WorldWideScience

Sample records for ash-bed material interactions

  1. Biomass ash-bed material interactions leading to agglomeration in FBC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, H.J.M.; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Kiel, J.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    In (bubbling) fluidized-bed combustion and gasification of biomass, several potential problems are associated with the inorganic components of the fuel. A major problem area is defluidization due to bed agglomeration. The most common found process leading to defluidization in commercial-scale ins...

  2. Corroded hydrothermal quartz in Ordovician altered volcanic ash beds of the Baltoscandian Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiipli, Tarmo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Partly dissolved prismatic quartz crystals have been found in an Upper Ordovician volcanic ash bed of the Vasagård section on Bornholm, Denmark. Similar crystals occur also in a volcanic ash in the Adze Formation of the Aizpute core, Latvia. Although biostratigraphic data are insufficient for the correlation of these findings, the abundant occurrence of this rare form of quartz at Vasagård indicates that it can be reliably used as a correlation criterion in future studies. Partly dissolved prismatic quartz crystals were most likely formed during hydrothermal processes in the volcanic source area.

  3. Corroded hydrothermal quartz in Ordovician altered volcanic ash beds of the Baltoscandian Region

    OpenAIRE

    Kiipli, Tarmo; Kallaste, Toivo; Kleesment, Anne; Nielsen, Arne T

    2009-01-01

    Partly dissolved prismatic quartz crystals have been found in an Upper Ordovician volcanic ash bed of the Vasagård section on Bornholm, Denmark. Similar crystals occur also in a volcanic ash in the Adze Formation of the Aizpute core, Latvia. Although biostratigraphic data are insufficient for the correlation of these findings, the abundant occurrence of this rare form of quartz at Vasagård indicates that it can be reliably used as a correlation criterion in future studies. Partly dissolved pr...

  4. Possible secondary apatite fission track age standard from altered volcanic ash beds in the middle Jurassic Carmel Formation, Southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowallis, B.J.; Christiansen, E.H.; Everett, B.H.; Crowley, K.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Miller, D.S.; Deino, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary age standards are valuable in intra- and interlaboratory calibration. At present very few such standards are available for fission track dating that is older than Tertiary. Several altered volcanic ash beds occur in the Middle Jurassic Carmel Formation in southwestern Utah. The formation was deposited in a shallow marine/sabhka environment. Near Gunlock, Utah, eight ash beds have been identified. Sanidines from one of the ash beds (GUN-F) give a single-crystal laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar age of 166.3??0.8 Ma (2??). Apatite and zircon fission track ages range from 152-185 Ma with typically 15-20 Ma errors (2??). Track densities in zircons are high and most grains are not countable. Apatites are fairly common in most of the ash beds and have reasonable track densities ranging between 1.2-1.5 ?? 106 tracks/cm2. Track length distributions in apatites are unimodal, have standard deviations <1??m, and mean track lengths of about 14-14.5 ??m. High Cl apatites (F:Cl:OH ratio of 39:33:28) are particularly abundant and large in ash GUN-F, and are fairly easy to concentrate, but the concentrates contain some siderite, most of which can be removed by sieving. GUN-F shows evidence of some reworking and detriaal contamination based on older single grain 40Ar/39Ar analyses and some rounding of grains, but the apatite population appears to be largely uncontaminated. At present BJK has approximately 12 of apatite separate from GUN-F. ?? 1993.

  5. Beam-Material Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N V

    2016-01-01

    Th is paper is motivated by the growing importance of better understanding of the phenomena and consequences of high- intensity energetic particle beam interactions with accelerator, generic target , and detector components. It reviews the principal physical processes of fast-particle interactions with matter, effects in materials under irradiation, materials response, related to component lifetime and performance, simulation techniques, and methods of mitigating the impact of radiation on the components and envir onment in challenging current and future application

  6. Interactions of tritium and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamawaki, Michio; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Tanaka, Satoru; Ono, Futaba (Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.); Yamamoto, Takuya

    1993-11-01

    In D-T burning fusion reactors, problems related to tritium-material interactions are vitally important. From this point of view, plasma-material interactions, blanket breeder material-tritium interactions, safety aspects of tritium-material interactions and tritium storage materials are reviewed with emphasis on the works going on in the authors' laboratories. (author) 83 refs.

  7. 14C ages of the Ata pyroclastic flow and the Kaimon volcanic ash bed in the Kagoshima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In southern Kyushu, volcanic ejecta of different ages and sources are widely distributed. Their age determination is important in connection with the history of recent volcanic activities. Of the volcanic ejecta, for the Irito-Tsumaya pyroclastic flow and Osumi fallout pumice layer originating from Aira Caldera and distributing most widely, the age of about 22,000 y.B.P. has been established. For the underlying Ata pyroclastic flow, however, the measured age is yet few, therefore it is not established. In the Nansatsu area (southern Kyushu), where volcanic ejecta originating from Kaimon-take are distributed in uppermost layer, the determined age in the lowermost layer indicating the initiation of Kaimon-take activity is few. From the Ata pyroclastic flow, two samples of carbonized wood were taken, and from the Kaimon volcanic ash bed of initial eruption, one sample of carbonized wood was taken. The 14C ages determined are 32,900 +- 3,900 y.B.P. and 28,600 y.B.P. for the former two and 4,040 +- 120 y.B.P. for the latter one. (J.P.N.)

  8. Materials interaction test summary description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Materials Interaction Test is designed to provide early scoping data on host rock performance and interaction between nuclear waste canister materials and host repository media under conditions representative of expected disposal environments. Capsules containing these materials were put in a spent fuel assembly and subsequently placed in a disposal test to study behavior in a low-level radiation environment at temperatures expected to range between 300 and 4000F. Thermal control capsules are being exposed in laboratory furnaces to allow a determination and separation of thermal and radiation effects. Post-test specimen examinations are planned to determine material property changes and interaction effects and provide data for understanding the effectiveness of host rock, canister, and cladding materials in long-term waste isolation

  9. Astronomy education through interactive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Antunes de Macêdo, Josué

    2015-08-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Sciences, using the mixed methodology, combined with the three pedagogical moments. Among other aspects, the viability of the use of resources was noticed, involving digital technologies and interactive materials on teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options for future teachers and meet their training needs.

  10. Fission-track age of a bentonitized ash bed and mammalian fauna from Nagrota formation (Upper Siwalik) of Jammu District, J and K, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission-track age of a bentonitized volcanic ash bed occurring in the middle part of Nagrota Formation. Upper Siwalik, north of Uttarbaini, Jammu district, Jammu and Kashmir, has been determined to be 1.6 ± 0.2 m.y. B.P. The radiometric age obtained for the sample roughly coincides with the Olduvai Event (1.6-1.8 m.y.). However, the lithological and paleoclimatic changes in the Upper Siwalik success ion are indicated at the contact between Parmandal Sandstone and Nagrota Formation, i.e. about 1100 m below the 1.6 ± 0.2 m.y. datum line in this part. Vertebrat e fauna was studied from 16 sites beneath and 12 above the volcanic ash bed to interpret the biological and palaeoenvironmental aspects of the Nagrota Formation. The assemblage represented in the collection is similar to that of the Pinjor Biozone (Villafranchian) and is assigned a probable age ranging from about 2.9 m.y. to 1.0 m.y. B.P. The stratigraphic interval from the base of Nagrota Formation (approx. 2.9 m.y. B.P.) to the 1.6 ± 0.2 m.y. datum is characterise d by predominance of advanced elephants along with other mammalian groups suggesting the climate to be probably warm and mildly arid. Above this level, until about 1 m.y. B.P., the elephants are rare and dry landforms predominate indicating incoming of more arid conditions. The faunal changes are attributable to the environmental changes which were gradually brought in by the Himalayan tectonism . (author). 8 refs., 6 figs

  11. Semiconductor packaging materials interaction and reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    In semiconductor manufacturing, understanding how various materials behave and interact is critical to making a reliable and robust semiconductor package. Semiconductor Packaging: Materials Interaction and Reliability provides a fundamental understanding of the underlying physical properties of the materials used in a semiconductor package. The book focuses on an important step in semiconductor manufacturing--package assembly and testing. It covers the basics of material properties and explains how to determine which behaviors are important to package performance. The authors also discuss how

  12. Hydrogen interaction with fusion-relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an outline of the work carried out at JRC Ispra in the Tritium-materials Interaction Laboratory, on the interaction of gaseous hydrogen with several materials of interest in the field of fusion technology. Experimental work is reported and a concise review of relevant theoretical and numerical supporting activity is given as well. A period of about seven years is covered since 1982. Current work and possible future extensions are also briefly mentioned. 11 figs., 18 refs

  13. Interaction of pesticides with natural organic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, R. L.; Burcar, P.J.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1969-01-01

    Two examples of the interaction of pesticides with natural organic materials have been investigated. Sodium humate solubilizes DDT in water and humic acid strongly sorbs 2,4,5-T. These two types of interactions are indicative of the types that one would expect when any organic pesticide is applied to a natural soil-water system.

  14. Slime mould interactions with chemicals and materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lacy Costello, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    At first sight a seemingly jumbled selection of images, what links all these together? It is an assessment of how P. polycephalum interacts with a synthetic human-made environment and how this can give indications of its natural environmental interactions but more importantly how these can be harnessed to give tangible outcomes in functional material synthesis and biologically inspired computing...

  15. Photoinduced processes, radiation interaction with material and damages - material hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srećković Milesa Ž.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photo and nuclear radiation induced processes are considered through the interaction of radiation with semiconducting, metallic and other materials, including the scintillator materials. The improvement of component efficiency by the use of quantum generators, trimming and hybrid processes with nuclear radiation has been analyzed. The studied processes can be positive or negative depending on application. Besides the experimental approach to the processes and chosen interactions, the analytical description of our experiments, as well as ones from other references, has been performed. The contemporary couplings between the nuclear physics, laser techniques and respective dosimetric aspects have been considered. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. II45003 i br. TP 35046

  16. Understanding Radionuclide Interactions with Layered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Layered materials play an important role in nuclear waste management and environmental cleanup. Better understanding of radionuclide interactions with those materials is critical for engineering high-performance materials for various applications. This presentation will provide an overview on radionuclide interactions with two general categories of layered materials - cationic clays and anionic clays - from a perspective of nanopore confinement. Nanopores are widely present in layered materials, either as the interlayers or as inter-particle space. Nanopore confinement can significantly modify chemical reactions in those materials. This effect may cause the preferential enrichment of radionuclides in nanopores and therefore directly impact the mobility of the radionuclides. This effect also implies that conventional sorption measurements using disaggregated samples may not represent chemical conditions in actual systems. The control of material structures on ion exchange, surface complexation, and diffusion in layered materials will be systematically examined, and the related modeling approaches will be discussed. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories, which is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the DOE under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  17. Interactively human: Sharing time, constructing materiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepstorff, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Predictive processing models of cognition are promising an elegant way to unite action, perception, and learning. However, in the current formulations, they are species-unspecific and have very little particularly human about them. I propose to examine how, in this framework, humans can be able to massively interact and to build shared worlds that are both material and symbolic. PMID:23663865

  18. Light-material interactions in laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discusses how light interactions with materials in laser material processing operations occur by a variety of mechanisms depending on the material being processed, the wavelength of the laser light, the gaseous environment, and the physical state of the material surface. The high reflectivity of metals limits the fraction of the beam power absorbed by the solid metal surface. For metals in the solid state, reflectivity increases as the wavelength of the laser light and the electrical conductivity of the metal increase. The reflectivity of metals is reduced upon heating to the melting point, and further reduced upon melting. At high power densities the liquid metal surface is heated so quickly that very rapid vaporization occurs. The recoil force produced by the evaporation causes a depression in the liquid/vapor interface. The keyhole resulting from this depression allows for multiple reflections and thus increases beam absorption in the liquid

  19. Laser-material interactions; fundamentals and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloembergen, N.

    1993-10-01

    The interaction of light with matter leads to electronic excitation by the absorption of photons. A large fraction of the high excitation energy of the electrons is transformed into heat on a time scale of about one picosecond in many circumstances. With lasers, power flux densities or intensities exceeding a terawatt/cm2 are readily achieved and any material may be converted into a high temperature plasma. The material response has been investigated over a wide range of intensities and irradiation times. Applications include heat treatment and ablation of surfaces, cutting, drilling, and welding of a wide variety of materials, laser recording and printing, and laser surgery. Phase transitions induced by ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses enlarge our understanding of materials under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature.

  20. Granular materials interacting with thin flexible rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Alfredo Gay; Campello, Eduardo M. B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we develop a computational model for the simulation of problems wherein granular materials interact with thin flexible rods. We treat granular materials as a collection of spherical particles following a discrete element method (DEM) approach, while flexible rods are described by a large deformation finite element (FEM) rod formulation. Grain-to-grain, grain-to-rod, and rod-to-rod contacts are fully permitted and resolved. A simple and efficient strategy is proposed for coupling the motion of the two types (discrete and continuum) of materials within an iterative time-stepping solution scheme. Implementation details are shown and discussed. Validity and applicability of the model are assessed by means of a few numerical examples. We believe that robust, efficiently coupled DEM-FEM schemes can be a useful tool to the simulation of problems wherein granular materials interact with thin flexible rods, such as (but not limited to) bombardment of grains on beam structures, flow of granular materials over surfaces covered by threads of hair in many biological processes, flow of grains through filters and strainers in various industrial segregation processes, and many others.

  1. Light-matter interaction in nanostructured materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst

    the effect is observable in a given material. We focus on the case of inverse opal photonic crystals and locate the position in the crystal where the effect is most pronounced. Furthermore, we quantify the influence of absorptive loss and give example calculations with experimental parameters for Pb......Light-matter interaction in nanostructured materials is studied theoretically with emphasis on spontaneous emission dynamics of quantum dots in photonic crystals. The main topics of the work are electromagnetic scattering calculations, decay dynamics of single quantum dots and multiple quantum dot...... dynamics. The electromagnetic Green's tensor enters naturally in calculations of light-matter interaction in multiple scattering media such as photonic crystals. We present a novel solution method to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for use in electric field scattering calculations and Green's tensor...

  2. Evaluating the provenance of Permian-Triassic and Palaeocene-Eocene ash beds by high precision U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic analyses of zircons: linking local sedimentary records to global events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eivind Augland, Lars; Jones, Morgan; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik; Tegner, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a powerful tool in geochronology and isotope geochemistry, as their affinity for U and Hf in the crystal structure and the low initial Pb and Lu allow for precise and accurate dating by U-Pb ID-TIMS and precise and accurate determination of initial Hf isotopic composition by solution MC-ICP-MS analysis. The U-Pb analyses provide accurate chronostratigraphic controls on the sedimentary successions and absolute age frames for the biotic evolution across geological boundaries. Moreover, the analyses of Lu-Hf by solution MC-ICP-MS after Hf-purification column chemistry provide a powerful and robust fingerprinting tool to test the provenance of individual ash beds. Here we focus on ash beds from Permian-Triassic and Palaeocene successions in Svalbard and from the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in Fur, Denmark. Used in combination with whole rock geochemistry from the ash layers and the available geochemical and isotopic data from potential source volcanoes, these data are used to evaluate the provenance of the Permian-Triassic and Palaeocene ashes preserved in Svalbard and PETM ashes in Denmark. If explosive eruptions from volcanic centres such as the Siberian Traps and the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) can be traced to distal basins as ash layers, they provide robust tests of hypotheses of global synchronicity of environmental changes and biotic crises. In addition, the potential correlation of ash layers with source volcanoes will aid in constraining the extent of explosive volcanism in the respective volcanic centres. The new integrated data sets will also contribute to establish new reference sections for the study of these boundary events when combined with stable isotope data and biostratigraphy.

  3. Beryllium containing plasma interactions with ITER materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beryllium-seeded deuterium plasma is used in PISCES-B to investigate mixed-material erosion and redeposition properties of ITER relevant divertor materials. The beryllium containing plasma simulates the erosion of first wall material into the ITER sol plasma and its subsequent flow toward the carbon divertor plates. The experiments are designed to quantify the behavior of plasma created mixed Be/C and Be/W surfaces. Developing an understanding of the mixed material surface behavior is crucial to accurately predicting the tritium accumulation rate within the ITER vacuum vessel. The temporal evolution of the plasma interactions with the various mixed surfaces are examined to better understand the fundamental mechanisms in play at the surface and to allow scaling of these results to the conditions expected in the ITER divertor. A new periodic heat pulse deposition system is also installed on PISCES-B to simulate the transient temperature excursions of surfaces expected to occur in the ITER divertor during ELMs and other off-normal events. These periodically applied heat pulses allow us to study the effects of transient power loading on the formation, stability and tritium content of mixed-material surfaces that are created during the experiments. (author)

  4. Sorptive interactions between VOCs and indoor materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, D; Corsi, R L; Rynes, M

    2001-12-01

    This study was carried out using various materials (carpet, gypsum board, upholstery, vinyl and wood flooring, acoustic tiles, and fruit) that were exposed to eight gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (isopropanol, MTBE, cyclohexane, toluene, ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene) in electro-polished stainless-steel chambers. Dynamic responses in VOC concentrations were used to determine linear adsorption and desorption rate coefficients and equilibrium partition coefficients. A linear adsorption/desorption model was used to effectively describe the interactions between VOCs and indoor surface materials for short-term source events (10 h). Relationships between sorption parameters and chemical vapor pressure and the octanol-air partition coefficient were observed. Carpet was identified as the most significant sorptive sink for non-polar VOCs. Virgin gypsum board was observed to be a significant sink for highly polar VOCs. Sorptive interactions between non-polar VOCs and indoor materials were not affected by variations in relative humidity. However, increases in relative humidity were observed to increase the degree of sorption of isopropanol to carpet. PMID:11761600

  5. Interaction of nanodiamonds materials with influenza viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The perspectives of the application of modern materials contained nanodiamonds (ND) are considered in this study. The interaction between detonation paniculate ND, soot and influenza A and B viruses, fragments of cDNA were analyzed at the normal conditions. It was shown that these sorbents can interact with the following viruses: reference epidemic strains of influenza A(H1N1), A(H1N1)v, A(H3N2) and B viruses circulated in the word in 2000-2010. The allantoises, concentrated viruses, cDNA can be absorbed by ND sorbents and getting removed from water solutions within 20 min. ND sorbents can be used for the preparation of antivirus filters for water solution and for future diagnostic systems in virology.

  6. Nonlinear Electromagnetic Interactions in Energetic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, M A; Moore, D S

    2016-01-01

    We study the scattering of electromagnetic waves in anisotropic energetic materials. Nonlinear light-matter interactions in molecular crystals result in frequency-conversion and polarization changes. Applied electromagnetic fields of moderate intensity can induce these nonlinear effects without triggering chemical decomposition, offering a mechanism for non-ionizing identification of explosives. We use molecular dynamics simulations to compute such two-dimensional Raman spectra in the terahertz range for planar slabs made of PETN and ammonium nitrate. We discuss third-harmonic generation and polarization-conversion processes in such materials. These observed far-field spectral features of the reflected or transmitted light may serve as an alternative tool for stand-off explosive detection.

  7. Interaction of DOE SNF and Packaging Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitivity analysis was conducted to identify and evaluate potential destructive interactions between the materials in US Department of Energy (USDOE) spent nuclear fuels (SNFs) and their storage/disposal canisters. The technical assessment was based on the thermodynamic properties as well as the chemical and physical characteristics of the materials expected inside the canisters. No chemical reactions were disclosed that could feasibly corrode stainless steel canisters to the point of failure. However, the possibility of embrittlement (loss of ductility) of the stainless steel through contact with liquid metal fission products or hydrogen inside the canisters cannot be dismissed. Higher-than-currently-permitted internal gas pressures must also be considered. These results, based on the assessment of two representative 90-year-cooled fuels that are stored at 200C in stainless steel canisters with internal blankets of helium, may be applied to most of the fuels in the USDOE's SNF inventory

  8. Runaway-electron-materials interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the operation of magnetic fusion devices it has been frequently observed that runaway electrons can cause severe damage to plasma facing components. The energy of the runaway electrons could possibly reach several 100 MeV in a next generation device with an energy content in the plasma in the order of 100 MJ. In this study effects of high energy electron - materials interaction were determined by laboratory experiments using particle beam facilities, i.e. the Electron Linear Accelerator of the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research of Osaka University and the 10 MW Neutral Beam Injection Test Stand of the National Institute for Fusion Science. The experiments and further analyses lead to a first assessment of the damage thresholds of plasma facing materials and components under runaway electron impact. It was found that metals (stainless steel, molybdenum, tungsten) showed grain growth, crack formation and/or melting already below the threshold for crack initiation on graphite (14-33 MJ/m2). Strong erosion of carbon materials would occur above 100 MJ/m2. Damage to metal coolant channels can occur already below an energy deposition of 100 MJ/m2. The energy deposited in the metal coolant channels depends on the thickness of the plasma facing carbon material D, with the shielding efficiency S of carbon approximately as S∼D1.15. (author) 304 refs. 12 tabs. 59 figs

  9. Interactive Materials In The Teaching Of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macêdo, J. A.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2014-10-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Science. The following steps were to be taken: i) analysis of the pedagogical projects (PPC) of the licenciates at the IFNMG, research locus of its Campus Januária; ii) analysis of students' preconceptions about astronomy and digital technologies, identified by the application of an initial questionnaire; iii) preparation of the course taking into account the students' previous knowledge; iv) application of the education proposal developed under part-time presence modality, using various interactive tools; v) application and analysis of the final questionnaire. The test was conducted with the qualitative and quantitative methodology, combined with a content analysis. The results indicated that in the IFNMG only the licenciate-course in physics includes astronomy content diluted in various subjects of the curriculum; the rates of students prior knowledge in relation to astronomy was low; an evidence of meaningful learning of the concepts related to astronomy, and of viability of resource use involving digital technologies in the Teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options of future teachers and meet their training needs.

  10. Intramolecular Interactions in Novel Macrocyclic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Theodore

    2009-03-01

    In this presentation I will report a strongly interacting new dendrimer system with an extended spectroscopic unit (coherent domain) beyond the trimer configuration. Strong cooperative enhancement of two-photon absorption cross-section was observed when going from the trimer arrangement to the next generation. Combination of a variety of femtosecond spectroscopy methods such as femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence upconversion, transient absorption, transient grating, three pulse photon echo peak shift experiments complemented with those of steady state spectroscopy allowed us to compare the properties of absorption states with those of fluorescence states, to estimate the reorganization energies, and the extent of inhomogeneous broadening. Our measurements indicated that spectroscopic unit (domain) is different for the trimer system and for the dendrimers of higher generation numbers. This coherent domain extends over the trimer geometry and its size is comparable with the size of the dendrimer G1 comprising nine linear segments. We have also investigated the novel applications of a two-dimensional carbon network structure's building blocks. The material shows very interesting two-photon absorption properties as well as strongly coupled optical excitations. They have also been suggested as good building blocks for molecular electronics applications.

  11. Plasma-material interactions in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a summary of plasma-material interactions which influence the operation of TFTR with high current (≤ 2.2 MA) ohmically heated, and high-power (≅ 10 MW) neutral-beam heated plasmas. The conditioning procedures which are applied routinely to the first-wall hardware are reviewed. Fueling characteristics during gas, pellet, and neutral-beam fueling are described. Recycling coefficients near unity are observed for most gas fueled discharges. Gas fueled discharges after helium discharge conditioning of the toroidal bumper limiter, and discharges fueled by neutral beams and pellets, show R e = 5-6x1019 m-3) values of Zeff are ≤ 1.5. Increases in Zeff of ≤ 1 have been observed with neutral beam heating of 10 MW. The primary low Z impurity is carbon with concentrations decreasing from ≅ 10% to e. Oxygen densities tend to increase with ne, and at the ohmic plasma density limit oxygen and carbon concentrations are comparable. Chromium getter experiments and He2+/D+ plasma comparisons indicate that the limiter is the primary source of carbon and that the vessel wall is a significant source of the oxygen impurity. Metallic impurities, consisting of the vacuum vessel metals (Ni, Fe, Cr) have significant (≅ 10-4 ne) concentrations only at low plasma densities (ne 19 m-3). The primary source of metallic impurities is most likely ion sputtering from metals deposited on the carbon limiter surface. (orig.)

  12. Plasma-material interactions in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a summary of plasma-material interactions which influence the operation of TFTR with high current (≤ 2 MA), ohmically heated and high power (∼ 10 MW), neutral-beam-heated plasmas. The conditioning procedures which are applied routinely to the first-wall hardware are reviewed. Fueling characteristics during gas, pellet, and neutral beam fueling are described. Recycling coefficients near unity are observed for most gas-fueled discharges. Gas-fueled discharges after helium discharge conditioning of the toroidal bumper limiter and discharges fueled by neutral beams and pellets show R +19 m-3) values of ≤ 1.5. Increases in Z/eff of ≤ 1 have been observed with neutral beam heating of 10 MW. The primary low-Z impurity is carbon with concentrations decreasing from ∼10% to ++/D+ plasma comparisons indicate that the limiter is the primary source of carbon and that the vessel wall is a significant source of the oxygen impurity. Metallic impurities, consisting of the vacuum vessel metals (Ni, Fe, Cr), have significant (∼ 10-4 n/sub e/) concentrations only at low plasma densities (n/sub e/ +19 m-3). The primary source of metallic impurities is most likely ion sputtering from metals deposited on the carbon limiter surface

  13. Material interaction in art therapy assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penzes-Driessen, I.J.N.J.; Hooren, S. van; Dokter, D.; Smeijsters, H.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse approaches to art therapy assessment agree that art materials should play a central role. However, relatively little research is done on the role of different art materials. This article describes the results of a qualitative study on the use of art materials by art therapists in art therapy

  14. Innovated Building Material's Interactions with Structural Form in Architectural Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Mozaikci, Begüm

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Interpretation of building materials into architectural form, is gaining greater interest and attention due to the conservation of architectural heritage. This study highlight, the influences of technological developments of building materials and their interactions with structural form in architectural design projects. Architectural form and decisions can potentially effects by introduced new materials and this study focus on the interaction of new material and structural form...

  15. Perspective: Interactive material property databases through aggregation of literature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Ram; Sparks, Taylor D.

    2016-05-01

    Searchable, interactive, databases of material properties, particularly those relating to functional materials (magnetics, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, etc.) are curiously missing from discussions of machine-learning and other data-driven methods for advancing new materials discovery. Here we discuss the manual aggregation of experimental data from the published literature for the creation of interactive databases that allow the original experimental data as well additional metadata to be visualized in an interactive manner. The databases described involve materials for thermoelectric energy conversion, and for the electrodes of Li-ion batteries. The data can be subject to machine-learning, accelerating the discovery of new materials.

  16. Interactive Packaging Solutions Based on RFIDTechnology and Controlled Delamination Material

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Jie; Pang, Zhibo; Chen, Qiang; Zheng, Li-Rong

    2010-01-01

    Interactive packaging is an emerging research area in recent years. It brings people convenient and smart lives, reduces consumption of traditional packaging materials and direct or indirect labor costs as well. Being integrated in interactive packaging, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology becomes one of the most proactive development enablers. In this paper, an interactive and intelligent packaging solution integrating passive RFID system and Controlled Delamination Material (CD...

  17. Laser interaction with biological material mathematical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the principles of laser interaction with biological cells and tissues of varying degrees of organization. The problems of biomedical diagnostics are considered. Scattering of laser irradiation of blood cells is modeled for biological structures (dermis, epidermis, vascular plexus). An analytic theory is provided which is based on solving the wave equation for the electromagnetic field. It allows the accurate analysis of interference effects arising from the partial superposition of scattered waves. Treated topics of mathematical modeling are: optical characterization of biological tissue with large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the layers, heating blood vessel under laser irradiation incident on the outer surface of the skin and thermo-chemical denaturation of biological structures at the example of human skin.

  18. Quantum Interactive Dualism: An Alternative to Materialism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, Henry P

    2005-06-01

    Materialism rest implicitly upon the general conception of nature promoted by Galileo and Newton during the seventeenth century. It features the causal closure of the physical: The course of physically described events for all time is fixed by laws that refer exclusively to the physically describeable features of nature, and initial conditions on these feature. No reference to subjective thoughts or feeling of human beings enter. That simple conception of nature was found during the first quarter of the twentieth century to be apparently incompatible with the empirical facts. The founders of quantum theory created a new fundamental physical theory, quantum theory, which introduced crucially into the causal structure certain conscious choices made by human agents about how they will act. These conscious human choices are ''free'' in the sense that they are not fixed by the known laws. But they can influence the course of physically described events. Thus the principle of the causal closure of the physical fails. Applications in psycho-neuro-dynamics are described.

  19. Femtosecond laser pulse train interaction with dielectric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Caulier, O Dematteo; Chimier, B; Skupin, S; Bourgeade, A; Léger, C Javaux; Kling, R; Hönninger, C; Lopez, J; Tikhonchuk, V; Duchateau, G

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of trains of femtosecond microjoule laser pulses with dielectric materials by means of a multi-scale model. Our theoretical predictions are directly confronted with experimental observations in soda-lime glass. We show that due to the low heat conductivity, a significant fraction of the laser energy can be accumulated in the absorption region. Depending on the pulse repetition rate, the material can be heated to high temperatures even though the single pulse energy is too low to induce a significant material modification. Regions heated above the glass transition temperature in our simulations correspond very well to zones of permanent material modifications observed in the experiments.

  20. Particle-solid interactions and 21st century materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic physics that governs the interaction of energetic ion beams with solids has its roots in the atomic and nuclear physics of the last century. The central formalism of Jens Lindhard, describing the 'particle-solid interaction', provides a valuable quantitative guide to statistically meaningful quantities such as energy loss, ranges, range straggling, channeling effects, sputtering coefficients, and damage intensity and profiles. Modern materials modification (nanoscience, solid state dynamics) requires atomic scale control of the particle-solid interaction. Two recent experimental examples are discussed: (1) the control of the size distribution of nanocrystals formed in implanted materials and (2) the investigation of the site-specific implantation of hydrogen into silicon. Both cases illustrate unique solid-state configurations, created by ion implantation, that address issues of current materials science interest

  1. Short-pulse laser interactions with disordered materials and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phinney, L.M.; Goldman, C.H.; Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    High-power, short-pulse lasers in the picosecond and subpicosecond range are utilized in an increasing number of technologies, including materials processing and diagnostics, micro-electronics and devices, and medicine. In these applications, the short-pulse radiation interacts with a wide range of media encompassing disordered materials and liquids. Examples of disordered materials include porous media, polymers, organic tissues, and amorphous forms of silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide. In order to accurately model, efficiently control, and optimize short-pulse, laser-material interactions, a thorough understanding of the energy transport mechanisms is necessary. Thus, fractals and percolation theory are used to analyze the anomalous diffusion regime in random media. In liquids, the thermal aspects of saturable and multiphoton absorption are examined. Finally, a novel application of short-pulse laser radiation to reduce surface adhesion forces in microstructures through short-pulse laser-induced water desorption is presented.

  2. Material Tissue Interaction-From Toxicity to Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, G; Widbiller, M; Galler, K M

    2016-01-01

    The topic of material tissue interaction has gained increasing interest over recent decades from both the dental profession and the public. The primary goal initially was to avoid adverse reactions after the application of dental materials. New laboratory test methods have been developed, and currently premarket testing programs, which attempt to guarantee a basic level of patient safety, are legally required worldwide. The dentist is responsible for selecting the correct indication as well as the proper handling of any newly emerging risk. Apart from this phenomenon-oriented "inert materials concept," the "analytical concept" focuses primarily on analyzing the reasons for adverse reactions, and identifying their associated modifying factors, in order to prevent them or to develop new and more biocompatible materials. The "concept of bioactivity" involves addressing the possibility of positively influencing tissue by materials application, such as the generation of tertiary dentin or antibacterial effects. Finally, tissue regeneration may be supported and promoted by the use of various suitable materials (matrices/scaffolds) into which stem cells can migrate or be seeded, leading to cell differentiation and the generation of new tissue. These new dental materials must also fulfill additional requirements such as controlled degradability in order to be suitable for clinical use. Clearly, the field of material tissue interaction is complex and comprises a wide range of issues. To be successful as dentists in the future, practitioners should remain informed of these important new developments and have the argumentative competence to both properly advise and treat their patients. PMID:26645359

  3. Modeling plasma/material interactions during a tokamak disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disruptions in tokamak reactors are still of serious concern and present a potential obstacle for successful operation and reliable design. Erosion of plasma-facing materials due to thermal energy dump during a disruption can severely limit the lifetime of these components, therefore diminishing the economic feasibility of the reactor. A comprehensive disruption erosion model which takes into account the interplay of major physical processes during plasma-material interaction has been developed. The initial burst of energy delivered to facing-material surfaces from direct impact of plasma particles causes sudden ablation of these materials. As a result, a vapor cloud is formed in front of the incident plasma particles. Shortly thereafter, the plasma particles are stopped in the vapor cloud, heating and ionizing it. The energy transmitted to the material surfaces is then dominated by photon radiation. It is the dynamics and the evolution of this vapor cloud that finally determines the net erosion rate and, consequently, the component lifetime. The model integrates with sufficient detail and in a self-consistent way, material thermal evolution response, plasma-vapor interaction physics, vapor hydrodynamics, and radiation transport in order to realistically simulate the effects of a plasma disruption on plasma-facing components. Candidate materials such as beryllium and carbon have been analyzed. The dependence of the net erosion rate on disruption physics and various parameters was analyzed and is discussed

  4. Femtosecond laser pulse train interaction with dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dematteo Caulier, O.; Mishchik, K.; Chimier, B.; Skupin, S.; Bourgeade, A.; Javaux Léger, C.; Kling, R.; Hönninger, C.; Lopez, J.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Duchateau, G.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of trains of femtosecond microjoule laser pulses with dielectric materials by means of a multi-scale model is investigated. Theoretical predictions are directly confronted with experimental observations in soda-lime glass. It is shown that due to the low heat conductivity, a significant fraction of the laser energy can be accumulated in the absorption region. Depending on the pulse repetition rate, the material can be heated to high temperatures even though the single pulse energy is too low to induce a significant material modification. Regions heated above the glass transition temperature in the simulations correspond very well to zones of permanent material modifications observed in the experiments. It turns out that pulse-to-pulse variations of the laser absorption are negligible and of minor influence to permanent material modifications.

  5. Final Report: Laser-Material Interactions Relevant to Analytic Spectroscopy of Wide Band Gap Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, J. T. [Washington State University

    2014-04-05

    We summarize our studies aimed at developing an understanding of the underlying physics and chemistry in terms of laser materials interactions relevant to laser-based sampling and chemical analysis of wide bandgap materials. This work focused on the determination of mechanisms for the emission of electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules from laser irradiation of surfaces. We determined the important role of defects on these emissions, the thermal, chemical, and physical interactions responsible for matrix effects and mass-dependent transport/detection. This work supported development of new techniques and technology for the determination of trace elements contained such as nuclear waste materials.

  6. Ex-vessel core catcher materials interactions. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A twelve-month program to investigate ex-vessel core catcher materials interactions has been completed. The investigations, involving depleted uranium dioxide, magnesia brick, stainless steel, and low-carbon steel, were conducted in furnaces and associated facilities existing at Aerospace, which were modified to process molten and solidified radioactive samples. In addition to developing efficient methods for the melting, pouring, and sustained heating of UO2, extensive sample characterizations and microanalyses were performed. Theoretical analyses were also made in data interpretation for the purpose of understanding the interaction kinetics

  7. Laser-Material Interaction of Powerful Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komashko, A

    2003-01-06

    Laser-material interaction of powerful (up to a terawatt) ultrashort (several picoseconds or shorter) laser pulses and laser-induced effects were investigated theoretically in this dissertation. Since the ultrashort laser pulse (USLP) duration time is much smaller than the characteristic time of the hydrodynamic expansion and thermal diffusion, the interaction occurs at a solid-like material density with most of the light energy absorbed in a thin surface layer. Powerful USLP creates hot, high-pressure plasma, which is quickly ejected without significant energy diffusion into the bulk of the material, Thus collateral damage is reduced. These and other features make USLPs attractive for a variety of applications. The purpose of this dissertation was development of the physical models and numerical tools for improvement of our understanding of the process and as an aid in optimization of the USLP applications. The study is concentrated on two types of materials - simple metals (materials like aluminum or copper) and wide-bandgap dielectrics (fused silica, water). First, key physical phenomena of the ultrashort light interaction with metals and the models needed to describe it are presented. Then, employing one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics code enhanced with models for laser energy deposition and material properties at low and moderate temperatures, light absorption was self-consistently simulated as a function of laser wavelength, pulse energy and length, angle of incidence and polarization. Next, material response on time scales much longer than the pulse duration was studied using the hydrocode and analytical models. These studies include examination of evolution of the pressure pulses, effects of the shock waves, material ablation and removal and three-dimensional dynamics of the ablation plume. Investigation of the interaction with wide-bandgap dielectrics was stimulated by the experimental studies of the USLP surface ablation of water (water is a model of

  8. Radiation interaction with composite materials: Building materials mixed with trommel sieve waste in different proportions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building materials (Portland cement, lime and pointing) mixed with different percentages (25, 50, 75%) of trommel sieve waste have been studied with respect to the photon interaction parameters. Measurements of the total mass attenuation coefficients of building materials mixed with trommel sieve waste (TSW) have been carried out using a high resolution Si(Li) detector. These coefficients were then used to calculate photon interaction cross sections, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities. A narrow beam good geometry set-up was performed using a gamma radiation source (Cd109) of different energies. Photon interaction parameters were discussed on the basis of photon energy and chemical composition. The experimentally obtained values of photon interaction parameters have been compared with the ones calculated from theory.

  9. Functional living biointerfaces to direct cell-material interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Navarro, Aleixandre

    2015-01-01

    [EN] This thesis deals with the development of a living biointerface between synthetic substrates and living cells to engineer cell-material interactions for tissue engineering purposes. This living biointerface is made of Lactococcus lactis, a non-pathogenic lactic bacteria widely used as starter in the dairy industry and, recently, in the expression of heterologous proteins in applications such as oral vaccine delivery or membrane-bound expression of proteins. L. lactis has been engine...

  10. Interactive image quantification tools in nuclear material forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruggiero, Christy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hush, Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harvey, Neal [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Pat [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scoggins, Wayne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-03

    Morphological and microstructural features visible in microscopy images of nuclear materials can give information about the processing history of a nuclear material. Extraction of these attributes currently requires a subject matter expert in both microscopy and nuclear material production processes, and is a time consuming, and at least partially manual task, often involving multiple software applications. One of the primary goals of computer vision is to find ways to extract and encode domain knowledge associated with imagery so that parts of this process can be automated. In this paper we describe a user-in-the-loop approach to the problem which attempts to both improve the efficiency of domain experts during image quantification as well as capture their domain knowledge over time. This is accomplished through a sophisticated user-monitoring system that accumulates user-computer interactions as users exploit their imagery. We provide a detailed discussion of the interactive feature extraction and segmentation tools we have developed and describe our initial results in exploiting the recorded user-computer interactions to improve user productivity over time.

  11. Computation of multi-material interactions using point method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Duan Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ma, Xia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giguere, Paul T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of fluid flows are often based on Eulerian description, while calculations of solid deformations are often based on Lagrangian description of the material. When the Eulerian descriptions are used to problems of solid deformations, the state variables, such as stress and damage, need to be advected, causing significant numerical diffusion error. When Lagrangian methods are used to problems involving large solid deformat ions or fluid flows, mesh distortion and entanglement are significant sources of error, and often lead to failure of the calculation. There are significant difficulties for either method when applied to problems involving large deformation of solids. To address these difficulties, particle-in-cell (PIC) method is introduced in the 1960s. In the method Eulerian meshes stay fixed and the Lagrangian particles move through the Eulerian meshes during the material deformation. Since its introduction, many improvements to the method have been made. The work of Sulsky et al. (1995, Comput. Phys. Commun. v. 87, pp. 236) provides a mathematical foundation for an improved version, material point method (MPM) of the PIC method. The unique advantages of the MPM method have led to many attempts of applying the method to problems involving interaction of different materials, such as fluid-structure interactions. These problems are multiphase flow or multimaterial deformation problems. In these problems pressures, material densities and volume fractions are determined by satisfying the continuity constraint. However, due to the difference in the approximations between the material point method and the Eulerian method, erroneous results for pressure will be obtained if the same scheme used in Eulerian methods for multiphase flows is used to calculate the pressure. To resolve this issue, we introduce a numerical scheme that satisfies the continuity requirement to higher order of accuracy in the sense of weak solutions for the continuity equations

  12. Protein-material interactions: From micro-to-nano scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article presents a survey on the significance of protein-material interactions, the mechanisms which control them and the techniques used for their study. Protein-surface interactions play a key role in regenerative medicine, drug delivery, biosensor technology and chromatography, while it is related to various undesired effects such as biofouling and bio-prosthetic malfunction. Although the effects of protein-surface interaction concern the micro-scale, being sometimes obvious even with bare eyes, they derive from biophysical events at the nano-scale. The sequential steps for protein adsorption involve events at the single biomolecule level and the forces driving or inhibiting protein adsorption act at the molecular level too. Following the scaling of protein-surface interactions, various techniques have been developed for their study both in the micro- and nano-scale. Protein labelling with radioisotopes or fluorescent probes, colorimetric assays and the quartz crystal microbalance were the first techniques used to monitor protein adsorption isotherms, while the surface force apparatus was used to measure the interaction forces between protein layers at the micro-scale. Recently, more elaborate techniques like total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), surface plasmon resonance, Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) have been applied for the investigation of protein density, structure or orientation at the interfaces. However, a turning point in the study of protein interactions with the surfaces was the invention and the wide-spread use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) which can both image single protein molecules on surfaces and directly measure the interaction force

  13. Protein-material interactions: From micro-to-nano scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapikouni, Theodora S. [Laboratory of Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics Department, University of Patras, Patras 26504 (Greece); Missirlis, Yannis F. [Laboratory of Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics Department, University of Patras, Patras 26504 (Greece)], E-mail: misirlis@mech.upatras.gr

    2008-08-25

    The article presents a survey on the significance of protein-material interactions, the mechanisms which control them and the techniques used for their study. Protein-surface interactions play a key role in regenerative medicine, drug delivery, biosensor technology and chromatography, while it is related to various undesired effects such as biofouling and bio-prosthetic malfunction. Although the effects of protein-surface interaction concern the micro-scale, being sometimes obvious even with bare eyes, they derive from biophysical events at the nano-scale. The sequential steps for protein adsorption involve events at the single biomolecule level and the forces driving or inhibiting protein adsorption act at the molecular level too. Following the scaling of protein-surface interactions, various techniques have been developed for their study both in the micro- and nano-scale. Protein labelling with radioisotopes or fluorescent probes, colorimetric assays and the quartz crystal microbalance were the first techniques used to monitor protein adsorption isotherms, while the surface force apparatus was used to measure the interaction forces between protein layers at the micro-scale. Recently, more elaborate techniques like total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), surface plasmon resonance, Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) have been applied for the investigation of protein density, structure or orientation at the interfaces. However, a turning point in the study of protein interactions with the surfaces was the invention and the wide-spread use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) which can both image single protein molecules on surfaces and directly measure the interaction force.

  14. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs) offer important and unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing. And they are well suited to serve together synergistically. TEC and MFHPs operate through working-fluid vaporization, condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures. TEC and MFHPs have apparently simple, isolated performance mechanisms that are somewhat similar. And they also have obviously difficult, complected material problems that again are somewhat similar. Intensive investigation reveals that aspects of their operating cycles and material problems tend to merge: high-temperature material effects determine the level and lifetime of performance. Simplified equations verify the preceding statement for TEC and MFHPs. Material properties and interactions exert primary influences on operational effectiveness. And thermophysicochemical stabilities dictate operating temperatures which regulate the thermoemissive currents of TEC and the vaporization flow rates of MFHPs. Major high-temperature material problems of TEC and MFHPs have been solved. These solutions lead to productive, cost-effective applications of current TEC and MFHPs - and point to significant improvements with anticipated technological gains.

  15. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torquato, Salvatore [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  16. Low Earth Orbital Atomic Oxygen Interactions With Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2004-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is formed in the low Earth orbital environment (LEO) by photo dissociation of diatomic oxygen by short wavelength (improved durability to atomic oxygen attack, as well as atomic oxygen protective coatings, have been employed with varying degrees of success to improve durability of polymers in the LEO environment. Atomic oxygen can also oxidize silicones and silicone contamination to produce non-volatile silica deposits. Such contaminants are present on most LEO missions and can be a threat to performance of optical surfaces. The LEO atomic oxygen environment, its interactions with materials, results of space testing, computational modeling, mitigation techniques, and ground laboratory simulation procedures and issues are presented.

  17. A fusion power plant without plasma-material interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    A steady-state fusion power plant is described which avoids the deleterious plasma-material interactions found in D-T fueled tokamaks. It is based on driven p-{sup 11}B fusion in a high-beta closed-field device, the field-reversed configuration (FRC), anchored in a gas-dynamic trap (GDT). The plasma outflow on the open magnetic-field lines is cooled by radiation in the GDT, then channeled through a magnetic nozzle, promoting 3-body recombination in the expansion region. The resulting supersonic neutral exhaust stream flows through a turbine, generating electricity.

  18. Tribocharging and charged interaction in same-material, microscopic grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitukaitis, S.; Lee, V.; Jaeger, H.

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally address the causes and consequences of charging between same-material, microscopic grains. We confirm quantitatively that differences in grain size alone drive charging. By comparing our data to independent thermoluminescence measurements, we show that trapped electrons are not the charged species being transferred. We observe and quantify a zoology of interactions between grains, including attractive orbits and repulsive slingshot events, cluster growth and annihilation via collisions, and granular molecule formation. Our results highlight the important role played by grain polarizability in aggregation and have implications for the dynamics of dust particles in protoplanetary disks.

  19. Tritium interactions with steel and construction materials in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The literature on the interactions of tritium and tritiated water with metals, glasses, ceramics, concrete, paints, polymers and other organic materials is reviewed in this report Some of the processes affecting the amount of tritium found on various materials, such as permeation, sorption and the conversion of tritium found on various materials, such as permeation, sorption and conversion of elemental tritium (T2) to tritiated water (HTO), are also briefly outlined. Tritium permeation in steels is fairly well understood, but effects of surface preparation and coatings on sorption are not yet clear. Permeation of T2 into other metals with cleaned surfaces has been studied thoroughly at high temperature, and the effect of surface oxidation has also been explored. The room-temperature permeation rates of low-permeability metals with cleaned surfaces are much faster than indicated by high-temperature results, because of grain-boundary diffusion. Elastomers have been studied to a certain extent, but some mechanisms of interaction with tritium gas and sorbed tritium are unclear. Ceramics have some of the lowest sorption and permeation rates, but ceramic coatings on stainless steels do not lower permeation or tritium as effectively as coatings obtained by oxidation of the steel, probably because of cracking caused by differences in thermal expansion coefficient. Studies on concrete are in their early stages; they show that sorption of tritiated water on concrete is a major concern in cleanup of releases of elemental tritium into air in tritium handling facilities. Some of the codes for modelling releases and sorption of T2 and HTO contain unproven assumptions about sorption and T2 → HTO conversion. Several experimental programs will be required in order to clear up ambiguities in previous work and to determine parameters for materials which have not yet been investigated. (146 refs., tab.)

  20. Shock Waves Impacting Composite Material Plates: The Mutual Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2013-02-01

    High-performance, fiber-reinforced polymer composites have been extensively used in structural applications in the last 30 years because of their light weight combined with high specific stiffness and strength at a rather low cost. The automotive industry has adopted these materials in new designs of lightweight vehicles. The mechanical response and characterization of such materials under transient dynamic loading caused with shock impact induced by blast is not well understood. Air blast is associated with a fast traveling shock front with high pressure across followed by a decrease in pressure behind due to expansion waves. The time scales associated with the shock front are typically 103 faster than those involved in the expansion waves. Impingement of blast waves on structures can cause a reflection of the wave off the surface of the structure followed by a substantial transient aerodynamic load, which can cause significant deformation and damage of the structure. These can alter the overpressure, which is built behind the reflected shock. In addition, a complex aeroelastic interaction between the blast wave and the structure develops that can induce reverberation within an enclosure, which can cause substantial overpressure through multiple reflections of the wave. Numerical simulations of such interactions are quite challenging. They usually require coupled solvers for the flow and the structure. The present contribution provides a physics-based analysis of the phenomena involved, a critical review of existing computational techniques together with some recent results involving face-on impact of shock waves on thin composite plates.

  1. Design studies of interaction processes between melt reactor core material composition, coolant and construction material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This effort presents results of the design studies performed for correct conducting of out-of-pile experiments at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan facilities to study interaction processes between the melt fuel composition and core materials, which might take place during accidents at the nuclear power plants. The design methods are considered to determine electromagnetic parameters of the facility melting unit - an induction melting furnace, to determine temperature fields in furnace construction component materials during the experiment process and at the moment of melt discharge. The methods are presented to calculate temperature fields and thermal flows in experimental device modelling a reactor vessel bottom when it contacts with the melt fuel composition. The results of thermal electric and hydraulic calculations are presented validating the experimental device operability designed to study the interaction processes between the melt fuel composition and reactor vessel bottom in simulating a residual energy release in the melt by direct current transmitting

  2. Characterization of laser beam interaction with carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents simulation and experimental results for the exposure of some carbon-based materials to alexandrite and Nd3+:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser radiation. Simulation of the heating effects was carried out using the COMSOL Multiphysics 3.5 package for samples of carbon-based P7295-2 fiber irradiated using an alexandrite laser and carbon-based P4396-2 fiber irradiated using an Nd3+:YAG laser, as well as by applying finite element modeling for P7295-2 samples irradiated using an Nd3+:YAG laser. In the experimental part, P7295-2 samples were exposed to alexandrite laser radiation while samples of carbon-based composite 3D C/C were exposed to Nd3+:YAG laser radiation. Micrographs of the laser induced craters were obtained by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the images analyzed using the ImageJ software. The results obtained enable identification of the laser–material interaction spots, and characterization of the laser induced changes in the materials investigated. (paper)

  3. Contribution to the beam plasma material interactions during material processing with TEA CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaschek, Rainer; Konrad, Peter E.; Mayerhofer, Roland; Bergmann, Hans W.; Bickel, Peter G.; Kowalewicz, Roland; Kuttenberger, Alfred; Christiansen, Jens

    1995-03-01

    The TEA-CO2-laser (transversely excited atmospheric pressure) is a tool for the pulsed processing of materials with peak power densities up to 1010 W/cm2 and a FWHM of 70 ns. The interaction between the laser beam, the surface of the work piece and the surrounding atmosphere as well as gas pressure and the formation of an induced plasma influences the response of the target. It was found that depending on the power density and the atmosphere the response can take two forms. (1) No target modification due to optical break through of the atmosphere and therefore shielding of the target (air pressure above 10 mbar, depending on the material). (2) Processing of materials (air pressure below 10 mbar, depending on the material) with melting of metallic surfaces (power density above 0.5 109 W/cm2), hole formation (power density of 5 109 W/cm2) and shock hardening (power density of 3.5 1010 W/cm2). All those phenomena are usually linked with the occurrence of laser supported combustion waves and laser supported detonation waves, respectively for which the mechanism is still not completely understood. The present paper shows how short time photography and spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy can be used to better understand the various processes that occur during laser beam interaction. The spectra of titanium and aluminum are observed and correlated with the modification of the target. If the power density is high enough and the gas pressure above a material and gas composition specific threshold, the plasma radiation shows only spectral lines of the background atmosphere. If the gas pressure is below this threshold, a modification of the target surface (melting, evaporation and solid state transformation) with TEA-CO2- laser pulses is possible and the material specific spectra is observed. In some cases spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy of a plasma allows the calculation of electron temperatures by comparison of two spectral lines.

