stabilization of neuronal activity by homeostatic control systems is fundamental for proper functioning of neural circuits. Failure in neuronal homeostasis has been hypothesized to underlie common pathophysiological mechanisms in a variety of brain disorders. However, the key molecules regulating homeostasis in central mammalian neural circuits remain obscure. Here, we show that selective inactivation of GABAB, but not GABA(A), receptors impairs firing rate homeostasis by disrupting synaptic homeostatic plasticity in hippocampal networks. Pharmacological GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R) blockade or genetic deletion of the GB(1a) receptor subunit disrupts homeostatic regulation of synaptic vesicle release. GABA(B)Rs mediate adaptive presynaptic enhancement to neuronal inactivity by two principle mechanisms: First, neuronal silencing promotes syntaxin-1 switch from a closed to an open conformation to accelerate soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex assembly, and second, it boosts spike-evoked presynaptic calcium flux. In both cases, neuronal inactivity removes tonic block imposed by the presynaptic, GB(1a)-containing receptors on syntaxin-1 opening and calcium entry to enhance probability of vesicle fusion. We identified the GB(1a) intracellular domain essential for the presynaptic homeostatic response by tuning intermolecular interactions among the receptor, syntaxin-1, and the Ca(V)2.2 channel. The presynaptic adaptations were accompanied by scaling of excitatory quantal amplitude via the postsynaptic, GB(1b)-containing receptors. Thus, GABA(B)Rs sense chronic perturbations in GABA levels and transduce it to homeostatic changes in synaptic strength. Our results reveal a novel role for GABA(B)R as a key regulator of population firing stability and propose that disruption of homeostatic synaptic plasticity may underlie seizure's persistence in the absence of functional GABA(B)Rs. PMID:26056260

  5. G protein-coupled receptor 39 deficiency is associated with pancreatic islet dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Jin, Chunyu;

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-39 is a seven-transmembrane receptor expressed mainly in endocrine and metabolic tissues that acts as a Zn(++) sensor signaling mainly through the G(q) and G(12/13) pathways. The expression of GPR39 is regulated by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1alpha and HNF-4a...... insulin in response to glucose stimulation than islets from wild-type littermates. It is concluded that GPR39 is involved in the control of endocrine pancreatic function, and it is suggested that this receptor could be a novel potential target for the treatment of diabetes.......G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-39 is a seven-transmembrane receptor expressed mainly in endocrine and metabolic tissues that acts as a Zn(++) sensor signaling mainly through the G(q) and G(12/13) pathways. The expression of GPR39 is regulated by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1alpha and HNF-4......alpha, and in the present study, we addressed the importance of GPR39 for glucose homeostasis and pancreatic islets function. The expression and localization of GPR39 were characterized in the endocrine pancreas and pancreatic cell lines. Gpr39(-/-) mice were studied in vivo, especially in respect of...

  6. P2X7 receptor-deficient mice are susceptible to bone cancer pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Rie; Nielsen, Christian K.; Nasser, Arafat;

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor is implicated in both neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and has been suggested as a possible target in pain treatment. However, the specific role of the P2X7 receptor in bone cancer pain is unknown. We demonstrated that BALB/cJ P2X7 receptor knockout (P2X7R KO) mice...... were susceptible to bone cancer pain and moreover had an earlier onset of pain-related behaviours compared with cancer-bearing, wild-type mice. Furthermore, acute treatment with the selective P2X7 receptor antagonist, A-438079, failed to alleviate pain-related behaviours in models of bone cancer pain...... with and without astrocyte activation (BALB/cJ or C3H mice inoculated with 4T1 mammary cancer cells or NCTC 2472 osteosarcoma cells, respectively), suggesting that astrocytic P2X7 receptors play a negligible role in bone cancer pain. The results support the hypothesis that bone cancer pain is a...

  7. P2X7 receptor-deficient mice are susceptible to bone cancer pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, RR; Nielsen, CK; Nasser, A; Thomsen, SI; Eghorn, LF; Pham, Y; Schulenburg, C; Syberg, S; Ding, Ming; Stojilkovic, SS; Jorgensen, NR; Heegaard, AM

    2011-01-01

    were susceptible to bone cancer pain and moreover had an earlier onset of pain-related behaviours compared with cancer-bearing, wild-type mice. Furthermore, acute treatment with the selective P2X7 receptor antagonist, A-438079, failed to alleviate pain-related behaviours in models of bone cancer pain...... with and without astrocyte activation (BALB/cJ or C3H mice inoculated with 4T1 mammary cancer cells or NCTC 2472 osteosarcoma cells, respectively), suggesting that astrocytic P2X7 receptors play a negligible role in bone cancer pain. The results support the hypothesis that bone cancer pain is a...

  8. Temporal phasing of locomotor activity, heart rate rhythmicity, and core body temperature is disrupted in VIP receptor 2-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hsiung, Hansen M; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Neurons of the brain's biological clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generate circadian rhythms of physiology (core body temperature, hormone secretion, locomotor activity, sleep/wake, and heart rate) with distinct temporal phasing when entrained by the light/dark (LD......) cycle. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal polypetide (VIP) and its receptor (VPAC2) are highly expressed in the SCN. Recent studies indicate that VIPergic signaling plays an essential role in the maintenance of ongoing circadian rhythmicity by synchronizing SCN cells and by maintaining rhythmicity...... within individual neurons. To further increase the understanding of the role of VPAC2 signaling in circadian regulation, we implanted telemetric devices and simultaneously measured core body temperature, spontaneous activity, and heart rate in a strain of VPAC2-deficient mice and compared these...

  9. Gene expression of a truncated and the full-length growth hormone (GH) receptor in subcutaneous fat and skeletal muscle in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Sidse; Kristensen, K; Rosenfalck, A M;

    2001-01-01

    In humans at least two GH receptors are significantly expressed. One is the full-length receptor (GHR); the other is a truncated form (GHRtr), that lacks most of the intracellular domain. This receptor may inhibit the action of the full-length receptor. Circulating GH-binding protein (GHBP) is a...... proteolytically cleaved product from both of these receptors. The clinical relevance of the different receptor types is unknown. We examined the gene expression of GHR and GHRtr in human adipose tissue and skeletal muscle and the influence of GH treatment on this expression. Furthermore, we studied the...... relationship of circulating GHBP and body composition to GHR and GHRtr gene expression. Eleven adult GH-deficient patients were studied before and after 4 months of GH substitution therapy. Abdominal fat obtained by liposuction and femoral muscle biopsies were taken at baseline and after 4 months. Gene...

  10. Resistance to diet-induced adiposity in cannabinoid receptor-1 deficient mice is not due to impaired adipocyte function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oosterveer Maaike H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overactivity and/or dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS contribute to development of obesity. In vitro studies indicate a regulatory role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 in adipocyte function and CB1-receptor deficient (CB1-/- mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity. Whether this phenotype of CB1-/- mice is related to altered fat metabolism in adipose tissue is unknown. Methods We evaluated adipose tissue differentiation/proliferation markers and quantified lipogenic and lipolytic activities in fat tissues of CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice fed a high-fat (HF or a high-fat/fish oil (HF/FO diet as compared to animals receiving a low-fat chow diet. Comparison between HF diet and HF/FO diet allowed to investigate the influence of dietary fat quality on adipose tissue biology in relation to CB1 functioning. Results The adiposity-resistant phenotype of the CB1-/- mice was characterized by reduced fat mass and adipocyte size in HF and HF/FO-fed CB1-/- mice in parallel to a significant increase in energy expenditure as compared to CB1+/+ mice. The expression levels of adipocyte differentiation and proliferation markers were however maintained in these animals. Consistent with unaltered lipogenic gene expression, the fatty acid synthesis rates in adipose tissues from CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice were unchanged. Whole-body and adipose-specific lipoprotein lipase (LPL activities were also not altered in CB1-/- mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that protection against diet-induced adiposity in CB1-deficient mice is not related to changes in adipocyte function per se, but rather results from increased energy dissipation by oxidative and non-oxidative pathways.

  11. Altered mRNA editing and expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors after kainic acid exposure in cyclooxygenase-2 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Caracciolo

    Full Text Available Kainic acid (KA binds to the AMPA/KA receptors and induces seizures that result in inflammation, oxidative damage and neuronal death. We previously showed that cyclooxygenase-2 deficient (COX-2(-/- mice are more vulnerable to KA-induced excitotoxicity. Here, we investigated whether the increased susceptibility of COX-2(-/- mice to KA is associated with altered mRNA expression and editing of glutamate receptors. The expression of AMPA GluR2, GluR3 and KA GluR6 was increased in vehicle-injected COX-2(-/- mice compared to wild type (WT mice in hippocampus and cortex, whereas gene expression of NMDA receptors was decreased. KA treatment decreased the expression of AMPA, KA and NMDA receptors in the hippocampus, with a significant effect in COX-2(-/- mice. Furthermore, we analyzed RNA editing levels and found that the level of GluR3 R/G editing site was selectively increased in the hippocampus and decreased in the cortex in COX-2(-/- compared with WT mice. After KA, GluR4 R/G editing site, flip form, was increased in the hippocampus of COX-2(-/- mice. Treatment of WT mice with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib for two weeks decreased the expression of AMPA/KA and NMDAR subunits after KA, as observed in COX-2(-/- mice. After KA exposure, COX-2(-/- mice showed increased mRNA expression of markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, such as cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, microglia (CD11b and astrocyte (GFAP. Thus, COX-2 gene deletion can exacerbate the inflammatory response to KA. We suggest that COX-2 plays a role in attenuating glutamate excitotoxicity by modulating RNA editing of AMPA/KA and mRNA expression of all ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits and, in turn, neuronal excitability. These changes may contribute to the increased vulnerability of COX-2(-/- mice to KA. The overstimulation of glutamate receptors as a consequence of COX-2 gene deletion suggests a functional coupling between COX-2 and the

  12. A mutant form of maltose-binding protein of Escherichia coli deficient in its interaction with the bacteriophage lambda receptor protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Bavoil, P; Wandersman, C; Schwartz, M; Nikaido, H

    1983-01-01

    In one malE mutant known to be deficient in the transport of maltose and maltodextrins across the outer membrane, the altered MalE protein was shown to be defective in its interaction with the phage lambda receptor, or LamB protein, of the outer membrane.

  13. Effects of High Fat Feeding and Diabetes on Regression of Atherosclerosis Induced by Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Therapy in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willecke, Florian; Yuan, Chujun; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Hu, Yunying; Barnhart, Shelley; Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether a high fat diet (HFD) containing the inflammatory dietary fatty acid palmitate or insulin deficient diabetes altered the remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques in LDL receptor knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice. Cholesterol reduction was achieved by using a helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) carrying the gene for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr; HDAd-LDLR). After injection of the HDAd-LDLR, mice consuming either HFD, which led to insulin resistance but not hyperglycemia, or low fat diet (LFD), showed regression compared to baseline. However there was no difference between the two groups in terms of atherosclerotic lesion size, or CD68+ cell and lipid content. Because of the lack of effects of these two diets, we then tested whether viral-mediated cholesterol reduction would lead to defective regression in mice with greater hyperglycemia. In both normoglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ)-treated hyperglycemic mice, HDAd-LDLR significantly reduced plasma cholesterol levels, decreased atherosclerotic lesion size, reduced macrophage area and lipid content, and increased collagen content of plaque in the aortic sinus. However, reductions in anti-inflammatory and ER stress-related genes were less pronounced in STZ-diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated Ldlr gene therapy is an effective and simple method to induce atherosclerosis regression in Ldlr-/- mice in different metabolic states. PMID:26046657

  14. Effects of High Fat Feeding and Diabetes on Regression of Atherosclerosis Induced by Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Therapy in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Willecke

    Full Text Available We tested whether a high fat diet (HFD containing the inflammatory dietary fatty acid palmitate or insulin deficient diabetes altered the remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques in LDL receptor knockout (Ldlr-/- mice. Cholesterol reduction was achieved by using a helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd carrying the gene for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr; HDAd-LDLR. After injection of the HDAd-LDLR, mice consuming either HFD, which led to insulin resistance but not hyperglycemia, or low fat diet (LFD, showed regression compared to baseline. However there was no difference between the two groups in terms of atherosclerotic lesion size, or CD68+ cell and lipid content. Because of the lack of effects of these two diets, we then tested whether viral-mediated cholesterol reduction would lead to defective regression in mice with greater hyperglycemia. In both normoglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ-treated hyperglycemic mice, HDAd-LDLR significantly reduced plasma cholesterol levels, decreased atherosclerotic lesion size, reduced macrophage area and lipid content, and increased collagen content of plaque in the aortic sinus. However, reductions in anti-inflammatory and ER stress-related genes were less pronounced in STZ-diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated Ldlr gene therapy is an effective and simple method to induce atherosclerosis regression in Ldlr-/- mice in different metabolic states.

  15. Deficiency in type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor in mice protects against oxygen-induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flejou Jean-François

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular responses to aging and oxidative stress are regulated by type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R. Oxidant injury, which is implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of respiratory diseases, acutely upregulates IGF-1R expression in the lung. This led us to suspect that reduction of IGF-1R levels in lung tissue could prevent deleterious effects of oxygen exposure. Methods Since IGF-1R null mutant mice die at birth from respiratory failure, we generated compound heterozygous mice harboring a hypomorphic (Igf-1rneo and a knockout (Igf-1r- receptor allele. These IGF-1Rneo/- mice, strongly deficient in IGF-1R, were subjected to hyperoxia and analyzed for survival time, ventilatory control, pulmonary histopathology, morphometry, lung edema and vascular permeability. Results Strikingly, after 72 h of exposure to 90% O2, IGF-1Rneo/- mice had a significantly better survival rate during recovery than IGF-1R+/+ mice (77% versus 53%, P neo/- mice which developed conspicuously less edema and vascular extravasation than controls. Also, hyperoxia-induced abnormal pattern of breathing which precipitated respiratory failure was elicited less frequently in the IGF-1Rneo/- mice. Conclusion Together, these data demonstrate that a decrease in IGF-1R signaling in mice protects against oxidant-induced lung injury.

  16. Human androgen deficiency: insights gained from androgen receptor knockout mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Kesha Rana; Davey, Rachel A; Zajac, Jeffrey D

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of androgen action is complex. Recently, significant advances have been made into our understanding of how androgens act via the androgen receptor (AR) through the use of genetically modified mouse models. A number of global and tissue-specific AR knockout (ARKO) models have been generated using the Cre-loxP system which allows tissue- and/or cell-specific deletion. These ARKO models have examined a number of sites of androgen action including the cardiovascular system, the immu...

  17. Abnormal lipoprotein metabolism and reversible female infertility in HDL receptor (SR-BI)–deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miettinen, Helena E.; Rayburn, Helen; Krieger, Monty

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian female fertility depends on complex interactions between the ovary and the extraovarian environment (e.g., the hypothalamic-hypophyseal ovarian axis). The role of plasma lipoproteins in fertility was examined using HDL-receptor SR-BI knockout (KO) mice. SR-BI KO females have abnormal HDLs, ovulate dysfunctional oocytes, and are infertile. Fertility was restored when the structure and/or quantity of abnormal HDL was altered by inactivating the apoAI gene or administering the choleste...

  18. Estrogen receptor β-deficient female mice develop a bladder phenotype resembling human interstitial cystitis

    OpenAIRE

    Imamov, Otabek; Yakimchuk, Konstantin; Morani, Andrea; Schwend, Thomas; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Razumov, Sergei; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome is a disease seen mostly in women, and symptoms tend to be worse premenopausally or during ovulation. The four cardinal symptoms of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome are bladder pain, urgency, frequency, and nocturia. Estrogen has been implicated in the etiology of this disease, but the role of the two estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, has not been investigated. We found that, in the bladders of WT mice, ERβ is expressed in the b...

  19. Vitamin D Deficiency Modulates Graves’ Hyperthyroidism Induced in BALB/c Mice by Thyrotropin Receptor Immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Misharin, Alexander; Hewison, Martin; Chen, Chun-Rong; Lagishetty, Venu; Aliesky, Holly A.; Mizutori, Yumiko; Rapoport, Basil; McLachlan, Sandra M.

    2008-01-01

    TSH receptor (TSHR) antibodies and hyperthyroidism are induced by immunizing mice with adenovirus encoding the TSHR or its A-subunit. Depleting regulatory T cells (Treg) exacerbates thyrotoxicosis in susceptible BALB/c mice and induces hyperthyroidism in normally resistant C57BL/6 mice. Vitamin D plays an important role in immunity; high dietary vitamin D intake suppresses (and low intake enhances) adaptive immune responses. Vitamin D-induced immunosuppression may enhance Treg. Therefore, we ...

  20. NADPH oxidase 4 protects against development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Langbein, Heike; Brunssen, Coy; Hofmann, Anja; Cimalla, Peter; Brux, Melanie; Bornstein, Stefan R; Deussen, Andreas; Koch, Edmund; Morawietz, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Aims Endothelial dysfunction is an early step in the development of atherosclerosis. Increased formation of superoxide anions by NADPH oxidase Nox1, 2, and 5 reduces nitric oxide availability and can promote endothelial dysfunction. In contrast, recent evidence supports a vasoprotective role of H2O2 produced by main endothelial isoform Nox4. Therefore, we analysed the impact of genetic deletion of Nox4 on endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldl...

  1. Folate receptor autoimmunity and cerebral folate deficiency in low-functioning autism with neurological deficits

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaekers, Vincent; Blau, N.; Sequeira, J.M.; Nassogne, M.-C.; Quadros, E.V.

    2007-01-01

    Reduced folate transport to the CNS was identified in two autism spectrum disorders, i.e., Rett syndrome and infantile low-functioning autism with neurological abnormalities. Twenty-five patients with early-onset low-functioning autism with or without neurological deficits, were evaluated for serum folate, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5MTHF), and serum FR autoantibodies of the blocking type to determine the significance of folate receptor (FR) autoantibodies with respec...

  2. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 deficiency attenuates trastuzumab (Herceptin) induced cardiac injury in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yousif Nasser; Al-amran Fadhil G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cardiac inflammation and generation of oxidative stress are known to contribute to trastuzumab (herceptin) induced cardiac toxicity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a part of the innate immune system and are involved in cardiac stress reactions. Since TLR4 might play a relevant role in cardiac inflammatory signaling, we investigated whether or not TLR4 is involved in trastuzumab induced cardiotoxicity. Methods Seven days after a single injection of herceptin (2 mg/kg; i.p.)...

  3. Glutamate and glycine modulation of 3H-MK801 binding to the NMDA receptor-ion channel complex in the vitamin B-6 deficient neonatal rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have previously shown that the concentrations of the neuroactive amino acids glutamate (GLU) and glycine (GLY) are significantly altered in the seizure-prone vitamin B-6 deficient neonatal rat brain. Recently, it has been shown that GLU and GLY modulate the binding of 3H-MK801 to the ion channel associated with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-glutamate receptor subtype. The present investigation was undertaken to determine if GLU or GLY modulation of 3H-MK801 binding was altered in B-6 deficient neonatal rat brain. Preparation of cortical membranes from control and deficient 14 day old rats and 3H-MK801 binding assay were done as described by Ransom and Stec. The results show a significant reduction in the potency and efficacy of GLU modulation of 3H-MK801 binding, as well as a reduction in the efficacy of GLY, in membrane preparations from deficient rats compared to controls. These results indicate a reduced ability of GLU and GLY to potentiate the binding of 3H-MK801 to the NMDA receptor-ion channel in the B-6 deficient neonatal rat brain

  4. Sex dimorphic actions of rosiglitazone in generalised peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ)-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, S. Z.; Usher, M. G.; Foley, E. L.; Milstone, D. S.; Brosius, F. C.; Mortensen, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The aim of this study was to determine the dependency on peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) of insulin sensitisation and glucose homeostasis by thiazolidinediones using a global Ppar-γ (also known as Pparg)-knockout mouse model. Methods Global Mox2-Cre-Ppar-γ-knockout (MORE-PGKO) mice were treated with rosiglitazone and analysed for insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. Metabolic and hormonal variables were determined. Adipose and other tissues were measured and analysed for gene expression. Results Rosiglitazone induced regrowth of fat in female but not male MORE-PGKO mice, and only in specific depots. Insulin sensitivity increased but, surprisingly, was not associated with the typical changes in adipokines, plasma NEFA or tissue triacylglycerol. However, increases in alternatively activated macrophage markers, which have been previously associated with metabolic improvement, were observed in the regrown fat. Rosiglitazone improved glucose homeostasis but not insulin sensitivity in male MORE-PGKO mice, with further increase of insulin associated with an apparent expansion of pancreatic islets. Conclusions/interpretation Stimulating fat growth by rosiglitazone is sufficient to improve insulin sensitivity in female mice with 95% PPAR-γ deficiency. This increase in insulin sensitivity is not likely to be due to changes typically seen in adipokines or lipids but may involve changes in macrophage polarisation that occur independent of PPAR-γ. In contrast, rosiglitazone improves glucose homeostasis in male mice with similar PPAR-γ deficiency by increasing insulin production independent of changes in adiposity. Further, the insulin-sensitising effect of rosiglitazone is dependent on PPAR-γ in this male lipodystrophic model. PMID:20401461

  5. Melanocortin 1 receptor-signaling deficiency results in an articular cartilage phenotype and accelerates pathogenesis of surgically induced murine osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Lorenz

    Full Text Available Proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides exert pleiotropic effects via binding to melanocortin receptors (MCR. MCR-subtypes have been detected in cartilage and bone and mediate an increasing number of effects in diathrodial joints. This study aims to determine the role of MC1-receptors (MC1 in joint physiology and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA using MC1-signaling deficient mice (Mc1re/e. OA was surgically induced in Mc1re/e and wild-type (WT mice by transection of the medial meniscotibial ligament. Histomorphometry of Safranin O stained articular cartilage was performed with non-operated controls (11 weeks and 6 months and 4/8 weeks past surgery. µCT-analysis for assessing epiphyseal bone architecture was performed as a longitudinal study at 4/8 weeks after OA-induction. Collagen II, ICAM-1 and MC1 expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Mc1re/e mice display less Safranin O and collagen II stained articular cartilage area compared to WT prior to OA-induction without signs of spontaneous cartilage surface erosion. This MC1-signaling deficiency related cartilage phenotype persisted in 6 month animals. At 4/8 weeks after OA-induction cartilage erosions were increased in Mc1re/e knees paralleled by weaker collagen II staining. Prior to OA-induction, Mc1re/e mice do not differ from WT with respect to bone parameters. During OA, Mc1re/e mice developed more osteophytes and had higher epiphyseal bone density and mass. Trabecular thickness was increased while concomitantly trabecular separation was decreased in Mc1re/e mice. Numbers of ICAM-positive chondrocytes were equal in non-operated 11 weeks Mc1re/e and WT whereas number of positive chondrocytes decreased during OA-progression. Unchallenged Mc1re/e mice display smaller articular cartilage covered area without OA-related surface erosions indicating that MC1-signaling is critical for proper cartilage matrix integrity and formation. When challenged with OA, Mc1re/e mice develop a more

  6. Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Expression Partially Attenuates the Adverse Effects of SR-BI Receptor Deficiency on Cholesterol Metabolism and Atherosclerosis*

    OpenAIRE

    El Bouhassani, Majda; Gilibert, Sophie; Moreau, Martine; Saint-Charles, Flora; Tréguier, Morgan; Poti, Francesco; Chapman, M. John; Le Goff, Wilfried; Lesnik, Philippe; Huby, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Scavenger receptor SR-BI significantly contributes to HDL cholesterol metabolism and atherogenesis in mice. However, the role of SR-BI may not be as pronounced in humans due to cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity. To address the impact of CETP expression on the adverse effects associated with SR-BI deficiency, we cross-bred our SR-BI conditional knock-out mouse model with CETP transgenic mice. CETP almost completely restored the abnormal HDL-C distribution in SR-BI-deficient mi...

  7. Studies in Mice Deficient for the Autoimmune Regulator (Aire) and Transgenic for the Thyrotropin Receptor Reveal a Role for Aire in Tolerance for Thyroid Autoantigens

    OpenAIRE

    Misharin, Alexander V.; Nagayama, Yuji; Aliesky, Holly A.; Rapoport, Basil; McLachlan, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    The autoimmune regulator (Aire) mediates central tolerance for many autoantigens, and autoimmunity occurs spontaneously in Aire-deficient humans and mice. Using a mouse model of Graves’ disease, we investigated the role of Aire in tolerance to the TSH receptor (TSHR) in Aire-deficient and wild-type mice (hyperthyroid-susceptible BALB/c background). Mice were immunized three times with TSHR A-subunit expressing adenovirus. The lack of Aire did not influence T-cell responses to TSHR protein or ...

  8. Deficiency of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive cells in Hirschsprung's disease colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donnell, Anne-Marie; Coyle, David; Puri, Prem

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive (PDGFRα+)-cells is altered in Hirschsprung’s disease (HD). METHODS: HD tissue specimens (n = 10) were collected at the time of pull-through surgery, while colonic control samples were obtained at the time of colostomy closure in patients with imperforate anus (n = 10). Immunolabelling of PDGFRα+-cells was visualized using confocal microscopy to assess the distribution of these cells, while Western blot analysis was undertaken to quantify PDGFRα protein expression. RESULTS: Confocal microscopy revealed PDGFRα+-cells within the mucosa, myenteric plexus and smooth muscle in normal controls, with a marked reduction in PDGFRα+-cells in the HD specimens. Western blotting revealed high levels of PDGFRα protein expression in normal controls, while there was a striking decrease in PDGFRα protein expression in the HD colon. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the altered distribution of PDGFRα+-cells in both the aganglionic and ganglionic HD bowel may contribute to the motility dysfunction in HD. PMID:27022215

  9. Fractalkine receptor deficiency impairs microglial and neuronal responsiveness to chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milior, Giampaolo; Lecours, Cynthia; Samson, Louis; Bisht, Kanchan; Poggini, Silvia; Pagani, Francesca; Deflorio, Cristina; Lauro, Clotilde; Alboni, Silvia; Limatola, Cristina; Branchi, Igor; Tremblay, Marie-Eve; Maggi, Laura

    2016-07-01

    Chronic stress is one of the most relevant triggering factors for major depression. Microglial cells are highly sensitive to stress and, more generally, to environmental challenges. However, the role of these brain immune cells in mediating the effects of stress is still unclear. Fractalkine signaling - which comprises the chemokine CX3CL1, mainly expressed by neurons, and its receptor CX3CR1, almost exclusively present on microglia in the healthy brain - has been reported to critically regulate microglial activity. Here, we investigated whether interfering with microglial function by deleting the Cx3cr1 gene affects the brain's response to chronic stress. To this purpose, we housed Cx3cr1 knockout and wild-type adult mice in either control or stressful environments for 2weeks, and investigated the consequences on microglial phenotype and interactions with synapses, synaptic transmission, behavioral response and corticosterone levels. Our results show that hampering neuron-microglia communication via the CX3CR1-CX3CL1 pathway prevents the effects of chronic unpredictable stress on microglial function, short- and long-term neuronal plasticity and depressive-like behavior. Overall, the present findings suggest that microglia-regulated mechanisms may underlie the differential susceptibility to stress and consequently the vulnerability to diseases triggered by the experience of stressful events, such as major depression. PMID:26231972

  10. A recombinant DNA vaccine protects mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor against lethal challenge with Usutu virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Cañas-Arranz, Rodrigo; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2016-04-19

    Usutu virus (USUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus whose circulation had been confined to Africa since it was first detected in 1959. However, in the last decade USUV has emerged in Europe causing episodes of avian mortality and sporadic severe neuroinvasive infections in humans. Remarkably, adult laboratory mice exhibit limited susceptibility to USUV infection, which has impaired the analysis of the immune responses, thus complicating the evaluation of virus-host interactions and of vaccine candidates against this pathogen. In this work, we showed that mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor (IFNAR (-/-) mice) were highly susceptible to USUV infection and provided a lethal challenge model for vaccine testing. To validate this infection model, a plasmid DNA vaccine candidate encoding the precursor of membrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of USUV was engineered. Transfection of cultured cells with this plasmid resulted in expression of USUV antigens and the assembly and secretion of small virus-like particles also known as recombinant subviral particles (RSPs). A single intramuscular immunization with this plasmid was sufficient to elicit a significant level of protection against challenge with USUV in IFNAR (-/-) mice. The characterization of the humoral response induced revealed that DNA vaccination primed anti-USUV antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies. Overall, these results probe the suitability of IFNAR (-/-) mice as an amenable small animal model for the study of USUV host virus interactions and vaccine testing, as well as the feasibility of DNA-based vaccine strategies for the control of this pathogen. PMID:26993334

  11. Effect of dietary fat on hepatic liver X receptor expression in P-glycoprotein deficient mice: implications for cholesterol metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Stephen D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pgp (P-glycoprotein, MDR1, ABCB1 is an energy-dependent drug efflux pump that is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC family of proteins. Preliminary studies have reported that nonspecific inhibitors of Pgp affect synthesis and esterification of cholesterol, putatively by blocking trafficking of cholesterol from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum, and that relative increases in Pgp within a given cell type are associated with increased accumulation of cholesterol. Several key efflux proteins involved in the cholesterol metabolic pathway are transcriptionally regulated by the nuclear hormone liver X receptor (LXR. Therefore, to examine the interplay between P-glycoprotein and the cholesterol metabolic pathway, we utilized a high fat, normal cholesterol diet to upregulate LXRα without affecting dietary cholesterol. Our research has demonstrated that mice lacking in P-glycoprotein do not exhibit alterations in hepatic total cholesterol storage, circulating plasma total cholesterol levels, or total cholesterol concentration in the bile when compared to control animals on either a normal (25% calories from dietary fat or high fat (45% calories from dietary fat diet. However, p-glycoprotein deficient mice (Mdr1a-/-/1b-/- exhibit increased hepatic LXRα protein expression and an elevation in fecal cholesterol concentration when compared to controls.

  12. Constitutive androstane receptor agonist, TCPOBOP, attenuates steatohepatitis in the methionine choline-deficient diet-fed mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To ascertain whether constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation by 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5,dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) modulates steatohepatitis in the methionine choline-deficient (MCD) diet-fed animal. METHODS: C57/BL6 wild-type mice were fed the MCD or standard diet for 2 wk and were treated with either the CAR agonist, TCPOBOP, or the CAR inverse agonist, androstanol. RESULTS: Expression of CYP2B10 and CYP3A11, known CAR target genes, increased 30-fold and 45-fold, respectively, in TCPOBOP-treated mice fed the MCD diet. TCPOBOP treatment reduced hepatic steatosis (44.6 ± 5.4% vs 30.4 ± 4.5%, P < 0.05) and serum triglyceride levels (48 ± 8 vs 20 ± 1 mg/Dl, P < 0.05) in MCD dietfed mice as compared with the standard diet-fed mice. This reduction in hepatic steatosis was accompanied by an increase in enzymes involved in fatty acid microsomal ω-oxidation and peroxisomal β-oxidation, namely CYP4A10, LPBE, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase. The reduction in steatosis was also accompanied by a reduction in liver cell apoptosis and inflammation. In contrast, androstanol was without effect on any of the above parameters. CONCLUSION: CAR activation stimulates induction of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation, and ameliorates hepatic steatosis, apoptosis and inflammation.

  13. Guipi decoction effects on brain somatostatin levels and receptor mRNA expression in rats with spleen deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huinan Qian; Le Wang; Libo Shen; Xueqin Hu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Somatostatin is abundant in the hypothalamus,cerebral cortex,limbic system,and mesencephalon.Somatostatin mRNA expression in the brain of rats with spleen deficiency is noticeably reduced,as well as attenuation of cognitive function. OBJECTIVE:To observe the interventional effect of Guipi decoction on somatostatin level and somatostatin receptor 1(SSTRI)mRNA expression in different encephalic regions of rats with spleen deficiency,and to compare the interventional effects of Guipi decoction,Chaihu Shugan powder,and Tianwang Buxin pellet. DESIGN:A randomized controlled observation. SETTING:Basic Medical College,Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.MATERIALS:Fifty adult Wistar male rats,of clean grade,weighing(160 ± 10)g,were provided by Beijing Weitong Lihua Laboratory Animal Technology Co.,Ltd.The protocol was performed in accordance with ethical guidelines for the use and care of animals.Somatostatin 1 polyclonal anti-rabbit antibody and SSTR1 in situ hybridization kit were provided by Department of Neuroanatomy,Shanghai Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA.The drug for developing rat models of spleen deficiency was composed of Dahuang,Houpu and Zhishi,and prepared at 2:1:1.Guipi decoction,Chaihu Shugan powder,and Tianwang Buxin pellet recipes were made according to previous studies.METHODS:This study was performed at the Basic Medical College,Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine from March 2002 to March 2005.The rats were randomly divided into 5 groups,with 10 rats in each group:normal,model,Guipi decoction,Chaihu Shugan powder,and Tianwang Buxin pelletgroups.Rat models of the latter 4 groups were developed by methods of purgation with bitter and cold nature drugs,improper diet,and overstrain.The rats received 7.5 g/kg of the drugs each morning and were fasted every other day,but were allowed free access to water at all times,The rats were forced to swim in 25℃ water until fatigued.Rats in the normal group

  14. Genomic dissection and prioritizing of candidate genes of QTL for regulating spontaneous arthritis on chromosome 1 in mice deficient for interleukin-1 receptor antagonist

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yanhong Cao; Jifei Zhang; Yan Jiao; Jian Yan; Feng Jiao; Xiaoyun Liu; Robert W. Williams; Karen A. Hasty; John M. Stuart; Weikuan Gu

    2012-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a heterogeneous disease with clinical and biological polymorphisms. IL-1RN is a protein that binds to interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptors and inhibits the binding of IL-1-alpha and IL-1-beta. IL-1RN levels are elevated in the blood of patients with a variety of infectious, immune, and traumatic conditions. Balb/c mice deficient in IL-1ra (mouse gene of IL-1RN) develop spontaneous autoimmune arthritis while DBA/1 mice deficient in IL-1ra do not. Previously, we identified a major QTL that regulates the susceptibility to arthritis in Balb/c mice with IL-1ra deficiency. In this study, we found that the QTL may contain two peaks that are regulated by two sets of candidate genes. By haplotype analysis, the total genomic regions of candidate genes were reduced from about 19 Mbp to approximately 9 Mbp. The total number of candidate genes was reduced from 208 to 21.

  15. Induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice deficient in either the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha or its CCR5 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, E H; Kuziel, W A; Owens, T

    2000-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha is a chemokine that is associated with Th1 cytokine responses. Expression and antibody blocking studies have implicated MIP-1alpha in multiple sclerosis (MS) and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We examined the role of MIP-1alpha and...... its CCR5 receptor in the induction of EAE by immunizing C57BL / 6 mice deficient in either MIP-1alpha or CCR5 with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). We found that MIP-1alpha-deficient mice were fully susceptible to MOG-induced EAE. These knockout animals were indistinguishable from wild...... chemoattractant protein-1, MIP-1beta, MIP-2, lymphotactin and T cell activation gene-3 during the course of the disease. CCR5-deficient mice were also susceptible to disease induction by MOG. The dispensability of MIP-1alpha and CCR5 for MOG-induced EAE in C57BL / 6 mice supports the idea that differential...

  16. Involvement of toll-like receptor 2 and 4 in association between dyslipidemia and osteoclast differentiation in apolipoprotein E deficient rat periodontium

    OpenAIRE

    Tomofuji, Takaaki; Ekuni, Daisuke; Azuma, Tetsuji; Irie, Koichiro; Endo, Yasumasa; Kasuyama, Kenta; Yoneda, Toshiki; Morita, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia increases circulating levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) and this may induce alveolar bone loss through toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 4. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dyslipidemia on osteoclast differentiation associated with TLR2 and TLR4 in periodontal tissues using a rat dyslipidemia (apolipoprotein E deficient) model. Methods Levels of plasma OxLDL, and the cholesterol and phospholipid profiles in plasma lipoproteins w...

  17. A Vitamin A Deficient Diet Enhances Proinflammatory Cytokine, Mu Opioid Receptor, and HIV-1 Expression in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Royal, Walter; III,; Wang, Huiyun; Jones, Odell; Tran, Hieu; Bryant, Joseph L.

    2007-01-01

    The HIV-1 (HIV) transgenic (Tg) rat develops several immune abnormalities in association with clinical impairments that are similar to what are seen with HIV infection in humans. In HIV infection, retinoids and opioids can have separate and potentially combined effects on the clinical course of HIV disease. In these studies, the effects of a vitamin A deficient diet on T cell proinflammatory cytokine and mu opioid receptor (MOR) expression were examined in the Tg and in wild-type (WT) rats. T...

  18. Role of alphabeta and gammadelta T cells in the host response to Salmonella infection as demonstrated in T-cell-receptor-deficient mice of defined Ity genotypes.

    OpenAIRE

    Weintraub, B C; Eckmann, L; Okamoto, S; Hense, M; Hedrick, S M; Fierer, J.

