WorldWideScience

Sample records for ash-bed material interactions

  1. Biomass ash - bed material interactions leading to agglomeration in fluidised bed combustion and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, H.J.M.; Hofmans, H.; Huijnen, R.; Kastelein, R.; Kiel, J.H.A. [ECN Biomass, Petten (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    The present study has been aimed at improving the fundamental understanding of mechanisms underlying agglomeration and defluidisation in fluidised bed combustion and gasification of biomass and waste. To this purpose dedicated lab-scale static heating and fluidisation experiments have been conducted with carefully selected and prepared ashes and bed materials, viz. straw ash/sand and willow ash/sand mixtures, mullite subjected to straw gasification and artificially coated mullite. The main conclusion is that ash/bed material interaction processes are very important and often determine the bed agglomeration and defluidisation tendency. In the static heating experiments with both ash/sand mixtures, partial melting-segregation of ash components and dissolution/reaction with the bed material are processes that determine the melt composition. This melt composition and behaviour can deviate considerably form expectations based on ash-only data. Artificially coated bed materials prove to be very useful for systematic studies on the influence of coating composition and thickness on agglomeration tendency. For the coated mullite samples, different stages in the defluidisation process are identified and the influence of coating properties (thickness, composition, morphology) and operating parameters is elucidated. The behaviour of the mullite appears to be dominated by a remnant glass phase. On the one hand, this glass phase accounts for an alkali-getter capability, while on the other hand it is mainly responsible for agglomeration at temperatures {>=} 800C. 3 refs.

  2. Biomass ash-bed material interactions leading to agglomeration in FBC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, H.J.M.; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Kiel, J.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    In (bubbling) fluidized-bed combustion and gasification of biomass, several potential problems are associated with the inorganic components of the fuel. A major problem area is defluidization due to bed agglomeration. The most common found process leading to defluidization in commercial-scale ins......In (bubbling) fluidized-bed combustion and gasification of biomass, several potential problems are associated with the inorganic components of the fuel. A major problem area is defluidization due to bed agglomeration. The most common found process leading to defluidization in commercial...... describes a fundamental study on the mechanisms of defluidization. For the studied process of bed defluidization due to sintering of grain-coating layers, it was found that the onset of the process depends on (a) a critical coating thickness, (b) on the fluidization velocity when it is below approximately...... four times the minimum fluidization velocity, and (c) on the viscosity (stickiness) of the outside of the grains (coating)....

  3. Stratigraphic implications of Sinian-Early Cambrian volcanic ash beds on the Yangtze Platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Junming; ZHU Maoyan; YANG Aihua; LI Guoxiang; YANG Jinghong; Christoph HEUBECK

    2004-01-01

    Volcanic ash beds from shallow- to deep-water facies strata of the Sinian-Early Cambrian (Meishucunian) on the Yangtze Platform consist of bentonites and tuffites which are readily recognized in the field by their physical features and confirmed by geochemical analyses.Geochemistry suggests that the volcanic ash beds in Meishucunian time are rhyolite and rhyodacite while those in the Qiongzhusian and Sinian are andesite and trachyandesite.The ash beds in the time-equivalent strata, even in different areas display rather similar geochemical features, whereas the ash beds in different strata even in the same areas show large chemical difference.The results suggest that these ash beds can be used for intra- and extra-basinal correlations of the Sinian-Early Cambrian interval on the Yangtze Platform.Additionally, these ash beds suggest high potentials for further U-Pb dating strategies.

  4. A convergent continent marginal volcanism source of ash beds near the Permian-Triassic boundary, South China: Constraints from trace elements and Hf-isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Zhao, L.; Chen, Z. Q.; Ma, D.; Yan, P.; Guo, F.; Wang, F.; Wan, Q.; Han, X.

    2015-12-01

    Growing evidence shows that volcanism near the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) may have been crucial in triggering the PTB biocrisis. However, whether this trigger is the Siberian traps or arc island volcanisms has long been debating. Meanwhile, multiple claystone beds are prominent near the PTB, South China. The nature and origin of the volcanic ashes therefore provide clue to find out the trigger of the PTB mass extinction. Following previous studies (Gao et al., 2013), 21 PTB ash beds from three additional PTB sections, namely the Shangsi, Jianshi and Meishan, all from South China have been systematically sampled. The U-Pb ages, trace elements, and Hf-isotope compositions of zircon grains from these ash beds were analyzed using LA-ICPMS and LA-MC-ICPMS. Volcanic ash geochemistry shows presence of Rhyolite or Dacite and reveal a collision-tectonic setting. Zircons from these ash layers yield comparatively low Nb/Hf and high Th/Nb ratios, dropping into the range of arc/orogenic-related settings. Zircon Hf-isotope compositions show that ɛHf(t) values vary from -11.7 to 1.8, indicating that at least two kinds of crustal component have been involved: juvenile lower crust and ancient middle-upper crust. The ash beds (Ss27a, Js129, Js130, Ms25, Ms26) near biotic extinction horizon have significant larger variation range of ɛHf(t) and relatively positive averages, implying that more juvenile lower crustal material had contributed to the volcanisms. This means that these volcanisms may have originated deeper depth or the volcanisms erupted so rapidly that there was no enough time for the mixing of different components. The volcanisms associated with biotic extinction should be the most intense and have greatest heat put. Spatial and temporal distributions of ash beds from thirty PTB sections worldwide reveal that the PTB volcanic ashes occurred only in the Paleo-Tethys region, suggesting that the volcanisms may be likely limited to the Paleo-Tethys continental

  5. Beam-Material Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Cerutti, F. [CERN

    2016-01-01

    Th is paper is motivated by the growing importance of better understanding of the phenomena and consequences of high-intensity energetic particle beam interactions with accelerator, generic target, and detector components. It reviews the principal physical processes of fast-particle interactions with matter, effects in materials under irradiation, materials response, related to component lifetime and performance, simulation techniques, and methods of mitigating the impact of radiation on the components and environment in challenging current and future applications.

  6. Beam-Material Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N.V.

    2016-01-01

    Th is paper is motivated by the growing importance of better understanding of the phenomena and consequences of high- intensity energetic particle beam interactions with accelerator, generic target , and detector components. It reviews the principal physical processes of fast-particle interactions with matter, effects in materials under irradiation, materials response, related to component lifetime and performance, simulation techniques, and methods of mitigating the impact of radiation on the components and envir onment in challenging current and future application

  7. Sedimentary cycles and volcanic ash beds in the Lower Pliocene lacustrine succession of Ptolemais (NW Greece): discrepancy between 40 Ar/39 Ar and astronomical ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, J.; Vugt, N. van; Hilgen, F.J.; Wijbrans, J.R.; Meulenkamp, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    A high-resolution cyclostratigraphy for the rhythmically bedded lignite-marl sequences of the Lower Pliocene Ptole-mais Formation is combined with 40 Ar= 39 Ar dating results of intercalated volcanic ash beds. Detailed field reconnaissance in three open-pit lignite mines reveals three end-member sed

  8. Semiconductor packaging materials interaction and reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    In semiconductor manufacturing, understanding how various materials behave and interact is critical to making a reliable and robust semiconductor package. Semiconductor Packaging: Materials Interaction and Reliability provides a fundamental understanding of the underlying physical properties of the materials used in a semiconductor package. The book focuses on an important step in semiconductor manufacturing--package assembly and testing. It covers the basics of material properties and explains how to determine which behaviors are important to package performance. The authors also discuss how

  9. Phase transformations, stability, and materials interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Brewer, L.; Cost, J.R.; Shewmon, P.

    1977-07-01

    The proceedings of the Materials Sciences Workshop on Phase Transformations, Stability, and Materials Interactions are divided into sections according to the following topics: (I) workshop scope and priorities; (II) study group reports--ERDA mission needs; (III) study group reports--technical area research priorities. (SDF)

  10. Interaction, Change, and Wholeness of Material Things

    CERN Document Server

    Semyonov, Oleg G

    2007-01-01

    Interaction is the mode of being of material things amid other material things an the driving force of change and wholeness. Through mutual influence, changes of interacting things become interdependent and their properties interrelated, which leads to formation of ensembles - material wholes of correlated things, where the mode of being of a particular component depends on the modes of being of all other components and vice versa. Every ensemble attains its wholeness and becomes a physical body through togetherness of interrelated components coexisting as a collective being with mutually restrained internal motion. Properties of ensembles on all structural levels of matter composition emerge through the collective being of components.

  11. Femtosecond Laser Interaction with Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E; Benterou, J; Lee, R; Roeske, F; Stuart, B

    2002-03-25

    Femtosecond laser ablation shows promise in machining energetic materials into desired shapes with minimal thermal and mechanical effects to the remaining material. We will discuss the physical effects associated with machining energetic materials and assemblies containing energetic materials, based on experimental results. Interaction of ultra-short laser pulses with matter will produce high temperature plasma at high-pressure which results in the ablation of material. In the case of energetic material, which includes high explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics, this ablation process must be accomplished without coupling energy into the energetic material. Experiments were conducted in order to characterize and better understand the phenomena of femtosecond laser pulse ablation on a variety of explosives and propellants. Experimental data will be presented for laser fluence thresholds, machining rates, cutting depths and surface quality of the cuts.

  12. The astronomy education through interactive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo, Josué Antunes; Voelzke, Marcos Rincon

    2014-11-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Sciences, using three pedagogical moments. Among other aspects, the viability of the use of resources was noticed, involving digital technologies and interactive materials on teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options for future teachers and meet their training needs

  13. Interactively human: Sharing time, constructing materiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepstorff, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Predictive processing models of cognition are promising an elegant way to unite action, perception, and learning. However, in the current formulations, they are species-unspecific and have very little particularly human about them. I propose to examine how, in this framework, humans can be able to massively interact and to build shared worlds that are both material and symbolic.

  14. Exotic Material as Interactions Between Scalar Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson G. A.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Many theoretical papers refer to the need to create exotic materials with average negative energies for the formation of space propulsion anomalies such as "wormholes" and "warp drives". However, little hope is given for the existence of such material to resolve its creation for such use. From the standpoint that non-minimally coupled scalar fields to gravity appear to be the current direction mathematically. It is proposed that exotic material is really scalar field interactions. Within this paper the Ginzburg-Landau (GL scalar fields associated with superconductor junctions isinvestigated as a source for negative vacuum energy fluctuations, which could be used to study the interactions among energyfluctuations, cosmological scalar (i.e., Higgs fields, and gravity.

  15. Granular materials interacting with thin flexible rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Alfredo Gay; Campello, Eduardo M. B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we develop a computational model for the simulation of problems wherein granular materials interact with thin flexible rods. We treat granular materials as a collection of spherical particles following a discrete element method (DEM) approach, while flexible rods are described by a large deformation finite element (FEM) rod formulation. Grain-to-grain, grain-to-rod, and rod-to-rod contacts are fully permitted and resolved. A simple and efficient strategy is proposed for coupling the motion of the two types (discrete and continuum) of materials within an iterative time-stepping solution scheme. Implementation details are shown and discussed. Validity and applicability of the model are assessed by means of a few numerical examples. We believe that robust, efficiently coupled DEM-FEM schemes can be a useful tool to the simulation of problems wherein granular materials interact with thin flexible rods, such as (but not limited to) bombardment of grains on beam structures, flow of granular materials over surfaces covered by threads of hair in many biological processes, flow of grains through filters and strainers in various industrial segregation processes, and many others.

  16. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-09-08

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth’s surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth’s surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  17. Nonlinear Electromagnetic Interactions in Energetic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, M A; Moore, D S

    2016-01-01

    We study the scattering of electromagnetic waves in anisotropic energetic materials. Nonlinear light-matter interactions in molecular crystals result in frequency-conversion and polarization changes. Applied electromagnetic fields of moderate intensity can induce these nonlinear effects without triggering chemical decomposition, offering a mechanism for non-ionizing identification of explosives. We use molecular dynamics simulations to compute such two-dimensional Raman spectra in the terahertz range for planar slabs made of PETN and ammonium nitrate. We discuss third-harmonic generation and polarization-conversion processes in such materials. These observed far-field spectral features of the reflected or transmitted light may serve as an alternative tool for stand-off explosive detection.