  4. Interactions of Plutonium and Lanthanides with Ordered Mesoporous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi

    Ordered mesoporous materials are porous solids with a regular, patterned structure composed of pores between 2 and 50 nm wide. Such materials have attracted much attention in the past twenty years because the chemistry of their synthesis allows control of their unique physicochemical properties, which can be tuned for a variety of applications. Generally, ordered mesoporous materials have very high specific surface areas and pore volumes, and offer unique structures that are neither crystalline nor amorphous. The large tunable interface provided by ordered mesoporous solids may be advantageous in applications involving sequestration, separation, or detection of actinides and lanthanides in solution. However, the fundamental chemical interactions of actinides and lanthanides must be understood before applications can be implemented. This dissertation focuses primarily on the fundamental interactions of plutonium with organically modified mesoporous silica, as well as several different porous carbon materials, both untreated and chemically oxidized. A method for functionalizing mesoporous silica by self assembly and molecular grafting of functional organosilane ligands was optimized for the 2D-hexagonal ordered mesoporous silica known as SBA-15 (Santa Barbara amorphous silica). Four different organically-modified silica materials were synthesized and characterized with several techniques. To confirm that covalent bonds were formed between the silane anchor of the ligand and the silica substrate, functionalized silica samples were analyzed with 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Infrared spectroscopy was used in combination with 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to verify the molecular structures of the ligands after they were synthesized and grafted to the silica. The densities of the functional silane ligands on the silica surface were estimated using thermogravimetric analysis. Batch sorption experiments were conducted with solutions of

  5. Interaction and Correlation Effects in Quasi Two-dimensional Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of atomically thin quasi two-dimensional materials (typically related to some parent van der Waals layered crystals) and their nanostructures have revealed that these systems can exhibit highly unusual behaviors. In this talk, we discuss some theoretical studies of the electronic, transport and optical properties of such systems. We present results on graphene and graphene nanostructures as well as other quasi-2D systems such as monolayer and few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g., MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2) and metal monochalcogenides (such as GaSe and FeSe). Owing to their reduced dimensionality, these systems present opportunities for unusual manifestation of concepts and phenomena that may not be so prominent or have not been seen in bulk materials. Symmetry and many-body interaction effects often play a critical role in shaping qualitatively and quantitatively their properties. Several quantum phenomena are discussed, including novel and dominant exciton effects, tunable magnetism, electron supercollimation by disorder, unusual plasmon behaviors, and possible enhanced superconductivity in some of these systems. We investigate their physical origins and compare theoretical predictions with experimental data. This work was supported by DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by NSF under Grant No. DMR10-1006184. I would like to acknowledge collaborations with members of the Louie group and the experimental groups of Crommie, Heinz, Wang, and Zhang.

  6. Interactions between chloride and cement-paste materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberon, Fabien; Baroghel-Bouny, Véronique; Zanni, Hélène; Bresson, Bruno; d'Espinose de la Caillerie, Jean-Baptiste; Malosse, Lucie; Gan, Zehong

    2005-02-01

    The durability of cement-based materials with respect to exterior aggressions is one of the current priorities in civil engineering. Depending on their use, the cement-based materials can be exposed to different types of aggressive environments. For instance, damages to concrete structures in contact with a saline environment (sea water on bridges, deicing salts on roads, etc.) are of utmost importance. Upon exposure to saline water, Cl- ions penetrate into the structures and subsequently lead to reinforcement corrosion. Chloride attack is often combined with other aggressive influences such as temperature (e.g., freezing) or the ingress of other ions (e.g., sulfates in sea water). We therefore aim to explore the effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on the structural chemistry of cement paste. Existing studies about reinforcement corrosion by chloride have focused on the penetration of Cl- ions and the comparison between "free" ions (water-soluble ions) and bound ones. However, little is known about the fixation mechanisms, the localization of Cl in the cement matrix and the structural interaction between Cl and the silicate and aluminate hydrate phases present in cement paste. We present here results of a multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance study on the fixation of chloride in the hydration products and the characterization of new phases potentially appearing due to chloride ingress. PMID:15833625

  7. Interactions of bioactive glass materials in the oral environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efflandt, Sarah Elizabeth

    The aim of this research was to investigate bioactive glass materials for their use in dental restorations. Mechanical properties such as strength, toughness and wear resistance were considered initially, but the focus of this thesis was the biological properties such as reactions with saliva and interactions with natural dental tissues. Bioactive composite materials were created by incorporating bioactive glass and alumina powders into an aqueous suspension, slip casting, and infiltrating with resin. Microstructure, mechanical properties and wear resistance were evaluated. Mechanically, the composites are comparable to natural dental tissues and current dental materials with a strength of 206 +/- 18.7 MPa and a toughness of 1.74 +/- 0.08 MPa(m)1/2. Interfacial reactions were examined using bulk bioactive glasses. Disks were prepared from a melt, placed in saliva and incubated at 37°C. Surfaces were analyzed at 2, 5, 10, 21, and 42 days using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microdiffraction. Results showed changes at 2 days with apatite crystallization by 10 days. These glass disks were then secured against extracted human dentin and incubated in saliva for 21 or 42 days. Results from SEM, electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and microdiffraction showed that dentin and bioactive glasses adhered in this in vitro environment due to attraction of collagen to bioactive glasses and growth of an interfacial apatite. After investigating these bulk glass responses, particulate bioactive glasses were placed in in vitro and in vivo set-ups for evaluation. Particles immersed in biologically buffered saliva showed crystallization of apatite at 3 days. These bioactive glass particles were placed in the molars of mini-pigs and left in vivo. After 30 days the bioactive paste was evaluated using SEM, EMPA and microdiffraction analyses. Results showed that the paste gained structural integrity and had chemical changes in vivo. These sets of experiments show that bioactive

  8. Technical committee meeting on material-coolant interactions and material movement and relocation in liquid metal fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Technical Committee Meeting on Material-Coolant Interactions and Material Movement and Relocation in Liquid Metal Fast Reactors was sponsored by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and hosted by PNC, on behalf of the Japanese government. A broad range of technical subjects was discussed in the TCM, covering entire aspects of material motion and interactions relevant to the safety of LMFRs. Recent achievement and current status in research and development in this area were presented including European out-of-pile test of molten material movement and relocation; molten material-sodium interaction; molten fuel-coolant interaction; core disruptive accidents; sodium boiling; post accident material relocation, heat removal and relevant experiments already performed or planned

  9. Interaction of dispersed polyvynil acetate with silicate in finishing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runova, R. F.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the processes of interaction between calcium silicate hydrates and dispersed polyvinyl acetate in tight films with the aim of developing compounds meant for restoration and finishing works. The basis of this development relies on the concept concerning the determining role of the crystal-chemical factor of the silicate phase in the formation of organic-mineral compounds of increased durability. The characteristics of dispersed calcium silicate hydrates are portrayed. The preparation conditions, accounting for the synthesis of the product of submicrocrystalline structure, conforming with the stoichiometry CaO∙SiO2 =0.8-2.0 have been determined. The interaction has been studied for compounds achieved by mixing ingredients in a rapid whirling mixer, and subjected to hardening at T=20+2 T. With the aid of XRD, DTA and Infra-Red Spectrometry methods the formation process of the sophisticated polymer silicate phase in the material was observed for a period of 90 days. The properties of the film were investigated and its high resistance against the influence of external factors was established. On this basis a conclusion concerning the quite high effectiveness of substituting portland cement with dispersed calcium silicate hydrate in polymer cement compounds has been made. White colour and other various special properties determine the suitability for repair and finishing works on facades of buildings.

    Este artículo está orientado a estudiar los procesos de interacción entre los silicatos cálcicos hidratados y el acetato de polivinilo disperso en capas impermeables, con el objeto de desarrollar compuestos destinados para la restauración. El fundamento de estos estudios es determinar el papel que los factores cristaloquímicos de las fases silicato tienen en la formación de compuestos órganominerales de elevada durabilidad. Se han descrito las características de los silicatos cálcicos hidratados

  10. Computer-Enhanced Instructional Materials for Interactive Fortran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, James E.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Strategies for incorporating a calculator made within FORTRAN programs and a Response Analysis Scheme during interactive sessions are described highlighting salient features of the programs. (Author/SK)

  11. Interactions of Plutonium and Lanthanides with Ordered Mesoporous Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi

    2014-01-01

    Ordered mesoporous materials are porous solids with a regular, patterned structure composed of pores between 2 and 50 nm wide. Such materials have attracted much attention in the past twenty years because the chemistry of their synthesis allows control of their unique physicochemical properties, which can be tuned for a variety of applications. Generally, ordered mesoporous materials have very high specific surface areas and pore volumes, and offer unique structures that are neither crystalli...

  12. Plasma-materials interactions and edge-plasma physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the: Pisces Program; Pisces Facilities; Pisces Experiments: Materials and Surface Physics; Pisces Experiments: Edge Plasma Physics; and, Theoretical Analysis: Edge Plasma Behavior

  13. Writing an Electronic Astronomy Book with Interactive Curricular Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kristen L.; Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of tablets, the past few years have seen an increase in the demand for quality electronic textbooks. Unfortunately, most of the current offerings do not exploit the accessibility and interactivity that electronic books can deliver. In this poster, we discuss how we are merging our curriculum development projects (Physlets, Easy Java/JavaScript Simulations, and Open Source Physics) with the EPUB electronic book format to develop an interactive textbook for use in a one-semester introductory astronomy course. The book, Astronomy: An Interactive Introduction, combines the narrative, equations, and images of a traditional astronomy text with new JavaScript simulations.

  14. Long-range Coulomb-like mode interaction in a coaxial waveguide filled with Faraday material

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninov, I I

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear mode coupling in a coaxial waveguide filled with Faraday material has been considered. The picture of mode interaction is shown to resemble Coulomb interaction of charges: higher modes with nonzero angular momentum interact like effective charges via exchange of zero angular momentum quanta of the fundamental mode. Thus, at large distances this interaction becomes the dominant mechanism of mode coupling. The developed model may be used in designing coaxial photonic crystal fibers with strong tailored mode interaction.

  15. Plasma-material interaction under simulated disruption conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudden evaporation of divertor plate surface under high heat load during tokamak plasma disruption instantaneously produces a vapor shield. The cloud of vaporized material prevents the divertor plates from the bulk of incoming energy flux and thus reduces the further material erosion. Dynamics and effectiveness of the vapor shield are studied experimentally at the 2MK-200 facility under simulated disruption conditions. (orig.)

  16. Solid state and materials research: metal-semiconductor interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section of the report is concerned with the study of the metallisation, oxidation and doping of materials which are of importance to the micro-electronics industry. The Van de Graaff accelerator and radioactive tracers are used for studying surface and sub-surface behaviour of these materials

  17. Smart material interfaces: a new form of physical interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; Poelman, Wim; Nijholt, Anton; De Bruijn, Arnoud; Chi, E.H.; Höök, K.

    2012-01-01

    Smart Material Interface (SMI) is the latest generation of user interface that makes use of engineered materials and leverages their special properties. SMIs are capable of changing their physical properties such as shape, size and color, and can be controlled under certain (external) conditions. We

  18. Theoretical model for the hydrogen-material interaction as a basis for prediction of the material mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural law concentration of hydrogen inside the materials has a distribution over the different binding energies. This distribution is changing under the mechanical tension. The model of interaction of the small hydrogen concentration with materials provides one with an instrument for modeling the materials fatigue and destruction, as well as the prediction of material properties during exploitation. The well-known models are of the phenomenological nature. However if one takes into account the physical mechanism then one obtains an accurate model and the instrument for the reliable prediction. The two-continuum model of the solid material is a substantiation for the present study. This model describes the interaction between the low concentration of hydrogen and the material. The redistribution of the hydrogen between the different binding energy levels is taken into account, too

  19. A Study of Multimodal Discourse in the Design of Interactive Digital Material for Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burset, Silvia; Bosch, Emma; Pujolà, Joan-Tomàs

    2016-01-01

    This study analyses some published interactive materials for the learning of Spanish as a f?irst language and English as a Foreign Language (EFL) commonly used in primary and secondary education in Spain. The present investigation looks into the relationships between text and image on the interface of Interactive Digital Material (IDM) to develop…

  20. Experimental Study on 308nm Laser Interaction with Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A 10 J, 40 ns XeC1 laser interaction with LY12 aluminum and optical glass K9 targets is reported. The properties of laser-produced plasma (LPP) are analyzed. As a result, some parameters such as plasma ignition threshold and plasma plume expansion velocity are obtained. Also, Laser induced pulse on irradiated targets are given.

  1. Controlling coverage of solution cast materials with unfavourable surface interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2014-03-03

    Creating uniform coatings of a solution-cast material is of central importance to a broad range of applications. Here, a robust and generic theoretical framework for calculating surface coverage by a solid film of material de-wetting a substrate is presented. Using experimental data from semiconductor thin films as an example, we calculate surface coverage for a wide range of annealing temperatures and film thicknesses. The model generally predicts that for each value of the annealing temperature there is a range of film thicknesses leading to poor surface coverage. The model accurately reproduces solution-cast thin film coverage for organometal halide perovskites, key modern photovoltaic materials, and identifies processing windows for both high and low levels of surface coverage. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  2. Vaporized wall material/plasma interaction during plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss a new plasma disruption model that has been developed for analyzing the consequences to the limiter/first wall structures. This model accounts for: nonequilibrium surface vaporization for the ablating structure, nonequilibrium ionization of and radiation emitted from the ablated material in the plasma, plasma particle and energy transport, and plasma electromagnetic field evolution during the disruption event. Calculations were performed for a 5 ms disruption on a stainless steel flat limiter as part of a d-shaped first wall. These results indicated that the effectiveness of the ablated wall material to shield the exposed structure is greater than predicted by earlier models, and that the rate of redeposition of the ablated wall material ions is very dramatic. Impurity transport along magnetic field lines, global plasma motion, and radiation transport in an optically thick plasma are important factors that require additional modeling. Experimental measurements are needed to verifty these models

  3. Long-Term Technetium Interactions With Reducing Cementitious Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium is among the key risk drivers at the Saltstone Facility. The way that it is immobilized in this cementitious waste form is by converting its highly mobile Tc(VII) form to a much less mobile Tc(IV) form through reduction by the cement's blast furnace slag. This report includes a review of published data and experimental results dealing with Tc leaching from Portland cement waste forms. The objectives for the literature study were to document previous reports of Tc interactions with slag-containing cementitious materials. The objectives for the laboratory study were to measure Tc-saltstone Kd values under reducing conditions. From the literature it was concluded: (1) Spectroscopic evidence showed that when Tc(IV) in a slag-cement was exposed to an oxidizing environment, it will convert to the more mobile Tc(VII) species within a short time frame, 2.5 years. (2) SRS saltstone will reduce Tc(VII) in the absence of NaS or sodium dithionite in a reducing atmosphere. (3) Only trace concentrations of atmospheric oxygen (30 to 60 ppm O2; Eh 120 mV) at the high pH levels of cementitious systems is required to maintain Tc as Tc(VII). (4) Experimental conditions must be responsible for wide variability of measured Kd values, such that they are either very low, ∼1 mL/g, or they are very high ∼1000 mL/g, suggesting that Tc(VII) or Tc(IV) dominate the systems. Much of this variability appears to be the result of experimental conditions, especially direct controls of oxygen contact with the sample. (5) A field study conducted at SRS in the 1980s indicated that a slag-saltstone immobilized Tc for 2.5 years. Below background concentrations of Tc leached out of the slag-containing saltstone, whereas Tc leached out of the slag-free saltstone at the rate of nitrate loss. One possible explanation for the immobilization of Tc in this study was that the slag-saltstone maintained reducing conditions within the core of the 55-gallon sample, whereas in the small-scale lab

  4. SPECIFIC ASPECTS OF INTERACTION OF PLATELETS WITH THE HEPARINIZED MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Nemets

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Comparative analysis of anticoagulant nature on medical materials testing was done. It was found that change of citrate by heparin is accompanied by significant changes in platelet adhesion and activation. This results allowed us to arrive at a conclusion about reasonability of heparin usage as anticoagulant in in vitro testing. 

  5. Interaction Between Steel Melt and Refractory Materials in Tundish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drofelnik N.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In Štore Steel steelworks steel is casted on a three strand continuous casting machine. Lining of tundish is mainly made from a magnesia based material. Tundish cover powder is based on alumina and silica. It also contains aluminum and carbon.

  6. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeldon, Ian; Farhadi, Arash; Bick, Alexander G; Khademhosseini, Ali [Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Jabbari, Esmaiel, E-mail: alik@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2011-05-27

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness these interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behavior. Here, we review two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3D) nanoscale tissue engineering technologies, and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffold technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D. However, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and that can control the temporal changes in the cellular microenvironment. (topical review)

  7. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness these interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behavior. Here, we review two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3D) nanoscale tissue engineering technologies, and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffold technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D. However, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and that can control the temporal changes in the cellular microenvironment. (topical review)

  8. Cell-material interactions on biphasic polyurethane matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicesare, Patrick; Fox, Wade M; Hill, Michael J; Krishnan, G Rajesh; Yang, Shuying; Sarkar, Debanjan

    2013-08-01

    Cell-matrix interaction is a key regulator for controlling stem cell fate in regenerative tissue engineering. These interactions are induced and controlled by the nanoscale features of extracellular matrix and are mimicked on synthetic matrices to control cell structure and functions. Recent studies have shown that nanostructured matrices can modulate stem cell behavior and exert specific role in tissue regeneration. In this study, we have demonstrated that nanostructured phase morphology of synthetic matrix can control adhesion, proliferation, organization and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Nanostructured biodegradable polyurethanes (PU) with segmental composition exhibit biphasic morphology at nanoscale dimensions and can control cellular features of MSCs. Biodegradable PU with polyester soft segment and hard segment composed of aliphatic diisocyanates and dipeptide chain extender were designed to examine the effect polyurethane phase morphology. By altering the polyurethane composition, morphological architecture of PU was modulated and its effect was examined on MSC. Results show that MSCs can sense the nanoscale morphology of biphasic polyurethane matrix to exhibit distinct cellular features and, thus, signifies the relevance of matrix phase morphology. The role of nanostructured phases of a synthetic matrix in controlling cell-matrix interaction provides important insights for regulation of cell behavior on synthetic matrix and, therefore, is an important tool for engineering tissue regeneration. PMID:23255285

  9. Progress of plasma surface interaction study on low activation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferritic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are candidate low activation materials for blanket components and first walls in fusion demonstration reactors. Several issues on these materials as the first wall have been investigated so far. Amount of deuterium retained in mechanically polished ferritic steel, F82H, after deuterium ion irradiation, was observed to be several times smaller than that of stainless steel, 316L SS. Physical sputtering yield of the ferritic steel due to deuterium ion was comparable to that of 316L SS. These results suggest that the property of the ferritic steel as the first wall material is superior to that of 316L SS, with respect to fuel hydrogen retention and in-vessel tritium inventory. Since first walls of blanket modules are exposed to both fuel hydrogen and helium, the helium is also trapped in the walls. Helium retention of V-4Cr-4Ti was investigated using helium ion irradiation apparatus. The amount of helium retained was comparable to those of other plasma facing materials. One of the major concerns in use of SiC/SiC composite for blanket is permeation of helium gas coolant into fusion plasma. Helium gas permeability of the SiC/SiC composite after heat cycles was measured using a vacuum device consisting two chambers. The increase in the permeability was not observed when the heating rate was suitably adjusted. Therefore, the blanket module may be made using only SiC/SiC composite if a vacuum pumping for the inside of blanket module is attached

  10. Molecular simulation of polar molecules interaction with MOFs family materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic of this thesis is the adsorption of simple molecular fluids in nano-porous materials. Many industrial processes are based on this phenomenon, including ionic exchange, selective separation and heterogeneous catalysis. I used molecular simulation to study the adsorption properties of polar molecules of industrial interest (CO2 and H2O) in a new class of crystalline microporous hybrid organic-inorganic materials called Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs). They have exceptional adsorption properties due to their topological variety and their versatility, allowed by the large range of possibilities offered by organic and coordination chemistry and functionalizations. I first studied the adsorption of CO2 in a family of materials called IRMOFs, which share the same topology but have different porous volume, in order to characterize the effect of confinement on their adsorption performance. In particular, a general behavior has been highlighted: the critical temperature decreases when the confinement increases. Then, I looked at a recently synthesized cationic MOF called Zn2(CBTACN). After having localized the extra-framework halogen anions in the unit cell of the material, something which was not possible experimentally, I characterized CO2 adsorption in this system first as a pure gas and then as a component of different mixtures. Finally, I was interested in the hydrothermal stability of MOFs, a crucial issue for their use in industrial applications. I observed the hydration mechanism of system that is analogous to the MOF-5 (IRMOF-0h) and shed light on some collaborative effects of the attack of water that were unknown to in the literature. (author)

  11. Many-Body Dispersion Interactions in Molecular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distasio, Robert A., Jr.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we have developed an efficient method for obtaining an accurate theoretical description of van der Waals (vdW) interactions that includes both long-range Coulomb electrodynamic response screening effects as well as treatment of the many-body vdW energy to infinite order. This method goes beyond the standard C6 /R6 pairwise additive approximation and can easily be coupled to a wide array of theoretical methods, ranging from classical force fields to higher-level quantum chemical calculations. To demonstrate the increasingly important role played by many-body vdW interactions in large, structurally complex molecular systems, we use this method to investigate several pertinent molecular properties, such as binding energies/affinities in gas-phase molecular dimers and supramolecular complexes, relative conformational energetics in small polypeptides, and thermodynamic stabilities among competing molecular crystal polymorphs. This work received funding from the Department of Energy under Grant Nos.: DOE DE-SC0008626 and DOE DE-FG02ER46201 and the European Research Council (ERC Starting Grant VDW-CMAT).

  12. Numerical study of electromagnetic waves interacting with negative index materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolinko, Pavel; Smith, David

    2003-04-01

    We study numerically the electromagnetic scattering properties of structures with negative indices of refraction. To perform this analysis, we utilize a commercial finite-element based electromagnetic solver (HFSS, Ansoft), in which a negative index material can be formed from mesh elements whose permittivity and permeability are both negative. In particular, we investigate the expected transmission characteristics of a finite beam incident on negative index prisms and lenses. We also confirm numerically the predicted superlens effect of an image formed by a planar slab with index n=-1, using two subwavelength (ë/20) slits as objects. PMID:19461776

  13. Interactions of Refractory Materials with Molten Gasifier Slags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Jimichiro; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Kwong, Kye-Sing; Bennett, James; Moss, Tyler

    2011-04-01

    The current study focuses on the analysis of sessile-drop interfacial reactions between two synthetic slags (based on average ash chemistries of coal and petcoke feedstock) and two refractory materials (90 wt% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}–10 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 100 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), using a Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope (CSLM). Ground slag samples (less than 325 mesh) were placed at specific microstructure locations on refractory substrates and heated to 1500 °C in an atmosphere of CO/CO{sub 2} gas mixture (volume ratio = 1.8), using a gold-image heating chamber. Cross-sections of the slag/refractory interface indicated unique slag penetration into preferred areas of the refractory and grain dissolution into the slag which promoted spalling of the refractory. Initially, the slag attacked both grain boundaries and fine microstructure areas, freeing alumina grains into the slag. The formation of VO{sub x}-based crystalline material in the petcoke slag was found to alter the liquid composition. Chemical spalling of Cr-containing crystal layer also facilitated degradation of the refractory.

  14. Interactions of refractory materials with molten gasifier slags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, J.; Sridhar, S.; Bennett, J.; Kwong, K.S.; Moss, T. [US DOE, Albany, OR (United States)

    2011-04-15

    The current study focuses on the analysis of sessile-drop interfacial reactions between two synthetic slags (based on average ash chemistries of coal and petcoke feedstock) and two refractory materials (90 wt% Cr2O{sub 3}-10 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 100 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), using a Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope (CSLM). Ground slag samples (less than 325 mesh) were placed at specific microstructure locations on refractory substrates and heated to 1500 {sup o}C in an atmosphere of CO/CO{sub 2} gas mixture (volume ratio = 1.8), using a gold-image heating chamber. Cross-sections of the slag/refractory interface indicated unique slag penetration into preferred areas of the refractory and grain dissolution into the slag which promoted spalling of the refractory. Initially, the slag attacked both grain boundaries and fine microstructure areas, freeing alumina grains into the slag. The formation of VOx-based crystalline material in the petcoke slag was found to alter the liquid composition. Chemical spalling of Cr-containing crystal layer also facilitated degradation of the refractory.

  15. Creep-Fatigue Interactions of Gas Turbine Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Goswami

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available The military aircraft gas turbine engines are often required to undergo a complex set of.operating conditions where the load varies considerably with respect to time. The temperature range for performing such requirements also increases as the thrust increases.The modern design of gas turbine demands very high thrust-to-weight ratio. In order to achieve this, the design is limited in the low cycle regime. The low cycle regime necessarily has the plasticity effect because of fatigue and inelastic time dependent permanent deformation because of creep. Fatigue and creep interaction studies are very important for the safe life design of critical components such as turbine discs and blades.

  16. Report of the 1990 workshop on plasma-materials interactions for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1990 Workshop of the Working Group in Research Committee on A and M Data, on plasma-materials interactions was held at the Headquarters of JAERI, Tokyo, on July 10-11, 1990. The aim of the Workshop was to obtain future prospects for the activities of the Working Group, by discussing current problems in plasma-materials interactions relevant to fusion research. This report contains all the 16 papers presented at hte Workshop, which are mainly concerned with problems in the first wall of large Tokamak devices, such as retention and release of hydrogen in carbon materials, sputtering and problems in material data system. (author)

  17. Some aspects of hydrogen interaction with amorphous metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time is considered change of some properties of amorphous metallic materials (AMM) directly in the process of hydrogenation. A supposition is made that many found effects are consequence of accumulation and relief of internal stresses during hydrogenation, exposure or following annealing of AMM. Fe81B14Si15, Fe52Co20Si15B13, Fe5Co70Si15B10, Fe5Co58Ni10Si11B16, Co67Fe4Cr7Si8B1484KChSP, Ni60Nb35Ti5, Ni60Nb40 and Pd17,5Cu6Si16.5 AMM were investigated. 24 refs.; 4 figs

  18. Estimation of the ATLAS Inner Detector material budget by use of hadronic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Pettersson, Nora Emilia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The dominant inefficiency in track reconstruction comes from particle interactions with the material in the detector. A good understanding of the material in the Inner Detector (ID) of the ATLAS detector is therefore a vital part of track and object reconstruction. In recent years a new technique has been developed, which by reconstructing nuclear interactions with the detector material allows one to quantify the material budget. The relatively low momentum interactions yields large opening angles between the outgoing particles. This makes it feasible to pinpoint the location of the interaction with excellent spatial resolutions, both perpendicular and parallel to the beam axis, permitting detailed comparisons of even minute detector elements. Utilising a second-pass tracking, specially designed to reconstruct secondary tracks with large impact parameters, the technique maps 0.3 $m^{3}$ of the ID volume. The collected results from the Run-1 and the Run-2 analyses will be presented.

  19. Biomolecular interactions of emerging two-dimensional materials with aromatic amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallineni, Sai Sunil Kumar; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao

    The present work experimentally investigates the interaction of aromatic amino acids, viz., tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine with novel two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO), and boron nitride (BN). Photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were employed to investigate the nature of interactions and possible charge transfer between 2D materials and amino acids. Consistent with previous theoretical studies, graphene and BN were observed to interact with amino acids through π- π interactions. Furthermore, we found that GO exhibits strong interactions with tryptophan and tyrosine as compared to graphene and BN, which we attribute to the formation of H-bonds between tryptophan and GO as shown theoretically in Ref. 2. On the other hand, phenylalanine did not exhibit much difference in interactions with G, GO, and BN. Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA.

  20. Mobility and bulk electron-phonon interaction in two-dimensional materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads; Markussen, Troels;

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of the phonon-limited mobility in intrinsic n-type monolayer graphene, silicene and MoS2. The material properties, including the electron-phonon interaction, are calculated from first principles. Unlike graphene, the carriers in silicene show strong interaction with the ou...

  1. The interaction of iodine with organic material in containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wren, J.C.; Ball, J.M.; Glown, G.A.; Portmann, R.; Sanipelli, G.G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-01

    Organic impurities in containment water, originating from various painted structural surfaces and organic containment materials, could have a significant impact on iodine volatility following an accident. A research program has been designed to determine the impact of organic impurities on iodine volatility under accident conditions. The program consists of experimental, literature and modelling studies on the radiolysis or organic compounds in the aqueous phase, thermal and radiolytic formation and decomposition of organic iodides, dissolution of organic solvents from various painted surfaces into the aqueous phase, and iodine deposition on painted surfaces. The experimental studies consist of bench-scale `separate effects` tests as well as intermediate-scale `integrated effects` in the Radioiodine Test facility. The studies have shown that organic impurities will be found in containment water, arising from the dissolution of organic compounds from various surface paints and that these compounds can potentially have a significant impact on iodine volatility following an accident. The main impact of surface paints will occur through aqueous-phase reactions of the organic compounds that they release to the aqueous phase. Under the radiation conditions expected during an accident, these compounds will react to reduce the pH and dissolved oxygen concentration, consequently increasing the formation of I{sub 2} from I{sup -} that is present in the sump. It appears that the rates of these processes may be controlled by the dissolution kinetics of the organic compounds from the surface coatings. Moreover, the organic compounds may also react thermally and radiolytically with I{sub 2} to form organic iodides in the aqueous phase. Our studies have shown that the formation of organic iodides from soluble organics such as ketones, alcohols and phenols may have more impact on the total iodine volatility than the formation of CH{sub 3}I. (author) 13 figs., 2 tabs., 19 refs.

  2. Results of recent fuel-coolant interaction experiments with reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of reactor-material experiments on fuel-coolant interaction recently performed at Argonne National Laboratory are summarized. Two types of experiments were conducted. The first type involves experiments of an exploratory nature on the interaction between molten uranium carbide and sodium, whereas the second type is concerned with the interaction between molten uranium dioxide and sodium in reactor pin-bundle geometries

  3. Development of High Power Lasers for Materials Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ps pulse duration for generating intense radiation for radiography, particle beam generation and eventually for a new class of fusion experiments call fast ignition. We have also built a record setting 50 watts of average output from a picosecond class laser and are using this technology for materials processing such as fine hole drilling and safe cutting of munitions. The laser science and technology program has developed and deployed a laser guide star on the Lick telescope on Mt. Hamilton and most recently on the Keck telescope in Hawaii. Their current development work in this area is focused on developing a much more compact all solid state diode pumped laser fiber system

  4. The interaction of components organic-silicate paintwork material with painted surface

    OpenAIRE

    Шолух, Н.Е.; Кудюков, Ю.П.; Ржецкий, Е.А.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of components organic-silicate paintwork material with painted surface is studied. It is shown that coverings on a basis of organic-silicate composition that is putting on a surfaces of concrete, brick, plaster, asbestos cement and similar building materials, have good physical-mechanical indicators.

  5. Thermodynamic Analysis on Interaction between MoltenTi Alloys and Oxide Molding Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic model has been built up for the interactions between molten Ti alloys and oxide molding materials in the way of decomposition and solution of molding materials, then the influences on the reaction free energy changes have been calculated and discussed.

  6. The Implementation of Interactive Multimedia Learning Materials in Teaching Listening Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampa, Andi Tenri

    2015-01-01

    One of the factors that may affect the success of the learning process is the use of learning media. Therefore, this research aimed to implement and evaluate the interactive multimedia learning materials using Wondershare Quizcreator program and audio materials in teaching "English listening skills". The research problem was whether or…

  7. Overview of plasma–material interaction experiments on EAST employing MAPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Fang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Luo, Guang-Nan, E-mail: gnluo@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Pitts, Richard A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon Sur Verdon, Saint Lez Druance (France); Litnovsky, Andrey [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Gong, Xianzu; Ding, Rui; Mao, Hongmin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Zhou, Haishan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Wampler, William R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stangeby, Peter C. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto (Canada); Carpentier, Sophie [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon Sur Verdon, Saint Lez Druance (France); Hellwig, Maren [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Yan, Rong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Ashikawa, Naoko [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Fukumoto, Masakatsu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Katayama, Kazunari [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Wang, Wenzhang; Wang, Huiqian; Chen, Liang; Wu, Jing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); and others

    2014-12-15

    The Material and Plasma Evaluation System (MAPES) in the EAST tokamak has been built up and used to address a variety of plasma–material interaction (PMI) issues relevant to ITER in 2012 EAST campaign. The topics studied cover erosion/redeposition of plasma-facing materials and components, hydrogenic retention in the gaps of castellation structure, deterioration of diagnostic mirrors from impurity deposition and protective technique. An introduction of MAPES system and an overview of the recent experimental results are presented.

  8. Overview of plasma–material interaction experiments on EAST employing MAPES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Material and Plasma Evaluation System (MAPES) in the EAST tokamak has been built up and used to address a variety of plasma–material interaction (PMI) issues relevant to ITER in 2012 EAST campaign. The topics studied cover erosion/redeposition of plasma-facing materials and components, hydrogenic retention in the gaps of castellation structure, deterioration of diagnostic mirrors from impurity deposition and protective technique. An introduction of MAPES system and an overview of the recent experimental results are presented

  9. Report of the 1991 workshop on particle-material interactions for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annual Workshop on Particle-Material Interactions in the Working Group of the Research Committee on A and M Data was held at the head-quarters of JAERI, Tokyo, on December 12-13, 1991. The purpose of the Workshop was to obtain future prospects for the activities of the Working Group, by discussing current states and problems in the research on particle-material interactions relevant to the thermocontrolled fusion. The present report contains 16 papers presented at the Workshop, which are mainly concerned with plasma-facing materials in ITER, radiation damage in carbon materials, trapping, emission and permeation of hydrogen in metals, and heavy ion-solid surface interactions. (author)

  10. A loosely-coupled scheme for the interaction between a fluid, elastic structure and poroelastic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukač, M.

    2016-05-01

    We model the interaction between an incompressible, viscous fluid, thin elastic structure and a poroelastic material. The poroelastic material is modeled using the Biot's equations of dynamic poroelasticity. The fluid, elastic structure and the poroelastic material are fully coupled, giving rise to a nonlinear, moving boundary problem with novel energy estimates. We present a modular, loosely coupled scheme where the original problem is split into the fluid sub-problem, elastic structure sub-problem and poroelasticity sub-problem. An energy estimate associated with the stability of the scheme is derived in the case where one of the coupling parameters, β, is equal to zero. We present numerical tests where we investigate the effects of the material properties of the poroelastic medium on the fluid flow. Our findings indicate that the flow patterns highly depend on the storativity of the poroelastic material and cannot be captured by considering fluid-structure interaction only.

  11. Characterization of factors interacting in CGI machining : machinability - material microstructure - material physical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Berglund, Anders

    2008-01-01

    The Swedish truck industry is forced to find new material solutions to achieve lighter engines with increased strength. Customers and new environmental regulations demand both higher specific power and more environmentally friendly trucks, and this places a rising pressure on the manufactures. This demand could be met by increasing the peak pressure in the cylinders. Consequently, a more efficient combustion is obtained and the exhaust lowered. This however exposes the engine to higher loads ...

  12. Dimensionless coordinates for simulations and theory of hyperfine interactions in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For problems involving simulations or theory of hyperfine interactions in materials, it is convenient to work in dimensionless coordinates of reasonable magnitude. Such a system is described here that constitutes a consistent and useful “natural” dimensionless unit system that simplifies point-charge approximations, scaling between different crystal structures, scaling charges of various defects in materials, and other computations involving hyperfine interactions. We present the proposed system with examples of its use for data analysis as well as for simulations and theory.

  13. A Theory of Interaction Mechanism between Laser Beam and Paper Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piili, Heidi

    Paper making and converting industry in Europe is suffering from transfer of basic manufacturing to fast-growing economies, such as China and Brazil. Pulp and paper production volume in Finland, Sweden and France was the same in 2011 as it was in 2000. Meanwhile China has tripled its volume and Brazil doubled. This is a situation where innovative solutions for papermaking and converting industry are needed. Laser can be solution for this, as it is fast, flexible, accurate and reliable. Before industrial application, characteristics of laser beam and paper material interaction has to be understood. When this fundamental knowledge is known, new innovations can be created. Fulfilling the lack of information on interaction phenomena can assist in the way of lasers for wider use of technology in paper making and converting industry. This study was executed by treating dried kraft pulp (grammage 67 g m-2) with different laser power levels, focal point settings and interaction time. Laser equipment was TRUMPF TLF HQ2700 CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 μm). Interaction between laser beam and dried kraft pulp was detected with multi-monitoring system (MMS), which consisted of spectrometer, pyrometer and active illumination imaging system. There is two different dominating mechanisms in interaction between laser beam and paper material. Furthermore, it was noticed that there is different interaction phases within these two interaction mechanisms. These interaction phases appear as function of time and as function of peak intensity of laser beam. Limit peak intensity divides interaction mechanism from one-phase interaction into dual-phase interaction.

  14. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 5 of the supplements on ''atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion'' to the journal ''Nuclear Fusion'' is devoted to a critical assessment of the physical and thermo-mechanical properties of presently considered candidate plasma-facing and structural materials for next-generation thermonuclear fusion devices. It contains 9 papers. The subjects are: (i) requirements and selection criteria for plasma-facing materials and components in the ITER EDA (Engineering Design Activities) design; (ii) thermomechanical properties of Beryllium; (iii) material properties data for fusion reactor plasma-facing carbon-carbon composites; (iv) high-Z candidate plasma facing materials; (v) recommended property data for Molybdenum, Niobium and Vanadium alloys; (vi) copper alloys for high heat flux structure applications; (vii) erosion of plasma-facing materials during a tokamak disruption; (viii) runaway electron effects; and (ix) data bases for thermo-hydrodynamic coupling with coolants. Refs, figs, tabs

  15. Experimental Beam Studies of Plasma-generated Species Interaction with Polymeric Materials and Biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Ting-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Low temperature plasma-based processes are used extensively in many modern technologies. It is thus very important to understand plasma and surface interactions in order to improve plasma processes and design of functional materials. Applying a high vacuum beam system, this dissertation studies the fundamental mechanisms of plasma species-induced modification of materials for two critical applications: manufacturing of semiconductor devices and surface deactivation of infectious biomolecules....

  16. Coupled electrostatic and material surface stresses yield anomalous particle interactions and deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, B. A.; Nikolayev, I.; Sheppard, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    Like-charges repel, and opposite charges attract. This fundamental tenet is a result of Coulomb's law. However, the electrostatic interactions between dielectric particles remain topical due to observations of like-charged particle attraction and the self-assembly of colloidal systems. Here, we show, using both an approximate description and an exact solution of Maxwell's equations, that nonlinear charged particle forces result even for linear material systems and can be responsible for anomalous electrostatic interactions such as like-charged particle attraction and oppositely charged particle repulsion. Furthermore, these electrostatic interactions and the deformation of such particles have fundamental implications for our understanding of macroscopic electrodynamics.

  17. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. Vol.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, through its Atomic and Molecular Data Unit, coordinates a wide spectrum of programmes for the compilation, evaluation, and generation of atomic, molecular, and plasma-wall interaction data for fusion research. The present, first, volume of Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion, contains extended versions of the reviews presented at the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on Particle-Surface Interaction Data for Fusion, held 19-21 April 1989 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, The plasma-wall interaction processes covered here are those considered most important for the operational performance of magnetic confinement fusion reactors. In addition to processes due to particle impact under normal operation, plasma-wall interaction effects due to off-normal plasma events (disruptions, electron runaway bombardment) are covered, and a summary of the status of data information on these processes is given from the point of view of magnetic fusion reactor design. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. The essential role of vibronic interactions in electron pairing in the micro- and macroscopic sized materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The electron-phonon interactions destroy the electron pairs formed by Coulomb interactions, and at the same time, form the energy gap by which the electron pairs become stable. - Abstract: In order to discuss how the nondissipative delocalized diamagnetic currents in the microscopic sized materials are closely related to the conventional superconductivity in the macroscopic sized materials, the unified theory, by which various sized superconductivity can be explained, is suggested. It has been believed for a long time that the electron-phonon interactions play an essential role in the attractive electron-electron interactions, as described in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory in the conventional superconductivity. However, it is suggested in this paper that the electron-phonon interactions do not play an essential role in the attractive electron-electron interactions but play an essential role in the forming of energy gap by which the electron pairs formed by the attractive Coulomb interactions in the conventional superconducting states become more stable than those in the normal metallic states at low temperatures.

  19. Application of laser matter interaction for generation of small-sized materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, Alika E-mail: alika@iitg.ernet.ink_alika@yahoo.com; Alti, Kamlesh; Das, Susanta; Patra, A.S.Ardhendu Sekhar; Sharma, Monisha

    2004-08-01

    Syntheses of nano particles have drawn considerable interest in the recent past because of their ability to offer superior properties to those of bulk materials. Reduction in the size of the materials can be performed with great precision via laser-matter interaction. We focus here on following two promising schemes: (a) selective ablation of thin films via high power laser interferometry and (b) manipulation of atomic trajectories via dipole force, to generate the small-sized materials in the form of ordered arrays of required configuration. Some of our preliminary investigations on both techniques are also presented.

  20. Application of laser matter interaction for generation of small-sized materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syntheses of nano particles have drawn considerable interest in the recent past because of their ability to offer superior properties to those of bulk materials. Reduction in the size of the materials can be performed with great precision via laser-matter interaction. We focus here on following two promising schemes: (a) selective ablation of thin films via high power laser interferometry and (b) manipulation of atomic trajectories via dipole force, to generate the small-sized materials in the form of ordered arrays of required configuration. Some of our preliminary investigations on both techniques are also presented

  1. DEM study on the interaction between wet cohesive granular materials and tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takuya; Matsui, Yu; Nakagawa, Yuta; Kadono, Yuuichi; Tanaka, Toshitsugu

    2013-06-01

    A model based on discrete element method has been developed for the interaction between wet cohesive granular materials and mechanical tools with complex geometry. To obtain realistic results, the motion of 52.5 million particles has been simulated and the formation of multiple shear bands during an excavation process by a bulldozer blade was observed.

  2. INTERACTION CURVES OF LINEARLY INTENSIFYING POLYMERIC MATERIALS UNDER TENSILE-TORSIONAL STRESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao-sheng Zhan

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental research has been performed on the interaction curves and stress paths of crystalline polymeric materials PE and POM under tensile-torsional stress with a linearly intensifying model and in terms of the yield points undergoing Von Mises criterion.

  3. Dynamical Study of Guest-Host Orientational Interaction in LiquidCrystalline Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Thai Viet

    2005-12-20

    Guest-host interaction has long been a subject of interest in many disciplines. Emphasis is often on how a small amount of guest substance could significantly affect the properties of a host material. This thesis describe our work in studying a guest-host effect where dye-doping of liquid crystalline materials greatly enhances the optical Kerr nonlinearity of the material. The dye molecules, upon excitation and via intermolecular interaction, provides an extra torque to reorient the host molecules, leading to the enhanced optical Kerr nonlinearity. We carried out a comprehensive study on the dynamics of the photoexcited dye-doped liquid crystalline medium. Using various experimental techniques, we separately characterized the dynamical responses of the relevant molecular species present in the medium following photo-excitation, and thus were able to follow the transient process in which photo-excitation of the dye molecules exert through guest-host interaction a net torque on the host LC material, leading to the observed enhanced molecular reorientation. We also observed for the first time the enhanced reorientation in a pure liquid crystal system, where the guest population is created through photoexcitation of the host molecules themselves. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the time-dependent theory based on a mean-field model of the guest-host interaction.

  4. High-intensity THz interactions with materials: New aspects and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report recent advances in the generation of intense THz fields from plasmas, including studies of the generation mechanism, demonstration of attosecond-level phase control of the polarization of THz single-cycle pulses, and the development of all-optical high-speed THz polarization modulators. First experiments probing the interaction of these high fields with materials are described.

  5. Exploratory study of molten core material/concrete interactions, July 1975--March 1977. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A.; Dahlgren, D.A.; Muir, J.F.; Murfin, W.D.

    1978-02-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between high-temperature molten materials and structural concrete is described. The experimental efforts focused on the interaction of melts of reactor core materials weighing 12 to 200 kg at temperatures 1700 to 2800/sup 0/C with calcareous and basaltic concrete representative of that found in existing light-water nuclear reactors. Observations concerning the rate and mode of melt penetration into concrete, the nature and generation rate of gases liberated during the interaction, and heat transfer from the melt to the concrete are described. Concrete erosion is shown to be primarily a melting process with little contribution from mechanical spallation. Water and carbon dioxide thermally released from the concrete are extensively reduced to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Heat transfer from the melt to the concrete is shown to be dependent on gas generation rate and crucible geometry. Interpretation of results from the interaction experiments is supported by separate studies of the thermal decomposition of concretes, response of bulk concrete to intense heat fluxes (28 to 280 W/cm/sup 2/), and heat transfer from molten materials to decomposing solids. The experimental results are compared to assumptions made in previous analytic studies of core meltdown accidents in light-water nuclear reactors. A preliminary computer code, INTER, which models and extrapolates results of the experimental program is described. The code allows estimation of the effect of physical parameters on the nature of the melt/concrete interaction.

  6. Biomolecular Interactions and Biological Responses of Emerging Two-Dimensional Materials and Aromatic Amino Acid Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallineni, Sai Sunil Kumar; Shannahan, Jonathan; Raghavendra, Achyut J; Rao, Apparao M; Brown, Jared M; Podila, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-01

    The present work experimentally investigates the interaction of aromatic amino acids viz., tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalnine with novel two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene, graphene oxide (GO), and boron nitride (BN). Photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry were employed to investigate the nature of interactions and possible charge transfer between 2D materials and amino acids. Graphene and GO were found to interact strongly with aromatic amino acids through π-π stacking, charge transfer, and H-bonding. Particularly, it was observed that both physi and chemisorption are prominent in the interactions of GO/graphene with phenylalanine and tryptophan while tyrosine exhibited strong chemisorption on graphene and GO. In contrast, BN exhibited little or no interactions, which could be attributed to localized π-electron clouds around N atoms in BN lattice. Lastly, the adsorption of amino acids on 2D materials was observed to considerably change their biological response in terms of reactive oxygen species generation. More importantly, these changes in the biological response followed the same trends observed in the physi and chemisorption measurements. PMID:27281436

  7. Ultrashort laser pulse–matter interaction: Implications for high energy materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Venugopal Rao

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of ultrashort [nanosecond (ns)/picosecond (ps)/femtosecond (fs)] pulses with materials is an exhaustive area of research with underlying, and often extremely rich, physics along with a plethora of applications evolving from it. High-energy materials (HEMs) are chemical compounds or mixture of compounds which, under suitable initiation, undergoes a very rapid exothermic and self-propagating decomposition. Herein, we describe the interaction of laser pulses with materials and its implications for studies on HEMs in four parts: (a) ns and fs laserinduced breakdown spectroscopic (LIBS) studies of HEMs towards understanding the molecular dynamics and discrimination, (b) ps/fs pulses interaction with metallic solids towards the production of nanoparticles, nanostructures and their utility in identifying explosive molecules using surface-enhanced Raman scattering studies, (c) interaction of laser pulses with the bulk and surface of glasses and polymers producing micro- and nanostructures for microfluidic/lab-on-a-chip applications, and (d) ultrafast spectroscopic studies for comprehending the excited state dynamics towards elucidation of vibrational dynamics in HEMs. Several applications resulting from these interactions will be discussed in detail.

  8. Exploratory study of molten core material/concrete interactions, July 1975--March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study of the interaction between high-temperature molten materials and structural concrete is described. The experimental efforts focused on the interaction of melts of reactor core materials weighing 12 to 200 kg at temperatures 1700 to 28000C with calcareous and basaltic concrete representative of that found in existing light-water nuclear reactors. Observations concerning the rate and mode of melt penetration into concrete, the nature and generation rate of gases liberated during the interaction, and heat transfer from the melt to the concrete are described. Concrete erosion is shown to be primarily a melting process with little contribution from mechanical spallation. Water and carbon dioxide thermally released from the concrete are extensively reduced to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Heat transfer from the melt to the concrete is shown to be dependent on gas generation rate and crucible geometry. Interpretation of results from the interaction experiments is supported by separate studies of the thermal decomposition of concretes, response of bulk concrete to intense heat fluxes (28 to 280 W/cm2), and heat transfer from molten materials to decomposing solids. The experimental results are compared to assumptions made in previous analytic studies of core meltdown accidents in light-water nuclear reactors. A preliminary computer code, INTER, which models and extrapolates results of the experimental program is described. The code allows estimation of the effect of physical parameters on the nature of the melt/concrete interaction

  9. Dispersion coefficients for the interaction of Cs atom with different material media

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Sahoo, B K; Arora, Bindiya

    2015-01-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the dispersion ($C_3$) coefficients for the interaction of a Cs atom with different material media such as Au (metal), Si (semiconductor) and various dielectric surfaces like SiO$_2$, SiN$_{\\rm{x}}$, sapphire and YAG are determined using accurate values of the dynamic polarizabilities of the Cs atom obtained employing the relativistic coupled-cluster approach and the dynamic dielectric constants of the walls. Moreover, we also give the retardation coefficients in the graphical representation as functions of separation distances to describe the interaction potentials between the Cs atom with the above considered material media. For the easy access to the interaction potentials at a given distance of separation, we devise a simple working functional fitting form for the retarded coefficients in terms of two parameters that are quoted for each medium.

  10. The Interaction of Bacteria with Engineered Nanostructured Polymeric Materials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Armentano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of great advances in biomaterials research and development, a significant proportion of medical devices undergo bacterial colonization and become the target of an implant-related infection. We present a review of the two major classes of antibacterial nanostructured materials: polymeric nanocomposites and surface-engineered materials. The paper describes antibacterial effects due to the induced material properties, along with the principles of bacterial adhesion and the biofilm formation process. Methods for antimicrobial modifications of polymers using a nanocomposite approach as well as surface modification procedures are surveyed and discussed, followed by a concise examination of techniques used in estimating bacteria/material interactions. Finally, we present an outline of future sceneries and perspectives on antibacterial applications of nanostructured materials to resist or counteract implant infections.

  11. Interaction of sintered powder metallic materials and cermets with the stainless steel melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of materials of nonconsumable electrodes for the electric contact-melting welding method with stainless steel melt in argon is studied. contact angles are measured during wetting of tungsten, molybdenum, titanium nitride, NKTM cermet and TiN-Cr composite bases with steel melt. It is shown that steel does not wet titanium nitride and NKTM. In this case there is no diffusion of the base elements into steel and steel into TiN base. Inconsiderable penetration of the steel phase into the base of the NKTM material as well as the absence of the NKTM material penetration and of the base material penetration into the steel melt are observed. An interaction of liquid steel with tungsten and molybdenum as well as formation of multicomponent solid solutions and intermetallic compounds is established. It is shown that interaction of steel with bases of the TiN-Cr composite is accompanied by solution of stainless steel components in the metallic binder of the base which is characterized by an increase of the binder microhardness as well as by growth of TiN grains. The hgher is the Cr content in the base material, the more significant are the above phenomena

  12. Evaluation of plasma-wall interactions using material probes in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control of plasma-wall interactions (PWIs) and understanding their mechanism are essential issues for realization of fusion reactor. In this study, plasma-wall interactions during FY2010 and FY2011 experiments in the Large Helical Device (LHD) were analyzed by using material probes. We installed material probes at the positions expected to have different deposits of materials such as boron and titanium and investigated the correlation between this impurity deposition and gas retention. The desorption behavior of hydrogen and helium depended on the level of impurity deposition. We observed a new peak for hydrogen desorption at the probe with large boron deposits. The amount of retained hydrogen was large in that probe; however the amount of retained helium was small in the same probe, which is opposite what we observe in the probe with titanium deposits and the probe with a thin deposition layer. (author)

  13. A review of the plasma-material interaction problems for reacting and burning plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serious problems have to be faced at present in linking present plasma research to fusion reactor engineering. Even in fusion devices of the near-term and of the next generation which aim to evaluate the fusion engineering feasibility of burning plasma experiments such as TFTR, JET, R-tokamak, ZEPHYR and INTOR, plasma-material interactions cause many technological difficulties such as large heat loads, large erosion rates, large magnetic forces and large induced radioactivities. Moreover, impurity control, tritium handling, ash exhaust and refuelling need to be solved by realistic methods with technological justifications. Since present fusion approaches might not give hopeful predictions to an economical, safe, and reliable fusion reactor, it is most important at present to find a possible window of promising fusion research. In this paper, we review technological restrictions from viewpoints of plasma-material interactions, then discuss the fusion research and related material investigations that are necessary to realize reasonable fusion reactor concepts. (orig.)

  14. Analysis the complex interaction among flexible nanoparticles and materials surface in the mechanical polishing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical polishing (MP), being the important technique of realizing the surface planarization, has already been widely applied in the area of microelectronic manufacturing and computer manufacturing technology. The surface planarization in the MP is mainly realized by mechanical process which depended on the microdynamic behavior of nanoparticle. The complex multibody interaction among nanoparticles and materials surface is different from interaction in the macroscopic multibody system which makes the traditional classical materials machining theory cannot accurately uncover the mystery of the surface generation in the MP. Large-scale classical molecular dynamic (MD) simulation of interaction among nanoparticles and solid surface has been carried out to investigate the physical essence of surface planarization. The particles with small impact angle can generate more uniform global planarization surface but the materials removal rate is lower. The shear interaction between particle and substrate may induce large friction torque and lead to the rotation of particle. The translation plus rotation makes the nanoparticle behaved like micro-milling tool. The results show that the nanoparticles may aggregrate together and form larger cluster thus deteriorate surface the quality. This MD simulation results illuminate that the f inal planarized surface can only be acquired by synergic behavior of all particles using various means such as cutting, impacting, scratching, indentation and so on.