    1997-01-01

    Salmonella spp. are facultative intracellular bacteria which enter the body through the intestinal tract. We studied the roles of T cells expressing either the alpha and beta chains or the gamma and delta chains of the T-cell receptor (alphabeta T cells or gammadelta T cells, respectively) in the host defense against Salmonella using mice genetically deficient in either alphabeta T cells, gammadelta T cells, or both T-cell subsets. These mutant strains of mice were infected orally or intraper...

  19. Endocytosis of the ASGP receptor H1 is reduced by mutation of tyrosine-5 but still occurs via coated pits

    OpenAIRE

    Fuhrer, C; Geffen, I; Spiess, M.

    1991-01-01

    The clustering of plasma membrane receptors in clathrin-coated pits depends on determinants within their cytoplasmic domains. In several cases, individual tyrosine residues were shown to be necessary for rapid internalization. We have mutated the single tyrosine at position 5 in the cytoplasmic domain of the major subunit H1 of the asialoglycoprotein receptor to alanine. Expressed in fibroblasts cells, the mutant protein was accumulated in the plasma membrane, and its rate of internalization ...

  20. Impaired clearance of influenza A virus in obese, leptin receptor deficient mice is independent of leptin signaling in the lung epithelium and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn A Radigan

    Full Text Available During the recent H1N1 outbreak, obese patients had worsened lung injury and increased mortality. We used a murine model of influenza A pneumonia to test the hypothesis that leptin receptor deficiency might explain the enhanced mortality in obese patients.We infected wild-type, obese mice globally deficient in the leptin receptor (db/db and non-obese mice with tissue specific deletion of the leptin receptor in the lung epithelium (SPC-Cre/LepR fl/fl or macrophages and alveolar type II cells (LysM-Cre/Lepr fl/fl with influenza A virus (A/WSN/33 [H1N1] (500 and 1500 pfu/mouse and measured mortality, viral clearance and several markers of lung injury severity.The clearance of influenza A virus from the lungs of mice was impaired in obese mice globally deficient in the leptin receptor (db/db compared to normal weight wild-type mice. In contrast, non-obese, SP-C-Cre+/+/LepR fl/fl and LysM-Cre+/+/LepR fl/fl had improved viral clearance after influenza A infection. In obese mice, mortality was increased compared with wild-type mice, while the SP-C-Cre+/+/LepR fl/fl and LysM-Cre+/+/LepR fl/fl mice exhibited improved survival.Global loss of the leptin receptor results in reduced viral clearance and worse outcomes following influenza A infection. These findings are not the result of the loss of leptin signaling in lung epithelial cells or macrophages. Our results suggest that factors associated with obesity or with leptin signaling in non-myeloid populations such as natural killer and T cells may be associated with worsened outcomes following influenza A infection.

  1. Hematopoietic deletion of transferrin receptor 2 in mice leads to a block in erythroid differentiation during iron-deficient anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Gautam; Secondes, Eriza S; Wallace, Daniel F; Subramaniam, V Nathan

    2016-08-01

    Iron metabolism and erythropoiesis are inherently interlinked physiological processes. Regulation of iron metabolism is mediated by the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin limits the amount of iron released into the blood by binding to and causing the internalization of the iron exporter, ferroportin. A number of molecules and physiological stimuli, including erythropoiesis, are known to regulate hepcidin. An increase in erythropoietic demand decreases hepcidin, resulting in increased bioavailable iron in the blood. Transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) is involved in the systemic regulation of iron metabolism. Patients and mice with mutations in TFR2 develop hemochromatosis due to inappropriate hepcidin levels relative to body iron. Recent studies from our laboratory and others have suggested an additional role for TFR2 in response to iron-restricted erythropoiesis. These studies used mouse models with perturbed systemic iron metabolism: anemic mice lacking matriptase-2 and Tfr2, or bone marrow transplants from iron-loaded Tfr2 null mice. We developed a novel transgenic mouse model which lacks Tfr2 in the hematopoietic compartment, enabling the delineation of the role of Tfr2 in erythroid development without interfering with its role in systemic iron metabolism. We show that in the absence of hematopoietic Tfr2 immature polychromatic erythroblasts accumulate with a concordant reduction in the percentage of mature erythroid cells in the spleen and bone marrow of anemic mice. These results demonstrate that erythroid Tfr2 is essential for an appropriate erythropoietic response in iron-deficient anemia. These findings may be of relevance in clinical situations in which an immediate and efficient erythropoietic response is required. Am. J. Hematol. 91:812-818, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27169626

  2. Divergent impact of Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency on repair mechanisms in healthy muscle versus Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojumdar, Kamalika; Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Liang, Feng; Divangahi, Maziar; Qureshi, Salman T; Petrof, Basil J

    2016-05-01

    Injury to skeletal muscle, whether acute or chronic, triggers macrophage-mediated innate immunity in a manner which can be either beneficial or harmful for subsequent repair. Endogenous ligands for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) are released by damaged tissues and might play an important role in activating the innate immune system following muscle injury. To test this hypothesis, we compared macrophage behaviour and muscle repair mechanisms in mice lacking TLR2 under conditions of either acute (cardiotoxin-induced) or chronic (mdx mouse genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy; DMD) muscle damage. In previously healthy muscle subjected to acute damage, TLR2 deficiency reduced macrophage numbers in the muscle post-injury but did not alter the expression pattern of the prototypical macrophage polarization markers iNOS and CD206. In addition, there was abnormal persistence of necrotic fibres and impaired regeneration in TLR2-/- muscles after acute injury. In contrast, TLR2 ablation in chronically diseased muscles of mdx mice not only resulted in significantly reduced macrophage numbers but additionally modified their phenotype by shifting from inflammatory (iNOS(pos) CD206(neg) ) to more anti-inflammatory (iNOS(neg) CD206(pos) ) characteristics. This decrease in macrophage-mediated inflammation was associated with ameliorated muscle histopathology and improved force-generating capacity of the dystrophic muscle. Our results suggest that the role of TLR2 in macrophage function and skeletal muscle repair depends greatly upon the muscle injury context, and raise the possibility that inhibition of TLR2 could serve as a useful therapeutic measure in DMD. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26800321

  3. Orp8 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells reduces atherosclerotic lesion progression in LDL receptor knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik van Kampen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oxysterol binding protein Related Proteins (ORPs mediate intracellular lipid transport and homeostatic regulation. ORP8 downregulates ABCA1 expression in macrophages and cellular cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I. In line, ORP8 knockout mice display increased amounts of HDL cholesterol in blood. However, the role of macrophage ORP8 in atherosclerotic lesion development is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: LDL receptor knockout (KO mice were transplanted with bone marrow (BM from ORP8 KO mice and C57Bl/6 wild type mice. Subsequently, the animals were challenged with a high fat/high cholesterol Western-type diet to induce atherosclerosis. After 9 weeks of Western-Type diet feeding, serum levels of VLDL cholesterol were increased by 50% in ORP8 KO BM recipients compared to the wild-type recipients. However, no differences were observed in HDL cholesterol. Despite the increase in VLDL cholesterol, lesions in mice transplanted with ORP8 KO bone marrow were 20% smaller compared to WT transplanted controls. In addition, ORP8 KO transplanted mice displayed a modest increase in the percentage of macrophages in the lesion as compared to the wild-type transplanted group. ORP8 deficient macrophages displayed decreased production of pro-inflammatory factors IL-6 and TNFα, decreased expression of differentiation markers and showed a reduced capacity to form foam cells in the peritoneal cavity. CONCLUSIONS: Deletion of ORP8 in bone marrow-derived cells, including macrophages, reduces lesion progression after 9 weeks of WTD challenge, despite increased amounts of circulating pro-atherogenic VLDL. Reduced macrophage foam cell formation and lower macrophage inflammatory potential are plausible mechanisms contributing to the observed reduction in atherosclerosis.

  4. Eicosapentaenoic acid ameliorates non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in a novel mouse model using melanocortin 4 receptor-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuniha Konuma

    Full Text Available Many attempts have been made to find novel therapeutic strategies for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, while their clinical efficacy is unclear. We have recently reported a novel rodent model of NASH using melanocortin 4 receptor-deficient (MC4R-KO mice, which exhibit the sequence of events that comprise hepatic steatosis, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma with obesity-related phenotypes. In the liver of MC4R-KO mice, there is a unique histological feature termed hepatic crown-like structures (hCLS, where macrophages interact with dead hepatocytes and fibrogenic cells, thereby accelerating inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, we employed MC4R-KO mice to examine the effect of highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, a clinically available n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on the development of NASH. EPA treatment markedly prevented the development of hepatocyte injury, hCLS formation and liver fibrosis along with lipid accumulation. EPA treatment was also effective even after MC4R-KO mice developed NASH. Intriguingly, improvement of liver fibrosis was accompanied by the reduction of hCLS formation and plasma kallikrein-mediated transforming growth factor-β activation. Moreover, EPA treatment increased the otherwise reduced serum concentrations of adiponectin, an adipocytokine with anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. Collectively, EPA treatment effectively prevents the development and progression of NASH in MC4R-KO mice along with amelioration of hepatic steatosis. This study unravels a novel anti-fibrotic mechanism of EPA, thereby suggesting a clinical implication for the treatment of NASH.

  5. Role of histamine H1-receptor on behavioral states and wake maintenance during deficiency of a brain activating system: A study using a knockout mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Régis; Zhao, Yan; Perier, Magali; Akaoka, Hideo; Lintunen, Minnamaija; Hou, Yiping; Panula, Pertti; Watanabe, Takeshi; Franco, Patricia; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Using knockout (KO) mice lacking the histamine (HA)-synthesizing enzyme (histidine decarboxylase, HDC), we have previously shown the importance of histaminergic neurons in maintaining wakefulness (W) under behavioral challenges. Since the central actions of HA are mediated by several receptor subtypes, it remains to be determined which one(s) could be responsible for such a role. We have therefore compared the cortical-EEG, sleep and W under baseline conditions or behavioral/pharmacological stimuli in littermate wild-type (WT) and H1-receptor KO (H1-/-) mice. We found that H1-/- mice shared several characteristics with HDC KO mice, i.e. 1) a decrease in W after lights-off despite its normal baseline daily amount; 2) a decreased EEG slow wave sleep (SWS)/W power ratio; 3) inability to maintain W in response to behavioral challenges demonstrated by a decreased sleep latency when facing various stimuli. These effects were mediated by central H1-receptors. Indeed, in WT mice, injection of triprolidine, a brain-penetrating H1-receptor antagonist increased SWS, whereas ciproxifan (H3-receptor antagonist/inverse agonist) elicited W; all these injections had no effect in H1-/- mice. Finally, H1-/- mice showed markedly greater changes in EEG power (notably in the 0.8-5 Hz band) and sleep-wake cycle than in WT mice after application of a cholinergic antagonist or an indirect agonist, i.e., scopolamine or physostigmine. Hence, the role of HA in wake-promotion is largely ensured by H1-receptors. An upregulated cholinergic system may account for a quasi-normal daily amount of W in HDC or H1-receptor KO mice and likely constitutes a major compensatory mechanism when the brain is facing deficiency of an activating system. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26723880

  6. The Role of Vitamin D Deficiency and Vitamin D Receptor Genotypes on the Degree of Collateralization in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Hossein-Nezhad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the association of vitamin D deficiency and the FokI polymorphism of the vitamin D receptor (VDR gene in 760 patients who underwent angiography due to suspected coronary artery disease (CAD. Angiography and the Rentrop scoring system were used to classify the severity of CAD in each patient and to grade the extent of collateral development, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP was used to determine the FokI VDR gene polymorphism. The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (serum 25(OHD < 10 ng/mL was significantly higher in patients with at least one stenotic coronary artery compared to those without any stenotic coronary arteries. Severe vitamin D deficiency was not independently associated with collateralization, but it was significantly associated with the VDR genotypes. In turn, VDR genotype was independently associated with the degree of collateralization; the Rentrop scores were the highest in FF, intermediate in Ff, and the lowest in the ff genotype. The results show that FokI polymorphism is independently associated with collateralization. Additionally, vitamin D deficiency is more prevalent in patients with CAD that may result from FokI polymorphism. Therefore, maintaining a normal vitamin D status should be a high priority for patients with CAD.

  7. CD8+ T Cell Response to Gammaherpesvirus Infection Mediates Inflammation and Fibrosis in Interferon Gamma Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigid M O'Flaherty

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, one of the most severe interstitial lung diseases, is a progressive fibrotic disorder of unknown etiology. However, there is growing appreciation for the role of viral infection in disease induction and/or progression. A small animal model of multi-organ fibrosis, which involves murine gammaherpesvirus (MHV68 infection of interferon gamma receptor deficient (IFNγR-/- mice, has been utilized to model the association of gammaherpesvirus infections and lung fibrosis. Notably, several MHV68 mutants which fail to induce fibrosis have been identified. Our current study aimed to better define the role of the unique MHV68 gene, M1, in development of pulmonary fibrosis. We have previously shown that the M1 gene encodes a secreted protein which possesses superantigen-like function to drive the expansion and activation of Vβ4+ CD8+ T cells. Here we show that M1-dependent fibrosis is correlated with heightened levels of inflammation in the lung. We observe an M1-dependent cellular infiltrate of innate immune cells with most striking differences at 28 days-post infection. Furthermore, in the absence of M1 protein expression we observed reduced CD8+ T cells and MHV68 epitope specific CD8+ T cells to the lungs-despite equivalent levels of viral replication between M1 null and wild type MHV68. Notably, backcrossing the IFNγR-/- onto the Balb/c background, which has previously been shown to exhibit weak MHV68-driven Vβ4+ CD8+ T cell expansion, eliminated MHV68-induced fibrosis-further implicating the activated Vβ4+ CD8+ T cell population in the induction of fibrosis. We further addressed the role that CD8+ T cells play in the induction of fibrosis by depleting CD8+ T cells, which protected the mice from fibrotic disease. Taken together these findings are consistent with the hypothesized role of Vβ4+ CD8+ T cells as mediators of fibrotic disease in IFNγR-/- mice.

  8. Targeting the liver via the asialoglycoprotein-receptor : synthesis of directed small molecule libraries for the H1-CRD

    OpenAIRE

    Riva, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    The ASGP-R, exclusively located on the cell surfaces of hepatocytes, is well known for removing desialylated glycoproteins with terminal galactose or N - acetylgalactosamine residues from circulation. However, small high affinity ligands with more drug-like properties than the natural glycoproteins, that can be used for specific targeting of the liver, were not yet investigated for the human H1-CRD. Various small-directed libraries of galactose derivatives and mimics thereof we...

  9. Effects of a n-3 PUFA deficient diet on the expression of retinoid nuclear receptors, neurogranin and neuromodulin in rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buaud Benjamin

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A lot of studies performed in rodents revealed that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA deficient diets could induce deficits of learning capacities but the mechanisms involved are not well known. Retinoic acid (RA and its nuclear receptors (RAR and RXR play a central role in the maintenance of cognitive processes and synaptic plasticity via its action on target genes that are neurogranin (RC3 and neuromodulin (GAP43. Given some interferences were described between the retinoid and fatty acid signaling pathways, we investigated the effects of a _α-linolenic acid (18: 3 n-3 deficient diet on retinoic acid nuclear receptors (RAR, and RXR, on GAP43 and RC3, and on blood and brain fatty acid composition in rats at three times of diet: 3, 9 and 18 weeks. In blood and brain of these animals, we observed a severe n-3 PUFA deficit (18:3 n-3, 20:5 n-3 and particularly 22:6 n-3 associated with an increase in the n-6 PUFA content (mainly 22:5 n-6. Real-time PCR and western blot analysis allowed us to note that retinoid signaling, GAP43 and RC3 expression were affected in the striatum of the n-3 PUFA deprived rats.

  10. Relationship between autophagy and the intracellular degradation of asialoglycoproteins in cultured rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between autophagy and the intracellular distribution of endocytosed asialoorosomucoid was studied in cultured rat hepatocytes. Overt autophagy was induced by shifting the cells to a minimal salt medium. Incubation in minimal salt medium led to the formation of buoyant lysosomes at the expense of denser lysosomes manifested as a dual distribution of these organelles in Nycodenz gradients. Asialoorosomucoid was labeled with 125I-tyramine cellobiose. The labeled degradation products formed from this ligand are trapped at the site of degradation and may therefore serve as markers for the subgroup of lysosomes involved in the degradation. In control cells the degradation of the ligand was initiated in a light prelysosomal compartment and continued in denser lysosomes. In cells with high autophagic activity, the degradation of labeled asialoorosomucoid took place exclusively in a buoyant group of lysosomes. These results suggest that degradation of endocytosed ligand takes place in the same secondary lysosomes as substrate sequestered by autophagic mechanisms. These light lysosomes represent a subgroup of active lysosomes which are gradually recruited from dense bodies. Data are also presented that indicate that insulin may prevent the change in buoyant density brought about by incubation in deficient medium

  11. Inverse regulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-6 receptor in histamine deficient histidine decarboxylase-knock-out mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horváth, B V; Falus, A; Tóth, S; Szalai, Cs; Lázár-Molnár, E; Holub, M Cs; Buzás, E; Nagy, A; Fulop, A K

    2002-01-01

    Interleukin-6, a multifunctional cytokine upon binding to its receptor on hepatocytes regulates production of acute phase proteins involved in local and systemic inflammation. Gene expression and biosynthesis of IL-6 and its receptor (IL-6 R/gp130) is under complex regulation. Histamine, in addition

  12. Relation between increased anxiety and reduced expression of alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of GABA(A) receptors in Wfs1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raud, Sirli; Sütt, Silva; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Innos, Jürgen; Kõks, Sulev; Vasar, Eero

    2009-08-28

    Mutations in the coding region of the WFS1 gene cause Wolfram syndrome, a rare multisystem neurodegenerative disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance. In clinical studies a relation between mutations in the Wfs1 gene and increased susceptibility for mood disorders has been established. According to our previous studies, mice lacking Wfs1 gene displayed increased anxiety in stressful environment. As the GABA-ergic system plays a significant role in the regulation of anxiety, we analyzed the expression of GABA-related genes in the forebrain structures of wild-type and Wfs1-deficient mice. Experimentally naïve Wfs1-deficient animals displayed a significant down-regulation of alpha1 (Gabra1) and alpha2 (Gabra2) subunits of GABA(A) receptors in the temporal lobe and frontal cortex. Exposure of wild-type mice to the elevated plus-maze decreased levels of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes in the temporal lobe. A similar tendency was also established in the frontal cortex of wild-type animals exposed to behavioral test. In Wfs1-deficient mice the elevated plus-maze exposure did not induce further changes in the expression of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes. By contrast, the expression of Gad1 and Gad2 genes, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of GABA, was not significantly affected by the exposure of mice to the elevated plus-maze or by the invalidation of Wfs1 gene. Altogether, the present study demonstrates that increased anxiety of Wfs1-deficient mice is probably linked to reduced expression of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes in the frontal cortex and temporal lobe. PMID:19477223

  13. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor - nitric oxide synthase pathway in the cortex of Nogo-A-deficient rats in relation to brain laterality and schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdena eKristofikova

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that Nogo-A, a myelin-associated protein, could play a role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and that Nogo-A-deficient rodents could serve as an animal model for schizophrenic symptoms. Since changes in brain laterality are typical of schizophrenia, we investigated whether Nogo-A-deficient rats showed any signs of disturbed asymmetry in cortical N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor–nitric oxide synthase (NOS pathway, which is reported as dysfunctional in schizophrenia. In particular, we measured separately in the right and left hemisphere of young and old Nogo-A-deficient male rats the expression of NMDA receptor subunits (NR1, NR2A and NR2B in the frontal cortex and activities of NOS isoforms (neuronal (nNOS, endothelial (eNOS and inducible (iNOS in the parietal cortex. In young controls, we observed right/left asymmetry of iNOS activity and three positive correlations (between NR1 in the left and NR2B laterality, between NR2B in the right and left sides, and between NR1 in the right side and nNOS laterality. In old controls, we found bilateral decreases in NR1, an increase in NR2B in the right side and two changes in correlations in the NR1–nNOS pathway. In young Nogo-A-deficient rats, we observed an increase in iNOS activity in the left hemisphere and two changes in correlations in NR1–nNOS and NR2A–eNOS, compared to young controls. Finally, we revealed in old Nogo-A-deficient animals, bilateral decreases in NR1 and one change in correlation between eNOS–iNOS, compared to old controls. Although some findings from schizophrenic brains did not manifest in Nogo-A-deficient rats (e.g., no alterations in NR2B, others did (e.g., alterations demonstrating accelerated ageing in young but not old animals, those occurring exclusively in the right hemisphere in young and old animals and those suggesting abnormal frontoparietal cortical interactions in young animals.

  14. Firing properties of dopamine neurons in freely moving dopamine-deficient mice: Effects of dopamine receptor activation and anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Siobhan; Smith, David M.; Mizumori, Sheri J. Y.; Palmiter, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    To examine the regulation of midbrain dopamine neurons, recordings were obtained from single neurons of freely moving, genetically engineered dopamine-deficient (DD) mice. DD mice were tested without dopamine signaling (basal state) and with endogenous dopamine signaling (after L-dopa administration). In the basal state, when dopamine concentration in DD mice is

  15. Diabetic Nephropathy Is Accelerated by Farnesoid X Receptor Deficiency and Inhibited by Farnesoid X Receptor Activation in a Type 1 Diabetes Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoxin X.; Jiang, Tao; Shen, Yan; Caldas, Yupanqui; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Santamaria, Hannah; Urbanek, Cydney; Solis, Nathaniel; Scherzer, Pnina; Lewis, Linda; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Adorini, Luciano; Pruzanski, Mark; Jeffrey B Kopp; Verlander, Jill W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy is complex and involves activation of multiple pathways leading to kidney damage. An important role for altered lipid metabolism via sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) has been recently recognized in diabetic kidney disease. Our previous studies have shown that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor, modulates renal SREBP-1 expression. The purpose of the present study was then to determ...

  16. Peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ ligands inhibit development of atherosclerosis in LDL receptor–deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Andrew C.; Kathleen K Brown; Silvestre, Mercedes J.; Willson, Timothy M; Palinski, Wulf; Glass, Christopher K.

    2000-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor that regulates fat-cell development and glucose homeostasis and is the molecular target of a class of insulin-sensitizing agents used for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PPARγ is highly expressed in macrophage foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions and has been demonstrated in cultured macrophages to both positively and negatively regulate genes implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We report...

  17. The role of ceramide in receptor- and stress-induced apoptosis studied in acidic ceramidase-deficient Farber disease cells

    OpenAIRE

    Burek, C. J.; Roth, J.; Koch, H. G.; Harzer, K.; Los, Marek Jan; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    The activation of sphingomyelinases leading to the generation of ceramide has been implicated in various apoptotic pathways. However, the role of ceramide as an essential death mediator remains highly controversial. In the present study, we investigated the functional relevance of ceramide in a genetic model by using primary cells from a Farber disease patient. These cells accumulate ceramide as the result of an inherited deficiency of acidic ceramidase. We demonstrate that Farber disease lym...

  18. Clinical significance of complement deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, H David; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is composed of more than 30 serum and membrane-bound proteins, all of which are needed for normal function of complement in innate and adaptive immunity. Historically, deficiencies within the complement system have been suspected when young children have had recurrent and difficult-to-control infections. As our understanding of the complement system has increased, many other diseases have been attributed to deficiencies within the complement system. Generally, complement deficiencies within the classical pathway lead to increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacterial infections as well as a syndrome resembling systemic lupus erythematosus. Complement deficiencies within the mannose-binding lectin pathway generally lead to increased bacterial infections, and deficiencies within the alternative pathway usually lead to an increased frequency of Neisseria infections. However, factor H deficiency can lead to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, deficiencies within the terminal complement pathway lead to an increased incidence of Neisseria infections. Two other notable complement-associated deficiencies are complement receptor 3 and 4 deficiency, which result from a deficiency of CD18, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, and CD59 deficiency, which causes paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Most inherited deficiencies of the complement system are autosomal recessive, but properidin deficiency is X-linked recessive, deficiency of C1 inhibitor is autosomal dominant, and mannose-binding lectin and factor I deficiencies are autosomal co-dominant. The diversity of clinical manifestations of complement deficiencies reflects the complexity of the complement system. PMID:19758139

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonism reduces the insulin-stimulated increase in circulating interleukin-6 in growth hormone (GH) replaced GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Morten B; Rasmussen, Lars M; Hansen, Troels K;

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Context: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonists modify cardiovascular risk factors and inflammatory markers in patients with type 2 diabetes. Growth hormone (GH) treatment in GH-deficient (GHD) patients may cause insulin resistance and exerts ambiguous effects...... on inflammatory markers. Objective: To investigate circulating markers of inflammation and endothelial function in GH replaced GHD patients before and after 12 weeks administration of either pioglitazone 30 mg/day (N=10) or placebo (N=10) in a randomized double-blind parallel design. Methods...... significantly abrogated this insulin-stimulated increment in IL-6 levels compared to placebo (P = 0.01). Furthermore PPARgamma agonist treatment significantly lowered basal IL-4 levels (P<0.05). Conclusions: 1) IL-6 levels increase during a hyperinsulinemic clamp in GH replaced patients, 2) This increase in IL...

  20. Dual Effects of IL-1 Overactivity on the Immune System in a Mouse Model of Arthritis due to Deficiency of IL-1 Receptor Antagonist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Yan; Yan Jiao; Hong Chen; Feng Jiao; Karen A.Hasty; John M.Stuart; Weikuan Gu

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the significance of cytokine interleukin 1 (IL-1) in the onset and progression of meumatoid arthritis (RA).The precise molecular mechanisms related to IL-1 underlying RA is still elusive.We conducted a whole genome-wide transcriptomal comparison of wild-type (WT) and arthritis-prone IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-Irn) deficient BALB/c mice to address this issue.To refine our search efforts,gene expression profiling was also performed on paired wild-type and arthritis-resis nt IL-1m deficient DBA/1 mice as internal controls when identifying causative arthritis candidate genes.Two hundred and fifteen trans dpts were found to be dysregulated greater than or equal to 2-fold in the diseased mice.The altered transcriptome in BALB/c mice revealed increased myeloid cell activities and impaired lymphocyte functionality,suggesting dual regulatory effects of IL-1 hyperactivil on immunological changes associated with arthritis development.Phase-specific gene expression changes were identified,such as early increase and late decrease of heat shock protein coding genes.Moreover,common gene expression changes were also observed,especially the upregulation of paired Ig-like receptor A (Pira) in both early and late phases of arthritis.Real-time PCR was performed to validate the expression of Pira and an intervention experiment with a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I inhibitor (brefeldin A) was carried out to investigate the role of suppressing Pira activity.We conclude that global pattern changes of common and distinct gene expressions may represent novel opportunities for better control of RA through early diagnosis and development of alternative therapeutic strategies.

  1. Temporal phasing of locomotor activity, heart rate rhythmicity, and core body temperature is disrupted in VIP receptor 2-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hsiung, Hansen M; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2011-01-01

    ) cycle. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal polypetide (VIP) and its receptor (VPAC2) are highly expressed in the SCN. Recent studies indicate that VIPergic signaling plays an essential role in the maintenance of ongoing circadian rhythmicity by synchronizing SCN cells and by maintaining rhythmicity...

  2. Utrophin abundance is reduced at neuromuscular junctions of patients with both inherited and acquired acetylcholine receptor deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slater, CR; Young, C; Wood, SJ; Bewick, GS; Anderson, LVB; Baxter, P; Fawcett, PRW; Roberts, M; Jacobson, L; Kuks, J; Vincent, A; NewsomDavis, J

    1997-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a heterogenous group of conditions in which muscle weakness resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission is often present from infancy. One form of congenital myasthenic syndrome is due to a reduction of the number of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the n

  3. Melatonin receptor deficiency decreases and temporally shifts ecto-5'-nucleotidase mRNA levels in mouse prosencephalon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, Moran; Pfeffer, Martina; Robson, Simon C; Fischer, Claudia; Zimmermann, Herbert; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2016-07-01

    Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (eN) is the major extracellular adenosine-producing ecto-enzyme in mouse brain. Via the production of adenosine, eN participates in many physiological and pathological processes, such as wakefulness, inflammation, nociception and neuroprotection. The mechanisms regulating the expression of eN are therefore of considerable neurobiological and clinical interest. Having previously described a modulatory effect of melatonin in the regulation of eN mRNA levels, we decided to analyze the melatonin receptor subtype involved in the regulation of eN mRNA levels by comparing eN mRNA patterns in melatonin-proficient transgenic mice lacking either the melatonin receptor subtype 1 (MT1 KO) or both melatonin receptor subtypes (MT1 and MT2; MT1/2 KO) with the corresponding melatonin-proficient wild-type (WT) controls. By means of radioactive in situ hybridization, eN mRNA levels were found to be diminished in both MT1 and MT1/2 KO mice compared with WT controls suggesting stimulatory impacts of melatonin receptors on eN mRNA levels. Whereas eN mRNA levels increased during the day and peaked at night in WT and MT1 KO mice, eN mRNA levels at night were reduced and the peak was shifted toward day-time in double MT1/2 KO mice. These data suggest that the MT2 receptor subtype may play a role in the temporal regulation of eN mRNA availability. Notably, day-time locomotor activity was significantly higher in MT1/2 KO compared with WT mice. Our results suggest melatoninergic signaling as an interface between the purinergic system and the circadian system. PMID:26917036

  4. The Use of an IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Peptide to Control Inflammation in the Treatment of Corneal Limbal Epithelial Stem Cell Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Corneal limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD may be treated using ex vivo limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs derived from cadaveric donor tissue. However, continuing challenges exist around tissue availability, inflammation, and transplant rejection. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS or recombinant human IL-1β stimulated primary human keratocyte and LESC models were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of a short chain, IL-1 receptor antagonist peptide for use in LESC sheet growth to control inflammation. The peptide was characterized using mass spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. Peptide cytotoxicity, patterns of cell cytokine expression in response to LPS or IL-1β stimulation, and peptide suppression of this response were investigated by MTS/LDH assays, ELISA, and q-PCR. Cell differences in LPS stimulated toll-like receptor 4 expression were investigated using immunocytochemistry. A significant reduction in rIL-1β stimulated inflammatory cytokine production occurred following LESC and keratocyte incubation with anti-inflammatory peptide and in LPS stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 production following keratocyte incubation with peptide (1 mg/mL P<0.05. LESCs produced no cytokine response to LPS stimulation and showed no TLR4 expression. The peptide supported LESC growth when adhered to a silicone hydrogel contact lens indicating potential use in improved LESC grafting through suppression of inflammation.

  5. Gamma Interferon (IFN-γ) Receptor Restricts Systemic Dengue Virus Replication and Prevents Paralysis in IFN-α/β Receptor-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Prestwood, Tyler R.; Morar, Malika M.; Zellweger, Raphaël M.; Miller, Robyn; May, Monica M.; Yauch, Lauren E.; Lada, Steven M.; Shresta, Sujan

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that mice lacking alpha/beta and gamma interferon receptors (IFN-α/βR and -γR) uniformly exhibit paralysis following infection with the dengue virus (DENV) clinical isolate PL046, while only a subset of mice lacking the IFN-γR alone and virtually no mice lacking the IFN-α/βR alone develop paralysis. Here, using a mouse-passaged variant of PL046, strain S221, we show that in the absence of the IFN-α/βR, signaling through the IFN-γR confers approximately 140-fold greater ...

  6. Low density lipoprotein receptor-independent hepatic uptake of a synthetic, cholesterol-scavenging lipoprotein: implications for the treatment of receptor-deficient atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolism of infused 111In-labeled phospholipid liposomes was examined in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits, which lack low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and in normal control rabbits. The half-times (t/sub 1/2/) for clearance of 111In and excess phospholipid from plasma were 20.8 +/- 0.9 hr and 20.3 +/- 4.6 hr in WHHL and 20.0 +/- 0.8 hr and 19.6 +/- 2.2 hr in the normal rabbits. By 6 hr postinfusion, the plasma concentration of unesterified cholesterol increased by 2.2 +/- 0.23 mmol/liter in WHHL and 2.1 +/- 0.04 mmol/liter in normal rabbits, presumably reflecting mobilization of tissue sores. Disappearance of excess plasma cholesterol was > 90% complete in both groups of rabbits by 70 hr postinfusion. By quantitative γ camera imaging, hepatic trapping of 111In-labeled liposomes over time was indistinguishable between the two groups. At autopsy, the liver was the major organ of clearance. Aortic uptake of 111In was < 0.02%. Thus, mobilization of cholesterol and hepatic uptake of phospholipid liposomes do not require LDL receptors. Because phospholipid infusions produce rapid substantial regression of atherosclerosis in genetically normal animals, the results suggest that phospholipid liposomes or triglyceride phospholipid emulsions (e.g., Intralipid) might reduce atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits and in humans with familial hypercholesterolemia

  7. Deficiency in type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor in mice protects against oxygen-induced lung injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahamed, Karmene; Epaud, Ralph; Holzenberger, Martin; Bonora, Monique; Flejou, Jean-François; Puard, Julien; Clément, Annick; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cellular responses to aging and oxidative stress are regulated by type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R). Oxidant injury, which is implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of respiratory diseases, acutely upregulates IGF-1R expression in the lung. This led us to suspect that reduction of IGF-1R levels in lung tissue could prevent deleterious effects of oxygen exposure. METHODS: Since IGF-1R null mutant mice die at birth from respiratory failure, we generated comp...

  8. Differential Expression of Claudin Family Proteins in Mouse Ovarian Serous Papillary Epithelial Adenoma in Aging FSH Receptor-Deficient Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakash Aravindakshan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is a deadly disease with long latency. To understand the consequences of loss of folliclestimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R signaling and to explore why the atrophic and anovulatory ovaries of follitropin receptor knockout (FORKO mice develop different types of ovarian tumors, including serous papillary epithelial adenoma later in life, we used mRNA expression profiling to gain a comprehensive view of misregulated genes. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, protein analysis, and cellular localization, we show, for the first time, in vivo evidence that, in the absence of FSH-R signaling, claudin-3, claudin-4, and claudin-11 are selectively upregulated, whereas claudin-1 decreases in ovarian surface epithelium and tumors in comparison to wild type. In vitro experiments using a mouse ovarian surface epithelial cell line derived from wild-type females reveal direct hormonal influence on claudin proteins. Although recent studies suggest that cell junction proteins are differentially expressed in ovarian tumors in women, the etiology of such changes remains unclear. Our results suggest an altered hormonal environment resulting from FSH-R loss as a cause of early changes in tight junction proteins that predispose the ovary to late-onset tumors that occur with aging. More importantly, this study identifies claudin-11 overexpression in mouse ovarian serous cystadenoma.