  18. Evaluating the provenance of Permian-Triassic and Palaeocene-Eocene ash beds by high precision U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic analyses of zircons: linking local sedimentary records to global events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eivind Augland, Lars; Jones, Morgan; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik; Tegner, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a powerful tool in geochronology and isotope geochemistry, as their affinity for U and Hf in the crystal structure and the low initial Pb and Lu allow for precise and accurate dating by U-Pb ID-TIMS and precise and accurate determination of initial Hf isotopic composition by solution MC-ICP-MS analysis. The U-Pb analyses provide accurate chronostratigraphic controls on the sedimentary successions and absolute age frames for the biotic evolution across geological boundaries. Moreover, the analyses of Lu-Hf by solution MC-ICP-MS after Hf-purification column chemistry provide a powerful and robust fingerprinting tool to test the provenance of individual ash beds. Here we focus on ash beds from Permian-Triassic and Palaeocene successions in Svalbard and from the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in Fur, Denmark. Used in combination with whole rock geochemistry from the ash layers and the available geochemical and isotopic data from potential source volcanoes, these data are used to evaluate the provenance of the Permian-Triassic and Palaeocene ashes preserved in Svalbard and PETM ashes in Denmark. If explosive eruptions from volcanic centres such as the Siberian Traps and the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) can be traced to distal basins as ash layers, they provide robust tests of hypotheses of global synchronicity of environmental changes and biotic crises. In addition, the potential correlation of ash layers with source volcanoes will aid in constraining the extent of explosive volcanism in the respective volcanic centres. The new integrated data sets will also contribute to establish new reference sections for the study of these boundary events when combined with stable isotope data and biostratigraphy.

  19. Assembly of Colloidal Materials Using Bioadhesive Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel A.; Hiddessen, Amy L.; Tohver, Valeria; Crocker, John C.; Weitz, David A.

    2002-01-01

    We have pursued the use of biological crosslinking molecules of several types to make colloidal materials at relatively low volume fraction of colloidal particles. The objective is to make binary alloys of colloidal particles, made of two different colloidal particles coated with complementary biological lock-and-key binding molecules, which assemble due to the biological specificity. The long-term goal is to use low affinity lock-and-key biological interactions, so that the can anneal to form crystalline states. We have used a variety of different surface chemistries in order to make colloidal materials. Our first system involved using selectin-carbohydrate (sialyl-Lewis) interactions; this chemistry is derived from immune system. This chemical interaction is of relatively low affinity, with timescales for dissociation of several seconds. Furthermore, the adhesion mediated by these molecules can be reversed by the chelation of calcium atoms; thus assembled structures can be disassembled reversibly. Our second system employed avidin-biotin chemistry. This well-studied system is of high affinity, and is generally irreversible on a laboratory time-scale. Thus, we would expect selectin-carbohydrate interactions at high molecular density and avidin-biotin interactions to give kinetically-trapped structures; however, at low densities, we would expect significant differences in the structure and dynamics of the two materials, owing to their very different release rates. We have also begun to use a third chemistry - DNA hybridization. By attaching single stranded DNA oligonucleotide chains to beads, we can drive the assembly of colloidal materials by hybridization of complementary DNA chains. It is well known that DNA adenosine-thymine (A-T) and guanine-cytosine (G-C) bases hybridize pairwise with a Gibbs free energy change of 1.7 kcal/mol per base; thus, the energy of the assembly can be modulated by altering the number of complementary bases in the DNA chains. Using

  20. How Coursebook Teaching Materials Facilitate English Classroom Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卉

    2013-01-01

    As classroom interaction forms the basis of any interactive language classroom, it is thus very important and valuable for language teacher to investigate. And This article attempts to account for how the teaching materials facilitate classroom interac-tion.

  1. Interactive Materials In The Teaching Of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macêdo, J. A.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2014-10-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Science. The following steps were to be taken: i) analysis of the pedagogical projects (PPC) of the licenciates at the IFNMG, research locus of its Campus Januária; ii) analysis of students' preconceptions about astronomy and digital technologies, identified by the application of an initial questionnaire; iii) preparation of the course taking into account the students' previous knowledge; iv) application of the education proposal developed under part-time presence modality, using various interactive tools; v) application and analysis of the final questionnaire. The test was conducted with the qualitative and quantitative methodology, combined with a content analysis. The results indicated that in the IFNMG only the licenciate-course in physics includes astronomy content diluted in various subjects of the curriculum; the rates of students prior knowledge in relation to astronomy was low; an evidence of meaningful learning of the concepts related to astronomy, and of viability of resource use involving digital technologies in the Teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options of future teachers and meet their training needs.

  2. Interactions of liposomes with dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sanko; Adamczak, Malgorzata; Hiorth, Marianne; Smistad, Gro; Kopperud, Hilde Molvig

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro adsorption and retention of liposomes onto four common types of dental restorative materials (conventional and silorane-based resin composites as well as conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GIC)) have been investigated due to their potential use in the oral cavity. Uncoated liposomes (positively and negatively charged) and pectin (low- and high-methoxylated) coated liposomes were prepared and characterized in terms of particle size and zeta potential. The adsorption of liposomes was performed by immersion, quantified by fluorescence detection, and visualized by fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy. Positive liposomes demonstrated the highest adsorption on all four types of materials likely due to their attractive surface charge. They also retained well (minimum 40% after 60 min) on both conventional resin composite and GIC even when exposed to simulated salivary flow. Although an intermediate initial level of adsorption was found for the pectin coated liposomes, at least 70% high methoxylated-pectin coated liposomes still remained on the conventional resin composite after 60 min flow exposure. This indicates significant contribution of hydrophobic interactions in the prolonged binding of liposomes to resin composites. Based on these results, the present paper suggests two new possible applications of liposomes in the preservation of dental restorations.

  3. Material interaction in art therapy assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penzes-Driessen, I.J.N.J.; Hooren, S. van; Dokter, D.; Smeijsters, H.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse approaches to art therapy assessment agree that art materials should play a central role. However, relatively little research is done on the role of different art materials. This article describes the results of a qualitative study on the use of art materials by art therapists in art therapy

  4. Material Programming: A New Interaction Design Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna; Boer, Laurens; Tsaknaki, Vasiliki;

    2016-01-01

    and complex temporal forms in their designs. As such it would blur the boundaries between programming and crafting these new smart and computational materials. We envision a material programming practice developed around physical tools (e.g. Fig 1) that draw on bodily skills and experiences (Fig 2) while...

  5. The influence of nanostructured materials on biointerfacial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegler, Peter; Clayton, Andrew; Thissen, Helmut; Santos, Gil Nonato C; Kingshott, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Control over biointerfacial interactions in vitro and in vivo is the key to many biomedical applications: from cell culture and diagnostic tools to drug delivery, biomaterials and regenerative medicine. The increasing use of nanostructured materials is placing a greater demand on improving our understanding of how these new materials influence biointerfacial interactions, including protein adsorption and subsequent cellular responses. A range of nanoscale material properties influence these interactions, and material toxicity. The ability to manipulate both material nanochemistry and nanotopography remains challenging in its own right, however, a more in-depth knowledge of the subsequent biological responses to these new materials must occur simultaneously if they are ever to be affective in the clinic. We highlight some of the key technologies used for fabrication of nanostructured materials, examine how nanostructured materials influence the behavior of proteins and cells at surfaces and provide details of important analytical techniques used in this context.

  6. Neutron interaction and their transport with bulk materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Esther Kalpana, E-mail: esther.kalpanarani@gmail.com [Department of Physics JNT University, Nachupally, Karimnagar, Telangana, 500055 (India); Radhika, K., E-mail: radhikanit@gmail.com [Department of Humanities and Applied Sciences, Talla Padmavathi College of Engineering, Warangal, Telangana, 506004 (India)

    2015-05-15

    In the current paper an attempt was made to study and provide fundamental information about neutron interactions that are important to nuclear material measurements. The application of this study is explained about macroscopic interactions with bulk compound materials through a program in DEV C++ language which is done by enabling interaction of neutrons in nature. The output of the entire process depends upon the random number (i.e., incident neutron number), thickness of the material and mean free path as input parameters. Further the current study emphasizes on the usage of materials in shielding.

  7. Parametric study of silo-material interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanain, G. S.

    1981-06-01

    The methods for determination of pressures and the analysis of silos for storage of granular materials are reviewed. A finite element procedure for linear analysis and an initial-strain analysis of hoop forces and horizontal bending moments in circular concrete silos with bisymmetric outlets is presented, and these methods are compared with the hoop steel areas obtained using current practice. A concrete coal silo is designed by these methods and compared with one designed by standard methods.

  8. Making Sense: Interactive Sculptures as Tangible Design Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Vedel; Stienstra, Marcelle

    2007-01-01

    The field of tangible interaction shows an increasing focus on embodiment; how the body has a central role in how we as human beings experience, understand, and interact with the world we live in. In this paper we present a design exercise that has a strong focus on the body and how interaction....... The interactive sculptures served as a physical reflective tool that allowed the students to test and experience the qualities of interaction they wanted to bring into a new design, before they moved on to designing the actual product. We conclude that interactive sculptures serve as a rich design material...

  9. Laser interaction with biological material mathematical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the principles of laser interaction with biological cells and tissues of varying degrees of organization. The problems of biomedical diagnostics are considered. Scattering of laser irradiation of blood cells is modeled for biological structures (dermis, epidermis, vascular plexus). An analytic theory is provided which is based on solving the wave equation for the electromagnetic field. It allows the accurate analysis of interference effects arising from the partial superposition of scattered waves. Treated topics of mathematical modeling are: optical characterization of biological tissue with large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the layers, heating blood vessel under laser irradiation incident on the outer surface of the skin and thermo-chemical denaturation of biological structures at the example of human skin.

  10. Quantum Interactive Dualism: An Alternative to Materialism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, Henry P

    2005-06-01

    Materialism rest implicitly upon the general conception of nature promoted by Galileo and Newton during the seventeenth century. It features the causal closure of the physical: The course of physically described events for all time is fixed by laws that refer exclusively to the physically describeable features of nature, and initial conditions on these feature. No reference to subjective thoughts or feeling of human beings enter. That simple conception of nature was found during the first quarter of the twentieth century to be apparently incompatible with the empirical facts. The founders of quantum theory created a new fundamental physical theory, quantum theory, which introduced crucially into the causal structure certain conscious choices made by human agents about how they will act. These conscious human choices are ''free'' in the sense that they are not fixed by the known laws. But they can influence the course of physically described events. Thus the principle of the causal closure of the physical fails. Applications in psycho-neuro-dynamics are described.

  11. Materials perspective on Casimir and van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, L. M.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Tkatchenko, A.; Rodriguez-Lopez, P.; Rodriguez, A. W.; Podgornik, R.

    2016-10-01

    Interactions induced by electromagnetic fluctuations, such as van der Waals and Casimir forces, are of universal nature present at any length scale between any types of systems. Such interactions are important not only for the fundamental science of materials behavior, but also for the design and improvement of micro- and nanostructured devices. In the past decade, many new materials have become available, which has stimulated the need for understanding their dispersive interactions. The field of van der Waals and Casimir forces has experienced an impetus in terms of developing novel theoretical and computational methods to provide new insights into related phenomena. The understanding of such forces has far reaching consequences as it bridges concepts in materials, atomic and molecular physics, condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, chemistry, and biology. This review summarizes major breakthroughs and emphasizes the common origin of van der Waals and Casimir interactions. Progress related to novel ab initio modeling approaches and their application in various systems, interactions in materials with Dirac-like spectra, force manipulations through nontrivial boundary conditions, and applications of van der Waals forces in organic and biological matter are examined. The outlook of the review is to give the scientific community a materials perspective of van der Waals and Casimir phenomena and stimulate the development of experimental techniques and applications.

  12. Femtosecond laser pulse train interaction with dielectric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Caulier, O Dematteo; Chimier, B; Skupin, S; Bourgeade, A; Léger, C Javaux; Kling, R; Hönninger, C; Lopez, J; Tikhonchuk, V; Duchateau, G

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of trains of femtosecond microjoule laser pulses with dielectric materials by means of a multi-scale model. Our theoretical predictions are directly confronted with experimental observations in soda-lime glass. We show that due to the low heat conductivity, a significant fraction of the laser energy can be accumulated in the absorption region. Depending on the pulse repetition rate, the material can be heated to high temperatures even though the single pulse energy is too low to induce a significant material modification. Regions heated above the glass transition temperature in our simulations correspond very well to zones of permanent material modifications observed in the experiments.

  13. Short-pulse laser interactions with disordered materials and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phinney, L.M.; Goldman, C.H.; Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    High-power, short-pulse lasers in the picosecond and subpicosecond range are utilized in an increasing number of technologies, including materials processing and diagnostics, micro-electronics and devices, and medicine. In these applications, the short-pulse radiation interacts with a wide range of media encompassing disordered materials and liquids. Examples of disordered materials include porous media, polymers, organic tissues, and amorphous forms of silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide. In order to accurately model, efficiently control, and optimize short-pulse, laser-material interactions, a thorough understanding of the energy transport mechanisms is necessary. Thus, fractals and percolation theory are used to analyze the anomalous diffusion regime in random media. In liquids, the thermal aspects of saturable and multiphoton absorption are examined. Finally, a novel application of short-pulse laser radiation to reduce surface adhesion forces in microstructures through short-pulse laser-induced water desorption is presented.