  15. Modification of the Interfacial Interaction between Carbon Fiber and Epoxy with Carbon Hybrid Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejing Yu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the hybrid materials and epoxy and carbon fiber (CF composites were improved significantly as compared to the CF composites made from unmodified epoxy. The reasons could be attributed to the strong interfacial interaction between the CF and the epoxy composites for the existence of carbon nanomaterials. The microstructure and dispersion of carbon nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and optical microscopy (OM. The results showed that the dispersion of the hybrid materials in the polymer was superior to other carbon nanomaterials. The high viscosity and shear stress characterized by a rheometer and the high interfacial friction and damping behavior characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA indicated that the strong interfacial interaction was greatly improved between fibers and epoxy composites. Remarkably, the tensile tests presented that the CF composites with hybrid materials and epoxy composites have a better reinforcing and toughening effect on CF, which further verified the strong interfacial interaction between epoxy and CF for special structural hybrid materials.

  16. Hydrogen-bond interaction assisted branched copolymer HILIC material for separation and N-glycopeptides enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wenya; Liu, Jianxi; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Yu; Weng, Yejing; Li, Senwu; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-09-01

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) has attracted increasing attention in recent years due to its efficient application in the separation of polar compounds and the enrichment of glycopeptides. However, HILIC materials are still of weak hydrophilicity and thereby present weak retention and selectivity. In this work, branched copolymer modified hydrophilic material Sil@Poly(THMA-co-MBAAm), with high hydrophilicity and unique "claw-like" polyhydric groups, were prepared by "grafting from" thiol-ene click reaction. Due to the abundant functional groups provided by branched copolymer, the material showed excellent retention for nucleosides, necleobases, acidic compounds, sugars and peptides. Furthermore, Sil@Poly(THMA-co-MBAAm) was also applied for the N-glycosylation sites profiling towards the digests of the mouse brain, and 1997N-glycosylated peptides were identified, corresponding to 686 glycoprotein groups. Due to the assisted hydrogen-bond interaction, the selectivity for glycopeptide enrichment in the real sample reached 94.6%, which was the highest as far as we know. All these results indicated that such hydrogen-bond interaction assisted branched copolymer HILIC material possessed great potential for the separation and large scale glycoproteomics analysis. PMID:27343616

  17. EDITORIAL: Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyldgaard, Per; Rahman, Talat S.

    2012-10-01

    The past decade has seen a dramatic rise in interest in exploring the role that van der Waals (vdW) or dispersion forces play in materials and in material behavior. Part of this stems from the obvious fact that vdW interactions (and other weak forces, such as Casimir) underpin molecular recognition, i.e., nature's approach to search for a match between genes and anti-genes and hence enable biological function. Less obvious is the recognition that vdW interactions affect a multitude of properties of a vast variety of materials in general, some of which also have strong technological applications. While for two atom- or orbital-sized material fragments the dispersive contributions to binding are small compared to those from the better known forms (ionic, covalent, metallic), those between sparse materials (spread over extended areas) can be of paramount importance. For example, an understanding of binding in graphite cannot arise solely from a study of the graphene layers individually, but also requires insight from inter-sheet graphene vdW bonding. It is the extended-area vdW bonding that provides sufficient cohesion to make graphite a robust, naturally occurring material. In fact, it is the vdW-bonded graphite, and not the all-covalently bonded diamond, that is the preferred form of pure carbon under ambient conditions. Also important is the understanding that vdW attraction can attain a dramatic relevance even if the material fragments, the building blocks, are not necessarily parallel from the outset or smooth when viewed in isolation (such as a graphene sheet or a carbon nanotube). This can happen if the building blocks have some softness and flexibility and allow an internal relative alignment to emerge. The vdW forces can then cause increasingly larger parts of the interacting fragments to line up at sub-nanometer separations and thus beget more areas with a sizable vdW bonding contribution. The gecko can scale a wall because it can bring its flexible hairs

  18. Laser-Material Interaction Studies Utilizing the Solid-State Heat Capacity Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, R; Parker, J; Boley, C; Cutter, K; Fochs, S; Rubenchik, A

    2007-04-19

    A variety of laser-material interaction experiments have been conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) utilizing the solid-state heat capacity laser (SSHCL). For these series of experiments, laser output power is 25kW, on-target laser spot sizes of up to 16 cm by 16 cm square, with air speeds of approximately 100 meters per second flowing across the laser-target interaction surface as shown in Figure 1. The empirical results obtained are used to validate our simulation models.

  19. Degradation of wide band-gap electrolumienscent materials by exciton-polaron interactions (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Hany; Wang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    The limited performance stability and gradual loss in the electroluminescence efficiency of OLEDs utilizing wide band-gap materials, such as blue-emitting phosphorescent and fluorescent devices, continues to be a challenge for wider technology adoption. We recently found that interactions between excitons and polarons play an important role in the aging behavior of electroluminescent materials, and that a correlation exists between the susceptibility of these materials to this aging mode and their band-gap. This degradation mode is also found to be often associated with the emergence of new bands - at longer wavelength - in the electroluminescence spectra of the materials, that can often be detected after prolonged electrical driving. Such bands contribute to the increased spectral broadening and color purity loss often observed in these devices over time. Exciton-polaron interactions, and the associated degradation, are also found to occur most significantly in the vicinity of device inter-layer interfaces such as at the interface between the emitter layer and the electron or hole transport layers. New results obtained from investigations of these phenomena in a wide range of commonly used host and guest OLED materials will be presented.

  20. Interactions between organisms and parent materials of a constructed Technosol shape its hydrostructural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Maha; Grimaldi, Michel; Lerch, Thomas Z.; Pando, Anne; Gigon, Agnès; Blouin, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    There is no information on how organisms influence hydrostructural properties of constructed Technosols and how such influence will be affected by the parent-material composition factor. In a laboratory experiment, parent materials, which were excavated deep horizons of soils and green waste compost (GWC), were mixed at six levels of GWC (from 0 to 50 %). Each mixture was set up in the presence/absence of plants and/or earthworms, in a full factorial design (n = 96). After 21 weeks, hydrostructural properties of constructed Technosols were characterized by soil shrinkage curves. Organisms explained the variance of hydrostructural characteristics (19 %) a little better than parent-material composition (14 %). The interaction between the effects of organisms and parent-material composition explained the variance far better (39 %) than each single factor. To summarize, compost and plants played a positive role in increasing available water in macropores and micropores; plants were extending the positive effect of compost up to 40 and 50 % GWC. Earthworms affected the void ratio for mixtures from 0 to 30 % GWC and available water in micropores, but not in macropores. Earthworms also acted synergistically with plants by increasing their root biomass, resulting in positive effects on available water in macropores. Organisms and their interaction with parent materials positively affected the hydrostructural properties of constructed Technosols, with potential positive consequences on resistance to drought or compaction. Considering organisms when creating Technosols could be a promising approach to improve their fertility.

  1. A study of the material in the ATLAS inner detector using secondary hadronic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Bondioli, Mario; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Debbe, Ramiro; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; 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Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernandez, Carlos Medina; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Keung, Justin; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kraus, Jana; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin–Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Savva, Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; 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Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jürgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS inner detector is used to reconstruct secondary vertices due to hadronic interactions of primary collision products, so probing the location and amount of material in the inner region of ATLAS. Data collected in 7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC, with a minimum bias trigger, are used for comparisons with simulated events. The reconstructed secondary vertices have spatial resolutions ranging from ~200 microns to 1 mm. The overall material description in the simulation is validated to within an experimental uncertainty of about 7%. This will lead to a better understanding of the reconstruction of various objects such as tracks, leptons, jets, and missing transverse momentum.

  2. PERMEABILITY, SOLUBILITY, AND INTERACTION OF HYDROGEN IN POLYMERS- AN ASSESSMENT OF MATERIALS FOR HYDROGEN TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, M

    2008-02-05

    Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) piping has been identified as a leading candidate for use in a transport system for the Hydrogen Economy. Understanding the permeation and leakage of hydrogen through the candidate materials is vital to effective materials system selection or design and development of safe and efficient materials for this application. A survey of the literature showed that little data on hydrogen permeation are available and no mechanistically-based models to quantitatively predict permeation behavior have been developed. However, several qualitative trends in gaseous permeation have been identified and simple calculations have been performed to identify leakage rates for polymers of varying crystallinity. Additionally, no plausible mechanism was found for the degradation of polymeric materials in the presence of pure hydrogen. The absence of anticipated degradation is due to lack of interactions between hydrogen and FRP and very low solubility coefficients of hydrogen in polymeric materials. Recommendations are made to address research and testing needs to support successful materials development and use of FRP materials for hydrogen transport and distribution.

  3. Results of Reactor Materials Experiments Investigating 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction and Debris Coolability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is conducting reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: 1) resolution of the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and 2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants and provide the technical basis for better containment designs of future plants. With respect to the second objective, there remain uncertainties in the models that evaluate the lateral vs. axial power split during core-concrete interaction because of a lack of truly two-dimensional experiment data. As a first step in bridging this gap, a large scale Core-Concrete Interaction experiment (CCI-1) has been conducted as part of the MCCI program. This test investigated the interaction of a 400 kg core-oxide melt with a crucible made of siliceous concrete along two walls and the base. The two remaining walls were made of non-ablative magnesium oxide. The initial phase of the test was conducted under dry conditions. After a predefined ablation depth was achieved, the cavity was flooded to obtain data on the coolability of a core melt after core-concrete interaction has progressed for some time. This paper provides a description of the test facility and an overview of results from this test. (authors)

  4. Research on the potential use of interactive materials on astronomy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Macedo, Josue

    2016-07-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Sciences, using the mixed methodology, combined with the three pedagogical moments. Among other aspects, the viability of the use of resources was noticed, involving digital technologies and interactive materials on teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options for future teachers and meet their training needs.

  5. The cianimetalatos as model materials for studying the adsorption of H2 and interactions that determine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the work done in recent years in the IMRE and the Faculties of Chemistry and Physics at the University of Havana, in collaboration with the Applied Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology at the National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico is presented; on the synthesis, physico-chemical characterization, assessment and modeling of potentially usable as nanoporous materials cianometalatos model to study the adsorption of H2 at high densities, and interactions that determine it. The mechanisms of interaction of the hydrogen molecule with the crystal lattice and its consequences for the adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen in these materials are discussed. The results have been reported in dozens of articles, published in international journals, they were presented at numerous scientific events and contributed to the preparation of several thesis, master's and Ph.D. (full text)

  6. Teachers’ Pedagogic Design of Digital Interactive Whiteboard Materials in the UK Secondary School

    OpenAIRE

    Jewitt, Carey

    2008-01-01

    Teachers have always made texts for use in the classroom. The wide spread introduction of Interactive whiteboard (IWB) technology into UK classrooms, and the screen more generally, makes the multimodal resources of color, image, dynamic movement, and sound newly available for pedagogic design in newly connectable ways. These facilities present teachers with new questions about how to design and use teaching materials, new possibilites and constraints. This presentation will examine teachers' ...

  7. Bibliographic data on surface processes in particle-material interactions published in Japan, 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on surface processes in particle-material interactions for fusion technology have been surveyed and collected over 24 publications which have been published during January, 1986 - December, 1987 in Japan. The bibliographic data in the form of data sheets were sent to the International Data Center in IAEA. This report presents 97 selected data sheets arranged in the order of codes of relevant phenomena. A list of literature is given. (author) 159 refs

  8. Polarization properties of four-wave interaction in dynamic recording material based on bacteriorhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchemskaya, Ellen Y.; Soskin, Marat S.

    1994-10-01

    The polarization properties of four-wave interaction on polymer films with bacteriorhodopsin that possess anisotropically saturating nonlinearity are studied both theoretically and experimentally. The amplitude and the polarization of the diffracted wave for recording material with anisotropically saturating nonlinearity are calculated. Low saturation intensity allows the operation of the polarization of low-intensity signals to be realized. It is shown that control of the diffractive wave polarization is possible only with the variation of the light recording intensity.

  9. Neutron production from 200-500 MeV proton interaction with spacecraft materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on detailed energy spectra of neutron production >14 MeV from collisions of 200-500 MeV protons with combinations of aluminium, graphite and polyethylene. Comparisons of normalised neutron spectra are made with respect to incident proton energy, angle of neutron production and material. In general, carbon (graphite) or polyethylene (by itself or in combination with aluminium) reduce secondary neutron production >14 MeV relative to the production from interactions in aluminium. (authors)

  10. Material power or normative conflict : determinants of the interaction between global and local agrifood governance

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, Doris; Glaab, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    "We witness a constant interaction of global and local forces in the global agrifood system. This paper develops an analytical framework for the identification of the relative impact of these global versus local forces on the sustainability of the agrifood system. In pursuit of its objectives, the framework highlights material and ideational sources of power as important determinants of how the contest between global and local actors and norms in global agrifood governance plays out. With ...

  11. Deuterium plasma-material wall interactions. Final report, 1 May 1979-30 September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the final year of this program we completed our study of plasma interactions with material surfaces. Analysis of unipolar arc damage on the microstructure of Ti-6Al-4V was the final part of the study of plasma-metal interactions. Unipolar arcing was found to be the most severe damage mechanism for this alloy and the degree of damage was very sensitive to the metal microstructure. ATJ-S graphite specimens were exposed to hot deuterium plasma and were examined for surface damage. The residual gas in the plasma device was studied using a monopole gas analyzer so as to determine the type and quantity of hydrocarbon species produced by the plasma-graphite interaction

  12. Using atomic diffraction of Na from material gratings to measure atom-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In atom optics a material structure is commonly regarded as an amplitude mask for atom waves. However, atomic diffraction patterns formed using material gratings indicate that material structures also operate as phase masks. In this study a well collimated beam of sodium atoms is used to illuminate a silicon nitride grating with a period of 100 nm. During passage through the grating slots atoms acquire a phase shift due to the van der Waals (vdW) interaction with the grating walls. As a result the relative intensities of the matter-wave diffraction peaks deviate from those expected for a purely absorbing grating. Thus a complex transmission function is required to explain the observed diffraction envelopes. An optics perspective to the theory of atomic diffraction from material gratings is put forth in the hopes of providing a more intuitive picture concerning the influence of the vdW potential. The van der Waals coefficient C3=2.7±0.8 meV nm3 is determined by fitting a modified Fresnel optical theory to the experimental data. This value of C3 is consistent with a van der Waals interaction between atomic sodium and a silicon nitride surface

  13. Assessment of database for interaction of tritium with ITER plasma facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work surveys recent literature on hydrogen isotope interactions with Be, SS and Inconels, Cu, C, and V, and alloys of Cu and V. The goals are (1) to provide input to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) team to help with tritium source term estimates for the Early Safety and Environmental Characterization Study and (2) to provide guidance for planning additional research that will be needed to fill gaps in the present materials database. Properties of diffusivity, solubility, permeability, chemical reactions, Soret effect, recombination coefficient, surface effects, trapping, porosity, layered structures, interfaces, and oxides are considered. Various materials data are tabulated, and a matrix display shows an assessment of the quality of the data available for each main property of each material. Recommendations are made for interim values of diffusivity and solubility to be used, pending further discussion by the ITER community

  14. Fumed silica nanoparticle mediated biomimicry for optimal cell-material interactions for artificial organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mel, Achala; Ramesh, Bala; Scurr, David J; Alexander, Morgan R; Hamilton, George; Birchall, Martin; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-03-01

    Replacement of irreversibly damaged organs due to chronic disease, with suitable tissue engineered implants is now a familiar area of interest to clinicians and multidisciplinary scientists. Ideal tissue engineering approaches require scaffolds to be tailor made to mimic physiological environments of interest with specific surface topographical and biological properties for optimal cell-material interactions. This study demonstrates a single-step procedure for inducing biomimicry in a novel nanocomposite base material scaffold, to re-create the extracellular matrix, which is required for stem cell integration and differentiation to mature cells. Fumed silica nanoparticle mediated procedure of scaffold functionalization, can be potentially adapted with multiple bioactive molecules to induce cellular biomimicry, in the development human organs. The proposed nanocomposite materials already in patients for number of implants, including world first synthetic trachea, tear ducts and vascular bypass graft. PMID:24243739

  15. Assessment of database for interaction of tritium with ITER plasma facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, T.J.; Anderl, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The present work surveys recent literature on hydrogen isotope interactions with Be, SS and Inconels, Cu, C, and V, and alloys of Cu and V. The goals are (1) to provide input to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) team to help with tritium source term estimates for the Early Safety and Environmental Characterization Study and (2) to provide guidance for planning additional research that will be needed to fill gaps in the present materials database. Properties of diffusivity, solubility, permeability, chemical reactions, Soret effect, recombination coefficient, surface effects, trapping, porosity, layered structures, interfaces, and oxides are considered. Various materials data are tabulated, and a matrix display shows an assessment of the quality of the data available for each main property of each material. Recommendations are made for interim values of diffusivity and solubility to be used, pending further discussion by the ITER community.

  16. Finite Element Model-Based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Systems for Composite Material under Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Ebna Hai, Bhuiyan Shameem Mahmood; Bause, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Advanced composite materials such as Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) tend to be used in aerospace industry to keep the weight at its minimum and yet retain a great strength. CFRP have a strong, stiff fibres in a matrix. The resulting material is very strong as it has the best strength to weight ratio of all construction materials. However, aircraft structures such as wings can break due to Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) oscillations or material fatigue. Material inspection by piezo...

  17. Anodized titania: Processing and characterization to improve cell-materials interactions for load bearing implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kakoli

    The objective of this study is to investigate in vitro cell-materials interactions using human osteoblast cells on anodized titanium. Titanium is a bioinert material and, therefore, gets encapsulated after implantation into the living body by a fibrous tissue that isolates them from the surrounding tissues. In this work, bioactive nonporous and nanoporous TiO2 layers were grown on commercially pure titanium substrate by anodization process using different electrolyte solutions namely (1) H3PO 4, (2) HF and (3) H2SO4, (4) aqueous solution of citric acid, sodium fluoride and sulfuric acid. The first three electrolytes produced bioactive TiO2 films with a nonporous structure showing three distinctive surface morphologies. Nanoporous morphology was obtained on Ti-surfaces from the fourth electrolyte at 20V for 4h. Cross-sectional view of the nanoporous surface reveals titania nanotubes of length 600 nm. It was found that increasing anodization time initially increased the height of the nanotubes while maintaining the tubular array structure, but beyond 4h, growth of nanotubes decreased with a collapsed array structure. Human osteoblast (HOB) cell attachment and growth behavior were studied using an osteoprecursor cell line (OPC 1) for 3, 7 and 11 days. Colonization of the cells was noticed with distinctive cell-to-cell attachment on HF anodized surfaces. TiO2 layer grown in H2SO4 electrolyte did not show significant cell growth on the surface, and some cell death was also noticed. Good cellular adherence with extracellular matrix extensions in between the cells was noticed for samples anodized with H3PO 4 electrolyte and nanotube surface. Cell proliferation was excellent on anodized nanotube surfaces. An abundant amount of extracellular matrix (ECM) between the neighboring cells was also noticed on nanotube surfaces with filopodia extensions coming out from cells to grasp the nanoporous surface for anchorage. To better understand and compare cell-materials interactions

  18. Interaction of graphene-related materials with human intestinal cells: an in vitro approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucki, M.; Rupper, P.; Sarrieu, C.; Melucci, M.; Treossi, E.; Schwarz, A.; León, V.; Kraegeloh, A.; Flahaut, E.; Vázquez, E.; Palermo, V.; Wick, P.

    2016-04-01

    Graphene-related materials (GRM) inherit unique combinations of physicochemical properties which offer a high potential for technological as well as biomedical applications. It is not clear which physicochemical properties are the most relevant factors influencing the behavior of GRM in complex biological environments. In this study we have focused on the interaction of GRM, especially graphene oxide (GO), and Caco-2 cells in vitro. We mimiked stomach transition by acid-treatment of two representative GRM followed by analysis of their physicochemical properties. No significant changes in the material properties or cell viability of exposed Caco-2 cells in respect to untreated GRM could be detected. Furthermore, we explored the interaction of four different GO and Caco-2 cells to identify relevant physicochemical properties for the establishment of a material property-biological response relationship. Despite close interaction with the cell surface and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), no acute toxicity was found for any of the applied GO (concentration range 0-80 μg ml-1) after 24 h and 48 h exposure. Graphene nanoplatelet aggregates led to low acute toxicity at high concentrations, indicating that aggregation, the number of layers or the C/O ratio have a more pronounced effect on the cell viability than the lateral size alone.Graphene-related materials (GRM) inherit unique combinations of physicochemical properties which offer a high potential for technological as well as biomedical applications. It is not clear which physicochemical properties are the most relevant factors influencing the behavior of GRM in complex biological environments. In this study we have focused on the interaction of GRM, especially graphene oxide (GO), and Caco-2 cells in vitro. We mimiked stomach transition by acid-treatment of two representative GRM followed by analysis of their physicochemical properties. No significant changes in the material properties or cell

  19. Numerical modelling of thermal effects on biological tissue during laser-material interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among numerous methods of the modelling of laser interaction with the material equivalent of biological tissue (including macroscopic and microscopic cell interaction), the case of pathogenic prostates is chosen to be studied. The principal difference between the inorganic and tissue equivalent material is the term which includes blood flow. Thermal modelling is chosen for interaction mechanisms, i.e. bio-heat equation. It was noticed that the principal problems are in selecting appropriate numerical methods, available mathematical program packages and finding all exact parameters for performing the needed calculations. As principal parameters, among them density, heat conduction, and specific heat, there are many other parameters which depend on the chosen approach (there could be up to 20 parameters, among them coefficient of time scaling, arterial blood temperature, metabolic heat source, etc). The laser type, including its wavelength which defines the quantity of absorbed energy and dynamic of irradiation, presents the term which could be modulated for the chosen problem. In this study, the program Comsol Multiphysics 3.5 is used in the simulation of prostate exposed to Nd3+:YAG laser in its fundamental mode. (paper)

  20. Wannier function approach to realistic Coulomb interactions in layered materials and heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösner, M.; Şaşıoǧlu, E.; Friedrich, C.; Blügel, S.; Wehling, T. O.

    2015-08-01

    We introduce an approach to derive realistic Coulomb interaction terms in freestanding layered materials and vertical heterostructures from ab initio modeling of the corresponding bulk materials. To this end, we establish a combination of calculations within the framework of the constrained random-phase approximation, Wannier function representation of Coulomb matrix elements within some low-energy Hilbert space, and continuum medium electrostatics, which we call Wannier function continuum electrostatics (WFCE). For monolayer and bilayer graphene we reproduce full ab initio calculations of the Coulomb matrix elements within an accuracy of 0.3 eV or better. We show that realistic Coulomb interactions in bilayer graphene can be manipulated on the eV scale by different dielectric and metallic environments. A comparison to electronic phase diagrams derived in M. M. Scherer et al. [Phys. Rev. B 85, 235408 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.235408] suggests that the electronic ground state of bilayer graphene is a layered antiferromagnet and remains surprisingly unaffected by these strong changes in the Coulomb interaction.

  1. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  2. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a 'primer' on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a 'bench-scale' laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the 'primer,' a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

  3. Core-melt materials interactions evaluations. Final report, April 1980-April 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final report describes work performed on a variety of topics related to the materials interactions that would occur following a postulated core-meltdown accident in a Light Water Reactor. The main topics addressed include: (1) an evaluation of candidate core-retention-system materials for the Zion and Indian Point (Z/IP) nuclear reactors; (2) an examination of various core-retention-system concepts with emphasis on the restrictions imposed by the conditions present in the Z/IP reactors; (3) development of a concept for retrofitting the Z/IP reactors with a molten-core retention device; (4) reactor-cavity conditions following vessel failure, including the existence of a hydraulic jump and molten-core entrainment and sweepout; (5) core debris-concrete crust development, and including the effects of composition, strength, gas pressure and surface tension; (6) a discussion of reactor-containment-system materials in the context of interactions with core debris; (7) reactions forming combustible hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons; (8) a discussion of the properties and behavior of urania and the prospects for decontamination of aerosols in a BWR suppression pool; and (9) the effect of water salinity and acidity on concrete

  4. Study of van der Waals bonding and interactions in metal organic framework materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal organic framework (MOF) materials have attracted a lot of attention due to their numerous applications in fields such as hydrogen storage, carbon capture and gas sequestration. In all these applications, van der Waals forces dominate the interaction between the small guest molecules and the walls of the MOFs. In this review article, we describe how a combined theoretical and experimental approach can successfully be used to study those weak interactions and elucidate the adsorption mechanisms important for various applications. On the theory side, we show that, while standard density functional theory is not capable of correctly describing van der Waals interactions, functionals especially designed to include van der Waals forces exist, yielding results in remarkable agreement with experiment. From the experimental point of view, we show examples in which IR adsorption and Raman spectroscopy are essential to study molecule/MOF interactions. Importantly, we emphasize throughout this review that a combination of theory and experiment is crucial to effectively gain further understanding. In particular, we review such combined studies for the adsorption mechanism of small molecules in MOFs, the chemical stability of MOFs under humid conditions, water cluster formation inside MOFs, and the diffusion of small molecules into MOFs. The understanding of these phenomena is critical for the rational design of new MOFs with desired properties. (topical review)

  5. Study of van der Waals bonding and interactions in metal organic framework materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga, Sebastian; Canepa, Pieremanuele; Tan, Kui; Chabal, Yves J; Thonhauser, Timo

    2014-04-01

    Metal organic framework (MOF) materials have attracted a lot of attention due to their numerous applications in fields such as hydrogen storage, carbon capture and gas sequestration. In all these applications, van der Waals forces dominate the interaction between the small guest molecules and the walls of the MOFs. In this review article, we describe how a combined theoretical and experimental approach can successfully be used to study those weak interactions and elucidate the adsorption mechanisms important for various applications. On the theory side, we show that, while standard density functional theory is not capable of correctly describing van der Waals interactions, functionals especially designed to include van der Waals forces exist, yielding results in remarkable agreement with experiment. From the experimental point of view, we show examples in which IR adsorption and Raman spectroscopy are essential to study molecule/MOF interactions. Importantly, we emphasize throughout this review that a combination of theory and experiment is crucial to effectively gain further understanding. In particular, we review such combined studies for the adsorption mechanism of small molecules in MOFs, the chemical stability of MOFs under humid conditions, water cluster formation inside MOFs, and the diffusion of small molecules into MOFs. The understanding of these phenomena is critical for the rational design of new MOFs with desired properties. PMID:24613989

  6. Promoted cell and material interaction on atmospheric pressure plasma treated titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Inho [Convergence Technology Exam. Div. II, Korean Intellectual Patent Office, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Vagaska, Barbora [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyok Jin [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jae Kyeong [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Byeong-Ju [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi Hee [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong-Chul, E-mail: parkjc@yuhs.ac [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-01

    Surface carbon contamination is a natural phenomenon. However, it interferes with cell-biomaterial interaction. In order to eliminate the interference, atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was employed. Dielectric barrier discharge treatment of titanium surface for less than 10 min turned titanium super-hydrophilic. Adsorption of fibronectin which is the major cell adhesive protein increased after plasma treatment. Cell attachment parameters of osteoblast cells such as population, cell area, perimeter, Feret's diameter and cytoskeleton development were also enhanced. Cell proliferation increased on the plasma treated titanium. In conclusion, dielectric barrier discharge type atmospheric pressure plasma system is effective to modify titanium surface and the modified titanium promotes cell and material interactions.

  7. NANOINTERACT: A rational approach to the interaction between nanoscale materials and living matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of understanding the interactions between nanoscale materials and living matter has now begun to be appreciated by an extraordinaryly large range of stakeholders, including researchers, industry, governments and society, all of whom appreciate both the opportunities presented by and challenges raised by this arena of research. Not only does it open up new directions in nanomedicine and nanodiagnostics, but it also offers the chance to implement nanotechnology across all industry in a safe and responsible manner. The underlying reasons for this arena as a new scientific paradigm are real and durable. Less than 100 nm nanoparticles can enter cells, less that 40 nm they can enter cell nucleus, and less that 35 nm they can pass through the blood brain barrier. These are fundamental length scales of biological relevance that will ensure that engineered nanoscience will impinge on biology and medicine for many decades to come. One important issue is the current lack of reproducibility of the outcomes of many experiments in this arena. Differences are likely a consequence of such things as uncontrolled nanoparticle aggregation leading to unpredictable doses being presented to cells, interference of the nanoparticles themselves with many of the tests being applied, differences in the degree of confluency of the cells used, and a host of other factors. NanoInteract has shown how careful control of all aspects of the test system, combined with round robin type approaches, can help resolve these issues and begin to ensure that the field can become a quantitative science. The basic principle of NanoInteract is that given identical nanomaterials, cells and biological materials, and using a common protocol, experiments must yield identical answers. Thus, any deviations result from errors in (applying) the protocol which can be tracked and eliminated, until quantitatively reproducible results are obtained by any researcher in any location. This paper outlines the

  8. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [and others

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  9. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT (deuterium-tritium) fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D (Research and Development) avenues for their resolution are presented

  10. Numerical Solutions of Interactive Multi-Trap Model and Application on Real Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Uzun

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermoluminescence phenomenon, have been commonly utilized for measurement of radiation doses. Most important point of the measurement of radiation doses by using this method is that fundamental traps parameters influencing thermoluminescence process. Up to now, several models are asserted to determine of the trap parameters and to explain of thermoluminescence process. In this work, interactive multi-trap model was investigated, physical model was performed, differential equations, which is asserted by the model, were solved by numerically and results were compared with real materials. In the light of results obtained from theoretical and experimental studies the proficiency of this model to explain the thermoluminescence process was discussed.

  11. Time-resolved quantitative-phase microscopy of laser-material interactions using a wavefront sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, Laurent; Monneret, Serge

    2016-07-15

    We report on a simple and efficient technique based on a wavefront sensor to obtain time-resolved amplitude and phase images of laser-material interactions. The main interest of the technique is to obtain quantitative self-calibrated phase measurements in one shot at the femtosecond time-scale, with high spatial resolution. The technique is used for direct observation and quantitative measurement of the Kerr effect in a fused silica substrate and free electron generation by photo-ionization processes in an optical coating. PMID:27420506

  12. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume of Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion is devoted to atomic collision processes of helium atoms and of beryllium and boron atoms and ions in fusion plasmas. Most of the articles included in this volume are extended versions of the contributions presented at the IAEA experts' meetings on Atomic Data for Helium Beam Fusion Alpha Particle Diagnostics and on the Atomic Database for Beryllium and Boron, held in June 1991 at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna, or have resulted from the cross-section data analyses and evaluations performed by the working groups of these meetings. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 6 of the supplement ''atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion'' to the journal ''Nuclear Fusion'' includes critical assessments and results of original experimental and theoretical studies on inelastic collision processes among the basic and dominant impurity constituents of fusion plasmas. Processes considered in the 15 papers constituting this volume are: electron impact excitation of excited Helium atoms, electron impact excitation and ionization of plasma impurity ions and atoms, electron-impurity-ion recombination and excitation, ionization and electron capture in collisions of plasma protons and impurity ions with the main fusion plasma neutral components helium and atomic and molecular hydrogen. Refs, figs, tabs

  14. Materials Design via Optimized Intramolecular Noncovalent Interactions for High-Performance Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiaojie; Liao, Qiaogan; Manley, Eric F.; Wu, Zishan; Wang, Yulun; Wang, Weida; Yang, Tingbin; Shin, Young-Eun; Cheng, Xing; Liang, Yongye; Chen, Lin X.; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Marks, Tobin J.; Guo, Xugang

    2016-04-12

    We report the design, synthesis, and implemention in semiconducting polymers of a novel head-to-head linkage containing the TRTOR (3-alkyl-3'-alkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene) donor subunit having a single strategically optimized, planarizing noncovalent S···O interaction. Diverse complementary thermal, optical, electrochemical, X-ray scattering, electrical, photovoltaic, and electron microscopic characterization techniques are applied to establish structure-property correlations in a TRTOR-based polymer series. In comparison to monomers having double S···O interactions, replacing one alkoxy substituent with a less electron-donating alkyl one yields TRTOR-based polymers with significantly depressed (0.2-0.3 eV) HOMOs. Furthermore, the weaker single S···O interaction and greater TRTOR steric encumberance enhances materials processability without sacrificing backbone planarity. From another perspective, TRTOR has comparable electronic properties to ring-fused 5Hdithieno[ 3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyran (DTP) subunits, but a centrosymmetric geometry which promotes a more compact and ordered structure than bulkier, axisymmetric DTP. Compared to monosubstituted TTOR (3-alkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene), alkylation at the TRTOR bithiophene 3-position enhances conjugation and polymer crystallinity with contracted π-π stacking. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) data reveal that the greater steric hindrance and the weaker single S···O interaction are not detrimental to close packing and high crystallinity. As a proof of materials design, copolymerizing TRTOR with phthalimides yields copolymers with promising thin-film transistor mobility as high as 0.42 cm2/(V·s) and 6.3% power conversion efficiency in polymer solar cells, the highest of any phthalimide copolymers reported to date. The depressed TRTOR HOMOs imbue these polymers with substantially increased Ion/Ioff ratios and Voc’s versus analogous subunits with multiple electron donating

  15. Experimental research on the multi-dimensional fuel-coolant interaction using reactor material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J. H.; Park, I. K.; Hwang, M. K.; Hong, S. W.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. D. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-10-01

    This paper reviews existing researches on the Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) and discusses the necessity of multi-dimensional FCI experiment using reactor material. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is performing a FCI experiment using Corium. The objective of the experiment is to investigate the physical mechanism of FCI in the area of explosion and mixing. The reactor material including UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, ZR up to 20 kg will be poured into a water tank with 60 cm diameter inside a pressure vessel. The fuel and water pool geometry is in multi-dimensional shape. This paper describes the conceptual design of the test facility. Also, the paper briefly discusses about the research on the development of multi-dimensional FCI computer code.

  16. INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL AND NON-THERMAL INTERACTIONS OF MICROWAVES WITH MATERIALS AND MICROWAVE CHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner KUŞLU

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of microwaves in industry has generated interest recently as an alternative to classic thermal heating because of the drastic reduction in the processing time. In spite of the fact that there is a wide application of microwaves, the interaction mechanism between microwaves and materials has not been well understood. Nowadays, the fact that there is a debate on the alternative use of microwaves is on not the dielectric heating which is well known but microwave specific effect. In this article there are reports which show similar kinetic in both microwave and classic thermal methods at similar temperature and simple dielectric heating of materials under microwaves conditions. There are also reports which show a clear reaction rate enhancement by microwave radiation compared to the thermal method under similar reactions conditions and temperatures indicating microwave specific effect. In addition, the study on the effects of microwaves on chemical reactions and hypothesis associated with the microwave effects will discuss.

  17. Plume splitting in pico-second laser-material interaction under the influence of shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study the physics of plume splitting in pico-second laser material interaction in background gas. The velocity distribution shows a clear split into two distinctive components. Detailed atom trajectory track reveals the behavior of atoms within the peaks and uncovers the mechanisms of peak formation. The observed plume velocity splitting emerges from two distinguished parts of the plume. The front peak of the plume is from the faster moving atoms and smaller particles during laser-material ablation. This region experiences strong constraint from the ambient gas and has substantial velocity attenuation. The second (rear) peak of the plume velocity originates from the larger and slower clusters in laser-material ablation. These larger clusters/particles experience very little constraint from the background, but are affected by the relaxation dynamics of plume and appear almost as a standing wave during the evolution. Density splitting only appears at the beginning of laser-material ablation and quickly disappears due to spread-out of the slower moving clusters. It is found that higher ambient pressure and stronger laser fluence favor earlier plume splitting.

  18. Application of interactive course management system in distance learning of material science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper presents ideas and construction kinds of distance learning system based on course management system for distance learning and Computer Aided Teaching in the field of material science.Design/methodology/approach: Paper describes contain and composition of the system including virtual courses and didactic materials for lectures in the discipline of materials science and instructions for classes guided in scientific laboratories used as a supplement for traditional learning methods.Findings: This study shows advantages, possibilities and features of already created and introduced e-learning system as a modern tool for distance education and interactive communication with students and between students. It’s also used for publishing of scientific researches and other staff of the Institute.Practical implications: As an example of such system is presented an educational platform applied in Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials at Silesian University of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Gliwice, Poland, with use of the “MOODLE” software in October 2004.Originality/value: Article is valuable for persons and institutions, which are concerned with e-learning and distance education, as well for students and all users of such systems.

  19. Using Atomic Diffraction of Na from Material Gratings to Measure Atom-Surface Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Perreault, J D; Savas, T A; Perreault, John D.; Cronin, Alexander D.

    2003-01-01

    In atom optics a material structure is commonly regarded as an amplitude mask for atom waves. However, atomic diffraction patterns formed using material gratings indicate that material structures also operate as phase masks. In this study a well collimated beam of sodium atoms is used to illuminate a silicon nitride grating with a period of 100 nm. During passage through the grating slots atoms acquire a phase shift due to the van der Waals interaction with the grating walls. As a result the relative intensities of the matter-wave diffraction peaks deviate from those expected for a purely absorbing grating. Thus a complex transmission function is required to explain the observed diffraction envelopes. An optics perspective to the theory of atomic diffraction from material gratings is put forth in the hopes of providing a more intuitive picture concerning the influence of the vdW potential. The van der Waals coefficient $C_{3} = 2.7\\pm 0.8{meV nm}^{3}$ is determined by fitting a modified Fresnel optical theory...

  20. Phenomena in the interaction among a core melt and protective and sacrificial materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a postulated core meltdown accident in a light water reactor there are bound to be interactions, in the ex-vessel phase, among the core melt and the structural materials within and below the reactor cavity. In existing plants, these structural materials normally are structural concrete, while future, evolutionary reactor lines are to have sacrificial and protective materials specially designed for this hypothetical case. To add to the state of knowledge about the phenomena occurring, experiments need to be conducted under conditions as realistic as possible. Within the research programs funded by the European Union, the German Federal Ministry for Economics, and the German nuclear power plant operators, experiments on a laboratory as well as an industrial scale on these problems are being carried out in the two projects called CORESA (COrium on REfractory and SAcrificial materials) and ECOSTAR (Ex-vessel COre melt STAbilization Research). The experiments are accompanied by an extensive analytical theoretical program also serving to advance and validate computer codes on the problems under investigation. The projects, which are carried out with international European participation, are expected to allow a concept to be developed for managing postulated accident scenarios involving core meltdown for innovative nuclear power plants, and to provide findings on risk evaluation of plants now in operation so as to further develop accident management measures. (orig.)

  1. Studies of a local spin interactions in magnetic materials of spinel structure by neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inelastic neutron scattering studies on magnetic materials with a spinel structure have been undertaken in order to investigate a local spin interactions at given sites of crystallographic sublattices. The measurements carried out on ZnFe2O4, Mnsub(0.2)Znsub(0.8)Fe2O4 and MnFe2O4 between 5 and 293 K, have shown that the 6Ssub(5/2)-terms of Fe3+ and Mn2+ ions at B and A sites (for MnFe2O4) are splitted into six levels, due to the local spin interaction. The neutron spectroscopic studies are extended to the case of MgCr204 spinel having the Cr3+ ions at B-sites only. The interpretation of spectrum at 5 K was based on the splitting of crystal-field 2-level of4Fsub(3/2)-term of Cr3+ ions at B-sites. The interaction parameters were determined for chromium ions at B-sites. Basing on these values the magnetic moments of Cr3+ at B-sites have been found to be lowered with respect to the magnetic moment of free ions. The spectroscopic measurements performed yielded complementary information about magnetic structure of MgCr2O4. It appears from the present studies that there is a probability of observation of local spin interactions in magnetic spinels, not perturbed by cooperative phenomena. It was found that a contact field of magneto-molecular nature is acting on the cations at A anb B sites. The fields is caused by an indirect (via oxygen) exchange interaction with nearest magnetic ions. (author)

  2. Current status of investigations on molten fuel: Coolant interaction, material movement and relocation in LMFBRs in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper contains information on experimental studies and calculation codes, related to molten fuel-coolant interaction, material movement and relocation. Some calculation results for the BN-800 type reactor are presented. (author)

  3. Nanoengineering of Soft Matter Interactions in Organic Electro-Optic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benight, Stephanie J.

    Identification of electronic intermolecular electrostatic interactions that can significantly enhance poling-induced order is important to the advancement of the field of organic electro-optics and utilization of organic materials in photonics applications. Here we demonstrate an example of such improvement achieved through exploitation of the interaction of coumarin pendant groups in chromophore-containing macromolecules. The synthetic attachment of these pendant groups to electro-optic (EO) chromophores promotes intermolecular cooperativity as demonstrated by a 2-3 fold increase in macroscopic EO activity (acentric order). Acentric order enhancement is explained in terms of lattice-symmetry effects, where constraint of orientational degrees of freedom alters the relationship between centrosymmetric and acentric order. We demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that lattice dimensionality can be defined using the relationship between centrosymmetric order and acentric order. Experimentally: Acentric order is determined by attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurement of electro-optic activity coupled with hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS) measurement of molecular first hyperpolarizability while centrosymmetric order is determined by the variable angle polarization referenced absorption spectroscopy (VAPRAS) method. These measurements of chromophore order and lattice dimensionality are correlated with measurements of viscoelastic properties by Shear Modulation Force Microscopy (SM-FM), Intrinsic Friction Analysis (IFA), and Dielectric Relaxation Spectroscopy (DRS), leading to a self-consistent picture of the effect of specific spatially-anisotropic intermolecular interactions upon the physical properties of nanoengineered soft matter EO materials. Theoretically: Order is determined from statistical mechanical models that predict the properties of soft condensed matter. Exploration of this reduced dimensionality effect is explored through attachment of

  4. Interactions between organisms and parent materials of a constructed Technosol shape its hydrostructural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, M.; Grimaldi, M.; Lerch, T. Z.; Pando, A.; Gigon, A.; Blouin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Constructed Technosols provide an opportunity to recycle urban waste, and are an alternative to the uptake of topsoil from the countryside. Despite potential problems of erosion, compaction or water holding capacity, their physical properties and the resulting water regulation services are poorly documented. In a laboratory experiment, excavated deep horizons of soils and green waste compost (GWC) were mixed at six levels of GWC (from 0 to 50 %). Each mixture was set up in the presence/absence of plants and/or earthworms, in a full factorial design (n = 96). After 21 weeks, hydrostructural properties of constructed Technosols were characterized by soil shrinkage curves. Organisms explained the variance of hydrostructural characteristics (19 %) a little better than parent-material composition (14 %). The interaction between the effects of organisms and parent-material composition explained the variance far better (39 %) than each single factor. To summarize, compost and plants played a positive role in increasing available water in macropores and micropores; plants were extending the positive effect of compost up to 40 and 50 % GWC. Earthworms affected the void ratio for mixtures from 0 to 30 % GWC and available water in micropores, not in macropores. Earthworms also acted synergistically with plants by increasing their root biomass and the resulting positive effects on available water in macropores. Organisms and their interaction with parent materials thus positively affected the hydro-structural properties of constructed Technosols, with potential positive consequences on resistance to drought or compaction. Considering organisms when creating Technosols could be a promising approach to improve their fertility.

  5. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding

  6. Spectral studies on the interaction of acetylacetone with aluminum-containing MCM-41 mesoporous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) was used to study the interaction of acetylacetone (acac) with the mesoporous aluminum-containing MCM-41 materials. A room temperature synthesis method was used for preparation of purely siliceous MCM-41 and for aluminum-containing MCM-41 materials. Samples with Si/Al ratios of 50, 20, 10 and 5 were synthesized. The synthesized mesoporous materials possess highly ordered structure and high surface area as evidenced from X-ray diffraction and nitrogen physisorption measurements, respectively. The treatment of the as-synthesized aluminum-containing MCM-41 samples with acac shows a distinct band at ∼290 nm. This band is assigned to six coordinated aluminum atoms in the structure which is produced by diffusion of acac molecules through surfactant micelles and their interaction with aluminum atoms. The 290-nm band disappears upon several successive washing of the sample with ethanol. The treatment of the calcined aluminum-containing MCM-41 sample with acac produces the same 290-nm band where its intensity increases with the aluminum content of the sample. The intensity of this band is reduced upon successive ethanol washing, but remains nearly constant after three times washing. This irremovable aluminum species can be assigned to framework aluminum. The measured acidity for our aluminum-containing MCM-41 samples correlates linearly with the intensity of 290-nm band for the ethanol treated samples. This supports the idea that the Bronsted acidity in aluminum-modified MCM-41 samples is a function of the amount of tetrahedral framework aluminum in the structure

  7. Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Materials Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups: Report on the joint meeting, July 9, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper contains a collection of viewgraphs from a joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Materials Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups. A list of contributing topics is: PPPL update, ATF update, Los Alamos RFP program update, status of DIII-D, PMI graphite studies at ORNL, PMI studies for low atomic number materials, high heat flux materials issues, high heat flux testing program, particle confinement in tokamaks, helium self pumping, self-regenerating coatings technical planning activity and international collaboration update

  8. A study of interaction of materialism and money attitude and its impact on car purchase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimple Manchanda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates how the interaction of materialism and money attitude affects individuals choice of car price range in recent purchases (i.e., within the past six months. Car purchase behavior in terms of car price range has also been tested for different income groups, age groups and gender in National Capital Region (India. The data was collected through judgment sampling from 164 respondents, who recently purchased a new car for their personal use. The findings revealed that there is a significant association between materialism and different attitudes regarding the amount of money used by the respondents to purchase a car during the last six months. Level of materialism varies across different income levels and money attitude differs between males and females. Income was found to be the only variable that had significant association with choice of car price range. Age and gender did not seem to affect the car purchase behavior. This research has implications for the automobile industry and organizations in allied business activities, policy makers and marketers.

  9. Physicochemical Properties of 'Particle Brush'-Based Materials: Using Polymer Graft Modification to Tailor Particle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael D.

    The advent of surface-initiated controlled radical polymerization techniques has allowed a new class of hybrid polymer-grafted nanoparticles, known as eparticle brushes,f to be realized. By grafting polymers from the surface, interactions between particles can be tuned using the precise control over graft architecture (i.e. chain length, dispersity, particle size, and grafting density) afforded by controlled radical polymerizations. Previously, a transition from particle-like to polymer-like interactions in small particles with increasing graft length has been observed. In the limit of long graft lengths, the polymer chains impart new interactions between particles, such as entanglements. These results outline a rich, but largely unexplored parameter space. The present thesis further elucidates the extent to which polymer graft modification facilitates new interaction types between particles and the dependence of those interactions on chain conformation. Specifically, the mechanical properties, processability, phase separation, and vibrational modes of particle brushes are examined. A dependence of the mechanical properties of particle brush assemblies on particle size is accurately captured by accounting for differences in chain conformation between particles of different sizes using a simple scaling model. Further tailoring of mechanical characteristics in weak particle brush assemblies can be achieved using appropriate homopolymer additives to form two-component systems. Improved mechanical properties are accompanied by a significant enhancement in particle processability that allows application of previously unusable processing methods. Considering more complex systems, mesoscale phase separation of nanoparticles is demonstrated for the first time by blending of particle brushes with different graft polymers. Polymer graft modification is seen to not only strengthen and introduce new interactions, but also tune particle properties. Vibrational modes of

  10. Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions.

  11. Biocompatibility and tissue interactions of a new filler material for medical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarini, Elena; Supino, Rosanna; Pratesi, Graziella; Laccabue, Diletta; Tortoreto, Monica; Scanziani, Eugenio; Ghisleni, Gabriele; Paltrinieri, Saverio; Tunesi, Gianfranco; Nava, Maurizio

    2004-09-15

    Filler materials for medical use present limits, such as the induction of chronic inflammation and fibrosis. In the search for synthetic materials with improved biocompatible properties, a new polyacrylamide hydrogel, Aquamid (Contura SA, Montreux, Switzerland), has been investigated in preclinical systems. In cell cultures (endothelial cells and fibroblast), no or only transient biological effects were associated with 10% Aquamid exposure. The Aquamid-host interactions were examined in mice (10 mice per group) implanted subcutaneously or in the mammary fat pad with a very large volume (1.5 ml) of the material. Blood analysis, performed after 15 and 94 days (five mice per time for each group) to detect acute or late manifestations of toxicity, did not reveal relevant abnormalities in either group of Aquamid-bearing mice compared with control mice, except for a transient thrombocytopenia and a mild leukocytosis. Histological analysis of the pellet showed the presence of a thin, poorly vascularized cyst wall in implants. Only mild mesenchymal reparative and inflammatory processes were observed, even at longer observation times (more than 400 days). No alterations in any organ were detected. Despite the large volume implanted (approximately 5 percent of mouse body weight), the Aquamid pellet maintained its original size and shape without spreading or sticking to surrounding tissues. In conclusion, the study indicated a good tolerability of the new biopolymer in preclinical systems. The clinical utility of this new compound, if confirmed by clinical randomized trials showing its atoxic properties, could be in the field of aesthetic plastic surgery as a filler material for body contouring and in reconstructive surgery and above all in cancer patients to restore surgical defects. PMID:15468401

  12. Increase of efficiency of interaction of production and transport in the logistic chains of material traffic of enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina SIZOVA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of interaction of production and transport in micro logistic flows of enterprises are considered. On the basis of identification of the characteristics of processes the substantive provisions of methodology of forming of material traffic chains in transport-freight complexes are developed, a model and algorithm of optimization of material traffic chains on a logistic criterion is offered

  13. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issues of the Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion contains 9 papers on atomic and molecular processes in the edge region of magnetically confined fusion plasmas, including spectroscopic data for fusion edge plasmas; electron collision processes with plasma edge neutrals; electron-ion collisions in the plasma edge; cross-section data for collisions of electrons with hydrocarbon molecules; dissociative and energy transfer reactions involving vibrationally excited hydrogen or deuterium molecules; an assessment of ion-atom collision data for magnetic fusion plasma edge modeling; an extended scaling of cross sections for the ionization of atomic and molecular hydrogen as well as helium by multiply-charged ions; ion-molecule collision processes relevant to fusion edge plasmas; and radiative losses and electron cooling rates for carbon and oxygen plasma impurities. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Calcium-magnesium Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2015-01-01

    Particulates, like sand and volcanic ash, threaten the development of robust environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) that protect next-generation silicon-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine engine components from harsh combustion environments during service. The siliceous particulates transform into molten glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) when ingested by an aircraft engine operating at temperatures above 1200C. In this study, a sample of desert sand was melted into CMAS glass to evaluate high-temperature interactions between the sand glass and an advanced EBC material. Desert sand glass was added to the surface of hot-pressed EBC substrates, which were then heated in air at temperatures ranging from 1200C to 1500C. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate microstructure and phase compositions of specimens and the CMASEBC interface after heat treatments.

  15. Interactive computer-based instruction: Basic material control and accounting demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of interactive, computer-based training (CBT) courses can be a time- and resource-saving alternative to formal instruction in a classroom milieu. With CBT, students can proceed at their own pace, fit the study course into their schedule, and avoid the extra time and effort involved in travel and other special arrangements. The demonstration given here is an abbreviated, annotated version of a recently developed course in basic material control and accounting designed for the MC and A novice. The system used is ''Quest'' which includes multi-media capabilities, individual scoring, and built-in result-reporting capabilities for the course administrator. Efficient instruction and training are more important than ever because of the growing numbers of relatively inexperienced persons becoming active in safeguards

  16. Exploring Coulomb interaction in piezoelectric materials for assisting the laser cooling of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani Nia, Iman; Mohseni, Hooman

    2014-02-01

    Realization of anti-Stokes cooling requires high enough photon extraction efficiency as well as quantum efficiency, making the implementation of this technique extremely difficult for semiconductors. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate that the Coulomb interaction between photogenerated electron-hole pairs in strong piezoelectric materials such as GaN/InGaN quantum wells could assist laser cooling. By comparing to the cavity back-action mechanism, we also explain how this process depends upon laser detuning with respect to bandgap. To demonstrate the advantage of this method even further, we present simulations by using experimentally reported parameters of GaN and In0.15Ga0.85N, in order to conclude that the net cooling is indeed possible even with current III-nitride growth technology.