  9. Mannose receptor-mediated delivery of moss-made α-galactosidase A efficiently corrects enzyme deficiency in Fabry mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jin-Song; Busch, Andreas; Day, Taniqua S; Meng, Xing-Li; Yu, Chun I; Dabrowska-Schlepp, Paulina; Fode, Benjamin; Niederkrüger, Holger; Forni, Sabrina; Chen, Shuyuan; Schiffmann, Raphael; Frischmuth, Thomas; Schaaf, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is an effective treatment for several lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). Intravenously infused enzymes are taken up by tissues through either the mannose 6-phosphate receptor (M6PR) or the mannose receptor (MR). It is generally believed that M6PR-mediated endocytosis is a key mechanism for ERT in treating LSDs that affect the non-macrophage cells of visceral organs. However, the therapeutic efficacy of MR-mediated delivery of mannose-terminated enzymes in these diseases has not been fully evaluated. We tested the effectiveness of a non-phosphorylated α-galactosidase A produced from moss (referred to as moss-aGal) in vitro and in a mouse model of Fabry disease. Endocytosis of moss-aGal was MR-dependent. Compared to agalsidase alfa, a phosphorylated form of α-galactosidase A, moss-aGal was more preferentially targeted to the kidney. Cellular localization of moss-aGal and agalsidase alfa in the heart and kidney was essentially identical. A single injection of moss-aGal led to clearance of accumulated substrate in the heart and kidney to an extent comparable to that achieved by agalsidase alfa. This study suggested that mannose-terminated enzymes may be sufficiently effective for some LSDs in which non-macrophage cells are affected, and that M6P residues may not always be a prerequisite for ERT as previously considered. PMID:26310963

  10. An inhibitor of transforming growth factor beta type I receptor ameliorates muscle atrophy in a mouse model of caveolin 3-deficient muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Yutaka; Okada, Tadashi; Nishimatsu, Shin-Ichiro; Ishizaki, Masatoshi; Suga, Tomohiro; Fujino, Masahiro; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Uchino, Makoto; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Noji, Sumihare; Hinohara, Atsushi; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Kiyoshi; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2012-08-01

    Skeletal muscle expressing Pro104Leu mutant caveolin 3 (CAV3(P104L)) in mouse becomes atrophied and serves as a model of autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C. We previously found that caveolin 3-deficient muscles showed activated intramuscular transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signals. However, the cellular mechanism by which loss of caveolin 3 leads to muscle atrophy is unknown. Recently, several small-molecule inhibitors of TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) kinase have been developed as molecular-targeting drugs for cancer therapy by suppressing intracellular TGF-β1, -β2, and -β3 signaling. Here, we show that a TβRI kinase inhibitor, Ki26894, restores impaired myoblast differentiation in vitro caused by activin, myostatin, and TGF-β1, as well as CAV3(P104L). Oral administration of Ki26894 increased muscle mass and strength in vivo in wild-type mice, and improved muscle atrophy and weakness in the CAV3(P104L) mice. The inhibitor restored the number of satellite cells, the resident stem cells of adult skeletal muscle, with suppression of the increased phosphorylation of Smad2, an effector, and the upregulation of p21 (also known as Cdkn1a), a target gene of the TGF-β family members in muscle. These data indicate that both TGF-β-dependent reduction in satellite cells and impairment of myoblast differentiation contribute to the cellular mechanism underlying caveolin 3-deficient muscle atrophy. TβRI kinase inhibitors could antagonize the activation of intramuscular anti-myogenic TGF-β signals, thereby providing a novel therapeutic rationale for the alternative use of this type of anticancer drug in reversing muscle atrophy in various clinical settings. PMID:22584670

  11. Expression of human alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in adipose tissue of beta 3-adrenergic receptor-deficient mice promotes diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valet, P; Grujic, D; Wade, J; Ito, M; Zingaretti, M C; Soloveva, V; Ross, S R; Graves, R A; Cinti, S; Lafontan, M; Lowell, B B

    2000-11-01

    Catecholamines play an important role in controlling white adipose tissue function and development. beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors (ARs) couple positively and negatively, respectively, to adenylyl cyclase and are co-expressed in human adipocytes. Previous studies have demonstrated increased adipocyte alpha 2/beta-AR balance in obesity, and it has been proposed that increased alpha 2-ARs in adipose tissue with or without decreased beta-ARs may contribute mechanistically to the development of increased fat mass. To critically test this hypothesis, adipocyte alpha 2/beta-AR balance was genetically manipulated in mice. Human alpha 2A-ARs were transgenically expressed in the adipose tissue of mice that were either homozygous (-/-) or heterozygous (+/-) for a disrupted beta 3-AR allele. Mice expressing alpha 2-ARs in fat, in the absence of beta 3-ARs (beta 3-AR -/- background), developed high fat diet-induced obesity. Strikingly, this effect was due entirely to adipocyte hyperplasia and required the presence of alpha2-ARs, the absence of beta 3-ARs, and a high fat diet. Of note, obese alpha 2-transgenic beta 3 -/- mice failed to develop insulin resistance, which may reflect the fact that expanded fat mass was due to adipocyte hyperplasia and not adipocyte hypertrophy. In summary, we have demonstrated that increased alpha 2/beta-AR balance in adipocytes promotes obesity by stimulating adipocyte hyperplasia. This study also demonstrates one way in which two genes (alpha 2 and beta 3-AR) and diet interact to influence fat mass. PMID:10948198

  12. Decreased fat mass in interleukin-1 receptor antagonist-deficient mice: impact on adipogenesis, food intake, and energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somm, Emmanuel; Henrichot, Elvire; Pernin, Agnès; Juge-Aubry, Cristiana E; Muzzin, Patrick; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Nicklin, Martin J H; Meier, Christoph A

    2005-12-01

    Interleukin (IL)-1 is a regulator of inflammation but is also implicated in the control of energy homeostasis. Because the soluble IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is markedly increased in the serum of obese patients and is overexpressed in white adipose tissue in obesity, we studied the metabolic consequences of genetic IL-1Ra ablation in mice. We have shown that IL-1Ra-/- mice have a lean phenotype due to decreased fat mass, related to a defect in adipogenesis and increased energy expenditure. The adipocytes were smaller in these animals, and the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis was reduced. Energy expenditure as measured by indirect calorimetry was elevated, and weight loss in response to a 24-h fast was increased in IL-1Ra-/- animals compared with wild-type mice. Lipid oxidation of IL-1Ra-/- mice was higher during the light period, reflecting their reduction in diurnal food intake. Interestingly, IL-1Ra-/- and IL-1Ra+/- mice presented an attenuation in high-fat diet-induced caloric hyperphagia, indicating a better adaptation to hypercaloric alimentation, which is in line with the role of IL-1Ra as a mediator of leptin resistance. Taken together, we show that IL-1Ra is an important regulator of adipogenesis, food intake, and energy expenditure. PMID:16306368

  13. Altered Rhythm of Adrenal Clock Genes, StAR and Serum Corticosterone in VIP Receptor 2-Deficient Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Georg, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens;

    2012-01-01

    The circadian time-keeping system consists of clocks in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and in peripheral organs including an adrenal clock linked to the rhythmic corticosteroid production by regulating steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Clock cells contain an autonomous molecular...... oscillator based on a group of clock genes and their protein products. Mice lacking the VPAC2 receptor display disrupted circadian rhythm of physiology and behaviour, and therefore, we using real-time RT-PCR quantified (1) the mRNAs for the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 in the adrenal gland and SCN, (2) the...... a 24-h rhythmic expression in the adrenal of WT mice under L/D and dark conditions. During a L/D cycle, the adrenal clock gene rhythm in VPAC2-KO mice was phase-advanced by approximately 6 h compared to WT mice and became arrhythmic in constant darkness. A significant 24-h rhythmic variation in the...

  14. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) receptor restricts systemic dengue virus replication and prevents paralysis in IFN-α/β receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwood, Tyler R; Morar, Malika M; Zellweger, Raphaël M; Miller, Robyn; May, Monica M; Yauch, Lauren E; Lada, Steven M; Shresta, Sujan

    2012-12-01

    We previously reported that mice lacking alpha/beta and gamma interferon receptors (IFN-α/βR and -γR) uniformly exhibit paralysis following infection with the dengue virus (DENV) clinical isolate PL046, while only a subset of mice lacking the IFN-γR alone and virtually no mice lacking the IFN-α/βR alone develop paralysis. Here, using a mouse-passaged variant of PL046, strain S221, we show that in the absence of the IFN-α/βR, signaling through the IFN-γR confers approximately 140-fold greater resistance against systemic vascular leakage-associated dengue disease and virtually complete protection from dengue-induced paralysis. Viral replication in the spleen was assessed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, which revealed a reduction in the number of infected cells due to IFN-γR signaling by 2 days after infection, coincident with elevated levels of IFN-γ in the spleen and serum. By 4 days after infection, IFN-γR signaling was found to restrict DENV replication systemically. Clearance of DENV, on the other hand, occurred in the absence of IFN-γR, except in the central nervous system (CNS) (brain and spinal cord), where clearance relied on IFN-γ from CD8(+) T cells. These results demonstrate the roles of IFN-γR signaling in protection from initial systemic and subsequent CNS disease following DENV infection and demonstrate the importance of CD8(+) T cells in preventing DENV-induced CNS disease. PMID:22973027

  15. Inducible Apoe Gene Repair in Hypomorphic ApoE Mice Deficient in the LDL Receptor Promotes Atheroma Stabilization with a Human-like Lipoprotein Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlé, Delphine; Luk, Fu Sang; Kim, Roy Y.; Olivas, Victor R.; Kumar, Nikit; Posada, Jessica M.; Li, Kang; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Rapp, Joseph H.; Raffai, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study atherosclerosis regression in mice following plasma lipid reduction to moderately elevated apolipoprotein B (apoB)-lipoprotein levels. Approach and Results Chow-fed hypomorphic Apoe mice deficient in LDL receptor expression (Apoeh/hLdlr−/−Mx1-cre mice) develop hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. These mice were studied before and after inducible cre-mediated Apoe gene repair. By 1 week, induced mice displayed a 2-fold reduction in plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels and a decrease in the non-HDL:HDL-cholesterol ratio from 87%:13% to 60%:40%. This halted atherosclerotic lesion growth and promoted macrophage loss and accumulation of thick collagen fibers for up to 8 weeks. Concomitantly, blood Ly-6Chi monocytes were decreased by 2-fold but lesional macrophage apoptosis was unchanged. The expression of several genes involved in extra-cellular matrix remodeling and cell migration were changed in lesional macrophages 1 week after Apoe gene repair. However, mRNA levels of numerous genes involved in cholesterol efflux and inflammation were not significantly changed at this time point. Conclusions Restoring apoE expression in Apoeh/hLdlr−/−Mx1-cre mice resulted in lesion stabilization in the context of a human-like ratio of non-HDL:HDL-cholesterol. Our data suggest that macrophage loss derived in part from reduced blood Ly-6Chi monocytes levels and genetic reprogramming of lesional macrophages. PMID:23788760

  16. The effect of vanadate on receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid in rat liver parenchymal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanadate is a phosphate analogue that inhibits enzymes involved in phosphate release and transfer reactions. Since such reactions may play important roles in endocytosis, we studied the effects of vanadate on various steps in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid labeled with 125I-tyramine-cellobiose (125I-TC-AOM). The labeled degradation products formed from 125I-TC-AOM are trapped in the lysosomes and may therefore serve as lysosomal markers in subcellular fractionation studies. Vanadate reduced the amount of active surface asialoglycoprotein receptors approximately 70%, but had no effect on the rate of internalization and retroendocytosis of ligand. The amount of surface asialoglycoprotein receptors can be reduced by lowering the incubation temperature gradually from 37 to 15 degrees C; vanadate affected only the temperature--sensitive receptors. Vanadate inhibited degradation of 125I-TC-AOM 70-80%. Degradation was much more sensitive to vanadate than binding; half-maximal effects were seen at approximately 1 mM vanadate for binding and approximately 0.1 mM vanadate for degradation. By subcellular fractionation in sucrose and Nycodenz gradients, it was shown that vanadate completely prevented the transfer of 125I-TC-AOM from endosomes to lysosomes. Therefore, the inhibition of degradation by vanadate was indirect; in the presence of vanadate, ligand did not gain access to the lysosomes. The limited degradation in the presence of vanadate took place in a prelysosomal compartment. Vanadate did not affect cell viability and ATP content

  17. Involvement of nitric oxide in iodine deficiency-induced microvascular remodeling in the thyroid gland: role of nitric oxide synthase 3 and ryanodine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craps, J; Wilvers, C; Joris, V; De Jongh, B; Vanderstraeten, J; Lobysheva, I; Balligand, J-L; Sonveaux, P; Gilon, P; Many, M-C; Gérard, A-C; Colin, I M

    2015-02-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) induces microvascular changes in the thyroid gland via a TSH-independent reactive oxygen species-hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway. The involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in this pathway and the role of calcium (Ca(2+)) and of ryanodine receptors (RYRs) in NO synthase 3 (NOS3) activation were investigated in a murine model of goitrogenesis and in 3 in vitro models of ID, including primary cultures of human thyrocytes. ID activated NOS3 and the production of NO in thyrocytes in vitro and increased the thyroid blood flow in vivo. Using bevacizumab (a blocking antibody against VEGF-A) in mice, it appeared that NOS3 is activated upstream of VEGF-A. L-nitroarginine methyl ester (a NOS inhibitor) blocked the ID-induced increase in thyroid blood flow in vivo and NO production in vitro, as well as ID-induced VEGF-A mRNA and HIF-1α expression in vitro, whereas S-nitroso-acetyl-penicillamine (a NO donor) did the opposite. Ca(2+) is involved in this pathway as intracellular Ca(2+) flux increased after ID, and thapsigargin activated NOS3 and increased VEGF-A mRNA expression. Two of the 3 known mammalian RYR isoforms (RYR1 and RYR2) were shown to be expressed in thyrocytes. RYR inhibition using ryanodine at 10μM decreased ID-induced NOS3 activation, HIF-1α, and VEGF-A expression, whereas RYR activation with ryanodine at 1nM increased NOS3 activation and VEGF-A mRNA expression. In conclusion, during the early phase of TSH-independent ID-induced microvascular activation, ID sequentially activates RYRs and NOS3, thereby supporting ID-induced activation of the NO/HIF-1α/VEGF-A pathway in thyrocytes. PMID:25406019

  18. A polymorphism in the leptin receptor gene at position 223 is associated with growth hormone replacement therapy responsiveness in idiopathic short stature and growth hormone deficiency patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pen-Hua; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yu, Ju-Shan; Chen, Suh-Jen; Chen, Jia-Yuh

    2012-12-01

    We hypothesized that responses to growth hormone (GH) therapy by idiopathic short stature (ISS) and growth hormone deficiency (GHD) patients were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the leptin (LEP) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes. We retrospectively enrolled ISS (n = 32) and GHD (n = 38) patients and forty healthy age-and gender-matched children. They were genotyped for the LEP promoter at nt.-2548, and LEPR K109R and LEPR Q223R polymorphisms. Clinical and laboratory variables were determined before and after 2 years of GH treatment. ISS patients with G/A or A/A genotypes of the LEPR Q223R SNP had a significantly higher height velocity (cm/y) than ISS patients with the G/G genotype at 2 years after GH treatment. For GHD patients, G/A or A/A genotype of the LEPR K109R SNP was associated with higher body weight, higher BMI, and higher weight velocity than patients with the G/G genotype before GH treatment, but not after GH treatment. G/A or A/A genotype of the LEPR Q223R SNP was associated with a significantly higher body weight, higher height velocity before treatment, but not after GH treatment. G/A or A/A genotype of the LEPR Q223R SNP was associated with a significantly higher weight velocity before treatment, but a significantly lower weight velocity was found at 2 years after GH treatment. These results suggest LEPR Q223R SNP (rs1137101) is associated with outcomes of GH replacement therapy in ISS and GHD patients. PMID:23009903

  19. Left ventricular dysfunction with reduced functional cardiac reserve in diabetic and non-diabetic LDL-receptor deficient apolipoprotein B100-only mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Fatima

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of suitable mouse models has hindered the studying of diabetic macrovascular complications. We examined the effects of type 2 diabetes on coronary artery disease and cardiac function in hypercholesterolemic low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient apolipoprotein B100-only mice (LDLR-/-ApoB100/100. Methods and results 18-month-old LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 (n = 12, diabetic LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II in pancreatic beta cells (IGF-II/LDLR-/-ApoB100/100, n = 14 and age-matched C57Bl/6 mice (n = 15 were studied after three months of high-fat Western diet. Compared to LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice, diabetic IGF-II/LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice demonstrated more calcified atherosclerotic lesions in aorta. However, compensatory vascular enlargement was similar in both diabetic and non-diabetic mice with equal atherosclerosis (cross-sectional lesion area ~60% and consequently the lumen area was preserved. In coronary arteries, both hypercholesterolemic models showed significant stenosis (~80% despite positive remodeling. Echocardiography revealed severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction and anteroapical akinesia in both LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 and IGF-II/LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice. Myocardial scarring was not detected, cardiac reserve after dobutamine challenge was preserved and ultrasructural changes revealed ischemic yet viable myocardium, which together with coronary artery stenosis and slightly impaired myocardial perfusion suggest myocardial hibernation resulting from chronic hypoperfusion. Conclusions LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice develop significant coronary atherosclerosis, severe left ventricular dysfunction with preserved but diminished cardiac reserve and signs of chronic myocardial hibernation. However, the cardiac outcome is not worsened by type 2 diabetes, despite more advanced aortic atherosclerosis in diabetic animals.

  20. Quantitiative evaluation of liver function with hepatic receptor scintigraphy using Tc-99m galactosylated serum albumin (GSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Tae [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    The reduction in the amount of asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor, which resides exclusively on the plasma membrane of functioning mammalian hepatocytes, as a consequence of hepatocellular damage has been demonstrated in various pathologic conditions of the liver. Galactosylated human serum albumin (GSA) is a newly developed receptor-binding agent, specific for the ASGP receptor. Tc-99m GSA binds quantitatively to liver ASGP receptors and the rate of accumulation in the liver is dependent on hepatic function represented as the amount of receptor, as well as the amount of ligand injected, its affinity to the receptor and the hepatic blood flow. The findings of Tc-99m GSA scintigraphy were reported to reflect the hepatic function of the patients with large hepatic tumors, obstructive jaundice, acute and chronic liver disease. Tc-99m GSA scintigraphy is an easy and reliable test and has the clinical potentials to evaluate the liver function in the patients with hepatic disorders.

  1. Detection of early stage atherosclerotic plaques using PET and CT fusion imaging targeting P-selectin in low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Ikuko, E-mail: nakamuri@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Hasegawa, Koki [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Wada, Yasuhiro [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Hirase, Tetsuaki; Node, Koichi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi, E-mail: yywata@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► P-selectin regulates leukocyte recruitment as an early stage event of atherogenesis. ► We developed an antibody-based molecular imaging probe targeting P-selectin for PET. ► This is the first report on successful PET imaging for delineation of P-selectin. ► P-selectin is a candidate target for atherosclerotic plaque imaging by clinical PET. -- Abstract: Background: Sensitive detection and qualitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaques are in high demand in cardiovascular clinical settings. The leukocyte–endothelial interaction mediated by an adhesion molecule P-selectin participates in arterial wall inflammation and atherosclerosis. Methods and results: A {sup 64}Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid conjugated anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody ({sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb) probe was prepared by conjugating an anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody with DOTA followed by {sup 64}Cu labeling. Thirty-six hours prior to PET and CT fusion imaging, 3 MBq of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb was intravenously injected into low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient Ldlr-/- mice. After a 180 min PET scan, autoradiography and biodistribution of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody was examined using excised aortas. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet for promotion of atherosclerotic plaque development, PET and CT fusion imaging revealed selective and prominent accumulation of the probe in the aortic root. Autoradiography of aortas that demonstrated probe uptake into atherosclerotic plaques was confirmed by Oil red O staining for lipid droplets. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a chow diet to develop mild atherosclerotic plaques, probe accumulation was barely detectable in the aortic root on PET and CT fusion imaging. Probe biodistribution in aortas was 6.6-fold higher in Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet than in those fed with a normal chow diet. {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin m

  2. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  3. Systemic administration of the neurotensin NTS1 receptor agonist PD149163 improves performance on a memory task in naturally deficient male Brown Norway rats

    OpenAIRE

    Keiser, Ashley A.; Matazel, Katelin S.; Esser, Melissa K.; Feifel, David; Prus, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Agonists for neurotensin NTS1 receptor consistently exhibit antipsychotic effects in animal models without producing catalepsy, suggesting that NTS1 receptor agonists may be a novel class of drugs to treat schizophrenia. Moreover, studies utilizing NTS1 agonists have reported improvements in some aspects of cognitive functioning, including prepulse inhibition and learning procedures, that suggest an ability of NTS1 receptor agonists to diminish neurocognitive deficits. The present study sough...

  4. Active radar guides missile to its target: receptor-based targeted treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma by nanoparticulate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing-Jun; Liao, Jia-Zhi; Lin, Ju-Sheng; He, Xing-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) usually present at advanced stages and do not benefit from surgical resection, so drug therapy should deserve a prominent place in unresectable HCC treatment. But chemotherapy agents, such as doxorubicin, cisplatin, and paclitaxel, frequently encounter important problems such as low specificity and non-selective biodistribution. Recently, the development of nanotechnology led to significant breakthroughs to overcome these problems. Decorating the surfaces of nanoparticulate-based drug carriers with homing devices has demonstrated its potential in concentrating chemotherapy agents specifically to HCC cells. In this paper, we reviewed the current status of active targeting strategies for nanoparticulate systems based on various receptors such as asialoglycoprotein receptor, transferrin receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, folate receptor, integrin, and CD44, which are abundantly expressed on the surfaces of hepatocytes or liver cancer cells. Furthermore, we pointed out their merits and defects and provided theoretical references for further research. PMID:25424700

  5. NMDA Receptors and Oxidative Stress Induced by the Major Metabolites Accumulating in HMG Lyase Deficiency Mediate Hypophosphorylation of Cytoskeletal Proteins in Brain From Adolescent Rats: Potential Mechanisms Contributing to the Neuropathology of This Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Carolina Gonçalves; Pierozan, Paula; Soares, Gilberto Machado; Ferreira, Fernanda; Zanatta, Ângela; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Borges, Clarissa Günther; Wajner, Moacir; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-10-01

    Neurological symptoms and cerebral abnormalities are commonly observed in patients with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HMG lyase) deficiency, which is biochemically characterized by predominant tissue accumulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric (HMG), 3-methylglutaric (MGA), and 3-methylglutaconic (MGT) acids. Since the pathogenesis of this disease is poorly known, the present study evaluated the effects of these compounds on the cytoskeleton phosphorylating system in rat brain. HMG, MGA, and MGT caused hypophosphorylation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and of the neurofilament subunits NFL, NFM, and NFH. HMG-induced hypophosphorylation was mediated by inhibiting the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on Ser55 residue of NFL and c-Jun kinase (JNK) by acting on KSP repeats of NFM and NFH subunits. We also evidenced that the subunit NR2B of NMDA receptor and Ca(2+) was involved in HMG-elicited hypophosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins. Furthermore, the antioxidants L-NAME and TROLOX fully prevented both the hypophosphorylation and the inhibition of PKA and JNK caused by HMG, suggesting that oxidative damage may underlie these effects. These findings indicate that the main metabolites accumulating in HMG lyase deficiency provoke hypophosphorylation of cytoskeleton neural proteins with the involvement of NMDA receptors, Ca(2+), and reactive species. It is presumed that these alterations may contribute to the neuropathology of this disease. PMID:26174040

  6. Using Soluble Transferrin Receptor and Taking Inflammation into Account When Defining Serum Ferritin Cutoffs Improved the Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency in a Group of Canadian Preschool Inuit Children from Nunavik

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon O'Brien, Huguette; Blanchet, Rosanne; Gagné, Doris; Vézina, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of iron depletion, iron deficient erythropoiesis (IDE), and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) was assessed in preschool Inuit children using soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and traditional indicators of iron status while disregarding or taking inflammation into account when defining SF cutoffs. Iron depletion was defined as follows: (1) SF 5 mg/L, respectively. IDE corresponded to iron depletion combined with total iron binding capacity > 72 μmol/L and/or transferrin saturation < 16%. Iron depletion and IDE affected almost half of the children when accounting for inflammation, compared to one-third when the SF cutoff was defined regardless of CRP level (P < 0.0001). The prevalence of IDE adjusted for inflammation (45.1%) was very similar to the prevalence observed when sTfR was used as a sole marker of IDE (47.4%). The prevalence of anemia was 15%. The prevalence of IDA (IDE + hemoglobin < 110 g/L) was higher when accounting for than when disregarding inflammation (8.0% versus 6.2%, P = 0.083). Using sTfR and different SF cutoffs for children with versus without inflammation improved the diagnosis of iron depletion and IDE. Our results confirm that Inuit children are at particularly high risk for iron deficiency. PMID:27382488

  7. Cutting Edge: IL-23 Receptor Deficiency Prevents the Development of Lupus Nephritis in C57BL/6–lpr/lpr Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Zhang, Zheng; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Oukka, Mohamed; Tsokos, George C.

    2010-01-01

    IL-17–producing T cells infiltrate kidneys of patients with lupus nephritis, and IL-23–treated lymph node cells from lupus-prone mice may transfer disease to Rag1-deficient mice. In this study, we show that IL-23R–deficient lupus-prone C57BL/6–lpr/lpr mice display decreased numbers of CD3+CD4−CD8− cells and IL-17A–producing cells in the lymph nodes and produce less anti-DNA Abs. In addition, clinical and pathology measures of lupus nephritis are abrogated. The presented experiments document t...

  8. Steroid receptor coactivator 1 deficiency increases MMTV-neu mediated tumor latency and differentiation specific gene expression, decreases metastasis, and inhibits response to PPAR ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) subgroup of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily is activated by a variety of natural and synthetic ligands. PPARs can heterodimerize with retinoid X receptors, which have homology to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Ligand binding to PPAR/RXRs results in recruitment of transcriptional coactivator proteins such as steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) and CREB binding protein (CBP). Both SRC-1 and CBP are histone acetyltransferases, which by modifying nucleosomal histones, produce more open chromatin structure and increase transcriptional activity. Nuclear hormone receptors can recruit limiting amounts of coactivators from other transcription factor binding sites such as AP-1, thereby inhibiting the activity of AP-1 target genes. PPAR and RXR ligands have been used in experimental breast cancer therapy. The role of coactivator expression in mammary tumorigenesis and response to drug therapy has been the subject of recent studies. We examined the effects of loss of SRC-1 on MMTV-neu mediated mammary tumorigenesis. SRC-1 null mutation in mammary tumor prone mice increased the tumor latency period, reduced tumor proliferation index and metastasis, inhibited response to PPAR and RXR ligands, and induced genes involved in mammary gland differentiation. We also examined human breast cancer cell lines overexpressing SRC-1 or CBP. Coactivator overexpression increased cellular proliferation with resistance to PPAR and RXR ligands and remodeled chromatin of the proximal epidermal growth factor receptor promoter. These results indicate that histone acetyltransferases play key roles in mammary tumorigenesis and response to anti-proliferative therapies

  9. Analysis of the therapeutic functions of novel melanocortin receptor agonists in MC3R- and MC4R-deficient C57BL/6J mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, K. Ganesh; Sutton, Gregory M.; Dong, Jesse Z.; Roubert, Pierre; Plas, Pascale; Halem, Heather A.; Culler, Michael D.; Yang, Hyunwon; Dixit, Vishwa D.; Butler, Andrew A

    2009-01-01

    Melanocortin receptor agonists act in the brain to regulate food intake and body weight and, independently of these actions, affect insulin sensitivity. These experiments investigated the function of novel non-selective melanocortin receptor agonists (BIM-22493, BIM-22511) that cross the blood-brain barrier when administered peripherally. Treatment of diet-induced obese C57BL/6J (B6) mice with melanocortin agonists administered peripherally improved obesity, hyperinsulinemia (∼50%) and fatty ...

  10. Impairment of mossy fiber long-term potentiation and associative learning in pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide type I receptor-deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Christiane; Kovalchuk, Yury; Wolfer, David Paul; Gass, Peter; Mart??n, Miguel; Zuschratter, Werner; Gr??ne, Hermann Josef; Kellendonk, Christoph; Tronche, Fran??ois; Maldonado, Rafael; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Konnerth, Arthur; Sch??tz, G??nter

    2001-01-01

    The pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) type I receptor (PAC1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor binding the strongly conserved neuropeptide PACAP with 1000-fold higher affinity than the related peptide vasoactive intestinal peptide. PAC1-mediated signaling has been implicated in neuronal differentiation and synaptic plasticity. To gain further insight into the biological significance of PAC1-mediated signaling in vivo, we generated two different mutant mouse strains, har...

  11. Extracellular Norepinephrine, Norepinephrine Receptor and Transporter Protein and mRNA Levels Are Differentially Altered in the Developing Rat Brain Due to Dietary Iron Deficiency and Manganese Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Joel G.; Fordahl, Steven C.; Cooney, Paula T.; Weaver, Tara L.; Colyer, Christa L.; Erikson, Keith M.

    2009-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element, but overexposure is characterized by Parkinson’s like symptoms in extreme cases. Previous studies have shown Mn accumulation is exacerbated by dietary iron deficiency (ID) and disturbances in norepinephrine (NE) have been reported. Because behaviors associated with Mn neurotoxicity are complex, the goal of this study was to examine the effects of Mn exposure and ID-associated Mn accumulation on NE uptake in synaptosomes, extracellular NE concentra...

  12. Vitamin D deficiency in girls from South Brazil: a cross-sectional study on prevalence and association with vitamin D receptor gene variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Betânia R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with a multitude of disorders including diabetes, defective insulin secretion as well as rickets and poor bone health. Vitamin D is also a concern during childhood and adolescence and has been reported in girls from South Brazil. We determined the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in girls from South Brazil and investigated whether the genotypic distribution of the BsmI, ApaI and TaqI polymorphisms of the VDR gene and their haplotypes were associated with vitamin D levels. Methods Cross-sectional study including 234 apparently healthy girls aged 7 to 18 years. Height and weight were measured for calculation of body mass index (BMI percentiles for age. Plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] were assessed. Participants were genotyped for ApaI (rs7975232, TaqI (rs731236, and BsmI (rs1544410 SNPs. Results The median and interquartile range (25-75% of BMI percentile was 62.0 (33.3 – 84.9. The frequency of overweight/obesity was 24.9%. Circulating levels of 25(OHD (≥ 30 ng/mL were adequate in 9.4%; insufficient in 54.3% (20–29 ng/mL; and deficient in 36.3% (vs. GA + AA, two-tailed Student’s t-test p vs. GT + TT, two-tailed Student’s t-test p = 0.031 and TaqI (TT vs. TC + CC, two-tailed Student’s t-test p = 0.005 SNPs and the GGT haplotype (two-tailed Student’s t-test p = 0.036 were significantly associated with lower 25(OHD levels. Conclusions 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were highly prevalent in this sample. The BsmI, ApaI and TaqI wild variants of the VDR gene, as well as the GGT haplotype, were associated with lower vitamin D levels, suggesting that VDR gene polymorphisms could be linked to higher susceptibility to vitamin D deficiency in a sub-population of children and adolescents.

  13. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES...... understand iron metabolism in elderly HF patients....

  14. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N; Ibrahim, M; Tzanakos, N; Peters, H; Yaplito-Lee, J; Pitt, J J

    2006-01-01

    We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood sa...

  15. Deletion of glycerol channel aquaporin-9 (Aqp9) impairs long-term blood glucose control in C57BL/6 leptin receptor-deficient (db/db) obese mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spegel, Peter; Chawade, Aakash; Nielsen, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    profiling did not detect differential gene expression between genotypes. Metabolite profiling revealed a sex independent increase in plasma glycerol (+55%) and glucose (+24%), and reduction in threonate (all at q < 0.1) in Aqp9(-/-) db/db mice compared to controls. Metabolite profiling thus confirms a role......Deletion of the glycerol channel aquaporin-9 (Aqp9) reduces postprandial blood glucose levels in leptin receptor-deficient (db/db) obese mice on a C57BL/6 × C57BLKS mixed genetic background. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated reduction of Aqp9 expression reduces liver triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in...... observed elevated plasma glucose in Aqp9(-/-) db/db mice (+1.1 mmol/L, life-time average), while plasma insulin concentration was reduced at the time of death. Glucose levels changed similarly in pentobarbital anesthetized, glucagon challenged Aqp9(wt) db/db and Aqp9(-/-) db/db mice. Liver transcriptional...

  16. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity. PMID:25765687

  17. Alteration in pancreatic immunoreactivity of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein (IGFBP)-6 and in intracellular degradation of IGFBP-3 in fibroblasts of IGF-II receptor/IGF-II-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braulke, T; Dittmer, F; Götz, W; von Figura, K

    1999-01-01

    The Type-2 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF2R) mediates the transport of lysosomal hydrolases to lysosomes and the clearance of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). Mutant mice lacking IGF2R usually die perinatally, but are completely rescued from lethality in the absence of IGF-II. IGF2R/IGF-II-deficient mice have elevated levels of circulating IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and show a strong IGFBP-6 immunoreactivity in all pancreatic islet cells and in secretory granules of different size in acinar cells and interlobular connective tissue of exocrine pancreas. Fibroblasts derived from double mutant mice missort the lysosomal protease cathepsin D, and are able to degrade endocytosed (125I)IGFBP-3 intracellularly, however, with lower efficiency than in control cells. These results show that the deficiency of IGF2R and IGF-II affects the expression and metabolism of IGFBPs in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. PMID:10226807

  18. Elevated Estrogen Receptor-α in VHL-Deficient Condition Induces Microtubule Organizing Center Amplification via Disruption of BRCA1/Rad51 Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Sang Jung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since loss of VHL is frequently detected early phase genetic event in human renal cell carcinoma, pVHL is assumed to be indispensable for suppression of tumor initiation step. However, induction of HIF-1α, target of pVHL E3 ligase, is more adequate to angiogenesis step after tumor mass formation. Concerning this, it has been reported that pVHL is involved in centrosome location during metaphase and regulates ER-α signaling. Here, we provide the evidences that pVHL-mediated ER-α suppression is critical for microtubule organizing center (MTOC maintaining and elevated ER-α promotes MTOC amplification through disruption of BRCA1-Rad51 interaction. In fact, numerous MTOC in VHL- or BRCA1-deficient cells are reduced by Fulvestrant, inhibitor of ER-α expression as well as antagonist. In addition, we reveal that activation of ER signaling can increase γ-tubulin, core factor of TuRC and render the resistance to Taxol. Thus, Fulvestrant but not Tamoxifen, antagonist against ER-α, can restore the Taxol sensitivity in VHL- or BRCA1-deficient cells. Our results suggest that pVHL-mediated ER-α suppression is important for regulation of MTOC as well as drug resistance.

  19. Osteopontin deficiency enhances parathyroid hormone/ parathyroid hormone related peptide receptor (PPR) signaling-induced alteration in tooth formation and odontoblastic morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Morishita, Maki; Ono, Noriaki; Miyai, Kentano; Nakagawa, Tomomi; Hanyu, Ryo; Nagao, Masashi; Kamolratanakul, Paksinee; Notomi, Takuya; Rittling, Susan R; Denhardt, David T.; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Ezura, Yoichi; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Noda, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related protein receptor (PPR) signaling is known to be involved in tooth development. In bone, extracellular matrix protein osteopontin (OPN) is a negative regulator of PPR signaling in bone formation. However, the role of OPN in modulation of PPR action in tooth development is not understood. Therefore, we examined the tooth in double mutant mice. Constitutively active PPR was expressed specifically in the odontoblasts and osteoblasts (caPPR-tg) in th...

  20. The 15q13.3 deletion syndrome: Deficient α(7)-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Stephen I; Burket, Jessica A; Benson, Andrew D; Urbano, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) has led to the identification of microdeletions of the proximal region of chromosome 15q between breakpoints (BP) 3 or BP4 and BP5 encompassing CHRNA7, the gene encoding the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) subunit. Phenotypic manifestations of persons with these microdeletions are variable and some heterozygous carriers are seemingly unaffected, consistent with their variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. Nonetheless, the 15q13.3 deletion syndrome is associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders, including idiopathic generalized epilepsy, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and schizophrenia. Haploinsufficient expression of CHRNA7 in this syndrome has highlighted important roles the α7nAChR plays in the developing brain and normal processes of attention, cognition, memory and behavior throughout life. Importantly, the existence of the 15q13.3 deletion syndrome contributes to an emerging literature supporting clinical trials therapeutically targeting the α7nAChR in disorders such as ASDs and schizophrenia, including the larger population of patients with no evidence of haploinsufficient expression of CHRNA7. Translational clinical trials will be facilitated by the existence of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the α7nAChR that act at sites on the receptor distinct from the orthosteric site that binds acetylcholine and choline, the receptor's endogenous ligands. PAMs lack intrinsic efficacy by themselves, but act where and when the endogenous ligands are released in response to relevant social and cognitive provocations to increase the likelihood they will result in α7nAChR ion channel activation. PMID:26257138

  1. Divergent responses to thermogenic stimuli in BAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue from interleukin 18 and interleukin 18 receptor 1-deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Pazos; Luis Lima; Sulay Tovar; David González-Touceda; Carlos Diéguez; María C. García

    2015-01-01

    Brown and beige adipocytes recruitment in brown (BAT) or white adipose tissue, mainly in the inguinal fat pad (iWAT), meet the need for temperature adaptation in cold-exposure conditions and protect against obesity in face of hypercaloric diets. Using interleukin18 (Il18) and Il18 receptor 1- knockout (Il18r1-KO) mice, this study aimed to investigate the role of IL18 signaling in BAT and iWAT activation and thermogenesis under both stimuli. Il18-KO, extremely dietary obesity-prone as previous...