  14. Investigation of migrant-polymer interaction in pharmaceutical packaging material using the linear interaction energy algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feenstra, Peter; Brunsteiner, Michael; Khinast, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between drug products and polymeric packaging materials is an important topic in the pharmaceutical industry and often associated with high costs because of the required elaborative interaction studies. Therefore, a theoretical prediction of such interactions would be beneficial. Often, material parameters such as the octanol water partition coefficient are used to predict the partitioning of migrant molecules between a solvent and a polymeric packaging material. Here, we present the investigation of the partitioning of various migrant molecules between polymers and solvents using molecular dynamics simulations for the calculation of interaction energies. Our results show that the use of a model for the interaction between the migrant and the polymer at atomistic detail can yield significantly better results when predicting the polymer solvent partitioning than a model based on the octanol water partition coefficient.

  15. Insights into the role of material surface topography and wettability on cell-material interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papenburg, Bernke J.; Rodrigues, Emillie Dooms; Wessling, Matthias; Stamatialis, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of surface topography and biomaterial wettability on protein absorption, cell attachment, proliferation and morphology and reveals important insights in the complexity of cell-material interactions. We use various materials, i.e. poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS), poly

  16. Final Report: Laser-Material Interactions Relevant to Analytic Spectroscopy of Wide Band Gap Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, J. T. [Washington State University

    2014-04-05

    We summarize our studies aimed at developing an understanding of the underlying physics and chemistry in terms of laser materials interactions relevant to laser-based sampling and chemical analysis of wide bandgap materials. This work focused on the determination of mechanisms for the emission of electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules from laser irradiation of surfaces. We determined the important role of defects on these emissions, the thermal, chemical, and physical interactions responsible for matrix effects and mass-dependent transport/detection. This work supported development of new techniques and technology for the determination of trace elements contained such as nuclear waste materials.

  17. Scaling Laws for van der Waals Interactions in Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobre, Vivekanand; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2014-03-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces originate from interactions between fluctuating multipoles in matter and play a significant role in the structure and stability of nanostructured materials. Many models used to describe vdW interactions in nanomaterials are based on a simple pairwise-additive approximation, neglecting the strong electrodynamic response effects caused by long-range fluctuations in matter. We develop and utilize an efficient microscopic method to demonstrate that vdW interactions in nanomaterials act at distances greater than typically assumed, and can be characterized by different scaling laws depending on the dimensionality and size of the system. Specifically, we study the behaviour of vdW interactions in single-layer and multilayer graphene, fullerenes of varying size, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons. As a function of nanostructure size, the van der Waals coefficients follow unusual trends for all of the considered systems, and deviate significantly from the conventionally employed pairwise-additive picture. We propose that the peculiar van der Waals interactions in nanostructured materials could be exploited to control their self-assembly.

  18. Laser-Material Interaction of Powerful Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komashko, A

    2003-01-06

    Laser-material interaction of powerful (up to a terawatt) ultrashort (several picoseconds or shorter) laser pulses and laser-induced effects were investigated theoretically in this dissertation. Since the ultrashort laser pulse (USLP) duration time is much smaller than the characteristic time of the hydrodynamic expansion and thermal diffusion, the interaction occurs at a solid-like material density with most of the light energy absorbed in a thin surface layer. Powerful USLP creates hot, high-pressure plasma, which is quickly ejected without significant energy diffusion into the bulk of the material, Thus collateral damage is reduced. These and other features make USLPs attractive for a variety of applications. The purpose of this dissertation was development of the physical models and numerical tools for improvement of our understanding of the process and as an aid in optimization of the USLP applications. The study is concentrated on two types of materials - simple metals (materials like aluminum or copper) and wide-bandgap dielectrics (fused silica, water). First, key physical phenomena of the ultrashort light interaction with metals and the models needed to describe it are presented. Then, employing one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics code enhanced with models for laser energy deposition and material properties at low and moderate temperatures, light absorption was self-consistently simulated as a function of laser wavelength, pulse energy and length, angle of incidence and polarization. Next, material response on time scales much longer than the pulse duration was studied using the hydrocode and analytical models. These studies include examination of evolution of the pressure pulses, effects of the shock waves, material ablation and removal and three-dimensional dynamics of the ablation plume. Investigation of the interaction with wide-bandgap dielectrics was stimulated by the experimental studies of the USLP surface ablation of water (water is a model of

  19. Interactive image quantification tools in nuclear material forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruggiero, Christy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hush, Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harvey, Neal [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Pat [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scoggins, Wayne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-03

    Morphological and microstructural features visible in microscopy images of nuclear materials can give information about the processing history of a nuclear material. Extraction of these attributes currently requires a subject matter expert in both microscopy and nuclear material production processes, and is a time consuming, and at least partially manual task, often involving multiple software applications. One of the primary goals of computer vision is to find ways to extract and encode domain knowledge associated with imagery so that parts of this process can be automated. In this paper we describe a user-in-the-loop approach to the problem which attempts to both improve the efficiency of domain experts during image quantification as well as capture their domain knowledge over time. This is accomplished through a sophisticated user-monitoring system that accumulates user-computer interactions as users exploit their imagery. We provide a detailed discussion of the interactive feature extraction and segmentation tools we have developed and describe our initial results in exploiting the recorded user-computer interactions to improve user productivity over time.

  20. Interactive image quantification tools in nuclear material forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Reid; Ruggiero, Christy; Hush, Don; Harvey, Neal; Kelly, Patrick; Scoggins, Wayne; Tandon, Lav

    2011-03-01

    Morphological and microstructural features visible in microscopy images of nuclear materials can give information about the processing history of a nuclear material. Extraction of these attributes currently requires a subject matter expert in both microscopy and nuclear material production processes, and is a time consuming, and at least partially manual task, often involving multiple software applications. One of the primary goals of computer vision is to find ways to extract and encode domain knowledge associated with imagery so that parts of this process can be automated. In this paper we describe a user-in-the-loop approach to the problem which attempts to both improve the efficiency of domain experts during image quantification as well as capture their domain knowledge over time. This is accomplished through a sophisticated user-monitoring system that accumulates user-computer interactions as users exploit their imagery. We provide a detailed discussion of the interactive feature extraction and segmentation tools we have developed and describe our initial results in exploiting the recorded user-computer interactions to improve user productivity over time.

  1. Charge-Transfer Interactions in Organic Functional Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bih-Yaw Jin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Our goal in this review is three-fold. First, we provide an overview of a number of quantum-chemical methods that can abstract charge-transfer (CT information on the excited-state species of organic conjugated materials, which can then be exploited for the understanding and design of organic photodiodes and solar cells at the molecular level. We stress that the Composite-Molecule (CM model is useful for evaluating the electronic excited states and excitonic couplings of the organic molecules in the solid state. We start from a simple polyene dimer as an example to illustrate how interchain separation and chain size affect the intercahin interaction and the role of the charge transfer interaction in the excited state of the polyene dimers. With the basic knowledge from analysis of the polyene system, we then study more practical organic materials such as oligophenylenevinylenes (OPVn, oligothiophenes (OTn, and oligophenylenes (OPn. Finally, we apply this method to address the delocalization pathway (through-bond and/or through-space in the lowest excited state for cyclophanes by combining the charge-transfer contributions calculated on the cyclophanes and the corresponding hypothetical molecules with tethers removed. This review represents a step forward in the understanding of the nature of the charge-transfer interactions in the excited state of organic functional materials.

  2. A New Approach to Authoring Interactive Curricular Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Wolfgang

    2001-10-01

    It is still not common to find computer-based interactive material incorporated into mainstream teaching. Learning the intricacies of a software package is a poor investment of time if the half-life of the textbook is longer than the half-life of the computer technology. Internet technologies are likely to change this situation. This talk describes a set of Java applets, known as Physlets, which make use of these technologies. Physlets are designed to communicate with browsers by employing a scripting language such as JavaScript, thereby allowing one applet to be used in many different contexts. This approach makes it possible to use a modular object-oriented approach for the design of material. But this is not enough. Effective curriculum development must couple our software design philosophy with research into the effectiveness of computer-based instruction. Examples of Physlet-based curricular material will be presented.

  3. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs) offer important and unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing. And they are well suited to serve together synergistically. TEC and MFHPs operate through working-fluid vaporization, condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures. TEC and MFHPs have apparently simple, isolated performance mechanisms that are somewhat similar. And they also have obviously difficult, complected material problems that again are somewhat similar. Intensive investigation reveals that aspects of their operating cycles and material problems tend to merge: high-temperature material effects determine the level and lifetime of performance. Simplified equations verify the preceding statement for TEC and MFHPs. Material properties and interactions exert primary influences on operational effectiveness. And thermophysicochemical stabilities dictate operating temperatures which regulate the thermoemissive currents of TEC and the vaporization flow rates of MFHPs. Major high-temperature material problems of TEC and MFHPs have been solved. These solutions lead to productive, cost-effective applications of current TEC and MFHPs - and point to significant improvements with anticipated technological gains.

  4. Structure-Interaction Effects In Novel Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nam B.

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methods have opened up new directions in graphene fundamental studies. In addition to understanding the basic properties of this material and its quasi-one dimensional structures, significant efforts are devoted to describing their long ranged dispersive interactions. Other two-dimensional materials, such as silicene, germanene, and transition metal dichalcogenides, are also being investigated aiming at finding complementary to graphene systems with other "wonder" properties. The focus of this work is to utilize first principles simulations methods to build our basic knowledge of structure-interaction relations in two-dimensional materials and design their properties. In particular, mechanical folding and extended defects in zigzag and armchair graphene nanoribbons can be used to modulate their electronic and spin polarization characteristics and achieve different stacking patterns. Our simulations concerning zigzag silicene nanoribbons show width-dependent antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic transitions unlike the case of zigzag graphene nanoribbons, which are always antiferromagnetic. Heterostructures, build by stacking graphene, silicene, and MoS2, are also investigated. It is found that hybridization alters the electronic properties of the individual layers and new flexural and breathing phonon modes display unique behaviors in the heterostructure compositions. Anchored to SiC substrate graphene nanoribbons are also proposed as possible systems to be used in graphene electronics. Our findings are of importance not only for fundamental science, but they could also be used for future experimental developments.

  5. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torquato, Salvatore [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  6. Material interaction and art product in art therapy assessment in adult mental health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penzé s, I.; Hooren, S. van; Dokter, D.; Smeijsters, H.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Art materials have a central role in art therapy. The way a client interacts with art materials - material interaction - is an important source of information in art therapy assessment in adult mental health. The aim of this study was to develop the categories of material interaction and

  7. Interaction mechanism of biomolecules on vacancy defected 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürel, Hikmet Hakan; Salmankurt, Bahadır

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present a first principles study of the adsorption of Adenine which is a nucleobases, Histide and Leucine molecules, which are the amino acids, on vacancy defected single layer materials such as graphene and phosphorene. Among these materials, graphene, which is a single layer honeycomb structure of carbon. Also, phosphorene is recently synthesized by mechanical exfoliation of the black phosphorus. Phosphorene forming a puckered honeycomb structure similar to silicene. However, unlike zero-bandgap graphene and silicene, phosphorene is a direct band gap semiconductor, which makes it very attractive for the nanoelectronic devices. According to the studies, local defects can always exist at any temperature. The most probable defect type is the single vacancy in the single layer honeycomb structures. Vacancy defects can be emerged during growth process and they change the properties of materials significantly. In this study, we show that how to manipulate interaction and binding mechanisms of biomolecules with 2D materials with increased chemical activity by vacancy defects.

  8. Organic microporous materials and their interactions with different gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepodd, T.J.; Miller, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Chemistry Dept.; Lagasse, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Processing Dept.

    1997-04-01

    This work explored the interactions of various organic microporous materials with different gases. The authors were attempting to make substances that could separate gases through differential adsorption or store gases at reduced pressures. They synthesized xerogels that were highly crosslinked, allowing relatively large amounts of micro- and mesopores within the organic polymers. The monomers were polymerized in a solvent which was removed forming xerogels. Then exhaustive drying was performed to yield the tested microporous materials. The xerogels were exposed to four gases to observe their gas adsorption affinities (methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and isobutane). For each microporous polymer the authors measured BET surface area, nitrogen isotherm, bulk density, pycnometric density, and equilibrium gas adsorption. Pore volume and pore size distribution were also calculated for some samples. Adsorption characteristics paralleled, but were not directly proportional to surface area or pore size distribution changes. Changes in adsorption magnitude and selectivity have been made through various formulations and derivatization. Increasing polarity showed increased affinities towards carbon dioxide, slightly increased affinities towards isobutane, and unchanged affinities towards methane and hydrogen. These materials could adsorb significant amounts of gas; about half the amount of some commercial carbons. Considering the minimal processing involved in their synthesis, these materials could be cost effective replacements for carbons in low-cost applications where high adsorption efficiencies are not a priority.