  17. Soy-based Polymers for Surface Modification and Interactions with Lignocellulosic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Araujo, Carlos Luis

    Recent environmental concerns about the use of synthetic materials that are often used to maintain our quality of life has triggered a significant amount of research to develop new technologies and to adopt sustainable, bio-based materials. Cellulose, lignin and other plant-derived macromolecules including proteins from soybeans have witnessed recent, renewed interest by the industrial and scientific communities. For example, soybean proteins have been proposed for a variety of applications, including wood adhesives, bio-plastics, composites and functional materials that may include synthetic polymers. Despite its importance in such systems or materials, very little is known about the fundamental nature of the interactions between soy proteins and other polymers. Therefore, this work addresses this issue by a systematic investigation of the interactions between soy proteins with the two most abundant macromolecules in the biosphere, namely, cellulose and lignin and with the most widely used synthetic polymer, polypropylene (PP). The adsorption of the main soy protein globulins, glycinin (11S) and beta-conglycinin (7S), was studied by using ultrathin films of cellulose, lignin and PP (as well as reference silica and organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) surfaces) that were used as substrates. The extent and dynamics of adsorption was monitored by using quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation (QCM-D), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) as well as complementary techniques including circular dichroism (CD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). QCM-D experiments indicated that soy protein adsorption was strongly affected by changes in the physicochemical environment. An increased adsorption of glycinin on silica (by 13%) and cellulose (by 89%) was observed with the increased ionic strength of the aqueous solution, from 0 to 0.1 M NaCl. This highlights the relevance of electrostatic interactions in the adsorption process. In contrast, the adsorption of beta

  18. Bone cell-material interactions on metal-ion doped polarized hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to study the influence of Mg2+ and Sr2+ dopants on in vitro bone cell-material interactions of electrically polarized hydroxyapatite [HAp, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] ceramics with an aim to achieve additional advantage of matching bone chemistry along with the original benefits of electrical polarization treatment relevant to biomedical applications. To achieve our research objective, commercial phase pure HAp has been doped with MgO, and SrO in single, and binary compositions. All samples have been sintered at 1200 deg. C for 2 h and subsequently polarized using an external d.c. field (2.0 kV/cm) at 400 deg. C for 1 h. Combined addition of 1 wt.% MgO/1 wt.% SrO in HAp has been most beneficial in enhancing the polarizability in which stored charge was 4.19 μC/cm2 compared to pure HAp of 2.23 μC/cm2. Bone cell-material interaction has been studied by culturing with human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB) for a maximum of 7 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of cell morphology reveal that favorable surface properties and dopant chemistry lead to good cellular adherence and spreading on negatively charged surfaces of both Sr2+ and Mg2+ doped HAp samples over undoped HAp. MTT assay results at 7 days show the highest viable cell densities on the negatively charged surfaces of binary doped HAp samples, while positive charged doped HAp surfaces exhibit limited cellular growth in comparison to neutral surfaces.

  19. Sorption interactions of biochars and pyrogenic carbonaceous materials with anionic contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fristak, Vladimir; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo; Micháleková-Richveisová, Barbora; Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Bucheli, Thomas; Soja, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Biochar as a highly porous and carbon-rich material with a large surface area is a new player in the system of environmental remediation techniques. A wide range of valuable sorption properties of this carbonaceous pyrolysis product provides new options to solve contaminant problems in soil and water and thus may reduce the number of contaminated sites. The sorption capacity of agricultural wastes and wood processing-derived biochars has been found to be excellent due to high surface area, pore volume, and surface functional groups. However, sorption interactions and separation of xenobiotics from waste water, soil solutions or polluted surface water is very often affected by the concentration of contaminant, contact time, effects of competitive substances and mainly by the chemical form of the respective contaminant. The negative surface charge of biochar-based sorption materials supports significant sorption in particular for cationic forms of pollutants. On the other hand many environmentally critical substances occur in anionic forms (e.g. As, P, Mo, Tc). Therefore their retention and immobilization by biochar is frequently considered as problematic or limited. Besides, details about the mechanism of biochar interactions with anionic compounds and the options for surface modification are largely unexplored. This contribution presents a comparative study about production and characterization of unmodified, chemically pre-treated and post-treated biochars with respect to sorption processes of model anionic compounds (PO43-, AsO43-). The obtained results confirmed the crucial role of altering biochar properties (pH) and of surface modification for improving biochar sorption efficiency for anionic contaminants.

  20. Collaborative Research. Fundamental Science of Low Temperature Plasma-Biological Material Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David Barry [Univ. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oehrlein, Gottlieb [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    atmospheric pressure using several types of low temperature plasma sources, for which radical induced interactions generally dominate due to short mean free paths of ions and VUV photons. For these conditions we demonstrated the importance of environmental interactions when atmospheric pressure plasma sources are used to modify biomolecules. This is evident from both gas phase characterization data and in-situ surface characterization of treated biomolecules. Environmental interactions can produce unexpected outcomes due to the complexity of reactions of reactive species with the atmosphere which determines the composition of reactive fluxes and atomistic changes of biomolecules. Overall, this work clarified a richer spectrum of scientific opportunities and challenges for the field of low temperature plasma-biomolecule surface interactions than initially anticipated, in particular for plasma sources operating at atmospheric pressure. The insights produced in this work, e.g. demonstration of the importance of environmental interactions, are generally important for applications of APP to materials modifications. Thus one major contributions of this research has been the establishment of methodologies to more systematically study the interaction of plasma with bio-molecules. In particular, our studies of atmospheric pressure plasma sources using very well-defined experimental conditions enabled to combine atomistic surface modifications of biomolecules with changes in their biological function. The clarification of the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in deactivation of biomolecules during low pressure and atmospheric pressure plasma-biomolecule interaction has broad implications, e.g. for the emerging field of plasma medicine. The development of methods to detect the effects of plasma treatment on immune-active biomolecules will be helpful in many future studies.

  1. Sequential enrichment of singly- and multiply-phosphorylated peptides with zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Qianying; Yang, Kaiya; Xue, Xingya; Li, Xiuling; Guo, Zhimou; Shen, Aijin; Ke, Yanxiong; Lan, Minbo; Liang, Xinmiao

    2015-09-25

    An interesting and novel method for the selective and sequential enrichment of singly- and multiply-phosphorylated peptides with a zwitterionic material "Click TE-Cys" is presented. Retention mechanisms between phosphopeptides and Click TE-Cys are systematically investigated by checking the influence of acetonitrile content, pH value, and buffer concentration on the retention of phosphopeptides. Both hydrophilic interaction and electrostatic interaction are involved in retention between phosphopeptides and Click TE-Cys. Based on these results, an optimized method is established for selective enrichment of phosphopeptides using Click TE-Cys. This method not only exhibits high selectivity for phosphopeptides, but also fractionates singly- and multiply-phosphorylated peptides into two fractions. This method was evaluated using relatively complex samples, including peptide mixtures of α-casein and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at a molar ratio of 1:10 and skim milk. This efficient and optimized protocol has great potential for enriching multiply-phosphorylated peptides and could be a valuable tool for specific enrichment of phosphopeptides in phosphoproteome analysis. PMID:26298604

  2. Interaction Studies of Ceramic Vacuum Plasma Spraying For The Melting Crucible Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hwan [Univ., of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Tae; Woo, Yoon Myung; Kim, Ki Hwan; Lee, Chan Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Fielding, R. S. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Candidate coating materials for re-usable metallic nuclear fuel crucibles, TaC, TiC, ZrC, ZrO{sub 2}, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were plasma-sprayed onto a niobium substrate. The microstructure of the plasma-sprayed coatings and thermal cycling behavior were characterized, and U-Zr melt interaction studies were carried out. The TaC and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating layers had a uniform thickness, and high density with only a few small closed pores showing good consolidation, while the ZrC, TiC, and ZrO{sub 2} coatings were not well consolidated with a considerable amount of porosity. Thermal cycling tests showed that the adhesion of the TiC, ZrC, and ZrO{sub 2} coating layers with niobium was relatively weak compared to the TaC and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings. The TaC and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings had better cycling characteristics with no interconnected cracks. In the interaction studies, ZrC and ZrO{sub 2} coated rods showed significant degradations after exposure to U-10 wt.% Zr melt at 1600 .deg. C for 15 min., but TaC, TiC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings showed good compatibility with U-Zr melt.

  3. Interactive Near-Field Illumination for Photorealistic Augmented Reality with Varying Materials on Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Kai; Buschel, Wolfgang; Dachselt, Raimund; Grosch, Thorsten

    2015-12-01

    At present, photorealistic augmentation is not yet possible since the computational power of mobile devices is insufficient. Even streaming solutions from stationary PCs cause a latency that affects user interactions considerably. Therefore, we introduce a differential rendering method that allows for a consistent illumination of the inserted virtual objects on mobile devices, avoiding delays. The computation effort is shared between a stationary PC and the mobile devices to make use of the capacities available on both sides. The method is designed such that only a minimum amount of data has to be transferred asynchronously between the participants. This allows for an interactive illumination of virtual objects with a consistent appearance under both temporally and spatially varying real illumination conditions. To describe the complex near-field illumination in an indoor scenario, HDR video cameras are used to capture the illumination from multiple directions. In this way, sources of illumination can be considered that are not directly visible to the mobile device because of occlusions and the limited field of view. While our method focuses on Lambertian materials, we also provide some initial approaches to approximate non-diffuse virtual objects and thereby allow for a wider field of application at nearly the same cost. PMID:26529458

  4. Interaction of graphene family materials with Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Strojny, Barbara; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Szeliga, Jacek; Hotowy, Anna; Lipińska, Ludwika; Koziński, Rafał; Jagiełło, Joanna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-01-01

    Graphene family materials have unique properties, which make them valuable for a range of applications. The antibacterial properties of graphene have been reported; however, findings have been contradictory. This study reports on the antimicrobial proprieties of three different graphene materials (pristine graphene (pG), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) against the food-borne bacterial pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica. A high concentration (250 μg/mL) of all the analyzed graphenes completely inhibited the growth of both pathogens, despite their difference in bacterial cell wall structure. At a lower concentration (25 μg/mL), similar effects were only observed with GO, as growth inhibition decreased with pG and rGO at the lower concentration. Interaction of the nanoparticles with the pathogenic bacteria was found to differ depending on the form of graphene. Microscopic imaging demonstrated that bacteria were arranged at the edges of pG and rGO, while with GO, they adhered to the nanoparticle surface. GO was found to have the highest antibacterial activity.

  5. Bone cell-materials interaction on alumina ceramics with different grain sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to study adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast cells (OPC1) on alumina ceramic, a bio-inert material. Alumina ceramic with different average grain sizes, 1 μm and 12 μm, respectively, were used in as-prepared condition without any grinding and polishing to understand the influence of grain size on cell-material interactions. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal imaging were used to study attachment, adhesion and differentiation of OPC1 cells. Cells attached, proliferated and differentiated well on both the substrates. Adhesion of cells, as assessed by observing the production of vinculin, was found to be a consistent phenomenon on both the substrates. On day 5 of cell culture, significant cell-attachment was observed and vinculin was detected throughout cytoplasm. MTT assay showed that proliferation of OPC1 cells was consistently higher in the case of 12 μm-alumina. Cells of different morphology, nodular, plate-like as well as elongated, were found to get anchored at grains, grain boundaries as well as pores. On day 16, there were clear signs of mineralization as well. Over all, alumina with average grain size of 12 μm showed better cell-attachment, growth and differentiation compared to 1 μm grain size samples.

  6. Report of the 2nd workshop on particle material interactions for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plenary session of the sub-committee for the data-banking of particle-material interactions in the Research Committee of A M Data Center was held at the JAERI Headquarters, Tokyo, February 24 and 25, 1982. The subsequent local meeting was held in Osaka branch office of JAERI, June 10, 1982. The aim of this workshop has been not only to make clear the present status in the A M data banking and the material science relevant to fusion research, but also to obtain an overview of the approaches that should be developed for solving the problems. In these workshops, 16 papers on the specified fields were presented by the committee members. This report contains these papers, and the investigation report in 1982 fiscal year on Diffusional Behaviour of Hydrogen and it's Isotope in Iron and Steel is added supplementarily. The contents of this report are composed of 4 chapters which are connected with each other concerning A M activities of hydrogen recycling: 1) Perspective review, 2) Re-emission and Retention, 3) Desorption and Diffusion, and 4) Radiation effects of neutron and ions on hydrogen recycling process. (author)

  7. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of the laser-ablated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid transformations through the liquid and vapor phases induced by laser-solid interactions are described by the authors' thermal model with the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to determine the vaporization temperature under different surface pressure condition. Hydrodynamic behavior of the vapor during and after ablation is described by gas dynamic equations. These two models are coupled. Modeling results show that lower background pressure results lower laser energy density threshold for vaporization. The ablation rate and the amount of materials removed are proportional to the laser energy density above its threshold. The authors also demonstrate a dynamic source effect that accelerates the unsteady expansion of laser-ablated material in the direction perpendicular to the solid. A dynamic partial ionization effect is studied as well. A self-similar theory shows that the maximum expansion velocity is proportional to csα, where 1 - α is the slope of the velocity profile. Numerical hydrodynamic modeling is in good agreement with the theory. With these effects, α is reduced. Therefore, the expansion front velocity is significantly higher than that from conventional models. The results are consistent with experiments. They further study how the plume propagates in high background gas condition. Under appropriate conditions, the plume is slowed down, separates with the background, is backward moving, and hits the solid surface. Then, it splits into two parts when it rebounds from the surface. The results from the modeling will be compared with experimental observations where possible

  8. Interactions of liquid lithium with various atmospheres, concretes, and insulating materials; and filtration of lithium aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the facilities and experiments and presents test results of a program being conducted at the hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) in support of the fusion reactor development effort. This experimental program is designed to characterize the interaction of liquid lithium with various atmospheres, concretes, and insulating materials. Lithium-atmosphere reaction tests were conducted in normal humidity air, pure nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. These tests are described and their results, such as maximum temperatures, aerosol generated, and reaction rates measured, are reported. Initial lithium temperatures for these tests ranged between 2240C and 8430C. A lithium-concrete reaction test, using 10 kg of lithium at 3270C, and lithium-insulating materials reaction tests, using a few grams of lithium at 3500C and 6000C, are also described and results are presented. In addition, a lithium-aerosol filter loading test was conducted to determine the mass loading capacity of a commercial high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The aerosol was characterized, and the loading-capacity-versus-pressure-buildup across the filter is reported

  9. Graphene and carbon nanodots in mesoporous materials: an interactive platform for functional applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenzi, Plinio; Malfatti, Luca; Carboni, Davide

    2015-07-01

    The present review is focused on a specific class of nanocomposites obtained through integration of graphene or carbon-based nanomaterials (such as carbon nanodots) with mesoporous inorganic or hybrid materials, obtained via template assisted self-assembly. The task of integrating graphene and carbon nanodots with a self-assembly process is still very challenging and this review shows some of the solutions which have been envisaged so far. These nanocomposite materials are an ideal interactive platform for developing innovative functional applications; they have a high capability of undergoing integration into advanced devices, which well exploits the advantage of tuning the wide properties and flexibility of the soft-chemistry route. A wide range of applications have been developed so far which span from sensing to electronics up to optics and biomedicine. Even though a large number of proof-of-concepts have been reported to date, an even greater expansion of applications in the field is expected to happen in the near future.

  10. Physical cell interactions with their surrounding materials: Mechanics and geometrical factors using microfluidic platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Garcia, Maria Del Carmen

    Microfluidics platforms are employed in: "sperm motion in a microfluidic device" and "mechanical interactions of mammary gland cells with their surrounding three dimensional extra-cellular matrix". Microfluidics has shown promise as a new platform for assisted reproduction. Sperm and fluid motion in microchannels was studied to understand the flow characteristics in the device, how sperm interacted with this flow, and how sperm-oocyte attachment occurs in the device. A threshold fluid velocity was found where sperm transition from traveling with the fluid to a regime in which they can move independently. A population of sperm remained in the inlet well area. There was also the tendency of sperm to travel along surface contours. These observations provide an improved understanding of sperm motion in microchannels and a basis for improved device designs. The effort to understand the development of breast cancer motivates the study of mammary gland cells and their interactions with the extra-cellular matrix. Mammographic density is a risk factor for breast cancer which correlates with collagen density affects cell behavior. Collagen gels with concentrations of 1.3, 2, and 3 mg/mL, were tensile tested to obtain the Young's modulus, E, at low displacement rates of 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mm/min. Local strain measurement in the gage section were used for both strain and strain rate determination. Local strain rates were on the order of cellular generated strain rate. A power law fitting described the relationship between Young's modulus and local strain rate. Mammary gland cells were seeded with collagen and fluorescent beads into microchannels and observed via four-dimensional imaging. The displacements of the beads were used to calculate strains. The Young's modulus due to the rate at which the cell was straining the collagen was obtained from the aforementioned fittings. Three-dimensional elastic theory for an isotropic material was employed to calculate the stress. The

  11. Plasma Wall Interaction Phenomena on Tungsten Armour Materials for Fusion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most attractive future complements to present energy sources is nuclear fusion. A large progress was made throughout the last decade from both the physical as the technological area leading to the construction of the ITER machine. One of the key issues that recently received a large interest at international level is focused on the Plasma Wall Interaction (PWI). One of the promising Plasma Facing Materials (PFM) are Tungsten (W) and Tungsten alloys. However, despite the worldwide use and industrial availability of W, the database of physical and mechanical properties is very limited. Especially after fusion relevant neutron irradiation and PWI phenomena, most of the properties are still unknown. The plasma fuel consists out of deuterium (D) and tritium (T). Tritium is radio-active and therefore an issue from the safety point of view. During steady-state plasma operation of future fusion power plants, the PFM need to extract a power density of ∼10-20 MW/m2. On top of this heat, transient events will deposit an additional non-negligible amount of energy (Disruptions, Vertical Displacement Events, Edge Localized Modes) during short durations. These severe heat loads cause cracking and even melting of the surface resulting in a reduced lifetime and the creation of dust. A contribution to the understanding of cracking phenomena under the severe thermal loads is described as well as the properties degradation under neutron irradiation. Several W grades were irradiated in the BR2 reactor (SCK.CEN) and the thermal loads were simulated with the electron-beam facility JUDITH (FZJ). Since knowledge should be gained about the Tritium retention in the PFM for safety and licensing reasons, a unique test facility at SCK.CEN is being set-up. The plasmatron VISION-I will simulate steady state plasmas for Tritium retention studies. The formation of surface cracks and dust, the initial porosity, neutron induced traps, re-deposited material - change the Tritium retention

  12. Plasma Wall Interaction Phenomena on Tungsten Armour Materials for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uytdenhouwen, I. [SCK.CEN - The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Massaut, V. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Van Oost, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-07-01

    One of the most attractive future complements to present energy sources is nuclear fusion. A large progress was made throughout the last decade from both the physical as the technological area leading to the construction of the ITER machine. One of the key issues that recently received a large interest at international level is focused on the Plasma Wall Interaction (PWI). One of the promising Plasma Facing Materials (PFM) are Tungsten (W) and Tungsten alloys. However, despite the worldwide use and industrial availability of W, the database of physical and mechanical properties is very limited. Especially after fusion relevant neutron irradiation and PWI phenomena, most of the properties are still unknown. The plasma fuel consists out of deuterium (D) and tritium (T). Tritium is radio-active and therefore an issue from the safety point of view. During steady-state plasma operation of future fusion power plants, the PFM need to extract a power density of {approx}10-20 MW/m{sup 2}. On top of this heat, transient events will deposit an additional non-negligible amount of energy (Disruptions, Vertical Displacement Events, Edge Localized Modes) during short durations. These severe heat loads cause cracking and even melting of the surface resulting in a reduced lifetime and the creation of dust. A contribution to the understanding of cracking phenomena under the severe thermal loads is described as well as the properties degradation under neutron irradiation. Several W grades were irradiated in the BR2 reactor (SCK.CEN) and the thermal loads were simulated with the electron-beam facility JUDITH (FZJ). Since knowledge should be gained about the Tritium retention in the PFM for safety and licensing reasons, a unique test facility at SCK.CEN is being set-up. The plasmatron VISION-I will simulate steady state plasmas for Tritium retention studies. The formation of surface cracks and dust, the initial porosity, neutron induced traps, re-deposited material - change the Tritium

  13. Interactions of tailings leachate with local liner materials found at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mill tailings site at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania is the first mill site to receive remedial action under the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Part of this remedial action will require excavating the 53,500 m3 (70,000 yd3) of tailings on the site having a specific activity exceeding 100 pCi/g, and encapsulating these contaminated tailings in a clay-lined cell. As part of the remedial action effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been studying the interactions of tailings and tailings leachate with locally occurring clays proposed for liner materials. These studies include physical and chemical characterization of amended and unamended local clays, chemical characterization of the tailings, column studies of tailings leached with deionized water, and column studies of clays contacted with tailings solutions to determine the attenuation properties of the proposed liner materials. Column studies of tailings leached with deionized water indicated that the Canonsburg tailings could represent a source of soluble radium-226 and uranium-238, several trace metals, cations, and the anions SO4, NO3, and Cl. Of these soluble contaminants, uranium-238, radium-226, the trace metals As and Mo, and the anions F and SO4 were present at levels exceeding maximum concentration levels in the tailings leaching column effluents. However, local clays, both in amended and unamended form were effective in attenuating contaminant migration. The soil amendments tested failed to increase radium attenuation. The tailings leaching studies indicated that the tailings will produce leachates of neutral pH and relatively low contaminant levels for at least 200 years. We believe that compacting the tailings within the encapsulation cell will help to reduce leaching of contaminants from the liner system, since very low permeabilities (-8 cm/s) were observed for even slightly compacted tailings materials

  14. Cumbustible material and ignition sources and their interaction on plant design and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fire protection at nuclear plants has the following objectives: assurance of nuclear safety, protection of operating personnel, preservation of availability of plants and protection of property in accordance with the principles of protection of capital goods. The safety related objective is a feature which is of particular importance in industrial plants involving an increased hazard potential, and it is thus one which is pursued consistently at nuclear facilities. The fire protection concept of a nuclear facility has to be consistent with the objectives of protection, including structural and technical fire protection measures and the fire protection measures in terms of plant operation. Within the framework of the fire protection concept for nuclear power plants, preventive fire protection measures (mainly those aiming at a minimization of the amount of combustible materials and possible ignition sources) are of particular importance. When considering preventive actions and measures restricting the effects of fires (mitigating measures), the criteria to be taken into account result from the interaction between plant design - for example, with respect to the safety related requirements - and plant operation. Such criteria also influence the type of fire protection measures. These measures can also be influenced by the concept for smoke and heat removal from rooms and areas inside the controlled access area and their release to the environment. The criteria influencing the selection of preventive and mitigating fire protection measures is dealt with in depth in this paper. Basically, the minimization of combustible materials and ignition sources can be achieved by selecting materials and taking special precautions in terms of plant engineering. Several criteria influence the application of fire protection measures. Depending on the area of the plant under review, the weight of individual criteria may differ considerably as a function of the objective of protection

  15. Plasma Wall Interaction Study in the Large Helical Device Using Material Probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fusion devices, only several material probes were employed to study on the wall behavior so far. Then, it was difficult to clarify the plasma wall interactions systematically. In the Large Helical Device (LHD), numerous material probes were installed along the toroidal and poloidal directions from the 1st to the present 9th experimental campaigns. After each campaign, the retention-desorption behavior of discharge gases (H,He) and impurity deposition were investigated to understand the plasma wall interactions. The change of the wall surface well corresponded to the plasma discharge behavior and an increase of the plasma stored energy in LHD. After the 3rd campaign, graphite tiles were installed at the divertor trace regions. The SS wall surface was significantly changed, i.e., largely covered by carbon, so that metal impurity level was reduced. The plasma stored energy very increased by the reduction of metal impurity level. After the 5th campaign, boronization was three times conducted during each campaign. The oxygen impurity level in the plasma was one or two orders lower, compared to that before the boronization. The toroidal distribution of deposited boron was measured, and it was seen that the wall was partly covered by the boron. These results suggest that the boron very effectively traps the oxygen even if a ratio of the wall coverage is not high. The helium was employed both in main and glow discharges in addition to hydrogen. The helium desorption was often observed during the hydrogen main discharge. The retained amount of helium in the wall was measured to understand this behavior. The amount was comparable to that of hydrogen, which suggests that the helium can easily desorbed from the wall. This helium behavior in the fusion devices has not been known so far. The amounts of retained hydrogen and helium were large in the vicinity of anodes used for the glow discharges. This result shows that the gas retention occurs mainly during the glow

  16. Experiments in support of the Gas Dynamic Trap based facility for plasma–material interaction testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldatkina, E.I., E-mail: E.I.Soldatkina@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Lavrentieva Prospect 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Street 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Arakcheev, A.S.; Bagryansky, P.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Lavrentieva Prospect 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Street 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Measurement of plasma heat flux in the mirror of a GDT device had been conducted. • The power density up to 0.25 GW m{sup −2} was experimentally obtained. • Steady state operation has not been achieved due to short NBI pulse. • The possibility of creating the PMI setup based on GDT had been discussed. -- Abstract: The power density along the field lines in the scrape-off layer plasma in machines of the class of ITER, Wendelstein 7-X, NSTX-U is in the range of few hundreds megawatt per square meter. It is crucial for the future of tokamaks and stellarators to develop the plasma science and component technology to handle such high plasma heat fluxes. It would be valuable to produce parallel plasma heat fluxes at these power densities, impinging on test components at very shallow angles, as planned in tokamaks. The primary objective of this work is the direct measurement of plasma heat fluxes in the mirror throat of a Gas Dynamic Trap device. Options to develop a facility for plasma–material interaction testing based on the Gas Dynamic Trap are discussed.

  17. Atomic oxygen interactions with protected organic materials on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Bucholz, Justine L.; Cales, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has provided an excellent opportunity to understand the nature of directed atomic oxygen interactions with protected polymers and composites. Although there were relatively few samples of materials with protective coatings on their external surfaces on LDEF which were exposed to a high atomic oxygen fluence, analysis of such samples has enabled an examination of the shape of atomic oxygen undercut cavities at defect sites in the protective coatings. Samples of front-surface aluminized (Kapton) polyimide were inspected by scanning electron microscopy to identify and measure crack defects in the aluminum protective coatings. After chemical removal of the aluminum coating, measurements were also made of the width of the oxidized undercut cavities below the crack defects. The LDEF flight undercut cavity geometries were then compared with Monte Carlo computational model undercut cavity predictions. The comparison of the LDEF results and computational modeling indicates agreement in specific undercut cavity geometries for atomic oxygen reaction probabilities dependent upon the 0.68 to 3.0 power of the energy. However, no single energy dependency was adequate to replicate flight results over a variety of aluminum crack widths.

  18. Grid-free tree-code simulations of the plasma-material interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fully kinetic grid-free model based on a Barnes-Hut tree code is used to selfconsistently simulate a collisionless plasma bounded by two floating walls. The workhorse for simulating such plasma wall transition layers is currently the PIC method. However, the present grid-free formulation provides a powerful independent tool to test it [1] and to possibly extend particle simulations towards collisional regimes in a more internally consistent way. Here, we use the grid-free massively parallel Barnes-Hut tree-code PEPC - a well established tool for simulations of Laser-plasmas and astrophysical applications - to develop a 3D ab initio plasma target interaction model. With our approach an electrostatic sheath naturally builds up within the first couple of Debye lengths close to the wall rather than being imposed as a prescribed boundary condition. We verified the code using analytic results [2] as well as 1D PIC simulations [3]. The model was then used to investigate the influence of inclined magnetic fields on the plasma material interface. We used the code to study the correlation between the magnetic field angle and the angular distribution of incident particles

  19. Future research needs on material interaction and relocation in LMFR safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper firstly classify the principles in the reactor safety area in future liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors (LMFRs) in order to clarify fundamental objectives of the reactor safety research. Further reduction of the occurrence frequency and also reduction of the consequences of core disruptive accidents should be recognized as the fundamental objectives. Secondary objectives and key R and D issues are developed under these fundamental objectives. This structure of the objectives and R and D issues is proposed as a fundamental framework of the safety researches aiming at development of commercialized large-scale LMFRs. Secondly, we will summarize future experimental research needs in the reactor safety area referring to the fundamental framework mentioned above. Our interest is focused rather on in-pile experiments. Finally, another objective is proposed, that is how to reduce or eliminate the recriticality event by design, utilizing the current knowledge on material motion and interaction which has been accumulated thus far. In this report, we will show an basic approach by means of discharging fuel out of the core. We also propose a measure for discharging fuel to eliminate the recriticality concerns. Experimental needs are also addressed. (author)

  20. Electronic and magnetic interactions in high temperature superconducting and high coercivity materials. Final performance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The issue addressed in the research was how to understand what controls the competition between two types of phase transition (ordering) which may be present in a hybridizing correlated-electron system containing two transition-shell atomic species; and how the variation of behavior observed can be used to understand the mechanisms giving the observed ordered state. This is significant for understanding mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity and other states of highly correlated electron systems. Thus the research pertains to magnetic effects as related to interactions giving high temperature superconductivity; where the working hypothesis is that the essential feature governing the magnetic and superconducting behavior of copper-oxide-type systems is a cooperative valence fluctuation mechanism involving the copper ions, as mediated through hybridization effects dominated by the oxygen p electrons. (Substitution of praseodymium at the rare earth sites in the 1·2·3 material provides an interesting illustration of this mechanism since experimentally such substitution strongly suppresses and destroys the superconductivity; and, at 100% Pr, gives Pr f-electron magnetic ordering at a temperature above 16K). The research was theoretical and computational and involved use of techniques aimed at correlated-electron systems that can be described within the confines of model hamiltonians such as the Anderson lattice hamiltonian. Specific techniques used included slave boson methodology used to treat modification of electronic structure and the Mori projection operator (memory function) method used to treat magnetic response (dynamic susceptibility)

  1. Atomic oxygen interaction with spacecraft materials: Relationship between orbital and ground-based testing for materials certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jon B.; Koontz, Steven L.; Lan, Esther H.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen on boron nitride (BN), silicon nitride (Si3N4), Intelsat 6 solar cell interconnects, organic polymers, and MoS2 and WS2 dry lubricant, were studied in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) flight experiments and in a ground based simulation facility. Both the inflight and ground based experiments employed in situ electrical resistance measurements to detect penetration of atomic oxygen through materials and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) analysis to measure chemical composition changes. Results are given. The ground based results on the materials studied to date show good qualitative correlation with the LEO flight results, thus validating the simulation fidelity of the ground based facility in terms of reproducing LEO flight results. In addition it was demonstrated that ground based simulation is capable of performing more detailed experiments than orbital exposures can presently perform. This allows the development of a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in the LEO environment degradation of materials.

  2. Study of Interfacial Interactions Using Thin Film Surface Modification: Radiation and Oxidation Effects in Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ) multi-scale computational modeling involving first- principle molecular dynamics (FPMD) and coarse-grained dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) approaches to develop theories underlying the evolution and stability of structures and phases. Samples from Tasks 1 to 3 (above) will be rigorously characterized and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Rutherford back scatter spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Expected outcomes of the experimental work include a quantitative understanding film-substrate interface mixing, evolution of defects and other phases at the interface, interaction of interfaces with defects, and the ability of the Y and Ti films to mitigate irradiation-assisted oxidation.The aforementioned experimental work will be closely coupled with multi-scale molecular dynamics (MD) modeling to understand the reactions at the surface, the transport of oxidant through the thin film, and the stabilities of the deposited thin films under radiation and oxidation. Simulations of materials property changes under conditions of radiation and oxidation require multiple size domains and a different simulation scheme for each of these domains. This will be achieved by coupling the FPMD and coarse-grained kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). This will enable the comparison of the results of each simulation approach with the experimental results.

  3. Study of Interfacial Interactions Using Thing Film Surface Modification: Radiation and Oxidation Effects in Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2014-01-09

    ) multi-scale computational modeling involving first- principle molecular dynamics (FPMD) and coarse-grained dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) approaches to develop theories underlying the evolution and stability of structures and phases. Samples from Tasks 1 to 3 (above) will be rigorously characterized and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Rutherford back scatter spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Expected outcomes of the experimental work include a quantitative understanding film-substrate interface mixing, evolution of defects and other phases at the interface, interaction of interfaces with defects, and the ability of the Y and Ti films to mitigate irradiation-assisted oxidation.The aforementioned experimental work will be closely coupled with multi-scale molecular dynamics (MD) modeling to understand the reactions at the surface, the transport of oxidant through the thin film, and the stabilities of the deposited thin films under radiation and oxidation. Simulations of materials property changes under conditions of radiation and oxidation require multiple size domains and a different simulation scheme for each of these domains. This will be achieved by coupling the FPMD and coarse-grained kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). This will enable the comparison of the results of each simulation approach with the experimental results.

  4. 2nd (final) IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'plasma-material interaction data for mixed plasma facing materials in fusion reactors'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 2nd Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Mixed Plasma Facing Materials in Fusion Reactors', held on October 16 and 17, 2000 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by the meeting participants and a review of the accomplishments of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). In addition, short summaries from the participants are included indicating the specific research completed in support of this CRP. (author)

  5. Analysis of material effect in molten fuel-coolant interaction, comparison of thermodynamic calculations and experimental observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tyrpekl, Václav; Piluso, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 46, AUGUST (2012), s. 197-203. ISSN 0306-4549 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Nuclear reactor severe accident * Fuel-Coolant Interaction * Material effect * Steam explosion Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.800, year: 2012

  6. Hudson and Blackburn: The Material Culture of the Chumash Interaction Sphere, Volume III: Clothing, Ornamentation, and Grooming

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Jeanne E.

    1985-01-01

    The Material Culture of the Chumash Interaction Sphere, Volume III: Clothing, Ornamentation, and Grooming. Travis Hudson and Thomas C. Blackburn. Menlo Park: Ballena Press Anthropological Papers No. 28 (a Ballena Press/Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Cooperative Publication), 1985, 375 pp., figures, tables. References, Index, $24.95 (paper), $39.95 (cloth).

  7. Analytical theory for the dark-soliton interaction in nonlocal nonlinear materials with an arbitrary degree of nonlocality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Qian; Wang, Q.; Bang, Ole;

    2010-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the interaction of dark solitons in materials with a spatially nonlocal nonlinearity. In particular we do this analytically and for arbitrary degree of nonlocality. We employ the variational technique to show that nonlocality induces an attractive force in the otherwise...

  8. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-01-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to…

  9. Van der Waals Layered Materials: Surface Morphology, Interlayer Interaction, and Electronic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Po-Chun

    The search for new ultrathin materials as the "new silicon" has begun. In this dissertation, I examine (1) the surface structure, including the growth, the crystal quality, and thin film surface corrugation of a monolayer sample and a few layers of MoS2 and WSe2, and (2) their electronic structure. The characteristics of these electronic systems depend intimately on the morphology of the surfaces they inhabit, and their interactions with the substrate or within layers. These physical properties will be addressed in each chapter. This thesis has dedicated to the characterization of mono- and a few layers of MoS2 and WSe2 that uses surface-sensitive probes such as low-energy electron microscopy and diffraction (LEEM and LEED). Prior to our studies, the characterization of monolayer MoS2 and WSe2 has been generally limited to optical and transport probes. Furthermore, the heavy use of thick silicon oxide layer as the supporting substrate has been important in order to allow optical microscopic characterization of the 2D material. Hence, to the best of our knowledge, this has prohibited studies of this material on other surfaces, and it has precluded the discovery of potentially rich interface interactions that may exist between MoS 2 and its supporting substrate. Thus, in our study, we use a so-called SPELEEM system (Spectroscopic Photo-Emission and Low Energy Electron Microscopy) to address these imaging modalities: (1) real-space microscopy, which would allow locating of monolayer MoS2 samples, (2) spatially-resolved low-energy diffraction which would allow confirmation of the crystalline quality and domain orientation of MoS2 samples, and, (3) spatially-resolved spectroscopy, which would allow electronic structure mapping of MoS2 samples. Moreover, we have developed a preparation procedure for samples that yield, a surface-probe ready, ultra-clean, and can be transferred on an arbitrary substrate. To fully understand the physics in MoS2 such as direct

  10. Measurement of the material in the ATLAS Inner Detector using hadronic interactions for an improvement in the track reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Kanai, Tsubasa

    The ATLAS is a high energy physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this experiment is a discovery of the new particles and new phenomena. In the experiment, the inner detector plays a crucial role in the track reconstruction of charged particles, and it is essential to reconstruct tracks precisely since the accuracy of the track reconstruction strongly affects physics results. Since particles passing through the detector are affected by the material, a precise description of the material in the detector is required for the Monte Carlo simulation to obtain a good agreement in tracking between the data from the detector and the simulation. However, it is hardly possible to put an exact amount of the materials in the simulation just from the design in the engineering point of view, thus datadriven method is adopted for the measurement of the detector materials. Although photon conversions are traditionally used for the material measurement, the method using hadronic interaction...

  11. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal; McNeill, Fiona E.; Prestwich, William V.; Byun, Soo Hyun; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel E.

    2014-01-01

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some "bystander effects" that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 1010 protons mm-2 s-1. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  12. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal, E-mail: ahmadsb@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); McNeill, Fiona E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Prestwich, William V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Byun, Soo Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seymour, Colin, E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Mothersill, Carmel E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some “bystander effects” that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 10{sup 10} protons mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  13. Dependence of the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a cavity wall on atomic and material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Casimir-Polder and van der Waals interactions between an atom and a flat cavity wall are investigated under the influence of real conditions including the dynamic polarizability of the atom, actual conductivity of the wall material and nonzero temperature of the wall. The cases of different atoms near metal and dielectric walls are considered. It is shown that to obtain accurate results for the atom-wall interaction at short separations, one should use the complete tabulated optical data for the complex refractive index of the wall material and the accurate dynamic polarizability of an atom. At relatively large separations in the case of a metal wall, one may use the plasma model dielectric function to describe the dielectric properties of the wall material. The obtained results are important for the theoretical interpretation of experiments on quantum reflection and Bose-Einstein condensation

  14. Dependences of the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a cavity wall on atomic and material properties

    CERN Document Server

    Mostepanenko, V M; Caride, A O; Klimchitskaya, G L; Zanette, S I

    2006-01-01

    The Casimir-Polder and van der Waals interactions between an atom and a flat cavity wall are investigated under the influence of real conditions including the dynamic polarizability of the atom, actual conductivity of the wall material and nonzero temperature of the wall. The cases of different atoms near metal and dielectric walls are considered. It is shown that to obtain accurate results for the atom-wall interaction at short separations, one should use the complete tabulated optical data for the complex refractive index of the wall material and the accurate dynamic polarizability of an atom. At relatively large separations in the case of a metal wall, one may use the plasma model dielectric function to describe the dielectric properties of wall material. The obtained results are important for the theoretical interpretation of experiments on quantum reflection and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  15. Interactions between cask components and content of packaging for the transport of radioactive material during drop tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the analytical, numerical and experimental investigations on the phenomenon of interactions between cask components and content of packages for the transport of radioactive material during drop tests required according to the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. Radial and axial gaps between cask components and content are usually necessary for thermal reasons but larger gaps can exist because of the geometrical dimensions of the specified content. Consequently interactions between content and cask components (lid system, cask body, etc.) are possible and can not be excluded during drop tests. Interactions in this context are relative movements between cask and content which are mainly due to elastic spring effects after releasing the cask for the free drop. These relative movements can cause interior collisions between content and cask during the main impact of the package onto the unyielding target. Drop tests with various types of Type A and Type B packages fully instrumented with strain gauges and accelerometers showed that these interactions respectively interior collisions can be considerable relating to high forces acting on cask lids, lid bolts and the content. Of course the real quantitative consequences of the interactions depend upon different conditions, among others the drop orientation, the design characteristics of the impact limiters, the dimensions of the gaps, the material characteristics of the contents, etc. . In order to investigate more precisely the phenomenon of interactions BAM carried out finite element calculations for the named casks using the ABAQUS/ Standard and ABAQUS/ Explicit computer code comparing them with results obtained from experiments. Additionally, tests with a simplified model instrumented with accelerometers were carried out accompanied by finite element calculations and analytical calculations using MATHEMATICA. The investigations on the mentioned phenomena of interaction

  16. Concise review of mechanisms of bacterial adhesion to biomaterials and of techniques used in estimating bacteria-material interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsikogianni M.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the mechanisms of bacterial adhesion to biomaterial surfaces, the factors affecting the adhesion, the techniques used in estimating bacteria-material interactions and the models that have been developed in order to predict adhesion. The process of bacterial adhesion includes an initial physicochemical interaction phase and a late molecular and cellular one. It is a complicated process influenced by many factors, including the bacterial properties, the material surface characteristics, the environmental factors, such as the presence of serum proteins and the associated flow conditions. Two categories of techniques used in estimating bacteria-material interactions are described: those that utilize fluid flowing against the adhered bacteria and counting the percentage of bacteria that detach, and those that manipulate single bacteria in various configurations which lend themselves to more specific force application and provide the basis for theoretical analysis of the receptor-ligand interactions. The theories that are reviewed are the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO theory, the thermodynamic approach and the extended DLVO theory. Over the years, significant work has been done to investigate the process of bacterial adhesion to biomaterial surfaces, however a lot of questions still remain unanswered.

  17. Current activities in the interactive joint research at Tohoku University. Advanced evaluation of radiation effects on fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science of the Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (hereafter the 'Center') was founded in 1969 and has been playing a vital role as the joint-use research center in Japan to assess the dynamic and static effects of neutron irradiation on the physical and mechanical properties of a variety of structural and functional materials through the use of nuclear reactors in Japan and overseas. The Center is now also open to researchers overseas. As a new initiative, the Center started an interactive joint research scheme on nuclear fusion reactor engineering with the NIFS in fiscal 2010. The interactive joint research aims at pioneering inter-disciplinary fields that connect neutron reactor engineering with other nuclear fusion sciences, and at conducting activities primarily on the key research subjects through inter-research-center collaboration. For this, a TDS (Thermal Desorption Spectrometer) with an ion gun (IG-TDS) has been installed in the radiation controlled area at the Center. Development of a compact divertor plasma simulator (C-DPS) system that will be integrated with the IG-TDS apparatus is in progress. It is prospected that the Center could play a leading role in international collaborative studies of neutron irradiation effects on plasma material interaction, along with other major research institutes over the world. (author)

  18. Applications of surface analytical techniques for study of the interactions between mercury and fluorescent lamp materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Twan A; Frisk, T A; Grossman, M W

    2002-08-01

    Several surface analytical techniques, including electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA)(X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS), were used to study the interaction between Hg and other components of fluorescent lamps, a very critical issue in lighting industries. Active sites, responsible for Hg interaction/deposition, can be successfully identified by comparing the x- y distribution (obtained by ESCA mapping) and depth distribution (available through SNMS) of respective lamp components with that of Hg. A correlation in both depth and x- y distribution is strong evidence of site preference for Hg interaction/deposition. A burial mechanism is, however, proposed when only depth distribution, not x- y, is correlated. Other modes of ESCA (high resolution, angle-resolved, etc.) were also helpful. Information about the valence states of the interacted Hg species would help to define the nature of the interaction. PMID:12185568

  19. Determination of the effective atomic and mass numbers for mixture and compound materials in high energy photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In consideration the radiological properties of materials and studying the scattering processes in atomic and nuclear physics, the effective atomic and mass numbers is widely employed. These numbers have been calculated for any mixed or composite materials in interaction with high energy photons (Linac in radiation therapy). A pair equation in terms of these numbers is obtained. The first equation has been derived from the conservation of mass energy law and the second by minimizing the binding energy from the semiempirical mass formula (Myers and Swiatecki formula) that gives a relation between atomic and mass numbers for stable nuclei approximately. By these equations one can obtain the effective atomic and mass numbers for any compound or mixed materials uniquely. These numbers are calculated for some materials and compared with the other studies. (author)

  20. Hydrophobic interaction in Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis adherence to various denture base resin materials.

    OpenAIRE

    Minagi, S; Miyake, Y; Inagaki, K; Tsuru, H; Suginaka, H

    1985-01-01

    The effects of hydrophobicities of substrate surfaces on microbial adherence were examined by using Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis and 21 denture base resin materials. With increasing surface free energy of resin plates, increasing adherence of C. albicans and decreasing adherence of C. tropicalis were observed. The surface free energy of C. albicans is higher than that of all resin material surfaces, and C. tropicalis has surface free energy lower than that of all materials used. In...

  1. The project of the Spanish Nuclear Industry Forum to develop an interactive educational material on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Training Department of the Spanish Nuclear Industry Forum has undertaken a new project to develop an interactive educational material on Radiological Protection. The objective was to develop an attractive, comprehensive and interactive material, to facilitate students and teachers of Elementary, Middle and High schools, to become familiar with ionising radiations. The novelly of the project, is that based on the European framework of key competencies for file long learning, which are defined as a set of knowledge, skills and altitudes that all individuals need for personal fulfilment and employment. The material presented in this paper, is based in an integrated structure of tasks, activities and exercises, which will facilitate the acquisition of as may key competencies as possible. Besides, the material also includes reference texts, links to pertinent web sites and videos. Students, through the development of a specific task (and related activities and exercises), will learn the differences between ionizing and non ionising radiation, the origin, characteristics and types of types of ionising radiation, how to detect and measure them, the potential detrimental health effects, the principles of radiation protection and the beneficial applications can have for man. The material is freely available in www.rinconeducativo.org. (Author) 4 refs.

  2. High power densities from high-temperature materials interactions. [thermionic energy conversion and metallic fluid heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy converters and metallic-fluid heat pipes are well suited to serve together synergistically. The two operating cycles appear as simple and isolated as their material problems seem forebodingly deceptive and complicated. Simplified equations verify material properties and interactions as primary influences on the operational effectiveness of both. Each experiences flow limitations in thermal emission and vaporization because of temperature restrictions redounding from thermophysicochemical stability considerations. Topics discussed include: (1) successful limitation of alkali-metal corrosion; (2) protection against external hot corrosive gases; (3) coping with external and internal vaporization; (4) controlling interfacial reactions and diffusion; and (5) meeting other thermophysical challenges; expansion matches and creep.

  3. Interacting with a Suite of Educative Features: Elementary Science Teachers' Use of Educative Curriculum Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Anna Maria; Bismack, Amber Schultz; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Palincsar, Annemarie Sullivan

    2016-01-01

    New reform documents underscore the importance of learning both the practices and content of science. This integration of practices and content requires sophisticated teaching that does not often happen in elementary classrooms. Educative curriculum materials--materials explicitly designed to support teacher and student learning--have been posited…

  4. Effect of charge on ion-solid interaction at the surface of two-dimensional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of charge on the ion-solid interaction between an incident carbon ion and a surface of graphite or hexagonal boron nitride was studied using ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The computational model was based on a carbon ion with a charge of +1, 0, or -1 incident on a (0 0 0 1) surface of graphite or hexagonal boron nitride. Carbon cations were found to make a strong stable covalent bond with the surface; carbon nonions were attracted to the surface through a van der Waals interaction; carbon anions were repulsed from the graphite surface, but attracted to the h-BN surface through ionic interaction. The stability of the structure and character of the bond is discussed below with reference to the electronic structure of the interacting incident ions and the surface. In conclusion, carbon cations were found to be suitable for the production of covalent bonds

  5. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume I. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the plasma materials interaction field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the field of plasma materials interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be central for near-term experiments, for intermediate-range reactor devices including D-T burning physics experiments, and for long-term reactor machines. Critical technical issues are ones central to understanding and successful operation of existing and near-term experiments/reactors or devices of great importance for the long run, i.e., ones which will require an extensive, long-term development effort and thus should receive attention now. Four subgroups were formed to assess the critical PMI issues along four major lines: (1) PMI and plasma confinement physics experiments; (2) plasma-edge modelling and theory; (3) surface physics; and (4) materials technology for in-vessel components and the first wall. The report which follows is divided into four major sections, one for each of these topics

  6. Multi-scale defect interactions in high-rate brittle material failure. Part I: Model formulation and application to ALON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Andrew L.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    Within this two part series we develop a new material model for ceramic protection materials to provide an interface between microstructural parameters and bulk continuum behavior to provide guidance for materials design activities. Part I of this series focuses on the model formulation that captures the strength variability and strain rate sensitivity of brittle materials and presents a statistical approach to assigning the local flaw distribution within a specimen. The material model incorporates a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state, micromechanics based damage growth, granular flow and dilatation of the highly damaged material, and pore compaction for the porosity introduced by granular flow. To provide initial qualitative validation and illustrate the usefulness of the model, we use the model to investigate Edge on Impact experiments (Strassburger, 2004) on Aluminum Oxynitride (AlON), and discuss the interactions of multiple mechanisms during such an impact event. Part II of this series is focused on additional qualitative validation and using the model to suggest material design directions for boron carbide.

  7. Talk, Mobility and Materialities:Pedagogical Interaction When Learning to Cycle and Ski Cross Country

    OpenAIRE

    McIlvenny, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The intersection of the quotidian practices of social interaction, learning and mobility outside of the classroom – for example, the ways in which talk shapes how children learn to be actively mobile – has been little studied until recently. This paper develops a social interactional approach to analysing talk and mobile action in what are arguably two quintessentially Nordic mobility practices, namely cycling and skiing. More specifically the focus is on investigating and comparing how a chi...

  8. New materials and advances in making electronic skin for interactive robots

    OpenAIRE

    Yogeswaran, N.; Dang, W.; Navaraj, W. T.; Shakthivel, D.; Khan, S; Polat, E. O.; Gupta, S.; Heidari, H.; Kaboli, M.; Lorenzelli, L.; Cheng, G.; Dahiya, R.

    2015-01-01

    Flexible electronics has huge potential to bring revolution in robotics and prosthetics as well as to bring about the next big evolution in electronics industry. In robotics and related applications, it is expected to revolutionise the way with which machines interact with humans, real-world objects and the environment. For example, the conformable electronic or tactile skin on robot’s body, enabled by advances in flexible electronics, will allow safe robotic interaction during physical conta...

  9. INTERACTION OF A SCREW DISLOCATION WITH AN INTERFACIAL EDGE CRACK IN A TWO-PHASE PIEZOELECTRIC MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jinxi; LIU Ai; JIANG Zhiqing

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of a screw dislocation with an interfacial edge crack in a two-phase piezoelectric medium is investigated. Closed-form solutions of the elastic and electrical fields induced by the screw dislocation are derived using the conformal mapping method in conjunction with the image principle. Based on the electroelastic fields derived, the stress and electric displacement intensity factors, the image force acting on the dislocation are given explicitly. We find that the stress and electric displacement intensity factors depend on the effective electroelastic material constants. In the case where one of two phases is purely elastic, the stress intensity factor and image force are plotted to illustrate the influences of electromechanical coupling effect, the position of the dislocation and the material properties on the interaction mechanism.

  10. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    , and demonstrated in public settings. We then describe INTERACT, a proposed research project that stages the robotic marionettes in a live performance. The interdisciplinary project brings humanities research to bear on scientific and technological inquiry, and culminates in the development a live......This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  11. Contribution of Drifting Carriers to the Casimir-Lifshitz and Casimir-Polder Interactions With Semiconductor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a theory for Casimir-Lifshitz and Casimir-Polder interactions with semiconductor or insulator surfaces that takes into account charge drift in the bulk material through use of the classical Boltzmann equation. We derive frequency-dependent dispersion relations that give the usual Lifshitz results for dielectrics as a limiting case and, in the quasistatic limit, coincide with those recently computed to account for Debye screening in the thermal Lifshitz force with conducting surfaces with small density of carriers

  12. New products formed due to interaction of fuel and construction materials in the 4th unit of Chernobyl NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics of damages in the 4th unit of Chernobyl NPP are given. Regions of localization of released fuel are indicated and its modifications are characterized. Correlation of location and routes of sample selection for one of typical products of fuel interaction with structural materials of the unit - 'elephant's foot' - are presented. Results of physochemical an radiochemical analyses are produced. Certain assumptions are made as to possible scenario of accident in the south-east guadrant of the reactor vault

  13. Preparation and surface functionalization of MWCNTs: study of the composite materials produced by the interaction with an iron phthalocyanine complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotubes [CNTs] were synthesized by the catalytic vapor decomposition method. Thereafter, they were functionalized in order to incorporate the oxygen groups (OCNT and subsequently the amine groups (ACNT. All three CNTs (the as-synthesized and functionalized underwent reaction with an iron organometallic complex (FePcS, iron(III phthalocyanine-4,4",4",4""-tetrasulfonic acid, in order to study the nature of the interaction between this complex and the CNTs and the potential formation of nanocomposite materials. Transmission electronic microscopy, N2 adsorption at 77 K, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature-programmed desorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were the characterization techniques employed to confirm the successful functionalization of CNTs as well as the type of interaction existing with the FePcS. All results obtained led to the same conclusion: There were no specific chemical interactions between CNTs and the fixed FePcS.