  2. Evidence for a partial deficiency of the LDL (apo B,E) receptor within a family of rhesus monkeys with a spontaneous hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous hypercholesterolemia is rare among non-human primates. Through screening of a rhesus monkey colony they have identified a family in which 3 out of its 6 members have a persistent hypercholesterolemia on a cholesterol-free Purina Chow diet and are high responders to a dietary fat challenge. On a basal diet the 3 affected animals also exhibited high plasma levels of LDL and apoB. To shed light on the mechanism of the hypercholesterolemia they have grown in culture fibroblasts from skin biopsies obtained from all members of the rhesus monkey family and 12 control. Binding studies at 40C and ligand blotting experiments using 125I-LDL of either normolipidemic rhesus monkeys or human subjects have shown that the fibroblasts from the 3 monkeys with a spontaneous hypercholesterolemia have a significant reduction of the number of LDL receptor and to the same extent as fibroblasts derived from subjects with heterozygous FH studied at the same time. The data suggest that the spontaneous elevation of plasma cholesterol observed in the 3 family members is related, at least in part, to a defective uptake of LDL by the LDL receptor pathway

  3. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Type 1 Receptor Inhibitor NVP-AEW541 Enhances Radiosensitivity of PTEN Wild-Type but Not PTEN-Deficient Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: During the past decade, many clinical trials with both monoclonal antibodies and small molecules that target the insulin-like growth factor-type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been launched. Despite the important role of IGF-1R signaling in radioresistance, studies of such agents in combination with radiotherapy are lagging behind. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the small molecule IGF-1R kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 on the intrinsic radioresistance of prostate cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effect of NVP-AEW541 on cell proliferation, cell viability, IGF-1R signaling, radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, and double strand break repair was determined in three human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145, 22Rv1). Moreover, the importance of the PTEN pathway status was explored by means of transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Results: NVP-AEW541 inhibited cell proliferation and decreased cell viability in a time-and dose-dependent manner in all three cell lines. Radiosensitization was observed in the PTEN wild-type cell lines DU145 and 22Rv1 but not in the PTEN-deficient PC3 cell line. NVP-AEW541-induced radiosensitization coincided with downregulation of phospho-Akt levels and high levels of residual double strand breaks. The importance of PTEN status in the radiosensitization effect was confirmed by transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Conclusions: NVP-AEW541 enhances the effect of ionizing radiation in PTEN wild-type, but not in PTEN-deficient, prostate cancer cells. Proper patient selection based on the PTEN status of the tumor will be critical to the achievement of optimal results in clinical trials in which the combination of radiotherapy and this IGF-1R inhibitor is being explored.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency dwarfism, pituitary growth hormone deficiency dwarfism isolated GH deficiency isolated HGH deficiency isolated human growth hormone deficiency isolated somatotropin deficiency isolated somatotropin deficiency disorder ...

  5. Divergent responses to thermogenic stimuli in BAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue from interleukin 18 and interleukin 18 receptor 1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Patricia; Lima, Luis; Tovar, Sulay; González-Touceda, David; Diéguez, Carlos; García, María C

    2015-01-01

    Brown and beige adipocytes recruitment in brown (BAT) or white adipose tissue, mainly in the inguinal fat pad (iWAT), meet the need for temperature adaptation in cold-exposure conditions and protect against obesity in face of hypercaloric diets. Using interleukin18 (Il18) and Il18 receptor 1- knockout (Il18r1-KO) mice, this study aimed to investigate the role of IL18 signaling in BAT and iWAT activation and thermogenesis under both stimuli. Il18-KO, extremely dietary obesity-prone as previously described, failed to develop diet-induced thermogenesis as assessed by BAT and iWAT Ucp1 mRNA levels. Overweight when fed standard chow but not HFD, HFD-fed Il18r1-KO mice exhibited increased iWAT Ucp1 gene expression. Energy expenditure was reduced in pre-obese Il18r1-KO mice and restored upon HFD-challenge. Cold exposure lead to similar results; Il18r1-KO mice were protected against acute body temperature drop, displaying a more brown-like structure, alternative macrophage activation and thermogenic gene expression in iWAT than WT controls. Opposite effects were observed in Il18-KO mice. Thus, Il18 and Il18r1 genetic ablation disparate effects on energy homeostasis are likely mediated by divergent BAT responses to thermogenic stimuli as well as iWAT browning. These results suggest that a more complex receptor-signaling system mediates the IL18 adipose-tissue specific effects in energy expenditure. PMID:26656097

  6. The Group 3 Innate Lymphoid Cell Defect in Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Deficient Mice Is Associated with T Cell Hyperactivation during Intestinal Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagie Wagage

    Full Text Available Intestinal infection with the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii results in the translocation of commensal bacteria to peripheral organs and the development of a T cell response specific to the microbiota. In naïve mice, the recently described RORγt+ group 3 innate lymphoid cell (ILC population plays a critical role in promoting intestinal barrier function and limiting responses to gut-resident commensal bacteria. Given this role for group 3 ILCs, studies were performed to evaluate whether these cells might influence the immune response to mucosal infection with T. gondii. Phenotypic characterization of RORγt+ ILCs in T. gondii infected mice revealed that this population decreased following challenge but the population that remained expressed costimulatory molecules and IL-22. One factor that influences the maintenance of RORγt+ ILCs is the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR, a ligand-activated transcription factor, and Ahr-/- mice have a marked defect in the lamina propria group 3 ILC population. When Ahr-/- mice were challenged with T. gondii, they lost more weight than wild type controls. This disease course in Ahr-/- animals was associated with increased T cell responses to Toxoplasma antigen and crude commensal antigen preparations. Together, these data suggest that group 3 ILCs have a role in limiting T cell activation during intestinal infection.

  7. The Group 3 Innate Lymphoid Cell Defect in Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Deficient Mice Is Associated with T Cell Hyperactivation during Intestinal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagage, Sagie; Harms Pritchard, Gretchen; Dawson, Lucas; Buza, Elizabeth L; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Hunter, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal infection with the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii results in the translocation of commensal bacteria to peripheral organs and the development of a T cell response specific to the microbiota. In naïve mice, the recently described RORγt+ group 3 innate lymphoid cell (ILC) population plays a critical role in promoting intestinal barrier function and limiting responses to gut-resident commensal bacteria. Given this role for group 3 ILCs, studies were performed to evaluate whether these cells might influence the immune response to mucosal infection with T. gondii. Phenotypic characterization of RORγt+ ILCs in T. gondii infected mice revealed that this population decreased following challenge but the population that remained expressed costimulatory molecules and IL-22. One factor that influences the maintenance of RORγt+ ILCs is the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, and Ahr-/- mice have a marked defect in the lamina propria group 3 ILC population. When Ahr-/- mice were challenged with T. gondii, they lost more weight than wild type controls. This disease course in Ahr-/- animals was associated with increased T cell responses to Toxoplasma antigen and crude commensal antigen preparations. Together, these data suggest that group 3 ILCs have a role in limiting T cell activation during intestinal infection. PMID:26010337

  8. CX3 chemokine receptor 1 deficiency leads to reduced dendritic complexity and delayed maturation of newborn neurons in the adult mouse hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xiao; Jun-mei Xu; Xing-hua Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that microglia impact the proliferation and differentiation of neu-rons during hippocampal neurogenesisvia the fractalkine/CX3 chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1) signaling pathway. However, whether microglia can influence the maturation and dendritic growth of newborn neurons during hippocampal neurogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we found that the number of doublecortin-positive cells in the hippocampus was decreased, and the dendritic length and number of intersections in newborn neurons in the hippocampus were reduced in transgenic adult mice with CX3CR1 deifciency (CX3CR1GFP/GFP). Furthermore, after experimental seizures were induced with kainic acid in these CX3CR1-deifcient mice, the expression of c-fos, a marker of neuronal activity, was reduced compared with wild-type mice. Collectively, the experimental ifndings indicate that the functional maturation of newborn neu-rons during hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice is delayed by CX3CR1 deifciency.

  9. IL-3/GM-CSF receptor promotes stem cell expansion, monocytosis, and atheroma macrophage burden in mice with hematopoietic Apoe deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mi; Subramanian, Manikandan; Abramowicz, Sandra; Murphy, Andrew J.; Gonen, Ayelet; Witztum, Joseph; Welch, Carrie; Tabas, Ira; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Coronary heart disease is associated with monocytosis. Studies using animal models of monocytosis and atherosclerosis such as Apoe-/- mice have shown bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem and multi-potential progenitor cell (HSPC) expansion, associated with increased cell surface expression of the common β subunit of the GM-CSF/IL-3 receptor (CBS) on HSPCs. Apoe-/- mice also display increased GM-CSF-dependent monocyte production in the spleen. We investigated the role of the CBS in cholesterol-driven HSPC expansion, monocytosis and atherosclerosis. Approach and Results Ldlr-/- mice were transplanted with Apoe-/-Cbs-/- or Apoe-/- BM followed by Western-type diet (WTD) feeding. Compared to Apoe-/- BM transplanted controls, Apoe-/-Cbs-/- BM transplanted mice had reduced BM and splenic HSPC proliferation, fewer blood monocytes and neutrophils, and reduced macrophage content and area of early atherosclerotic lesions. More advanced lesions showed diminished macrophage and collagen content; however, lesion size was unchanged reflecting an increase in necrotic core area, associated with a marked decrease in Abcg1 expression and increased macrophage apoptosis. Compared with wild-type mice, WTD-fed Apoe-/- mice showed increased CBS expression on GM-CSF-producing innate response activator (IRA) B cells and expansion of this population. Apoe-/-Cbs-/- BM transplanted Ldlr-/- mice showed a marked decrease in IRA B cells compared to Apoe-/- BM transplanted Ldlr-/- controls. Conclusions Increased levels of CBS on HSPCs and splenic IRA B cells leads to expansion of these populations in Apoe-/- BM transplanted Ldlr-/- mice, contributing to monocytosis and increased lesional macrophage content. However, in more advanced lesions, the CBS also has a role in atherosclerotic plaque stabilization. PMID:24651678

  10. Sex differences between CRF1 receptor deficient mice following naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal in a conditioned place aversion paradigm: implication of HPA axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Antonio García-Carmona

    Full Text Available Extinction period of positive affective memory of drug taking and negative affective memory of drug withdrawal, as well as the different response of men and women might be important for the clinical treatment of drug addiction. We investigate the role of corticotropin releasing factor receptor type one (CRF1R and the different response of male and female mice in the expression and extinction of the aversive memory.We used genetically engineered male and female mice lacking functional CRF1R. The animals were rendered dependent on morphine by intraperitoneally injection of increasing doses of morphine (10-60 mg/kg. Negative state associated with naloxone (1 mg/kg s.c.-precipitated morphine withdrawal was examined by using conditioned place aversion (CPA paradigm. No sex differences for CPA expression were found in wild-type (n = 29 or CRF1R knockout (KO mice (n = 29. However, CRF1R KO mice presented less aversion score than wild-type mice, suggesting that CRF1R KO mice were less responsive than wild-type to continuous associations between drug administration and environmental stimuli. In addition, CPA extinction was delayed in wild-type and CRF1R KO male mice compared with females of both genotypes. The genetic disruption of the CRF1R pathway decreased the period of extinction in males and females suggesting that CRF/CRF1R is implicated in the duration of aversive memory. Our results also showed that the increase in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH levels observed in wild-type (n = 11 mice after CPA expression, were attenuated in CRF1R KO mice (n = 10. In addition, ACTH returned to the baseline levels in males and females once CPA extinction was finished.These results suggest that, at least, CPA expression is partially due to an increase in plasma ACTH levels, through activation of CRF1R, which can return when CPA extinction is finished.

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ...

  12. The Presence of Clitoromegaly in the Nonclassical Form of 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency Could Be Partially Modulated by the CAG Polymorphic Tract of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Gomes, Larissa; Bugano Diniz Gomes, Diogo; Marcondes, José Antônio Miguel; Madureira, Guiomar; de Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Bachega, Tânia A. Sartori Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Background In the nonclassical form (NC), good correlation has been observed between genotypes and 17OH-progesterone (17-OHP) levels. However, this correlation was not identified with regard to the severity of hyperandrogenic manifestations, which could depend on interindividual variability in peripheral androgen sensitivity. Androgen action is modulated by the polymorphic CAG tract (nCAG) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene and by polymorphisms in 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) enzyme, both of which are involved in the severity of hyperandrogenic disorders. Objectives To analyze whether nCAG-AR and SRD5A2 polymorphisms influence the severity of the nonclassical phenotype. Patients NC patients (n = 114) diagnosed by stimulated-17OHP ≥10 ng/mL were divided into groups according to the beginning of hyperandrogenic manifestations (pediatric and adolescent/adult) and CYP21A2 genotypes (C/C: homozygosis for mild mutations; A/C: compound heterozygosis for severe/mild mutations). Methods CYP21A2 mutations were screened by allelic-specific PCR, MLPA and/or sequencing. HpaII-digested and HpaII-undigested DNA samples underwent GeneScan analysis to study nCAG, and the SRD5A2 polymorphisms were screened by RLFP. Results Mean nCAG did not differ among pediatric, adolescent/adult and asymptomatic subjects. In the C/C genotype, we observed a significantly lower frequency of longer CAG alleles in pediatric patients than in adolescent/adults (p = 0.01). In patients carrying the A/C genotype, the frequencies of shorter and longer CAG alleles did not differ between pediatric patients and adolescent/adults (p>0.05). Patients with clitoromegaly had significantly lower weighted CAG biallelic mean than those without it: 19.1±2.7 and 21.6±2.5, respectively (p = 0.007), independent of the CYP21A2 genotype's severity. The SRD5A2 polymorphisms were not associated with the variability of hyperandrogenic NC phenotypes. Conclusions In this series, we observed a modulatory effect of the CAG

  13. Impact of glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphisms on the metabolic profile of adult patients with the classical form of 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo P P Moreira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CAH patients have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and it remains unknown if lifelong glucocorticoid (GC treatment is a contributing factor. In the general population, glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1 polymorphisms are associated with an adverse metabolic profile. Our aim was to analyze the association between the NR3C1 polymorphisms and the metabolic profile of CAH patients. METHODOLOGY: Sixty-eight adult patients (34SV/34SW with a mean age of 28.4±9 years received dexamethasone (mean 0.27±0.11 mg/day to obtain normal androgen levels. SW patients also received fludrocortisone (50 µg/day. Metabolic syndrome (MetS was defined by the NCEP ATPIII criteria and obesity by BMI ≥30 kg/m². NR3C1 alleles were genotyped, and association analyses with phenotype were carried out with Chi-square, t-test and regression analysis. RESULTS: Obesity and MetS were observed in 23.5% and 7.3% of patients, respectively, and were not correlated with GC doses and treatment duration. BMI was positively correlated with blood pressure (BP, triglycerides (TG, LDL-c levels and HOMA-IR and inversely correlated with HDL-c levels. BclI and A3669G variants were found in 26.4% and 9.6% of alleles, respectively. Heterozygotes for the BclI polymorphism presented with higher BMI (29 kg/m²±5.3 vs. 26 kg/m²±5.3, respectively and waist circumference (89 cm±12.7 vs. 81 cm±13, respectively compared to wild-type subjects. Hypertension was found in 12% of patients and heterozygotes for the BclI polymorphism presented higher systolic BP than wild type subjects. Low HDL-c and high TG levels were identified in 30% and 10% of patients, respectively, and were not associated with the NR3C1 polymorphisms. A3669G carriers and non-carriers did not differ. CONCLUSION: In addition to GC therapy, the BclI GR variant might play an important role in obesity susceptibility in CAH patients. Genotyping of GR polymorphisms could result in the identification of a

  14. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Anouk de Bruyn; Yves Jacquemyn; Kristof Kinget; François Eyskens

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, su...

  15. Iron deficiency anemia: current strategies for the diagnosis and management

    OpenAIRE

    Zühre Kaya

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the commonest nutritional deficiencies in the world. It is multifactorial and may be caused by lack of intake, blood loss and intestinal causes. Clinical features are highly variable, and most patients are asymptomatic. Typical laboratory features of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include a hypochromic microcytic anemia, low serum iron level, high total iron binding capacity, low serum ferritin level. Usefulness of monitoring serum transferrin receptor level (sTf...

  16. Factor VII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000548.htm Factor VII deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Factor VII (seven) deficiency is a disorder caused by a ...

  17. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  18. Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) LAD is an immune deficiency in ... are slow to heal also may have LAD. Treatment and Research Doctors prescribe antibiotics to prevent and ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can ...

  20. Factor V deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor V deficiency is a condition that is passed down through families, which affects the ability of the blood ... These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor V deficiency is caused by a lack of Factor ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully ... With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  3. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000408.htm Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency is a group of rare genetic disorders ...

  4. Iron deficiency and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Hulthén, Lena

    2003-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional disorder in the world. One of the most worrying consequences of iron deficiency in children is the alteration of behaviour and cognitive performance. In iron-deficient children, striking behavioural changes are observed, such as reduced attention span, reduced emotional responsiveness and low scores on tests of intelligence. Animal studies on nutritional iron deficiency show effects on learning ability that parallel the human studies. Despite ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented ...

  8. Iron deficiency: from diagnosis to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polin, Vanessa; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Dhooge, Marion; Abitbol, Vered; Leblanc, Sarah; Prat, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2013-10-01

    Iron deficiency is the most frequent cause of anaemia worldwide. It impairs quality of life, increases asthenia and can lead to clinical worsening of patients. In addition, iron deficiency has a complex mechanism whose pathologic pathway is recently becoming better understood. The discovery of hepcidin has allowed a better clarification of iron metabolism regulation. Furthermore, the ratio of concentration of soluble transferrin receptor to the log of the ferritin level, has been developed as a tool to detect iron deficiency in most situations. The cause of iron deficiency should always be sought because the underlying condition can be serious. This review will summarize the current knowledge regarding diagnostic algorithms for iron deficiency anaemia. The majority of aetiologies occur in the digestive tract, in men and postmenopausal women, and justify morphological examination of the gut. First line investigations are upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy, and when negative, the small bowel should be explored; newer tools such as video capsule endoscopy have also been developed. The treatment of iron deficiency is aetiological if possible and iron supplementation whether in oral or in parenteral form. New parenteral formulations are available and seem to have promising results in terms of efficacy and safety. PMID:23582772

  9. G6PD Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that is most common in males. About 1 in 10 African American males in the United States has it. G6PD deficiency mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen ...

  10. Deficiently Extremal Gorenstein Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavinder Singh

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this article is to study the homological properties of deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebras. We prove that if / is an odd deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebra with pure minimal free resolution, then the codimension of / must be odd. As an application, the structure of pure minimal free resolution of a nearly extremal Gorenstein algebra is obtained.

  11. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  12. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  13. Vitamin deficiencies and excesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamins are essential nutrients that must be supplied exogenously either as part of a well balanced diet or as supplements. Deficiency states are uncommon in developed countries except, perhaps, among some food insecure families. In contrast, deficiency states are quite common in many developing ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  15. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A; Laforet, P; Lonsdorfer-Wolf, E; Doutreleau, S; Geny, B; Akman, H O; Dimauro, S; Vissing, J

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  16. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar K; Bava H; Shetty J; Joshi M

    1997-01-01

    A rare case of a 3 month old child with lipoprotein lipase deficiency who presented with bronchopneumonia is reported. After noticing lipaemic serum and lipaemia retinalis, a diagnosis of hyperlipoproteinaemia was considered. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency was confirmed with post heparin lipoprotein lipase enzyme activity estimation.

  17. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease.Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient. PMID:27106490

  18. Thiamine deficiency and delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiezagha, Kenneth; Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C; Barker, Narviar C; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K

    2013-04-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  19. Rescue of deficient amygdala tonic γ-aminobutyric acidergic currents in the Fmr(-/y) mouse model of fragile X syndrome by a novel γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor-positive allosteric modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brandon S; Martinez-Botella, Gabriel; Loya, Carlos M; Salituro, Francesco G; Robichaud, Albert J; Huntsman, Molly M; Ackley, Mike A; Doherty, James J; Corbin, Joshua G

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory transmission are emerging as a common component of many nervous system disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Tonic γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission provided by peri- and extrasynaptic GABA type A (GABAA ) receptors powerfully controls neuronal excitability and plasticity and, therefore, provides a rational therapeutic target for normalizing hyperexcitable networks across a variety of disorders, including ASDs. Our previous studies revealed tonic GABAergic deficits in principal excitatory neurons in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in the Fmr1(-/y) knockout (KO) mouse model fragile X syndrome. To correct amygdala deficits in tonic GABAergic neurotransmission in Fmr1(-/y) KO mice, we developed a novel positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptors, SGE-872, based on endogenously active neurosteroids. This study shows that SGE-872 is nearly as potent and twice as efficacious for positively modulating GABAA receptors as its parent molecule, allopregnanolone. Furthermore, at submicromolar concentrations (≤1 μM), SGE-872 is selective for tonic, extrasynaptic α4β3δ-containing GABAA receptors over typical synaptic α1β2γ2 receptors. We further find that SGE-872 strikingly rescues the tonic GABAergic transmission deficit in principal excitatory neurons in the Fmr1(-/y) KO BLA, a structure heavily implicated in the neuropathology of ASDs. Therefore, the potent and selective action of SGE-872 on tonic GABAA receptors containing α4 subunits may represent a novel and highly useful therapeutic avenue for ASDs and related disorders involving hyperexcitability of neuronal networks. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26308557

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Public Health Topics Education & Awareness Resources Contact The Health ... Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, ...

  2. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  3. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency? Sleep deprivation (DEP-rih-VA- ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February 22, 2012 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Education & Awareness Resources Contact The Health Information Center Health Professionals Systematic Evidence Reviews & Clinical Practice ... and see the benefits of treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Contact Us FAQs Home » ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood ...

  11. Adult growth hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) is being recognized increasingly and has been thought to be associated with premature mortality. Pituitary tumors are the commonest cause for AGHD. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) has been associated with neuropsychiatric-cognitive, cardiovascular, neuromuscular, metabolic, and skeletal abnormalities. Most of these can be reversed with growth hormone therapy. The insulin tolerance test still remains the gold standard dynamic test to diagnose AGHD. Growth...

  12. Iron deficiency anemia Review

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, İnci

    2009-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most frequent and widespread anemia around the world Its prevalence is increased in infants and adolescent girls The etiologic factors may vary but anemia is essentially related to iron deficient nutrition blood loss and malabsorption Children may have paleness cardiovascular and neurologic impacts of anemia pica epithelial changes as koilonychia glossitis angular stomatitis Treatment is by oral or parenteral supplementation of iron Turk Arch Ped 2009; 44 Suppl: ...

  13. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    G-6-PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... G6PD deficiency occurs when a person is missing or doesn't have enough of an enzyme called glucose- ...

  15. Antepartum ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Takeda, Masako; Hara, Noriko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Urita, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Risa; Miura, Ken; Taniguchi, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left. PMID:25759629

  16. 'Renal phenotypic investigations of megalin-deficient patients'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Tina; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Frykholm, Carina;

    2013-01-01

    The reabsorption of filtered plasma proteins, hormones and vitamins by the renal proximal tubules is vital for body homeostasis. Studies of megalin-deficient mice suggest that the large multi-ligand endocytic receptor megalin plays an essential role in this process. In humans, dysfunctional megal...

  17. Vitamin D Deficiency and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin D receptors have a broad tissue distribution that includes vascular smooth muscle, endothelium, and cardiomyocytes. A growing body of evidence suggests that vitamin D deficiency may adversely affect the cardiovascular system, but few prospective data exist. This study examined the relation...

  18. The role of the endogenous opiates in zinc deficiency anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essatara, M B; Morley, J E; Levine, A S; Elson, M K; Shafer, R B; McClain, C J

    1984-03-01

    Anorexia is a major symptom of zinc deficiency, but the mechanism(s) for this anorexia are poorly defined. Recent studies have suggested an integral role for endogenous opiate peptides in appetite regulation. Dynorphin, a leucine-enkephalin containing opiate peptide, is a potent inducer of spontaneous feeding. In this study we showed that zinc deficient animals were relatively resistant to dynorphin-induced feeding. Measurement of dynorphin levels using a highly sensitive radioimmunoassay showed that zinc deficient animals had lower levels of dynorphin in the hypothalamus than did ad lib fed animals, with weight restricted animals having intermediate values. [3H]-naloxone binding was significantly increased to isolated brain membranes from zinc deficient animals using 1 nM unlabeled naloxone when compared to ad lib fed controls with the weight restricted animals again having intermediate values. These data suggest that abnormalities in endogenous opiate regulation of appetite may well play a role in the anorexia of zinc deficiency. The effects of zinc deficiency on endogenous opiate action appear to include alterations in receptor affinity, a post-receptor defect and alterations in the synthesis and/or release of dynorphin. PMID:6146993

  19. Prostaglandin Receptor Signaling in Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Matsuoka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids, consisting of the prostaglandins (PGs and the thromboxanes (TXs, are a group of lipid mediators formed in response to various stimuli. They include PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2, and TXA2. They are released outside of the cells immediately after synthesis, and exert their actions by binding to a G-protein coupled rhodopsin-type receptor on the surface of target cells. There are eight types of the prostanoid receptors conserved in mammals from mouse to human. They are the PGD receptor (DP, four subtypes of the PGE receptor (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, the PGF receptor (FP, PGI receptor (IP, and TXA receptor (TP. Recently, mice deficient in each of these prostanoid receptors were generated and subjected to various experimental models of disease. These studies have revealed the roles of PG receptor signaling in various pathological conditions, and suggest that selective manipulation of the prostanoid receptors may be beneficial in treatment of the pathological conditions. Here we review these recent findings of roles of prostanoid receptor signaling and their therapeutic implications.

  20. Tsh receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Frauman, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The TSH receptor is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor(GPCR)family. It is one of the glycoprotein hormone receptors, which also includes the FSH and LH/CG receptors. The TSH receptor mediates the action of the pituitary-derived glycoprotein, TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone, thyrotropin or thyrotrophin). TSH binds to the TSH receptor which is located on thyroid follicular cells (but is also expressed in extrathyroidal sites). Glycosylation of the TSH receptor occurs, as does cleavage ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... Institutes of Health—shows how Susan, a full-time worker and student, has coped with having iron- ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  3. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    biennially to exchange views and research findings. The fourth biennial meeting was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 2-3 June 2005. This review covers the wide range of AAT deficiency-related topics that were addressed encompassing advances in genetic characterization, risk factor identification, clinical...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  4. MCAD deficiency in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Brage Storstein; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael; Christensen, Ernst; Gahrn, Birthe; Christensen, Mette; Bross, Peter; Vested, Anne; Simonsen, Henrik; Skogstrand, Kristin; Olpin, Simon; Brandt, Niels Jacob; Skovby, Flemming; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Gregersen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common defect of fatty acid oxidation. Many countries have introduced newborn screening for MCADD, because characteristic acylcarnitines can easily be identified in filter paper blood spot samples by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/M...

  5. THE EFFECTS OF ZINC DEFICIENCY ON THE CONCENTRATION OF BRAIN FREE AMINO ACIDS AND SYNAPTIC MEMBRANES N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE RECEPTORS IN RATS%缺锌对大鼠脑组织游离氨基酸和突触膜 N-甲基-D-天冬氨酸受体含量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕强; 顾景范

    2003-01-01

    本研究进行了两系列实验以探讨缺锌对大鼠脑组织游离氨基酸和突触膜N-甲基-D-天冬氨酸受体含量的影响.在第一系列实验中,把生长大鼠随机分为三组即缺锌组(ZD)、对喂组(PF)和缺锌补锌组(ZS),分别饲喂低锌饲料(3.3mg/kg)、常锌饲料但给料量与缺锌组一致以及先饲喂缺锌饲料21d后再饲喂常锌饲料,持续饲喂35d.饲养实验结束后,采取脑组织样本以分析其中的游离氨基酸的含量.在第二系列实验中,第1和第2组的处理与实验1一致,而第3组则不限食地饲喂常锌饲料,持续饲喂28d.然后取海马组织以分析其中的NMDA受体的含量.结果表明,缺锌显著降低端脑中游离谷氨酸、牛磺酸、苏氨酸、丝氨酸、丙氨酸、半胱氨酸和精氨酸含量,同时使海马中NMDA受体的最大结合率降低.此结果可能与缺锌降低大鼠学习记忆功能有关.%Two experiments were used to evaluate the effects of zinc deficiency on the concentration of free amino acids and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. In Exp. 1, Growing rats respectively consumed a low zinc (3.3mg/kg) diet (ZD), the adequate zinc but restricted according to feed consumption of ZD group (PF) or an adequate zinc diet after a low zinc diet for 21d(ZS). The duration is 35d. The telencephalon tissues were used for free amino acid concentration analysis. In Exp. 2, The treatment of group 1 and 2 were similar to Exp.1, but the rats of group 3 consumed adequate zinc diet ad libitum. The duration is 28d. The hippocampus tissues were used for NMDA receptor concentration analysis. Zinc deficiency significantly reduced the concentration of glutamate, taurine, threonine, serine, alanine, cysteine and arginine in telencephalon tissues,and Bmax of NMDA receptors in hippocampus tissues. The results provides a good explanation for low learning and memory ability in zinc deficient rats.

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition ...

  7. Deficient T Cell Receptor Excision Circles (TRECs) in autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome caused by DOCK8 mutation: implications for pathogenesis and potential detection by newborn screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasouki, Majed; Okonkwo, Kingsley C; Ray, Abhishek; Folmsbeel, Caspian K; Gozales, Diana; Keles, Sevgi; Puck, Jennifer M; Chatila, Talal

    2011-11-01

    Loss of function of DOCK8 is the major cause of autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome, a primary immunodeficiency with adaptive and innate immune dysfunction. Patients affected with ARHIES have atopic dermatitis and recurrent, potentially life-threatening viral and bacterial infections. Three consanguineous Pakistani siblings presented with severe atopic dermatitis and superinfection. Direct sequencing of DOCK8 in all three affected siblings demonstrated homozygosity for a deleterious, novel exon 14 frame shift mutation. Current newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID) and related T cell disorders relies on the quantitation of T Cell Receptor Excision Cells (TRECs) in dried blood spots (DBS). Significantly, both older affected siblings had undetectable TRECs, and TREC copy number was reduced in the youngest sibling. These findings suggest that AR-HIES may be detected by TREC newborn screening, and this diagnosis should be considered in the evaluation of newborns with abnormal TRECs who do not have typical SCID. PMID:21763205

  8. Transient partial growth hormone deficiency due to zinc deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Aihara, K; Fujie, A; Kihara, M

    1989-04-01

    We present here a 13-year-old boy with partial growth hormone deficiency due to chronic mild zinc deficiency. When zinc administration was started, his growth rate, growth hormone levels, and plasma zinc concentrations increased significantly. His poor dietary intake resulted in chronic mild zinc deficiency, which in turn could be the cause of a further loss of appetite and growth retardation. There was also a possibility of renal zinc wasting which may have contributed to zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency should be carefully ruled out in patients with growth retardation. PMID:2708733

  9. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  10. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hisahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first choice to delay the starting of L-dopa therapy. In advanced stage of PD, they are also used as adjunct therapy together with L-dopa. DA receptor agonists act by stimulation of presynaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors. Despite the usefulness, they could be causative drugs for valvulopathy and nonmotor complication such as DA dysregulation syndrome (DDS. In this paper, physiological characteristics of DA receptor familyare discussed. We also discuss the validity, benefits, and specific adverse effects of pharmaceutical DA receptor agonist.

  11. Biotin and biotinidase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Zempleni, Janos; Hassan, Yousef I.; Wijeratne, Subhashinee SK

    2008-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that serves as an essential coenzyme for five carboxylases in mammals. Biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze the fixation of bicarbonate in organic acids and play crucial roles in the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Carboxylase activities decrease substantially in response to biotin deficiency. Biotin is also covalently attached to histones; biotinylated histones are enriched in repeat regions in the human genome and appear to play a role...

  12. Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahari

    1965-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to draw attention to iron deficiency anemia which is the most common nutritional disturbance in infants and children. Iron deficiency anemia constitutes the most prevalent form of anemia in this age group. The records of infants and children admitted to the Pediatric Department of Tehran University Puhlavi Hospital for various ailments during a one year period (Mnrch l!l63 - HHi-t were analyzed. 262 infants and children out of a total number of an5, or 7t•/., showed iron deficiency anemia detect cd by blood film studies and hemoglobin determination, The majority, 123 or 4{.!t•/., of these patients were infants and children between six months and two years of age. The etiology indicates that faulty feeding is the main cause. Infections, parnsitcs, and hemorrhage were among other causes observed. ,'('itll regard to treatment, parenteral iron was preferred because cf its ef., Icctivcncss in short periods of hospital stay. In conclusion, the routine study of blood films and hemoglobin determiualion, especially in the low socio _ economic group of medically less organized countries is advised

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  14. Potentiation of latent inhibition by haloperidol and clozapine is attenuated in Dopamine D2 receptor (Drd-2)-deficient mice: do antipsychotics influence learning to ignore irrelevant stimuli via both Drd-2 and non-Drd-2 mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Matthew J; Bay-Richter, Cecilie; O'Tuathaigh, Colm Mp; Heery, David M; Waddington, John L; Moran, Paula M

    2014-10-01

    Whether the dopamine Drd-2 receptor is necessary for the behavioural action of antipsychotic drugs is an important question, as Drd-2 antagonism is responsible for their debilitating motor side effects. Using Drd-2 null mice (Drd2 -/-) it has previously been shown that Drd-2 is not necessary for antipsychotic drugs to reverse D-amphetamine disruption of latent inhibition (LI), a behavioural measure of learning to ignore irrelevant stimuli. Weiner's 'two-headed' model indicates that antipsychotics not only reverse LI disruption, 'disrupted LI', but also potentiate LI when low/absent in controls, 'persistent' LI. We investigated whether antipsychotic drugs haloperidol or clozapine potentiated LI in wild-type controls or Drd2 -/-. Both drugs potentiated LI in wild-type but not in Drd2 -/- mice, suggesting moderation of this effect of antipsychotics in the absence of Drd-2. Haloperidol potentiated LI similarly in both Drd1 -/- and wild-type mice, indicating no such moderation in Drd1 -/-. These data suggest that antipsychotic drugs can have either Drd-2 or non-Drd-2 effects on learning to ignore irrelevant stimuli, depending on how the abnormality is produced. Identification of the non-Drd-2 mechanism may help to identify novel non-Drd2 based therapeutic strategies for psychosis. PMID:25122042

  15. AT2 Receptors Targeting Cardiac Protection Post-Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaschina, Elena; Lauer, Dilyara; Schmerler, Patrick; Unger, Thomas; Steckelings, Ulrike Muscha

    2014-01-01

    The angiotensin AT2-receptor mediates tissue protective actions. Its regenerative potential has been tested in multiple disease models including models of myocardial infarction. These studies used different experimental approaches in order to detect AT2-receptor-related effects such as AT2-receptor...... deficiency or overexpression, treatment with an AT1-receptor blocker leading to indirect stimulation of the unopposed AT2-receptor, or studies using AT2-receptor agonists. It is a common finding in these studies that the AT2-receptor improves cardiac function in the early phase post-MI, and that this effect...... is preserved over periods of up to four months. Depending on the experimental protocol, the AT2R also attenuates post-MI left ventricular remodeling or protects the heart from early left ventricular thinning and rupture. In combination with AT1-receptor blockade or deficiency, post-MI cardiac...

  16. Melanocortin receptor accessory proteins in adrenal disease and obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, David S.; Ramachandrappa, Shwetha; Clark, Adrian J; Chan, Li F.

    2015-01-01

    Melanocortin receptor accessory proteins (MRAPs) are regulators of the melanocortin receptor family. MRAP is an essential accessory factor for the functional expression of the MC2R/ACTH receptor. The importance of MRAP in adrenal gland physiology is demonstrated by the clinical condition familial glucocorticoid deficiency type 2. The role of its paralog melanocortin-2-receptor accessory protein 2 (MRAP2), which is predominantly expressed in the hypothalamus including the paraventricular nucle...

  17. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  18. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  19. Antithrombin deficiency in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Shivani; Tan, Lay Kok; Lim, Serene

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 39-year-old, gravida 3 para 2, Chinese female with a history of inherited type 1 Antithrombin deficiency and multiple prior episodes of venous thromboembolism. She presented at 29+4 weeks' gestation with severe pre-eclampsia complicated by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome. She subsequently underwent an emergency caesarean section for non-reassuring fetal status, which was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony, requiring a B-Lynch suture intraoperatively. PMID:27207982

  20. Nasal Tip Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerkes, Nazim

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tip deficiency can be congenital or secondary to previous nasal surgeries. Underdeveloped medial crura usually present with underprojected tip and lack of tip definition. Weakness or malposition of lateral crura causes alar rim retraction and lateral nasal wall weakness. Structural grafting of alar cartilages strengthens the tip framework, reinforces the disrupted support mechanisms, and controls the position of the nasal tip. In secondary cases, anatomic reconstruction of the weakened or interrupted alar cartilages and reconstitution of a stable nasal tip tripod must be the goal for a predictable outcome. PMID:26616702

  1. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  2. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life aft...

  3. Iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, E J; Schwartz, G S

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a group of patients with limbal stem cell (SC) deficiency without prior diagnosis of a specific disease entity known to be causative of SC deficiency. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of the records of all patients with ocular surface disease presenting to the University of Minnesota between 1987 and 1996. Patients were categorized according to etiology of limbal deficiency. Patients who did not have a specific diagnosis previously described as being causative...