  9. Contribution to the beam plasma material interactions during material processing with TEA CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaschek, Rainer; Konrad, Peter E.; Mayerhofer, Roland; Bergmann, Hans W.; Bickel, Peter G.; Kowalewicz, Roland; Kuttenberger, Alfred; Christiansen, Jens

    1995-03-01

    The TEA-CO2-laser (transversely excited atmospheric pressure) is a tool for the pulsed processing of materials with peak power densities up to 1010 W/cm2 and a FWHM of 70 ns. The interaction between the laser beam, the surface of the work piece and the surrounding atmosphere as well as gas pressure and the formation of an induced plasma influences the response of the target. It was found that depending on the power density and the atmosphere the response can take two forms. (1) No target modification due to optical break through of the atmosphere and therefore shielding of the target (air pressure above 10 mbar, depending on the material). (2) Processing of materials (air pressure below 10 mbar, depending on the material) with melting of metallic surfaces (power density above 0.5 109 W/cm2), hole formation (power density of 5 109 W/cm2) and shock hardening (power density of 3.5 1010 W/cm2). All those phenomena are usually linked with the occurrence of laser supported combustion waves and laser supported detonation waves, respectively for which the mechanism is still not completely understood. The present paper shows how short time photography and spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy can be used to better understand the various processes that occur during laser beam interaction. The spectra of titanium and aluminum are observed and correlated with the modification of the target. If the power density is high enough and the gas pressure above a material and gas composition specific threshold, the plasma radiation shows only spectral lines of the background atmosphere. If the gas pressure is below this threshold, a modification of the target surface (melting, evaporation and solid state transformation) with TEA-CO2- laser pulses is possible and the material specific spectra is observed. In some cases spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy of a plasma allows the calculation of electron temperatures by comparison of two spectral lines.

  10. Interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and organic material substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) associations are widespread and form between ca. two-thirds of all land plants and fungi in the phylum Glomeromycota. The association is a mutualistic symbiosis with the fungi enhancing nutrient capture for the plant while obtaining carbon in return. Although arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) lack any substantial saprophytic capability they do preferentially associate with various organic substrates and respond by hyphal proliferation, indicating the fungus derives a benefit from the organic substrate. AMF may also enhance decomposition of the organic material. The benefit to the host plant of this hyphal proliferation is not always apparent, particularly regarding nitrogen (N) transfer, and there may be circumstances under which both symbionts compete for the N released given both have a large demand for N. The results of various studies examining AMF responses to organic substrates and the interactions with other members of the soil community will be discussed.

  11. Interactions between chloride and cement-paste materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberon, Fabien; Baroghel-Bouny, Véronique; Zanni, Hélène; Bresson, Bruno; d'Espinose de la Caillerie, Jean-Baptiste; Malosse, Lucie; Gan, Zehong

    2005-02-01

    The durability of cement-based materials with respect to exterior aggressions is one of the current priorities in civil engineering. Depending on their use, the cement-based materials can be exposed to different types of aggressive environments. For instance, damages to concrete structures in contact with a saline environment (sea water on bridges, deicing salts on roads, etc.) are of utmost importance. Upon exposure to saline water, Cl- ions penetrate into the structures and subsequently lead to reinforcement corrosion. Chloride attack is often combined with other aggressive influences such as temperature (e.g., freezing) or the ingress of other ions (e.g., sulfates in sea water). We therefore aim to explore the effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on the structural chemistry of cement paste. Existing studies about reinforcement corrosion by chloride have focused on the penetration of Cl- ions and the comparison between "free" ions (water-soluble ions) and bound ones. However, little is known about the fixation mechanisms, the localization of Cl in the cement matrix and the structural interaction between Cl and the silicate and aluminate hydrate phases present in cement paste. We present here results of a multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance study on the fixation of chloride in the hydration products and the characterization of new phases potentially appearing due to chloride ingress.

  12. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beiersdorfer, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chernov, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Magee, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  13. Interactions of bioactive glass materials in the oral environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efflandt, Sarah Elizabeth

    The aim of this research was to investigate bioactive glass materials for their use in dental restorations. Mechanical properties such as strength, toughness and wear resistance were considered initially, but the focus of this thesis was the biological properties such as reactions with saliva and interactions with natural dental tissues. Bioactive composite materials were created by incorporating bioactive glass and alumina powders into an aqueous suspension, slip casting, and infiltrating with resin. Microstructure, mechanical properties and wear resistance were evaluated. Mechanically, the composites are comparable to natural dental tissues and current dental materials with a strength of 206 +/- 18.7 MPa and a toughness of 1.74 +/- 0.08 MPa(m)1/2. Interfacial reactions were examined using bulk bioactive glasses. Disks were prepared from a melt, placed in saliva and incubated at 37°C. Surfaces were analyzed at 2, 5, 10, 21, and 42 days using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microdiffraction. Results showed changes at 2 days with apatite crystallization by 10 days. These glass disks were then secured against extracted human dentin and incubated in saliva for 21 or 42 days. Results from SEM, electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and microdiffraction showed that dentin and bioactive glasses adhered in this in vitro environment due to attraction of collagen to bioactive glasses and growth of an interfacial apatite. After investigating these bulk glass responses, particulate bioactive glasses were placed in in vitro and in vivo set-ups for evaluation. Particles immersed in biologically buffered saliva showed crystallization of apatite at 3 days. These bioactive glass particles were placed in the molars of mini-pigs and left in vivo. After 30 days the bioactive paste was evaluated using SEM, EMPA and microdiffraction analyses. Results showed that the paste gained structural integrity and had chemical changes in vivo. These sets of experiments show that bioactive

  14. Interaction of dispersed polyvynil acetate with silicate in finishing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runova, R. F.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the processes of interaction between calcium silicate hydrates and dispersed polyvinyl acetate in tight films with the aim of developing compounds meant for restoration and finishing works. The basis of this development relies on the concept concerning the determining role of the crystal-chemical factor of the silicate phase in the formation of organic-mineral compounds of increased durability. The characteristics of dispersed calcium silicate hydrates are portrayed. The preparation conditions, accounting for the synthesis of the product of submicrocrystalline structure, conforming with the stoichiometry CaO∙SiO2 =0.8-2.0 have been determined. The interaction has been studied for compounds achieved by mixing ingredients in a rapid whirling mixer, and subjected to hardening at T=20+2 T. With the aid of XRD, DTA and Infra-Red Spectrometry methods the formation process of the sophisticated polymer silicate phase in the material was observed for a period of 90 days. The properties of the film were investigated and its high resistance against the influence of external factors was established. On this basis a conclusion concerning the quite high effectiveness of substituting portland cement with dispersed calcium silicate hydrate in polymer cement compounds has been made. White colour and other various special properties determine the suitability for repair and finishing works on facades of buildings.

    Este artículo está orientado a estudiar los procesos de interacción entre los silicatos cálcicos hidratados y el acetato de polivinilo disperso en capas impermeables, con el objeto de desarrollar compuestos destinados para la restauración. El fundamento de estos estudios es determinar el papel que los factores cristaloquímicos de las fases silicato tienen en la formación de compuestos órganominerales de elevada durabilidad. Se han descrito las características de los silicatos cálcicos hidratados

  15. Pressure Interaction of Mixing Particulate Material Along the Blade Length

    OpenAIRE

    Peciar Peter; Peciar Marián; Fekete Roman; Úradníček Juraj

    2015-01-01

    To assess the energy intensity of particulate materials mixing, it is necessary to know the state of stress in the particulate material in front of mixing elements. The theoretical background of this process results from the theory of the equilibrium limit of the particulate material, and this state may by described by Mohr’s circle theory and the Novosad model. Based on the above assumptions, it is possible to derive the pressure distribution along the blade height, but only for an infinitel...

  16. Writing an Electronic Astronomy Book with Interactive Curricular Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kristen L.; Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of tablets, the past few years have seen an increase in the demand for quality electronic textbooks. Unfortunately, most of the current offerings do not exploit the accessibility and interactivity that electronic books can deliver. In this poster, we discuss how we are merging our curriculum development projects (Physlets, Easy Java/JavaScript Simulations, and Open Source Physics) with the EPUB electronic book format to develop an interactive textbook for use in a one-semester introductory astronomy course. The book, Astronomy: An Interactive Introduction, combines the narrative, equations, and images of a traditional astronomy text with new JavaScript simulations.

  17. DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ELECTRONS AND POSITRONS INTERACTING WITH DETECTOR MATERIAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEIRING, WJ; VANKLINKEN, J; WICHERS, VA

    1991-01-01

    A theory of multiple scattering, exhibiting differences between electrons and positrons in interactions with matter, is developed. Additional differences in stopping power and annihilation for positrons are briefly discussed. Experimental verification of these differences is reported for plastic sci

  18. Material decomposition mechanisms in femtosecond laser interactions with metals

    CERN Document Server

    Povarnitsyn, M E; Sentis, M; Khishchenko, K V; Levashov, P R

    2007-01-01

    A numerical hydrodynamic study of femtosecond laser ablation is presented. A detailed analysis of material decomposition is performed using a thermodynamically complete equation of state with separate stable and metastable phase states and phase boundaries. The lifetime of the metastable liquid state is estimated based on the classical theory of homogeneous nucleation. In addition, mechanical fragmentation of the target material is controlled based on available criteria. As a result, several ablation mechanisms are observed. A major fraction of the ablated material, however, is found to originate from the metastable liquid region, which is decomposed either thermally in the vicinity of the critical point into a liquid-gas mixture, or mechanically at high strain rate and negative pressure into liquid droplets and chunks. The calculation results explain available experimental findings.

  19. Controlling coverage of solution cast materials with unfavourable surface interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2014-03-03

    Creating uniform coatings of a solution-cast material is of central importance to a broad range of applications. Here, a robust and generic theoretical framework for calculating surface coverage by a solid film of material de-wetting a substrate is presented. Using experimental data from semiconductor thin films as an example, we calculate surface coverage for a wide range of annealing temperatures and film thicknesses. The model generally predicts that for each value of the annealing temperature there is a range of film thicknesses leading to poor surface coverage. The model accurately reproduces solution-cast thin film coverage for organometal halide perovskites, key modern photovoltaic materials, and identifies processing windows for both high and low levels of surface coverage. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  20. Comments on ""Contact Diffusion Interaction of Materials with Cladding''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A Russian paper by A. A. Babad-Zakhryapina contributes much to the understanding of fuel, clad interactions, and thus to nuclear thermionic technology. In that publication the basic diffusion expression is a simple one. A more general but complicated equation for this mass transport results from the present work. With appropriate assumptions, however, the new relation reduces to Babad-Zakhryapina's version.

  1. Developing Interactive Video Resource Materials for Community Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Claire; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the creation of a series of interactive video modules on dental hygiene at Luzerne County Community College. These modules are intended to supplement instruction in a community dentistry and health education course and to guide students in an assignment to develop and implement dental health projects in their community. (MBR)

  2. Experimental Study on 308nm Laser Interaction with Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A 10 J, 40 ns XeC1 laser interaction with LY12 aluminum and optical glass K9 targets is reported. The properties of laser-produced plasma (LPP) are analyzed. As a result, some parameters such as plasma ignition threshold and plasma plume expansion velocity are obtained. Also, Laser induced pulse on irradiated targets are given.

  3. LONG-TERM TECHNETIUM INTERACTIONS WITH REDUCING CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.; Lilley, M.; Almond, P.; Powell, B.

    2011-03-15

    Technetium is among the key risk drivers at the Saltstone Facility. The way that it is immobilized in this cementitious waste form is by converting its highly mobile Tc(VII) form to a much less mobile Tc(IV) form through reduction by the cement's blast furnace slag. This report includes a review of published data and experimental results dealing with Tc leaching from Portland cement waste forms. The objectives for the literature study were to document previous reports of Tc interactions with slag-containing cementitious materials. The objectives for the laboratory study were to measure Tc-saltstone Kd values under reducing conditions. From the literature it was concluded: (1) Spectroscopic evidence showed that when Tc(IV) in a slag-cement was exposed to an oxidizing environment, it will convert to the more mobile Tc(VII) species within a short time frame, 2.5 years. (2) SRS saltstone will reduce Tc(VII) in the absence of NaS or sodium dithionite in a reducing atmosphere. (3) Only trace concentrations of atmospheric oxygen (30 to 60 ppm O{sub 2}; Eh 120 mV) at the high pH levels of cementitious systems is required to maintain Tc as Tc(VII). (4) Experimental conditions must be responsible for wide variability of measured K{sub d} values, such that they are either very low, {approx}1 mL/g, or they are very high {approx}1000 mL/g, suggesting that Tc(VII) or Tc(IV) dominate the systems. Much of this variability appears to be the result of experimental conditions, especially direct controls of oxygen contact with the sample. (5) A field study conducted at SRS in the 1980s indicated that a slag-saltstone immobilized Tc for 2.5 years. Below background concentrations of Tc leached out of the slag-containing saltstone, whereas Tc leached out of the slag-free saltstone at the rate of nitrate loss. One possible explanation for the immobilization of Tc in this study was that the slag-saltstone maintained reducing conditions within the core of the 55-gallon sample, whereas

  4. Interaction Between Steel Melt and Refractory Materials in Tundish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drofelnik N.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In Štore Steel steelworks steel is casted on a three strand continuous casting machine. Lining of tundish is mainly made from a magnesia based material. Tundish cover powder is based on alumina and silica. It also contains aluminum and carbon.