  14. Quantitative Evaluation of Peptide-Material Interactions by a Force Mapping Method: Guidelines for Surface Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Oguchi, Masahiro; Kim, Seong-Oh; Jackman, Joshua A; Ogawa, Tetsu; Lkhamsuren, Ganchimeg; Cho, Nam-Joon; Hayashi, Tomohiro

    2015-07-28

    Peptide coatings on material surfaces have demonstrated wide application across materials science and biotechnology, facilitating the development of nanobio interfaces through surface modification. A guiding motivation in the field is to engineer peptides with a high and selective binding affinity to target materials. Herein, we introduce a quantitative force mapping method in order to evaluate the binding affinity of peptides to various hydrophilic oxide materials by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Statistical analysis of adhesion forces and probabilities obtained on substrates with a materials contrast enabled us to simultaneously compare the peptide binding affinity to different materials. On the basis of the experimental results and corresponding theoretical analysis, we discuss the role of various interfacial forces in modulating the strength of peptide attachment to hydrophilic oxide solid supports as well as to gold. The results emphasize the precision and robustness of our approach to evaluating the adhesion strength of peptides to solid supports, thereby offering guidelines to improve the design and fabrication of peptide-coated materials. PMID:26125092

  15. Interaction of Water with Cement Based Repository Materials - Application of Neutron Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementitious materials are conventionally used in conditioning intermediate and low level radioactive waste. In this study, a candidate cement-based wasteform and a series of barrier materials have been investigated using neutron imaging to: 1) characterise the wasteform for disposal in a repository for radioactive materials, and 2) characterise the compositon of the barrier materials in assessing their potential to transmit water. Imaging showed both the pore size distribution and the extent of the cracking that had occurred in the wasteform samples. The rate of the water penetration measured both by conventional sorptivity measurements and neutron imaging was greater than in pastes made from Ordinary Portland Cement. The ability of the cracks to distribute the water through the sample in a very short time was also evident. Macro-pore volume distributions of barrier samples, also acquired using neutron tomography, are shown to relate to water/cement ratio, composition and sorptivity data. The study highlights the significant potential of neutron imaging in the investigation of cementitious materials. The technique has the advantage of visualising and measuring, non-destructively, material distribution within macroscopic samples and is particularly useful in defining movement of water through the cementitious materials. (author)

  16. A measurement of material in the ATLAS tracker using secondary hadronic interactions in 7 TeV pp collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; ATLAS Collaboration; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bisanz, Tobias; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelijn, Remco; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; 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Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; 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Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kentaro, Kawade; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koehler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Ravinovich, Ilia; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turgeman, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tyndel, Mike; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Wenxiao; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wolf, Tim Michael Heinz; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Worm, Steven D; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the material in the ATLAS inner tracking detector is crucial in understanding the reconstruction of charged-particle tracks, the performance of algorithms that identify jets containing \\emph{b}-hadrons and is also essential to reduce background in searches for exotic particles that can decay within the inner detector volume. Interactions of primary hadrons produced in \\emph{pp} collisions with the material in the inner detector are used to map the location and amount of this material. The hadronic interactions of primary particles may result in secondary vertices, which in this analysis are reconstructed by an inclusive vertex-finding algorithm. Data were collected using minimum-bias triggers by the ATLAS detector operating at the LHC during 2010 at centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of $19$ nb$^{-1}$. Kinematic properties of these secondary vertices are used to study the validity of the modelling of hadronic interactions in simulation. Secondary-...

  17. Interaction between adsorbed hydrogen and potassium on a carbon nanocone containing material as studied by photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiaofeng [Nesna University College, 8700 Nesna (Norway); Raaen, Steinar, E-mail: sraaen@ntnu.no [Physics Department, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-09-14

    Hydrogen adsorption on a potassium doped carbon nanocone containing material was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and work function measurement. The valence band spectra indicate that there is charge transfer from potassium to carbon. Upon deposition on carbon potassium is in its ionic state for lower doping and shows both ionic and metallic behavior at higher doping. Adsorption of hydrogen facilitates diffusion of potassium on the carbon material as seen by changes in the K{sub 2p} core level spectrum. Variations in the measured sample work function indicate that hydrogen initially adsorb on the K dopants and subsequently adsorb on the carbon cone containing material.

  18. Interaction between adsorbed hydrogen and potassium on a carbon nanocone containing material as studied by photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen adsorption on a potassium doped carbon nanocone containing material was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and work function measurement. The valence band spectra indicate that there is charge transfer from potassium to carbon. Upon deposition on carbon potassium is in its ionic state for lower doping and shows both ionic and metallic behavior at higher doping. Adsorption of hydrogen facilitates diffusion of potassium on the carbon material as seen by changes in the K2p core level spectrum. Variations in the measured sample work function indicate that hydrogen initially adsorb on the K dopants and subsequently adsorb on the carbon cone containing material

  19. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists such as...

  20. Methane activation under dielectric barrier discharge plasma interacting with mesoporous material

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, J; Park, D; Lee, C.(Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan); Lee, D H; Kim, T.

    2015-01-01

    International audience Direct methane activation on a mesoporous material under dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was investigated in the present study. The specific surface area of the mesoporous material (SBA-15) was controlled by varying the hydrothermal reaction temperature to investigate the effect of the specific surface area on the methane activation. As a result, methane conversion increased as the specific surface area increased and the discharge frequency decreased. Energ...

  1. Study on thermal-hydraulic behavior during molten material and coolant interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a core disruptive accident (CDA) of a Fast Breeder Reactor, the post accident heat removal (PAHR) is crucial for the accident mitigation. The molten core material should be solidified in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. The material, being fragmented while solidification and forming debris bed, will be cooled in sodium coolant. It is still unknown whether the coolant vapor generation will promote or disturb the solidification and fragmentation process. The purpose of the present study is to experimentally clarify the capability of the coolant for solidification and fragmentation of the molten material including coolant boiling. In the experiment, molten metal jet is injected into water to experimentally obtain the visualized information of the fragmentation and boiling phenomena during PAHR in CDA. The jet ejection experiment shows that the break up of the molten material into fine fragments are observed at the top, side and middle part of the jet during very short time interval. The distributed particle behavior of the molten material jet is observed with high-speed video camera. And the visual data is analyzed with PIV. Consequently, it is confirmed that the PIV analysis is useful to quantitatively evaluate the underwater flow field of the molten material. (author)

  2. Numerical Investigation of Ultrafast interaction between THz Fields and Crystalline Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Clark, Stewart J.; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantum - mechanical molecular dynamics investigation of the interaction between strong single - cyc le THz pulses and ionic crystals . We find nonlinearities in the response of the CsI crystals at field strengths higher than 10 MV/cm.......We present a quantum - mechanical molecular dynamics investigation of the interaction between strong single - cyc le THz pulses and ionic crystals . We find nonlinearities in the response of the CsI crystals at field strengths higher than 10 MV/cm....

  3. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.L. (ed.)

    1985-10-01

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

  4. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well

  5. Dependence of plasmon excitation energy on filler material in interaction of charged particle with filled nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahari, A., E-mail: bahari.a@lu.ac.i [Department of Physics, Lorestan University, Lorestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohamadi, A. [Department of Physics, Shiraz Payaem Noor University, Fars (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The interaction of charged particles with filled single-walled metallic nanotubes (SWMNT) has been investigated. Numerical results for the plasmon energy as a function of the wave vector are presented when the charged particle is outside the nanotube. Dependence of the plasmon energy on ratio of plasma frequency of the filler and SWMNT has been shown.

  6. A Strategy for Material-specific e-Textile Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gowrishankar, Ramyah; Bredies, Katharina; Ylirisku, Salu

    2016-01-01

    . Especially the shape-reformation capabilities of textiles may inform the design of expressive and aesthetically rewarding applications. In this chapter, we propose ways in which the textileness of e-Textiles can be better harnessed. We outline an e-Textile Interaction Design strategy that is based...

  7. Nutrient analysis explained for non-chemists by using interactive e-learning material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busstra, M.C.; Hulshof, P.J.M.; Houwen, J.; Elburg, L.; Hollman, P.C.H.

    2012-01-01

    The diverse educational and professional background of individuals involved in food composition data work presents challenges in their training. In particular, it is difficult to explain chemical analysis of nutrients to individuals lacking a background in chemistry. Therefore an interactive e-learn

  8. Nonlinear interaction processes in experiments on laser irradiation of low-density porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on 1 μm-laser interaction with planar low-density porous targets at power densities ∼1014 W/cm2 were carried out. Backscattered emissions near 1ω0, 2ω0, and 3ω0/2 were analyzed. Numerous features of spectrally and temporally resolved back-scatters were observed and discussed. (authors)

  9. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, through its Atomic and Molecular Data Unit, coordinates a wide spectrum of programmes for the compilation, evaluation, and generation of atomic, molecular, and plasma-wall interaction data for fusion research. The present volume is exclusively devoted to cross sections for collisions of hydrogen atoms with electron, protons and multiply charged ions

  10. A magnetic-piezoelectric smart material-structure utilizing magnetic force interaction to optimize the sensitivity of current sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Po-Chen; Chung, Tien-Kan; Lai, Chen-Hung; Wang, Chieh-Min

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a magnetic-piezoelectric smart material-structure using a novel magnetic-force-interaction approach to optimize the sensitivity of conventional piezoelectric current sensing technologies. The smart material-structure comprises a CuBe-alloy cantilever beam, a piezoelectric PZT sheet clamped to the fixed end of the beam, and an NdFeB permanent magnet mounted on the free end of the beam. When the smart material-structure is placed close to an AC conductor, the magnet on the beam of the smart structure experiences an alternating magnetic attractive and repulsive force produced by the conductor. Thus, the beam vibrates and subsequently generates a strain in the PZT sheet. The strain produces a voltage output because of the piezoelectric effect. The magnetic force interaction is specifically enhanced through the optimization approach (i.e., achieved by using SQUID and machining method to reorient the magnetization to different directions to maximize the magnetic force interaction). After optimizing, the beam's vibration amplitude is significantly enlarged and, consequently, the voltage output is substantially increased. The experimental results indicated that the smart material-structure optimized by the proposed approach produced a voltage output of 4.01 Vrms with a sensitivity of 501 m Vrms/A when it was placed close to a conductor with a current of 8 A at 60 Hz. The optimized voltage output and sensitivity of the proposed smart structure were approximately 316 % higher than those (1.27 Vrms with 159 m Vrms/A) of representative piezoelectric-based current sensing technologies presented in other studies. These improvements can significantly enable the development of more self-powered wireless current sensing applications in the future.

  11. Development of new materials and structures based on managed physical-chemical factors of local interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakov, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    The paper states that assigning certain physical and chemical characteristics to pills and medical drugs solutions can substitute for the development of new drugs (which is essentially equivalent to the creation of new medicines). It is established that the purposeful change of physical and chemical characteristics of the standard ("old") materials (in other words, the known substances) is fundamental for the production of solid and liquid medicines, which allows us to get "new" structures and materials. The paper shows that assigning new physical and chemical properties to "old" materials and their further usage for the production of tablets and solutions from the "old" and well-known medicines can turn even very "old" medicine into very "novel" (moreover, even very fashionable) one with unprecedented (fantastic) pharmacological activity and new mechanisms of action.

  12. Refractive-index-matched hydrogel materials for modeling flow-structure interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Byron, Margaret L

    2012-01-01

    In imaging-based studies of flow around solid objects, it is useful to have materials that are refractive-index-matched to the surrounding fluid. However, materials currently in use are usually rigid and matched to liquids that are either expensive or highly viscous. This does not allow for measurements at high Reynolds number, nor accurate modeling of flexible structures. This work explores the use of two hydrogels (agarose and polyacrylamide) as refractive-index-matched models in water. These hydrogels are inexpensive, can be cast into desired shapes, and have flexibility that can be tuned to match biological materials. The use of water as the fluid phase allows this method to be implemented immediately in many experimental facilities and permits investigation of high Reynolds number phenomena. We explain fabrication methods and present a summary of the physical and optical properties of both gels, and then show measurements demonstrating the use of hydrogel models in quantitative imaging.

  13. Scientific report. Plasma-wall interaction studies related to fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This scientific report summarises research done on erosion and deposition mechanisms affecting the optical reflectivity of potential materials for use in the mirrors used in fusion reactors. Work done in Juelich, Germany, at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland, the JET laboratory in England and in Basle is discussed. Various tests made with the mirrors are described. Results obtained are presented in graphical and tabular form and commented on. The influence of various material choices on erosion and deposition mechanisms is discussed

  14. Magnetothermoelastic interactions in hollow structures of functionally graded material subjected to mechanical loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper considers the magnetothermoelastic problem of functionally graded material (FGM) hollow structures subjected to mechanical loads. Exact solutions for stresses and perturbations of the magnetic field vector in FGM hollow cylinders and FGM hollow spheres are determined using the infinitesimal theory of magnetothermoelasticity. The material stiffness, thermal expansion coefficient and magnetic permeability are assumed to obey the same simple power-law variation through the structures' wall thickness. The aim of this research is to understand the effect of composition on magneto- thermoelastic stresses and to design optimum FGM hollow cylinders and hollow spheres

  15. Coulomb interaction revised in the presence of material with negative permittivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rangelov, A A

    2009-01-01

    Coulomb law is one of the fundamental laws in Physics. It describes the magnitude of the electrostatic force between two electric charges. Counterintuitively the repulsion force between two equal electric charges in a vacuum, stated by the Coulomb law, turn into the attraction force between the same electric charges when they are placed next to a material with negative permittivity and the distance between them is larger than some critical distance. As a result the equally charged particles "crystallize" occupying equilibrium positions. We prove this claim with the method of images for two charged particles placed next to a material with negative permittivity.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between hydrogen and fusion-relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a thermonuclear reactor fusion between hydrogen isotopes takes place, producing helium and energy. The so-called divertor is the part of the fusion reactor vessel where the plasma is neutralized in order to exhaust the helium. The surface plates of the divertor are subjected to high heat loads and high fluxes of energetic hydrogen and helium. In the next generation fusion device - the tokamak ITER - the expected conditions at the plates are particle fluxes exceeding 1024 per second and square metre, particle energies ranging from 1 to 100 eV and an average heat load of 10 MW per square metre. Two materials have been identified as candidates for the ITER divertor plates: carbon and tungsten. Since there are currently no fusion devices that can create these harsh conditions, it is unknown how the materials will behave in terms of erosion and hydrogen retention. To gain more insight in the physical processes under these conditions molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted. Since diamond has been proposed as possible plasma facing material, we have studied erosion and hydrogen retention in diamond and amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H). As in experiments, diamond shows a lower erosion yield than a-C:H, however the hydrogen retention in diamond is much larger than in a-C:H and also hardly depending on the substrate temperature. This implies that simple heating of the surface is not sufficient to retrieve the hydrogen from diamond material, whereas a-C:H readily releases the retained hydrogen. So, in spite of the higher erosion yield carbon material other than diamond seems more suitable. Experiments suggest that the erosion yield of carbon material decreases with increasing flux. This was studied in our simulations. The results show no flux dependency, suggesting that the observed reduction is not a material property but is caused by external factors as, for example, redeposition of the erosion products. Our study of the redeposition showed that the

  17. Plasma protein corona modulates the vascular wall interaction of drug carriers in a material and donor specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Sobczynski

    Full Text Available The nanoscale plasma protein interaction with intravenously injected particulate carrier systems is known to modulate their organ distribution and clearance from the bloodstream. However, the role of this plasma protein interaction in prescribing the adhesion of carriers to the vascular wall remains relatively unknown. Here, we show that the adhesion of vascular-targeted poly(lactide-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA spheres to endothelial cells is significantly inhibited in human blood flow, with up to 90% reduction in adhesion observed relative to adhesion in simple buffer flow, depending on the particle size and the magnitude and pattern of blood flow. This reduced PLGA adhesion in blood flow is linked to the adsorption of certain high molecular weight plasma proteins on PLGA and is donor specific, where large reductions in particle adhesion in blood flow (>80% relative to buffer is seen with ∼60% of unique donor bloods while others exhibit moderate to no reductions. The depletion of high molecular weight immunoglobulins from plasma is shown to successfully restore PLGA vascular wall adhesion. The observed plasma protein effect on PLGA is likely due to material characteristics since the effect is not replicated with polystyrene or silica spheres. These particles effectively adhere to the endothelium at a higher level in blood over buffer flow. Overall, understanding how distinct plasma proteins modulate the vascular wall interaction of vascular-targeted carriers of different material characteristics would allow for the design of highly functional delivery vehicles for the treatment of many serious human diseases.

  18. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of laser-ablated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An annealing model is extended to treat the vaporization process, and a hydrodynamic model describes the ablated material. We find that dynamic source and ionization effects accelerate the expansion front of the ablated plume with thermal vaporization temperature. The vaporization process and plume propagation in high background gas pressure are studied

  19. Predicting emissions of SVOCs from polymeric materials and their interaction with airborne particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Little, John C

    2006-01-15

    A model that predicts the emission rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials is extended and used to predict the emission rate of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from polymeric materials. Reasonable agreement between model predictions and gas-phase di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) concentrations is achieved using data collected in a previous experimental study that measured emissions of DEHP from vinyl flooring in two very different chambers. While emissions of highly volatile VOCs are subject to "internal" control (the material-phase diffusion coefficient), emissions of the very low volatility SVOCs are subject to "external" control (partitioning into the gas phase, the convective mass-transfer coefficient, and adsorption onto interior surfaces). The effect of SVOCs partitioning onto airborne particles is also examined. The DEHP emission rate is increased when the gas-phase concentration is high, and especially when partitioning to the airborne particles is strong. Airborne particles may play an important role in inhalation exposure as well as in transporting SVOCs well beyond the source. Although more rigorous validation is needed, the model should help elucidate the mechanisms governing emissions of phthalate plasticizers, brominated flame retardants, biocides, and other SVOCs from a wide range of building materials and consumer products. PMID:16468389

  20. Chemical interactions of reactor core materials up to very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes which chemical interactions may occur in a LWR fuel rod bundle containing (Ag, In, Cd) absorber rods or (Al2O3/B4C) burnable poison rods with increasing temperature up to the complete melting of the components and the formed reaction products. The kinetics of the most important chemical interactions has been investigated and the results are described. In most cases the reaction products have lower melting points or ranges than the original components. This results in a relocation of liquefied components often far below their melting points. There exist three distinct temperature regimes in which liquid phases can form in the core in differently large quantities. These temperature regimes are described in detail. The phase relations in the important ternary (U, Zr, O) system have been extensively studied. The effect of steel constituents on the phase relations is given in addition. All the considerations are focused on PWR conditions only. (orig.)

  1. Results of thermal interaction tests for various materials performed in the Ispra tank facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A test facility for fuel/coolant thermal interaction measurements is described together with recent improvements of the melting oven design, the instrumentation and the collection and cleaning of the debris. The formation of a UO2 crust on the melting crucible is investigated theoretically taking into account the heat losses during transport of the crucible from the oven to the reaction chamber. Experimental results for the systems steel-sodium, steel-water and UO2-sodium are presented and discussed with respect to particle size distribution and appearence of the debris. A sodium/fuel interaction model is introduced in the hydrodynamic REXCO-H-code. The results of test calculations are dealt with

  2. Interaction Between Drugs and Biomedical Materials i: Binding Position of Bezafibrate to Human Serum Alubmin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masami; Minagawa, Keiji; Berber, Mohamed R.; Hafez, Inas H.; Mori, Takeshi

    The interaction between bezafibrate (BZF) and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by equilibrium dialysis. Since the binding constant of BZF to HSA was independent of ionic strength and decreased with the addition of fatty acid, the interaction between BZF and HSA was considered to be due to hydrophobic mechanism. Chemical shifts in 1H-NMR spectra of BZF were independent of the concentration of BZF and addition of HSA. Spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of respective protons of BZF were independent of the concentration, but depended on the concentration of HSA added. The binding position of BZF to HSA was considered to involve the hydrophobic aromatic moiety of BZF from the ratio of spin-spin relaxation rates (1/T2) of BZF bound to HSA and free BZF.

  3. Numerical Solutions of Interactive Multi-Trap Model and Application on Real Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Erdem UZUN

    2000-01-01

    Thermoluminescence phenomenon, have been commonly utilized for measurement of radiation doses. Most important point of the measurement of radiation doses by using this method is that fundamental traps parameters influencing thermoluminescence process. Up to now, several models are asserted to determine of the trap parameters and to explain of thermoluminescence process. In this work, interactive multi-trap model was investigated, physical model was performed, differential equations, which is ...

  4. Numerical Solutions of Interactive Multi-Trap Model and Application on Real Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Erdem Uzun

    2010-01-01

    Thermoluminescence phenomenon, have been commonly utilized for measurement of radiation doses. Most important point of the measurement of radiation doses by using this method is that fundamental traps parameters influencing thermoluminescence process. Up to now, several models are asserted to determine of the trap parameters and to explain of thermoluminescence process. In this work, interactive multi-trap model was investigated, physical model was performed, differential equations, which is ...

  5. Temperature Spectra from a Turbulent Free Thermal Plume and in Interaction with its Material Environment

    OpenAIRE

    J. Zinoubi; T. Naffouti; R.B. Maad

    2011-01-01

    In this work we study the interaction of an axysymmetric thermal plume with a thermosiphon flow that surrounds it. The thermal plume is created by a circular disk heated by joule effect at constant temperature. The disk is placed at an open ended vertical cylinder on a quiet constant temperature. The internal wall of the cylinder heats up under the effect of thermal radiation emitted by the hot source. The confinement of the fluid causes, in the bottom part of the cylinder...

  6. Effect of Solid Material and Surfactant Presence on Interactions of Bubbles with Horizontal Solid Surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zedníková, Mária; Vobecká, Lucie; Vejražka, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2010), s. 473-481. ISSN 0008-4034 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB200720801; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200720801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble motion * surfactants * bubble-wall interaction Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.707, year: 2010

  7. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I., E-mail: lotkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kashin, Oleg A., E-mail: okashin@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A., E-mail: yulia-k1970@mail.ru; Antonova, Larisa V., E-mail: antonova.la@mail.ru; Matveeva, Vera G., E-mail: matveeva-vg@mail.ru; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A., E-mail: sergeewa.ew@yandex.ru [Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, 650002 (Russian Federation); Kudryashov, Andrey N., E-mail: kudryashov@angioline.ru [Angioline Interventional Device Ltd, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture.

  8. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I.; Kashin, Oleg A.; Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A.; Antonova, Larisa V.; Kudryashov, Andrey N.; Matveeva, Vera G.; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A.

    2015-10-01

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture.

  9. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture

  10. Haptics using a smart material for eyes-free interaction in personal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Lane, William Brian; Pappas, Devin; Duque, Bryam; Leong, John

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a prototype using a dry ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) in interactive personal devices such as bracelet, necklace, pocket key chain or mobile devices for haptic interaction when audio or visual feedback is not possible or practical. This prototype interface is an electro-mechanical system that realizes a shape-changing haptic display for information communication. A dry IPMC will change its dimensions due to the electrostatic effect when an electrical potential is provided to them. The IPMC can operate at a lower voltage (less than 2.5V) which is compatible with requirements for personal electrical devices or mobile devices. The prototype consists of the addressable arrays of the IPMCs with different dimensions which are deformable to different shapes with proper handling or customization. 3D printing technology will be used to form supporting parts. Microcontrollers (about 3cm square) from DigiKey will be imbedded into this personal device. An Android based mobile APP will be developed to talk with microcontrollers to control IPMCs. When personal devices receive information signals, the original shape of the prototype will change to another shape related to the specific sender or types of information sources. This interactive prototype can simultaneously realize multiple methods for conveying haptic information such as dimension, force, and texture due to the flexible array design. We conduct several studies of user experience to explore how users' respond to shape change information.

  11. Study of the interaction between microstructure, mechanical and tribo-performance of a commercial brake lining material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Interdependencies between the performance influencing parameters are established. • The constituents role is influenced by the heterogeneity of the friction material. • The anisotropy of the material depends essentially on the fiber orientation. • The ability of fibers to participate on load-bearing depends on their orientations. - Abstract: The interaction between microstructure, mechanical, and frictional properties of a commercial brake lining material (BLM) was investigated in order to correlate them to braking performance. For this purpose, a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping and spectrum were used to identify and analyze different constituents. The mechanical properties were determined using compression test. Relevant physical properties (density and porosity) were determined using standard test methods. The friction coefficient and wear behavior of the friction material on contact with the grey cast iron disc were established using a pad-on disc tribometer. The results have shown that the brake lining material contains phenol resin such as the matrix and other various ingredients, including silica, rock and mineral filler reinforcement, barium sulfate and carbon-rich particles as filler and brass particles as friction modifier. It had a varied amount and size up to 1 mm for brass particles. The density and porosity were 1.8 g cm−3 and 7%, respectively. The investigated material exhibited excellent mechanical properties in the normal solicitation direction. The average friction coefficient was about 0.65, whereas the friction coefficient was stable. The different actions of various ingredients in terms of their effects on the friction and wear behavior of the BLM could be related to their different bonding strengths with the resin matrix and their different abilities to form friction films (third-body layer) on the surfaces of the material and transfer films on the counterpart cast iron

  12. The interaction of laser-cavitation with a soft surface material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A phenomenon of laser induced cavitation bubble has been studied using high speed photography system. ND:YAG laser was focused in distilled water to create an artificial bubble. The focused region was illuminated by dye laser which also stood as a flash of light for photography system. An aluminium foil was employed as a soft surface material in this study. The exposed material were observed from side and top view with the aid of shadow graph and metallurgical technique. The development of cavitation damage was studied at various distance of separation. The damage was quantified according to the surface area and the depth of the dent. The maximum damage was found at optimum distance of 0.6 mm. In this particular study the damage is mainly contribute by the impact of shock wave mechanism. (author)

  13. Neighboring Interactions in a Periodic Plasmonic Material for Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Musho, Terence D; Coppens, Zackary J

    2015-01-01

    A periodic plasmonic meta-material was studied using finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method to investigate the influence of neighboring particles on the near unity optical absorptivity. The meta-material was constructed as a silver nanoparticle (20-90nm) situated above an alumina (Al$_2$O$_3$) dielectric environment. A full parametric sweep of the particle width and the dielectric thickness was conducted. Computational results identified several resonances between the metal-dielectric and metal-air that have potential to broadening the response through stacked geometry. A significant coupled resonance between the metal-dielectric resonance and a cavity resonance between particles was capture as a function of dielectric thickness. This coupled resonance was not evident below dielectric thicknesses of 40nm and above cavity widths of 20nm. Additionally, a noticeable propagating surface plasmon polariton resonance was predicted when the particle width was half the unit cell length.

  14. PISCES Program: Plasma-materials interactions and edge-plasma physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program investigates and characterizes the behavior of materials under plasma bombordment, in divertor regions. The PISCES facility is used to study divertor and plasma edge management concepts (in particular gas target divertors), as well as edge plasma turbulence and transport. The plasma source consists of a hot LaB6 cathode with an annular, water-cooled anode and attached drift tube. This cross sectional area of the plasma can be adjusted between 3 and 10 cm. A fast scanning diagnostic probe system was used for mapping plasma density profiles during biased limiter and divertor simulation experiments. Some experimental data are given on: (1) materials and surface physics, (2) edge plasma physics, and (3) a theoretical analysis of edge plasma modelling

  15. Progress in nano-electro optics characterization of nano-optical materials and optical near-field interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2005-01-01

    This volume focuses on the characterization of nano-optical materials and optical-near field interactions. It begins with the techniques for characterizing the magneto-optical Kerr effect and continues with methods to determine structural and optical properties in high-quality quantum wires with high spatial uniformity. Further topics include: near-field luminescence mapping in InGaN/GaN single quantum well structures in order to interpret the recombination mechanism in InGaN-based nano-structures; and theoretical treatment of the optical near field and optical near-field interactions, providing the basis for investigating the signal transport and associated dissipation in nano-optical devices. Taken as a whole, this overview will be a valuable resource for engineers and scientists working in the field of nano-electro-optics.

  16. Coulomb interaction revised in the presence of material with negative permittivity

    OpenAIRE

    Rangelov, A. A.; Karchev, N.

    2009-01-01

    Coulomb law is one of the fundamental laws in Physics. It describes the magnitude of the electrostatic force between two electric charges. Counterintuitively the repulsion force between two equal electric charges in a vacuum, stated by the Coulomb law, turn into the attraction force between the same electric charges when they are placed next to a material with negative permittivity and the distance between them is larger than some critical distance. As a result the equally charged particles "...

  17. Liquid Lithium Divertor Characteristics and Plasma-Material Interactions in NSTX High-Performance Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: ITER and future fusion experiments are hampered by erosion and degradation of plasma- facing components, forcing regular replacement. The conventional approach has been the use of high-Z walls (e.g., W) which can undergo permanent modification due to erosion and melting. One novel approach to solving these issues in the tokamak edge is the usage of liquid metal plasma facing components. The National Spherical Torus Experiments (NSTX) is the only US confinement device operating a liquid metal divertor target to examine the technological and scientific aspects of this innovative approach. The Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) module formed a nearly toroidally continuous surface in the outer, lower divertor. NSTX H-mode discharges were repeatedly run with the outer strike-point directly on the LLD plates. Peak heat fluxes of ∼ 5 MW/m2 were regularly applied to the LLD surfaces alongside significant ion fluxes. No molybdenum line radiation was observed in these plasma [3] indicating protection of the substrate material. During these experiments, no macroscopic ejection was observed from the LLD contrary to experiments conducted in the DIII-D tokamak, where lithium ejection exposed the substrate [4]. Quiescent scrape-off layer current (SOLC) densities were ∼ 10 kA/m2, with peak SOLCs > 100 kA/m2 . Stability analyses for the liquid metal layers show that despite the large current densities, capillary and viscous forces are effective at reducing motion demonstrating stable operation of the liquid metal PFC. The strong chemical reactivity of lithium results in the steady accumulation of impurities in the PFC material, mitigating the low-Z benefits of the lithium. Eroded material from the carbon PFCs in NSTX can redeposit onto the LLD, and background vacuum gases are also gettered onto the surface. Flowing systems are under study and are designed to allow one to obtain a low-Z, replenishable PFC by removing gettered materials and eliminating the accumulation

  18. Modelling local hygrothermal interaction between airflow and porous materials for building applications

    OpenAIRE

    Steeman, Hendrik-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Moisture related damage in buildings is a phenomenon which is familiar to most people. Most of the time it is spontaneously associated with damage due to liquid moisture transport such as plumbing leaks, rising moisture in walls, . . . Yet some materials and objects are so sensitive to moisture that they can already be damaged by water vapour transport through the air. This is especially true for culturally or historically valuable artefacts: even a small amount of damage (like small cracks, ...

  19. Material effect in the fuel-coolant interaction: structural characterization of the steam explosion debris and solidification mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work has been performed under joint supervision between Charles University in Prague (Czech Republic) and Strasbourg University (France). It also profited from the background and cooperation of Institute of Inorganic Chemistry Academy of Science of the Czech Republic and French Commission for Atomic and Alternative energies (CEA Cadarache). Results of the work contribute to the OECD/NEA project Serena 2 (Program on Steam Explosion Resolution for Nuclear Applications). Presented thesis can be classed in the scientific field of nuclear safety and material science. It is aimed on the so-called 'molten nuclear Fuel - Coolant Interaction' (FCI) that belongs among the recent issues of the nuclear reactor severe accident R and D. During the nuclear reactor melt down accident the melted reactor load can interact with the coolant (light water). This interaction can be located inside the vessel or outside in the case of vessel break-up. These two scenarios are commonly called in- and ex-vessel FCI and they differ in the conditions such as initial pressure of the system, water sub-cooling etc. The Molten fuel - coolant interaction can progress into thermal detonation called 'steam explosion' that can challenge the reactor or containment integrity. Recent experiments have shown that the melt composition has a major effect on the occurrence and yield of such explosion. In particular, different behaviors have been observed between simulant material (alumina), which has important explosion efficiency, and some prototypic corium compositions (80 w. % UO2, 20% w. % ZrO2. This 'material effect' has launched a new interest in the post-test analyses of FCI debris in order to estimate the processes occurring during these extremely rapid phenomena. The thesis is organized in nine chapters. The chapter 1 gives the general introduction and context of the nuclear reactor accident. Major nuclear accidents (Three Miles Island 1979, Chernobyl 1986 and Fukushima 2011) are briefly

  20. FY04 LDRD Final Report: Interaction of Viruses with Membranes and Soil Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaldach, C M

    2005-02-08

    The influence of ionic strength on the electrostatic interaction of viruses with environmentally relevant surfaces was determined for three viruses, MS2, Q{beta} and Norwalk. The environmental surface is modeled as charged Gouy-Chapman plane with and without a finite atomistic region (patch) of opposite charge. The virus is modeled as a particle comprised of ionizable amino acid residues in a shell surrounding a spherical RNA core of negative charge, these charges being compensated for by a Coulomb screening due to intercalated ions. Surface potential calculations for each of the viruses show excellent agreement with electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential measurements as a function of pH. The results indicate that the electrostatic interaction between the virus and the planar surface, mitigated by the ionic strength of the solute, is dependent upon the spatial distribution of the amino acid residues in the different viruses. Specifically, the order of interaction energies with the patch (MS2 greatest at 5 mM; Norwalk greatest at 20 mM) is dependent upon the ionic strength of the fluid as a direct result of the viral coat amino acid distributions. We have developed an atomistic-scale method of calculation of the binding energy of viruses to surfaces including electrostatic, van der Waals, electron-overlap repulsion, surface charge polarization (images), and hydrophobic effects. The surface is treated as a Gouy-Chapman plane allowing inclusion of pH and ionic strength effects on the electrostatic potential at each amino acid charge. Van der Waals parameters are obtained from the DREIDING force field and from Hamaker constant measurements. We applied this method to the calculation of the Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV), a negatively charged virus at a pH of 7.0, and find that the viral-gold surface interaction is very long range for both signs of surface potential, a result due to the electrostatic forces. For a negative (Au) surface potential of -0.05 volts, a nearly

  1. Accelerator System Design, Injection, Extraction and Beam-Material Interaction: Working Group C Summary Report

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N V

    2014-01-01

    The performance of high beam power accelerators is strongly dependent on appropriate injection, acceleration and extraction system designs as well as on the way interactions of the beam with machine components are handled. The experience of the previous ICFA High -Brightness Beam workshops has proven that it is quite beneficial to combine analyses and discussion of these issues in one group. A broad range of topics was presented and discussed at the Working Group C sessions at the HB2012 Workshop. Highlights from the talks, outstanding issues along with plans and proposals for future work are briefly described in this report.

  2. JNM theme issue on models and data for plasma-material interaction and hydrogen retention in fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2015-12-01

    Plasma-wall interaction in fusion devices encompasses a wide variety of processes. On a short timescale these include deposition of energetic plasma particles (primarily hydrogen and helium) into the surface, physical and chemical sputtering of surface material into the plasma, and reflection and desorption of particles from the surface. On a longer timescale the processes include diffusion of hydrogen and helium in the wall and changes in surface composition, morphology and material microstructure due to plasma bombardment and (in a reactor) neutron irradiation. Together these processes are extremely important in determining the plasma performance, the lifetime of plasma-facing components, trapping and retention of the tritium fusion fuel in the wall, and ultimately the feasibility of fusion power production.

  3. IAEA technical meeting on atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion science technology. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings and conclusions of the Technical Meeting on 'Atomic and Plasma- Material Interaction Data for Fusion Science Technology' held in Juelich, Germany on October 28-31 are summarized. During the course of the meetings working groups were formed to review the status of specific areas of atomic, molecular and material physics of relevance to fusion and to make recommendations on data needs in fusion from these areas. The reports of those working groups are summarized and the complete reports included as appendices. This meeting brought together over fifty leading scientists in fusion related data. Results of research in a number of topics were presented and very useful discussions were held. The meeting was extremely successful. (author)

  4. Temperature Spectra from a Turbulent Free Thermal Plume and in Interaction with its Material Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zinoubi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we study the interaction of an axysymmetric thermal plume with a thermosiphon flow that surrounds it. The thermal plume is created by a circular disk heated by joule effect at constant temperature. The disk is placed at an open ended vertical cylinder on a quiet constant temperature. The internal wall of the cylinder heats up under the effect of thermal radiation emitted by the hot source. The confinement of the fluid causes, in the bottom part of the cylinder, an aspiration of the fresh air. It is a thermosiphon flow that comes to interact with the plume. By studying the average and fluctuating thermal fields it was found that the flow of the plume is strongly influenced by the presence of nearby walls. It was noted that the vertical transport becomes more intense and the structure of the flow becomes more turbulent. On the other hand, we attend a fast homogenization of the flow in the upper cylinder. To obtain more detailed information of this flow, we develops, during this study, a spectral analysis of the fluctuating thermal fields for the case of a plume evolving in unlimited and in an enclosed environment. The energy spectra study shows an important shift of the energy peaks toward the high frequencies under the effect of the thermosiphon. As destroying structures them on a big scale generated by the plume, the thermosiphon provokes a fast mixture of the fluid thus while leading to vortex of weaker size.

  5. Investigation of ultrafast laser photonic material interactions: challenges for directly written glass photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Ams, M; Dekker, P; Dubov, M; Mezentsev, V K; Bennion, I; Withford, M J

    2008-01-01

    Currently, direct-write waveguide fabrication is probably the most widely studied application of femtosecond laser micromachining in transparent dielectrics. Devices such as buried waveguides, power splitters, couplers, gratings and optical amplifiers have all been demonstrated. Waveguide properties depend critically on the sample material properties and writing laser characteristics. In this paper we discuss the challenges facing researchers using the femtosecond laser direct-write technique with specific emphasis being placed on the suitability of fused silica and phosphate glass as device hosts for different applications.

  6. Interactions of efficiency and material requirements for terrestrial silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, D. L.; Wolf, M.

    1980-01-01

    The transport velocity transformation method was used to analyze solar cell designs to determine optimum cell structures. It was found that low resistivity materials should be used up to the onset of Auger recombination; a properly designed three-layer structure permits base region approaching an ideal device in performance; and that higher resistivity front regions will need more sophisticated grid metallization structures than those used now. It was concluded that new features will provide idealized silicon cell structures yielding airmass 1 efficiencies in the 24-26.5% range, with real efficiencies near 22%.

  7. Interaction of osteogenic cells with hydroxylapatite implant materials in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagambisa, F B; Joos, U; Schilli, W

    1990-01-01

    In a series of scanning electron microscopic studies, the reaction of osteogenic cells to hydroxylapatite (HA) implant materials was investigated in culture and following implantation. Tissue components as found in normal rat and dog bone were identified at the interface in both test systems. In vivo, implant bed cells showed an intimate contact with the HA surfaces. Osteoblasts deposited organic matrix and bone mineral in direct apposition to HA, with no evidence of encapsulation or granulation tissue. The development of such a direct spatial relationship appears to involve mechanisms more encompassing than epitaxis. PMID:2098325

  8. Study of gas contaminants and interaction with materials in RPC closed loop system

    CERN Document Server

    Colafranceschi, S; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Passamonti, L.; Piccolo, D.; Pierluigi, D.; Russo, A.; Ferrini, M.; Greci, T.; Saviano, G.; Vendittozzi, C.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Verwilligen, P.; Sharma, A.

    2013-01-01

    Resistive Plate Counters (RPC) detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments use gas recirculation systems to cope with large gas mixture volumes and costs. In this paper a long-term systematic study about gas purifiers, gas contaminants and detector performance is discussed. The study aims at measuring the lifetime of purifiers with new and used cartridge material along with contaminants release in the gas system. During the data-taking the response of several RPC double-gap detectors was monitored in order to characterize the correlation between dark currents, filter status and gas contaminants.

  9. A study of gas contaminants and interaction with materials in RPC closed loop systems

    CERN Document Server

    Colafranceschi, S; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Russo, A; Ferrini, M; Greci, T; Saviano, G; Vendittozzi, C; Abbrescia, M; Calabria, C; Colaleo, A; Iaselli, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Pugliese, G; Verwilligen, P; Sharma, A

    2012-01-01

    Resistive Plate Counters (RPC) detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments use gas recirculation systems to cope with large gas mixture volumes and costs. In this paper a long-term systematic study about gas purifiers, gas contaminants and detector performance is discussed. The study aims at measuring the lifetime of purifiers with unused and used cartridge material along with contaminants release in the gas system. During the data-taking the response of several RPC double-gap detectors was monitored in order to characterize the correlation between dark currents, filter status and gas contaminants.

  10. Thermoddem: A geochemical database focused on low temperature water/rock interactions and waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of Thermoddem, a thermodynamic database devoted to geochemical modelling for environmental studies in general and, more specifically, to chemical systems involving waste materials, is discussed here. Concerns are also focused on taking into account some specific needs for modellers by proposing different output formats and some important information concerning the solid phases, the transformation path, paragenesis and insights into crystallographic details. This additional information aims to avoid considering phases that may not be “active” under current environmental conditions. The database is especially devoted to environmental applications, ranging from waste material management to pollutant behaviour, including the context of deep underground disposal. Selection rules and conventions are illustrated through the example of the Fe-water system, while a second example details the relationships between low and high ionic strength media, from the point of view of thermodynamic databases. Technical aspects concerning the development of a management information system for Thermoddem and its availability on the web ( (http://thermoddem.brgm.fr)) are also provided.

  11. Material Interactions in a Novel Pinless Tool Approach to Friction Stir Spot Welding Thin Aluminum Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakavos, Dimitrios; Chen, Yingchun; Babout, Laurent; Prangnell, Phil

    2011-05-01

    The requirement for a probe, or pin, in friction stir spot welding (FSSW) leads to an undesirable keyhole and "hooking," which can influence the fracture path and weld strength. Furthermore, the full weld cycle for FSSW is typically longer than ideal for the automotive industry, being 2 to 5 seconds. Here, it is shown that using a novel pinless tool design it is possible to achieve high lap shear strength (~3.4 kN) in thin aluminum sheet (~1 mm thick), with short weld cycle times (weld formation in pinless FSSW, including high-resolution X-ray tomography, to understand the role of the tool design and weld parameters. Despite the "simple" nature of a pinless tool, material flow in the weld zone was found to be surprisingly complex and strongly influenced by surface features on the tool, which greatly increased the penetration of the plastic zone into the bottom sheet. Because of the rapid thermal cycle and high level of grain refinement, the weld zone was found to develop a higher strength than the parent material with little evidence of a heat affected zone (HAZ) after postweld natural aging.

  12. HERMES - a Monte Carlo program system for beam-materials interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HERMES (High Energy Radiation Monte Carlo Elaborate System) is a system of Monte-Carlo computer codes that are necessary to treat the different physics to be considered in computer simulation of radiation transport and interaction problems. The HERMES collection of physics programs permits the simulation of secondary particle histories induced by primary particles of any energy up to the regime of high-energy physics and down to thermal energies, e.g. for neutrons. The particles, that are considered by the programs of the HERMES system are p, n, π+, π-, π0, π±, e+, e-, γ, and light ions to A=10. The programs of the HERMES system have been taken as original codes as far as possible. To satisfy the needs of some applications, extensions and changes became necessary. Also the interfacing technique by HERMES submission files needs some additional programming. All changes made to the original codes are documented. (orig./DG)

  13. Synthetic Spectra and Light Curves of Interacting Binaries and Exoplanets with Circumstellar Material: SHELLSPEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaj, Ján

    2012-04-01

    Program SHELLSPEC is designed to calculate light-curves, spectra and images of interacting binaries and extrasolar planets immersed in a moving circumstellar environment which is optically thin. It solves simple radiative transfer along the line of sight in moving media. The assumptions include LTE and optional known state quantities and velocity fields in 3D. Optional (non)transparent objects such as a spot, disc, stream, jet, shell or stars may be defined (embedded) in 3D and their composite synthetic spectrum calculated. The Roche model can be used as a boundary condition for the radiative transfer. Recently, a new model of the reflection effect, dust and Mie scattering were incorporated into the code. ɛ Aurigae is one of the most mysterious objects on the sky. Prior modeling of its light-curve assumed a dark, inclined, disk of dust with a central hole to explain the light-curve with a sharp mid-eclipse brightening. Our model consists of two geometrically thick flared disks: an internal optically thick disk and an external optically thin disk which absorbs and scatters radiation. Shallow mid-eclipse brightening may result from eclipses by nearly edge-on flared (dusty or gaseous) disks. Mid-eclipse brightening may also be due to strong forward scattering and optical properties of the dust which can have an important effect on the light-curves. There are many similarities between interacting binary stars and transiting extrasolar planets. The reflection effect which is briefly reviewed is one of them. The exact Roche shape and temperature distributions over the surface of all currently known transiting extrasolar planets have been determined. In some cases (HAT-P-32b, WASP-12b, WASP-19b), departures from the spherical shape can reach 7-15%.

  14. Investigations of Interaction of Laser Radiation and Plasma Beams with Materials of Reactor Chamber for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of the project was to experimentally analyze some the processes which take place during the interaction of laser radiation and plasma beams with the materials of reactor chamber for the Inertial Confinement Fusion. First, we studied the effect of target nature on the laser ablation process and on the properties of laser-generated plasma ions. As an example we considered porous targets having different densities and showed how the charge state, the energy and the intensity of the plasma ions depend on the target density. We also studied the effect of laser frequency on the properties of plasma ions generated at the surface of such porous targets. We considered possibilities of controlling the intensity and the energy of the ions by changing the frequency of the laser and the density of the target because of the change in laser ablation process. Then we investigated the changes in the properties of laser-produced plasma ions after the ablation process, during the plasma expansion, due to the mutual interaction between the ions of different mass. For this purpose we studied two- element plasma ions generated from (Sc2O3, Ce2O3, Lu2O3) targets. Experiments have shown that structural defects caused by the neutron irradiation, influence not only on the efficiency of the process of material evaporation and emission of plasma, but also on the ionization and recombination processes taking place at the initial stage of the plasma formation and expansion. (author)

  15. Development of a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system on the Plasma Material Interaction System (PLAMIS-II) device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, I. J.; Lee, K. Y.; Lee, K. I.; Choi, Y.-S.; Cho, S. G.; Bae, M. K.; Lee, D.-H.; Hong, S. H.; Lho, T.; Chung, K.-S.

    2015-12-01

    A laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed for the plasma material interaction system (PLAMIS-II) device, which is equipped with a unique plasma gun composed of a LaB6 cathode and two anodes with electromagnets to generate a focused dense plasma. PLAMIS-II simulates the interactions of plasma with different materials and is to be used for the test of plasma facing components of fusion devices. The LIF system is composed of a seed laser with Littmann/Metcalf cavity and a master oscillator power amplifier to pump 3d4F7/2 metastable argon ion to 4p4D5/2 level at the wavelength of 668.61 nm, which has the following input parameters: laser power = 20 mW, line width 70 GHz. For in-situ measurement of laser wavelength, the wavelength spectrum of an iodine cell was measured by a photo-transistor during LIF measurement. To measure argon ion temperature (Ti) and drift velocity (vd) in PLAMIS-II, the fluorescence light with the wavelength of 442.72 nm, emitted from 4p4D5/2 level to 4s4P3/2 level and passing through 1 nm band-width filter, was collected by the photomultiplier tube combined with a lock-in amplifier and a chopper with frequency of 3 kHz. Initial data of Ti and vd were analysed in terms of gas flow rate and applied power.

  16. Elemental analysis on reaction layers formed in the core materials interaction at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain the fundamental data to evaluate the initial stage of the core degradation during a severe accident in LWRs, quantitative elemental analyses with SEM-EDX/WDX were performed on reaction layers formed at interfaces between core materials in laboratory tests at high temperatures. The reaction layers analyzed were those formed in the reactions of Zircaloy-4/Inconel-718, Zircaloy-4/stainless steel type 304, Ag-In-Cd alloy/Zircaloy-4, B4C/stainless steel type 304, and B4C/Zircaloy-4. The results indicated that initiation temperatures of these reactions and discontinuities of the temperature dependence of the reaction rate were obviously connected with eutectic formations. (author)

  17. Communication: Charge-population based dispersion interactions for molecules and materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Martin; Michelitsch, Georg S.; Tully, John C.; Reuter, Karsten; Maurer, Reinhard J.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a system-independent method to derive effective atomic C6 coefficients and polarizabilities in molecules and materials purely from charge population analysis. This enables the use of dispersion-correction schemes in electronic structure calculations without recourse to electron-density partitioning schemes and expands their applicability to semi-empirical methods and tight-binding Hamiltonians. We show that the accuracy of our method is en par with established electron-density partitioning based approaches in describing intermolecular C6 coefficients as well as dispersion energies of weakly bound molecular dimers, organic crystals, and supramolecular complexes. We showcase the utility of our approach by incorporation of the recently developed many-body dispersion method [Tkatchenko et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 236402 (2012)] into the semi-empirical density functional tight-binding method and propose the latter as a viable technique to study hybrid organic-inorganic interfaces.

  18. Characterization of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Torch and the Surface Interaction for Material Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Anthony Joseph

    An atmospheric pressure plasma torch has been developed and characterized for removal of organic based coatings. The focus of the Strategic Environmental Research & Development Program (SERDP) project WP-1762, that funded the bulk of this dissertation work, is removal of paint from US Navy vessels. The goal is to develop a novel technology for coating removal that is capable of reducing the amount of environmental waste produced during the commonly used grit blasting process. The atmospheric pressure air plasma torch was identified as having the capacity to remove the paint systems while using only compressed air and electricity as a media-less removal system with drastically reduced waste generation. Any improvements to the existing technology need to be based on scientific knowledge and thus the plasma removal mechanisms or material warranted investigation. The removal of material does not show a strong relation to the plasma parameters of power, frequency, and gas flow, nor is there a strong relation to the presences of inorganic fillers impeding or altering the removal rates. The underlying removal mechanisms also do not show a strong correlation to the rotational temperature of the plasma but do show a strong correlation to the optical emission intensity. Primarily, the emission from atomic oxygen and molecular nitrogen were identified significant contributors and were investigated further. The plasma feed gas was then varied from the nitrogen and oxygen ratio present in ambient air to pure nitrogen to identify the effect of oxygen on the removal mechanism. From these experiments it was concluded that the oxygen present in air does contribute to the overall removal mechanism; however, it is not the sole contributing factor with the other major factor being nitrogen.

  19. Surface Modification of Carbon Nanotubes with Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Fundamental Interactions and Applications in Composite Materials, Nanofibers, Electronics, and Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ezzeddine, Alaa

    2015-10-01

    Ever since their discovery, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been renowned to be potential candidates for a variety of applications. Nevertheless, the difficulties accompanied with their dispersion and poor solubility in various solvents have hindered CNTs potential applications. As a result, studies have been developed to address the dispersion problem. The solution is in modifying the surfaces of the nanotubes covalently or non-covalently with a desired dispersant. Various materials have been employed for this purpose out of which polymers are the most common. Non-covalent functionalization of CNTs via polymer wrapping represents an attractive method to obtain a stable and homogenous CNTs dispersion. This method is able to change the surface properties of the nanotubes without destroying their intrinsic structure and preserving their properties. This thesis explores and studies the surface modification and solublization of pristine single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes via a simple solution mixing technique through non-covalent interactions of CNTs with various anionic and cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs). The work includes studying the interaction of various poly(phenylene ethynylene) electrolytes with MWCNTs and an imidazolium functionalized poly(3-hexylthiophene) with SWCNTs. Our work here focuses on the noncovalent modifications of carbon nanotubes using novel CPEs in order to use these resulting CPE/CNT complexes in various applications. Upon modifying the CNTs with the CPEs, the resulting CPE/CNT complex has been proven to be easily dispersed in various organic and aqueous solution with excellent homogeneity and stability for several months. This complex was then used as a nanofiller and was dispersed in another polymer matrix (poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA). The PMMA/CPE/CNT composite materials were cast or electrospun depending on their desired application. The presence of the CPE modified CNTs in the polymer matrix has been proven to enhance

  20. Synthetic Spectra and Light Curves of Interacting Binaries and Exoplanets with Circumstellar Material: SHELLSPEC

    CERN Document Server

    Budaj, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Program SHELLSPEC is designed to calculate light-curves, spectra and images of interacting binaries and extrasolar planets immersed in a moving circumstellar environment which is optically thin. It solves simple radiative transfer along the line of sight in moving media. The assumptions include LTE and optional known state quantities and velocity fields in 3D. Optional (non)transparent objects such as a spot, disc, stream, jet, ufo, shell or stars may be defined (embedded) in 3D and their composite synthetic spectrum calculated. Roche model can be used as a boundary condition for the radiative transfer. Recently a new model of the reflection effect, dust and Mie scattering were incorporated into the code. $\\epsilon$ Aurigae is one of the most mysterious objects on the sky. Prior modeling of its light-curve assumed dark, inclined, disk of dust with the central hole to explain the light-curve with a sharp mid-eclipse brightening. Our model consists of two geometrically thick flared disks. Internal optically thi...