  4. Zinc deficiency and eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, L; Vivian, B; Stuart, M; McClain, C J

    1989-12-01

    Decreased food intake, a cyclic pattern of eating, and weight loss are major manifestations of zinc deficiency. In this study, zinc status was evaluated in 62 patients with bulimia and 24 patients with anorexia nervosa. Forty percent of patients with bulimia and 54% of those with anorexia nervosa had biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency. The authors suggest that for a variety of reasons, such as lower dietary intake of zinc, impaired zinc absorption, vomiting, diarrhea, and binging on low-zinc foods, patients with eating disorders may develop zinc deficiency. This acquired zinc deficiency could then add to the chronicity of altered eating behavior in those patients. PMID:2600063

  5. Development and function of CD94-deficient natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Orr

    Full Text Available The CD94 transmembrane-anchored glycoprotein forms disulfide-bonded heterodimers with the NKG2A subunit to form an inhibitory receptor or with the NKG2C or NKG2E subunits to assemble a receptor complex with activating DAP12 signaling proteins. CD94 receptors expressed on human and mouse NK cells and T cells have been proposed to be important in NK cell tolerance to self, play an important role in NK cell development, and contribute to NK cell-mediated immunity to certain infections including human cytomegalovirus. We generated a gene-targeted CD94-deficient mouse to understand the role of CD94 receptors in NK cell biology. CD94-deficient NK cells develop normally and efficiently kill NK cell-susceptible targets. Lack of these CD94 receptors does not alter control of mouse cytomegalovirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, vaccinia virus, or Listeria monocytogenes. Thus, the expression of CD94 and its associated NKG2A, NKG2C, and NKG2E subunits is dispensable for NK cell development, education, and many NK cell functions.

  6. Thiamine deficiency induced neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological alterations: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Storti, Monica; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen; Brigo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional deficiency can cause, mainly in chronic alcoholic subjects, the Wernicke encephalopathy and its chronic neurological sequela, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). Long-term chronic ethanol abuse results in hippocampal and cortical cell loss. Thiamine deficiency also alters principally hippocampal- and frontal cortical-dependent neurochemistry; moreover in WKS patients, important pathological damage to the diencephalon can occur. In fact, the amnesic syndrome typical for WKS is mainly due to the damage in the diencephalic-hippocampal circuitry, including thalamic nuclei and mammillary bodies. The loss of cholinergic cells in the basal forebrain region results in decreased cholinergic input to the hippocampus and the cortex and reduced choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities and function, as well as in acetylcholine receptor downregulation within these brain regions. In this narrative review, we will focus on the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological studies shedding light on the effects of thiamine deficiency in experimental models and in humans. PMID:24235882

  7. 肝肾不足型重型斑秃患者血皮质醇及糖皮质激素受体mRNA的表达状况%Serum cortisol and peripheral blood mononuclear cell glucocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in severe alopecia areata with liver-kidney deficiency syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈修漾; 陈达灿; 陈建宏; 危建安

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨肝肾不足型重型斑秃患者血皮质醇、外周血单个核细胞(PBMC)中糖皮质激素受体mRNA(GRmRNA)表达状况与斑秃发病关系.方法 采用化学发光法检测23例肝肾不足型重型斑秃患者血皮质醇表达水平,并用逆转录-实时荧光定量聚合酶链反应分别检测该23例患者应用糖皮质激素(GC)治疗前后PBMC中GRmRNA表达水平,并与20例正常对照组相对比.结果 重型斑秃组与正常对照组两组血清皮质醇水平差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),重型斑秃组治疗前、后GRmRNA表达水平均低于正常对照组(P<0.05),并且治疗后GRmRNA表达水平比治疗前更低(P<0.01).结论 重型斑秃患者存在GC-GR紊乱,GRmRNA表达水平降低可能参与了重型斑秃的发病机制.肝肾不足型重型斑秃患者PBMC中GR mRNA表达水平显著低于正常对照组,这可能是重型斑秃肝肾不足证型在受体及基因水平上的病理变化,也可能是重型斑秃肝肾不足证型的微观本质之一.%Objective To investigate serum cortisol level and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with severe alopecia areata and liver-kidney deficiency syndrome and their involvement in the pathogenesis of severe alopecia areata. Methods In 32 patients with severe alopecia areata, serum cortisol levels were measured by chemiluminescence assay and GR mRNA expression in the PBMCs was detected using reverse transcription real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR before and after treatment, with 20 normal subjects serving as the controls. Results Serum cortisol level showed no significant difference between the cases and the normal controls (P>0.05). The expression of GR mRNA in the PBMCs was significantly lower in the patients than in the normal controls (P<0.05). The expression of GR mRNA was even lower after treatments in patients with alopecia areata (P<0.01). Conclusion GC-GR disorder exists in

  8. Cleft palate and gonadotrophin deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Gillis, P H; Peeters, R.

    1984-01-01

    A boy who had previously had a cleft lip and palate repaired and bilateral orchiopexies presented at 16 years of age with delayed puberty. Isolated gonadotrophin deficiency and testicular hyporesponsiveness to human chorionic gonadotrophin were found. The possibility of bilateral cryptorchidism due to gonadotrophin deficiency should be considered in boys with either cleft lip or palate, or both.

  9. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shin Hisahara; Shun Shimohama

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic) neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa) significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first ...

  10. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  11. The effects of MyD88 deficiency on disease phenotype in dysferlin-deficient A/J mice: role of endogenous TLR ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ampong, Beryl; Sali, Arpana; Vandermeulen, Jack; Wei, Benjamin; Creeden, Brittany; Huynh, Tony; Quinn, James; Tatem, Kathleen; Rayavarapu, Sree; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-01-01

    An absence of dysferlin leads to activation of innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and skeletal muscle inflammation. Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) is a key mediator of TLR-dependent innate immune signalling. We hypothesized that endogenous TLR ligands released from the leaking dysferlin-deficient muscle fibres engage TLRs on muscle and immune cells and contribute to disease progression. To test this hypothesis, we generated and characterized d...

  12. Interactions between copper deficiency, selenium deficiency and adriamycin toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, J.; Tackett, R.; Johnson, M.A. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there are interactions between copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) status, and adriamycin (ADR) toxicity. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed Cu,Se adequate; Cu deficient, Se adequate ({minus}Cu); Cu adequate, Se deficient; or Cu,Se deficient diets for 38-41 days. ADR or saline (SAL) were administered weekly for the last 4 weeks of the study. Cu deficiency was confirmed by a 3-fold decrease in liver Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and liver Cu, and a 5-fold decrease in RBC Cu,Zn-SOD. Se deficiency was confirmed by a 10-fold decrease in liver glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). ADR, Cu deficiency and Se deficiency all caused EKG abnormalities. However, Cu and Se deficiencies did not enhance ADR's influence on EKGs. ADR increased lipid peroxidation in liver by 15% and in heart by 18% (NS). Cu deficiency decreased ADR-induced lipid peroxidation in heart tissue by 25%. ADR influenced Se status by significantly increasing heart GSH-Px, and Cu status by increasing liver Cu, plasma ceruloplasmin and liver Cu, Zn-SOD. These elevations in Cu,Zn-SOD and GSH-Px may be a consequence of the increased lipid peroxidation initiated by ADR. In {minus}Cu rats, ADR caused severe hemolytic anemia characterized by a 19% decrease in hematocrit and a 17-fold increase in splenic Fe. These data suggest that there are numerous interactions between ADR toxicity and Cu and Se status.

  13. Iron homeostasis and nutritional iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, Elizabeth C

    2011-04-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins encoded in iron responsive element (IRE)-mRNA. The noncoding IRE-mRNA structures bind protein repressors, IRP1 or 2, during iron deficiency. Integration of the IRE-RNA in translation regulators (near the cap) or turnover elements (after the coding region) increases iron uptake (DMT1/TRF1) or decreases iron storage/efflux (FTN/FPN) when IRP binds. An antioxidant response element in FTN DNA binds Bach1, a heme-sensitive transcription factor that coordinates expression among antioxidant response proteins like FTN, thioredoxin reductase, and quinone reductase. FTN, an antioxidant because Fe(2+) and O(2) (reactive oxygen species generators) are consumed to make iron mineral, is also a nutritional iron concentrate that is an efficiently absorbed, nonheme source of iron from whole legumes. FTN protein cages contain thousands of mineralized iron atoms and enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, an absorption mechanism distinct from transport of nonheme iron salts (ferrous sulfate), iron chelators (ferric-EDTA), or heme. Recognition of 2 nutritional nonheme iron sources, small and large (FTN), will aid the solution of iron deficiency, a major public health problem, and the development of new policies on iron nutrition. PMID:21346101

  14. Epileptogenesis after traumatic brain injury in Plau-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkvadze, Tamuna; Rantala, Jukka; Puhakka, Noora; Andrade, Pedro; Pitkänen, Asla

    2015-10-01

    Several components of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)-interactome, including uPAR and its ligand sushi-repeat protein 2, X-linked (SRPX2), are linked to susceptibility to epileptogenesis in animal models and/or humans. Recent evidence indicates that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), a uPAR ligand with focal proteinase activity in the extracellular matrix, contributes to recovery-enhancing brain plasticity after various epileptogenic insults such as traumatic brain injury (TBI) and status epilepticus. Here, we examined whether deficiency of the uPA-encoding gene Plau augments epileptogenesis after TBI. Traumatic brain injury was induced by controlled cortical impact in the somatosensory cortex of adult male wild-type and Plau-deficient mice. Development of epilepsy and seizure susceptibility were assessed with a 3-week continuous video-electroencephalography monitoring and a pentylenetetrazol test, respectively. Traumatic brain injury-induced cortical or hippocampal pathology did not differ between genotypes. The pentylenetetrazol test revealed increased seizure susceptibility after TBI (p<0.05) in injured mice. Epileptogenesis was not exacerbated, however, in Plau-deficient mice. Taken together, Plau deficiency did not worsen controlled cortical impact-induced brain pathology or epileptogenesis caused by TBI when assessed at chronic timepoints. These data expand previous observations on Plau deficiency in models of status epilepticus and suggest that inhibition of focal extracellular proteinase activity resulting from uPA-uPAR interactions does not modify epileptogenesis after TBI. PMID:26253597

  15. RNA-sequencing of WFS1-deficient pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivask, Marilin; Hugill, Alison; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, is caused by mutations in theWFS1gene.WFS1encodes an endoplasmic reticulum resident transmembrane protein. TheWfs1-null mice exhibit progressive insulin deficiency and diabetes. The aim of this study was to describe the insulin secretion and transcriptome of pancreatic islets inWFS1-deficient mice.WFS1-deficient (Wfs1KO) mice had considerably less pancreatic islets than heterozygous (Wfs1HZ) or wild-type (WT) mice. Wfs1KOpancreatic islets secreted less insulin after incubation in 2 and 10 mmol/L glucose and with tolbutamide solution compared toWTand Wfs1HZislets, but not after stimulation with 20 mmol/L glucose. Differences in proinsulin amount were not statistically significant although there was a trend that Wfs1KOhad an increased level of proinsulin. After incubation in 2 mmol/L glucose solution the proinsulin/insulin ratio in Wfs1KOwas significantly higher than that ofWTand Wfs1HZRNA-seq from pancreatic islets found melastatin-related transient receptor potential subfamily member 5 protein gene (Trpm5) to be downregulated inWFS1-deficient mice. Functional annotation ofRNAsequencing results showed thatWFS1 deficiency influenced significantly the pathways related to tissue morphology, endocrine system development and function, molecular transport network. PMID:27053292

  16. Vitamin D deficiency leads to sensory and sympathetic denervation of the rat synovium

    OpenAIRE

    Tague, Sarah E; Smith, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to inflammatory arthritis. Sensory and sympathetic synovial nerves are critical to the development of inflammatory arthritis and spontaneously degenerate in the early phases of disease. These nerves contain vitamin D receptors and vitamin D influences nerve growth and neurotrophin expression. We therefore examined the density of synovial nerves and neurotrophin-containing cells in vitamin D deficient rats. Seven week old Sprague...

  17. Adaptive gene regulation in the Striatum of RGS9-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Busse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RGS9-deficient mice show drug-induced dyskinesia but normal locomotor activity under unchallenged conditions. RESULTS: Genes related to Ca2+ signaling and their functions were regulated in RGS9-deficient mice. CONCLUSION: Changes in Ca2+ signaling that compensate for RGS9 loss-of-function can explain the normal locomotor activity in RGS9-deficient mice under unchallenged conditions. SIGNIFICANCE: Identified signaling components may represent novel targets in antidyskinetic therapy. The long splice variant of the regulator of G-protein signaling 9 (RGS9-2 is enriched in striatal medium spiny neurons and dampens dopamine D2 receptor signaling. Lack of RGS9-2 can promote while its overexpression prevents drug-induced dyskinesia. Other animal models of drug-induced dyskinesia rather pointed towards overactivity of dopamine receptor-mediated signaling. To evaluate changes in signaling pathways mRNA expression levels were determined and compared in wild-type and RGS9-deficient mice. Unexpectedly, expression levels of dopamine receptors were unchanged in RGS9-deficient mice, while several genes related to Ca2+ signaling and long-term depression were differentially expressed when compared to wild type animals. Detailed investigations at the protein level revealed hyperphosphorylation of DARPP32 at Thr34 and of ERK1/2 in striata of RGS9-deficient mice. Whole cell patch clamp recordings showed that spontaneous synaptic events are increased (frequency and size in RGS9-deficient mice while long-term depression is reduced in acute brain slices. These changes are compatible with a Ca2+-induced potentiation of dopamine receptor signaling which may contribute to the drug-induced dyskinesia in RGS9-deficient mice.

  18. AHNAK deficiency promotes browning and lipolysis in mice via increased responsiveness to β-adrenergic signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Jae Hoon Shin; Seo Hyun Lee; Yo Na Kim; Il Yong Kim; Youn Ju Kim; Dong Soo Kyeong; Hee Jung Lim; Soo Young Cho; Junhee Choi; Young Jin Wi; Jae-Hoon Choi; Yeo Sung Yoon; Yun Soo Bae; Je Kyung Seong

    2016-01-01

    In adipose tissue, agonists of the β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) regulate lipolysis, lipid oxidation, and thermogenesis. The deficiency in the thermogenesis induced by neuroblast differentiation-associated protein AHNAK in white adipose tissue (WAT) of mice fed a high-fat diet suggests that AHNAK may stimulate energy expenditure via development of beige fat. Here, we report that AHNAK deficiency promoted browning and thermogenic gene expression in WAT but not in brown adipose tissue of mice ...

  19. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Diagnosed? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency usually is diagnosed after you develop a ... related to the condition. Your doctor may suspect AAT deficiency if you have signs or symptoms of ...

  20. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has no cure, but its related lung ... pulmonary disease). If you have symptoms related to AAT deficiency, your doctor may recommend: Medicines called inhaled ...

  1. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs GARD Information Navigator FAQs About Rare Diseases Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Title Other Names: G6PD ... G6PD deficiency Categories: Newborn Screening Summary Summary Listen Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a hereditary ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: factor V deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions factor V deficiency factor V deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Print All Open All Close All Description Factor V deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder. The signs ...

  3. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: congenital leptin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital leptin deficiency congenital leptin deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Print All Open All Close All Description Congenital leptin deficiency is a condition that causes severe obesity ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CPT I deficiency carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) deficiency is a condition ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: factor XIII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... InfoSearch: Factor XIII deficiency Factor XIII Registry Database: Introduction to Factor XIII Deficiency MalaCards: factor xiii deficiency ... Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions combined pituitary hormone deficiency combined pituitary hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Combined pituitary hormone deficiency is a condition that causes ...

  8. Phenotypic studies of natural killer cell subsets in human transporter associated with antigen processing deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Zimmer

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood natural killer (NK cells from patients with transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP deficiency are hyporesponsive. The mechanism of this defect is unknown, but the phenotype of TAP-deficient NK cells is almost normal. However, we noticed a high percentage of CD56(bright cells among total NK cells from two patients. We further investigated TAP-deficient NK cells in these patients and compared them to NK cells from two other TAP-deficient patients with no clinical symptoms and to individuals with chronic inflammatory diseases other than TAP deficiency (chronic lung diseases or vasculitis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from venous blood were stained with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies and the phenotype of NK cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, (51Chromium release assays were performed to assess the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. In the symptomatic patients, CD56(bright NK cells represented 28% and 45%, respectively, of all NK cells (higher than in healthy donors. The patients also displayed a higher percentage of CD56(dimCD16(- NK cells than controls. Interestingly, this unusual NK cell subtype distribution was not found in the two asymptomatic TAP-deficient cases, but was instead present in several of the other patients. Over-expression of the inhibitory receptor CD94/NKG2A by TAP-deficient NK cells was confirmed and extended to the inhibitory receptor ILT2 (CD85j. These inhibitory receptors were not involved in regulating the cytotoxicity of TAP-deficient NK cells. We conclude that expansion of the CD56(bright NK cell subtype in peripheral blood is not a hallmark of TAP deficiency, but can be found in other diseases as well. This might reflect a reaction of the immune system to pathologic conditions. It could be interesting to investigate the relative distribution of NK cell subsets in various respiratory and autoimmune diseases.

  9. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided into...... childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cutoff below or above 18 years at onset of GHD. METHOD: Data on death were identified in national registries. Sex- and cause-specific mortalities were identified in CO and AO GHD when compared with controls. RESULTS: Mortality was increased...... in CO and AO GHD in both genders, when compared with controls. The hazard ratio (HR) for CO males was 8.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.5-15.1) and for females 9.4 (CI 4.6-19.4). For AO males, HR was 1.9 (CI 1.7-2.2) and for females 3.4 (CI 2.9-4.0). We found a significantly higher HR in AO females...

  10. Iodine deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, T C

    1987-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) affects 800 million people in the world, yet iodine supplementation is one of the most cost-effective nutritional interventions known. Iodine is incorporated into thyroid hormones, necessary for regulating metabolic rate, growth, and development of the brain and nervous system. IDD may appear as goiter in adults, usually not a serious problem, or in cretinism in children, which is marked by severe mental and physical retardation, with irreversible hearing and speech defects and either deaf-mutism, squint and paralysis, or stunting and edema. Children supplemented by age 1 or 2 can sometimes be helped. Foods contain variable amounts of iodine dependent on the soil where they are grown, hence mountainous and some inland regions have high goiter and IDD incidence. There are also goitrogenic foods, typically those of the cabbage family. Diagnosis is clinical or by blood tests for thyroid hormone levels and ratios. Finger-stick methods are available. Prevention of IDD is simple with either iodized salt or flour, iodinated central water supplies, injectable or oral iodine-containing oil. All cost about $.04 per person per year, except injections, which cost about $1 per person, but have the advantage that they could be combined with immunizations. Local problems with supplements are loss of iodine in salt with storage in tropics, and local production of cheaper uniodinated salt. Emphasis should be given to pregnant women and young children. There is no harm in giving pregnant women iodine injections in 2nd or 3rd trimester. PMID:12343033

  11. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors increases 5-HT2A receptor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Kirkegaard, Lisbeth; Krey, Gesa; Marcussen, Anders Bue; Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Chourbaji, Sabine; Brandwein, Christiane; Ridder, Stephanie; Halldin, Christer; Gass, Peter; Knudsen, Gitte M; Aznar, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Major depression is associated with both dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and serotonergic deficiency, not the least of the 5-HT2A receptor. However, how these phenomena are linked to each other, and whether a low 5-HT2A receptor level is a state or a trait marker of...... depression is unknown. In mice with altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression we investigated 5-HT2A receptor levels by Western blot and 3H-MDL100907 receptor binding. Serotonin fibre density was analyzed by stereological quantification of serotonin transporter immunopositive fibers. To establish an...... effect of GR activation on 5-HT2A levels, mature organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to corticosterone with or without GR antagonist mifepristone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist spironolactone. In GR under-expressing mice, hippocampal 5-HT2A receptor protein levels were decreased...

  12. Chemokines and their receptors in central nervous system disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, K; de Jong, EK; van Weering, HRJ; Boddeke, HWGM

    2006-01-01

    Almost a decade ago, it was discovered that the human deficiency virus (HIV) makes use of chemokine receptors to infect blood cells. This appreciation of the clinical relevance of specific chemokine receptors has initiated a considerable boost in the field of chemokine research. It is clear today th

  13. Clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, A S

    1985-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc for humans was recognized in the early 1960s. The causes of zinc deficiency include malnutrition, alcoholism, malabsorption, extensive burns, chronic debilitating disorders, chronic renal diseases, following uses of certain drugs such as penicillamine for Wilson's disease and diuretics in some cases, and genetic disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica and sickle cell disease. In pregnancy and during periods of growth the requirement of zinc is increased. The clinical manifestations in severe cases of zinc deficiency include bullous-pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections, hypogonadism in males; it is fatal if unrecognized and untreated. A moderate deficiency of zinc is characterized by growth retardation and delayed puberty in adolescents, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, taste abnormalities, and abnormal dark adaptation. In mild cases of zinc deficiency in human subjects, we have observed oligospermia, slight weight loss, and hyperammonemia. Zinc is a growth factor. Its deficiency adversely affects growth in many animal species and humans. Inasmuch as zinc is needed for protein and DNA synthesis and for cell division, it is believed that the growth effect of zinc is related to its effect on protein synthesis. Whether or not zinc is required for the metabolism of somatomedin needs to be investigated in the future. Testicular functions are affected adversely as a result of zinc deficiency in both humans and experimental animals. This effect of zinc is at the end organ level; the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is intact in zinc-deficient subjects. Inasmuch as zinc is intimately involved in cell division, its deficiency may adversely affect testicular size and thus affect its functions. Zinc is required for the functions of several enzymes and whether or not it has an enzymatic role in steroidogenesis is not known at present

  14. [Immune deficiencies in nutritional anemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet Gajdos, M; Navarro, J; Belas, F; Traineau, R

    1982-12-16

    A transient cellular immunologic defect caused by folic acid deficiency was seen in a goat-milk-fed infant with severe enterocolitis. Data on the immunologic consequences of folic acid, protein and iron deficiencies were reviewed in the medical literature. Investigations are difficult because of the patients' poor general condition. Results are difficult to interpret as many etiologic factors are often combined and mechanisms of immunologic responses are complex. Attention is drawn to the danger of iron therapy in patients with transferrin deficiency. PMID:6297076

  15. Iron deficiency - a global problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron deficiency is an important nutritional global problem. This paper contains summery of information gathered from a dietary survey as iron deficiency anaemia is major public health problem in many developing countries including Pakistan. Comparison of anaemia in different age group and sex versus various regions in the world are given. In Pakistan also anaemia is widespread. According to the report of Micro-Nutrient survey of Pakistan 40% of the population are found to have low level of haemoglobin, more than half of pregnant women suffered from marginal or deficient haemoglobin. (A.B.)

  16. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) CLIMB: Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases Muscular Dystrophy Association: Myoadenylate Deaminase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Muscle AMP deaminase deficiency ...

  17. Fc receptor-γ subunits with both polar or non-polar amino acids at position of T22 are capable of restoring surface expression of the high-affinity IgE receptor and degranulation in γ subunit-deficient rat basophilic leukemia cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rashid, A.; Housden, J.E.; Helm, B.A.; Dráber, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2013), s. 270-273. ISSN 0161-5890 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12073; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA MŠk 1M0506 Grant ostatní: European Cooperation in Science and Technology(XE) BM1007; AV ČR(CZ) M200520901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : allergy * high-affinity IgE receptor * plasma membrane * transmembrane signaling * 3-helix assembly model Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.003, year: 2013

  18. Evolutionary Processes and Mental Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Herman H.

    1973-01-01

    The author hypothesizes that central nervous system damage of deficiency associated with mental retardation affects primarily those cortical processes which developed at a late stage in man's evolutionary history. (Author)

  19. Cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goskowicz, M; Eichenfield, L F

    1993-08-01

    Nutritional deficiencies may be associated with a variety of cutaneous findings in children. This review emphasizes new developments relating to cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies. Zinc deficiency, acrodermatitis enteropathica, and acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruptions are seen with a variety of conditions including cystic fibrosis, anorexia nervosa, and breastfeeding. Similar cutaneous findings not related to zinc deficiency may also occur with such metabolic disorders as methylmalonic aciduria, multiple carboxylase deficiency, essential fatty acid deficiency and other amino acid deficiencies. Vitamin K deficiency is associated with hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and coagulopathy. Vitamin A deficiency presents with a variety of systemic findings and distinctive dermatologic findings. Acute vitamin A deficiency may be seen in children infected with measles and is associated with more severe disease. The systemic and cutaneous findings of vitamin C deficiency, scurvy, are discussed. PMID:8374671

  20. Health Consequences of Iodine Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kapil, Umesh

    2007-01-01

    Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) are one of the biggest worldwide public health problem of today. Their effect is hidden and profoundly affects the quality of human life. Iodine deficiency occurs when the soil is poor in iodine, causing a low concentration in food products and insufficient iodine intake in the population. When iodine requirements are not met, the thyroid may no longer be able to synthesize sufficient amounts of thyroid hormone. The resulting low-level of thyroid hormones in ...

  1. Organophosphates and monocyte esterase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To examine the possibility that monocyte esterase deficiency (MED) could be caused by exposure to organophosphates. METHODS--Pseudocholinesterase, paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured in the serum and acetylcholinesterase activity was measured in the red cells of a group of monocyte esterase deficient subjects and compared with the enzyme activities of a control group of monocyte esterase positive subjects. RESULTS--No significant difference was found between the enzyme...

  2. Zinc and its deficiency diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G W

    1986-01-01

    The pervasive role of zinc in the metabolic function of the body results from its function as a cofactor of a multitude of enzymes. Zinc is found in every tissue in the body, and because zinc metalloenzymes are found in every known class of enzymes, the metal has a function in every conceivable type of biochemical pathway. Symptoms resulting from zinc deficiency are as diverse as the enzymes with which the metal is associated. If chronic, severe, and untreated, zinc deficiency can be fatal. Less drastic symptoms include infections, hypogonadism, weight loss, emotional disturbance, dermatitis, alopecia, impaired taste acuity, night blindness, poor appetite, delayed wound healing, and elevated blood ammonia levels. Many symptoms of zinc deficiency result from poor diet consumption, but often the most severe symptoms result from other factors including excessive alcohol use, liver diseases, malabsorption syndromes, renal disease, enteral or parenteral alimentation, administration of sulfhydryl-containing drugs, and sickle cell disease. The most severe symptoms of zinc deficiency occur in young children affected with the autosomal-recessive trait, acrodermatitis enteropathica. This disease results in decreased synthesis of picolinic acid which causes an impaired ability to utilize zinc from common food. Because simple laboratory analyses are often not reliable in determining zinc nutriture of a patient, those symptoms caused by suspected zinc deficiency are best verified by the oral administration of zinc dipicolinate. This zinc compound is efficacious and safe and would provide an accurate means of identifying symptoms that do result from zinc deficiency. PMID:3514057

  3. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  4. PPARγ deficiency results in reduced lung elastic recoil and abnormalities in airspace distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Starcher Barry C; Ingenito Edward P; Tsai Larry W; Simon Dawn M; Mariani Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ is a nuclear hormone receptor that regulates gene expression, cell proliferation and differentiation. We previously described airway epithelial cell PPARγ deficient mice that develop airspace enlargement with decreased tissue resistance and increased lung volumes. We sought to understand the impact of airspace enlargement in conditionally targeted mice upon the physio-mechanical properties of the lung. Methods We measured...

  5. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during brain maturation reduces neuronal and behavioral plasticity in adulthood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsharan Singh Bhatia

    Full Text Available Omega-3-fatty acid DHA is a structural component of brain plasma membranes, thereby crucial for neuronal signaling; however, the brain is inefficient at synthesizing DHA. We have asked how levels of dietary n-3 fatty acids during brain growth would affect brain function and plasticity during adult life. Pregnant rats and their male offspring were fed an n-3 adequate diet or n-3 deficient diets for 15 weeks. Results showed that the n-3 deficiency increased parameters of anxiety-like behavior using open field and elevated plus maze tests in the male offspring. Behavioral changes were accompanied by a level reduction in the anxiolytic-related neuropeptide Y-1 receptor, and an increase in the anxiogenic-related glucocorticoid receptor in the cognitive related frontal cortex, hypothalamus and hippocampus. The n-3 deficiency reduced brain levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and increased the ratio n-6/n-3 assessed by gas chromatography. The n-3 deficiency reduced the levels of BDNF and signaling through the BDNF receptor TrkB, in proportion to brain DHA levels, and reduced the activation of the BDNF-related signaling molecule CREB in selected brain regions. The n-3 deficiency also disrupted the insulin signaling pathways as evidenced by changes in insulin receptor (IR and insulin receptor substrate (IRS. DHA deficiency during brain maturation reduces plasticity and compromises brain function in adulthood. Adequate levels of dietary DHA seem crucial for building long-term neuronal resilience for optimal brain performance and aiding in the battle against neurological disorders.

  6. The effects of MyD88 deficiency on disease phenotype in dysferlin-deficient A/J mice: role of endogenous TLR ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ampong, Beryl; Sali, Arpana; Vandermeulen, Jack; Wei, Benjamin; Creeden, Brittany; Huynh, Tony; Quinn, James; Tatem, Kathleen; Rayavarapu, Sree; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-10-01

    An absence of dysferlin leads to activation of innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and skeletal muscle inflammation. Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) is a key mediator of TLR-dependent innate immune signalling. We hypothesized that endogenous TLR ligands released from the leaking dysferlin-deficient muscle fibres engage TLRs on muscle and immune cells and contribute to disease progression. To test this hypothesis, we generated and characterized dysferlin and MyD88 double-deficient mice. Double-deficient mice exhibited improved body weight, grip strength, and maximum muscle contractile force at 6-8 months of age when compared to MyD88-sufficient, dysferlin-deficient A/J mice. Double-deficient mice also showed a decrease in total fibre number, which contributed to the observed increase in the number of central nuclei/fibres. These results indicate that there was less regeneration in the double-deficient mice. We next tested the hypothesis that endogenous ligands, such as single-stranded ribonucleic acids (ssRNAs), released from damaged muscle cells bind to TLR-7/8 and perpetuate the disease progression. We found that injection of ssRNA into the skeletal muscle of pre-symptomatic mice (2 months old) resulted in a significant increase in degenerative fibres, inflammation, and regenerating fibres in A/J mice. In contrast, characteristic histological features were significantly decreased in double-deficient mice. These data point to a clear role for the TLR pathway in the pathogenesis of dysferlin deficiency and suggest that TLR-7/8 antagonists may have therapeutic value in this disease. PMID:23857504

  7. STAT5B deficiency: Impacts on human growth and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Vivian

    2016-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) promotes postnatal human growth primarily by regulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I production through activation of the GH receptor (GHR)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-5B signaling cascade. The critical importance of STAT5B in human IGF-I production was confirmed with the identification of the first homozygous, autosomal recessive, STAT5B mutation in a young female patient who phenotypically resembled patients with classical growth hormone insensitivity (GHI) syndrome (Laron syndrome) due to mutations in the GHR gene, presenting with severe postnatal growth failure and marked IGF-I deficiency. Of note, the closely related STAT5A, which shares >95% amino acid identity with STAT5B, could not compensate for loss of functional STAT5B. To date, 7 homozygous, inactivating, STAT5B mutations in 10 patients have been reported. STAT5B deficient patients, unlike patients deficient in GHR, can also present with a novel, potentially fatal, primary immunodeficiency, which can manifest as chronic pulmonary disease. STAT5B deficiency may be underestimated in endocrine, immunology and pulmonary clinics. PMID:26703237

  8. Clinical heterogeneity can hamper the diagnosis of patients with ZAP70 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Turul (Tuba); I. Tezcan (Ilhan); S. de Bruin-Versteeg (Sandra); B.H. Barendregt (Barbara); I. Reisli (Ismail); O. Sanal (Ozden); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOne of the severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCIDs), which is caused by a genetic defect in the signal transduction pathways involved in T-cell activation, is the ZAP70 deficiency. Mutations in ZAP70 lead to both abnormal thymic development and defective T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling

  9. Folate Deficiency in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishna Rajesh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, While there has been a spurt of interest in genetic alterations associated with pancreatitis in the past few years, interest in the role of environmental factors has largely focused on alcoholism and smoking with insufficient attention being paid to the contributions of nutritional deficiency, and the role of environmental toxins in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Braganza and Dormandy [1] argue convincingly about the role played by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (especially CYP1A enzyme induction by xenobiotics and the resultant oxidative stress, as also the now increasingly recognized reductive stress posed by the metabolites in initiating pancreatic injury. Their article underlines the important part played by the deficiency of methyl and thiol molecules in different stages of the progression of pancreatic damage. Furthermore, they attempt to establish a link between environmental and genetic factors and bring in a holistic view on the etiopathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis. We have recently demonstrated lower plasma methionine levels in two cohorts of chronic pancreatitis patients; one of tropical chronic pancreatitis and the other, of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis as compared to healthy controls [2] which suggests that deficiency of methyl groups may be a factor in various forms of pancreatitis. Similarly, we have shown lower red cell glutathione levels in chronic pancreatitis patients with tropical chronic pancreatitis and alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, indicating deficiency of thiol molecules. In addition, we have demonstrated significantly higher levels of plasma total homocysteine in chronic pancreatitis patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, our study has shown that there is a deficiency of red cell folate in the majority of chronic pancreatitis patients, more so in tropical chronic pancreatitis; and that folate deficiency appeared to be the key factor in hyperhomocysteinemia in chronic pancreatitis patients

  10. Pyogenic Bacterial Infections in Humans with MyD88 Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bernuth, Horst; Picard, Capucine; Jin, Zhongbo; Pankla, Rungnapa; Xiao, Hui; Ku, Cheng-Lung; Chrabieh, Maya; Mustapha, Imen Ben; Ghandil, Pegah; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Vasconcelos, Júlia; Sirvent, Nicolas; Guedes, Margarida; Vitor, Artur Bonito; Herrero-Mata, María José; Aróstegui, Juan Ignacio; Rodrigo, Carlos; Alsina, Laia; Ruiz-Ortiz, Estibaliz; Juan, Manel; Fortuny, Claudia; Yagüe, Jordi; Antón, Jordi; Pascal, Mariona; Chang, Huey-Hsuan; Janniere, Lucile; Rose, Yoann; Garty, Ben-Zion; Chapel, Helen; Issekutz, Andrew; Maródi, László; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Banchereau, Jacques; Abel, Laurent; Li, Xiaoxia; Chaussabel, Damien; Puel, Anne; Casanova1, Jean-Laurent

    2009-01-01

    MyD88 is a key downstream adapter for most Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin-1 receptors (IL-1Rs). MyD88 deficiency in mice leads to susceptibility to a broad range of pathogens in experimental settings of infection. We describe a distinct situation in a natural setting of human infection. Nine children with autosomal recessive MyD88 deficiency suffered from life-threatening, often recurrent pyogenic bacterial infections, including invasive pneumococcal disease. However, these patients were otherwise healthy, with normal resistance to other microbes. Their clinical status improved with age, but not due to any cellular leakiness in MyD88 deficiency. The MyD88-dependent TLRs and IL-1Rs are therefore essential for protective immunity to a small number of pyogenic bacteria, but redundant for host defense to most natural infections. PMID:18669862

  11. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  12. Characterization of NPY receptors Y1, Y2 and Y5 expression and function in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Hassani, Hessameh

    2003-01-01

    The general aim of these studies was to further elucidate the role of NPY receptors in the regulation of the food intake and energy homeostasis, nociception, and inflammation. We have utilized both normal and genetically modified mice, and a number of different techniques to study these mechanisms. To identify the role of the Y2 receptor subtype in the central control of food intake, Y2 receptor null mutant mice were used. Y2 receptor deficient mice exhibited increased b...

  13. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senard Jean-Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS. Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance.

  14. Lipoxin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Romano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoxins (LXs represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL. In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1. This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed.

  15. [Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have the potential to provide the skeletal benefits of estrogen without the increased risk of uterine and breast cancer. Raloxifene, second generation SERM has been approved for the prevention and treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis. Bazedoxifene, third generation SERM acts as a tissue selective estrogen antagonist or agonist. These SERMs inhibited bone turnover and prevented bone loss caused estrogen deficiency. Furthermore, these SERMs did not affect the uterine endometrial thickness and reduced serum cholesterol. These data suggest that SERMs are potential drug for the prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. PMID:26529929

  16. NCOA4 Deficiency Impairs Systemic Iron Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bellelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cargo receptor NCOA4 mediates autophagic ferritin degradation. Here we show that NCOA4 deficiency in a knockout mouse model causes iron accumulation in the liver and spleen, increased levels of transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, and liver hepcidin, and decreased levels of duodenal ferroportin. Despite signs of iron overload, NCOA4-null mice had mild microcytic hypochromic anemia. Under an iron-deprived diet (2–3 mg/kg, mice failed to release iron from ferritin storage and developed severe microcytic hypochromic anemia and ineffective erythropoiesis associated with increased erythropoietin levels. When fed an iron-enriched diet (2 g/kg, mice died prematurely and showed signs of liver damage. Ferritin accumulated in primary embryonic fibroblasts from NCOA4-null mice consequent to impaired autophagic targeting. Adoptive expression of the NCOA4 COOH terminus (aa 239–614 restored this function. In conclusion, NCOA4 prevents iron accumulation and ensures efficient erythropoiesis, playing a central role in balancing iron levels in vivo.