  5. Materials Analysis of Transient Plasma-Wall Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-13

    model showing the importance sputter and re-deposition. plasma, pulsed plasma, directed energy, transient wall interaction, high energy density...each equipped with a 25kV copper- vapor thyratron start switch capable of sub-microsecond triggering resolution. Each start switch is paired with a...sample exposure positions within the plasma jet. The probe utilizes a PCB Piezotronics model 113B21 pressure sensor modified to work in the plasma jet

  6. Magnetoelectric interaction and transport behaviours in magnetic nanocomposite thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenyu; Liu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Ping; Zhang, Qingjie; Zhu, Wanting; Su, Xianli; Tang, Xinfeng; Yang, Jihui; Liu, Yong; Shi, Jing; Chao, Yimin; Lin, Siqi; Pei, Yanzhong

    2017-01-01

    How to suppress the performance deterioration of thermoelectric materials in the intrinsic excitation region remains a key challenge. The magnetic transition of permanent magnet nanoparticles from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism provides an effective approach to finding the solution to this challenge. Here, we have designed and prepared magnetic nanocomposite thermoelectric materials consisting of BaFe12O19 nanoparticles and Ba0.3In0.3Co4Sb12 matrix. It was found that the electrical transport behaviours of the nanocomposites are controlled by the magnetic transition of BaFe12O19 nanoparticles from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism. BaFe12O19 nanoparticles trap electrons below the Curie temperature (TC) and release the trapped electrons above the TC, playing an 'electron repository' role in maintaining high figure of merit ZT. BaFe12O19 nanoparticles produce two types of magnetoelectric effect—electron spiral motion and magnon-drag thermopower—as well as enhancing phonon scattering. Our work demonstrates that the performance deterioration of thermoelectric materials in the intrinsic excitation region can be suppressed through the magnetic transition of permanent magnet nanoparticles.

  7. Creep-Fatigue Interactions of Gas Turbine Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Goswami

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available The military aircraft gas turbine engines are often required to undergo a complex set of.operating conditions where the load varies considerably with respect to time. The temperature range for performing such requirements also increases as the thrust increases.The modern design of gas turbine demands very high thrust-to-weight ratio. In order to achieve this, the design is limited in the low cycle regime. The low cycle regime necessarily has the plasticity effect because of fatigue and inelastic time dependent permanent deformation because of creep. Fatigue and creep interaction studies are very important for the safe life design of critical components such as turbine discs and blades.

  8. ACTIVATING ROLE OF INTERACTIVE DIDACTIC MATERIALS IN TEACHING COMPUTER SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Lis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the days of the visual culture a manner of the transmission of information plays a very important role. Adopting a technique of the join of text, graphics, sound and animation in frames of the uniform structure of presenting data, particularly in the education, it is possible to achieve good results in handing over of knowledge than at using only one of the media. The article presents the results of research devoted to the influence of visual and textual teaching materials, on the level of assimilation of knowledge subjects and their involvement in the assimilation of content. The analysis of the results showed that the visualization of teaching content is a factor significantly activating the educational process and affecting the level of knowledge assimilation.

  9. Estimation of the ATLAS Inner Detector material budget by use of hadronic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Pettersson, Nora Emilia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The dominant inefficiency in track reconstruction comes from particle interactions with the material in the detector. A good understanding of the material in the Inner Detector (ID) of the ATLAS detector is therefore a vital part of track and object reconstruction. In recent years a new technique has been developed, which by reconstructing nuclear interactions with the detector material allows one to quantify the material budget. The relatively low momentum interactions yields large opening angles between the outgoing particles. This makes it feasible to pinpoint the location of the interaction with excellent spatial resolutions, both perpendicular and parallel to the beam axis, permitting detailed comparisons of even minute detector elements. Utilising a second-pass tracking, specially designed to reconstruct secondary tracks with large impact parameters, the technique maps 0.3 $m^{3}$ of the ID volume. The collected results from the Run-1 and the Run-2 analyses will be presented.

  10. A Strategy for Material-specific e-Textile Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gowrishankar, Ramyah; Bredies, Katharina; Ylirisku, Salu

    2016-01-01

    The interaction design of e-Textile products are often characterized by conventions adopted from electronic devices rather than developing interactions that can be specific to e-Textiles. We argue that textile materials feature a vast potential for the design of novel digital interactions....... Especially the shape-reformation capabilities of textiles may inform the design of expressive and aesthetically rewarding applications. In this chapter, we propose ways in which the textileness of e-Textiles can be better harnessed. We outline an e-Textile Interaction Design strategy that is based...... on defining the material-specificity of e-Textiles as its ability to deform in ways that match the expectations we have of textile materials. It embraces an open-ended exploration of textile-related interactions (for e.g. stretching, folding, turning-inside-out etc.) and their potential for electronic...

  11. Interaction of Radiation with Graphene Based Nanomaterials for Sensing Fissile Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Interaction of Radiation with Graphene Based Nanomaterials for Sensing Fissile Materials Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release...Enter number of invention disclosures 5 Table: Data elements and input methods Main Category Sub-Elements Input Att. A cc om pl is hm en ts...about how ionizing radiation (gamma rays, neutrons) and associated charged particles interact with nano- materials /structures based on graphene, which

  12. Biomolecular interactions of emerging two-dimensional materials with aromatic amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallineni, Sai Sunil Kumar; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao

    The present work experimentally investigates the interaction of aromatic amino acids, viz., tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine with novel two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO), and boron nitride (BN). Photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were employed to investigate the nature of interactions and possible charge transfer between 2D materials and amino acids. Consistent with previous theoretical studies, graphene and BN were observed to interact with amino acids through π- π interactions. Furthermore, we found that GO exhibits strong interactions with tryptophan and tyrosine as compared to graphene and BN, which we attribute to the formation of H-bonds between tryptophan and GO as shown theoretically in Ref. 2. On the other hand, phenylalanine did not exhibit much difference in interactions with G, GO, and BN. Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA.

  13. The interaction of iodine with organic material in containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wren, J.C.; Ball, J.M.; Glown, G.A.; Portmann, R.; Sanipelli, G.G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-01

    Organic impurities in containment water, originating from various painted structural surfaces and organic containment materials, could have a significant impact on iodine volatility following an accident. A research program has been designed to determine the impact of organic impurities on iodine volatility under accident conditions. The program consists of experimental, literature and modelling studies on the radiolysis or organic compounds in the aqueous phase, thermal and radiolytic formation and decomposition of organic iodides, dissolution of organic solvents from various painted surfaces into the aqueous phase, and iodine deposition on painted surfaces. The experimental studies consist of bench-scale `separate effects` tests as well as intermediate-scale `integrated effects` in the Radioiodine Test facility. The studies have shown that organic impurities will be found in containment water, arising from the dissolution of organic compounds from various surface paints and that these compounds can potentially have a significant impact on iodine volatility following an accident. The main impact of surface paints will occur through aqueous-phase reactions of the organic compounds that they release to the aqueous phase. Under the radiation conditions expected during an accident, these compounds will react to reduce the pH and dissolved oxygen concentration, consequently increasing the formation of I{sub 2} from I{sup -} that is present in the sump. It appears that the rates of these processes may be controlled by the dissolution kinetics of the organic compounds from the surface coatings. Moreover, the organic compounds may also react thermally and radiolytically with I{sub 2} to form organic iodides in the aqueous phase. Our studies have shown that the formation of organic iodides from soluble organics such as ketones, alcohols and phenols may have more impact on the total iodine volatility than the formation of CH{sub 3}I. (author) 13 figs., 2 tabs., 19 refs.

  14. Mobility and bulk electron-phonon interaction in two-dimensional materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads; Markussen, Troels

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of the phonon-limited mobility in intrinsic n-type monolayer graphene, silicene and MoS2. The material properties, including the electron-phonon interaction, are calculated from first principles. Unlike graphene, the carriers in silicene show strong interaction with the out...

  15. Growing grass: a smart material interactive display, design and construction history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minuto, Andrea; Nijholt, Anton

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we will present the design process and development of 'Follow the Grass', our smart material interactive pervasive display, with related technical detailed explanation. We will present the design steps and prototypes with instructions for the use of smart materials (NiTiNOL) to create

  16. Thermodynamic Analysis on Interaction between MoltenTi Alloys and Oxide Molding Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic model has been built up for the interactions between molten Ti alloys and oxide molding materials in the way of decomposition and solution of molding materials, then the influences on the reaction free energy changes have been calculated and discussed.

  17. The Implementation of Interactive Multimedia Learning Materials in Teaching Listening Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampa, Andi Tenri

    2015-01-01

    One of the factors that may affect the success of the learning process is the use of learning media. Therefore, this research aimed to implement and evaluate the interactive multimedia learning materials using Wondershare Quizcreator program and audio materials in teaching "English listening skills". The research problem was whether or…

  18. A Study on the Interaction Mechanism between Thermal Radiation and Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dehong XIA; Tao YU; Chuangu WU; Qingqing CHANG; Honglei JIAO

    2005-01-01

    From the viewpoint of field synergy principle and dipole radiation theory, the interaction between the incident thermal radiation wave and materials is analyzed to reveal the mechanism of selective absorption of incident thermal radiation. It is shown that the frequency of the incident thermal radiation and the damping constant of damping oscillators in materials are of vital importance for the thermal radiation properties (reflectivity, absorptivity, transmissivity, etc.) of materials.

  19. Materials in products selection: tools for including user-interaction in materials selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kesteren, I.E.H.; Stappers, P.J.; De Bruijn, J.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Products do not only discriminate from other products in functionality, but also in the way they please users. The sensorial properties of materials influence whether a product provides adequate feedback or gives a pleasant emotional experience. Designing a specific userinteraction involves selectin

  20. Laser-material interaction during atom probe tomography of oxides with embedded metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, D.; Arnoldi, L.; Devaraj, A.; Vella, A.

    2016-10-01

    Oxide-supported metal nano-particles are of great interest in catalysis but also in the development of new large-spectrum-absorption materials. The design of such nano materials requires three-dimensional characterization with a high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. The laser assisted Atom Probe Tomography (La-APT) presents both these capacities if an accurate understanding of laser-material interaction is developed. In this paper, we focus on the fundamental physics of field evaporation as a function of sample geometry, laser power, and DC electric field for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO. By understanding the laser-material interaction through experiments and a theoretical model of heat diffusion inside the sample after the interaction with laser pulse, we point out the physical origin of the noise and determine the conditions to reduce it by more than one order of magnitude, improving the sensitivity of the La-APT for metal-dielectric composites.

  1. Optimal Hubbard models for materials with nonlocal Coulomb interactions: graphene, silicene, and benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüler, M; Rösner, M; Wehling, T O; Lichtenstein, A I; Katsnelson, M I

    2013-07-19

    To understand how nonlocal Coulomb interactions affect the phase diagram of correlated electron materials, we report on a method to approximate a correlated lattice model with nonlocal interactions by an effective Hubbard model with on-site interactions U(*) only. The effective model is defined by the Peierls-Feynman-Bogoliubov variational principle. We find that the local part of the interaction U is reduced according to U(*)=U-V[over ¯], where V[over ¯] is a weighted average of nonlocal interactions. For graphene, silicene, and benzene we show that the nonlocal Coulomb interaction can decrease the effective local interaction by more than a factor of 2 in a wide doping range.

  2. Sub-nanosecond optical diagnostics of laser-material interaction and dynamic microstructure of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.

    1993-03-01

    Several optical diagnostic techniques are used to evaluate the dynamic response of materials to intense dynamic loading and unloading, high stress and strain, and pressure. Velocity interferometry and electronic streak photography, each with sub-nanosecond time resolution, are used to record dynamic material response. Laser-launched flat plates are accelerated to 10{sup 12} m/s{sup 2} with terminal velocities >5 km/s. By impacting these plates into target samples, high strain rates (10{sup 8} sec{sup {minus}1}) and pressures >100 GPa have been generated for a duration of 0.8--5 nanoseconds. The efficacy and limitations of each technique are detailed and applications to other fields discussed.

  3. Sub-nanosecond optical diagnostics of laser-material interaction and dynamic microstructure of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.

    1993-01-01

    Several optical diagnostic techniques are used to evaluate the dynamic response of materials to intense dynamic loading and unloading, high stress and strain, and pressure. Velocity interferometry and electronic streak photography, each with sub-nanosecond time resolution, are used to record dynamic material response. Laser-launched flat plates are accelerated to 10[sup 12] m/s[sup 2] with terminal velocities >5 km/s. By impacting these plates into target samples, high strain rates (10[sup 8] sec[sup [minus]1]) and pressures >100 GPa have been generated for a duration of 0.8--5 nanoseconds. The efficacy and limitations of each technique are detailed and applications to other fields discussed.