  1. Interaction of low-energy highly charged ions with matter; Wechselwirkung niederenergetischer hochgeladener Ionen mit Materie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzel, Rainer

    2010-06-09

    The thesis presented herein deals with experimental studies of the interaction between highly charged ions and neutral matter at low collision energies. The energy range investigated is of great interest for the understanding of both charge exchange reactions between ions comprising the solar wind and various astrophysical gases, as well as the creation of near-surface nanostructures. Over the course of this thesis an experimental setup was constructed, capable of reducing the kinetic energy of incoming ions by two orders of magnitude and finally focussing the decelerated ion beam onto a solid or gaseous target. A coincidence method was employed for the simultaneous detection of photons emitted during the charge exchange process together with the corresponding projectile ions. In this manner, it was possible to separate reaction channels, whose superposition presumably propagated large uncertainties and systematic errors in previous measurements. This work has unveiled unexpectedly strong contributions of slow radiative decay channels and clear evidence of previously only postulated decay processes in charge exchange-induced X-ray spectra. (orig.)

  2. Study of plasma-material surface interaction using Langmuir probe technique during plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we tried to understand the plasma-surface interactions by using Langmuir probes. Two different types of plasmas were studied, the first is the electropositive plasma in Argon and the second is the electronegative plasma in Sulfur Hexafluoride. In the first type, the effects of Argon gas pressure, the injection of Helium in the remote zone and the substrate bias on the measurements of the Electron Energy Probability Function (EEPF) and on the plasma parameters (electron density (ne), effective electron temperature (Teff), plasma potential (Vp) and floating potential (Vf)) have been investigated. The obtained EEPFs and plasma parameters have been used to control two remote plasma processes. The first is the remote Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) of thin films, on silicon wafers, from Hexamethyldisoloxane (HMDSO) precursor diluted in the remote Ar-He plasma. The second is the pure Argon remote plasma treatment of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) polymer surface. In the second type, the plasma diagnostics were performed in the remote zone as a function of SF6 flow rate, where relative concentrations of fluorine atoms were measured using actinometry optical emission spectroscopy; electron density, electron temperature and plasma potential were determined using single cylindrical Langmuir probe, positive ion flux and negative ion fraction were determined using an planar probe. The silicon etching process in SF6 plasma was studied. (author)

  3. An interactive model of antisocial behaviour in young offenders: The role of callous-unemotional traits, materialism and risk-taking behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess a model of interactive risk in a young offender sample (n=60) aged 14 to 17 years old. It was hypothesised that interactive relationships between callous-unemotional traits, materialism and risk-taking behaviour would account for more variance in the severity of antisocial behaviour. The participants completed a set of self-report questionnaires measuring callous-unemotional traits, materialism, antisocial behaviour and also played a computer task, the Balloon Analo...

  4. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Yang; Qiang Han; Shuya Cao; Feng Huang; Molin Qin; Chenghai Guo; Mingyu Ding

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical an...

  5. The DIII-D Boundary/Plasma Materials Interaction Center (BPMIC): Progress and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D.

    2015-11-01

    The boundary of a putative fusion reactor remains a key unresolved issue in the development of useful fusion energy. The BPMIC was established to develop validated boundary/PMI solutions for burning plasma devices by leveraging the existing DIII-D resources in well controlled, variable geometry edge plasmas and extensive boundary diagnostic set. During the first part of the 2015 campaign we have made significant progress in experiments designed to isolate specific known boundary and PMI physics issues and provide data for challenging existing analytical modeling tools such as the SOLPS suite and UEDGE. Topics include characterizing the relation between upstream and divertor parameters, the separate effects of closure and local magnetic geometry on detachment performance, leading edge tungsten erosion studies, and scaling relationships for the divertor heat flux width. This poster summarizes results from these experiments and will describe our high-level goals for the remainder of the 2015 campaign as well as for the 2016 campaign where we plan a campaign to study high-Z material migration and integration. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  6. Interaction of ultra soft magnetic materials with the high-Tc superconductor YBCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have grown bilayers of optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) and ferromagnetic CoFeB on single-crystalline substrates by pulsed laser deposition and sputtering. These heterostructures are typically composed of about 100 nm YBCO and several 10 nm of CoFeB. Regarding the superconductor, the properties of the YBCO film change as a consequence of the vicinity of the ferromagnet. In detail we investigated the critical current density as a function of temperature, applied field and time as well as the transition temperature by SQUID magnetization measurements and quantitative magneto-optical measurements. The amorphous material CoFeB exhibits an in plane anisotropy and a very low coercivity. From magneto-optical images we find that the flux line lattice of the superconductor is mapped into the magnet and still visible as significant magnetic out-of-plane contrast at room temperature. We discuss this phenomenon as a new route to high-resolution mapping of the flux line distribution on a nanometer scale.

  7. Phenoloxidase-mediated interactions of phenols and anilines with humic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dec, J.; Bollag, J.M.

    2000-06-01

    Phenoloxidases present in terrestrial systems may contribute to the formation of humus through random coupling of a variety of aromatic compounds, including xenobiotic chemicals. Because of their structural similarity to natural substrates originating mainly from lignin decomposition, xenobiotic phenols and anilines can be readily incorporated into the soil organic matter, a phenomenon referred to as binding. The underlying mechanism of binding involves oxidation of the xenobiotic substrates to free radicals or quinone products that subsequently couple directly to humus or to naturally occurring phenols that also are subject to oxidation. The oxidation can be mediated by soil phenoloxidases as well as by abiotic catalysts. The ability of the enzymes to mediate the oxidation was demonstrated in a number of model studies, in which selected pollutants were incubated with humic monomers or natural humic acids in the presence of different phenoloxidases (laccase, peroxidase, tyrosinase). Analysis of the formed complexes by mass spectrometry and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy left no doubt about the formation of covalent bonds between the pollutants and humic materials. Some bonds were formed at the chlorinated sites, leading to partial dehalogenation of the aromatic contaminants. Experimental data indicated that bound phenols and anilines were unlikely to adversely affect the environment; their release from humic complexes by soil microorganisms was very limited and once released, they were subjected to mineralization. For those reasons, phenoloxidases, which proved capable of mediating the underlying reaction, are currently considered as a tool for enhancing immobilization phenomena in soil.

  8. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-06-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to evaluate the (HIC) system, which incorporates augmented reality, virtual reality and cloud-classroom to teach basic materials science courses. The study followed a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental research design. A total of 92 students (aged 19-20 years), in a second-year undergraduate program, participated in this 18-week-long experiment. The students were divided into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group (36 males and 10 females) was instructed utilizing the HIC system, while the control group (34 males and 12 females) was led through traditional teaching methods. Pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest scores were evaluated by multivariate analysis of covariance. The results indicated that participants in the experimental group who used the HIC system outperformed the control group, in the both posttest and delayed posttest, across three learning dimensions. Based on these results, the HIC system is recommended to be incorporated in formal materials science learning settings.

  9. Lipoprotein interactions with a polyurethane and a polyethylene oxide-modified polyurethane at the plasma-material interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Rena M; Macri, Joseph; Cornelius, Katherine M; Brash, John L

    2016-01-01

    Lipoproteins [high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)] are present in blood in relatively high concentrations, and, given their importance in cardiovascular disease, the interactions of these species with blood contacting biomaterials and their possible role in thrombogenesis is of interest. In the present communication, quantitative data on the adsorption of apolipoprotein AI, apolipoprotein AII (the main protein components of HDL), and apolipoprotein B (the main protein component of LDL and VLDL), as well as the lipoproteins themselves from plasma to a biomedical grade polyurethane (PU) with and without a copolymer additive that contains polyethylene oxide (PEO) segments, were investigated. Adsorption from some binary solutions was also studied. Significant quantities of the apolipoproteins were found to adsorb from plasma to the PU, while adsorption to the PEO material was more than 90% lower, demonstrating strong protein resistance of the latter material. In contrast, significant quantities of the lipoproteins were found to adsorb to the PEO as well as to the PU material. From these and previously published results, it is concluded that the protein layer formed on the PU surface from plasma (and by extension from blood) contains apolipoproteins and lipoproteins in addition to other plasma proteins; the layer formed on the PEO surface, however, appears to contain minimal quantities of plasma proteins (including free apolipoproteins) but significant quantities of lipoproteins. PMID:27306077

  10. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-02-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to evaluate the (HIC) system, which incorporates augmented reality, virtual reality and cloud-classroom to teach basic materials science courses. The study followed a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental research design. A total of 92 students (aged 19-20 years), in a second-year undergraduate program, participated in this 18-week-long experiment. The students were divided into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group (36 males and 10 females) was instructed utilizing the HIC system, while the control group (34 males and 12 females) was led through traditional teaching methods. Pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest scores were evaluated by multivariate analysis of covariance. The results indicated that participants in the experimental group who used the HIC system outperformed the control group, in the both posttest and delayed posttest, across three learning dimensions. Based on these results, the HIC system is recommended to be incorporated in formal materials science learning settings.

  11. Development of a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system on the Plasma Material Interaction System (PLAMIS-II) device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed for the plasma material interaction system (PLAMIS-II) device, which is equipped with a unique plasma gun composed of a LaB6 cathode and two anodes with electromagnets to generate a focused dense plasma. PLAMIS-II simulates the interactions of plasma with different materials and is to be used for the test of plasma facing components of fusion devices. The LIF system is composed of a seed laser with Littmann/Metcalf cavity and a master oscillator power amplifier to pump 3d4F7/2 metastable argon ion to 4p4D5/2 level at the wavelength of 668.61 nm, which has the following input parameters: laser power = 20 mW, line width < 100 kHz, and a mode-hop free tuning range > 70 GHz. For in-situ measurement of laser wavelength, the wavelength spectrum of an iodine cell was measured by a photo-transistor during LIF measurement. To measure argon ion temperature (Ti) and drift velocity (vd) in PLAMIS-II, the fluorescence light with the wavelength of 442.72 nm, emitted from 4p4D5/2 level to 4s4P3/2 level and passing through 1 nm band-width filter, was collected by the photomultiplier tube combined with a lock-in amplifier and a chopper with frequency of 3 kHz. Initial data of Ti and vd were analysed in terms of gas flow rate and applied power

  12. Non-Reactor testing stands for investigation of interaction of the fuel and constructive materials with the coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1991 in the United Expedition of Scientific and Industrial Corp. Luch the non-reactor experiments were beginning. The appearances accompanied by water cooling reactor heavy accident were studied. There are 'Ruchej', 'LAVA', 'SLAVA' experimental facilities working out for such purposes. The 'Ruchej' facility is intended for conducting of the investigation of behavior of water cooling reactor core constructive elements in the high temperature gas-steam media. There were 27 testing start-up of 'Ruchej' facility and 70 fuel elements shells samples and 2 models fuel elements. 'LAVA' facility is intended to study the processes of the interaction of the melting composition of WWER-1000 reactor core with water. The 'SLAVA' facility is destined for study of corium jet characteristics and the processes of interaction of corium with WWER-1000 reactor constructive materials. The corium generation is realized in the electric melting furnaces (EPP-1, EPP-2) and both of them could be using for the 'LAVA' facility and the 'SLAVA' facility. The expenses, temperature, pressure of the water in the facility's cooling highway, pressure of gas within device, temperature of the corium or its imitator, geometrical parameters of stream' temperature of construct device's elements, electric parameters (voltage, current) has being registered

  13. LBL coating of type I collagen and hyaluronic acid on aminolyzed PLLA to enhance the cell-material interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to assemble extracellular matrix components onto poly (L-lactic acid (PLLA films using layer-by-layer (LBL depositing method to enhance the cell-material interaction. To introduce charges onto the hydrophobic and neutral PLLA surface so that the electronic assembly can be processed, poly (ethylene imine (PEI was covalently bonded to modify the PLLA films. Positively charged collagen I (Col I was then deposited onto the aminolyzed PLLA film surface in a LBL assembly manner using hyaluronic acid (HA as a negatively charged polyelectrolyte. The PEI modification efficiency was monitored via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS measurements. The results of Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR and Water contact angle (WCA monitoring the LBL assemble process presented that the HA/Col I deposited alternately onto the PLLA surface. The surface topography of the films was observed by Atomic force microscope (AFM. In vitro osteoblast culture found that the presence of Col I layer greatly improved the cytocompatibility of the PLLA films in terms of cell viability, cell proliferation and Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP expression. Furthermore, osteoblast extensions were found to be directed by contact guidance of the aligned Col I fibrils. Thus, these very flexible systems may allow broad applications for improve the bioactivity of polymeric materials, which might be a potential application for bone tissue engineering.

  14. Characterization of the interaction between therapeutical carbon ions and bone-like materials and related impact on treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is one of the most common and effective therapies for cancer. The treatment planning system for ions TRiP98 was developed at GSI, Darmstadt. In TRiP98, the interaction between primary radiation and tissue is modeled from experimental data measured in water and rescaled to other tissue. This approximation is not accurate enough for biological materials whose elemental composition besides density deviates significantly from water. The nuclear attenuation of carbon beams in bone-like materials was measured and an estimation of the fragmentation cross section was done. In parallel, the dose profile inhomogeneity predicted by TRiP98 at the interface between water and bones was investigated and measured at HIT (Heidelberg). A 3D treatment plan was delivered in a water phantom equipped with bone targets. Pin-point ionization chambers and X-ray dosimetric films were used for measuring the dose at different positions. As a further step, the measured cross sections of carbon ions in bone have been implemented in TRiP98. The comparison of the dose profiles calculated with the standard and benchmarked versions of the treatment planning will give an estimate of the improvement.

  15. Chemical interactions in complex matrices: Determination of polar impurities in biofuels and fuel contaminants in building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglayeva, Ganna

    The solutions to several real-life analytical and physical chemistry problems, which involve chemical interactions in complex matrices are presented. The possible interferences due to the analyte-analyte and analyte-matrix chemical interactions were minimized on each step of the performed chemical analysis. Concrete and wood, as major construction materials, typically become contaminated with fuel oil hydrocarbons during their spillage. In the catastrophic scenarios (e.g., during floods), fuel oil mixes with water and then becomes entrained within the porous structure of wood or concrete. A strategy was proposed for the efficient extraction of fuel oil hydrocarbons from concrete to enable their monitoring. The impacts of sample aging and inundation with water on the extraction efficiency were investigated to elucidate the nature of analytematrix interactions. Two extraction methods, 4-days cold solvent extraction with shaking and 24-hours Soxhlet extraction with ethylacetate, methanol or acetonitrile yielded 95-100 % recovery of fuel oil hydrocarbons from concrete. A method of concrete remediation after contamination with fuel oil hydrocarbons using activated carbon as an adsorbent was developed. The 14 days remediation was able to achieve ca. 90 % of the contaminant removal even from aged water-submerged concrete samples. The degree of contamination can be qualitatively assessed using transport rates of the contaminants. Two models were developed, Fickian and empirical, to predict long-term transport behavior of fuel oil hydrocarbons under flood representative scenarios into wood. Various sorption parameters, including sorption rate, penetration degree and diffusion coefficients were obtained. The explanations to the observed three sorption phases are provided in terms of analyte-matrix interactions. The detailed simultaneous analysis of intermediate products of the cracking of triacylglycerol oils, namely monocarboxylic acids, triacyl-, diacyl- and

  16. Plasma-materials interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past year, plasma edge diagnostics for the Advanced Toroidal Facility were identified, and the design of hardware was initiated. These diagnostics are being prepared to study plasma density and temperature, particle and heat fluxes, impurity production and transport, and the configuration of the edge plasma. The conceptual design of top and bottom rail limiters, configured as calorimeter arrays, was finished, and detailed engineering design is under way. In collaboration with Japan and the Federal Republic of Germany, the PMI group is responsible for H/sub α/ measurements and the helium removal experiment on the ALT-II experiment in TEXTOR. Initial H/sub α/ measurements and calibration of the detectors were performed on TEXTOR. Several concepts have been investigated and the associated diagnostics identified to implement a helium removal experiment on ALT-II. In collaboration with France, a pump limiter system for steady-state operation is being designed for Tore Supra. In the past year, several concepts for pump limiter systems were studied, and predictive modeling of heat and particle removal was performed. Studies of plasma-surface phenomena were concentrated during the past year on graphites, wall carbonization, erosion/redeposition, and postmortem analysis of limiters. Erosion/redeposition experiments were performed with the 13C technique in collaboration with the JET and TEXTOR groups. Other initiatives include studies of surface effects on the performance of rf components

  17. Contribution to concrete modelling towards aging and durability: interactions between creep deformations and non-linear behaviour of the material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concrete structures are examined during their lifetime and often present important cracking states, which can progress with time and lead to change the structural behavior. The civil engineering works that the main function corresponds to protection's wall are very sensitive to this damage and its evolution. The growth of the time - dependent cracks represents an aging pathology linked with interaction between creep mechanism and the non-linear behavior of the material. In this thesis, a modeling for these mechanisms and their coupling are proposed. It based on creep strains analysis under different load levels, on the influence of the rate effect to the mechanical behavior. A stress limit is put on prominent manner, where beyond it, the creep - cracking interaction becomes important with the introduction of the ultimate tertiary creep kinetic. This level of strength is identified for infinitely slow loading rates and is also called intrinsic strength. It defines the limit on this side the viscous behavior of the cement paste limits the irreversibility processes as cracking. Thus, a constitutive law of viscoelastic - viscoplastic behavior with a high coupling between the cracking mechanism and the creep strains is proposed. The developments of the model are built on DUVAUT - LIONS approach integrated a generalized MAXWELL chain model. For one part, the viscoelastic behavior translates the creep mechanism under low stresses. For a second part, it associated with the viscoplastic behavior, which allows introducing both creep effect under high stresses and rate effect acting on micro-cracked zones. The cracking mechanism is described throughout a plasticity theory with multi-criteria, which induce a property of anisotropy for hardening. Qualitatively, ails of the creep kinetics are reproduced. An additional validation is based on experimental tests in compression, traction and flexion where the main parameters of the modeling are detailed. Thus, we can conclude on the

  18. A tutorial for sandstone petrology: architecture and development of an interactive program for teaching highly visual material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choh, Suk-Joo; Milliken, Kitty L.; McBride, Earle F.

    2003-11-01

    We have developed an interactive computer-based tutorial in sandstone petrology for undergraduate-level students. The goal of this tutorial is to provide students exposure to the highly visual subject matter of petrography outside the confines of organized laboratory exercises. This paper describes the architecture and development procedures of the current version of the sandstone petrography tutorial, and offers a possible model for similar development approaches in other fields of petrography or in any other field that utilizes large quantities of visual material such as remote sensing image interpretation or seismic interpretation. The tutorial is an interactive photomicrograph archive with sufficient content and flexible architecture that functions as a virtual laboratory instructor as well as a stand-alone reference. The current tutorial was programmed using Macromedia Authorware v.6.0 and supports both Windows-based and MacOS personal computers. The tutorial is constructed around the Folk sandstone classification scheme (quartzarenite, arkose, and litharenite), and an additional section addresses grains other than quartz, feldspar, and lithic fragments and sandstones dominated by these grains. The user interface is designed to take minimal portion of the screen area so that the screen can closely mimic the type of view seen by a student peering down a microscope. Each photomicrograph in the tutorial is basically unadorned until the user actively calls up information that is temporarily displayed over the image, inducing the user to search for information and actively "ask" to be informed with a mouse click. The structure of the tutorial permits multiple strategies of program use, as a linear tutorial, tutorial driven by thumbnail browser, and as a searchable reference.

  19. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper.

  20. Research on the interaction of hydrogen-bond acidic polymer sensitive sensor materials with chemical warfare agents simulants by inverse gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Huang, Feng; Qin, Molin; Guo, Chenghai; Ding, Mingyu

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26043177

  1. Reactor similarity for plasma–material interactions in scaled-down tokamaks as the basis for the Vulcan conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Discussion of similarity scalings for reduced-size tokamaks. ► Proposal of a new set of scaling laws for divertor similarity. ► Discussion of how the new scaling provides fidelity to a reactor. ► The new scaling is used as the basis for the Vulcan conceptual design. - Abstract: Dimensionless parameter scaling techniques are a powerful tool in the study of complex physical systems, especially in tokamak fusion experiments where the cost of full-size devices is high. It is proposed that dimensionless similarity be used to study in a small-scale device the coupled issues of the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma, plasma–material interactions (PMI), and the plasma-facing material (PFM) response expected in a tokamak fusion reactor. Complete similarity is not possible in a reduced-size device. In addition, “hard” technological limits on the achievable magnetic field and peak heat flux, as well as the necessity to produce non-inductive scenarios, must be taken into account. A practical approach is advocated, in which the most important dimensionless parameters are matched to a reactor in the reduced-size device, while relaxing those parameters which are far from a threshold in behavior. “Hard” technological limits are avoided, so that the reduced-size device is technologically feasible. A criticism on these grounds is offered of the “P/R” model, in which the ratio of power crossing the last closed flux surface (LCFS), P, to the device major radius, R, is held constant. A new set of scaling rules, referred to as the “P/S” scaling (where S is the LCFS area) or the “PMI” scaling, is proposed: (i) non-inductive, steady-state operation; (ii) P is scaled with R2 so that LCFS areal power flux P/S is constant; (iii) magnetic field B constant; (iv) geometry (elongation, safety factor q*, etc.) constant; (v) volume-averaged core density scaled as n≈n¯e∼R−2/7; and (vi) ambient wall material temperature TW,0 constant. It is shown that

  2. New lubrication concepts for environmental friendly machines. Tribological, thermophysical and viscometric properties of lubricants interacting with triboactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.; Klingenberg, G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Woydt, M. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    high wear resistance can additionally be used on aluminium liners to increase the resistance of critical components against wear, adhesive wear and thermomechanical stresses. For given tribological test conditions all APS coatings on piston rings showed no friction reducing effect. The coefficient of friction is more determined by the lubricants than by the materials or by an individual interaction between lubricants and a specific material or tribopairing. Lubricious oxides or triboactive materials and/or polar base oils may substitute the extreme pressure (EP) and anti-wear (AW) properties realized by the additives, thus enabling long drains and responding to 'eco-tox' or 'bio-no-tox' requirements as well as restrictions from the 'chemical box'. Overall, the different polymer-free bionotox and low-ash prototype engine oils with reduced additive contents displayed isoperformance regarding the tribological behaviour against cast iron with high carbon content and triboreactive materials. (orig.)

  3. Final IAEA research coordination meeting on plasma-interaction induced erosion of fusion reactor materials. October 9-11, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings and results of the Final IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on ''Plasma-interaction Induced Erosion of Fusion Reactor Materials'' held on October 9, 10 and 11, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the erosion of plasma facing components and in-vessel materials, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  4. A dose calculation algorithm with correction for proton-nucleus interactions in non-water materials for proton radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Sato, S.; Kohno, R.

    2016-01-01

    In treatment planning for proton radiotherapy, the dose measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling by stopping power ratio {ρ\\text{S}} . Since the body tissues are chemically different from water, this approximation may cause dose calculation errors, especially due to differences in nuclear interactions. We proposed and validated an algorithm for correcting these errors. The dose in water is decomposed into three constituents according to the physical interactions of protons in water: the dose from primary protons continuously slowing down by electromagnetic interactions, the dose from protons scattered by elastic and/or inelastic interactions, and the dose resulting from nonelastic interactions. The proportions of the three dose constituents differ between body tissues and water. We determine correction factors for the proportion of dose constituents with Monte Carlo simulations in various standard body tissues, and formulated them as functions of their {ρ\\text{S}} for patient dose calculation. The influence of nuclear interactions on dose was assessed by comparing the Monte Carlo simulated dose and the uncorrected dose in common phantom materials. The influence around the Bragg peak amounted to  -6% for polytetrafluoroethylene and 0.3% for polyethylene. The validity of the correction method was confirmed by comparing the simulated and corrected doses in the materials. The deviation was below 0.8% for all materials. The accuracy of the correction factors derived with Monte Carlo simulations was separately verified through irradiation experiments with a 235 MeV proton beam using common phantom materials. The corrected doses agreed with the measurements within 0.4% for all materials except graphite. The influence on tumor dose was assessed in a prostate case. The dose reduction in the tumor was below 0.5%. Our results verify that this algorithm is practical and accurate for proton radiotherapy treatment planning, and

  5. Early Career. Harnessing nanotechnology for fusion plasma-material interface research in an in-situ particle-surface interaction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allain, Jean Paul [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-08-08

    This project consisted of fundamental and applied research of advanced in-situ particle-beam interactions with surfaces/interfaces to discover novel materials able to tolerate intense conditions at the plasma-material interface (PMI) in future fusion burning plasma devices. The project established a novel facility that is capable of not only characterizing new fusion nanomaterials but, more importantly probing and manipulating materials at the nanoscale while performing subsequent single-effect in-situ testing of their performance under simulated environments in fusion PMI.

  6. Development of small-bore, high-current-density railgun as testbed for study of plasma-materials interaction. Progress report for October 16, 2000 - May 13, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present document is a final technical report summarizing the progress made during 10/16/2000 - 05/13/2003 toward the development of a small-bore railgun with transaugmentation as a testbed for investigating plasma-materials interaction

  7. Effects of Teacher- versus Student-Created Tactual Instructional Materials versus Interactive Whiteboards on the Achievement of Sixth-Grade Suburban Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Anthony Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this researcher was to examine the effects of compatibility between the learning style preferences and instructional strategies which include learning with tactual or interactive whiteboard materials created either by the teacher or the student on students' science achievement gains. A counterbalanced-research design was…

  8. Radiation damage studies in fusion reactor materials. Part of a coordinated programme on energetic particle interactions with materials of importance for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper constitutes the final report (IAEA Research Contract No. 1882/RB) on Radiation Damage Studies in Fusion Reactor Materials (Sputtering and Blistering) performed at the Research Centre of Bhabha, India

  9. A new model for humic materials and their interactions with hydrophobic organic chemicals in soil-water or sediment-water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A generalized model of humic materials in soils and sediments, which is consistent with their observed properties, is presented. This model provides a means of understanding the interaction of hydrophobic pollutants with humic materials. In this model, it is proposed that the humic materials in soils and sediments consist of a number of different oligomers and simple compounds which result from the partial degradation of plant remains. These degradation products are stabilized by incorporation into humic aggregates bound together by weak bonding mechanisms, such as hydrogen bonding, pi bonding, and hydrophobic interactions. The resulting structures are similar to micelles or membranes, in which the interiors of the structures are hydrophobic and the exteriors are hydrophilic. Hydrophobic compounds will partition into the hydrophobic interiors of the humic micelles or "membrane-like" structures. ?? 1986.

  10. Multi-scale defect interactions in high-rate failure of brittle materials, Part II: Application to design of protection materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Andrew L.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    Micromechanics based damage models, such as the model presented in Part I of this 2 part series (Tonge and Ramesh, 2015), have the potential to suggest promising directions for materials design. However, to reach their full potential these models must demonstrate that they capture the relevant physical processes. In this work, we apply the multiscale material model described in Tonge and Ramesh (2015) to ballistic impacts on the advanced ceramic boron carbide and suggest possible directions for improving the performance of boron carbide under impact conditions. We simulate both dynamic uniaxial compression and simplified ballistic loading geometries to demonstrate that the material model captures the relevant physics in these problems and to interrogate the sensitivity of the simulation results to some of the model input parameters. Under dynamic compression, we show that the simulated peak strength is sensitive to the maximum crack growth velocity and the flaw distribution, while the stress collapse portion of the test is partially influenced by the granular flow behavior of the fully damaged material. From simulations of simplified ballistic impact, we suggest that the total amount of granular flow (a possible performance metric) can be reduced by either a larger granular flow slope (more angular fragments) or a larger granular flow timescale (larger fragments). We then discuss the implications for materials design.

  11. Book of abstracts of the fourth international school for young scientists and specialists Interaction of hydrogen isotopes with structural materials (IHISM-08)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book includes abstracts of presentations at the 4th International School for young scientists and specialists Interaction of hydrogen isotopes with structural materials (IHISM-08). The lectures of lecturer and presentations of young scientists associated with the use of hydrogen isotopes in power engineering, national economy and basic research are considered. The presentations cover the following areas: kinetics and thermodynamics of interaction between hydrogen isotopes and solids including effects of radiogenic helium accumulation; hydrides and hydride transformations; structural transformations and mechanical properties; equipment and research techniques

  12. Book of abstracts of the 3rd International conference and the 3rd International School for young scientists Interaction of hydrogen isotopes with structural materials. IHISM-07

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book involves abstracts of presentations at the 3rd International Conference and the 3rd International School for Young Scientists Interaction of Hydrogen Isotopes with Structural Materials (IHISM-07). The activities of Russian and foreign scientific centers associated with the use of hydrogen isotopes in power engineering, national economy and basic research are considered. The presentations cover the following areas: kinetics and interaction between hydrogen isotopes and solids including effects of radiogenic helium accumulation, hydrides and hydride transformations; structural transformations and mechanical properties; equipment and research techniques

  13. Effects of material parameter on interaction length to occur optical phase conjugation via stimulated Brillouin scattering in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present formulation using hydrodynamic model and coupled mode scheme of plasmas the interaction length necessary to achieve optical phase conjugation is obtained from steady-state Brillouin gain coefficient for a semiconductor crystal. The analytical investigation of steady-state gain of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is made by assuming that the SBS is resulted from the nonlinear interaction of an intense electromagnetic wave with acoustic perturbation internally generated due to acousto-optic property of the semiconductor crystal. Numerical estimates confirm that when cyclotron frequency is tuned with pump frequency, interaction length is found to be nearly 104 m smaller than that obtained in absence of magnetic filed. Pump intensity and free carrier concentration both helpful in reducing the required interaction length. -- Highlights: ► OPC via SBS is obtained in doped semiconductors. ► Favourable interaction length to occur OPC is obtained. ► Magnetic field reduces interaction length. ► Minimum interaction length is obtained in dispersionless acoustic regime.

  14. A study of materials used for muon chambers at the CMS Experiment at the LHC: interaction with gas, new materials and new technologies for detector upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Colafranceschi, Stefano

    This thesis lays its foundation in both technological and theoretical stud- ies carried out between several aspects of applied engineering. There are several original contributions within the material science. The first is the detailed studies about the CMS RPC gas filters, which required an intense 3 years data-taking and ended up with a complete characterization of purifier materials. On top of this a stable ad − hoc setup (GGM) has been devel- oped for the CMS Experiment in order to monitor the RPC muon chamber working point. Finally a complete new detector has been designed, build and tested using new technology and new electronics establishing the word’s record in size for this kind of detector, which is taken under consideration for the upgrade of the high-η region of the CMS Experiment.

  15. Material effect in the nuclear fuel-coolant interaction: Analyses of prototypic melt fragmentation and solidification in the KROTOS facility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tyrpekl, V.; Piluso, P.; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Dugne, O.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 186, č. 2 (2014), s. 229-240. ISSN 0029-5450 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : fuel-coolant interaction * melt fragmentation * KROTOS facility Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.725, year: 2014

  16. Data Evaluation and the Establishment of a Standard Library of Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion. Summary Report of an IAEA Consultants' Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven experts in the field of atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M+PMI) data and data evaluation for fusion plasma physics met with IAEA A+M Data Unit staff at IAEA Headquarters to provide advice towards the establishment of an evaluated and recommended library of A+M+PMI data for fusion. The proceedings and conclusions of the meeting are summarized here. (author)

  17. Degradation and in vitro cell–material interaction studies on hydroxyapatite-coated biodegradable porous iron for hard tissue scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Nurizzati Mohd Daud; Ng Boon Sing; Abdul Hakim Yusop; Fadzilah Adibah Abdul Majid; Hendra Hermawan

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes degradation and cell–material interaction studies on hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated biodegradable porous iron proposed for hard tissue scaffolds. Porous iron scaffolds are expected to serve as an ideal platform for bone regeneration. To couple their inherent mechanical strength, pure HA and HA/poly(ε-caprolactone) (HA/PCL) were coated onto porous iron using dip coating technique. The HA/PCL mixture was prepared to provide a more stable and flexible coating than HA alone. Degr...

  18. Interaction of Nano-Sized Materials With Polymer Chains in Polymer-Nanocomposite Thin Films-An AFM Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocomposite thin films were prepared with polyurethane as a matrix and organically modified clay as a filler. The interfacial interaction between the exfoliated clay nanoplatelets and the polymeric chains has been investigated by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The nanoclay platelets show a preferential association with the hard domains of polyurethane matrix on the surface of the thin films. The pendant hydroxyl group on the nanoplatelets attract the isocyanate of the polyisocyanate and a urethane group is formed. This leads to the 'clouding' and 'entwining' of the nanoplatelets by the hard segmental chains. This is the first visual evidence of nanomaterial filler and polymer matrix interaction and it could open up a spectrum of novel property achievements in nanocomposite thin films. Also the understanding of this interaction can lead to more controlled architecture of nanocomposites.

  19. Kinetic study of hydrogen-material interactions in nickel base alloy 600 and stainless steel 316L through coupled experimental and numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In France all of the nuclear power plant facilities in service today are pressurized water reactors (PWR). Some parts of the PWR in contact with the primary circuit medium, such as the steam generator tubes (fabricated in nickel base alloy A600) and some reactor core internal components (fabricated in stainless steel 316L), can fall victim to environmental degradation phenomena such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In the late 1950's, H. Coriou observed experimentally and predicted this type of cracking in alloys traditionally renowned for their SCC resistance (A600). Just some 20 to 30 years later his predictions became a reality. Since then, numerous studies have focused on the description and comprehension of the SCC phenomenon in primary water under reactor operating conditions. In view of reactor lifetime extension, it has become both critical and strategic to be capable of simulating SCC phenomenon in order to optimize construction materials, operating conditions, etc. and to understand the critical parameters in order to limit the damage done by SCC. This study focuses on the role hydrogen plays in SCC phenomenon and in particular H-material interactions. Hydrogen, from primary medium in the form of dissolved H gas or H from the water, can be absorbed by the alloy during the oxidation process taking place under reactor operating conditions. Once absorbed, hydrogen may be transported across the material, diffusing in the interstitial sites of the crystallographic structure and interacting with local defects, such as dislocations, precipitates, vacancies, etc. The presence of these [local defect] sites can slow the hydrogen transport and may provoke local H accumulation in the alloy. This accumulation could modify the local mechanical properties of the material and favor premature rupture. It is therefore essential to identify the nature of these H-material interactions, specifically the rate of H diffusion and hydrogen trapping kinetics at these

  20. Materials Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian Tomlinson

    2005-01-01

    @@ Introduction Materials development is both a field of study and a practical undertaking. As a field it studies the principles and procedures of the design, implementation and evaluation and adaptation of language teaching materials, by teachers for their own classrooms and by materials writers for sale or distribution. Ideally these two aspects of materials development are interactive in that the theoretical studies inform and are informed by the development and use of classroom materials (e. g. Tomlinson 1998c).

  1. Effective atomic numbers of different types of materials for proton interaction in the energy region 1 keV–10 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    The effective atomic numbers (Z{sub eff}) of different types of materials such as tissues, tissue equivalents, organic compounds, glasses and dosimetric materials have been calculated for total proton interactions in the energy region 1 keV–10 GeV. Also, effective atomic numbers relative to water (Z{sub eff}RW) have been presented in the entire energy region for the materials that show better water equivalent properties. Some human tissues such as adipose tissue, bone compact, muscle skeletal and muscle striated have been investigated in terms of tissue equivalency by comparing Z{sub eff} values and the better tissue equivalents have been determined for these tissues. With respect to the variation of Z{sub eff} with kinetic energy, it has been observed that Z{sub eff} seems to be more or less the same in the energy region 400 keV–10 GeV for the given materials except for the photographic emulsion, calcium fluoride, silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide and Teflon. The values of Z{sub eff} have found to be constant for photographic emulsion after 1 GeV, for calcium fluoride between 1 MeV and 1 GeV and for silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide and Teflon between 400 keV and 1 GeV. This constancy clearly shows the availability of using Z{sub eff} in estimating radiation response of the materials at first glance.

  2. Experimental studies on interactions of molten LiF-NaF salt with some candidate structural materials for components of advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of molten 60 LiF - 40 NaF (% mol) salt with candidate structural materials for components of advanced nuclear reactors has been studied using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The corrosion of structural materials (stainless steel, Ni base alloy, nickel), which was induced by the molten salt melt, has been examined in dependence on the time of exposure at operating temperature of 680 deg C. The above choice of the two analytical techniques made it possible to assess on the whole the extent of corrosion. The corrosion phenomena in structural materials were investigated using EPMA. Corrosion-released elements dissolved in solidified molten salt were determined after salt dissolution by means of ICP-OES. The LiF-NaF melt produced corrosion, which proved as a surficial modification of a structural material and a trace contamination of the melt itself. The X-ray maps by EPMA with its 1-μm lateral resolution revealed compositional changes in structural materials, such as, e. g. regular depletion of Cr in alloy A686 to the depth of 10 - 25 μm. While the lateral resolution of LA-ICP-MS with the applied laser spot diameter of 25 μm was not exactly adequate to mapping of the corroded material section and, consequently, yielded less information in comparison with EPMA, this technique was quite sufficient for the mapping of elemental content changes in solidified salt profile. Finally, nickel was proved to be the most resistant material. It was concluded that: (i) EPMA study, involving semi-quantitative elemental mapping / content profiling and detailed spot quantitative analyses makes it possible to obtain quantitative assessment of the corrosion process; (ii) qualitative profiles are provided by LA-ICP-MS, which needs further development on quantification procedure based on matched calibration samples. (author)

  3. Evidence for metalsupport interactions in Au modified TiO_{x}/SBA-15 materials prepared by photodeposition

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, Bastian; Wiktor, Christian; Turner, Stuart; Pougin, Anna; Tendeloo, van, G.; Fischer, Roland A; Muhler, Martin; Strunk, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been efficiently photodeposited onto titanate-loaded SBA-15 (Ti(x)/SBA-15) with different titania coordination. Transmission electron microscopy shows that relatively large Au nanoparticles are photodeposited on the outer surface of the Ti(x)/SBA-15 materials and that TiOx tends to form agglomerates in close proximity to the Au nanoparticles, often forming coreshell Au/TiOx structures. This behavior resembles typical processes observed due to strong-metal sup...

  4. Properties and toxicological effects of particles from the interaction between tyres, road pavement and winter traction material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In regions where studded tyres and traction material are used during winter, e.g. the Nordic countries, northern part of USA, Canada, and Japan, mechanically generated particles from traffic are the main reason for high particle mass concentrations in busy street and road environments. In many Nordic municipalities the European environmental quality standard for inhalable particles (PM10) is exceeded due to these particles. In this study, particles from the wear of studded and studless friction tyres on two pavements and traction sanding were generated using a road simulator. The particles were characterized using particle sizers, Particle Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis and electron microscopy. Cell studies were conducted on particles sampled from the tests with studded tyres and compared with street environment, diesel exhaust and subway PM10, respectively. The results show that in the road simulator, where resuspension is minimized, studded tyres produce tens of times more particles than friction tyres. Chemical analysis of the sampled particles shows that the generated wear particles consist almost entirely of minerals from the pavement stone material, but also that Sulfur is enriched for the submicron particles and that Zink is enriched for friction tyres for all particles sizes. The chemical data can be used for source identification and apportionment in urban aerosol studies. A mode of ultra-fine particles was also present and is hypothesised to originate in the tyres. Further, traction material properties affect PM10 emission. The inflammatory potential of the particles from wear of pavements seems to depend on type of pavement and can be at least as potent as diesel exhaust particles. The results imply that there is a need and a good potential to reduce particle emission from pavement wear and winter time road and street operation by adjusting both studded tyre use as well as pavement and traction material properties

  5. Roughness Parameters Calculation by Means of On-line Vibration Monitoring Emerging from AWJ Interaction with Material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hreha, P.; Radvanská, A.; Knapčíková, L.; Krolczyk, G.; Legutko, S.; Królczyk, J. B.; Hloch, Sergej; Monka, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2015), s. 315-326. ISSN 0860-8229 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : abrasive water jet * surface topography * material vibration * vibration measurement Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 0.925, year: 2014 http://www.metrology.pg.gda.pl/archives.html

  6. Cellular interaction between fixed and living cells; transfer of radioactive materials from living cells to fixed cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, H.; Otsu, H.; Kanegasaki, S.

    1979-06-01

    Transfer of radioactive materials to fixed cells from an overlying layer of living cells has been examined to determine whether fixed cells can act as acceptors of glycosyltransferases of living cells. After the incubation of living cells were removed by EDTA treatment, and the radioactivity associated with the fixed cells was determined. Lipids, proteins and carbohydrates were found to be transfered from the living cells to the fixed cells. The amount of radioactivity transferred to the fixed cells was dependent on the number of both fixed and living cells and increased with the time of incubation. When fixed cells were treated with chloroform-methanol before the addition of living cells, the transfer of both lipids and proteins to the fixed cells decreased drastically, but only a slight decrease in carbohydrate transfer was observed. Most of the radioactive materials transferred from living cells labeled with glucosamine or fucose to chloroform-methanol-treated fixed cells were solubilized by trypsin but not by the detergents tested. Approximately 55% of the materials transferred from the cells labeled with glucosamine could be solubilized by hyaluronidase and chondroitinase, and the rest was solubilized by neuraminidase and a glycosidase mixture. The treatment of chloroform-methanol-extracted fixed cells with trypsin caused a significant decrease in the transfer from cells labeled with glucosamine. When nucleotide sugars were used as the radioactive precursor, no significant amount of radioactivity was transferred to the fixed cells.

  7. High-temperature interaction of fuel rod cladding material (Zr1%Nb alloy) with oxygen-containing mediums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental data on kinetics of Zr1%Nb alloy oxidation in steam at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range 550 to 1600 deg. C are presented. The effect of fuel rod claddings deformation on zirconium alloy interaction with steam is shown. The estimates of influence of the additives of air, nitrogen and hydrogen in mixtures with steam at atmospheric pressure on kinetics of steam/zirconium reaction in the temperature range 800 to 1200 deg. C are presented. The correlations for determination of weight gain with indication of area of applicability in space of parameters (temperature, time, deformation, pressure) are shown. (author). 10 refs, 10 figs

  8. Natural frequency of bottom-fixed offshore wind turbines considering pile-soil-interaction with material uncertainties and scouring depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Jin-Hak; Kim, Sun-Bin; Yoon, Gil-Lim;

    2015-01-01

    include pile-soil-interaction (PSI) effects, realization of dynamically stable designs to avoid resonances, and quick and safe installation in remote areas. In this study, the effects of PSI on the dynamic properties of bottom-fixed OWTs, including monopile-, tripod-and jacket-supported OWTs, were...... investigated intensively. The tower and substructure were modeled using conventional beam elements with added mass, and pile foundations were modeled with beam and nonlinear spring elements. The effects of PSI on the dynamic properties of the structure were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation considering...... the load amplitude, scouring depth, and the uncertainties in soil properties....

  9. Material dependence of Casimir interaction between a sphere and a plate: First analytic correction beyond proximity force approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Teo, L P

    2013-01-01

    We derive analytically the asymptotic behavior of the Casimir interaction between a sphere and a plate when the distance between them, $d$, is much smaller than the radius of the sphere, $R$. The leading order and next-to-leading order terms are derived from the exact formula for the Casimir interaction energy. They are found to depend nontrivially on the dielectric functions of the objects. As expected, the leading order term coincides with that derived using the proximity force approximation. The result on the next-to-leading order term complements that found by Bimonte, Emig and Kardar [Appl. Phys. Lett. \\textbf{100}, 074110 (2012)] using derivative expansion. Numerical results are presented when the dielectric functions are given by the plasma model or the Drude model, with the plasma frequency (for plasma and Drude models) and relaxation frequency (for Drude model) given respectively by 9eV and 0.035eV, the conventional values used for gold metal. It is found that if plasma model is used instead of Drude...

  10. Are there generic mechanisms governing interactions between nanoparticles and cells? Epitope mapping the outer layer of the protein material interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Iseult

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of a general paradigm for cell-biomaterial and cell-nanoparticle interactions. The basis of the paradigm is that the nature of the biomaterial or nanoparticle surface is not the important parameter, but rather the nature of the outermost layer of adsorbed proteins as well as long-lived misfolded proteins shed from the surfaces. If the adsorbed protein is irreversibly adsorbed onto the surface it may be sufficiently disrupted so that a variety of peptide units (here termed “cryptic epitopes”) not usually expressed in nature at the surface of the protein become exposed. Similarly, where there is a slow exchange time with the surface, surface-induced perturbations may lead to long-lived misfolded proteins being shed from the surface and continuing to express altered surface peptide sequences. In cases where the proteins have lost most of their tertiary structure, anomalous peptide sequences and geometries that are not displayed at the surface by the native protein may in fact be presented after surface adsorption of a protein. Such anomalous surface expressions could contain novel epitopes that trigger various signalling pathways or even diseases. Thus, future approaches to understanding cell-biomaterial and cell-nanoparticle interactions should focus on characterising the outer layer of the adsorbed proteins, or “epitope mapping” as well as examining the possibility of formation of essentially “new” proteins as a result of desorption of conformationally or geometrically altered proteins.

  11. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions. [in thermionic energy conversion and metallic fluid heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs), offering unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing by virtue of operating on working-fluid vaporization/condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures, share complex materials problems. Simplified equations are presented that verify and solve such problems, suggesting the possibility of cost-effective applications in the near term for TEC and MFHP devices. Among the problems discussed are: the limitation of alkali-metal corrosion, protection against hot external gases, external and internal vaporization, interfacial reactions and diffusion, expansion coefficient matching, and creep deformation.

  12. New Devices For Controlling The Interaction Of High-Power Laser Light With Anorganic And Organic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greguss, Pal

    1989-01-01

    Two unconventional methods, which may be used in some cases to control heat conduction conditions responsible for secondary effects both in laser surgery and in laser material transformation, are presented. The tools developed for this purpose are based either on thermoelectrically controlled (TEC) or on thermodynamically controlled (TDC) temperature pattern generation around the acting laser beam. Using TEC laser scalpel secondary tissue damages may be avoided, while transformation hardening by laser radiation may be controlled through the thermodynamic effect known as Ranque-effect.

  13. Plasma–wall interaction in laser inertial fusion reactors: novel proposals for radiation tests of first wall materials

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez Ruiz, Jesus; Rivera de Mena, Antonio; Mima, K.; Garoz, D.; Gonzalez Arrabal, Raquel; Gordillo Garcia, Nuria; Fuchs, J; Tanaka, K.; Fernández, I.; Briones, F.; Perlado Martin, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Dry-wall laser inertial fusion (LIF) chambers will have to withstand strong bursts of fast charged particles which will deposit tens of kJ m−2 and implant more than 1018 particles m−2 in a few microseconds at a repetition rate of some Hz. Large chamber dimensions and resistant plasma-facing materials must be combined to guarantee the chamber performance as long as possible under the expected threats: heating, fatigue, cracking, formation of defects, retention of light species, swelling and er...

  14. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of modified cellulose fiber-based materials and related interactions with water vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedane, Alemayehu H., E-mail: Alemayehu.Bedane@unb.ca; Xiao, Huining, E-mail: hxiao@unb.ca; Eić, Mladen, E-mail: meic@unb.ca; Farmahini-Farahani, Madjid, E-mail: Madjid.Farahani@unb.ca

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Coating on paper increases the specific surface area but decreases the pore diameter. • Pore size reduction and decrease of hydrophilic property caused reduction in WVTRs. • The low monolayer moisture content of the sample is generally related to the low WVTR. • The net isosteric heats of adsorption decreased with increased sample moisture content. • FT-IR results reveal the formation of water clusters at higher relative humidities. - Abstract: In this study, the surface characteristics, water vapor interactions, and state of water adsorbed on unmodified and coated paper samples were investigated in an attempt to obtain a better understanding of the fundamental principles related to thermodynamics of this process, as well as to provide essential insight that could be used for further improvement of the papers’ barrier properties. Based on the BET measurement, the coated paper samples showed higher specific surface areas than unmodified paper; however, their mean pore diameters are smaller. The BJH method was used for pore size distribution analysis. Hydrophobic properties of the paper samples were determined from experimental isotherms, e.g., monolayer moisture content, and these results have been related to the water vapor transfer rates (WVTRs) showing a complex nature of these relations. The highest peak corresponding to the modified samples with smaller pore sizes was found to be in the range of 1–30 nm, while it was in the 30–100 nm pore size range for unmodified paper. The net isosteric heats of sorption for different unmodified and modified paper samples were determined from water vapor adsorption isotherms measured at 15, 25, and 35 °C. The net isosteric heats of sorption decreased with an increase of moisture content after reaching the maximum values at 12.53, 15.25, 14.71, 23.2, and 22.77 kJ/mol for unmodified, zein grafted, calendered coated, PLA, and PHBV coated papers, respectively. The state of adsorbed water and water

  15. Enhanced Cooperative Interactions at the Nanoscale in Spin-Crossover Materials with a First-Order Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Gautier; Nicolazzi, William; Salmon, Lionel; Molnár, Gábor; Perrier, Marine; Maurin, Guillaume; Larionova, Joulia; Long, Jérôme; Guari, Yannick; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2013-06-01

    We analyzed the size effect on a first-order spin transition governed by elastic interactions. This study was performed in the framework of a nonextensive thermodynamic core-shell model. When decreasing the particle size, differences in surface energies between the two phases lead to the shrinking of the thermal hysteresis width, the lowering of the transition temperature, and the increase of residual fractions at low temperature, in good agreement with recent experimental observations on spin transition nanomaterials. On the other hand, a modification of the particle-matrix interface may allow for the existence of the hysteresis loop even at very low sizes. In addition, an unexpected reopening of the hysteresis, when the size decreases, is also possible due to the hardening of the nanoparticles at very small sizes, which we deduced from the size dependence of the Debye temperature of a series of coordination nanoparticles.

  16. Titanium alloys as alternative material for the supercontainer shell in the KBS-3H concept. A preliminary Ti-clay interaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ti alloys have been proposed as alternative materials to steel for the supercontainer shell surrounding the bentonite buffer in the KBS-3H disposal concept. Ti-based materials display high strength and are known to behave chemically inert under a variety of conditions. This preliminary study addresses the suitability of titanium as supercontainer material with regard to the performance of the clay buffer. Thus, possible titanium-bentonite interactions which may adversely affect the buffer's safety functions are evaluated by means of a literature and a preliminary experimental assessment. Titanium metals display very low corrosion rates (2 which forms a passive surface corrosion layer under both oxic and reducing conditions. The interactions between titanium and clay have been barely studied so far. Preliminary long-term data obtained by Prof. Olefjord and co-workers from Chalmers (S) in the 1980s (as part of SKB's canister program) suggests similar corrosion rates in compacted bentonite compared to those measured in water, i.e. 2 or mixed (Fe, Ti) oxide, (iv) Ti precipitated as separate silicate phase and (v) polymerized as cross-linked TiO2 units in the interlayer (Ti pillared clay). The latter two transformation products would have the strongest impact on the buffer, but are improbable on the basis of current knowledge. A preliminary batch-type investigation has been carried out to shed more light on Ti-clay interaction processes and on the Ti species resulting from these interactions. Purified MX-80 bentonite was mixed with metallic Ti nano powder and foil at different pH and temperature conditions. After several months, solid and solute samples from the first set of tests were analyzed by wet chemistry and quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis. The chemical speciation of Ti was analyzed with XAS. In addition to reacted samples, a number of reference and starting materials (e.g. MX-80, Rokle bentonite, Opalinus Clay, Illite du Puy) were characterized by XRF

  17. Chemical interaction between granular B4C and 304L-type stainless steel materials used in BWRs in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical reactions between stainless steel and boron carbide were investigated using the materials applied for control rods in BWRs in Japan, specifically 304L-type stainless steel and granular boron carbide. The reaction region consisted of 2–4 layers, in which the significant composition variation of each element was detected, especially for B and C. Assuming that the reaction layer growth obeys the parabolic law, the effective rate constant between 304L-type stainless steel and granular boron carbide was evaluated to be approximately one order of magnitude smaller than the previously reported values for boron carbide pellets or powers. This difference might originate from the loose contact between the stainless steel and the granular boron carbide in the present study. Regarding liquefaction progress, the stainless steel components were selectively dissolved in the melt; consequently, the unreacted boron carbide tended to remain. (author)

  18. Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe- and Cu-Sulfide Earth Materials: A Connection between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities, and Bonded Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Downs, R. T.; Spackman, M. A.