  17. Vitamin D Deficiency and Exogenous Vitamin D Excess Similarly Increase Diffuse Atherosclerotic Calcification in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ellam, Timothy; Hameed, Abdul; ul Haque, Risat; Muthana, Munitta; Wilkie, Martin; Francis, Sheila E.; Chico, Timothy J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational data associate lower levels of serum vitamin D with coronary artery calcification, cardiovascular events and mortality. However, there is little interventional evidence demonstrating that moderate vitamin D deficiency plays a causative role in cardiovascular disease. This study examined the cardiovascular effects of dietary vitamin D deficiency and of vitamin D receptor agonist (paricalcitol) administration in apolipoprotein E knockout mice. Methods Mice were fed athe...

  18. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    HU, Rehman

    1984-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency occurs primarily as a result  of insufficient dietary intake or poor absorp-tion. There is widespread global prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, resulting in considerable morbidity.

  19. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) ... develop. The most common faulty gene that can cause AAT deficiency is called PiZ. If you inherit ...

  20. Diagnosis of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    HU, Rehman

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency occurs primarily as a result  of insufficient dietary intake or poor absorp-tion. There is widespread global prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, resulting in considerable morbidity.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions TH deficiency tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency ...

  2. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Center (GARD) Print friendly version Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Table of Contents Overview Symptoms Cause ... National Institutes of Health. Overview Listen Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a hereditary condition in ...

  3. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven F Werder

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven F Werder1,21Kansas University School of Medicine – Wichita, Wichita, KS, USA; 2Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, Pittsburg, KS, USAIntroduction: Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1 Which patients should be tested? (2 What test should be ordered? (3 How are inferences made from such testing? (4 In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5 Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6 What is to be expected from treatment? (7 How is B12 deficiency treated?Methods: On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment and then reviewed in answering the above questions.Results: The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed.Discussion: Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test

  4. G6PD Deficiency in Turkish Cypriots

    OpenAIRE

    SÖZÜÖZ, Ayşe

    1998-01-01

    1108 Turkish Cypriot men and 318 male labourers from mainland Turkey were screened for G6PD deficiency and haemoglobinopathy traits. The results revealed a 6.7% G6PD deficiency rate in the Turkish Cypriot men and a 1.6% prevalance rate in the Turkish men. The mean haemoglobin level of the G6PD deficient males was approximately 1g/dl lower than that of the non-deficient males.

  5. Congenital longitudinal deficiency of the tibia

    OpenAIRE

    Spiegel, D. A.; Loder, R T; Crandall, R. C.

    2003-01-01

    We performed a clinical and radiographic review of 15 patients (19 limbs) with longitudinal deficiency of the tibia treated between 1981 and 2001. Ten limbs with Kalamchi type I deficiencies were managed by through-knee amputation. Five type II deficiencies were treated by foot ablation and tibiofibular synostosis, either at the same time or staged, but prosthetic problems may arise from varus alignment and prominence of the proximal fibula. Patients with type III deficiencies (four cases) we...

  6. Cobalamin deficiency in children: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Moen, Synne Helland

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to present cobalamin deficiency in children with a specific focus on infants. Background: Cobalamin deficiency is caused by inadequate intake, malabsorption or inborn errors of vitamin B12 metabolism. Cobalamin deficiency in infants is usually caused by deficiency in the mother. There is often a diagnostic delay among infants because the most frequent symptoms are unspecific, e.g., developmental delay, apathy, hypotonia, anorexia and failure to thrive. Chi...

  7. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  8. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...... base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby...

  9. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashman, Kevin D.; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency has been described as being pandemic, but serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] distribution data for the European Union are of very variable quality. The NIH-led international Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing existing...... 25(OH)D values from national health/nutrition surveys. OBJECTIVE: This study applied VDSP protocols to serum 25(OH)D data from representative childhood/teenage and adult/older adult European populations, representing a sizable geographical footprint, to better quantify the prevalence of vitamin D...... deficiency in Europe. DESIGN: The VDSP protocols were applied in 14 population studies [reanalysis of subsets of serum 25(OH)D in 11 studies and complete analysis of all samples from 3 studies that had not previously measured it] by using certified liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry on biobanked...

  10. Muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naini, Ali; Toscano, Antonio; Musumeci, Olimpia; Vissing, John; Akman, Hasan O; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM) deficiency (glycogen storage disease type X) has been reported in 12 patients of whom 9 were African American. OBJECTIVE: To describe 2 patients, 1 of Pakistani and 1 of Italian ethnic origin, with typical clinical and biochemical changes of glycogen...... type X is not confined to the African American population, is often associated with sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) proliferation, and is genetically heterogeneous....

  11. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong; Chen, Shubao

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affec...

  12. Vitamin D deficiency in Fibromyalgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To check the Vitamin D levels in patients diagnosed as fibromyagia in our population. Methods: Study was done at Medical OPD of Civil Hospital Karachi, from January to March 2009. Female patients diagnosed as Fibromyalgia according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and exclusion of systemic illness on examination, and normal reports of blood CP, ESR, serum calcium, phosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase, were asked to get Vitamin D levels in their serum. Vitamin D deficiency is defined as 30 ng/ml. Result: Forty female patients were included in the study. The mean age was 37.65 +- 11.5 years. Mean Vitamin D level was 17.41 +- 5.497 ng/ml. Thirty two (80%) of patients had Vitamin D deficiency, mean levels of 15.855 +- 4.918 ng/ml and 8(20%) had Vitamin D insufficiency, mean levels of 23.64 +- 2.39 ng/ml. Patients with vitamin D deficiency and age less than 45 years were 22 (68.75%), had mean vitamin D level 16.87 +- 4.48 ng/ml whereas in age ranging from 46-75 years were 10 (31.25%) had mean vitamin D level 16.09 +- 6.45 ng/ml. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency is frequently seen in patients diagnosed as fibromyalgia and nonspecific musculoskeletal pain in our population. Although the sample size of the study is small, but the figures are so alarming that it is an eye opener towards the need of a population based study, including normal population as well as those presenting with musculoskeletal pain. (author)

  13. Iron deficiency anemia: current strategies for the diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zühre Kaya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is one of the commonest nutritional deficiencies in the world. It is multifactorial and may be caused by lack of intake, blood loss and intestinal causes. Clinical features are highly variable, and most patients are asymptomatic. Typical laboratory features of iron deficiency anemia (IDA include a hypochromic microcytic anemia, low serum iron level, high total iron binding capacity, low serum ferritin level. Usefulness of monitoring serum transferrin receptor level (sTfR and hepcidin for identifying IDA have been examined in a few studies. Available data suggest that sTfR can potentially become a valuable tool for regular testing of patients in the future. Despite IDA is easily corrected with iron therapy, establishing the cause can be difficult, particularly in cases caused by disorders of iron transport. Education for clinician needs to focus on increasing awareness of the importance of failure respond to iron supplementation. The aim of this review was to outline the current strategies for the diagnosis and management of IDA in the light of the latest reports.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v4i3.480

  14. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    OpenAIRE

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in ...

  15. Low Prevalence of Iron and Vitamin A Deficiency among Cambodian Women of Reproductive Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Frank T; Sophonneary, Prak; Whitney, Sophie; Mao, Bunsoth; Berger, Jacques; Conkle, Joel; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine A; Laillou, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of women of reproductive age (WRA) in Cambodia are anemic. To guide interventions, national data on nutritional causes of anemia, including iron deficiency and vitamin A deficiency, are needed. In 2012, a national household survey in WRA on antibodies to routine vaccine-preventable disease immunity was performed. We used serum samples from this survey to estimate the prevalence of iron and vitamin A deficiency in 2112 Cambodian WRA, aged 15 to 39 years. Iron deficiency was classified as low or marginal iron stores (ferritin concentrations corrected for inflammation Fer), iron deficient erythropoiesis (soluble transferrin receptor concentrations >8.3 mg/L; sTfR), or low total body iron (TBI) derived from Fer and sTfR concentrations (<0 mg/kg). Vitamin A status was classified using retinol binding protein (RBP) concentrations corrected for inflammation as deficient (<0.70 μmol/L) or marginal (<1.05 μmol/L. Overall, the prevalence of low iron stores, low TBI and iron deficient erythropoiesis was 8.1%, 5.0% and 9.3% respectively. Almost 40% of the women had marginal iron stores. Iron status was better in women living in urban areas compared to rural areas (p < 0.05 for TBI and sTfR). The prevalence of vitamin A deficiency was <1%. These findings suggest that the contribution of iron and vitamin A deficiency to the high prevalence of anemia in Cambodian WRA may be limited. The etiology of anemia in Cambodia needs to be elucidated further to guide current policies on anemia. PMID:27043624

  16. Glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Geballe, Matthew T; Snyder, James P;

    2006-01-01

    Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS relies almost entirely on the neurotransmitter glutamate and its family of ion channel receptors. An appreciation of the coupling between agonist binding and channel opening has advanced rapidly during the past five years, largely as a result of ne...

  17. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette;

    2003-01-01

    In 1972, Brazeau et al. isolated somatostatin (somatotropin release-inhibiting factor, SRIF), a cyclic polypeptide with two biologically active isoforms (SRIF-14 and SRIF-28). This event prompted the successful quest for SRIF receptors. Then, nearly a quarter of a century later, it was announced...

  18. Primary Carnitine (OCTN2) Deficiency Without Neonatal Carnitine Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    de Boer, L.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Morava, E.

    2012-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a primary carnitine deficiency is usually based on a very low level of free and total carnitine (free carnitine: 1–5 μM, normal 20–55 μM) (Longo et al. 2006), we detected a patient via newborn screening with a total carnitine level 67 % of the normal value. At the age of 1 year, after interruption of carnitine supplementation for a 4-week period the carnitine profile was assessed and the free carnitine level had dropped to 10.4 μmol/l (normal: 20–55 μM) and total car...

  19. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA. PMID:26728130

  20. Blood and hair lead in children with different extents of iron deficiency in Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childhood iron deficiency has a high incidence in Pakistan. Some but not all studies have shown that dietary iron deficiency may cause increased absorption of lead as both compete for the same transporters in the small intestine. Therefore, children in Pakistan, residing in heavily polluted cities like Karachi may be prone to lead poisoning. This hypothesis was tested by investigating blood and hair lead concentrations in children from Karachi who were divided into four groups of iron status; normal, borderline iron deficiency, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia. A prospective observational study was conducted where 269 children were categorized into four groups of iron status using the World Health Organization criteria and one based on soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood iron status was determined using a full blood count, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation and soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood lead was determined by graphite atomic absorption spectroscopy, whereas hair lead was assessed using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher in children with iron deficiency anaemia (mean [95% confidence intervals] were 24.9 [22.6–27.2] μg/dL) compared to those with normal iron status (19.1 [16.8–21.4] μg/dL) using WHO criteria. In contrast, hair lead content was not significantly different in children of different iron status. Our findings reinforce the importance of not only reducing environmental lead pollution but also the development of national health strategies to reduce childhood iron deficiency in Pakistan.

  1. Blood and hair lead in children with different extents of iron deficiency in Karachi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ataur Rahman, Muhammad; Rahman, Bushra [Karachi Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270 (Pakistan); Saeed Ahmad, Muhammad [School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom); Blann, Andrew [Department of Medicine, City Hospital, Birmingham B18 7QH, United Kingdom. (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Nessar, E-mail: N.Ahmed@mmu.ac.uk [School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    Childhood iron deficiency has a high incidence in Pakistan. Some but not all studies have shown that dietary iron deficiency may cause increased absorption of lead as both compete for the same transporters in the small intestine. Therefore, children in Pakistan, residing in heavily polluted cities like Karachi may be prone to lead poisoning. This hypothesis was tested by investigating blood and hair lead concentrations in children from Karachi who were divided into four groups of iron status; normal, borderline iron deficiency, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia. A prospective observational study was conducted where 269 children were categorized into four groups of iron status using the World Health Organization criteria and one based on soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood iron status was determined using a full blood count, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation and soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood lead was determined by graphite atomic absorption spectroscopy, whereas hair lead was assessed using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher in children with iron deficiency anaemia (mean [95% confidence intervals] were 24.9 [22.6-27.2] {mu}g/dL) compared to those with normal iron status (19.1 [16.8-21.4] {mu}g/dL) using WHO criteria. In contrast, hair lead content was not significantly different in children of different iron status. Our findings reinforce the importance of not only reducing environmental lead pollution but also the development of national health strategies to reduce childhood iron deficiency in Pakistan.

  2. Vitamin D deficiency in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Imtiaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to determine serum vitamin D levels in breast cancer patients and to assess its risk association with grade and stage of the tumor. Materials and Methods: Ninety breast cancer patients and equal number of age-matched healthy females were recruited into the study by consecutive sampling over a period of 6 months for this case control study. Serum 25(OH2D levels and CT bone mineral density was done. Results: The mean age was 46±1.5 years. Age, marital status, menopausal, residential area, parda observing status, and body mass index were similar in distribution among cases and controls. The mean serum vitamin D level in the breast cancer patients was 9.3 ng/ml and in the control group was 14.9 ng/ml (P value <0.001. Vitamin D deficiency was seen in 95.6% (86 breast cancer patients and in 77% (69 of the control group (P value <0.001. Among the breast cancer patients the tumor characteristics (histology, grade, stage, and receptor status did not show any significant associations with serum levels of vitamin D. Premenopausal breast cancer females had a mean serum vitamin D level of 10.5 ng/ml and postmenopausal females had a mean value of 13.5 ng/ml (P value 0.015. Low BMD did not correlate significantly with vitamin D deficiency (P value 0.787. Conclusion: Invariably almost all patients with breast cancer were vitamin D deficient. Tumor characteristics did not show any significant associations with serum levels of vitamin D. Bone mineral density did not correlate significantly with vitamin D deficiency.

  3. Regulation of chemokine receptor by Toll-like receptor 2 is critical to neutrophil migration and resistance to polymicrobial sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Alves-Filho, Jose C.; Freitas, Andressa; Souto, Fabricio O.; Spiller, Fernando; Paula-Neto, Heitor; Silva, Joao S.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with sepsis have a marked defect in neutrophil migration. Here we identify a key role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in the regulation of neutrophil migration and resistance during polymicrobial sepsis. We found that the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 was dramatically down-regulated in circulating neutrophils from WT mice with severe sepsis, which correlates with reduced chemotaxis to CXCL2 in vitro and impaired migration into an infectious focus in vivo. TLR2 deficiency ...

  4. Dopamine and glucose, obesity and Reward Deficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth eBlum

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and many well described eating disorders are accurately considered a global epidemic. The consequences of Reward Deficiency Syndrome, a genetic and epigenetic phenomena that involves the interactions of powerful neurotransmitters, are impairments of brain reward circuitry, hypodopaminergic function and abnormal craving behavior. Numerous sound neurochemical and genetic studies provide strong evidence that food addiction is similar to psychoactive drug addiction. Important facts which could translate to potential therapeutic targets espoused in this review include: 1 brain dopamine (DA production and use is stimulated by consumption of alcohol in large quantities or carbohydrates bingeing; 2 in the mesolimbic system the enkephalinergic neurons are in close proximity, to glucose receptors; 3 highly concentrated glucose activates the calcium channel to stimulate dopamine release from P12 cells; 4 blood glucose and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of homovanillic acid, the dopamine metabolite, are significantly correlated and 5 2-deoxyglucose the glucose analogue, in pharmacological doses associates with enhanced dopamine turnover and causes acute glucoprivation. Evidence from animal studies and human fMRI support the hypothesis that multiple, but similar brain circuits are disrupted in obesity and drug dependence and DA-modulated reward circuits are involved in pathologic eating behaviors. Treatment for addiction to glucose and drugs alike, based on a consensus of neuroscience research, should incorporate dopamine agonist therapy, in contrast to current theories and practices that use dopamine antagonists. Until now, powerful dopamine-D2 agonists have failed clinically, due to chronic down regulation of D2 receptors instead, consideration of novel less powerful D2 agonists that up-regulate D2 receptors seems prudent. We encourage new strategies targeted at improving DA function in the treatment and prevention of obesity a subtype of

  5. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  6. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  7. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer

  8. Carnitine deficiency disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    Mitochondrial oxidation of long-chain fatty acids provides an important source of energy for the heart as well as for skeletal muscle during prolonged aerobic work and for hepatic ketogenesis during long-term fasting. The carnitine shuttle is responsible for transferring long-chain fatty acids across the barrier of the inner mitochondrial membrane to gain access to the enzymes of beta-oxidation. The shuttle consists of three enzymes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, carnitine acylcarnitine translocase, carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 2) and a small, soluble molecule, carnitine, to transport fatty acids as their long-chain fatty acylcarnitine esters. Carnitine is provided in the diet (animal protein) and also synthesized at low rates from trimethyl-lysine residues generated during protein catabolism. Carnitine turnover rates (300-500 micromol/day) are benefit in genetic or acquired disorders of energy production to improve fatty acid oxidation, to remove accumulated toxic fatty acyl-CoA metabolites, or to restore the balance between free and acyl-CoA. Two disorders have been described in children where the supply of carnitine becomes limiting for fatty acid oxidation: (1) A recessive defect of the muscle/kidney sodium-dependent, plasma membrane carnitine symporter, which presents in infancy with cardiomyopathy or hypoketotic hypoglycemia; treatment with oral carnitine is required for survival. (2) Chronic administration of pivalate-conjugated antibiotics in which excretion of pivaloyl-carnitine can lead to carnitine depletion; tissue levels may become low enough to limit fatty acid oxidation, although no cases of illness due to carnitine deficiency have been described. There is speculation that carnitine supplements might be beneficial in other settings (such as genetic acyl-CoA oxidation defects--"secondary carnitine deficiency", chronic ischemia, hyperalimentation, nutritional carnitine deficiency), but efficacy has not been documented. The formation of abnormal

  9. Activation of serotonin receptors promotes microglial injury-induced motility but attenuates phagocytic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, Grietje; Matyash, Vitali; Pannasch, Ulrike; Mamer, Lauren; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Microglia, the brain immune cell, express several neurotransmitter receptors which modulate microglial functions. In this project we studied the impact of serotonin receptor activation on distinct microglial properties as serotonin deficiency not only has been linked to a number of psychiatric disea

  10. Effects of cellular iron deficiency on the formation of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis. Iron deficiency and angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckard Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young women diagnosed with breast cancer are known to have a higher mortality rate from the disease than older patients. Specific risk factors leading to this poorer outcome have not been identified. In the present study, we hypothesized that iron deficiency, a common ailment in young women, contributes to the poor outcome by promoting the hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF formation. This hypothesis was tested in an in vitro cell culture model system. Results Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1 shRNA to constitutively impair iron uptake. Cellular iron status was determined by a set of iron proteins and angiogenesis was evaluated by levels of VEGF in cells as well as by a mouse xenograft model. Significant decreases in ferritin with concomitant increases in VEGF were observed in TfR1 knockdown MDA-MB-231 cells when compared to the parental cells. TfR1 shRNA transfectants also evoked a stronger angiogenic response after the cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The molecular mechanism appears that cellular iron deficiency elevates VEGF formation by stabilizing HIF-1α. This mechanism is also true in human breast cancer MCF-7 and liver cancer HepG2 cells. Conclusions Cellular iron deficiency increased HIF-1α, VEGF, and angiogenesis, suggesting that systemic iron deficiency might play an important part in the tumor angiogenesis and recurrence in this young age group of breast cancer patients.

  11. Relationship between 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 deficiency and changes of progesterone receptor isoforms in ectopic endometrium%异位子宫内膜17β-羟基类固醇脱氢酶2缺乏与孕激素受体亚型变化的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张萍; 李笛悠; 惠宁

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨子宫内膜异位症(EMT)病灶对孕激素不敏感是否由局部孕激素受体(PRs)亚型及173 -羟基类固醇脱氢酶2( 17β-HSD2)改变或功能缺陷所致.方法 采用Real-Time PCR检测36例EMT患者的卵巢异位子宫内膜(EMT异位子宫内膜组)和16例在位子宫内膜(EMT在位子宫内膜组)的PR-(A+B)、PR-A、PR-B及l7β-HSD2 mRNA的表达;免疫组织化学方法检测PR-(A+ B)、PR-B和17β-HSD2蛋白的表达.结果 EMT在位子宫内膜组PR-(A+B)、PR-B、PR-A mRNA增殖期较分泌期表达升高(P<0.05);增殖期子宫内膜腺上皮细胞及间质细胞都有PRs表达,在分泌期主要在间质细胞中表达;PR-A占优势,PR-A/PR-B比值在整个月经周期中保持相对恒定.子宫内膜间质细胞中PR-B与腺上皮细胞中17β-HSD2的表达一致.EMT异位子宫内膜组PR-A在整个月经周期中持续性低表达,在分泌期与在位内膜PR-A表达差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);PR-B在整个月经周期的表达明显低于在位内膜;PR-A及PR-B的周期性变化消失.与EMT在位子宫内膜组比较,EMT异位子宫内膜组PR-B表达相对降低,PR-A/PR-B值显著升高(P=0.001).EMT异位子宫内膜组间质细胞中PR-B明显下降;17β-HSD2也明显下降,其周期性变化消失.结论 异位子宫内膜的PRs亚型改变影响173-HSD2的表达,可能是EMT发生孕激素抵抗的分子机制之一.%Objective To investigate the mechanism of changes of isoforms of local progesterone receptors ( PRs) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (17JJ-HSD2) deficiency in insensitiveness of ectopic endometrium ( EMT) to progestin. Methods Ectopic endometrium samples of 36 cases of EMT (EMT ectopic endometrium group) and 16 samples of eutopic endometrium ( EMT eutopic endometrium group) were selected, the expression of PR-( A + B), PR-A, PR-B and 17β-HSD2 mRNA was detected by Real-Time PCR, and the expression of PR-( A + B), PR-B and 17B-HSD2 protein was determined by

  12. Vitamin D deficiency and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D comprises a group of fat-soluble pro-hormones, obtained from sun exposure, food, and supplements, and it must undergo two hydroxylation reactions to be activated in the body. Several studies have shown the role of vitamin D in mineral metabolism regulation, especially calcium, phosphorus, and bone metabolism. Some factors such as inadequate vitamin intake and liver or kidney disorders can lead to vitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, vitamin D malnutrition may also be linked to susceptibility to chronic diseases such as heart failure, peripheral artery disease, high blood pressure, cognitive impairment including foggy brain and memory loss, and autoimmune diseases including diabetes type I. Recent research has revealed that low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of cardiovascular-related morbidity (Sato et al., 2004 and mortality (Pilz et al., 2008. Also, hypertension contributes to a reduction in bone mineral density and increase in the incidence of stroke and death. This article reviews the function and physiology of vitamin D and examines the effects of vitamin D deficiency on susceptibility to stroke, as a cardiovascular event, and its morbidity and subsequent mortality.

  13. Vitamin B12 deficiency and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Milanlıoğlu, Aysel

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may cause psychiatric manifestations preceding the hematological and neurological symptoms. Despite a variety of symptoms, data on the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in depression are sparse. We report a case with B12 deficiency that is diagnosed with psychotic depression and treated successively with vitamin B12 replacement instead of using conventional therapy. Future investigations should focus on the role of vitamin B12 status in depression and other neurops...

  14. Atypical B12 Deficiency with Nonresolving Paraesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, S.; Ahmad, N; Anaissie, E J; Abdel Karim, N.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can present with various hematological, gastrointestinal and neurological manifestations. We report a case of elderly female who presented with neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency where the final work-up revealed polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes (POEMS). This case suggests that, although POEMS syndrome is a rare entity, it can present with vitamin-B12 deficiency and thus specific work up for early diagnosis of P...

  15. Multispectral Analysis of Color Vision Deficiency Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Sergejs FOMINS; Ozolinsh, Maris

    2011-01-01

    Color deficiency tests are usually produced by means of polygraphy technologies and help to diagnose the type and severity of the color deficiencies. Due to different factors, as lighting conditions or age of the test, standard characteristics of these tests fail, thus not allowing diagnosing unambiguously the degree of different color deficiency. Multispectral camera was used to acquire the spectral images of the Ishihara and Rabkin pseudoisochromatic plates in the visible spectrum. Spectral...

  16. Prevalence of Color Vision Deficiency in Qazvin

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad khalaj; Ameneh Barikani; Mozhgan Mohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Color vision deficiency (CVD) is an X chromosome-linked recessive autosomal dominant. Determine the prevalence of color blindness in Qazvin population. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study color vision deficiency examined in 1853 individuals with age 10-25 years old who participated in private clinics and eye clinic of Bu-Ali hospital in Qazvin in 2010. The screening of color vision deficiency was performed using Ishihara test. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16 with χP...

  17. SEAWEED SUPPLEMENTATION TO PREVENT IODINE DEFICIENCY

    OpenAIRE

    Juhi Agarwal; Sirimavo Nair

    2012-01-01

    Iodine is considered as one of the essential elements for the proper functioning of the hormones of human and animal thyroid glands. In many parts of the world iodine deficiency disorders develop because of deficiency of iodine in water and food supply. An iodine deficient goitrous mother may give birth to a cretinous baby because the fetus requires an adequate secretion of thyroxine during the later stages of pregnancy. Seaweed has such a large proportion of iodine compared to dietary minimu...

  18. Vitamin B12 deficiency and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Aysel Milanlıoğlu

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may cause psychiatric manifestations preceding the hematological and neurological symptoms. Despite a variety of symptoms, data on the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in depression are sparse.We report a case with B12 deficiency that is diagnosed with psychotic depression and treated successively with vitamin B12 replacement instead of using conventional therapy.Future investigations should focus on the role of vitamin B12 status in depression and other neuropsychiatric ...

  19. Treatment of Iron Deficiency in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Breymann, C; Römer, T.; Dudenhausen, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency with and without anaemia is a common cause of morbidity, particularly in women. Iron deficiency is generally the result of an imbalance between iron loss and iron absorption. In women with symptoms suspicious for iron deficiency, it is important to confirm or exclude the suspicion using proper tests. The use of serum ferritin levels is considered the gold standard for diagnosis. Although the ideal ferritin levels are not unknown the current consent is that le...

  20. Vitamin D Deficiency in Early Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Flood-Nichols, Shannon K.; Tinnemore, Deborah; Huang, Raywin R.; Napolitano, Peter G.; Ippolito, Danielle L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency is a common problem in reproductive-aged women in the United States. The effect of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is unknown, but has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between vitamin D deficiency in the first trimester and subsequent clinical outcomes. Study Design This is a retrospective cohort study. Plasma was collected in the first trimester from 310 nulliparous women with singlet...

  1. Vitamin D Deficiency in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Andıran, Nesibe; Çelik, Nurullah; AKÇA, Halise; Doğan, Güzide

    2012-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency is an important health problem in both developed and developing countries. Recent reports on the extraskeletal effects of vitamin D have led to increased interest in prevalence studies on states of deficiency/insufficiency of vitamin D. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in children and adolescents residing in Ankara, Turkey and to investigate the factors associated with low vitamin D status. Methods: A...

  2. The effects of in utero vitamin D deficiency on airway smooth muscle mass and lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Jones, Anya C; Gout, Alex; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Zosky, Graeme R

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and airway hyperresponsiveness in whole-life vitamin D-deficient female mice. In this study, we aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms contributing to altered lung structure and function. RNA was extracted from lung tissue of whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete female mice, and gene expression patterns were profiled by RNA sequencing. The data showed that genes involved in embryonic organ development, pattern formation, branching morphogenesis, Wingless/Int signaling, and inflammation were differentially expressed in vitamin D-deficient mice. Network analysis suggested that differentially expressed genes were connected by the hubs matrix metallopeptidase 9; NF-κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells inhibitor, α; epidermal growth factor receptor; and E1A binding protein p300. Given our findings that developmental pathways may be altered, we investigated if the timing of vitamin D exposure (in utero vs. postnatal) had an impact on lung health outcomes. Gene expression was measured in in utero or postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice, as well as whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete mice at 8 weeks of age. Baseline lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation were measured and lungs fixed for lung structure assessment using stereological methods and quantification of ASM mass. In utero vitamin D deficiency was sufficient to increase ASM mass and baseline airway resistance and alter lung structure. There were increased neutrophils but decreased lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage. Expression of inflammatory molecules S100A9 and S100A8 was mainly increased in postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice. These observations suggest that in utero vitamin D deficiency can alter lung structure and function and increase inflammation, contributing to symptoms in chronic diseases, such as asthma. PMID:25867172

  3. Genetics Home Reference: common variable immune deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 links) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Immune System National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Educational Resources (8 links) Boston Children's ...

  4. Congenital longitudinal deficiency of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, D A; Loder, R T; Crandall, R C

    2003-01-01

    We performed a clinical and radiographic review of 15 patients (19 limbs) with longitudinal deficiency of the tibia treated between 1981 and 2001. Ten limbs with Kalamchi type I deficiencies were managed by through-knee amputation. Five type II deficiencies were treated by foot ablation and tibiofibular synostosis, either at the same time or staged, but prosthetic problems may arise from varus alignment and prominence of the proximal fibula. Patients with type III deficiencies (four cases) were treated by foot ablation. Prosthetic problems relating to proximal or distal tibiofibular instability may necessitate additional surgical intervention. PMID:12879290

  5. Ageing Fxr Deficient Mice Develop Increased Energy Expenditure, Improved Glucose Control and Liver Damage Resembling NASH

    OpenAIRE

    Bjursell, Mikael; Wedin, Marianne; Admyre, Therése; Hermansson, Majlis; Böttcher, Gerhard; Göransson, Melker; Lindén, Daniel; Bamberg, Krister; Oscarsson, Jan; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4 (Nr1h4, FXR) is a bile acid activated nuclear receptor mainly expressed in the liver, intestine, kidney and adrenal glands. Upon activation, the primary function is to suppress cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the classic or neutral bile acid synthesis pathway. In the present study, a novel Fxr deficient mouse line was created and studied with respect to metabolism and liver function in ageing mice fed chow d...

  6. A guide to diagnosis of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in digestive diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Fernando; García-López, Santiago

    2009-10-01

    Iron deficiency (ID), with or without anemia, is often caused by digestive diseases and should always be investigated, except in very specific situations, as its causes could be serious diseases, such as cancer. Diagnosis of ID is not always easy. Low serum levels of ferritin or transferrin saturation, imply a situation of absolute or functional ID. It is sometimes difficult to differentiate ID anemia from anemia of chronic diseases, which can coexist. In this case, other parameters, such as soluble transferrin receptor activity can be very useful. After an initial evaluation by clinical history, urine analysis, and serological tests for celiac disease, gastroscopy and colonoscopy are the key diagnostic tools for investigating the origin of ID, and will detect the most important and prevalent diseases. If both tests are normal and anemia is not severe, treatment with oral iron can be indicated, along with stopping any treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In the absence of response to oral iron, or if the anemia is severe or clinical suspicion of important disease persists, we must insist on diagnostic evaluation. Repeat endoscopic studies should be considered in many cases and if both still show normal results, investigating the small bowel must be considered. The main techniques in this case are capsule endoscopy, followed by enteroscopy. PMID:19787826

  7. Functional genomic analyses identify pathways dysregulated by progranulin deficiency, implicating Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Ezra Y; Wexler, Eric M; Versano, Revital; Coppola, Giovanni; Gao, Fuying; Winden, Kellen D; Oldham, Michael C; Martens, Lauren Herl; Zhou, Ping; Farese, Robert V; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2011-09-22

    Progranulin (GRN) mutations cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but GRN's function in the CNS remains largely unknown. To identify the pathways downstream of GRN, we used weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to develop a systems-level view of transcriptional alterations in a human neural progenitor model of GRN-deficiency. This highlighted key pathways such as apoptosis and ubiquitination in GRN deficient human neurons, while revealing an unexpected major role for the Wnt signaling pathway, which was confirmed by analysis of gene expression data from postmortem FTD brain. Furthermore, we observed that the Wnt receptor Fzd2 was one of only a few genes upregulated at 6 weeks in a GRN knockout mouse, and that FZD2 reduction caused increased apoptosis, while its upregulation promoted neuronal survival in vitro. Together, these in vitro and in vivo data point to an adaptive role for altered Wnt signaling in GRN deficiency-mediated FTD, representing a potential therapeutic target. PMID:21943601

  8. The Syk/CARD9-coupled receptor Dectin-1 is not required for host resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Marakalala, Mohlopheni J.; Guler, Reto; Matika, Lungile; Murray, Graeme; Jacobs, Muazzam; Brombacher, Frank; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Sher, Alan; Brown, Gordon D.

    2011-01-01

    There is interest in identifying the pattern recognition receptors involved in initiating protective or non-protective host responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here we explored the role of the Syk/CARD9-coupled receptor, Dectin-1, using an aerosol model of Mtb infection in wild-type and Dectin-1 deficient mice. We observed a reduction in pulmonary bacilli burdens in the Dectin-1 deficient animals, but this did not correlate with significant changes in pulmonary pathology, cytokine ...

  9. Mechanistic insights into the role of C-type lectin receptor/CARD9 signaling in human antifungal immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond, Rebecca A.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2016-01-01

    Human CARD9 deficiency is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the gene CARD9, which encodes a signaling protein that is found downstream of many C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). CLRs encompass a large family of innate recognition receptors, expressed predominantly by myeloid and epithelial cells, which bind fungal carbohydrates and initiate antifungal immune responses. Accordingly, human CARD9 deficiency is associated with the spontaneous d...

  10. Mechanistic Insights into the Role of C-Type Lectin Receptor/CARD9 Signaling in Human Antifungal Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond, Rebecca A.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2016-01-01

    Human CARD9 deficiency is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the gene CARD9, which encodes a signaling protein that is found downstream of many C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). CLRs encompass a large family of innate recognition receptors, expressed predominantly by myeloid and epithelial cells, which bind fungal carbohydrates and initiate antifungal immune responses. Accordingly, human CARD9 deficiency is associated with the spontaneous d...

  11. Pmch-Deficiency in Rats Is Associated with Normal Adipocyte Differentiation and Lower Sympathetic Adipose Drive

    OpenAIRE

    Mul, Joram D.; Eoghan O'Duibhir; Shrestha, Yogendra B.; Arjen Koppen; Peter Vargoviç; Toonen, Pim W; Eleen Zarebidaki; Richard Kvetnansky; Eric Kalkhoven; Edwin Cuppen; Bartness, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The orexigenic neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), a product of Pmch, is an important mediator of energy homeostasis. Pmch-deficient rodents are lean and smaller, characterized by lower food intake, body-, and fat mass. Pmch is expressed in hypothalamic neurons that ultimately are components in the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) drive to white and interscapular brown adipose tissue (WAT, iBAT, respectively). MCH binds to MCH receptor 1 (MCH1R), which is present on adipocytes. ...

  12. Vitamin D or hormone D deficiency in autoimmune rheumatic diseases, including undifferentiated connective tissue disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cutolo, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of autoimmune diseases. The presence of vitamin D receptors in the cells of the immune system and the fact that several of these cells produce the vitamin D hormone suggested that vitamin D could have immunoregulatory properties, and now potent immuno-mudulatory activities on dendritic cells, Th1 and Th17 cells, as well as B cells have been confirmed. Patients with undifferenti...

  13. Mertk Deficiency Affects Macrophage Directional Migration via Disruption of Cytoskeletal Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yong; Wu, Shen; Liu, Qian; Xie, Jiayi; Zhang, Jingxue; Han, Dong; Lu, Qingxian; Lu, Qingjun

    2015-01-01

    Mertk belongs to the Tyro3, Axl and Mertk (TAM) family of receptor tyrosine kinases, and plays a pivotal role in regulation of cytoskeletal rearrangement during phagocytosis. Phagocytosis by either professional or non-professional phagocytes is impaired in the Mertk deficient individual. In the present study, we further investigated the effects of Mertk mutation on peritoneal macrophage morphology, attachment, spreading and movement. Mertk-mutated macrophages exhibited decreased attachment, w...

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Malaria: Cytochemical Detection of Heterozygous G6PD Deficiency in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Anna L.; Van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a X-chromosomally transmitted disorder of the erythrocyte that affects 400 million people worldwide. Diagnosis of heterozygously-deficient women is complicated: as a result of lyonization, these women have a normal and a G6PD-deficient population of erythrocytes. The cytochemical assay is the only reliable assay to discriminate between heterozygously-deficient women and non-deficient women or homozygously-deficient women. G6PD deficiency ...

  15. Photodissociation of neutron deficient nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnabend, K.; Babilon, M.; Hasper, J.; Mueller, S.; Zarza, M.; Zilges, A. [TU Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    The knowledge of the cross sections for photodissociation reactions like e.g. ({gamma}, n) of neutron deficient nuclei is of crucial interest for network calculations predicting the abundances of the so-called p nuclei. However, only single cross sections have been measured up to now, i.e., one has to rely nearly fully on theoretical predictions. While the cross sections of stable isotopes are accessible by experiments using real photons, the bulk of the involved reactions starts from unstable nuclei. Coulomb dissociation (CD) experiments in inverse kinematics might be a key to expand the experimental database for p-process network calculations. The approach to test the accuracy of the CD method is explained. (orig.)