  4. Deterioration of organic packing materials commonly used in air biofiltration: effect of VOC-packing interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrero, Raquel; Estrada, José M; Muñoz, Raúl; Quijano, Guillermo

    2014-05-01

    The abiotic deterioration of three conventional organic packing materials used in biofiltration (compost, wood bark and Macadamia nutshells) caused by their interaction with toluene (used as a model volatile organic compound) was here studied. The deterioration of the materials was evaluated in terms of structural damage, release of co-substrates and increase of the packing biodegradability. After 21 days of exposure to toluene, all packing materials released co-substrates able to support microbial growth, which were not released by the control materials not exposed to toluene. Likewise, the exposure to toluene increased the packing material biodegradability by 26% in wood bark, 20% in compost and 17% in Macadamia nutshells. Finally, scanning electron microscopy analysis confirmed the deterioration in the structure of the packing materials evaluated due to the exposure to toluene, Macadamia nutshells being the material with the highest resistance to volatile organic compound attack.

  5. Teachers’ Pedagogic Design of Digital Interactive Whiteboard Materials in the UK Secondary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Jewitt

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Teachers have always made texts for use in the classroom. The wide spread introduction of Interactive whiteboard (IWB technology into UK classrooms, and the screen more generally, makes the multimodal resources of color, image, dynamic movement, and sound newly available for pedagogic design in newly connectable ways. These facilities present teachers with new questions about how to design and use teaching materials, new possibilites and constraints. This presentation will examine teachers' design of digital multimodal resources for IWBs and the influence of prevalent policy discourses of interactivity, multimodality and fast pace influence on teacher’s digital materials for the IWB.

  6. Exchange-coupling interaction and effective anisotropy in nanocomposite permanent materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Taking Nd2Fe14B/?-Fe as example, the exchange-coupling interactions between magnetically soft and hard grains in nanocomposite permanent materials and their effects on the effective anisotropy of materials were investigated. The calculation results expressed that the exchange- coupling interactions are enhanced with the reduction of grain size, and the effective anisotropy of materials decreases with the reduction of grain size and the increase of magnetically soft phase component. The remanence and the effective anisotropy of materials possess the opposite variation trend with the change of grain size and phase ratio. The mean grain size should be in the range of 10-15 nm and the ratio of soft phase should be less than 50% for getting the magnet with high energy product.

  7. A Theory of Interaction Mechanism between Laser Beam and Paper Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piili, Heidi

    Paper making and converting industry in Europe is suffering from transfer of basic manufacturing to fast-growing economies, such as China and Brazil. Pulp and paper production volume in Finland, Sweden and France was the same in 2011 as it was in 2000. Meanwhile China has tripled its volume and Brazil doubled. This is a situation where innovative solutions for papermaking and converting industry are needed. Laser can be solution for this, as it is fast, flexible, accurate and reliable. Before industrial application, characteristics of laser beam and paper material interaction has to be understood. When this fundamental knowledge is known, new innovations can be created. Fulfilling the lack of information on interaction phenomena can assist in the way of lasers for wider use of technology in paper making and converting industry. This study was executed by treating dried kraft pulp (grammage 67 g m-2) with different laser power levels, focal point settings and interaction time. Laser equipment was TRUMPF TLF HQ2700 CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 μm). Interaction between laser beam and dried kraft pulp was detected with multi-monitoring system (MMS), which consisted of spectrometer, pyrometer and active illumination imaging system. There is two different dominating mechanisms in interaction between laser beam and paper material. Furthermore, it was noticed that there is different interaction phases within these two interaction mechanisms. These interaction phases appear as function of time and as function of peak intensity of laser beam. Limit peak intensity divides interaction mechanism from one-phase interaction into dual-phase interaction.

  8. Bound states in a model of interaction of Dirac field with material plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pismak Yu. M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the Symanzik approach model of the interaction of the Dirac spinor field with the material plane in the 3 + 1-dimensional space is constructed. The model contains eight real parameters characterizing the properties of the material plane. The general solution of the Euler-Lagrange equations of the model and dispersion equations for bound states are analyzed. It is shown that there is a choice of parameters of the model in which the connected states are characterized by dispersion law of a mass-less particle moving along the material plane with the dimensionless Fermi velocity not exceeding one.

  9. Dynamical Study of Guest-Host Orientational Interaction in LiquidCrystalline Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Thai Viet [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Guest-host interaction has long been a subject of interest in many disciplines. Emphasis is often on how a small amount of guest substance could significantly affect the properties of a host material. This thesis describe our work in studying a guest-host effect where dye-doping of liquid crystalline materials greatly enhances the optical Kerr nonlinearity of the material. The dye molecules, upon excitation and via intermolecular interaction, provides an extra torque to reorient the host molecules, leading to the enhanced optical Kerr nonlinearity. We carried out a comprehensive study on the dynamics of the photoexcited dye-doped liquid crystalline medium. Using various experimental techniques, we separately characterized the dynamical responses of the relevant molecular species present in the medium following photo-excitation, and thus were able to follow the transient process in which photo-excitation of the dye molecules exert through guest-host interaction a net torque on the host LC material, leading to the observed enhanced molecular reorientation. We also observed for the first time the enhanced reorientation in a pure liquid crystal system, where the guest population is created through photoexcitation of the host molecules themselves. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the time-dependent theory based on a mean-field model of the guest-host interaction.

  10. INTERACTION CURVES OF LINEARLY INTENSIFYING POLYMERIC MATERIALS UNDER TENSILE-TORSIONAL STRESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao-sheng Zhan

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental research has been performed on the interaction curves and stress paths of crystalline polymeric materials PE and POM under tensile-torsional stress with a linearly intensifying model and in terms of the yield points undergoing Von Mises criterion.

  11. Performing a Course Material Enhancement Process with Asynchronous Interactive Online System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hei-Chia

    2007-01-01

    Online systems have come to be heavily used in education, particularly for online learning and collecting information not otherwise readily available. Most e-learning systems, including interactive learning systems, have been designed to "push" course materials to students but rarely to "collect" or "pull" ideas from them. The interactive…

  12. The Interaction of Bacteria with Engineered Nanostructured Polymeric Materials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Armentano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of great advances in biomaterials research and development, a significant proportion of medical devices undergo bacterial colonization and become the target of an implant-related infection. We present a review of the two major classes of antibacterial nanostructured materials: polymeric nanocomposites and surface-engineered materials. The paper describes antibacterial effects due to the induced material properties, along with the principles of bacterial adhesion and the biofilm formation process. Methods for antimicrobial modifications of polymers using a nanocomposite approach as well as surface modification procedures are surveyed and discussed, followed by a concise examination of techniques used in estimating bacteria/material interactions. Finally, we present an outline of future sceneries and perspectives on antibacterial applications of nanostructured materials to resist or counteract implant infections.

  13. The Interaction of Bacteria with Engineered Nanostructured Polymeric Materials: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentano, Ilaria; Arciola, Carla Renata; Fortunati, Elena; Ferrari, Davide; Mattioli, Samantha; Amoroso, Concetta Floriana; Rizzo, Jessica; Kenny, Jose M.; Imbriani, Marcello; Visai, Livia

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of great advances in biomaterials research and development, a significant proportion of medical devices undergo bacterial colonization and become the target of an implant-related infection. We present a review of the two major classes of antibacterial nanostructured materials: polymeric nanocomposites and surface-engineered materials. The paper describes antibacterial effects due to the induced material properties, along with the principles of bacterial adhesion and the biofilm formation process. Methods for antimicrobial modifications of polymers using a nanocomposite approach as well as surface modification procedures are surveyed and discussed, followed by a concise examination of techniques used in estimating bacteria/material interactions. Finally, we present an outline of future sceneries and perspectives on antibacterial applications of nanostructured materials to resist or counteract implant infections. PMID:25025086

  14. Generalized thermoelastic interaction in functional graded material with fractional order three-phase lag heat transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ibrahim A. Abbas

    2015-01-01

    The present work is concerned with the solution of a problem on thermoelastic interactions in a functional graded material due to thermal shock in the context of the fractional order three-phase lag model. The governing equations of fractional order generalized thermoelasticity with three-phase lag model for functionally graded materials (FGM) (i.e., material with spatially varying material properties) are established. The analytical solution in the transform domain is obtained by using the eigenvalue approach. The inversion of Laplace transform is done numerically. The graphical results indicate that the fractional parameter has significant effects on all the physical quantities. Thus, we can consider the theory of fractional order generalized thermoelasticity an improvement on studying elastic materials.

  15. Ultrashort laser pulse–matter interaction: Implications for high energy materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Venugopal Rao

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of ultrashort [nanosecond (ns)/picosecond (ps)/femtosecond (fs)] pulses with materials is an exhaustive area of research with underlying, and often extremely rich, physics along with a plethora of applications evolving from it. High-energy materials (HEMs) are chemical compounds or mixture of compounds which, under suitable initiation, undergoes a very rapid exothermic and self-propagating decomposition. Herein, we describe the interaction of laser pulses with materials and its implications for studies on HEMs in four parts: (a) ns and fs laserinduced breakdown spectroscopic (LIBS) studies of HEMs towards understanding the molecular dynamics and discrimination, (b) ps/fs pulses interaction with metallic solids towards the production of nanoparticles, nanostructures and their utility in identifying explosive molecules using surface-enhanced Raman scattering studies, (c) interaction of laser pulses with the bulk and surface of glasses and polymers producing micro- and nanostructures for microfluidic/lab-on-a-chip applications, and (d) ultrafast spectroscopic studies for comprehending the excited state dynamics towards elucidation of vibrational dynamics in HEMs. Several applications resulting from these interactions will be discussed in detail.

  16. Exploratory study of molten core material/concrete interactions, July 1975--March 1977. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A.; Dahlgren, D.A.; Muir, J.F.; Murfin, W.D.

    1978-02-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between high-temperature molten materials and structural concrete is described. The experimental efforts focused on the interaction of melts of reactor core materials weighing 12 to 200 kg at temperatures 1700 to 2800/sup 0/C with calcareous and basaltic concrete representative of that found in existing light-water nuclear reactors. Observations concerning the rate and mode of melt penetration into concrete, the nature and generation rate of gases liberated during the interaction, and heat transfer from the melt to the concrete are described. Concrete erosion is shown to be primarily a melting process with little contribution from mechanical spallation. Water and carbon dioxide thermally released from the concrete are extensively reduced to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Heat transfer from the melt to the concrete is shown to be dependent on gas generation rate and crucible geometry. Interpretation of results from the interaction experiments is supported by separate studies of the thermal decomposition of concretes, response of bulk concrete to intense heat fluxes (28 to 280 W/cm/sup 2/), and heat transfer from molten materials to decomposing solids. The experimental results are compared to assumptions made in previous analytic studies of core meltdown accidents in light-water nuclear reactors. A preliminary computer code, INTER, which models and extrapolates results of the experimental program is described. The code allows estimation of the effect of physical parameters on the nature of the melt/concrete interaction.

  17. Dispersion coefficients for the interaction of Cs atom with different material media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Kaur, Jasmeet; Sahoo, B. K.; Arora, Bindiya

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by a large number of applications, the dispersion (C3) coefficients for the interaction of a Cs atom with different material media such as Au (metal), Si (semiconductor) and various dielectric surfaces like vitreous SiO2, SiNx, sapphire and YAG are determined using accurate values of the dynamic polarizabilities of the Cs atom obtained employing the relativistic coupled-cluster approach and the dynamic dielectric constants of the walls. Moreover, we also give the retardation function in the graphical representation as functions of separation distances to describe the interaction potentials between the Cs atom with the above considered material media. For the easy access to the interaction potentials at a given distance of separation, we give a simple working functional fitting form for the retardation functions in terms of four fitting parameters that are quoted for the respective medium.

  18. XPS investigations of electrolyte/electrode interactions for various Li-ion battery materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oswald, S.; Mikhailova, D.; Scheiba, F.; Reichel, P.; Fiedler, A.; Ehrenberg, H. [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    For future Li-ion battery applications the search for both new design concepts and materials is necessary. The electrodes of the batteries are always in contact with electrolytes, which are responsible for the transport of Li ions during the charging and discharging process. A broad range of materials is considered for both electrolytes and electrodes so that very different chemical interactions between them can occur, while good cycling behavior can only be obtained for stable solid-electrolyte interfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to study the most relevant interactions between various electrode materials in contact with different electrolyte solutions. It is shown how XPS can provide useful information on reactivities and thus preselect suitable electrode/electrolyte combinations, prior to electrochemical performance tests. (orig.)