    2007-03-01

    Bond critical point and local energy density properties together with net atomic charges were calculated for theoretical electron density distributions, F(r), generated for a variety of Fe and Cu metal-sulfide materials with high- and low-spin Fe atoms in octahedral coordination and high-spin Fe atoms in tetrahedral coordination. The electron density, F(rc), the Laplacian, 32F(rc), the local kinetic energy, G(rc), and the oxidation state of Fe increase as the local potential energy density, V(rc), the Fe-S bond lengths, and the coordination numbers of the Fe atoms decrease. The properties of the bonded interactions for the octahedrally coordinated low-spin Fe atoms for pyrite and marcasite are distinct from those for high-spin Fe atoms for troilite, smythite, and greigite. The Fe-S bond lengths are shorter and the values of F(rc) and 32F(rc) are larger for pyrite and marcasite, indicating that the accumulation and local concentration of F(r) in the internuclear region are greater than those involving the longer, high-spin Fe-S bonded interactions. The net atomic charges and the bonded radii calculated for the Fe and S atoms in pyrite and marcasite are also smaller than those for sulfides with high-spin octahedrally coordinated Fe atoms. Collectively, the Fe-S interactions are indicated to be intermediate in character with the low-spin Fe-S interactions having greater shared character than the highspin interactions. The bond lengths observed for chalcopyrite together with the calculated bond critical point properties are consistent with the formula Cu+Fe3+S2. The bond length is shorter and the F(rc) value is larger for the FeS4 tetrahedron displayed by metastable greigite than those displayed by chalcopyrite and cubanite, consistent with a proposal that the Fe atom in greigite is tetravalent. S-S bond paths exist between each of the surface S atoms of adjacent slabs of FeS6 octahedra comprising the layer sulfide smythite, suggesting that the neutral Fe3S4 slabs are

  19. Theoretical electron density distributions for Fe- and Cu-sulfide earth materials: a connection between bond length, bond critical point properties, local energy densities, and bonded interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, G V; Cox, D F; Rosso, K M; Ross, N L; Downs, R T; Spackman, M A

    2007-03-01

    Bond critical point and local energy density properties together with net atomic charges were calculated for theoretical electron density distributions, rho(r), generated for a variety of Fe and Cu metal-sulfide materials with high- and low-spin Fe atoms in octahedral coordination and high-spin Fe atoms in tetrahedral coordination. The electron density, rho(rc), the Laplacian, triangle down2rho(rc), the local kinetic energy, G(rc), and the oxidation state of Fe increase as the local potential energy density, V(rc), the Fe-S bond lengths, and the coordination numbers of the Fe atoms decrease. The properties of the bonded interactions for the octahedrally coordinated low-spin Fe atoms for pyrite and marcasite are distinct from those for high-spin Fe atoms for troilite, smythite, and greigite. The Fe-S bond lengths are shorter and the values of rho(rc) and triangle down2rho(rc) are larger for pyrite and marcasite, indicating that the accumulation and local concentration of rho(r) in the internuclear region are greater than those involving the longer, high-spin Fe-S bonded interactions. The net atomic charges and the bonded radii calculated for the Fe and S atoms in pyrite and marcasite are also smaller than those for sulfides with high-spin octahedrally coordinated Fe atoms. Collectively, the Fe-S interactions are indicated to be intermediate in character with the low-spin Fe-S interactions having greater shared character than the high-spin interactions. The bond lengths observed for chalcopyrite together with the calculated bond critical point properties are consistent with the formula Cu+Fe3+S2. The bond length is shorter and the rho(rc) value is larger for the FeS4 tetrahedron displayed by metastable greigite than those displayed by chalcopyrite and cubanite, consistent with a proposal that the Fe atom in greigite is tetravalent. S-S bond paths exist between each of the surface S atoms of adjacent slabs of FeS6 octahedra comprising the layer sulfide smythite

  20. Dynamics of Dense Magnetized Plasma Streams and their Interaction with Material Surfaces: Comparative Studies with Magnetoplasma Compressor (MPC) and Quasi-Steady-State Plasma Accelerator QSPA Kh-50

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quasi-steady-state plasma accelerator QSPA Kh-50 and short-pulsed magnetoplasma compressor (MPC) have been used for comparative studies of plasma-surface interaction and materials erosion issues, development of recommendations for fusion reactor materials and in numerical models for validation of predictive codes. The main advantage of QSPA in simulation experiments is possibility of generation of long magnetized pulse plasma streams with the pulse duration of 0.2-0.3 ms, the ion impact energy of 0.9 keV, the heat loads up to 20 MJ/m2, and the plasma parameter betta up to 0.3, which combination is not achievable in other types of plasma sources. Using within the framework of one problem both short- (∼1-3 μs) and long pulsed (300 μs) plasma devices permitted to investigate the plasma effects on materials surfaces in a wide range of plasma pulse duration with varied energy and particle loads to the exposed surfaces. Crack patterns (major- and micro-type) in tungsten targets and cracking thresholds (both threshold energy load for the cracking onset and threshold target temperature related to ductile-to-brittle transition) as well as residual stresses after repetitive plasma pulses have been studied for different tungsten grades and, in particular, for a deformed W material, which is considered as the ITER-reference grade. The thickness of major- and micro-cracks, the network distance as well as the penetration of cracks into the material depth are analyzed. Comparisons of the cracking failure of deformed tungsten with behaviour of sintered W samples are performed. Results of QSPA plasma exposures are compared with short pulse PSI experiments with pulsed plasma gun and dense plasma-focus facilities, aiming at features of surface damage and tungsten impurities behavior in near-surface plasma in front of the target. (author)

  1. Effective atomic numbers, water and tissue equivalence properties of human tissues, tissue equivalents and dosimetric materials for total electron interaction in the energy region 10 keV–1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective atomic numbers (Zeff) of 107 different materials of dosimetric interest have been calculated for total electron interactions in the wide energy region 10 keV–1 GeV. The stopping cross sections of elements and dosimetric materials were used to calculate Zeff of the materials. Differences (%) in Zeff relative to water have been calculated in the entire energy region to evaluate the water equivalency of the used materials. Moreover, the tissue equivalent materials have been compared with the tissues and dosimetric materials in terms of Zeff to reveal their ability to use as tissue substitutes. Possible conclusions were drawn based on the variation of Zeff through the entire energy region and water and tissue equivalency comparisons in terms of Zeff. - Highlights: • Effective atomic number for total electron interaction. • Water and tissue equivalences of dosimetric materials

  2. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per; Olofsson, Stefan; Sokoler, Tomas; Grønfeldt, Peter; Rasmussen, Jørgen; Kramp, Gunnar; Käfer, Gerald; Schmid, Reiner; Wuchner, Egon

    2006-01-01

    We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction as an...... interpretation of palpability, comprising usability as well as patient empowerment and socially performative issues. We present a prototype environment for video recording during physiotherapeutical consultation which illustrates our current thoughts on explicit interaction and serves as material for further...

  3. Measuring the ion energy distribution using a retarding field energy analyzer in a plasma material interaction test stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Michael; Jung, Soonwook; Andruczyk, Daniel; Curreli, Davide; Ruzic, David

    2013-10-01

    The Divertor Erosion and Vapor Shielding eXperiment (DEVeX) at the University of Illinois is a gas-puff driven, theta pinch plasma source that is used as a test stand for off-normal plasma events incident on materials in the edge and divertor regions of a tokamak. Ion temperatures and the resulting energy distribution are of vital importance in DEVeX, indicating the level of edge simulation. For this reason, a theta pinch has been applied as a source of external heating, along with a coaxial plasma accelerator as a pre-ionization source. In its most recent iteration, the accurate diagnosis of ion temperature will prove difficult using conventional methods, since diagnostics are difficult in a pulsed device for measuring the ion temperature range produced in DEVeX (~10-100 eV). A retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA) has been proposed to measure the ion energy distribution and will be compared to theoretical predictions for the ion temperature in the upgraded DEVeX system. Such a diagnostic tool would be less susceptible to external fields and would be suitable for ion temperatures on the order of 100 eV. The RFEA will serve as a diagnostic for the ThermoElectric-driven Liquid-metal plasma-facing Structures (TELS), and its further applications are discussed. In residence at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

  4. New Insight into the Interaction between Carbonate-based Electrolyte and Cuprous Sulfide Electrode Material for Lithium Ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuprous sulfide (Cu2S) is attractive electrode material for lithium-ion battery because of its high capacity and energy density. Interestingly, the cycling stability of cuprous sulfide is poor in the carbonate-based electrolytes used in lithium ion battery industry but excellent in ether-based electrolyte. In this study, we have compared the electrochemical performance of commercially available cuprous sulfide in various kinds of carbonate-based electrolytes. Our results show that the specific capacity of Cu2S electrode fades quickly in cyclic carbonate-based electrolytes, but a much better electrochemical performance in linear carbonate-based electrolytes. In linear carbonate-based electrolyte (1 M LiPF6 in EMC), it exhibits a specific discharge capacity of 242.8 mAh g−1 after 50 cycles with coulombic efficiency of 99.6%. Our study suggests that the poor cycling performance of Cu2S in cyclic carbonate-based electrolytes is mainly due to the higher reactivity of cyclic carbonates with polysulfides on the surface of the electrode than linear carbonates, which was confirmed for the first time by our experiment studies and theoretical calculation

  5. Carbon, oxygen and their interaction with intrinsic point defects in solar silicon ribbon material: A speculative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goesele, U.; Ast, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Some background information on intrinsic point defects is provided and on carbon and oxygen in silicon in so far as it may be relevant for the efficiency of solar cells fabricated from EFG ribbon material. The co-precipitation of carbon and oxygen and especially of carbon and silicon self interstitials are discussed. A simple model for the electrical activity of carbon-self-interstitial agglomerates is presented. The self-interstitial content of these agglomerates is assumed to determine their electrical activity and that both compressive stresses (high self-interstitial content) and tensile stresses (low self-interstitial content) give rise to electrical activity of the agglomerates. The self-interstitial content of these carbon-related agglomerates may be reduced by an appropriate high temperature treatment and enhanced by a supersaturation of self-interstitials generated during formation of the p-n junction of solar cells. Oxygen present in supersaturation in carbon-rich silicon may be induced to form SiO, precipitates by self-interstitials generated during phosphorus diffusion. It is proposed that the SiO2-Si interface of the precipates gives rise to a continuum of donor stables and that these interface states are responsible for at least part of the light inhancement effects observed in oxygen containing EFG silicon after phosphorus diffusion.

  6. Carbon, oxygen and their interaction with intrinsic point defects in solar silicon ribbon material. Annual report, September 1982-September 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goesele, U.; Ast, D.G.

    1983-10-01

    This report first provides some background information on intrinsic point defects, and on carbon and oxygen in silicon in so far as it may be relevant for the efficiency of solar cells fabricated from EFG ribbon material. We discuss the co-precipitation of carbon and oxygen and especially of carbon and silicon self interstitials. A simple model for the electrical activity of carbon-self-interstitial agglomerates is presented. We assume that the self-interstitial content of these agglomerates determines their electrical activity and that both compressive stresses (high self-interstitial content) and tensile stresses (low self-interstitial content) give rise to electrical activity of the agglomerates. The self-interstitial content of these carbon-related agglomerates may be reduced by an appropriate high-temperature treatment and enhanced by a supersaturation of self-interstitials generated during formation of the p-n junction of solar cells. It is suggested that oxygen present in supersaturation in carbon-rich silicon may be induced to form SiO/sub 2/ precipitates by self-interstitials generated during phosphorus diffusion. It is proposed that the SiO/sub 2/-Si interface of the precipates gives rise to a continuum of donor states and that these interface states are responsible for at least part of the light-enhancement effects observed in oxygen containing EFG silicon after phosphorus diffusion.

  7. Influence of environmental parameters and of their interactions on the release of metal(loid)s from a construction material in hydraulic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmukat, A; Duester, L; Goryunova, E; Ecker, D; Heininger, P; Ternes, T A

    2016-03-01

    Besides the leaching behaviour of a construction material under standardised test-specific conditions with laboratory water, for some construction materials it is advisable to test their environmental behaviour also under close to end use conditions. The envisaged end use combined with the product characteristics (e.g. mineral phases) is decisive for the choice of environmental factors that may change the release of substance that potentially cause adverse environmental effects (e.g. fertilisation or ecotoxicity). At the moment an experimental link is missing between mono-factorial standardised test systems and non standardised complex incubation experiments such as mesocosms which are closer to environmental conditions. Multi-factorial batch experiments may have the potential to close the gap. To verify this, batch experiments with copper slag were performed which is used as armour stones in hydraulic engineering. Design of experiments (DoE) was applied to evaluate the impact of pH, ionic strength, temperature and sediment content on the release of As, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn. The study shows that release and sediment-eluent partitioning of metal(loid)s are impacted by interactions between the studied factors. Under the prevalent test conditions sediment acts as a sink enhancing most strongly the release of elements from the material. PMID:26546704

  8. The interaction between parent material, climate and volcanism as the major soil forming factor in the Ecuadorian high Andes region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buytaert, W.; Duyck, H.; Dercon, G.; Deckers, J.; Wyseure, G.

    2003-04-01

    The high Andes region of Ecuador and Colombia (>3500m a.s.l.) is covered by the so-called páramo ecosystem, characterised by a cold climate, a typical grass or small shrub vegetation and volcanic soils. Soil profiles of the paramo in the Austro Ecuatoriano, South Ecuador, were studied in order to reveal genetic relationships with geology, volcanic ash deposits, climate and land use. A gradual diminuation of Andic properties was found, related to the distance of the pedon to the active volcanoes of the Northern Volcanic Zone of the Andes. Pedons in the north of the region, closer to these volcanoes (Sangay, Tungurahua) are classified as non-allophanic Histic Andosols. The influence of the vicinity of the volcanoes leads to a higher oxalate extractable aluminium and iron. The genesis of the Andosols seems to be strongly related to the presence and thickness of volcanic ash depositions. The limit of these depositions is situated south of the city of Cuenca. Pedons further to the south are classified as Histosols. However, they also have clear Andic properties. Several differences in chemical properties between the Western and Eastern cordilleras where found, that are most probable related with a difference in mother material, and maybe also a different climatic regime. Correlation of the chemical properties with land use reveals that no chemical differences can be found that are invoked by occupying natural Andosols for agricultural purposes, within the first five years of cultivation. At last, the conclusions were used to revisit the World Reference Base for Soil Resources in order to sharpen up differenciation between Andosols and Histosols.

  9. Titanium alloys as alternative material for the supercontainer shell in the KBS-3H concept: A preliminary Ti-clay interaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ti alloys have been proposed as alternative materials to steel for the supercontainer shell surrounding the bentonite buffer in the KBS-3H disposal concept. Ti-based materials display high strength and are known to behave chemically inert under a variety of conditions. This preliminary study addresses the suitability of titanium as supercontainer material with regard to the performance of the clay buffer. Thus, possible titanium-bentonite interactions which may adversely affect the buffer's safety functions are evaluated by means of a literature and a preliminary experimental assessment. Titanium metals display very low corrosion rates (2 which forms a passive surface corrosion layer under both oxic and reducing conditions. The interactions between titanium and clay have been barely studied so far. Preliminary long-term data obtained by Prof. Olefjord and co-workers from Chalmers (S) in the 1980ies (as part of SKB's canister program) suggests similar corrosion rates in compacted bentonite compared to those measured in water, i.e. 1 nm/a. So far, no work on reaction products from this interaction process has been carried out. Even the speciation of Ti in natural clays is uncertain. In principle, four possible reaction products resulting from Ti-clay interactions are possible: (i) Ti sorbed to the clay surface via cation exchange or specific adsorption, (ii) Ti incorporated in the octahedral or tetrahedral clay structure, (iii) Ti precipitated as separate TiO2 or mixed (Fe, Ti) oxide, (iv) Ti precipitated as separate silicate phase and (v) polymerized as cross-linked TiO2 units in the interlayer (Ti pillared clay). The latter two transformation products would have the strongest impact on the buffer, but are improbable on the basis of current knowledge. A preliminary batch-type investigation has been carried out to shed more light on Ticlay interaction processes and on the Ti species resulting from these interactions. Purified MX-80 bentonite was mixed with metallic

  10. Titanium alloys as alternative material for the supercontainer shell in the KBS-3H concept: A preliminary Ti-clay interaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P. [Gruner Ltd, Basel (Switzerland); Grolimund, D. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Kumpulainen, S.; Kiviranta, L. [B and Tech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Brendle, J. [Mulhouse Univ. (France); Snellman, M. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-12-15

    Ti alloys have been proposed as alternative materials to steel for the supercontainer shell surrounding the bentonite buffer in the KBS-3H disposal concept. Ti-based materials display high strength and are known to behave chemically inert under a variety of conditions. This preliminary study addresses the suitability of titanium as supercontainer material with regard to the performance of the clay buffer. Thus, possible titanium-bentonite interactions which may adversely affect the buffer's safety functions are evaluated by means of a literature and a preliminary experimental assessment. Titanium metals display very low corrosion rates (< 1 nm/a) over a large range of pH and Eh conditions. The corrosion behaviour is governed by the low solubility of tetravalent TiO{sub 2} which forms a passive surface corrosion layer under both oxic and reducing conditions. The interactions between titanium and clay have been barely studied so far. Preliminary long-term data obtained by Prof. Olefjord and co-workers from Chalmers (S) in the 1980ies (as part of SKB's canister program) suggests similar corrosion rates in compacted bentonite compared to those measured in water, i.e. 1 nm/a. So far, no work on reaction products from this interaction process has been carried out. Even the speciation of Ti in natural clays is uncertain. In principle, four possible reaction products resulting from Ti-clay interactions are possible: (i) Ti sorbed to the clay surface via cation exchange or specific adsorption, (ii) Ti incorporated in the octahedral or tetrahedral clay structure, (iii) Ti precipitated as separate TiO{sub 2} or mixed (Fe, Ti) oxide, (iv) Ti precipitated as separate silicate phase and (v) polymerized as cross-linked TiO{sub 2} units in the interlayer (Ti pillared clay). The latter two transformation products would have the strongest impact on the buffer, but are improbable on the basis of current knowledge. A preliminary batch-type investigation has been carried out

  11. Titanium alloys as alternative material for the supercontainer shell in the KBS-3H concept. A preliminary Ti-clay interaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, Paul (Gruner Ltd (Switzerland)); Grolimund, Daniel (Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland)); Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Kiviranta, Leena (BandTech Oy (Finland)); Brendle, Jocelyne (University of Mulhouse (France)); Snellman, Margit (Saanio and Riekkola Oy (Finland))

    2010-12-15

    Ti alloys have been proposed as alternative materials to steel for the supercontainer shell surrounding the bentonite buffer in the KBS-3H disposal concept. Ti-based materials display high strength and are known to behave chemically inert under a variety of conditions. This preliminary study addresses the suitability of titanium as supercontainer material with regard to the performance of the clay buffer. Thus, possible titanium-bentonite interactions which may adversely affect the buffer's safety functions are evaluated by means of a literature and a preliminary experimental assessment. Titanium metals display very low corrosion rates (< 1 nm/a) over a large range of pH and Eh conditions. The corrosion behaviour is governed by the low solubility of tetravalent TiO{sub 2} which forms a passive surface corrosion layer under both oxic and reducing conditions. The interactions between titanium and clay have been barely studied so far. Preliminary long-term data obtained by Prof. Olefjord and co-workers from Chalmers (S) in the 1980s (as part of SKB's canister program) suggests similar corrosion rates in compacted bentonite compared to those measured in water, i.e. <1 nm/a. So far, no work on reaction products from this interaction process has been carried out. Even the speciation of Ti in natural clays is uncertain. In principle, four possible reaction products resulting from Ti-clay interactions are possible: (i) Ti sorbed to the clay surface via cation exchange or specific adsorption, (ii) Ti incorporated in the octahedral or tetrahedral clay structure, (iii) Ti precipitated as separate TiO{sub 2} or mixed (Fe, Ti) oxide, (iv) Ti precipitated as separate silicate phase and (v) polymerized as cross-linked TiO{sub 2} units in the interlayer (Ti pillared clay). The latter two transformation products would have the strongest impact on the buffer, but are improbable on the basis of current knowledge. A preliminary batch-type investigation has been carried out

  12. Data Evaluation for Atomic, Molecular and Plasma Material Interaction Processes in Fusion. Summary Report of a Joint IAEA-NFRI Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the Joint IAEA-NFRI Technical Meeting on 'Data Evaluation for Atomic, Molecular and Plasma Material Interaction Processes in Fusion' on 4-7 September 2012. Twenty five participants from 10 Member States and two from the IAEA attended the four-day meeting held at the Daejeon Convention Center in Daejeon, Republic of Korea hosted by the National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) in conjunction with the 8th International Symposium on Standard Reference Data. The report includes discussions on the issues of the critical assessment of fundamental data required for fusion and plasma applications, meeting conclusions and recommendations. The abstracts of presentations presented in the meeting are attached in the Appendix. (author)

  13. Study of comparative reliability of computer simulation codes in estimating the cross sections for intermediate-energy proton interactions with nuclei of ADT materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental data obtained by the authors on the production cross sections of residual nuclei in the 100-2600 MeV proton interactions with 59Co, 63,65Cu, nat,206,207,208Pb, 209Bi nuclei (thin targets) and with natW nucleus (thick target) are compared with the results of predictive simulation by ten codes. The reliability of the codes is estimated by quantitative ranking separately for a few combinations of proton energies and target materials making allowance for different generation channels of residual product nuclei. Despite quite satisfactory results of comparing between the experimental and simulated data in some cases, none of the simulation codes can be considered to show the required degree of applicability to all of the reactions studied

  14. Modifications on A-F hardening rule to assess ratcheting response of materials and its interaction with fatigue damage under uniaxial stress cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadehrishehri, Gholamreza

    stress levels. The constructed calibration curves were employed to determine strain rate coefficients required to assess ratcheting response of materials under uniaxial loading conditions at various cyclic stress levels. The predicted ratcheting strain values based on the modified hardening rule were found in good agreements with the experimentally obtained ratcheting data over stages I and II under uniaxial loading conditions. The capability of the modified hardening rule to assess ratcheting deformation of materials under multi-step uniaxial loading spectra was also assessed. Subsequent load steps were considerably affected by previous load steps in multi-step loading conditions. Ratcheting strains for low-high stress steps were successfully predicted by the modified hardening rule. High-low loading sequences however resulted in an overestimated reversed ratcheting strain in the later load steps. The modified hardening rule proposed in this thesis was then employed to predict the ratcheting strain and its concurrent interaction with fatigue damage over stress cycles in steel alloys. The interaction of ratcheting and fatigue damage was defined based on mechanistic parameters involving the effects of mean stress, stress amplitude, and cyclic softening/hardening response of materials. The extent of ratcheting effect on the overall damage of steel samples was defined by means of the product of the average ratcheting strain rate over the stress cycles and the applied maximum cyclic stress, while fatigue damage was analysed based on earlier developed energy-based models of Xia-Ellyin and Smith-Watson-Topper. Overall damage induced by both ratcheting and fatigue was calibrated through a weighting factor at various ratios of mean stress/cyclic amplitude stress (sigmam/sigmaa). The estimated lives based on the proposed algorithm at different mean stresses and stress amplitudes showed good agreements as compared with experiments.

  15. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs as...... well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  16. Degradation and in vitro cell–material interaction studies on hydroxyapatite-coated biodegradable porous iron for hard tissue scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurizzati Mohd Daud

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes degradation and cell–material interaction studies on hydroxyapatite (HA-coated biodegradable porous iron proposed for hard tissue scaffolds. Porous iron scaffolds are expected to serve as an ideal platform for bone regeneration. To couple their inherent mechanical strength, pure HA and HA/poly(ε-caprolactone (HA/PCL were coated onto porous iron using dip coating technique. The HA/PCL mixture was prepared to provide a more stable and flexible coating than HA alone. Degradation of the samples was evaluated by weight loss and potentiodynamic polarisation. Human skin fibroblast (HSF and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC were put in contact with the samples and their interaction was observed. Results showed that coated samples degraded ∼10 times slower (0.002 mm/year for HA/PCL-Fe, 0.003 mm/year for HA-Fe than the uncoated ones (0.031 mm/year, indicating an inhibition effect of the coating on degradation. Both HSF and hMSC maintained high viability when in contact with the coated samples (100–110% control for hMSC during 2–5 days of incubation, indicating the effect of HA in enhancing cytocompatibility of the surface. This study provided early evidence of the potential translation of biodegradable porous iron scaffolds for clinical use in orthopedic surgery. However, further studies including in vitro and in vivo tests are necessary.

  17. Materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective of the materials program is the development of a structural material for the MSBR primary circuit which is resistant to irradiation embrittlement and intergranular attack by fission products. The bulk of the work was done on the development and study of modified Hastelloy N (Ti, Nb), including its interaction with salt and fission Te. Materials (Ta-10 percent W, Mo, graphite) are also being tested for corrosion resistance at 600 and 7000C to Bi--Li for use in fuel processing

  18. Cementitious Materials in Safety Cases for Geological Repositories for Radioactive Waste: Role, Evolution and Interactions. A Workshop organised by the OECD/NEA Integration Group for the Safety Case and hosted by ONDRAF/NIRAS. Cementitious materials in safety cases for radioactive waste: role, evolution and interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) organised a workshop to assess current understanding on the use of cementitious materials in radioactive waste disposal. The workshop was hosted by the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials (Ondraf/Niras), in Brussels, Belgium on 17-19 November 2009. The workshop brought together a wide range of people involved in supporting safety case development and having an interest in cementitious materials: namely, cement and concrete experts, repository designers, scientists, safety assessors, disposal programme managers and regulators. The workshop was designed primarily to consider issues relevant to the post-closure safety of radioactive waste disposal, but also addressed some related operational issues, such as cementitious barrier emplacement. Where relevant, information on cementitious materials from analogous natural and anthropogenic systems was also considered. This report provides a synthesis of the workshop, and summarises its main results and findings. The structure of this report follows the workshop agenda: - Section 2 summarises plenary and working group discussions on the uses, functions and evolution of cementitious materials in geological disposal, and highlights key aspects and discussions points. - Section 3 summarises plenary and working group discussions on interactions of cementitious materials with other disposal system components, and highlights key aspects and discussions points. - Section 4 summarises the workshop session on the integration of issues related to cementitious materials using the safety case. - Section 5 presents the main conclusions from the workshop. - Section 6 contains a list of references. - Appendix A presents the workshop agenda. - Appendix B contains the abstracts and, where provided, technical papers supporting oral presentations at the workshop. - Appendix C contains the abstracts and, where provided, technical

  19. Probing the nanoscale interaction forces and elastic properties of organic and inorganic materials using force-distance (F-D) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Abhilash

    Due to their therapeutic applications such as radical scavenging, MRI contrast imaging, Photoluminescence imaging, drug delivery, etc., nanoparticles (NPs) have a significant importance in bio-nanotechnology. The reason that prevents the utilizing NPs for drug delivery in medical field is mostly due to their biocompatibility issues (incompatibility can lead to toxicity and cell death). Changes in the surface conditions of NPs often lead to NP cytotoxicity. Investigating the role of NP surface properties (surface charges and surface chemistry) on their interactions with biomolecules (Cells, protein and DNA) could enhance the current understanding of NP cytotoxicity. Hence, it is highly beneficial to the nanotechnology community to bring more attention towards the enhancement of surface properties of NPs to make them more biocompatible and less toxic to biological systems. Surface functionalization of NPs using specific ligand biomolecules have shown to enhance the protein adsorption and cellular uptake through more favorable interaction pathways. Cerium oxide NPs (CNPs also known as nanoceria) are potential antioxidants in cell culture models and understanding the nature of interaction between cerium oxide NPs and biological proteins and cells are important due to their therapeutic application (especially in site specific drug delivery systems). The surface charges and surface chemistry of CNPs play a major role in protein adsorption and cellular uptake. Hence, by tuning the surface charges and by selecting proper functional molecules on the surface, CNPs exhibiting strong adhesion to biological materials can be prepared. By probing the nanoscale interaction forces acting between CNPs and protein molecules using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based force-distance (F-D) spectroscopy, the mechanism of CNP-protein adsorption and CNP cellular uptake can be understood more quantitatively. The work presented in this dissertation is based on the application of AFM in

  20. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 7, part B. Particle induced erosion of Be, C and W in fusion plasmas. Part B: Physical sputtering and radiation-enhanced sublimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present volume of Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion is devoted to a critical review of the physical sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation (RES) behaviour of fusion plasma-facing materials, in particular carbon, beryllium and tungsten. The present volume is intended to provide fusion reactor designers a detailed survey and parameterization of existing, critically assessed data for the chemical erosion of plasma-facing materials by particle impact. The survey and data compilation is presented for a variety of materials containing the elements C, Be and W (including dopants in carbon materials) and impacting plasma species. The dependencies of physical sputtering and RES yields on the material temperature, incident projectile energy, and incident flux are considered. The main data compilation is presented as separate data sheets indicating the material, impacting plasma species, experimental conditions, and parameterizations in terms of analytic functions

  1. Physical processes taking place in dense plasma focus devices at the interaction of hot plasma and fast ion streams with materials under test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) device represents a source of powerful streams of penetrating radiations (hot plasma, fast electron and ion beams, x-rays and neutrons) of ns-scale pulse durations. Power flux densities of the radiation types may reach in certain cases the values up to 1013 W cm  -  2. They are widely used at present time in more than 30 labs in the world in the field of radiation material science. Areas of their implementations are testing of the materials perspective for use in modern fusion reactors (FR) of both types, modification of surface layers with an aim of improvements their properties, production of some nanostructures on their surface, and so on. To use a DPF correctly in these applications it is important to understand the mechanisms of generation of the above-mentioned radiations, their dynamics inside and outside of the pinch and processes of interaction of these streams with targets. In this paper, the most important issues on the above matter we discuss in relation to the cumulative hot plasma stream and the beam of fast ions with illustration of experimental results obtained at four DPF devices ranged in the limits of bank energies from 1 kJ to 1 MJ. Among them mechanisms of a jet formation, a current abruption phenomenon, a super-Alfven ion beam propagation inside and outside of DPF plasma, generation of secondary plasma and formation of shock waves in plasma and inside a solid-state target, etc. Nanosecond time-resolved techniques (electric probes, laser interferometry, frame self-luminescent imaging, x-ray/neutron probes, etc) give an opportunity to investigate the above-mentioned events and to observe the process of interaction of the radiation types with targets. After irradiation, we analyzed the specimens by contemporary instrumentation: optical and scanning electron microscopy, local x-ray spectral and structure analysis, atomic force microscopy, the portable x-ray diffractometer that combines x-ray single

  2. The use of image analysis for the interaction of 1,3,5-trisubstituted isocyanurates with oxidizer and different binders in composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dostanić Jasmina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite propellants are non-homogenous propellants and comprise primarily crystalline oxidizer and metal fuels uniformly suspended in a resin binder. The strength of the bonds between the polymer matrix and the oxidizer determine the mechanical properties of composite propellants. In order to achieve good mechanical properties of the fuel, bonding agents are added to the mixture. The role of the bonding agents is to enable good interactions (interphase between the polymer matrix and the oxidizer grains. The level of interconnection between the phases could be measured by using the surface obtained by cutting the composite material and observing the resulting surface. A problem in the visualization of such a material is to enable the visibility of the polymer matrix and the grains in the image as both phases are white. There are two possible ways to overcome this problem: to add a pigment into the matrix polymer and to color the matrix and make it different from the grain color. Another possibility is to find a solvent for one of the phases and to dissolve one of the phases in an appropriate solvent so that the remaining phase could be stained, photographed and analyzed using the image analysis program. The morphological characteristics of the image could be established and analyzed. The topic of this study was to establish the conditions of preparation of composite propellants containing ammonium per chlorate and HMX and RDX as oxidizers, and polymer of the polybutadiene type and 1,3,5-trisubstituted isocyanurates as bonding agents. The bonding phenomenon was investigated by optical microscopy. The established procedure of preparation will enable the visualization of the composite structure and the morphological characteristics of the surface will be obtained. From the morphological properties of the obtained composite, it will be possible to select a suitable polymer for the preparation of uniformly distributed composite propellant.

  3. Simulation experiment of interaction of plasma facing materials and transient heat loads in ITER divertor by use of magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, M.; Ando, K.; Higashi, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2009-11-01

    Interaction of plasma facing materials and transient head loads such as type I ELMs is one of the critical issues in ITER divertor. The heat load to the ITER divertor during type I ELMs is estimated to be 0.5-3 MJ/m^2 with a pulse length of 0.1-0.5 ms. We have developed a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for the simulation experiment of transient heat load during type I ELMs in ITER divertor. The MCPG has inner and outer electrodes made of stainless steel 304. In addition, the inner electrode is covered with molybdenum so as to suppress the release of impurities from the electrode during the discharge. The diameters of inner and outer electrodes are 0.06 m and 0.14 m, respectively. The power supply for the MCPG is a capacitor bank (7 kV, 1 mF, 25 kJ). The plasma velocity estimated by the time of flight measurement of the magnetic fields was about 50 km/s, corresponding to the ion energy of 15 eV (H) or 30 eV (D). The absorbed energy density of the plasma stream was measured a calorimeter made of graphite. It was found that the absorbed energy density was 0.9 MJ/m^2 with a pulse width of 0.5 ms at the distance of 100 mm from the inner electrode. In the conference, experimental results of plasma exposure on the plasma facing materials in ITER divertor will be shown.

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Materials Interface Interactions Test: Papers presented at the Commission of European Communities workshop on in situ testing of radioactive waste forms and engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three papers in this report were presented at the second international workshop to feature the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT). This Workshop on In Situ Tests on Radioactive Waste Forms and Engineered Barriers was held in Corsendonk, Belgium, on October 13--16, 1992, and was sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). The Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre D'Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN, Belgium), and the US Department of Energy (via Savannah River) also cosponsored this workshop. Workshop participants from Belgium, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United States gathered to discuss the status, results and overviews of the MIIT program. Nine of the twenty-five total workshop papers were presented on the status and results from the WIPP MIIT program after the five-year in situ conclusion of the program. The total number of published MIIT papers is now up to almost forty. Posttest laboratory analyses are still in progress at multiple participating laboratories. The first MIIT paper in this document, by Wicks and Molecke, provides an overview of the entire test program and focuses on the waste form samples. The second paper, by Molecke and Wicks, concentrates on technical details and repository relevant observations on the in situ conduct, sampling, and termination operations of the MIIT. The third paper, by Sorensen and Molecke, presents and summarizes the available laboratory, posttest corrosion data and results for all of the candidate waste container or overpack metal specimens included in the MIIT program

  5. Photostrictive materials

    OpenAIRE

    Kundys, B.

    2015-01-01

    Light-matter interactions that lead to nonthermal changes in size of the sample constitute a photostrictive effect in many compounds. The photostriction phenomenon was observed in four main groups of materials, ferroelectrics, polar, and non-polar semiconductors, as well as in organic-based materials that are reviewed here. The key mechanisms of photostriction and its dependence on several parameters and perturbations are assessed. The major literature of the photostriction is surveyed, and t...

  6. Development of small-bore, high-current-density railgun as testbed for study of plasma-materials interaction. Progress report for October 16,2000 - May 13, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyekyoon [Kevin

    2003-05-14

    The present document is a final technical report summarizing the progress made during 10/16/2000 - 05/13/2003 toward the development of a small-bore railgun with transaugmentation as a testbed for investigating plasma-materials interaction.

  7. Interaction Effects between Exposure to Sexually Explicit Online Materials and Individual, Family, and Extrafamilial Factors on Hong Kong High School Students' Beliefs about Gender Role Equality and Body-Centered Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Siu-ming; Kan, Siu-mee Iu; Ngai, Steven Sek-yum

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the interaction effects between Hong Kong adolescents' exposure to sexually explicit online materials (SEOM) and individual, family, peer, and cultural factors on their beliefs about gender role equality and body-centered sexuality. Based on a survey design with a sample of 503 high school students in Hong Kong, the results…

  8. Analysis of 440 GeV proton beam-matter interaction experiments at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Raginel, V.; Wollmann, D.; Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    In a previous paper [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we presented the first results on beam-matter interaction experiments that were carried out at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN. In these experiments, extended cylindrical targets of solid copper were irradiated with beam of 440 GeV protons delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The beam comprised of a large number of high intensity proton bunches, each bunch having a length of 0.5 ns with a 50 ns gap between two neighboring bunches, while the length of this entire bunch train was about 7 μs. These experiments established the existence of the hydrodynamic tunneling phenomenon the first time. Detailed numerical simulations of these experiments were also carried out which were reported in detail in another paper [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 063112 (2014)]. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental measurements and the simulation results that validate our previous simulations done using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam of 7 TeV protons [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.--Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. According to these simulations, the range of the full LHC proton beam and the hadronic shower can be increased by more than an order of magnitude due to the hydrodynamic tunneling, compared to that of a single proton. This effect is of considerable importance for the design of machine protection system for hadron accelerators such as SPS, LHC, and Future Circular Collider. Recently, using metal cutting technology, the targets used in these experiments have been dissected into finer pieces for visual and microscopic inspection in order to establish the precise penetration depth of the protons and the corresponding hadronic shower. This, we believe will be helpful in studying the very important phenomenon of hydrodynamic tunneling in a more quantitative manner. The details of this experimental work together with a comparison with the numerical

  9. In-vitro interactions of human chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells, and of mouse macrophages with phospholipid-covered metallic implant materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Willumeit

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipid-coatings on metallic implant surfaces were evaluated in terms of adhesion, proliferation and matrix production of skeletal cells, and of macrophage stimulation. The working hypothesis is that mimicking a model biomembrane by phospholipids on surfaces to which cells adhere, the surface recognition by surrounding cells is altered. In this study, 1 mirror-like polished Ti-6Al-7Nb and 2 porous Ti-6Al-4V specimens were covered with the phospholipids POPE (palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and POPC (palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidyl-choline, and the interactions of a human articular chondrocytes (HAC, b human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSC, and c mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 were tested in vitro. On POPE-covered polished surfaces adherence of HAC (42% of seeded cells after 2 hrs and metabolic activity (MTT after 3 days were reduced, while on porous surfaces 99% HAC adhered, and metabolic activity was significantly increased, compared to respective native surfaces. On both POPE-covered surfaces the chondrocyte phenotype was present. After 3 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation, cartilage matrix production (measuring chondroitin sulphate per HAC number was significantly increased by about 30% on both POPE-covered metallic surfaces. On both POPC-covered surfaces nearly no adhering and surviving HAC were found. HMSC grown on POPE-covered porous substrates showed osteogenic differentiation by improved osteopontin and collagen I expression in RT-PCR, and osteocalcin fluorescence and bone nodule formation was only detectable on POPE-covered porous surfaces. In contrast to POPC and other phospholipids used as positive controls, POPE did not stimulate the NO production in mouse macrophage cultures. We therefore conclude that a phospholipid coating by POPE shows potential as surface modification for metallic implant materials.

  10. WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant]/SRL in situ tests: Part 2, Pictorial history of MIIT [Materials Interface Interactions Tests] and final MIIT matrices, assemblies, and sample listings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ testing of Savannah River Plant [SRP] waste glass is an important component in ensuring technical and public confidence in the safety and effective performance of the wasteforms. Savannah River Laboratory [SRL] is currently involved in joint programs involving field testing of SRP waste in Sweden, Belgium, and the United Kingdom. Most recently, this in situ effort has been expanded to include the first field tests to be conducted in the United States, involving burial of a variety of simulated nuclear waste systems. This new effort, called the Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT, is a program jointly conducted by Sandia National Laboratory/Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] and SRL. Over 1800 samples, supplied by the United States, France, West Germany, Belgium, Canada, Japan, and the United Kingdom, were buried approximately 650m below the earth's surface in the salt geology at WIPP, near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The MIIT program is one of the largest cooperative efforts ever undertaken in the waste management field; the data produced from these tests are designed to benefit a wide cross-section of the waste management community. An earlier document provided an overview of the WIPP MIIT program and described its place in the waste glass assessment program at Savannah River. This document represents the second in this series and its objectives include: (1) providing a pictorial history of assembly and installation of wasteforms, metals, and geologic samples in WIPP; (2) providing 'finalized and completed' sample matrices for the entire 7-part MIIT program; (3) documenting final sample assemblies by the use of schematic drawings, including each sample, its orientation, and its environment; and (4) providing a complete listing of all samples and the means for managing analyses and resulting data

  11. Analysis of 440 GeV proton beam–matter interaction experiments at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous paper [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we presented the first results on beam–matter interaction experiments that were carried out at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN. In these experiments, extended cylindrical targets of solid copper were irradiated with beam of 440 GeV protons delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The beam comprised of a large number of high intensity proton bunches, each bunch having a length of 0.5 ns with a 50 ns gap between two neighboring bunches, while the length of this entire bunch train was about 7 μs. These experiments established the existence of the hydrodynamic tunneling phenomenon the first time. Detailed numerical simulations of these experiments were also carried out which were reported in detail in another paper [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 063112 (2014)]. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental measurements and the simulation results that validate our previous simulations done using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam of 7 TeV protons [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.--Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. According to these simulations, the range of the full LHC proton beam and the hadronic shower can be increased by more than an order of magnitude due to the hydrodynamic tunneling, compared to that of a single proton. This effect is of considerable importance for the design of machine protection system for hadron accelerators such as SPS, LHC, and Future Circular Collider. Recently, using metal cutting technology, the targets used in these experiments have been dissected into finer pieces for visual and microscopic inspection in order to establish the precise penetration depth of the protons and the corresponding hadronic shower. This, we believe will be helpful in studying the very important phenomenon of hydrodynamic tunneling in a more quantitative manner. The details of this experimental work together with a comparison with the

  12. Analysis of 440 GeV proton beam–matter interaction experiments at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkart, F. [CERN-AB, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland and Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Schmidt, R.; Wollmann, D. [CERN-AB, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Raginel, V. [CERN-AB, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland and TU Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Tahir, N. A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Shutov, A. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Piriz, A. R. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2015-08-07

    In a previous paper [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we presented the first results on beam–matter interaction experiments that were carried out at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN. In these experiments, extended cylindrical targets of solid copper were irradiated with beam of 440 GeV protons delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The beam comprised of a large number of high intensity proton bunches, each bunch having a length of 0.5 ns with a 50 ns gap between two neighboring bunches, while the length of this entire bunch train was about 7 μs. These experiments established the existence of the hydrodynamic tunneling phenomenon the first time. Detailed numerical simulations of these experiments were also carried out which were reported in detail in another paper [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 063112 (2014)]. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental measurements and the simulation results that validate our previous simulations done using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam of 7 TeV protons [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.--Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. According to these simulations, the range of the full LHC proton beam and the hadronic shower can be increased by more than an order of magnitude due to the hydrodynamic tunneling, compared to that of a single proton. This effect is of considerable importance for the design of machine protection system for hadron accelerators such as SPS, LHC, and Future Circular Collider. Recently, using metal cutting technology, the targets used in these experiments have been dissected into finer pieces for visual and microscopic inspection in order to establish the precise penetration depth of the protons and the corresponding hadronic shower. This, we believe will be helpful in studying the very important phenomenon of hydrodynamic tunneling in a more quantitative manner. The details of this experimental work together with a comparison with the

  13. Materials for Fusion Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Matějíček

    2013-01-01

    An overview of materials foreseen for use or already used in fusion devices is given. The operating conditions, material requirements and characteristics of candidate materials in several specific application segments are briefly reviewed. These include: construction materials, electrical insulation, permeation barriers and plasma facing components. Special attention will be paid to the latter and to the issues of plasma-material interaction, materials joining and fuctionally graded interlayers.

  14. Research on materials for advanced electronic and aerospace application. [including optical and magnetic data processing, stress corrosion and H2 interaction, and polymeric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Development and understanding of materials most suitable for use in compact magnetic and optical memory systems are discussed. Suppression of metal deterioration by hydrogen is studied. Improvement of mechanical properties of polymers is considered, emphasizing low temperature ductility and compatibility with high modulus fiber materials.

  15. Interactive data visualization of the Norwegian phosphorus cycle, coupling phosphorus with dry matter and energy in a multi-layered material flow analysis model

    OpenAIRE

    Rud, Richard Olav

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of data visualization to explore complex systems is arguably an indispensable method for increasing understanding of a specific problem domain. It is argued that visualization techniques for presenting material flow analysis results should be further developed. This thesis explores the effectiveness of combining material flow analysis with data visualization techniques to communicate the impacts of targeted policies for managing food waste for the Norwegian food production, co...

  16. Electrostatic interactions for directed assembly of high performance nanostructured energetic materials of Al/Fe2O3/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Ma, Zhuang; Li, Guoping; Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Benbo; Luo, Yunjun

    2016-05-01

    Electrostatic self-assembly in organic solvent without intensively oxidative or corrosive environments, was adopted to prepare Al/Fe2O3/MWCNT nanostructured energetic materials as an energy generating material. The negatively charged MWCNT was used as a glue-like agent to direct the self-assembly of the well dispersed positively charged Al (fuel) and Fe2O3 (oxide) nanoparticles. This spontaneous assembly method without any surfactant chemistry or other chemical and biological moieties decreased the aggregation of the same nanoparticles largely, moreover, the poor interfacial contact between the Al (fuel) and Fe2O3 (oxide) nanoparticles was improved significantly, which was the key characteristic of high performance nanostructured energetic materials. In addition, the assembly process was confirmed as Diffusion-Limited Aggregation. The assembled Al/Fe2O3/MWCNT nanostructured energetic materials showed excellent performance with heat release of 2400 J/g, peak pressure of 0.42 MPa and pressurization rate of 105.71 MPa/s, superior to that in the control group Al/Fe2O3 nanostructured energetic materials prepared by sonication with heat release of 1326 J/g, peak pressure of 0.19 MPa and pressurization rate of 33.33 MPa/s. Therefore, the approach, which is facile, opens a promising route to the high performance nanostructured energetic materials.

  17. The Effect of Micro/Nano-metrics Size on the Interaction of Jordanian Aluminosilicate Raw Materials with High pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldabsheh, Islam; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martinez, Salvador

    2014-05-01

    Environmental preservation has become a driving force behind the search for new sustainable and environmentally friendly composites to replace conventional concrete produced from ordinary Portland cement (OPC). Current researches concentrate on developing building products (geopolymers) through geopolymerization. The goal is to produce low cost construction materials for green housing. Geopolymerization is the process of polymerizing minerals with high silica and alumina at low temperature by the use of alkali solutions. Dissolution is the most important process for supplying the high initial Al and Si concentrations to produce the gel phase that is responsible for geopolymerization. This study has been focused on the influence of different micrometric particle sizes of three Jordanian raw materials on their dissolution behavior in sodium hydroxide solution. The samples are kaolinite, volcanic tuff and silica sand. The dissolution properties of each material, alone and mixed with the other two materials were studied in different concentrations (5 and 10 M) using (NaOH) at 25ºC, and shaking time for 24 and 168 h. To better understand the dissolution process, the alkaline solution was renewed after the desired time in order to know if the Al-Si raw material is completely dissolved or not. Different analytical techniques were used to characterize raw materials physically, mineralogically, chemically and thermally. All processed samples either centrifuged solutions or solid residues were fully characterized. The leached concentrations of Al and Si were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP). X-ray Diffraction Technique (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used to evaluate the solid residue characterization compared with the original ones. The three aluminosilicate raw materials have indicated variable degrees of solubility under highly alkaline conditions. The method for the size reduction of the used raw

  18. Physicochemical interactions resulting from the use of a SiC/SiC composite material in typical environments of future nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of high purity SiC fibers during the nineties has led to their consideration as nuclear reactors components through the use of SiC/SiC composites. SiC and SiC/SiC composites are considered as core materials of future nuclear reactors (SFR, GFR) and as a potential replacement for the zirconium cladding of PWR. Therefore, the thermochemical compatibility of these materials with typical environments of those nuclear reactors has been studied. The composition and the growth kinetics of the reaction zone of SiC towards niobium and tantalum (considered as materials to ensure the leak-tightness of a SiC/SiC cladding for GFR) have been studied between 1050 and 1500 C. High temperature heat treatments in open and closed systems between SiC and UO2 have shown a significant reactivity over 1200 C characterized by the formation of CO and uranium silicides. Moreover, a liquid phase has been detected between 1500 and 1650 C. The exposure of SiC/SiC to liquid sodium (550 C, up to 2000 h) has been studied as a function of the oxygen concentration dissolved in liquid sodium. An improvement of the mechanical properties of the composites elaborated for this study (increase of the tensile strength and strain at failure) has been highlighted after immersion in the liquid sodium independently of its oxygen concentration. It is believed that this phenomenon is due to the presence of residual sodium in the material. (author)

  19. Plasma-wall interactions data compendium-3. Hydrogen retention property, diffusion and recombination coefficients database for selected plasma-facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report will present additional data to those included in the previous report of this series. These new data are ''effective'' hydrogen (deuterium) recombination coefficients estimated under the assumption that hydrogen recombination occurs in the bulk of materials, followed by immediate desorption to vacuum. The SI units are used for all the data collected in this report. (author)

  20. Interparticle interactions in composites of nanoparticles of ferrimagnetic (gamma-Fe2O3) and antiferromagnetic (CoO,NiO) materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Cathrine; Ostenfeld, Christopher Worsøe; Xu, M.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde; Keller, L.; Lefmann, Kim; Mørup, Steen

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic properties of mixtures of ferrimagnetic gamma-Fe2O3 (maghemite) and antiferromagnetic NiO or CoO nanoparticles have been studied by use of Fe-57 Mossbauer spectroscopy, neutron powder diffraction and magnetization measurements. The studies showed that the interaction with antiferroma......The magnetic properties of mixtures of ferrimagnetic gamma-Fe2O3 (maghemite) and antiferromagnetic NiO or CoO nanoparticles have been studied by use of Fe-57 Mossbauer spectroscopy, neutron powder diffraction and magnetization measurements. The studies showed that the interaction with...... antiferromagnetic particles has a significant influence on the magnetic properties of the gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. It was found that mixing the gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with NiO nanoparticles resulted in a faster superparamagnetic relaxation and a reduced coercivity compared to a sample consisting solely of...

  1. Meanings of Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karana, E.

    2009-01-01

    This book is about meanings we attribute to materials of the objects around us. Materials convey meanings: they look traditional, they express luxury, they are associated with factories, or they conjure up one’s childhood. How do materials obtain these meanings? How do they interact with other e

  2. Interactive Workspaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst

    augmented reality, interactive building elements, and mobile devices to support new ways of working in a diversity of application domains with work situations ranging from individual work, through local collaboration, to distributed collaboration. The work situations may take place in offices/project rooms......Many application domains such as architecture, engineering, industrial design, city planning, environmental supervision, health care etc. share the properties of users working collaboratively with complex mixtures of physical and digital materials. Studies in such domains show that it is hard...

  3. Dynamic and fluid-structure interaction simulations of bioprosthetic heart valves using parametric design with T-splines and Fung-type material models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming-Chen; Kamensky, David; Xu, Fei; Kiendl, Josef; Wang, Chenglong; Wu, Michael C. H.; Mineroff, Joshua; Reali, Alessandro; Bazilevs, Yuri; Sacks, Michael S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper builds on a recently developed immersogeometric fluid-structure interaction (FSI) methodology for bioprosthetic heart valve (BHV) modeling and simulation. It enhances the proposed framework in the areas of geometry design and constitutive modeling. With these enhancements, BHV FSI simulations may be performed with greater levels of automation, robustness and physical realism. In addition, the paper presents a comparison between FSI analysis and standalone structural dynamics simulation driven by prescribed transvalvular pressure, the latter being a more common modeling choice for this class of problems. The FSI computation achieved better physiological realism in predicting the valve leaflet deformation than its standalone structural dynamics counterpart.