  16. Photodissociation of neutron deficient nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnabend, K.; Babilon, M.; Hasper, J.; Müller, S.; Zarza, M.; Zilges, A.

    2006-03-01

    The knowledge of the cross sections for photodissociation reactions like e.g. (γ, n) of neutron deficient nuclei is of crucial interest for network calculations predicting the abundances of the so-called p nuclei. However, only single cross sections have been measured up to now, i.e., one has to rely nearly fully on theoretical predictions. While the cross sections of stable isotopes are accessible by experiments using real photons, the bulk of the involved reactions starts from unstable nuclei. Coulomb dissociation (CD) experiments in inverse kinematics might be a key to expand the experimental database for p-process network calculations. The approach to test the accuracy of the CD method is explained.

  17. The new biology of histamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Feng; Thurmond, Robin L

    2008-03-01

    The physiologic functions of histamine have been recognized for more than 100 years, yet new roles are still being uncovered. Most importantly, a newly discovered receptor of the amine has helped refine our understanding of histamine. This new receptor, the histamine H4 receptor (H4R), has a higher affinity for histamine compared with the histamine H1 receptor and appears to be more selectively expressed, found mainly on hematopoietic cells. H4R is involved in chemotaxis and inflammatory mediator release by eosinophils, mast cells, monocytes, dendritic cells, and T cells. Studies in animal models using selective antagonists or H4R-deficient mice have shown a role for the receptor in inflammation in vivo. In particular, H4R antagonists have shown promise in experimental models of asthma and pruritus, two conditions where currently marketed antihistamines targeting the histamine H1 receptor are not optimally effective in humans. Thus, a new class of H4R-specific antihistamines may be distinctively effective in treating allergic diseases associated with chronic pruritus and asthma. PMID:18377770

  18. Sortilin-related receptor SORCS3 is a postsynaptic modulator of synaptic depression and fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiderhoff, Tilman; Christiansen, Gitte B; Pallesen, Lone T; Vaegter, Christian; Nykjaer, Anders; Holm, Mai Marie; Glerup, Simon; Willnow, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    SORCS3 is an orphan receptor of the VPS10P domain receptor family, a group of sorting and signaling receptors central to many pathways in control of neuronal viability and function. SORCS3 is highly expressed in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, but the relevance of this receptor for hippocampal activity remained absolutely unclear. Here, we show that SORCS3 localizes to the postsynaptic density and that loss of receptor activity in gene-targeted mice abrogates NMDA receptor-dependent and -independent forms of long-term depression (LTD). Consistent with a loss of synaptic retraction, SORCS3-deficient mice suffer from deficits in behavioral activities associated with hippocampal LTD, particularly from an accelerated extinction of fear memory. A possible molecular mechanism for SORCS3 in synaptic depression was suggested by targeted proteomics approaches that identified the ability of SORCS3 to functionally interact with PICK1, an adaptor that sorts glutamate receptors at the postsynapse. Faulty localization of PICK1 in SORCS3-deficient neurons argues for altered glutamate receptor trafficking as the cause of altered synaptic plasticity in the SORCS3-deficient mouse model. In conclusion, our studies have identified a novel function for VPS10P domain receptors in control of synaptic depression and suggest SORCS3 as a novel factor modulating aversive memory extinction. PMID:24069373

  19. Effects of vitamin B-6 nutrition on benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor binding in the developing rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dietary deficiency of vitamin B-6 promotes seizure activity in neonatal animals and human infants. Previous studied have shown that neonatal vitamin B-6 deprivation results in reduced levels of brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and increased binding at the GABA site of the GABA/BDZ receptor complex. Since the GABA and BDZ receptors are allosterically linked, this study was undertaken to determine if vitamin B-6 deprivation had an effect on BDZ receptor binding. Benzodiazepine receptor binding isotherms using 3H-flunitrazepam as ligand were performed in the presence and absence of 10 μM GABA. The results indicate a significant increase in the binding affinity (Kd) in the presence of GABA in cerebellar membranes from deficient rat pups at 14 days of age with no effect on receptor number (Bmax). By 28 days of age, the increase in Kd was no longer present. No change in Kd or Bmax was observed in cortical tissue from deficient animals at 14 or 28 days of age. Preliminary studies of GABA-enhancement of 3H-flunitrazepam binding indicate that vitamin B-6 deficiency also induces alterations in the ability of GABA to enhance BZD receptor binding. In summary, these results indicate that the effects of vitamin B-6 deprivation on BDZ receptor binding are region specific and age related

  20. Reprint of "Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women impairs regulatory T cell function".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayendra Chary, A; Hemalatha, R; Seshacharyulu, M; Vasudeva Murali, M; Jayaprakash, D; Dinesh Kumar, B

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells and IgE receptors (CD23 and CD21) on B cells were assessed in vitamin D deficient pregnant women. For this, 153 pregnant women were recruited from a government hospital and were categorized into three groups based on 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) status. Regulatory T cell population (Treg cells) and CD23/CD21 expression on B cells were quantified by FACS ARIA II in maternal blood at third trimester; and the same parameters were evaluated in cord blood soon after delivery. In addition, TGF β and IL-10 were quantified in maternal and cord blood by using Milliplex kits. In a representative sample of eight women from each group (vitamin D sufficient, insufficient and deficient), placental tissues were processed for mRNA expressions of vitamin D receptor (VDR), retinoic acid receptor (RXR), vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) and vitamin D regulating enzymes. Of the 153 pregnant women, 18 were sufficient (≥30ng/mL), 55 were insufficient (20-29ng/mL) and 80 were deficient (≤19ng/mL) for 25(OH)D3 status. The maternal blood Treg cell population (mean (%)±SE) was lower (pTreg cell population (mean (%)±SE) was also lower (pasthma in neonates. PMID:25644204

  1. Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women impairs regulatory T cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayendra Chary, A; Hemalatha, R; Seshacharyulu, M; Vasudeva Murali, M; Jayaprakash, D; Dinesh Kumar, B

    2015-03-01

    Regulatory T cells and IgE receptors (CD23 and CD21) on B cells were assessed in vitamin D deficient pregnant women. For this, 153 pregnant women were recruited from a government hospital and were categorized into three groups based on 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) status. Regulatory T cell population (Treg cells) and CD23/CD21 expression on B cells were quantified by FACS ARIA II in maternal blood at third trimester; and the same parameters were evaluated in cord blood soon after delivery. In addition, TGF β and IL-10 were quantified in maternal and cord blood by using Milliplex kits. In a representative sample of eight women from each group (vitamin D sufficient, insufficient and deficient), placental tissues were processed for mRNA expressions of vitamin D receptor (VDR), retinoic acid receptor (RXR), vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) and vitamin D regulating enzymes. Of the 153 pregnant women, 18 were sufficient (≥30 ng/mL), 55 were insufficient (20-29 ng/mL) and 80 were deficient (≤19 ng/mL) for 25(OH)D3 status. The maternal blood Treg cell population (mean (%)± SE) was lower (pTreg cell population (mean (%)± SE) was also lower (pasthma in neonates. PMID:25448751

  2. Academic Deficiency: Student Experiences of Institutional Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouch-Gilbert, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Limited existing research examines how undergraduate students in the United States experience the process of being identified as deficient due to their academic performance. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of college students on academic probation who were labeled academically deficient. Students…

  3. Short Stature and Growth Hormone Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Matemi, Sezer

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the importance of measurements of height and weight in normal children and emphasizes the role of growth increments for the diagnosis of short stature Causes of short stature methods for diagnosis of GH hormone deficiency actions of growth hormone treatment of growth hormone deficiency and doses for biosynthetic GH treatment are described Key words: Short Stature Growth Hormone

  4. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  5. Genetics Home Reference: beta-ketothiolase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Test Genetic Testing Registry: Deficiency of acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the ... Testing Registry (1 link) Deficiency of acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase ACT Sheets (1 link) Elevated C5-OH Acylcarnitine ...

  6. Acquired Zinc Deficiency in an Adult Female

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanan Saritha; Divya Gupta; Laxmisha Chandrashekar; Devinder M Thappa; Nachiappa G Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of zinc absorption. Acquired cases are reported occasionally in patients with eating disorders or Crohn′s disease. We report a 24-year-old housewife with acquired isolated severe zinc deficiency with no other comorbidities to highlight the rare occurrence of isolated nutritional zinc deficiency in an otherwise normal patient.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National (UK) Information Centre for Metabolic Diseases National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Pyruvate kinase deficiency of red cells Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most common cause of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency , accounting for approximately 80 percent of cases. These mutations ... deficiency ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (5 links) ...

  9. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  10. Genetics Home Reference: complement factor I deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the complement system decreases blood levels of another complement protein called C3, reducing the immune system's ability to fight infections. ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition C3 inactivator deficiency complement component 3 inactivator deficiency Related Information How are ...

  11. How common is vitamin B12 deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In considering the vitamin B-12 fortification of flour, it is important to know who is at risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency and whether those individuals would benefit from flour fortification.This article reviews current knowledge of the prevalence and causes of vitamin B-12 deficiency and considers ...

  12. Breath hydrogen test and sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, R P; Barnes, G L

    1983-01-01

    Sucrose breath hydrogen tests were performed on 7 children with proved sucrase isomaltase deficiency. All children had raised breath hydrogen excretion. The amount of hydrogen produced and symptoms experienced increased with increasing sucrose loads. The sucrose breath hydrogen test appears to be a reliable indicator of sucrose malabsorption in sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

  13. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif;

    1995-01-01

    Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH-deficiency ...

  14. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice. PMID:25586321

  15. Prevalence of Color Vision Deficiency in Qazvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad khalaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Color vision deficiency (CVD is an X chromosome-linked recessive autosomal dominant. Determine the prevalence of color blindness in Qazvin population. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study color vision deficiency examined in 1853 individuals with age 10-25 years old who participated in private clinics and eye clinic of Bu-Ali hospital in Qazvin in 2010. The screening of color vision deficiency was performed using Ishihara test. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16 with χP2P test with p<0.05. Results: Mean age of participant was 17.86±4.48 years. 59.5% of them were female. 3.49% of the total population had color vision deficiency that 0.93% and 2.56% were female and male respectively. Conclusion: color vision deficiency must be noticed by decision makers in health field for screen planning.

  16. Immune deficiencies due to defects in cytokine signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John; Leonard, Warren J

    2003-09-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) represents a syndrome comprising the most severe forms of inherited immunodeficiencies. Defects in cytokine signaling pathways can result in impaired development of lymphoid cells and/or defective functioning of these cells, and most cases of SCID result from defective signaling through the common cytokine receptor g chain (g(c)) or associated molecules and signaling pathways. Studies of these patients and the analysis of gene-targeted mice provide insight into the underlying signaling defects in inherited immunodeficiencies. The identification of the genetic defects in humans with SCID provides the basis for future therapies for these patients. More subtle deficiencies in cytokine signaling have also been found as causes of other forms of immunodeficiency, and the knowledge learned could lead to novel approaches to antimicrobial therapy. PMID:12906775

  17. Epileptogenesis after traumatic brain injury in Plaur-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkvadze, Tamuna; Puhakka, Noora; Pitkänen, Asla

    2016-07-01

    Binding of the extracellular matrix proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) to its receptor, uPAR, regulates tissue remodeling during development and after injury in different organs, including the brain. Accordingly, mutations in the Plaur gene, which encodes uPAR, have been linked to language deficits, autism, and epilepsy, both in mouse and human. Whether uPAR deficiency modulates epileptogenesis and comorbidogenesis after brain injury, however, is unknown. To address this question, we induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) by controlled cortical impact (CCI) in 10 wild-type (Wt-CCI) and 16 Plaur-deficient (uPAR-CCI) mice. Sham-operated mice served as controls (10 Wt-sham, 10 uPAR-sham). During the 4-month follow-up, the mice were neurophenotyped by assessing the somatomotor performance with the composite neuroscore test, emotional learning and memory with fear conditioning to tone and context, and epileptogenesis with videoelectroencephalography monitoring and the pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizure susceptibility test. At the end of the testing, the mice were perfused for histology to analyze cortical and hippocampal neurodegeneration and mossy fiber sprouting. Fourteen percent (1/7) of the mice in the Wt-CCI and 0% in the uPAR-CCI groups developed spontaneous seizures (p>0.05; chi-square). Both the Wt-CCI and uPAR-CCI groups showed increased seizure susceptibility in the PTZ test (plearning showed a genotype effect, being more impaired in uPAR-CCI than in Wt-CCI mice (p<0.05). The findings of the present study indicate that uPAR deficiency does not increase susceptibility to epileptogenesis after CCI injury but has an unfavorable comorbidity-modifying effect after TBI. PMID:27208924

  18. Complement component C7 deficiency in a Spanish family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Bermúdez, M F; Barroso, S; Walter, K; Alvarez, A J; Alarcón, A; López-Trascasa, M; Wichmann, I; Aguilar, F; Núñez-Roldán, A; Sánchez, B

    2003-08-01

    Different genetic mutations have been described in complement component C7 deficiency, a molecular defect which is clinically associated with an increased susceptibility to neisserial recurrent infections, although some cases remain asymptomatic. In this work we report the genetic bases of C7 deficiency in one Spanish family. Exon-specific PCR and sequencing revealed a novel point mutation at nucleotide 615 (exon 6) leading to a stop codon (UGG to UGA) in the patient, his mother, and sister. This transversion causes the premature truncation of the C7 protein (W183X). Additionally, we detected a missense mutation at position 1135 (exon 9) located in the first nucleotide of the codon GGG (CGG), resulting in an amino acid change (G357R) in the patient, his father, as well as in his sister. This latter mutation had been previously described in individuals from Moroccan Sephardic Jewish ancestry. Since both heterozygous mutations were found in the patient as well as in his asymptomatic sister, we analyse other meningococcal defence mechanisms such as polymorphisms of the opsonin receptors on polymorphonuclear cells. Results showed that the patient and his sister bore identical combinations of FcgammaRIIA-H/R131 and FcgammaRIIIB-NA1/2 allotypes. Our results provide further evidence that the molecular pathogenesis of C7 deficiency as well as susceptibility to meningococcal disease are heterogeneous, since different families carry different molecular defects, although many of the C7 defects appear to be homogeneous in individuals from certain geographical areas. The missense mutation G357R would make an interesting topic of analysis with regard to meningococcal disease susceptibility in the Spanish population. PMID:12869030

  19. Vitamin D deficiency and childhood obesity: interactions, implications, and recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson CA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Catherine A Peterson Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO, USA Abstract: Vitamin D deficiency and childhood obesity have been classified as epidemics throughout the world, and both share some common risk factors including poor diet and inactivity. Observational and clinical studies show that vitamin D status and fat mass are inversely correlated. It is not clear whether vitamin D deficiency contributes to, or is a consequence of obesity, or whether there are regulatory interactions between excess adiposity and vitamin D activity. The effects of this deficiency in childhood obesity appear to have negative influences on overall health, including insulin resistance, inflammation, and impeded bone mineralization, as well as increased future risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis. The rather ubiquitous distribution of the vitamin D receptor and the 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1a-hydroxylase throughout the body, including evidence for a role of vitamin D in adipogenesis and adipocyte metabolism, may in part explain these widespread effects. Most of the findings to date suggest that the vitamin D needs of obese children are greater than the nonobese. Although ultraviolet B-induced skin synthesis is a main source of vitamin D, its use is neither feasible nor prudent due to limited sun availability for many and concerns for skin cancer. Likewise, obtaining adequate vitamin D from natural food sources alone is generally not achievable, and even in countries that allow fortification, vitamin D intakes are low. Therefore, in obese children, vitamin D supplementation is warranted. Weight loss interventions using energy restriction and physical activity may also improve the poor vitamin D status associated with obesity. More research is needed to define optimal vitamin D status in this vulnerable population, including investigations to determine the efficacy of vitamin D

  20. Deficiency of RAMP1 attenuates antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyu Li

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the lung, characterized by breathing difficulty during an attack following exposure to an environmental trigger. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP is a neuropeptide that may have a pathological role in asthma. The CGRP receptor is comprised of two components, which include the G-protein coupled receptor, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR, and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1. RAMPs, including RAMP1, mediate ligand specificity in addition to aiding in the localization of receptors to the cell surface. Since there has been some controversy regarding the effect of CGRP on asthma, we sought to determine the effect of CGRP signaling ablation in an animal model of asthma. Using gene-targeting techniques, we generated mice deficient for RAMP1 by excising exon 3. After determining that these mice are viable and overtly normal, we sensitized the animals to ovalbumin prior to assessing airway resistance and inflammation after methacholine challenge. We found that mice lacking RAMP1 had reduced airway resistance and inflammation compared to wildtype animals. Additionally, we found that a 50% reduction of CLR, the G-protein receptor component of the CGRP receptor, also ameliorated airway resistance and inflammation in this model of allergic asthma. Interestingly, the loss of CLR from the smooth muscle cells did not alter the airway resistance, indicating that CGRP does not act directly on the smooth muscle cells to drive airway hyperresponsiveness. Together, these data indicate that signaling through RAMP1 and CLR plays a role in mediating asthma pathology. Since RAMP1 and CLR interact to form a receptor for CGRP, our data indicate that aberrant CGRP signaling, perhaps on lung endothelial and inflammatory cells, contributes to asthma pathophysiology. Finally, since RAMP-receptor interfaces are pharmacologically tractable, it may be possible to develop compounds targeting the RAMP1/CLR

  1. Iron deficiency in the elderly Deficiência de ferro no idoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra F. M. Gualandro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is a common problem in the elderly and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. More than 10% of all individuals above the age of 65 have anemia. Because an increasing proportion of the world's population is aged 65 and older, it is inevitable that the prevalence of anemia will increase in the future. Thus, early diagnosis of anemia is important to prevent the condition from worsening, to slow disease progression, and improve outcomes in patients. The WHO definition of anemia (hemoglobin concentration Anemia é comum em idosos e é associada a significante morbidade e mortalidade. Mais de 10% dos indivíduos acima de 65 anos tem anemia. Com uma proporção crescente da população mundial atingindo idade igual ou superior a 65 anos, a prevalência de anemia certamente aumentará no futuro. O diagnóstico precoce é importante para prevenir piora do quadro, diminuir progressão da doença e melhorar a evolução dos pacientes. Os critérios mais utilizados em estudos epidemiológicos para definir anemia em idosos são os da OMS (hemoglobina<12 g/dL para mulheres e hemoglobina <13 g/dL para homens. Aproximadamente um terço dos idosos com anemia tem deficiência de ferro, folato e/ou vitamina B12, um terço tem insuficiência renal e/ou inflamação crônica e o terço remanescente tem anemia inexplicada. A anemia ferropênica é microcítica e hipocrômica e caracteriza-se por baixos níveis de ferritina sérica, capacidade total de ligação de ferro do plasma aumentada, saturação da transferrina diminuída, concentração do receptor solúvel da transferrina elevada e ausência de ferro na medula óssea. É causada geralmente por perda de sangue pelo trato gastrointestinal devido a gastrite, úlceras, câncer de colo ou angiodisplasia. Anormalidades do trato gastrointestinal podem ser identificadas na maioria dos pacientes. Em alguns casos, ingestão ou absorção inadequada de ferro pode contribuir para a anemia

  2. Folate deficiency affects histone methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Benjamin A; Luka, Zigmund; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Bhanu, Natarajan V; Wagner, Conrad

    2016-03-01

    that the bound THF serves to protect the FAD class of histone demethylases from the destructive effects of formaldehyde generation by formation of 5,10-methylene-THF. We present pilot data showing that decreased folate in livers as a result of dietary folate deficiency is associated with increased levels of methylated lysine 4 of histone 3. This can be a result of decreased LSD1 activity resulting from the decreased folate available to scavenge the formaldehyde produced at the active site caused by the folate deficiency. Because LSD1 can regulate gene expression this suggests that folate may play a more important role than simply serving as a carrier of one-carbon units and be a factor in other diseases associated with low folate. PMID:26880641

  3. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Dopamine beta (β)-hydroxylase deficiency is a condition that ...

  4. Who Is at Risk for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency occurs in all ethnic groups. However, the ... most often in White people of European descent. AAT deficiency is an inherited condition. "Inherited" means the ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions mannose-binding lectin deficiency mannose-binding lectin deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Mannose-binding lectin deficiency is a condition that affects the immune ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions ataxia with vitamin E deficiency ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that ...

  8. Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency Share | Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency This ... is the best tool for prevention of the flu, should patients with immune deficiency be given the ...

  9. Complementary Signaling through flt3 and Interleukin-7 Receptor α Is Indispensable for Fetal and Adult B Cell Genesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sitnicka, Ewa; Brakebusch, Cord; Martensson, Inga-Lill; Svensson, Marcus; Agace, William W.; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Bryder, David; M.Cilio, Corrado; Ahlenius, Henrik; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Peschon, Jacques J.; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.

    2003-01-01

    Extensive studies of mice deficient in one or several cytokine receptors have failed to support an indispensable role of cytokines in development of multiple blood cell lineages. Whereas B1 B cells and Igs are sustained at normal levels throughout life of mice deficient in IL-7, IL-7Rα, common cytokine receptor gamma chain, or flt3 ligand (FL), we report here that adult mice double deficient in IL-7Rα and FL completely lack visible LNs, conventional IgM+ B cells, IgA+ plasma cells, and B1 cel...

  10. Primary Immuno-deficiencies (PID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Ghaffari1

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 6 June, 2009 ; Accepted 22 July, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Primary immune-deficiencies (PID are associated with a wide range of clinical disorders along with variable symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate and improve our knowledge regarding PID from patients that were referred to Booali Sina Hospital.Materials and methods: We evaluated all of PID`s that were referred to Booali Sina Hospital from their data records. Demography, clinical and laboratory data were recorded and then analyzed.Results: In the duration of 3 years, we had 10 patients with PID (7 males and 3 females. Of these cases, 5 had hum oral (50%, 1case had phagocytic (10%, 3 cases had cellular (30% and 1 case had hyper IgE syndrome (10%. Many of them had respiratory and otitis media infections, while a few patients had adenitis, gastroenteritis, liver abscesses, bleedings and malignancy.Conclusion: PID is a diverse disorder that involves different immune systems. Knowledge from patient’s clinical symptoms and consideration in their differential diagnosis can be helpful in early diagnosis and an effective treatment.J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(70: 76-80 (Persian

  11. Cernunnos deficiency: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turul, T; Tezcan, I; Sanal, O

    2011-01-01

    B cell-negative severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is caused by molecules involved in the variable (diversity) joining (V[D]J) recombination process. Four genes involved in the nonhomologous end joining pathway--Artemis, DNA-PKcs, DNA ligase 4, and Cernunnos--are involved in B cell-negative radiosensitive SCID. Deficiencies in DNA ligase 4 and the recently described Cernunnos gene result in microcephaly, growth retardation, and typical bird-like facies. Lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinemia with normal or elevated immunoglobulin (Ig) M levels indicate a defect in V(D)J recombination. We present a case with recurrent postnatal pulmonary infections leading to chronic lung disease, disseminated molluscum contagiosum, lymphopenia, low IgG, IgA and normal IgM levels. Our patient had phenotypic features such as microcephaly and severe growth retardation. Clinical presentation in patients with the B cell-negative subtype ranges from SCID to atypical combined immunodeficiency, occasionally associated with autoimmune manifestations and cytomegalovirus infection. Our patient survived beyond infancy with combined immunodeficiency and no autoimmune manifestations. PMID:21721379

  12. Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Wollmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods: The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33, and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results: Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003, and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03 compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6. Conclusion: The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results.

  13. Perinatal iron deficiency and neurocognitive development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Clare Radlowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is the most common form of nutrient deficiency worldwide. It is highly prevalent due to the limited availability of high quality food in developing countries, and poor dietary habits in industrialized countries. According to the World Health Organization, it affects nearly 2 billion people and up to 50% of women who are pregnant. Maternal anemia during pregnancy is especially burdensome to healthy neurodevelopment in the fetus because iron is needed for proper neurogenesis, development, and myelination. Maternal anemia also increases the risk of low birth weight, either due to premature birth or fetal growth restriction, which is associated with delayed neurocognitive development and even psychiatric illness. As rapid neurodevelopment continues after birth infants that received sufficient iron in utero, but that receive a low iron diet after 6 months of age, also show deficits in neurocognitive development, including impairments in learning and memory. Unfortunately, the neurocognitive complications of iron deficiency during critical pre- and postnatal periods of brain development are difficult to remedy, persisting into adulthood. Thus, preventing iron deficiency in the pre- and postnatal periods is critical as is devising new means to recapture cognitive function in individuals who experienced early iron deficiency. This review will discuss the prevalence of pre- and postnatal iron deficiency, the mechanism, and effects of iron deficiency on brain and cognitive development.

  14. Corneal proteoglycan changes under vitamin A deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vitamin A-deficient keratinized cornea is very susceptible to ulceration possibly due to altered stromal components. In this study the proteoglycans present in the corneal stroma of vitamin A-deficient, pair-fed and normal rabbits were compared. Rabbits after weaning were placed on a vitamin A deficient diet, the same diet with retinyl palmitate added (pair-fed) or normal rabbit chow. After 5 months, the corneas of the vitamin A-deficient animals became keratinized. The corneal components were then labeled by injection of 3H-leucine and Na35SO4 into the anterior chamber of the eyes on 3 successive days. On the 4th day the animals were sacrificed the corneas removed and dissected. The labeled corneal stromas were extracted with 4 M GuHCl and the components separated on a DEAE-Sepharose column. The proteoglycans were eluted with 0.5 M and 1.0 M NaCl. The 1.0 M NaCl fraction (mainly keratin sulfate proteoglycans) was increased 25% in the vitamin A-deficient corneas over that for the pair-fed and normal corneas. These proteoglycans from the deficient corneas gave a different elution pattern on Octyl-Sepharose eluted with a Triton X-100 gradient than those from the pair-fed corneas. The total labeled proteoglycans were similar in the stromas from the 3 types of rabbits. These results indicate the various corneal proteoglycan ratios differ under vitamin A deficiency conditions

  15. SURF1 deficiency: a multi-centre natural history study

    OpenAIRE

    Wedatilake, Y; Brown, R; Mcfarland, R.; Yaplito-Lee, J.; Morris, A.A.; Champion, M; Jardine, P E; Clarke, A.; Thorburn, D R; Taylor, R. W.; Land, J M; Forrest, K.; Dobbie, A.; Simmons, L; Aasheim, E. T.

    2013-01-01

    Background SURF1 deficiency, a monogenic mitochondrial disorder, is the most frequent cause of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficient Leigh syndrome (LS). We report the first natural history study of SURF1 deficiency. Methods We conducted a multi-centre case notes review of 44 SURF1-deficient patients from ten different UK centres and two Australian centres. Survival data for LRPPRC-deficient LS and nuclear-encoded complex I-deficient LS patients were obtained from previous publications. The su...

  16. SCID patients with ARTEMIS vs RAG deficiencies following HCT: increased risk of late toxicity in ARTEMIS-deficient SCID

    OpenAIRE

    Schuetz, Catharina; Neven, Benedicte; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Leroy, Sandrine; Ege, Markus J.; Pannicke, Ulrich; Schwarz, Klaus; Schulz, Ansgar S.; Hoenig, Manfred; Sparber-Sauer, Monika; Gatz, Susanne A.; Denzer, Christian; Blanche, Stephane; Moshous, Despina; Picard, Capucine

    2014-01-01

    No difference in survival, early toxicity, or occurrence of tumors between ARTEMIS and RAG-deficient SCID.ARTEMIS-deficient patients develop late toxicity following HCT: growth retardation, endocrinologic deficiencies, and dental abnormalities.

  17. C3 Deficiency – A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Carreiro-Martins, P; Gaspar, A.; Rosado-Pinto, J.

    2006-01-01

    O sistema do complemento é um componente essencial do sistema imunitário inato, pelo que as deficiências de proteínas da sua complexa cascata podem ter consequências mais ou menos graves, de acordo com a importância do factor afectado. As complicações mais usuais das deficiências do complemento são infecções recorrentes a bactérias encapsuladas e distúrbios autoimunes. Os autores apresentam um caso clínico de deficiência do factor C3, situação extremamente rara, discutindo a fisiopatolo...

  18. Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony in Biotinidase Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghini, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is a disorder inherited autosomal recessively showing evidence of hearing loss and optic atrophy in addition to seizures, hypotonia, and ataxia. In the present study, a 2-year-old boy with Biotinidase deficiency is presented in which clinical symptoms have been reported with auditory neuropathy/auditory dyssynchrony (AN/AD). In this case, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions showed bilaterally normal responses representing normal function of outer hair cells. In contrast, acoustic reflex test showed absent reflexes bilaterally, and visual reinforcement audiometry and auditory brainstem responses indicated severe to profound hearing loss in both ears. These results suggest AN/AD in patients with Biotinidase deficiency. PMID:27144235

  19. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Kyphoscoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhai, Abhishek; Banzal, Subodh

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among Indian population. Women are especially at risk for severe vitamin D deficiency. The risk is higher for those who are multiparous and postmenopausal. Poor exposure to sunlight, higher latitude, winter season, inadequate diet, older age, obesity and malabsorption are also important risk factors. Symptoms of hypovitaminosis D, including diffuse or migratory pain affecting several sites (especially the shoulder, pelvis, ribcage and lower back) have also been misdiagnosed as musculoskeletal disorders, including fibromyalgia, polymyalgia rheumatica and ankylosing spondylitis. Here, we report two cases presented with kyphoscoliosis, diagnosed to have severe vitamin D deficiency. PMID:26664847

  20. Induction of Colitis in Mice Deficient of Peyer’s Patches and Mesenteric Lymph Nodes Is Associated with Increased Disease Severity and Formation of Colonic Lymphoid Patches

    OpenAIRE

    Spahn, Thomas W.; Herbst, Hermann; Rennert, Paul D.; Lügering, Norbert; Maaser, Christian; Kraft, Mathias; Fontana, Adriano; Weiner, Howard L.; Domschke, Wolfram; Kucharzik, Torsten

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with immune activation in Peyer’s patches and mucosal lymph nodes. The role of these organs in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis was investigated. We used mice lacking Peyer’s patches and/or lymph nodes because of lymphotoxin-α gene deficiency or treatment in utero with lymphotoxin-β-receptor IgG and tumor necrosis factor-receptor-I (55)-IgG fusion proteins. Mice lacking Peyer’s patches and lymph nodes because of lymphotoxin-α deficiency or ...

  1. MHC class I–deficient natural killer cells acquire a licensed phenotype after transfer into an MHC class I–sufficient environment

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Julie M.; Wahle, Joseph A.; Yokoyama, Wayne M.

    2010-01-01

    In MHC class I–deficient hosts, natural killer (NK) cells are hyporesponsive to cross-linking of activation receptors. Functional competence requires engagement of a self–major histocompatability complex (MHC) class I–specific inhibitory receptor, a process referred to as “licensing.” We previously suggested that licensing is developmentally determined in the bone marrow. In this study, we find that unlicensed mature MHC class I–deficient splenic NK cells show gain-of-function and acquire a l...

  2. The expression of the ACTH receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L.K. Elias

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal glucocorticoid secretion is regulated by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH acting through a specific cell membrane receptor (ACTH-R. The ACTH-R is a member of the G protein superfamily-coupled receptors and belongs to the subfamily of melanocortin receptors. The ACTH-R is mainly expressed in the adrenocortical cells showing a restricted tissue specificity, although ACTH is recognized by the other four melanocortin receptors. The cloning of the ACTH-R was followed by the study of this gene in human diseases such as familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD and adrenocortical tumors. FGD is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by glucocorticoid deficiency, elevated plasma ACTH levels and preserved renin/aldosterone secretion. This disorder has been ascribed to an impaired adrenal responsiveness to ACTH due to a defective ACTH-R, a defect in intracellular signal transduction or an abnormality in adrenal cortical development. Mutations of the ACTH-R have been described in patients with FGD in segregation with the disease. The functional characterization of these mutations has been prevented by difficulties in expressing human ACTH-R in cells that lack endogenous melanocortin receptor activity. To overcome these difficulties we used Y6 cells, a mutant variant of the Y1 cell line, which possesses a non-expressed ACTH-R gene allowing the functional study without any background activity. Our results demonstrated that the several mutations of the ACTH-R found in FGD result in an impaired cAMP response or loss of sensitivity to ACTH stimulation. An ACTH-binding study showed an impairment of ligand binding with loss of the high affinity site in most of the mutations studied.

  3. G-Protein-Coupled Receptor MrgD Is a Receptor for Angiotensin-(1-7) Involving Adenylyl Cyclase, cAMP, and Phosphokinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzner, Anja; Gebolys, Kinga; Meinert, Christian; Klein, Sabine; Uhlich, Anja; Trebicka, Jonel; Villacañas, Óscar; Walther, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) has cardiovascular protective effects and is the opponent of the often detrimental Ang II within the renin-angiotensin system. Although it is well accepted that the G-protein-coupled receptor Mas is a receptor for the heptapeptide, the lack in knowing initial signaling molecules stimulated by Ang-(1-7) prevented definitive characterization of ligand/receptor pharmacology as well as identification of further hypothesized receptors for the heptapeptide. The study aimed to identify a second messenger stimulated by Ang-(1-7) allowing confirmation as well as discovery of the heptapeptide's receptors. Ang-(1-7) elevates cAMP concentration in primary cells, such as endothelial or mesangial cells. Using cAMP as readout in receptor-transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, we provided pharmacological proof that Mas is a functional receptor for Ang-(1-7). Moreover, we identified the G-protein-coupled receptor MrgD as a second receptor for Ang-(1-7). Consequently, the heptapeptide failed to increase cAMP concentration in primary mesangial cells with genetic deficiency in both Mas and MrgD Mice deficient in MrgD showed an impaired hemodynamic response after Ang-(1-7) administration. Furthermore, we excluded the Ang II type 2 receptor as a receptor for the heptapeptide but discovered that the Ang II type 2 blocker PD123319 can also block Mas and MrgD receptors. Our results lead to an expansion and partial revision of the renin-angiotensin system, by identifying a second receptor for Ang-(1-7), by excluding Ang II type 2 as a receptor for the heptapeptide, and by enforcing the revisit of such publications which concluded Ang II type 2 function by only using PD123319. PMID:27217404

  4. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Vikram, E-mail: prasadvm@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Chirra, Shivani [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Kohli, Rohit [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Shull, Gary E. [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.

  5. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors

  6. The insulin receptor activation process involves localized conformational changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Gautier, N; Van Obberghen, E

    1992-11-15

    The molecular process by which insulin binding to the receptor alpha-subunit induces activation of the receptor beta-subunit with ensuing substrate phosphorylation remains unclear. In this study, we aimed at approaching this molecular mechanism of signal transduction and at delineating the cytoplasmic domains implied in this process. To do this, we used antipeptide antibodies to the following sequences of the receptor beta-subunit: (i) positions 962-972 in the juxtamembrane domain, (ii) positions 1247-1261 at the end of the kinase domain, and (iii) positions 1294-1317 and (iv) positions 1309-1326, both in the receptor C terminus. We have previously shown that insulin binding to its receptor induces a conformational change in the beta-subunit C terminus. Here, we demonstrate that receptor autophosphorylation induces an additional conformational change. This process appears to be distinct from the one produced by ligand binding and can be detected in at least three different beta-subunit regions: the juxtamembrane domain, the kinase domain, and the C terminus. Hence, the cytoplasmic part of the receptor beta-subunit appears to undergo an extended conformational change upon autophosphorylation. By contrast, the insulin-induced change does not affect the juxtamembrane domain 962-972 nor the kinase domain 1247-1261 and may be limited to the receptor C terminus. Further, we show that the hormone-dependent conformational change is maintained in a kinase-deficient receptor due to a mutation at lysine 1018. Therefore, during receptor activation, the ligand-induced change could precede ATP binding and receptor autophosphorylation. We propose that insulin binding leads to a transient receptor form that may allow ATP binding and, subsequently, autophosphorylation. The second conformational change could unmask substrate-binding sites and stabilize the receptor in an active conformation. PMID:1331080

  7. GABA transporter-1 deficiency confers schizophrenia-like behavioral phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Yu

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of schizophrenia remains poorly understood. The hyper-dopamine and hypo-NMDA receptor hypotheses have been the most enduring ideas. Recently, emerging evidence implicates alterations of the major inhibitory system, GABAergic neurotransmission in the schizophrenic patients. However, the pathophysiological role of GABAergic system in schizophrenia still remains dubious. In this study, we took advantage of GABA transporter 1 (GAT1 knockout (KO mouse, a unique animal model with elevated ambient GABA, to study the schizophrenia-related behavioral abnormalities. We found that GAT1 KO mice displayed multiple behavioral abnormalities related to schizophrenic positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Moreover, GAT1 deficiency did not change the striatal dopamine levels, but significantly enhanced the tonic GABA currents in prefrontal cortex. The GABA(A receptor antagonist picrotoxin could effectively ameliorate several behavioral defects of GAT1 KO mice. These results identified a novel function of GAT1, and indicated that the elevated ambient GABA contributed critically to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Furthermore, several commonly used antipsychotic drugs were effective in treating the locomotor hyperactivity in GAT1 KO mice, suggesting the utility of GAT1 KO mice as an alternative animal model for studying schizophrenia pathogenesis and developing new antipsychotic drugs.