  19. CREATING AN ENGLISH COMPUTER GAME AS AN INTERACTIVE MATERIAL IN TEACHING ENGLISH TO YOUNG LEARNER (TEYL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilian Ria Adisti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at explaining the interactive materials that were needed in Teaching English to Young Learner, creating an English computer game into an interactive material, and examining the effective of the implementation of an English computer game as an interactive material in Teaching English to Young Learner to the first-grade students of elementary school. The study used Research and Development (R&D adapted from Hutchinson and Water (1987:53-56 and by Borg and Gall (1985. The study had seven stages, they were: (1 conducting a need analysis of the first-grade students, (2 writing the course grid such as lesson plan and map of interactive material, (3 developing preliminary form of English computer game, (4 preliminary field testing by English teacher, English learning expert, and ICT learning expert, (5 revising the English computer game, (6 trying out, and (7 writing the final draft of the use of English computer game for Teaching English to Young Learners. The result of the study showed that students got better achievement in learning English. It could be seen from the result between pre-test and post-test using t-test formula. The result showed t value > t table; 7.165 > 2.021, it meant that there was a significant difference between pre-test and post-test. The post-test was higher that pre-test. The mean of pre-test was 65.2 while the mean of post-test was 87.44. It was also strengthened by the result of the interview which concluded that students liked learning English through this interactive material.

  20. Simulation study on thermal effect of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; Jin, Guangyong; Yuan, Boshi

    2016-10-01

    Laser machining is one of most widely used technologies nowadays and becoming a hot industry as well. At the same time, many kinds of carbon fiber material have been used in different area, such as sports products, transportation, microelectronic industry and so on. Moreover, there is lack of the combination research on the laser interaction with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) material with simulation method. In this paper, the temperature status of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP will be simulated and discussed. Firstly, a laser thermal damage model has been built considering the heat conduction theory and thermal-elasto-plastic theory. Then using COMSOL Multiphysics software to build the geometric model and to simulate the mathematic results. Secondly, the functions of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP has been introduced. Material surface temperature increased by time during the laser irradiating time and the increasing speed is faster when the laser fluence is higher. Furthermore, the peak temperature of the center of material surface is increasing by enhanced the laser fluence when the pulse length is a constant value. In this condition, both the ablation depth and the Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) is larger when increased laser fluence. When keep the laser fluence as a constant value, the laser with shorter pulse length is more easier to make the CFRP to the vaporization material. Meanwhile, the HAZ is becoming larger when the pulse length is longer, and the thermal effect depth is as the same trend as the HAZ. As a result, when long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material, the thermal effect is the significant value to analysis the process, which is mostly effect by laser fluence and pulse length. For laser machining in different industries, the laser parameter choose should be different. The shorter pulse length laser is suitable for the laser machining which requires high accuracy, and the longer one is better for the deeper or larger

  1. Some significant but buried studies of embodiment and materiality in social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2016-01-01

    . The review identified an embodied turn in the field becoming established from around 2004, but also noted earlier ’significant moments’, including publications before the more-commonly-cited Goodwin (2000), or Streeck et al. (2011) collection. Apart from pioneering work in the 1970/80s (C. & M.H.Goodwin...... discussion of doing CA and EM as a research community. Goodwin, C. (2000) Action and embodiment within situated human interaction. Journal of Pragmatics, 32, 1489–1522. Nevile, M. (2015) The embodied turn in research on language and social interaction. Research on Language and Social Interaction. 48,2: 121......-151. Streeck, J., Goodwin, C., & LeBaron, C. (Eds.). (2011) Embodied interaction: Language and body in the material world. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press....

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between energetic dust and plasma-facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Guo-jian, E-mail: niugj@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Li, Xiao-chun; Xu, Qian; Yang, Zhong-shi [Hefei Center Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Luo, Guang-nan [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Hefei Center Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Hefei Science Center of CAS, Hefei (China)

    2015-11-15

    The interactions between dust and plasma-facing material (PFM) relate to the lifetime of PFM and impurity production. Series results have been obtained theoretically and experimentally but more detailed studies are needed. In present research, we investigate the evolution of kinetic, potential and total energy of plasma-facing material (PFM) in order to understand the dust/PFM interaction process. Three typical impacting energy are selected, i.e., 1, 10 and 100 keV/dust for low-, high- and hyper-energy impacting cases. For low impacting energy, dust particles stick on PFM surface without damaging it. Two typical time points exist and the temperature of PFM grows all the time but PFM structure experience a modifying process. Under high energy case, three typical points appear. The temperature curve fluctuates in the whole interaction process which indicates there are dust/PFM and kinetic/potential energy exchanges. In the hyper-energy case in present simulation, the violence dust/PFM interactions cause sputtering and crater investigating on energy evolution curves. We further propose the statistics of energy distribution. Results show that about half of impacting energy consumes on heating plasma-facing material meanwhile the other half on PFM structure deformation. Only a small proportion becomes kinetic energy of interstitial or sputtering atoms.

  3. Laser-material interaction during atom probe tomography of oxides with embedded metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinde, D.; Arnoldi, L.; Devaraj, A.; Vella, A.

    2016-10-28

    Oxide-supported metal nano-particles are of great interest in catalysis but also in the development of new large-spectrum-absorption materials. The design of such nano materials requires three-dimensional characterization with a high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. The laser assisted Atom Probe Tomography (La-APT) presents both these capacities if an accurate understanding of laser-material interaction is developed. In this paper, we focus on the fundamental physics of field evaporation as a function of sample geometry, laser power, and DC electric field for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO. By understanding the laser-material interaction through experiments and a theoretical model of heat diffusion inside the sample after the interaction with laser pulse, we point out the physical origin of the noise and determine the conditions to reduce it by more than one order of magnitude, improving the sensitivity of the La-APT for metal-dielectric composites. Published by AIP Publishing.

  4. Modification of the Interfacial Interaction between Carbon Fiber and Epoxy with Carbon Hybrid Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejing Yu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the hybrid materials and epoxy and carbon fiber (CF composites were improved significantly as compared to the CF composites made from unmodified epoxy. The reasons could be attributed to the strong interfacial interaction between the CF and the epoxy composites for the existence of carbon nanomaterials. The microstructure and dispersion of carbon nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and optical microscopy (OM. The results showed that the dispersion of the hybrid materials in the polymer was superior to other carbon nanomaterials. The high viscosity and shear stress characterized by a rheometer and the high interfacial friction and damping behavior characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA indicated that the strong interfacial interaction was greatly improved between fibers and epoxy composites. Remarkably, the tensile tests presented that the CF composites with hybrid materials and epoxy composites have a better reinforcing and toughening effect on CF, which further verified the strong interfacial interaction between epoxy and CF for special structural hybrid materials.

  5. Hydrogen-bond interaction assisted branched copolymer HILIC material for separation and N-glycopeptides enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wenya; Liu, Jianxi; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Yu; Weng, Yejing; Li, Senwu; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-09-01

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) has attracted increasing attention in recent years due to its efficient application in the separation of polar compounds and the enrichment of glycopeptides. However, HILIC materials are still of weak hydrophilicity and thereby present weak retention and selectivity. In this work, branched copolymer modified hydrophilic material Sil@Poly(THMA-co-MBAAm), with high hydrophilicity and unique "claw-like" polyhydric groups, were prepared by "grafting from" thiol-ene click reaction. Due to the abundant functional groups provided by branched copolymer, the material showed excellent retention for nucleosides, necleobases, acidic compounds, sugars and peptides. Furthermore, Sil@Poly(THMA-co-MBAAm) was also applied for the N-glycosylation sites profiling towards the digests of the mouse brain, and 1997N-glycosylated peptides were identified, corresponding to 686 glycoprotein groups. Due to the assisted hydrogen-bond interaction, the selectivity for glycopeptide enrichment in the real sample reached 94.6%, which was the highest as far as we know. All these results indicated that such hydrogen-bond interaction assisted branched copolymer HILIC material possessed great potential for the separation and large scale glycoproteomics analysis.

  6. EDITORIAL: Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyldgaard, Per; Rahman, Talat S.

    2012-10-01

    The past decade has seen a dramatic rise in interest in exploring the role that van der Waals (vdW) or dispersion forces play in materials and in material behavior. Part of this stems from the obvious fact that vdW interactions (and other weak forces, such as Casimir) underpin molecular recognition, i.e., nature's approach to search for a match between genes and anti-genes and hence enable biological function. Less obvious is the recognition that vdW interactions affect a multitude of properties of a vast variety of materials in general, some of which also have strong technological applications. While for two atom- or orbital-sized material fragments the dispersive contributions to binding are small compared to those from the better known forms (ionic, covalent, metallic), those between sparse materials (spread over extended areas) can be of paramount importance. For example, an understanding of binding in graphite cannot arise solely from a study of the graphene layers individually, but also requires insight from inter-sheet graphene vdW bonding. It is the extended-area vdW bonding that provides sufficient cohesion to make graphite a robust, naturally occurring material. In fact, it is the vdW-bonded graphite, and not the all-covalently bonded diamond, that is the preferred form of pure carbon under ambient conditions. Also important is the understanding that vdW attraction can attain a dramatic relevance even if the material fragments, the building blocks, are not necessarily parallel from the outset or smooth when viewed in isolation (such as a graphene sheet or a carbon nanotube). This can happen if the building blocks have some softness and flexibility and allow an internal relative alignment to emerge. The vdW forces can then cause increasingly larger parts of the interacting fragments to line up at sub-nanometer separations and thus beget more areas with a sizable vdW bonding contribution. The gecko can scale a wall because it can bring its flexible hairs

  7. Interactions between grape skin cell wall material and commercial enological tannins. Practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Cano-Lechuga, Mario; Ruiz-García, Yolanda; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2014-01-01

    Commercial enological tannins were used to investigate the role that cell wall material plays in proanthocyanidin adsorption. Insoluble cell wall material, prepared from the skin of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Monastrell berries, was combined with solutions containing six different commercial enological tannins (proanthocyanidin-type tannins). Analysis of the proanthocyanidins in the solution, after fining with cell wall material, using phloroglucinolysis and size exclusion chromatography, provided quantitative and qualitative information on the non-adsorbed compounds. Cell wall material showed strong affinity for the proanthocyanidins, one of the commercial tannins being bound up to 61% in the experiment. Comparison of the molecular mass distribution of the commercial enological tannins in solution, before and after fining, suggested that cell walls affinity for proanthocyanidins was more related with the proanthocyanidin molecular mass than with their percentage of galloylation. These interactions may have some enological implications, especially as regards the time of commercial tannins addition to the must/wine.

  8. When biomolecules meet graphene: from molecular level interactions to material design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dapeng; Zhang, Wensi; Yu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Zhenping; Su, Zhiqiang; Wei, Gang

    2016-12-01

    Graphene-based materials have attracted increasing attention due to their atomically-thick two-dimensional structures, high conductivity, excellent mechanical properties, and large specific surface areas. The combination of biomolecules with graphene-based materials offers a promising method to fabricate novel graphene-biomolecule hybrid nanomaterials with unique functions in biology, medicine, nanotechnology, and materials science. In this review, we focus on a summarization of the recent studies in functionalizing graphene-based materials using different biomolecules, such as DNA, peptides, proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, and viruses. The different interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level are demonstrated and discussed in detail. In addition, the potential applications of the created graphene-biomolecule nanohybrids in drug delivery, cancer treatment, tissue engineering, biosensors, bioimaging, energy materials, and other nanotechnological applications are presented. This review will be helpful to know the modification of graphene with biomolecules, understand the interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level, and design functional graphene-based nanomaterials with unique properties for various applications.

  9. Interactions between organisms and parent materials of a constructed Technosol shape its hydrostructural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Maha; Grimaldi, Michel; Lerch, Thomas Z.; Pando, Anne; Gigon, Agnès; Blouin, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    There is no information on how organisms influence hydrostructural properties of constructed Technosols and how such influence will be affected by the parent-material composition factor. In a laboratory experiment, parent materials, which were excavated deep horizons of soils and green waste compost (GWC), were mixed at six levels of GWC (from 0 to 50 %). Each mixture was set up in the presence/absence of plants and/or earthworms, in a full factorial design (n = 96). After 21 weeks, hydrostructural properties of constructed Technosols were characterized by soil shrinkage curves. Organisms explained the variance of hydrostructural characteristics (19 %) a little better than parent-material composition (14 %). The interaction between the effects of organisms and parent-material composition explained the variance far better (39 %) than each single factor. To summarize, compost and plants played a positive role in increasing available water in macropores and micropores; plants were extending the positive effect of compost up to 40 and 50 % GWC. Earthworms affected the void ratio for mixtures from 0 to 30 % GWC and available water in micropores, but not in macropores. Earthworms also acted synergistically with plants by increasing their root biomass, resulting in positive effects on available water in macropores. Organisms and their interaction with parent materials positively affected the hydrostructural properties of constructed Technosols, with potential positive consequences on resistance to drought or compaction. Considering organisms when creating Technosols could be a promising approach to improve their fertility.