  4. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 8. Elastic and related transport cross sections for collisions among isotopomers of H+ + H, H+ + H2, H+ + He, H + H, and H + H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Volume 8 of the 'Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion' provides an exhaustive source of information on elastic scattering, momentum transfer and viscosity cross sections for collisions of hydrogenic ions, atoms and molecules, and their isotopes, in the energy range pertinent to fusion reactor divertor plasmas and extending (in its low-energy part) to collision conditions that are relevant for astrophysics. Hydrogen ion-helium atom collisions are also included. The reported cross sections are obtained from extensive quantum-mechanical calculations and can be regarded as having very high accuracy

  5. Interaction of short x-ray pulses 
with low-Z x-ray optics materials 
at the LCLS free-electron laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hau-Riege, S.P.; London, R.A.; Graf, A.; Baker, S. L.; Soufli, R.; Sobierajski, R.; Burian, Tomáš; Chalupský, Jaromír; Juha, Libor; Gaudin, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Moeller, S.; Messerschmidt, M.; Bozek, J.; Bostedt, C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 23 (2010), s. 23933-23938. ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10046; GA AV ČR IAA400100701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : x-ray optics * optical materials * x-ray free electron laser Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.749, year: 2010

  6. Further study of genetic interactions: Loss of short arm material in patients with ring chromosome 4 changes developmental pattern of del(4) (q33)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lurie, I.W. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-04-10

    Segment 4q33 is not considered a probable location of a gene related with limb deficiency by Roberts and Tabin; however, the occurrence of ectrodactyly or its equivalents in at least 9 published cases of monosomy 4q33 suggests probable location of one of these genes in that region. Ulnar ray defects and/or ectrodactyly were the prevailing forms. An additional loss of the tip of 4p in patients with ring chromosome 4 leads to a change of limb deficiency type: 8 of 9 patients with r(4) and limb deficiency had radial ray defects. Therefore, interactions between a proposed {1/2} dose {open_quotes}ectrodactyly{close_quotes} gene on 4q33 and some {1/2} dosage genes on distal 4p (or disturbed cellular homeostasis due to a ring chromosome 4) can change the development pattern of limb deficiency. Possible mechanisms and significance of the phenomenon are discussed. 36 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Topological, non-topological and instanton droplets driven by spin-transfer torque in materials with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentieri, Mario; Tomasello, Riccardo; Zivieri, Roberto; Finocchio, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    The interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction can modify the topology of droplets excited by a localized spin-polarized current. Here, we show that, in addition to the stationary droplet excitations with skyrmion number either one (topological) or zero (non-topological), there exists, for a fixed current, an excited mode with a non-stationary time behavior. We call this mode “instanton droplet”, which is characterized by time domain transitions of the skyrmion number. These transitions are coupled to an emission of incoherent spin-waves that can be observed in the frequency domain as a source of noise. Our results are interesting from a fundamental point of view to study spin-wave emissions due to a topological transition in current-driven systems, and could open the route for experiments based on magnetoresistance effect for the design of a further generation of nanoscale microwave oscillators.

  8. The interaction of human microbial pathogens, particulate material and nutrients in estuarine environments and their impacts on recreational and shellfish waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malham, Shelagh K; Rajko-Nenow, Paulina; Howlett, Eleanor; Tuson, Karen E; Perkins, Tracy L; Pallett, Denise W; Wang, Hui; Jago, Colin F; Jones, Davey L; McDonald, James E

    2014-09-20

    Anthropogenic activities have increased the load of faecal bacteria, pathogenic viruses and nutrients in rivers, estuaries and coastal areas through point and diffuse sources such as sewage discharges and agricultural runoff. These areas are used by humans for both commercial and recreational activities and are therefore protected by a range of European Directives. If water quality declines in these zones, significant economic losses can occur. Identifying the sources of pollution, however, is notoriously difficult due to the ephemeral nature of discharges, their diffuse source, and uncertainties associated with transport and transformation of the pollutants through the freshwater-marine interface. Further, significant interaction between nutrients, microorganisms and particulates can occur in the water column making prediction of the fate and potential infectivity of human pathogenic organisms difficult to ascertain. This interaction is most prevalent in estuarine environments due to the formation of flocs (suspended sediment) at the marine-freshwater interface. A range of physical, chemical and biological processes can induce the co-flocculation of microorganisms, organic matter and mineral particles resulting in pathogenic organisms becoming potentially protected from a range of biotic (e.g. predation) and abiotic stresses (e.g. UV, salinity). These flocs contain and retain macro- and micro- nutrients allowing the potential survival, growth and transfer of pathogenic organisms to commercially sensitive areas (e.g. beaches, shellfish harvesting waters). The flocs can either be transported directly to the coastal environment or can become deposited in the estuary forming cohesive sediments where pathogens can survive for long periods. Especially in response to storms, these sediments can be subsequently remobilised releasing pulses of potential pathogenic organisms back into the water column leading to contamination of marine waters long after the initial

  9. Electronics materials research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The electronic materials and is aimed at the establishment of quantitative relationships underlying crystal growth parameters, materials properties, electronic characteristics and device applications. The overall program evolves about the following main thrust areas: (1) crystal growth novel approaches to engineering of semiconductor materials; (2) investigation of materials properties and electronic characteristics on a macro and microscale; (3) surface properties and surface interactions with the bulk and ambients; (4) electronic properties controlling device applications and device performance.

  10. Interaction between particle precipitation and creep behavior in the NI-base Alloy 617B: Microstructural observations and constitutive material model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The creep behavior of the Ni-base Alloy 617B was analyzed at 725 °C with the focus on microstructural changes during temperature and stress exposure. High resolution electron microscopy of crept specimens reveals the precipitation behavior of secondary phases such as Cr-rich M23C6-carbides and the γ'-phase. Physical models are used to describe the Ostwald coarsening of the γ' particles and the evolution of the yield strength of the alloy. Together with the results from hot tensile tests and hardness measurements, a constitutive model for Alloy 617B has been developed. This model takes account of precipitation strengthening which is consistent with the microstructural observations, internal back stress due to dislocation hardening and material damage, all by evolutionary equations

  11. Interaction between particle precipitation and creep behavior in the NI-base Alloy 617B: Microstructural observations and constitutive material model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, J., E-mail: j.haan@iwm.rwth-aachen.de; Bezold, A., E-mail: a.bezold@iwm.rwth-aachen.de; Broeckmann, C., E-mail: c.broeckmann@iwm.rwth-aachen.de

    2015-07-29

    The creep behavior of the Ni-base Alloy 617B was analyzed at 725 °C with the focus on microstructural changes during temperature and stress exposure. High resolution electron microscopy of crept specimens reveals the precipitation behavior of secondary phases such as Cr-rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6}-carbides and the γ'-phase. Physical models are used to describe the Ostwald coarsening of the γ' particles and the evolution of the yield strength of the alloy. Together with the results from hot tensile tests and hardness measurements, a constitutive model for Alloy 617B has been developed. This model takes account of precipitation strengthening which is consistent with the microstructural observations, internal back stress due to dislocation hardening and material damage, all by evolutionary equations.

  12. Studies of the consolidation behaviour of salt grit as filling material for repositories in salt domes, with special regard to the interaction between rock and fill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final report presents the results of laboratory tests on the consolidation behaviour of salt grit carried out under the research project, and evaluates them together with the results obtained from previous tests. Further evaluation and discussion of the connection between consolidation (reduction of the pore volume), consolidation rate, stress and temperature as well as a comparison with the results obtained by other authors are performed on the basis of parameter determination for the material law by Zhang et al. By means of the determined parameters, the laboratory tests were recalculated. The measurement data available so far from the large-scale test ''Thermal simulation of gallery emplacement'' being carried out at the Asse mine on the consolidation of salt grit fill are included in the comparisons of results. Finally, the experiments performed under this project to determine the permeability of salt grit as a function of porosity and granulometric composition are represented. (orig./HP)

  13. Interactions of low-power photons with natural opals—PBG materials, photonic control, natural metamaterials, spontaneous laser emissions, and band-gap boundary responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four views of each of the opal research specimens in white light (for in-article or cover), in the same order as the specimens depicted in Fig. 3 of the main manuscript. A.On the left: 1.5 carat oval cabochon precious fire opal. B.In the center: 2.5 carats faceted fancy shield precious fire contra luz with mild adularescence. C.On the right: 5.0 carats round cabochon precious crystal opal with blue adularescence. Highlights: ► Emission of micro-lasers from microspheroid cluster boundary zones (quantum dots). ► Lasers illuminated or fluoresced the intra-opal structures of microspheroid photonic glass clusters. ► Microspheroid boundaries are durable to low power light sources. ► Display of previously unknown low power photonic optic properties. ► The research specimens are natural metamaterials. - Abstract: One overall goal of this research was to examine types of naturally-occurring opals that exhibit photonic control to learn about previously-unknown properties of naturally occurring photonic control that may be developed for broader applications. Three different photon sources were applied consecutively to three different types of natural, flawless, gem-quality precious opals. Two photon sources were lasers (green and red) and one was simulated daylight tungsten white. As each type of precious opal was exposed to each of the photon sources, the respective refractions, reflections, and transmissions were studied. This research is the first to show that applying various pleochroic and laser photon sources to these types of opals revealed significant information regarding naturally occurring photonic control, metamaterials, spontaneous laser emissions, and microspheroid cluster (inter-PBG zone) boundary effects. Plus, minimizing ambient light and the use of low power photon sources were critical to observing the properties regarding this photonic materials research. This research yielded information applicable to the development of materials to advance

  14. Uranium-bearing phases in a U-mill disposal site in Northern Canada: Products of the interaction between leachate/raffinate and tailings material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Uranyl-phases in an U-tailings site. ► Raffinate–tailings interaction. ► U-bearing gypsum. ► Ammonium-bearing autunite and zippeite. - Abstract: The Above Ground Tailings Management Facility (AGTMF) is a licensed tailings receiving facility at the Key Lake mine site, Northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Tailings within the AGTMF were deposited between 1983 and 1995 and are derived from mining and milling of the Gaertner and Deilmann ore-bodies at Key Lake. The tailings are primarily composed of quartz, phyllosilicate and clay gangue minerals, minor amounts of Ni–Co–S-arsenides, iron oxide minerals and gypsum. They typically contain U concentrations on the order of between 50 and 300 ug/g U. A small area of the AGTMF receives occasional mill-process upset solutions with an initial pH-range of 2–6. The solutions contain elevated activities of U-bearing aqueous-species and are rapidly buffered to neutral and sub-alkaline pH values during interaction with surroundings tailings solids having a pH of approximately 10. This buffering and neutralization process results in the precipitation of gypsum and minor amounts of uranyl minerals. Phases of the autunite-group (chernikovite, (H3O)[(UO2)(PO4)](H2O)3 and troegerite, (H3O)[(UO2)(AsO4)] (H2O)3 with minor NH4+) occur predominantly in the gypsum matrix but can also occur as crusts on silicates. The occurrence of troegerite is due to elevated concentrations of As within the deposited tailings solids. Surface alteration on phyllosilicates within tailings affected by the mill process solutions results in elevated concentrations of K at the phyllosilicate–water interface, which are ideal nucleation sites for the formation of single crystals of zippeite, K3(H2O)3[(UO2)4(SO4)2O3(OH)]. Use of NH4-sulfates and ammonia in the extraction and yellow-cake precipitation cycles and subsequent entrainment of (NH4)+ species in the tailings results in the occurrence of (NH4)-bearing phases of the zippeite- and

  15. Material musical como acervo de conocimiento: sujeto, acción e interacción en procesos de improvisación musical = Musical material as stock of knowledge: subject, action and interaction within processes of musical improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueroa-Dreher, Silvana K.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta contribuição explora a potencialidade da abordagem subjetiva representada na teoria fenomenonológica de Alfred Schutz para explicar processos de improvisação musical a partir de uma perspectiva sociológica. Isto constitui um desafio para a teoria de Schutz, uma vez que sua ideia de projetos de ação tipificados podem explicar ação improvisatória e interação apenas parcialmente. Contudo, esta mesma teoria abre um novo caminho – ainda menos explorado – para explicar fenômenos de improvisação com a noção de estoque de conhecimento subjetivo e social. A principal contribuição deste artigo é conectar a noção de estoque de conhecimento com o de material musical e, com isso, vincular ação improvisatória e interação

  16. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physical Processes in Laser-Materials Interaction, which was the 9th course of the Europhysics School of Quantum Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    1983-01-01

    It is a pleasure to write a few words as an introduction to the proceedings of the 1980 NATO ASI on "Physical Processes in Laser­ Naterial Interaction." This ASI is the ninth course of a series devoted to lasers and their applications, held under the responsibility of the Quantum Electronics Division of the European Physical Society, and for this reason known as the "Europhysics School of Quantum Electronics." Since 1971 the School has been operating with the joint direc­ tion of myself as representative of the academic research, and Dr. D. Roess (formerly with Siemens AEG, Munich, and now with Sick, Optik und Electronik, GmbH, Munich) for the industrial applications. Indeed the aim of the School is to alternate fundamental and applied frontier topics in the area of quantum electronics and modern optics, in order to introduce young research people from universities and industrial R&D laboratories to the new aspects of research opened by the laser.

  17. Interface interaction and inter-osmosis effect of Fex (SiO2)1-x nanocomposite materials on magnetic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊永红; 熊曹水; 李铁; 李玉芝; 王德兴

    1999-01-01

    Fex(SiC2 )1 - x nanocomposites prepared by using mechanical alloying method were reported. The mi-crostructure character and magnetic properties of Fex (SiO2) 1 - x nanocomposite samples with different Fe content and different ball milling time were studied by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mossbauer spectroscopy, and Faraday magnetic balance in a wide temperature range. The results indicate that the mi-crostructure and magnetic properties are closely related to ball milling time and Fe content. When Fe content is less than 20 wt% , the sample after 80-h ball milling has very complex microstructure. Small α-Fe grains and Fe cluster are implanted in SiO2 matrix. And there are not only isolated α-Fe granular and Fe cluster, but also nanometer scaled sandwich network-like structure. Fex (SiO2) 1 - x nanocomposite samples display a rich variety of physical and chemical properties as a result of their unique nanostructure, strong interface interaction and inter

  18. Materials by design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major developments in materials characterization instrumentation over the past decade have helped significantly to elucidate complex processes and phenomena connected with the microstructure of materials and interfacial interactions. Equally remarkable advances in theoretical models and computer technology also have been taking place during this period. These latter now permit, for example, in selected cases the computation of material structures and bonding and the prediction of some material properties. Two assessments of the state of the art of instrumental techniques and theoretical methods for the study of material structures and properties have recently been conducted. This paper discusses aspects from these assessments of computational theoretical methods apply to materials

  19. Implicit Partitioned Cardiovascular Fluid-Structure Interaction of the Heart Cycle Using Non-newtonian Fluid Properties and Orthotropic Material Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlhausen, M-P; Janoske, U; Oertel, H

    2015-03-01

    Although image-based methods like MRI are well-developed, numerical simulation can help to understand human heart function. This function results from a complex interplay of biochemistry, structural mechanics, and blood flow. The complexity of the entire system often causes one of the three parts to be neglected, which limits the truth to reality of the reduced model. This paper focuses on the interaction of myocardial stress distribution and ventricular blood flow during diastole and systole in comparison to a simulation of the same patient-specific geometry with a given wall movement (Spiegel, Strömungsmechanischer Beitrag zur Planung von Herzoperationen, 2009). The orthotropic constitutive law proposed by Holzapfel et al. (Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. Ser. A, 367:3445-3475, 2009) was implemented in a finite element package to model the passive behavior of the myocardium. Then, this law was modified for contraction. Via the ALE method, the structural model was coupled to a flow model which incorporates blood rheology and the circulatory system (Oertel, Prandtl-Essentials of Fluid Mechanics, 3rd edn, Springer Science + Business Media, 2010; Oertel et al., Modelling the Human Cardiac Fluid Mechanics, 3rd edn, Universitätsverlag Karlsruhe, 2009). Comparison reveals a good quantitative and qualitative agreement with respect to fluid flow. The motion of the myocardium is consistent with physiological observations. The calculated stresses and the distribution are within the physiological range and appear to be reasonable. The coupled model presented contains many features essential to cardiac function. It is possible to calculate wall stresses as well as the characteristic ventricular fluid flow. Based on the simulations we derive two characteristics to assess the health state quantitatively including solid and fluid mechanical aspects. PMID:26577098

  20. Plasma-material interactions: A Langmuir probe analysis of a cylindrical SiO(2) deposition system and a computational study using VFTRIM3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkot, Robert Bruce, Jr.

    This dissertation is broken into two sections describing, first, a computer code simulating ion-surface interactions, VFTRIM3D, and, second, an experimental Langmuir probe analysis of a cylindrical SiOsb2 deposition system. VFTRIM3D is a 3-dimensional, Monte-Carlo, binary collision code employing fractal algorithms used to simulate atomic-scale surface roughness. This work applies this code to studies of incident ion energies in the 10's to 100's of eV on various targets and comparisons to experimental data prove its dependability for such simulations. The experimental portion of this thesis includes the development and investigation of a cylindrical SiOsb2 deposition system used to deposit gas permeation barrier thin films onto PET bottles. The plasma analysis is done utilizing time- and spatially resolved Langmuir probe techniques. In order to study the characteristics of the dielectric deposition plasma, a "hot" Langmuir probe was developed to acquire typical Langmuir probe data during SiOsb2 deposition. The SiOsb2 films deposited in this system are analyzed for their gas permeation qualities and are correlated to the plasma properties gathered using Langmuir probes as well as the gas, pressure, and time recipes used to produce them. It is found in this work that the application of SiOsb2 films onto flexible PET bottles using the fashion explained herein results in a decrease in the gas permeation characteristics of the SiOsb2-PET membrane as desired, but is found to be independent of the thickness of the SiOsb2 present. This limit is found to be caused by cracks and pinhole defects across the SiOsb2 film that permit uninhibited gas flow directly to the PET bottle.

  1. Plasma-wall interaction; Interaction plasma paroi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichle, R

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the 43 slides presented in the framework of the week long lecture 'hot plasmas 2004' and dedicated to plasma-wall interaction in a tokamak. This document is divided into 4 parts: 1) thermal load on the wall, power extraction and particle recovery, 2) basic edge plasma physics, 3) processes that drive the plasma-solid interaction, and 4) material conditioning (surface treatment...) for ITER.

  2. Evaluation of long-term interaction between cement and bentonite for geological disposal (2) XAFS analysis of calcium silicate hydrate precipitates at cementitious and bentonite material interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Numerical analyses of the long-term alteration of the engineered barriers used for the disposal of TRU waste predicted precipitation of C-S-H minerals at the interface between the cementitious materials and the bentonite-based buffer. When the C-S-H precipitates at this interface, the diffusion coefficient in the engineered barriers will decrease, resulting in reduced mass transport, which feeds back to reduce the rate of subsequent alteration. The C-S-H predicted to form at the cement-bentonite interface could not be identified directly using conventional analytical tools, including XRD, due to its low crystallinity. The authors propose that XAFS analysis, which provides spectra sensitive to the valency and coordination of the element of interest regardless of its crystallinity, would be capable of characterizing the C-S-H. The presence of the C-S-H precipitated as a secondary mineral has already been confirmed by applying chemical and XAFS analyses to bentonite specimens collected from the compacted bentonite-cement interface. However, because of the limitations on the width of specimens that can be collected by cutting from block samples, i.e. approximately 1 mm, detailed concentration profiles could not be obtained for this secondary C-S-H. In this study, XAFS spectra of thin specimens were measured using an X-ray detector in order to obtain detailed concentration profiles for the C-S-H formed at the interface between the cementitious material and the bentonite-based buffer. The X-ray detector used in the XAFS analysis consists of 1024 photodiodes arranged in line with a 0.025 mm pitch (photodiode array; PDA). Ca-K-edge XAFS measurements were conducted at the Photon Factory of the KEK. The synchrotron was operated in top-up mode with 450 mA during the measurements. Specimens were taken from a contact sample of compacted bentonite (Kunigel V1; dry density of 1.6 g/cm3) and hardened OPC (w/c = 0.6) immersed in

  3. Towards highly efficient red thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials by the control of intra-molecular π-π stacking interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunge; Zhang, Dongdong; Cai, Minghan; Li, Yilang; Zhang, Deqiang; Qiu, Yong; Duan, Lian

    2016-03-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials have attracted much attention as they can achieve 100% theoretical internal quantum efficiency without using expensive noble metals. However, efficient red TADF emitters are hard to realize according to the energy gap law. Here, three donor-acceptor-donor type TADF emitters with the same acceptor of o-phthalodinitrile (PN) but different donors (9, 9-dimethyl-9, 10-dihydroacridine (DMAC), phenoxazine (PXZ), and phenothiazine (PTZ) for DMAC-PN, PXZ-PN, and PTZ-PN, respectively) have been synthesized, and it is observed that the performance of the emitters can be improved by reducing the intra-molecular π-π stacking. DMAC-PN with reduced intra-molecular π-π stacking shows a photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 20.2% in degassed toluene solution, much higher than those of PXZ-PN, and PTZ-PN (0.8%, 0.2%, respectively). An organic light-emitting diode (OLED) employing DMAC-PN doped into 4,4'-bis(9H-carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) as the emitting layer exhibits a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 10.2% with the emission peak at 564 nm. Moreover, when DMAC-PN is doped into a polar host, bis[2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl] ether oxide (DPEPO), the OLED shows a large redshift of the emission maximum to 594 nm, while maintaining a peak EQE as high as 7.2%, indicating that efficient red TADF OLEDs can be fabricated by doping orange TADF emitters into hosts with proper polarity. PMID:26821694

  4. Strongly Correlated Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H.; Si, Qimiao

    2013-01-01

    Strongly correlated materials are profoundly affected by the repulsive electron-electron interaction. This stands in contrast to many commonly used materials such as silicon and aluminum, whose properties are comparatively unaffected by the Coulomb repulsion. Correlated materials often have remarkable properties and transitions between distinct, competing phases with dramatically different electronic and magnetic orders. These rich phenomena are fascinating from the basic science perspective ...

  5. Geochemistry and correlation of volcanic ash beds from the Rootsiküla Stage (Wenlock–Ludlow in the eastern Baltic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarmo Kiipli

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nine altered volcanic ash samples from the shoal and lagoonal sediments of the Rootsiküla Stage (Wenlock–Ludlow boundary interval, Estonia were analysed, compared and correlated with five samples of deep sea environments from Latvia. Volcanic ash correlations indicate that the Wenlock–Ludlow boundary correlates with the boundary of the Viita and Kuusnõmme beds, i.e., it is significantly lower than proposed earlier. The distribution of chitinozoans supports this new correlation. Geochemical data indicate subalkaline source magma of volcanic ashes with potassium dominating over sodium.

  6. Geochemistry and correlation of volcanic ash beds from the Rootsiküla Stage (Wenlock–Ludlow) in the eastern Baltic

    OpenAIRE

    Tarmo Kiipli; Rein Einasto; Toivo Kallaste; Viiu Nestor; Helle Perens; Sven Siir

    2011-01-01

    Nine altered volcanic ash samples from the shoal and lagoonal sediments of the Rootsiküla Stage (Wenlock–Ludlow boundary interval, Estonia) were analysed, compared and correlated with five samples of deep sea environments from Latvia. Volcanic ash correlations indicate that the Wenlock–Ludlow boundary correlates with the boundary of the Viita and Kuusnõmme beds, i.e., it is significantly lower than proposed earlier. The distribution of chitinozoans supports this new correlation. Geochemical d...

  7. Reliability of construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One can also speak of reliability with respect to materials. While for reliability of components the MTBF (mean time between failures) is regarded as the main criterium, this is replaced with regard to materials by possible failure mechanisms like physical/chemical reaction mechanisms, disturbances of physical or chemical equilibrium, or other interactions or changes of system. The main tasks of the reliability analysis of materials therefore is the prediction of the various failure reasons, the identification of interactions, and the development of nondestructive testing methods. (RW)

  8. Interactions between industrial organic pollutants and rhizosphere components and documentation of material streams in plant-based wastewater treatment plants - laboratory experiments; Wechselwirkungen industrieller organischer Schadstoffe mit Rhizosphaerenkomponenten und Bilanzierung von Stoffstroemen in Pflanzenklaeranlagen - Laborversuche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plugge, J.

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the suitability of plant/soil systems for cleaning organically polluted effluents and to assess the influence of plant growth and dissolved humic substances on processes leading to the elimination of organic pollutants. This involved an examination of sorption interactions between selected pollutants on the one hand and sand and root material on the other, use of vertically irrigated plant-bearing sand columns for simulating real plant-based wastewater treatment plants, assessment of the cleaning efficiency of these systems with respect to the employed model pollutants and determination of the contamination of the filter material and plants with pollutants. Radiotracer techniques were used to determine pollution paths of phenanthrene and its microbial degradation in the model system. [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde die Eignung von Pflanze/Boden-Systemen zur Reinigung carbochemisch belasteter Abwaesser untersucht und der Einfluss eines Pflanzenbewuchses sowie geloester Huminstoffe auf die Prozesse, die zur Entfernung organischer Schadstoffe fuehren, bewertet. Die Bearbeitung dieses Themas umfasste Untersuchungen zu Sorptionswechselwirkungen ausgewaehlter Schadstoffe mit Sand- und Wurzelmaterial, die Anwendung vertikal durchstroemter, bepflanzter Sandsaeulen zur Nachbildung realer Pflanzenklaeranlagen, die Erfassung der Reinigungseffizienz dieser Systeme fuer die Modellschadstoffe sowie die Bestimmung der Schadstoffkontamination des Filtermaterials und der Pflanzen. Unter Anwendung der Radiotracertechnik erfolgte darueber hinaus die Bestimmung der Schadstoffpfade von Phenanthren einschliesslich des mikrobiellen Abbaus im Modellsystem. (orig.)

  9. Wood–water interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the performance of wood for decades ahead is important when using the material for structural purposes. The performance is closely related to the hierarchical material structure of wood and the dependent interaction with water in the structure. Accurately predicting wood performance...... therefore requires an understanding of material structure from molecular to macroscopic level as well as of the impact of water molecules. The objective of this work is to investigate the performance of wood in terms of mechanical response of the material and effect of water. To understand the latter, one...... must first know in which parts of the wood structure, water is located. If parts of the water in wood are held in capillaries in the wood structure, these water molecules interact with the material differently than those held within wood cell walls. In this study, the occurrence of capillary water in...

  10. Fusion materials: insulators and plasma facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulating materials: surface damage: Oxide materials will be extensively used in ITER in heating and current drive, and diagnostic systems where they will play important roles as electrical insulators, and RF and optical transmission components. These materials will be subjected to neutron and gamma radiation, and additionally to bombardment by low energy ions and neutral particles of energies between eV and keV as a consequence of neutron reactions and related sputtering at vacuum surfaces, as well as ionization and acceleration of the residual gas due to local electric fields. To assess the damage, SiO2 (KS-4V), Al2O3, AlN, and BeO, the main candidate ceramic insulators for ITER were implanted (bombarded) with light ions, and KS-4V and sapphire were also irradiated with electrons. In-situ surface electrical conductivity measurements in high vacuum during implantation or irradiation were carried out. In addition, before and after implantation or irradiation, both optical absorption measurements and SEM X-ray analysis were performed. It was found that the origin of the surface electrical and related optical degradation is radiolytic, i.e. the damage is caused by the electronic excitation induced during material irradiation. Plasma Wall Interaction: In fusion devices, in the region next to high temperature plasma (typically ∼10 keV), material erodes from plasma-facing materials in one location and is transported to other, sometimes remote, locations throughout the device. The transported material may then be deposited on, or implanted into, other materials. If the plasma facing material in a device consists of more than a single element there is a high probability that the composition of the plasma-facing surfaces will evolve over time and may exhibit plasma interaction properties much different from the originally installed material. These plasma-created materials are so - called mixed materials. The creation of mixed-material surfaces will depend on many

  11. Sustainable materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwood, Julian M.

    2016-01-01

    Materials influence every aspect of the energy system; therefore, as well as developing new materials for energy generation, materials scientists should engage in public debate about the limitations of future innovations and the conservation of existing materials.

  12. Plasma-wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers the 43 slides presented in the framework of the week long lecture 'hot plasmas 2004' and dedicated to plasma-wall interaction in a tokamak. This document is divided into 4 parts: 1) thermal load on the wall, power extraction and particle recovery, 2) basic edge plasma physics, 3) processes that drive the plasma-solid interaction, and 4) material conditioning (surface treatment...) for ITER

  13. Commentary: The Materials Project: A materials genome approach to accelerating materials innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anubhav; Ong, Shyue Ping; Hautier, Geoffroy; Chen, Wei; Richards, William Davidson; Dacek, Stephen; Cholia, Shreyas; Gunter, Dan; Skinner, David; Ceder, Gerbrand; Persson, Kristin A.

    2013-07-01

    Accelerating the discovery of advanced materials is essential for human welfare and sustainable, clean energy. In this paper, we introduce the Materials Project (www.materialsproject.org), a core program of the Materials Genome Initiative that uses high-throughput computing to uncover the properties of all known inorganic materials. This open dataset can be accessed through multiple channels for both interactive exploration and data mining. The Materials Project also seeks to create open-source platforms for developing robust, sophisticated materials analyses. Future efforts will enable users to perform ``rapid-prototyping'' of new materials in silico, and provide researchers with new avenues for cost-effective, data-driven materials design.

  14. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  15. Production of 62Zn radioactive nuclear beam and on-line PAC investigation of quadrupole interaction in nano-magnetic material Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL), dedicated to on-line perturbed angular correlation (PAC) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), has been constructed at CIAE based on the HI-13 tandem accelerator, and a 30 keV radioactive beam of 62Zn with intensity of 2 ×107/s produced by it. Using the 62Zn radioactive beam the investigation of the nano-crystalline soft magnetic Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 materials has been fulfiled for the first time by the on-line time differential PAC technique. Two quadrupole interaction frequencies ω01 ( = 440 Mrad/s) and ω02 ( = 90 Mrad/s) were gained, indicating there are two implantation sites of 62Zn. The frequency ω02 shows a fluctuation of the crystal lattice constants and proves the characteristic distribution model of nano-crystalline grain boundary. The frequency ω01 demonstrates that the implanted 62Zn occupies the site of the ordered grain core. The fractions of ω01 and ω02 are f01 = 38 % and f02 = 62 %, respectively.

  16. Laser-surface interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the interaction of laser radiation with various surfaces at variable parameters of radiation. As a basic principle of classification we chose the energetic or intensity level of interaction of laser radiation with the surfaces. These two characteristics of laser radiation are the most important parameters defining entire spectrum of the processes occurring on the surfaces during interaction with electromagnetic waves. This is a first book containing a whole spectrum of the laser-surface interactions distinguished by the ranges of used laser intensity. It combines the surface response starting from extremely weak laser intensities (~1 W cm-2) up to the relativistic intensities (~1020 W cm-2 and higher). The book provides the basic information about lasers and acquaints the reader with both common applications of laser-surface interactions (laser-related printers, scanners, barcode readers, discs, material processing, military, holography, medicine, etc) and unusual uses of the processes on t...

  17. Modeling multiphase materials processes

    CERN Document Server

    Iguchi, Manabu

    2010-01-01

    ""Modeling Multiphase Materials Processes: Gas-Liquid Systems"" describes the methodology and application of physical and mathematical modeling to multi-phase flow phenomena in materials processing. The book focuses on systems involving gas-liquid interaction, the most prevalent in current metallurgical processes. The performance characteristics of these processes are largely dependent on transport phenomena. This volume covers the inherent characteristics that complicate the modeling of transport phenomena in such systems, including complex multiphase structure, intense turbulence, opacity of

  18. Understanding Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    Almost everything people have ever done has involved materials. Historical evidence indicates that "engineered materials" have been available and utilized for the benefit of humankind since the Neolithic period, beginning about 10,000 BC. Some of these materials have been in existence for thousands of years. At first, materials consisted of wood,…

  19. Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop new methods of vibrational damping in polymeric composite materials along with expanding the knowledge of currently used vibrational damping methods. A new barrier layer technique that dramatically increased damping in viscoelastic damping materials that interacted with the composite resin was created. A method for testing the shear strength of damping materials cocured in composites was developed. Directional damping materials, where the loss facto...

  20. Biogenic Impact on Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Ina; Askew, Peter; Gorbushina, Anna; Grinda, Manfred; Hertel, Horst; Krumbein, Wolfgang; Müller, Rolf-Joachim; Pantke, Michael; Plarre, Rüdiger (Rudy); Schmitt, Guenter; Schwibbert, Karin

    Materials as constituents of products or components of technical systems rarely exist in isolation and many must cope with exposure in the natural world. This chapter describes methods that simulate how a material is influenced through contact with living systems such as microorganisms and arthropods. Both unwanted and desirable interactions are considered. This biogenic impact on materials is intimately associated with the environment to which the material is exposed (Materials-Environment Interaction, Chap. 15). Factors such as moisture, temperature and availability of food sources all have a significant influence on biological systems. Corrosion (Chap. 12) and wear (Chap. 13) can also be induced or enhanced in the presence of microorganisms. Section 14.1 introduces the categories between desired (biodegradation) and undesired (biodeterioration) biological effects on materials. It also introduces the role of biocides for the protection of materials. Section 14.2 describes the testing of wood as a building material especially against microorganisms and insects. Section 14.3 characterizes the test methodologies for two other groups of organic materials, namely polymers (Sect. 14.3.1) and paper and textiles (Sect. 14.3.2). Section 14.4 deals with the susceptibility of inorganic materials such as metals (Sect. 14.4.1), concrete (Sect. 14.4.2) and ceramics (Sect. 14.4.3) to biogenic impact. Section 14.5 treats the testing methodology concerned with the performance of coatings and coating materials. In many of these tests specific strains of organisms are employed. It is vital that these strains retain their ability to utilize/attack the substrate from which they were isolated, even when kept for many years in the laboratory. Section 14.6 therefore considers the importance of maintaining robust and representative test organisms that are as capable of utilizing a substrate as their counterparts in nature such that realistic predictions of performance can be made.

  1. Materials for Fusion Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2013), s. 197-212. ISSN 1210-2709. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology/25./. Praha, 18.06.2012-21.06.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1872; GA MŠk 7G10072 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : nuclear fusion * materials * plasma facing components * plasma-material interaction * functionally graded materials Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://ctn.cvut.cz/ap/download.php?id=797

  2. Spacecraft Environmental Interactions Technology, 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    State of the art of environment interactions dealing with low-Earth-orbit plasmas; high-voltage systems; spacecraft charging; materials effects; and direction of future programs are contained in over 50 papers.

  3. Improvement of turbine materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials for turbine blades and rotors are discussed with a view to the following subjects: Long period creep behaviour, gas/metal reactions, fatigue behaviour in long-term and creep strength testing, fracture mechanics testing, creep/fatigue interactions, development of a turbine blade of TZM, jointing of TZM, decontamination. (orig./IHOE)

  4. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi; Min, Chulhong; Cheok, Adrian; Waern, Annika; Walz, Steffen

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...... space for human-computer interaction. However, research on embarrassment in HCI has remained scattered and unsystematic so far. This workshop therefore convenes researchers and practitioners to assemble and advance the current state of research on embarrassing interactions....

  5. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  6. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  7. Functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a compilation of chapters written by active researchers and offer information and critical insights about semiconducting materials and devices, dielectric and ferroelectric materials, magnetic materials, composites and other functional materials. In the book, the functional materials are discussed from the mixed valences and stoichiometry points of view, to understand the structural evolution and transformation of different material systems - in particular, the role played by crystal structures in property control of functional materials using advanced characterization techniques. The book examines the properties, soft-chemistry preparations, electronic structures and crystal structures of transition and rare earth metals and their oxides. The book presents a strong argument that functional materials system is the future direction of the multidisciplinary research involving physics, chemistry, materials science and electrical engineering, with emphasis on device applications. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  8. Multiactivity in Social Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doing more than one thing at the same time – a phenomenon that is often called ‘multitasking’ – is characteristic to many situations in everyday and professional life. Although we all experience it, its real time features remain understudied. Multiactivity in Social Interaction: Beyond multitasking...... offers a fresh view to the phenomenon by presenting studies that explore how two or more activities can be related and made co-relevant as people interact with one another. The studies build on the basis that multiactivity is a social, verbal and embodied phenomenon. They investigate multiactivity by...... using video recordings of real-life interactions from a range of different contexts, such as medical settings, office workplaces and car driving. With the companion collection Interacting with Objects: Language, materiality, and social activity, the book advances understanding of the complex...

  9. The materiality of materials and artefacts used in science classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowie, Bronwen; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Moreland, Judy

    2015-01-01

    between materials as natural objects in this world and artefacts as manmade objects. We are aware that in a classroom material objects and artefacts shape, and are shaped by classroom practice through the way they selectively present scientific explanations. However, materials and artefacts have no...... as fossils, plant samples and artefacts like test tubes, worksheets and digital tools along with written inscriptions produced during interactions and that served as artefacts in subsequent interactions (Roehl, 2012). Data sources Data were generated via classroom observation using video, student...... but thought about means and ends of artefacts/ materials. They explored artefacts/materials and how they could be used and through this exemplified materiality in the objects. More deliberate and focused attention to what constitutes materiality can support collaboration and communication to support...

  10. Lasers in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Ossi, Paolo; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    This book covers various aspects of lasers in materials science, including a comprehensive overview on basic principles of laser-materials interactions and applications enabled by pulsed laser systems.  The material is organized in a coherent way, providing the reader with a harmonic architecture. While systematically covering the major current and emerging areas of lasers processing applications, the Volume provides examples of targeted modification of material properties achieved through careful control of the processing conditions and laser irradiation parameters. Special emphasis is placed on specific strategies aimed at nanoscale control of material structure and properties to match the stringent requirements of modern applications.  Laser fabrication of novel nanomaterials, which expands to the domains of photonics, photovoltaics, sensing, and biomedical applications, is also discussed in the Volume. This book assembles chapters based on lectures delivered at the Venice International School on Lasers...

  11. Surface Chemistry in Nanoscale Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex V. Hamza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although surfaces or, more precisely, the surface atomic and electronic structure, determine the way materials interact with their environment, the influence of surface chemistry on the bulk of the material is generally considered to be small. However, in the case of high surface area materials such as nanoporous solids, surface properties can start to dominate the overall material behavior. This allows one to create new materials with physical and chemical properties that are no longer determined by the bulk material, but by their nanoscale architectures. Here, we discuss several examples, ranging from nanoporous gold to surface engineered carbon aerogels that demonstrate the tuneability of nanoporous solids for sustainable energy applications.

  12. Thermoelectric materials: The anharmonicity blacksmith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heremans, Joseph P.

    2015-12-01

    Anharmonicity is a property of lattice vibrations governing how they interact and how well they conduct heat. Experiments on tin selenide, the most efficient thermoelectric material known, now provide a link between anharmonicity and electronic orbitals.

  13. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  14. Simple Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    a Danish and international public. The exhibition Simple Interactions. Sound Art from Japan presents works by 9 Japanese artists at the Museum of Contemporary Art Roskilde. The exhibition mixes installations, performances and documentations, all of which examine how simple interactions can create...

  15. Contrast Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adverse reaction, you should tell your doctor about: allergies to contrast materials, food, drugs, dyes, preservatives, or animals medications ... These include: previous adverse reactions to iodine-based contrast materials history of ... disease dehydration sickle cell anemia , polycythemia and ...

  16. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... practical examples of designing for bodily potential. This paper presents Kinesthetic Interaction as a unifying concept for describing the body in motion as a foundation for designing interactive systems. Based on the theoretical foundation for Kinesthetic Interaction, a conceptual framework is introduced...... to reveal bodily potential in relation to three design themes – kinesthetic development, kinesthetic means and kinesthetic disorder; and seven design parameters – engagement, sociality, movability, explicit motivation, implicit motivation, expressive meaning and kinesthetic empathy. The framework is...

  17. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin

    There is a growing interest in considering aesthetic aspects in the design of interactive systems. A set of approaches are emerging each representing different applications of the terminology as well as different inherent assumptions on the role of the user, designer and interaction ideals. In this...... paper, we use the concept of Pragmatist Aesthetics to provide a framework for distinguishing between different approaches to aesthetics. Moreover, we use our own design cases to illustrate how pragmatist aesthetics is a promising path to follow in the context of designing interactive systems, as it...... promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  18. Flourinated material

    OpenAIRE

    Bozukova, Dimitriya; Jérôme, Christine; Pagnoulle, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for modifying the surface of a material for use with a biological sample or tissue comprising the steps of providing a material having a surface which comprises reactive-functional groups; providing fluorinated molecules having reactive-functional groups complimentary to those on the material surface; using wet chemistry to attach the fluorinated molecules to the surface of the material by reacting the reactive-functional groups of the implant with the compl...

  19. Materials Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Fidancevska, Emilija; Srebrenkoska, Vineta

    2013-01-01

    The material presented in this book is the last part from the five books series which are resulte of the aforementioned project. Sustainable development, pariculary for industry was the base for developing of these educative materials. Part of the contents presented in the previous books covered the temas which generally are connected with sustainable development, but this book coveres the types of materials in general and the management of the waste materials. The nowdays f...

  20. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry....... The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro...

  1. Effects of Corroded and Non-Corroded Biodegradable Mg and Mg Alloys on Viability, Morphology and Differentiation of MC3T3-E1 Cells Elicited by Direct Cell/Material Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofi, Sepideh; Bonyadi Rad, Ehsan; Wiltsche, Helmar; Fasching, Ulrike; Szakacs, Gabor; Ramskogler, Claudia; Srinivasaiah, Sriveena; Ueçal, Muammer; Willumeit, Regine; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina; Schaefer, Ute

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of biodegradable Mg and Mg alloys on selected properties of MC3T3-E1 cells elicited by direct cell/material interaction. The chemical composition and morphology of the surface of Mg and Mg based alloys (Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd) were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX, following corrosion in cell culture medium for 1, 2, 3 and 8 days. The most pronounced difference in surface morphology, namely crystal formation, was observed when Pure Mg and Mg2Ag were immersed in cell medium for 8 days, and was associated with an increase in atomic % of oxygen and a decrease of surface calcium and phosphorous. Crystal formation on the surface of Mg10Gd was, in contrast, negligible at all time points. Time-dependent changes in oxygen, calcium and phosphorous surface content were furthermore not observed for Mg10Gd. MC3T3-E1 cell viability was reduced by culture on the surfaces of corroded Mg, Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd in a corrosion time-independent manner. Cells did not survive when cultured on 3 day pre-corroded Pure Mg and Mg2Ag, indicating crystal formation to be particular detrimental in this regard. Cell viability was not affected when cells were cultured on non-corroded Mg and Mg alloys for up to 12 days. These results suggest that corrosion associated changes in surface morphology and chemical composition significantly hamper cell viability and, thus, that non-corroded surfaces are more conducive to cell survival. An analysis of the differentiation potential of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on non-corroded samples based on measurement of Collagen I and Runx2 expression, revealed a down-regulation of these markers within the first 6 days following cell seeding on all samples, despite persistent survival and proliferation. Cells cultured on Mg10Gd, however, exhibited a pronounced upregulation of collagen I and Runx2 between days 8 and 12, indicating an enhancement of osteointegration by this alloy that could be valuable for in vivo orthopedic

  2. Interacting parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Parasitism is the most popular life-style on Earth, and many vertebrates host more than one kind of parasite at a time. A common assumption is that parasite species rarely interact, because they often exploit different tissues in a host, and this use of discrete resources limits competition (1). On page 243 of this issue, however, Telfer et al. (2) provide a convincing case of a highly interactive parasite community in voles, and show how infection with one parasite can affect susceptibility to others. If some human parasites are equally interactive, our current, disease-by-disease approach to modeling and treating infectious diseases is inadequate (3).

  3. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  4. MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. BISHOP

    2000-09-01

    This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

  5. Interaction Widget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Mads

    2003-01-01

    This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced in the...... pattern. The intended audience of the pattern is developers and researchers within the field of human computer interaction....

  6. Mechanics of moving materials

    CERN Document Server

    Banichuk, Nikolay; Neittaanmäki, Pekka; Saksa, Tytti; Tuovinen, Tero

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with theoretical aspects of modelling the mechanical behaviour of manufacturing, processing, transportation or other systems in which the processed or supporting material is travelling through the system. Examples of such applications include paper making, transmission cables, band saws, printing presses, manufacturing of plastic films and sheets, and extrusion of aluminium foil, textiles and other materials.   The work focuses on out-of-plane dynamics and stability analysis for isotropic and orthotropic travelling elastic and viscoelastic materials, with and without fluid-structure interaction, using analytical and semi-analytical approaches.  Also topics such as fracturing and fatigue are discussed in the context of moving materials. The last part of the book deals with optimization problems involving physical constraints arising from the stability and fatigue analyses, including uncertainties in the parameters.   The book is intended for researchers and specialists in the field, providin...

  7. Materials Characterization Center program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) has been established at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Materials Characterization Organization for providing an authoritative, referenceable basis for establishing nuclear waste material properties and test methods. The MCC will provide a data base that will include information on the components of the waste emplacement package - the spent fuel or processed waste form and the engineered barriers - and their interaction with each other and as affected by the environment. The MCC will plan materials testing, develop and document procedures, collect and analyze existing materials data, and conduct tests as necessary

  8. Engineering materials

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaraswamy, Mohan

    2002-01-01

    One element of the CIVCAL project Web-based resources containing images, tables, texts and associated data of the Engineering Materials such as concrete, metals and wood. Portland Cement Concrete is a particulate composite consisting of a continuous binder phase, the cementitious matrix and a dispersed particulate phase, the aggregates. Metals as construction material are an important construction material. They possess characteristics such as strength, stiffness, toughness and ductili...

  9. Material Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Brath; Mortensen, Henrik Rubæk; Mullins, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes and reflects upon the results of an investigative project which explores the setting up of a material system - a parametric and generative assembly consisting of and taking into consideration material properties, manufacturing constraints and geometric behavior. The project...... approaches the subject through the construction of a logic-driven system aiming to explore the possibilities of a material system that fulfills spatial, structural and performative requirements concurrently and how these are negotiated in situations where they might be conflicting....

  10. Materializing Ethnography

    OpenAIRE

    Geismar, H.; Horst, H. A.

    2004-01-01

    The articles in this volume were originally presented in a panel entitled ‘Material Methodologies’ at the American Anthropological Association meeting in New Orleans (November 2002). The panel was devised to tie together theoretical advances in the study of the material with the creative possibilities of fieldwork practices. Through detailed ethnographic discussion, we highlighted the ways in which a focus on a specifically material world enabled us to discover new perspecti...

  11. Orbital interactions in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, Thomas A; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Explains the underlying structure that unites all disciplines in chemistry Now in its second edition, this book explores organic, organometallic, inorganic, solid state, and materials chemistry, demonstrating how common molecular orbital situations arise throughout the whole chemical spectrum. The authors explore the relationships that enable readers to grasp the theory that underlies and connects traditional fields of study within chemistry, thereby providing a conceptual framework with which to think about chemical structure and reactivity problems. Orbital Interactions

  12. Electrocatalyst-support interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, K.

    1978-01-01

    The maximum utilization of noble metals as heterogeneous catalysts is achieved by dispersing the noble metals as small particles supported on a porous, high surface area powder. In some studies with supported noble metal catalysts, it has been reported that the metal particle interacts with the support material and that the interaction affects the catalytic properties of the metal. Experimental studies on metal-support interactions that are pertinent to electrocatalysis will be discussed. Platinum supported on carbon black is one of the most active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in phosphoric acid fuel cells. In the acid environment at 100 to 200/sup 0/C, the Pt surface area decreases with time due to the growth of the supported Pt particles. The effects of a liquid-phase environment on the particle growth mechanism of supported Pt catalysts is discussed. 60 references.

  13. Interactive Karyotyping Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kotwaliwale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the wide use of newer techniques in genetic diagnostics, there remains a need for technologists to learn human chromosome morphology, identify abnormal metaphases and report clinical abnormalities. Global short age of cytogenetic trainers and a time consuming training process makes Karyotyping training difficult. We have developed a web based interactive Karyotyping training tool, KaryoTutor©, that allows technologists to learn karyotyping in an interactive environment and aids the trainer in the training process. KaryoTutor©provides visual clues for identifying abnormal chromosomes, provides instant test scores and includes a reference library of ideograms,sample chromosome images and reference materials. Trainees are able to recursively work on a case till a satisfactory result is achieved,with KaryoTutor providing interactive inputs.Additionally, trainers can assign cases and monitor trainee progress using audit trail management and other administrative features.

  14. Handbook of luminescent semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is an important approach for examining the optical interactions in semiconductors and optical devices with the goal of gaining insight into material properties. With contributions from researchers at the forefront of this field, Handbook of Luminescent Semiconductor Materials explores the use of this technique to study semiconductor materials in a variety of applications, including solid-state lighting, solar energy conversion, optical devices, and biological imaging. After introducing basic semiconductor theory and photoluminescence principles, the book focuses

  15. Nuclear technology and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current and expected problems in the materials of nuclear technology are reviewed. In the fuel elements of LWRs, cladding waterside corrosion, secondary hydriding and pellet-cladding interaction may be significant impediments to extended burnup. In the fuel, fission gas release remains a key issue. Materials issues in the structural alloys of the primary system include stress-corrosion cracking of steel, corrosion of steam generator tubing and pressurized thermal shock of the reactor vessel. Prediction of core behavior in severe accidents requires basic data and models for fuel liquefaction, aerosol formation, fission product transport and core-concrete interaction. Materials questions in nuclear waste management and fusion technology are briefly reviewed. (author)

  16. Materials for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Züttel

    2003-09-01

    The goal is to pack hydrogen as close as possible, i.e. to reach the highest volumetric density by using as little additional material as possible. Hydrogen storage implies the reduction of an enormous volume of hydrogen gas. At ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure, 1 kg of the gas has a volume of 11 m3. To increase hydrogen density, work must either be applied to compress the gas, the temperature decreased below the critical temperature, or the repulsion reduced by the interaction of hydrogen with another material.

  17. Adhesive dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two main classes of material are involved, the glass-ionomer cements and the composite resins. This investigation describes the way they are bonded to the tooth and highlights their differences. Glass ionomers develop a zone of interaction with the tooth as they age which ultimately gives an extremely strong bond, and results in excellent retention rates. By contrast, bonding of composite resins is more complicated and possibly less effective, though these materials have better wear resistance and better aesthetics than glass ionomers. Assessment of bond durability is difficult. This is because a dental restorative can fail by a number of mechanisms apart from de bonding: for example, through wear or fracture

  18. Materiality, Practice and Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Stine Liv; Skovbjerg-Karoff, Helle

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand the interaction between human and technology, the relationship must be emphasized as a triangulation between materiality, body and practice. By introducing play situations from a just finished empirical study in three bigger cities in Denmark, this paper will address the...... interplay from the human‟s point of view, as a body doing a certain practice, which is constantly produced by taking approaches which comes from phenomenology and practice theory. We introduce aspects of play understood as a dynamic between materiality, body and practice with the goal of inspiring not only...

  19. Tritium-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report deals broadly with tritium-surface interactions as they relate to a fusion power reactor enterprise, viz., the vacuum chamber, first wall, peripherals, pumping, fuel recycling, isotope separation, repair and maintenance, decontamination and safety. The main emphasis is on plasma-surface interactions and the selection of materials for fusion chamber duty. A comprehensive review of the international (particularly U.S.) research and development is presented based upon a literature review (about 1 000 reports and papers) and upon visits to key laboratories, Sandia, Albuquerque, Sandia, Livermore and EGβG Idaho. An inventory of Canadian expertise and facilities for RβD on tritium-surface interactions is also presented. A number of proposals are made for the direction of an optimal Canadian RβD program, emphasizing the importance of building on strength in both the technological and fundamental areas. A compendium of specific projects and project areas is presented dealing primarily with plasma-wall interactions and permeation, anti-permeation materials and surfaces and health, safety and environmental considerations. Potential areas of industrial spinoff are identified

  20. Étude des interactions mécaniques et physico-chimiques entre les argiles et les fluides de forage. Application à l'argile de Boom (Belgique A Study O the Mechanical and Physicochemical Interactions Between the Clay Materials and the Drilling Fluids. Application to the Boom Clay (Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshibangu J. P.

    2006-11-01

    pour sa disponibilité et, d'autre part, pour la grande quantité d'informations disponibles sur ce matériau. General ConsiderationsThis work deals with problems encountered regarding the stability of wells drilled in the clay material formations with water based muds. In fact, clays or shales have a property of taking water, thus causing the instability of wells either because of the swelling of some mineral species, or because the supporting pressure is suppressed by modification of the pore pressure. The aim here is to experimentally emphasize the principal mechanisms driving the phenomenon of instability, and to try to quantify the importance of these mechanisms in order to include them in calculation models. The behaviour of a shale put in contact of a water based fluid depends on its initial water activity and on the composition of the fluid. According to the situation, the shale will take or expel water, with a consequence of swelling or shrinkage. Three factors play an important role in the water activity of shales :- The electrostatic interaction which is related to the cation exchange. This mechanism consists in a cation passing from the solution to the surface of a layer and an interlayer cation of the clay doing the opposite path. Clay materials are characterized by the Cation Exchange Capacity or CEC;- The salt concentration which is related to the osmotic phenomenon. If a shale, and especially a montmorillonite, is put in contact with a pure solvent, in addition of the ion hydration, the solvent will be taken by the shale in order to dilute the high ionic concentration of that shale. This last mechanism is macroscopically expressed by a difference of osmotic pressure between the external solvent and the pore fluid of the shale. If we consider the case in which the solvent is pure water the osmotic pressure is expressed by equation (2 in which awi is the water activity of the shale and vw the partial molar volume of water (we suppose here that this vw has