  8. Combined deficiency of coagulation factors V and VIII: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunlei; Zhang, Bin

    2013-09-01

    Combined deficiency of factor V (FV) and FVIII (F5F8D) is an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by simultaneous decreases of both coagulation factors. This review summarizes recent reports on the clinical presentations, treatments, and molecular mechanism of F5F8D. Genetic studies identified LMAN1 and MCFD2 as causative genes for this disorder, revealing a previously unknown intracellular transport pathway shared by the two important blood coagulation factors. LMAN1 and MCFD2 form a Ca2+-dependent cargo receptor complex that functions in the transport of FV/FVIII from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi. Disrupting the LMAN1-MCFD2 receptor, complex formation is the primary molecular defect of missense mutations leading to F5F8D. The EF-hand domains of MCFD2 are necessary and sufficient for the interactions with both LMAN1 and FV/FVIII. Similarly, the carbohydrate recognition domain of LMAN1 contains distinct and separable binding sites for both MCFD2 and FV/FVIII. Therefore, FV and FVIII likely carry duel sorting signals that are separately recognized by LMAN1 and MCFD2 and necessary for the efficient ER-to-Golgi transport. FV and FVIII likely bind LMAN1 through the high-mannose N-linked glycans under the higher Ca2+ conditions in the ER and dissociate in the lower Ca2+ environment of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment. PMID:23852824

  9. The ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α component induces the secretion of and is required for functional responses to cardiotrophin-like cytokine

    OpenAIRE

    Plun-Favreau, Hélène; Elson, Greg; Chabbert, Marie; Froger, Josy; deLapeyrière, Odile; Lelièvre, Eric; Guillet, Catherine; Hermann, Jacques; Gauchat, Jean-François; Gascan, Hugues; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2001-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is involved in the survival of a number of different neural cell types, including motor neurons. CNTF functional responses are mediated through a tripartite membrane receptor composed of two signalling receptor chains, gp130 and the leukaemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR), associated with a non-signalling CNTF binding receptor α component (CNTFR). CNTFR-deficient mice show profound neuronal deficits at birth, leading to a lethal phenotype. In contrast, i...

  10. Investigation of suspected growth hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Milner, R. D. G.; Burns, E C

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes views of the Health Services Human Growth Hormone Committee on how a child suspected of growth hormone deficiency should be investigated in a district general hospital or in a regional growth centre.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... elevated acidity in the blood and tissues (metabolic acidosis). In addition to the features present in moderate ... Kaabachi N, Hachicha M. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency. Fetal Pediatr Pathol. ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK) Muscular Dystrophy Association National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Resource list from the University of Kansas Medical Center: Metabolic Conditions Genetic Testing Registry (2 links) Deficiency of phosphoglycerate kinase ...

  13. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 237,000 ...

  14. Vitamin D Deficiency (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient education: Vitamin D deficiency (Beyond the Basics) Author Marc K Drezner, ... topic last updated: Jun 09, 2015. INTRODUCTION — Vitamin D plays an important role in many places throughout ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions sepiapterin reductase deficiency sepiapterin reductase ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome dopamine ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body is unable to use the vitamin biotin effectively. This disorder is classified as a multiple ... impaired activity of certain enzymes that depend on biotin. The signs and symptoms of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: familial glucocorticoid deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clark AJ, Metherell LA. ACTH resistance: genes and mechanisms. Endocr Dev. 2013;24:57-66. doi: 10. ... Metherell LA. Familial glucocorticoid deficiency: New genes and mechanisms. Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2013 May 22;371(1- ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: mevalonate kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... net Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) Autoinflammatory Alliance National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Hyper ... Haas D, Hoffmann GF. Mevalonate kinase deficiency and autoinflammatory disorders. N Engl J Med. 2007 Jun 28; ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resulting in a shortage of red blood cells ( anemia ). Chronic hemolytic anemia can lead to unusually pale skin (pallor), yellowing ... ducts (gallstones) may also occur in this disorder. Hemolytic anemia in GPI deficiency can range from mild to ...

  1. Somatomedin C deficiency in Asian sisters.

    OpenAIRE

    McGraw, M E; Price, D A; D. J. Hill

    1986-01-01

    Two sisters of Asian origin showed typical clinical and biochemical features of primary somatomedin C (SM-C) deficiency (Laron dwarfism). Abnormalities of SM-C binding proteins were observed, one sister lacking the high molecular weight (150 Kd) protein.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: deoxyguanosine kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or mtDNA, which is essential for the normal function of these structures. Deoxyguanosine kinase is involved in producing and maintaining the ... DNA (known as mitochondrial DNA depletion) impairs mitochondrial function ... deficiency . Learn more about the gene associated ...

  3. Antibody deficiency in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herriot, R; Miedzybrodzka, Z

    2016-03-01

    The developmental disorder Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is frequently complicated by recurrent respiratory infections. In many cases this is likely to be the result of microaspiration or gastro-oesophageal reflux but, in a proportion, underlying antibody deficiency is a potentially modifiable susceptibility factor for infection. Relatively subtle, specific defects of pneumococcal antibody production have previously been described in the context of RTS. Here, we report a rare association between the syndrome and an overt, major primary antibody deficiency disorder (common variable immune deficiency) which was successfully managed with immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Early recognition and investigation for antibody deficiency associated with RTS allied to effective and optimized treatment are essential to minimize morbidity and mortality and improve quality and duration of life. PMID:26307339

  4. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif;

    1995-01-01

    -deficiency may be at risk for developing hyperthermia. To pursue this, we performed a controlled study on sweating and body temperature regulation during exercise in the heat in 16 GH-treated GH-deficient patients with normalized insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor/binding protein-3 serum...... levels [11 with multiple pituitary deficiency (MPD) and 5 with isolated GH deficiency] and in 10 healthy subjects as controls (CTs). Each subject exercised on a bicycle ergometer for 60 min at a workload corresponding to 45% of their individual maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), in a room maintained at...... 35 C. GH serum concentrations increased significantly after approximately 10 min of exercise in the CTs (P <0.001) but remained low in the patients. Body heat storage was significantly higher in the patients compared with the CTs [89 (SE +/- 10) watts (MPD) vs. 37 (SE +/- 8) watts (CTs), P <0...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic conditions treated or managed? What is genetic testing? How can I find a genetics professional in my area? Other Names for This Condition De Vivo disease encephalopathy due to GLUT1 deficiency G1D glucose ...

  6. Sepiapterin Reductase Deficiency: Mimic of Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at University of California at San Diego, and 22 other US national and international centers studied the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in a cohort of 38 patients with sepiapterin reductase deficiency (SRD).

  7. Colour vision deficiency and physics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, Louise; Featonby, David

    2016-05-01

    1 in 12 males suffer from some form of colour vision deficiency (CVD) which in the present colour dominated world of education presentation can be a severe disadvantage. Although aware of ‘colourblindness’ most teachers make little or no adjustment for these pupils for whom tasks may be more difficult. This article examines colour vision deficiency and looks at ways in which we can help the many students who have this problem.

  8. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Review

    OpenAIRE

    Şaşmaz, İlgen

    2009-01-01

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase G6PD is the first enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway providing reducing power to all cells in the form of reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect being present in more than 400 million people worldwide G6PD deficiency is an X linked hereditary genetic defect caused by mutations in the G6PD gene Clinical presentations include acute hemolytic anemia chronic hemolytic anemia neonatal...

  9. Androgen deficiency and aging in men.

    OpenAIRE

    Swerdloff, R S; Wang, C

    1993-01-01

    Androgen levels decrease with age in men. Androgen deficiency in men older than 65 years leads to asthenia, a decrease in muscle mass, osteoporosis, and a decrease in sexual activity. Androgen deficiency has been reported to cause changes in mood and cognitive function. The combination of these factors results in impaired quality of life in older men. Androgen replacement therapy in hypogonadal men increases bone and muscle mass, enhances muscle and cardiovascular function, and improves sexua...

  10. Cobalamin Deficiency: Clinical Picture and Radiological Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Briani; Chiara Dalla Torre; Valentina Citton; Renzo Manara; Sara Pompanin; Gianni Binotto; Fausto Adami

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes a wide range of hematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological disorders. Hematological presentation of cobalamin deficiency ranges from the incidental increase of mean corpuscular volume and neutrophil hypersegmentation to symptoms due to severe anemia, such as angor, dyspnea on exertion, fatigue or symptoms related to congestive heart failure, such as ankle edema, orthopnea and nocturia. Neuropsychiatric symptoms may precede hematologic signs and...

  11. Congenital leptin deficiency and thyroid function

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-Filho Gilberto; Delibasi Tuncay; Erol Halil K; Wong Ma-Li; Licinio Julio

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Thyroid function is closely related to leptin's secretion by the adipose tissue. In states of leptin-deficiency, the circadian rhythm of TSH is altered, leading to central hypothyroidism in animal models. In humans, central hypothyroidism has also been described in rare cases of congenital leptin deficiency. However, the thyroid phenotype in these cases is heterogeneous, with the occurrence of central hypothyroidism in a minority of cases. Here we describe thyroid function in four l...

  12. Study of neutron-deficient Sn isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of neutron deficient nuclei by heavy ion reactions is investigated. The experimental technique is presented, and the results obtained concerning Sn et In isotopes reported: first excited states of 106Sn, high spin states in 107Sn and 107In; Yrast levels of 106Sn, 107Sn, 108Sn; study of neutron deficient Sn and In isotopes formed by the desintegration of the compound nucleus 112Xe. All these results are discussed

  13. Targeting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraon, Tajinderpal; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common in heart failure (HF) patients, and is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes. Clinical trials of intravenous iron supplementation in iron-deficient HF patients have demonstrated short-term improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. In some trials, the benefits of iron supplementation were independent of the hemoglobin levels. Additional investigations of iron supplementation are needed to characterize the mechanisms contributing to clinical benefit and long-term safety in HF. PMID:26657161

  14. Deficiently Extremal Cohen-Macaulay Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chanchal Kumar; Pavinder Singh

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to study homological properties of deficiently extremal Cohen–Macaulay algebras. Eagon–Reiner showed that the Stanley–Reisner ring of a simplicial complex has a linear resolution if and only if the Alexander dual of the simplicial complex is Cohen–Macaulay. An extension of a special case of Eagon–Reiner theorem is obtained for deficiently extremal Cohen–Macaulay Stanley–Reisner rings.

  15. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Kyphoscoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Singhai, Abhishek; Banzal, Subodh

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among Indian population. Women are especially at risk for severe vitamin D deficiency. The risk is higher for those who are multiparous and postmenopausal. Poor exposure to sunlight, higher latitude, winter season, inadequate diet, older age, obesity and malabsorption are also important risk factors. Symptoms of hypovitaminosis D, including diffuse or migratory pain affecting several sites (especially the shoulder, pelvis, ribcage and lower back) have also been ...

  16. Vitamin D Deficiency: Time for Inaction?

    OpenAIRE

    Plotnikoff, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    In 1998, the British Medical Journal boldly stated in an editorial headline, “Vitamin D Deficiency: Time for Action.” 1 The urgency was clear: vitamin D deficiency was going undiagnosed and untreated in large numbers of people. Patients were at risk and suffering needlessly. A simple, extremely low-cost, low-toxicity intervention was readily available. All that was required was vitamin D advocacy.

  17. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in adults presented with anemia. Subjects and Methods: Eighteen months admission data was reviewed for G6PD deficiency as a cause of anemia. Anemia was defined by world health organization (WHO) criteria as haemoglobin less than 11.3 gm%. G6PD activity was measured by Sigma dye decolorisation method. All patients were screened for complications of hemolysis and its possible cause. Patients with more than 13 years of age were included in the study. Results: Out of 3600 patients admitted, 1440 were found anaemic and 49 as G6PD deficient. So the frequency of G6PD deficiency in anaemic patients was 3.4% and the overall frequency is 1.36%. G6PD deficiency among males and females was three and six percent respectively. Antimalarials and antibiotics containing sulphonamide group were the most common precipitating factors for hemolysis. Anemia and jaundice were the most common presentations while malaria was the most common associated disease. Acute renal failure was the most severe complication occurring in five patients with two deaths. Conclusion: G6PD deficiency is a fairly common cause of anemia with medicine as common precipitating factor for hemolysis. Such complications can be avoided with early recognition of the disease and avoiding indiscriminate use of medicine. (author)

  18. [Approaches to vitamin B12 deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russcher, Henk; Heil, Sandra G; Slobbe, Lennert; Lindemans, Jan

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old female vegetarian was referred to a specialist in internal medicine with persistent iron deficiency. Laboratory analysis revealed microcytic anaemia with low ferritin levels but normal total vitamin B12 levels. The red blood cell distribution width, however, showed a very wide variation in red blood cell sizes, indicating a coexisting vitamin B12 deficiency, which was confirmed by the low concentration of active vitamin B12. Another patient, a 69-year-old woman with a history of previous gastric surgery and renal insufficiency as a complication of diabetes mellitus, was suspected to be deficient in vitamin B12, as she had low total vitamin B12 levels and an accumulation of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine in her blood. Testing the total concentration of vitamin B12 alone has insufficient diagnostic accuracy and no accepted gold standard is available for diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency. With the development of newer tests, such as measuring holotranscobalamin II (concentration of active vitamin B12), atypical and subclinical deficiency states can be recognized. A new approach to diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency is presented, based upon these 2 case descriptions. PMID:22217304

  19. Tlr4 Deficiency Protects against Cardiac Pressure Overload Induced Hyperinflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Ehrentraut

    Full Text Available Transverse aortic constriction provokes a pro-inflammatory reaction and results in cardiac hypertrophy. Endogenous ligands contribute to cardiac hypertrophy via toll-like receptor (TLR-4 binding. A lack of TLR4 signaling diminishes hypertrophy and inflammation. Wild type mice undergoing aortic constriction respond to a lipopolysaccharide second-hit stimulus with hyperinflammation. The objective of this study was to assess whether other second-hit challenges utilizing TLR ligands provoke a comparable inflammatory reaction, and to find out whether this response is absent in TLR4 deficient mice. Assuming that cardiac stress alters the expression of pattern recognition receptors we analyzed the effects of transverse aortic constriction and second-hit virulence factor treatment on TLR expression, as well as cytokine regulation. Wild type and Tlr4-/- mice were subjected to three days of TAC and subsequently confronted with gram-positive TLR2 ligand lipoteichoic acid (LTA, 15 mg/g bodyweight or synthetic CpG-oligodesoxynucleotide 1668 thioate (20 nmol/kg bodyweight, 30 min after D-galactosamin desensitization signaling via TLR9. Hemodynamic measurements and organ preservation were performed 6 h after stimulation. Indeed, the study revealed a robust enhancement of LTA induced pattern recognition receptor and cytokine mRNA expression and a LTA-dependent reduction of hemodynamic pressure in TAC wild type mice. Second-Hit treatment with CpG-ODNs led to similar results. However, second-hit effects were abolished in Tlr4-/- mice. In total, these data indicate for the first time that cardiac stress increases the inflammatory response towards both, gram-negative and gram-positive, TLR ligands as well as bacterial DNA. The decrease of the inflammatory response upon TLR2 and -9 ligand challenge in TAC Tlr4-/- mice demonstrates that a lack of TLR4 signaling does not only prevent left ventricular hypertrophy but also protects the mice from a cardiac stress induced

  20. Tlr4 Deficiency Protects against Cardiac Pressure Overload Induced Hyperinflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Olaf; El Aissati, Sakina; Foltz, Fabian; Goelz, Lina; Goertz, David; Kebir, Sied; Weisheit, Christina; Wolf, Michael; Meyer, Rainer; Baumgarten, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Transverse aortic constriction provokes a pro-inflammatory reaction and results in cardiac hypertrophy. Endogenous ligands contribute to cardiac hypertrophy via toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 binding. A lack of TLR4 signaling diminishes hypertrophy and inflammation. Wild type mice undergoing aortic constriction respond to a lipopolysaccharide second-hit stimulus with hyperinflammation. The objective of this study was to assess whether other second-hit challenges utilizing TLR ligands provoke a comparable inflammatory reaction, and to find out whether this response is absent in TLR4 deficient mice. Assuming that cardiac stress alters the expression of pattern recognition receptors we analyzed the effects of transverse aortic constriction and second-hit virulence factor treatment on TLR expression, as well as cytokine regulation. Wild type and Tlr4-/- mice were subjected to three days of TAC and subsequently confronted with gram-positive TLR2 ligand lipoteichoic acid (LTA, 15mg/g bodyweight) or synthetic CpG-oligodesoxynucleotide 1668 thioate (20 nmol/kg bodyweight, 30 min after D-galactosamin desensitization) signaling via TLR9. Hemodynamic measurements and organ preservation were performed 6 h after stimulation. Indeed, the study revealed a robust enhancement of LTA induced pattern recognition receptor and cytokine mRNA expression and a LTA-dependent reduction of hemodynamic pressure in TAC wild type mice. Second-Hit treatment with CpG-ODNs led to similar results. However, second-hit effects were abolished in Tlr4-/- mice. In total, these data indicate for the first time that cardiac stress increases the inflammatory response towards both, gram-negative and gram-positive, TLR ligands as well as bacterial DNA. The decrease of the inflammatory response upon TLR2 and -9 ligand challenge in TAC Tlr4-/- mice demonstrates that a lack of TLR4 signaling does not only prevent left ventricular hypertrophy but also protects the mice from a cardiac stress induced hyperinflammatory

  1. Cell type-specific deficiency of c-kit gene expression in mutant mice of mi/mi genotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Isozaki, K; Tsujimura, T; Nomura, S; Morii, E; Koshimizu, U.; Nishimune, Y; Kitamura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The mi locus of mice encodes a novel member of the basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper protein family of transcription factors (hereafter called mi factor). In addition to microphthalmus, osteopetrosis, and lack of melanocytes, mice of mi/mi genotype are deficient in mast cells. Since the c-kit receptor tyrosine kinase plays an important role in the development of mast cells, and since the c-kit expression by cultured mast cells from mi/mi mice is deficient in both mRNA and protein levels, ...

  2. Growth Hormone-induced JAK2 Signaling and GH Receptor Down-regulation: Role of GH Receptor Intracellular Domain Tyrosine Residues

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Luqin; Jiang, Jing; Frank, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    GH receptor (GHR) mediates important somatogenic and metabolic effects of GH. A thorough understanding of GH action requires intimate knowledge of GHR activation mechanisms, as well as determinants of GH-induced receptor down-regulation. We previously demonstrated that a GHR mutant in which all intracellular tyrosine residues were changed to phenylalanine was defective in its ability to activate signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)5 and deficient in GH-induced down-regulati...

  3. Haematinic deficiency and macrocytosis in middle-aged and older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese McNamee

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence and determinants of haematinic deficiency (lack of B12 folate or iron and macrocytosis in blood from a national population-based study of middle-aged and older adults. METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving 1,207 adults aged ≥45 years, recruited from a sub-study of the Irish National Survey of Lifestyle Attitudes and Nutrition (SLÁN 2007. Participants completed a health and lifestyle questionnaire and a standard food frequency questionnaire. Non-fasting blood samples were obtained for measurement of full blood count and expert morphological assessment, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor assay (sTfR, B12, folate and coeliac antibodies. Blood samples were also assayed for thyroid function (T4, TSH, liver function, aminotransferase (AST and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT. RESULTS: The overall prevalence (95% C.I. of anaemia (Hb 21 nmol/ml only 2.3% were iron-deficient. 3.0% and 2.7% were found to have low levels of serum folate (99fl was detected in 8.4% of subjects. Strong, significant and independent associations with macrocytosis were observed for lower social status, current smoking status, moderate to heavy alcohol intake, elevated GGT levels, deficiency of folate and vitamin B12, hypothyroidism and coeliac disease. The population attributable fraction (PAF for macrocytosis associated with elevated GGT (25.0% and smoking (24.6% was higher than for excess alcohol intake (6.3%, folate deficiency (10.5% or vitamin B12 (3.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Haematinic deficiency and macrocytosis are common in middle-aged/older adults in Ireland. Macrocytosis is more likely to be attributable to an elevated GGT and smoking than vitamin B12 or folate deficiency.

  4. High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and cancer in Saudi Arabian populations: Can we hypothesize a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Gowher; Hobani, Yahya; Sarwat, Maryam

    2015-08-01

    Inspite of having so much sunshine, Saudi Arabian population is suffering from the deficiency of the 'sunshine vitamin', vitamin D, measured in the serum as 25-OHD level. According to a recent report, about 83.6% of Saudi population is vitamin D deficient. 31.9% have severe, 32% have moderate and 19.7% have mild vitamin D deficiency (VDD). The severity of VDD differs with age, gender and region. Females are more severely vitamin D deficient than males. Various factors contributing towards it deficiency are linked to their housing designs, religious practices, lifestyle choices and dark skin color. The increasing incidences of breast, prostate and colon cancer among this society are also raising an alarm. The presence of vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the enzyme responsible for conversion of the 25(OH)D in its active metabolite 25(OH)2D3 in extra renal tissue shows the involvement of vitamin D in other diseases like cancer, diabetes, multiple sclerosis etc. About 2000 genes related to various types of diseases are found to be regulated by VDRs. These genes possess vitamin D responsive elements (VDREs) in their promoters. Studies on population of other regions also have shown correlation with low serum levels of 25(OH)D and certain diseases So, we hypothesized that vitamin D deficiencies might cause a higher prevalence of these diseases in the Kingdom. PMID:26025591

  5. The epidemiology of global micronutrient deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Regan L; West, Keith P; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are essential to sustain life and for optimal physiological function. Widespread global micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs) exist, with pregnant women and their children under 5 years at the highest risk. Iron, iodine, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiencies are the most widespread MNDs, and all these MNDs are common contributors to poor growth, intellectual impairments, perinatal complications, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is the most common MND worldwide and leads to microcytic anemia, decreased capacity for work, as well as impaired immune and endocrine function. Iodine deficiency disorder is also widespread and results in goiter, mental retardation, or reduced cognitive function. Adequate zinc is necessary for optimal immune function, and deficiency is associated with an increased incidence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections, major causes of death in those <5 years of age. Folic acid taken in early pregnancy can prevent neural tube defects. Folate is essential for DNA synthesis and repair, and deficiency results in macrocytic anemia. Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of blindness worldwide and also impairs immune function and cell differentiation. Single MNDs rarely occur alone; often, multiple MNDs coexist. The long-term consequences of MNDs are not only seen at the individual level but also have deleterious impacts on the economic development and human capital at the country level. Perhaps of greatest concern is the cycle of MNDs that persists over generations and the intergenerational consequences of MNDs that we are only beginning to understand. Prevention of MNDs is critical and traditionally has been accomplished through supplementation, fortification, and food-based approaches including diversification. It is widely accepted that intervention in the first 1,000 days is critical to break the cycle of malnutrition; however, a coordinated, sustainable commitment to scaling up nutrition at the

  6. The androgen receptor and estrogen receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterkamp, H.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptors (ER) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family. These NRs are distinguished from the other transcription factors by their ability to control gene expression upon ligand binding (steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, fatty acids, and other small hydrophobic molecules). Their combined effects are vast, influencing virtually every fundamental biological process, from development and homeostasis, to proliferation and different...

  7. [Diagnostic criteria for vitamin D-deficient rickets and hypocalcemia-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency causes rickets or osteomalacia, which is associated with hypomineralization of bone and chondrocytes, and/or hypocalcemia. Accumulating evidence indicates increase in frequency of vitamin D deficiency due to insufficient intake of vitamin D and calcium and decrease in sunshine. It is necessary for clinician to diagnose vitamin D deficiency accurately and treat patients with vitamin D deficiency adequately. For the purpose, clinical guideline or expert opinion on vitamin D deficiency has been reported. PMID:26813501

  8. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake toge...

  9. Evidence of the importance of the first intracellular loop of prokineticin receptor 2 in receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Ana Paula; Noel, Sekoni D; Xu, Shuyun; Carroll, Rona S; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2012-08-01

    Prokineticin receptors (PROKR) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) that regulate diverse biological processes, including olfactory bulb neurogenesis and GnRH neuronal migration. Mutations in PROKR2 have been described in patients with varying degrees of GnRH deficiency and are located in diverse functional domains of the receptor. Our goal was to determine whether variants in the first intracellular loop (ICL1) of PROKR2 (R80C, R85C, and R85H) identified in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism interfere with receptor function and to elucidate the mechanisms of these effects. Because of structural homology among GPCR, clarification of the role of ICL1 in PROKR2 activity may contribute to a better understanding of this domain across other GPCR. The effects of the ICL1 PROKR2 mutations on activation of signal transduction pathways, ligand binding, and receptor expression were evaluated. Our results indicated that the R85C and R85H PROKR2 mutations interfere only modestly with receptor function, whereas the R80C PROKR2 mutation leads to a marked reduction in receptor activity. Cotransfection of wild-type (WT) and R80C PROKR2 showed that the R80C mutant could exert a dominant negative effect on WT PROKR2 in vitro by interfering with WT receptor expression. In summary, we have shown the importance of Arg80 in ICL1 for PROKR2 expression and demonstrate that R80C PROKR2 exerts a dominant negative effect on WT PROKR2. PMID:22745195

  10. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya M. Gupta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID, anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES. Prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA among children 1–5 years was 7.1% (5.5, 8.7, 3.2% (2.0, 4.3, and 1.1% (0.6, 1.7, respectively. The prevalence of both ID and anemia were higher among children 1–2 years (p < 0.05. In addition, 50% of anemic children 1–2 years were iron deficient. This analysis provides an update on the prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA for a representative sample of US children. Our results suggest little change in these indicators over the past decade. Monitoring of ID and anemia is critical and prevention of ID in early childhood should remain a public health priority.

  11. The effect of mGlu8 deficiency in animal models of psychiatric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendt, M; Bürki, H; Imobersteg, S; van der Putten, H; McAllister, K; Leslie, J C; Shaw, D; Hölscher, C

    2010-02-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 8 (mGlu(8)) is presynaptically located and regulates the release of the transmitter. Dysfunctions of this mechanism are involved in the pathophysiology of different psychiatric disorders. mGlu(8) deficient mice have been previously investigated in a range of studies, but the results are contradictory and there are still many open questions. Therefore, we tested mGlu(8)-deficient animals in different behavioral tasks that are commonly used in neuropsychiatric research. Our results show a robust contextual fear deficit in mGlu(8)-deficient mice. Furthermore, novel object recognition, chlordiazepoxide-facilitated extinction of operant conditioning and the acoustic startle response were attenuated by mGlu(8) deficiency. We found no changes in sensory processing, locomotor activity, prepulse inhibition, phencyclidine-induced changes in locomotion or prepulse inhibition, operant conditioning, conditioned fear to a discrete cue or in animal models of innate fear and post-traumatic stress disorder. We conclude that mGlu(8) might be a potential target for disorders with pathophysiological changes in brain areas where mGlu(8) modulates glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) transmission. Our data especially point to anxiety disorders involving exaggerated contextual fear, such as generalized anxiety disorders, and to conditions with disturbed declarative memory. PMID:19740090

  12. Vitamin D deficiency among northern Native Peoples: a real or apparent problem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Frost

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency seems to be common among northern Native peoples, notably Inuit and Amerindians. It has usually been attributed to: (1 higher latitudes that prevent vitamin D synthesis most of the year; (2 darker skin that blocks solar UVB; and (3 fewer dietary sources of vitamin D. Although vitamin D levels are clearly lower among northern Natives, it is less clear that these lower levels indicate a deficiency. The above factors predate European contact, yet pre-Columbian skeletons show few signs of rickets—the most visible sign of vitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, because northern Natives have long inhabited high latitudes, natural selection should have progressively reduced their vitamin D requirements. There is in fact evidence that the Inuit have compensated for decreased production of vitamin D through increased conversion to its most active form and through receptors that bind more effectively. Thus, when diagnosing vitamin D deficiency in these populations, we should not use norms that were originally developed for European-descended populations who produce this vitamin more easily and have adapted accordingly.

  13. The Effect of Stromal Integrin β3-Deficiency on Two Different Tumors in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Reigstad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing focus on the tumor microenvironment in carcinogenesis. Integrins are important receptors and adhesion molecules in this environment and have been shown to be involved in cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and migration. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of stromal integrin β3-deficiency on tumor growth, angiogenesis, interstitial fluid pressure (PIF, fibrosis and metastasis in a murine breast cancer (4T1 and a prostate tumor (RM11 model. We showed that stromal integrin β3-deficiency led to an elevation in PIF that correlated to a shift towards thicker collagen fibrils in the 4T1 mammary tumor. In the RM11 prostate carcinoma model there was no effect of integrin β3-deficiency on PIF and collagen fibril thickness. These findings support the notion that changes in the collagen scaffold influence PIF, and also indicate that there must be important crosstalk between the stroma and tumor cells, in a tumor cell line specific manner. Furthermore, stromal integrin β3-deficiency had no effect on tumor growth or angiogenesis in both tumor models and no effect on lung metastasis in the 4T1 mammary tumor model. In conclusion, the stromal β3 integrin influence PIF, possibly via its effect on the structure of the collagen network, in a tumor cell line dependent manner.

  14. Chop Deficiency Protects Mice Against Bleomycin-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis by Attenuating M2 Macrophage Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yingying; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Zhijun; He, Long; Zhu, Jianghui; Zhang, Meng; He, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Zhenshun; Ao, Qilin; Cao, Yong; Yang, Ping; Su, Yunchao; Zhao, Jianping; Zhang, Shu; Yu, Qilin; Ning, Qin; Xiang, Xudong; Xiong, Weining; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Yongjian

    2016-05-01

    C/EBP homologous protein (Chop) has been shown to have altered expression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), but its exact role in IPF pathoaetiology has not been fully addressed. Studies conducted in patients with IPF and Chop(-/-) mice have dissected the role of Chop and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pulmonary fibrosis pathogenesis. The effect of Chop deficiency on macrophage polarization and related signalling pathways were investigated to identify the underlying mechanisms. Patients with IPF and mice with bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis were affected by the altered Chop expression and ER stress. In particular, Chop deficiency protected mice against BLM-induced lung injury and fibrosis. Loss of Chop significantly attenuated transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production and reduced M2 macrophage infiltration in the lung following BLM induction. Mechanistic studies showed that Chop deficiency repressed the M2 program in macrophages, which then attenuated TGF-β secretion. Specifically, loss of Chop promoted the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and suppressors of cytokine signaling 3, and through which Chop deficiency repressed signal transducer and activator of transcription 6/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling, the essential pathway for the M2 program in macrophages. Together, our data support the idea that Chop and ER stress are implicated in IPF pathoaetiology, involving at least the induction and differentiation of M2 macrophages. PMID:26883801

  15. Insulin deficiency exacerbates cerebral amyloidosis and behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer transgenic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Wei-Ping

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although increasing evidence has indicated that brain insulin dysfunction is a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD, the underlying mechanisms by which insulin deficiency may impact the development of AD are still obscure. Using a streptozotocin (STZ-induced insulin deficient diabetic AD transgenic mouse model, we evaluated the effect of insulin deficiency on AD-like behavior and neuropathology. Results Our data showed that administration of STZ increased the level of blood glucose and reduced the level of serum insulin, and further decreased the phosphorylation levels of insulin receptors, and increased the activities of glycogen synthase kinase-3α/β and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in the APP/PS1 mouse brain. We further showed that STZ treatment promoted the processing of amyloid-β (Aβ precursor protein resulting in increased Aβ generation, neuritic plaque formation, and spatial memory deficits in transgenic mice. Conclusions Our present data indicate that there is a close link between insulin deficient diabetes and cerebral amyloidosis in the pathogenesis of AD.

  16. Vitamin D Deficiency Among Professional Basketball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Matthew P.; Lombardo, Stephen J.; Kharrazi, F. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D plays an important role in several systems of the human body. Various studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to stress and insufficiency fractures, muscle recovery and function, and athletic performance. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the elite athletic population has not been extensively studied, and very few reports exist among professional athletes. Hypothesis: There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency among players attending the National Basketball Association (NBA) Combine. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This is a retrospective review of data previously collected as part of the routine medical evaluation of players in the NBA Combines from 2009 through 2013. Player parameters evaluated were height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and vitamin D level. Statistical analysis using t tests and analysis of variance was used to detect any correlation between the player parameters and vitamin D level. Vitamin D levels were categorized as deficient (32 ng/mL). Results: After institutional review board approval was submitted to the NBA, the NBA released deidentified data on 279 players who participated in the combines from 2009 through 2013. There were 90 players (32.3%) who were deficient, 131 players (47.0%) who were insufficient, and 58 players (20.8%) who were sufficient. A total of 221 players (79.3%) were either vitamin D deficient or insufficient. Among all players included, the average vitamin D level was 25.6 ± 10.2 ng/mL. Among the players who were deficient, insufficient, and sufficient, the average vitamin D levels were 16.1 ± 2.1 ng/mL, 25.0 ± 3.4 ng/mL, and 41.6 ± 8.6 ng/mL, respectively. Player height and weight were significantly increased in vitamin D–sufficient players compared with players who were not sufficient (P = .0008 and .009, respectively). Player age and BMI did not significantly differ depending on vitamin D status (P = .15 and .77

  17. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in blood does not decrease in proportion of the Zn deficiency. Adverse effects of Zn deficiency vary with age: low weight gain, diarrhoea, aneroxia and neurobehavioral disturbances are observed in infants, while skin changes and dwarfism are frequent in toddlers and adolescents. Common manifestations of Zn deficiency among elderly include hypogeusia, chronic non-healing ulcers and recurrent infections.Ameliorative measures of Zn deficiency in humans can be classified in two groups, namely, nutraceutical and biofortification of food grains. Nutraceutical interventions include pharmaceutical supplements, dietary supplements and dietary diversification, while biofortification of food grains can be achieved by genetic modification (GM of crops or by agronomic techniques that include soil or/and foliar fertilization of crops.The major disadvantage of nutraceutical approaches is that the major beneficiaries are urban people and the poor rural masses that need adequate Zn nutrition most are left out. Genetic biofortification of food grains requires large amounts of funds and a fairly long-period of time. Further, a large number of countries have not yet accepted genetically modified (GM foods. On the other hand agronomic biofortification of food grains yields immediate effects and rural and urban people are equally benefitted. Our studies have shown that Zn concentration in cereals (rice, wheat etc and pulses can be considerably increased by soil or/and foliar

  18. Clinical implications of vitamin D deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Matyjaszek-Matuszek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a common medical problem worldwide and its prevalence rises along with latitude, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, limited sunlight exposure and aging. A great body of evidence has shown that patients with vitamin D deficiency have increased cardiovascular risks and total mortality. Conversely, the presence of comorbidities progressive with age such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and hypertension places the patients at an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. The multidirectional effect of vitamin D deficiency is present in different phases of the aging process. Based on the literature review, the risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency most often found in post-menopausal women include limited sun exposure and time spent outdoors, inadequate dietary vitamin D intake, winter season and increased age. Vitamin D supplementation in this group might offer prevention of falls and fractures and may be beneficial for cardiovascular health, what may be especially important in osteoporotic and elderly populations. Prevention and treatment processes involve education regarding sunlight exposure and pharmacological cholecalciferol supplementation according to the recommendations for Central Europe. This manuscript reviews the role of vitamin D and its deficiency and considers their clinical implications, with particular regard to peri- and postmenopausal women.

  19. Vascular Dysfunction following Polymicrobial Sepsis: Role of Pattern Recognition Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrentraut, Stefan Felix; Dörr, Anne; EHRENTRAUT Heidi; Lohner, Ralph; Lee, Sun-Hee; Hoeft, Andreas; Baumgarten, Georg; Knuefermann, Pascal; Boehm, Olaf; Meyer, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Aims Aim was to elucidate the specific role of pattern recognition receptors in vascular dysfunction during polymicrobial sepsis (colon ascendens stent peritonitis, CASP). Methods and Results Vascular contractility of C57BL/6 (wildtype) mice and mice deficient for Toll-like receptor 2/4/9 (TLR2-D, TLR4-D, TLR9-D) or CD14 (CD14-D) was measured 18 h following CASP. mRNA expression of pro- (Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα), Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) and of ...

  20. Feedback Enhancement of Antibody Responses via Complement and Fc Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström, Jörgen

    2001-01-01

    IgG, IgM and IgE in complex with antigen have the capacity to regulate specific immune responses. In this investigation, the role of Fc receptors for IgG (FcγRI, FcγRII and FcγRIII) and complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) for antibody-mediated enhancement of antibody responses are investigated. IgM is known to efficiently activate complement and thereby enhance specific antibody responses but it is not known if this involves binding to CR1/2. Using CR1/2 deficient mice, immunized with sheep ...