  10. Thermodynamics of water-solid interactions in crystalline and amorphous pharmaceutical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Pharmaceutical materials, crystalline and amorphous, sorb water from the atmosphere, which affects critical factors in the development of drugs, such as the selection of drug substance crystal form, compatibility with excipients, dosage form selection, packaging, and product shelf-life. It is common practice to quantify the amount of water that a material sorbs at a given relative humidity (RH), but the results alone provide minimal to no physicochemical insight into water-solid interactions, without which pharmaceutical scientists cannot develop an understanding of their materials, so as to anticipate and circumvent potential problems. This research was conducted to advance the science of pharmaceutical materials by examining the thermodynamics of solids with sorbed water. The compounds studied include nonhygroscopic drugs, a channel hydrate drug, a stoichiometric hydrate excipient, and an amorphous excipient. The water sorption isotherms were measured over a range of temperature to extract the partial molar enthalpy and entropy of sorbed water as well as the same quantities for some of the solids. It was found that water-solid interactions spanned a range of energy and entropy as a function of RH, which was unique to the solid, and which could be valuable in identifying batch-to-batch differences and effects of processing in material performance.

  11. A study of the material in the ATLAS inner detector using secondary hadronic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Bondioli, Mario; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Debbe, Ramiro; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dubbs, Tim; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernandez, Carlos Medina; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Keung, Justin; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kraus, Jana; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin–Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Savva, Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shichi, Hideharu; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jürgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS inner detector is used to reconstruct secondary vertices due to hadronic interactions of primary collision products, so probing the location and amount of material in the inner region of ATLAS. Data collected in 7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC, with a minimum bias trigger, are used for comparisons with simulated events. The reconstructed secondary vertices have spatial resolutions ranging from ~200 microns to 1 mm. The overall material description in the simulation is validated to within an experimental uncertainty of about 7%. This will lead to a better understanding of the reconstruction of various objects such as tracks, leptons, jets, and missing transverse momentum.

  12. Research on the potential use of interactive materials on astronomy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Macedo, Josue

    2016-07-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Sciences, using the mixed methodology, combined with the three pedagogical moments. Among other aspects, the viability of the use of resources was noticed, involving digital technologies and interactive materials on teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options for future teachers and meet their training needs.

  13. Inhomogeneity Dislocation Interaction of Piezoelectric Materials Under Remote Non-uniform Shear & Electric Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The complex potentials method is used to develop a solution for a screw dislocation interacting with an elliptical piezoelectric inhomogeneity in piezoelectric materials under remote non-uniform antiplane shear and non-uniform inplane electric field. The theoretical analysis result is formulated via the conformal mapping and Laurent series expansion in the transformed plane by using complex variable method. The general expression of the complex variables is dirived explicitly in both the elliptical inhomogeneity and the surrounding matrix

  14. Interaction of graphene-related materials with human intestinal cells: an in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucki, M; Rupper, P; Sarrieu, C; Melucci, M; Treossi, E; Schwarz, A; León, V; Kraegeloh, A; Flahaut, E; Vázquez, E; Palermo, V; Wick, P

    2016-04-28

    Graphene-related materials (GRM) inherit unique combinations of physicochemical properties which offer a high potential for technological as well as biomedical applications. It is not clear which physicochemical properties are the most relevant factors influencing the behavior of GRM in complex biological environments. In this study we have focused on the interaction of GRM, especially graphene oxide (GO), and Caco-2 cells in vitro. We mimiked stomach transition by acid-treatment of two representative GRM followed by analysis of their physicochemical properties. No significant changes in the material properties or cell viability of exposed Caco-2 cells in respect to untreated GRM could be detected. Furthermore, we explored the interaction of four different GO and Caco-2 cells to identify relevant physicochemical properties for the establishment of a material property-biological response relationship. Despite close interaction with the cell surface and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), no acute toxicity was found for any of the applied GO (concentration range 0-80 μg ml(-1)) after 24 h and 48 h exposure. Graphene nanoplatelet aggregates led to low acute toxicity at high concentrations, indicating that aggregation, the number of layers or the C/O ratio have a more pronounced effect on the cell viability than the lateral size alone.

  15. Dynamics of the guest-host orientational interaction in dye-doped liquid-crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Thai V; Xu, Lei; Shen, Y R

    2005-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study on the dynamics of laser-induced molecular reorientation in a dye-doped liquid crystalline (LC) medium that exhibits significant enhancement of the optical Kerr nonlinearity due to guest-host interaction. Using various techniques, we separately characterized the dynamical responses of the relevant molecular species present in the medium following photoexcitation and, thus, were able to follow the transient process in which photoexcitation of the dye molecules exert through guest-host interaction a net torque on the host LC material, leading to the observed enhanced optical Kerr nonlinearity. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the time-dependent theory based on a mean-field model of the guest-host interaction.

  16. Fumed silica nanoparticle mediated biomimicry for optimal cell-material interactions for artificial organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mel, Achala; Ramesh, Bala; Scurr, David J; Alexander, Morgan R; Hamilton, George; Birchall, Martin; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-03-01

    Replacement of irreversibly damaged organs due to chronic disease, with suitable tissue engineered implants is now a familiar area of interest to clinicians and multidisciplinary scientists. Ideal tissue engineering approaches require scaffolds to be tailor made to mimic physiological environments of interest with specific surface topographical and biological properties for optimal cell-material interactions. This study demonstrates a single-step procedure for inducing biomimicry in a novel nanocomposite base material scaffold, to re-create the extracellular matrix, which is required for stem cell integration and differentiation to mature cells. Fumed silica nanoparticle mediated procedure of scaffold functionalization, can be potentially adapted with multiple bioactive molecules to induce cellular biomimicry, in the development human organs. The proposed nanocomposite materials already in patients for number of implants, including world first synthetic trachea, tear ducts and vascular bypass graft.

  17. Assessment of database for interaction of tritium with ITER plasma facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, T.J.; Anderl, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The present work surveys recent literature on hydrogen isotope interactions with Be, SS and Inconels, Cu, C, and V, and alloys of Cu and V. The goals are (1) to provide input to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) team to help with tritium source term estimates for the Early Safety and Environmental Characterization Study and (2) to provide guidance for planning additional research that will be needed to fill gaps in the present materials database. Properties of diffusivity, solubility, permeability, chemical reactions, Soret effect, recombination coefficient, surface effects, trapping, porosity, layered structures, interfaces, and oxides are considered. Various materials data are tabulated, and a matrix display shows an assessment of the quality of the data available for each main property of each material. Recommendations are made for interim values of diffusivity and solubility to be used, pending further discussion by the ITER community.

  18. Effect of the particle interactions on the structuration and mechanical strength of particulate materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrant, A. L. R.; Pauchard, L.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of the particles interaction on the mechanical strength of particulate materials. Starting from a dispersion of charged particles, the interparticle force can be modulated by the addition of ionic species. The structuration of the medium is then governed by the competition between drying and gelation processes. Rheological measurements show that addition of ionic species boosts the aggregation dynamics into a solid state and changes the structural properties of the final material. This last point is highlighted by precise measurements of i) the mechanical properties of particulate materials through crack pattern quantification, supported by indentation testing, and ii) the permeation properties during the drying process in a controlled geometry. In particular, these results show a decrease of the drained elastic modulus and an increase in the pore size when the ionic species content in the particulate material is increased. Hence, we show that the solid structure behaves mechanically as a network whose pore size increases when the electrostatic repulsion between particles is decreased. These results are consistent with the fact that the way particulate materials are structured determines their mechanical properties.

  19. The Supply Chain Triangle: How Synchronisation, Stability, and Productivity of Material Flows Interact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Klug

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical evidence created a commonly accepted understanding that synchronisation and stability of material flows impact its productivity. This crucial link between synchronous and stable material flows by time and quantity to create a supply chain with the highest throughput rates is at the heart of lean thinking. Although this supply chain triangle has generally been acknowledged over many years, it is necessary to reach a finer understanding of these dynamics. Therefore, we will develop and study supply chains with the help of fluid dynamics. A multistage, continuous material flow is modelled through a conservation law for material density. Unlike similar approaches, our model is not based on some quasi steady-state assumptions about the stochastic behaviour of the involved supply chain but rather on a simple deterministic rule for material flow density. These models allow us to take into account the nonlinear, dynamical interactions of different supply chain echelons and to test synchronised and stable flow with respect to its potential impacts. Numerical simulations verify that the model is able to simulate transient supply chain phenomena. Moreover, a quantification method relating to the fundamental link between synchronisation, stability, and productivity of supply chains has been found.

  20. Interaction of graphene-related materials with human intestinal cells: an in vitro approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucki, M.; Rupper, P.; Sarrieu, C.; Melucci, M.; Treossi, E.; Schwarz, A.; León, V.; Kraegeloh, A.; Flahaut, E.; Vázquez, E.; Palermo, V.; Wick, P.

    2016-04-01

    Graphene-related materials (GRM) inherit unique combinations of physicochemical properties which offer a high potential for technological as well as biomedical applications. It is not clear which physicochemical properties are the most relevant factors influencing the behavior of GRM in complex biological environments. In this study we have focused on the interaction of GRM, especially graphene oxide (GO), and Caco-2 cells in vitro. We mimiked stomach transition by acid-treatment of two representative GRM followed by analysis of their physicochemical properties. No significant changes in the material properties or cell viability of exposed Caco-2 cells in respect to untreated GRM could be detected. Furthermore, we explored the interaction of four different GO and Caco-2 cells to identify relevant physicochemical properties for the establishment of a material property-biological response relationship. Despite close interaction with the cell surface and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), no acute toxicity was found for any of the applied GO (concentration range 0-80 μg ml-1) after 24 h and 48 h exposure. Graphene nanoplatelet aggregates led to low acute toxicity at high concentrations, indicating that aggregation, the number of layers or the C/O ratio have a more pronounced effect on the cell viability than the lateral size alone.Graphene-related materials (GRM) inherit unique combinations of physicochemical properties which offer a high potential for technological as well as biomedical applications. It is not clear which physicochemical properties are the most relevant factors influencing the behavior of GRM in complex biological environments. In this study we have focused on the interaction of GRM, especially graphene oxide (GO), and Caco-2 cells in vitro. We mimiked stomach transition by acid-treatment of two representative GRM followed by analysis of their physicochemical properties. No significant changes in the material properties or cell

  1. Anodized titania: Processing and characterization to improve cell-materials interactions for load bearing implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kakoli

    The objective of this study is to investigate in vitro cell-materials interactions using human osteoblast cells on anodized titanium. Titanium is a bioinert material and, therefore, gets encapsulated after implantation into the living body by a fibrous tissue that isolates them from the surrounding tissues. In this work, bioactive nonporous and nanoporous TiO2 layers were grown on commercially pure titanium substrate by anodization process using different electrolyte solutions namely (1) H3PO 4, (2) HF and (3) H2SO4, (4) aqueous solution of citric acid, sodium fluoride and sulfuric acid. The first three electrolytes produced bioactive TiO2 films with a nonporous structure showing three distinctive surface morphologies. Nanoporous morphology was obtained on Ti-surfaces from the fourth electrolyte at 20V for 4h. Cross-sectional view of the nanoporous surface reveals titania nanotubes of length 600 nm. It was found that increasing anodization time initially increased the height of the nanotubes while maintaining the tubular array structure, but beyond 4h, growth of nanotubes decreased with a collapsed array structure. Human osteoblast (HOB) cell attachment and growth behavior were studied using an osteoprecursor cell line (OPC 1) for 3, 7 and 11 days. Colonization of the cells was noticed with distinctive cell-to-cell attachment on HF anodized surfaces. TiO2 layer grown in H2SO4 electrolyte did not show significant cell growth on the surface, and some cell death was also noticed. Good cellular adherence with extracellular matrix extensions in between the cells was noticed for samples anodized with H3PO 4 electrolyte and nanotube surface. Cell proliferation was excellent on anodized nanotube surfaces. An abundant amount of extracellular matrix (ECM) between the neighboring cells was also noticed on nanotube surfaces with filopodia extensions coming out from cells to grasp the nanoporous surface for anchorage. To better understand and compare cell-materials interactions

  2. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  3. Evaporative moisture loss from heterogeneous stone: Material-environment interactions during drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Daniel; Warke, Patricia; McCabe, Stephen; Gomez-Heras, M.

    2016-11-01

    The complexities of evaporation from structurally and mineralogically heterogeneous sandstone (Locharbriggs Sandstone) are investigated through a laboratory-based experiment in which a variety of environmental conditions are simulated. Data reported demonstrate the significance of material-environment interactions on the spatial and temporal variability of evaporative dynamics. Evaporation from porous stone is determined by the interplay between environmental, material and solution properties, which govern the rate and mode by which water is transmitted to, and subsequently removed from, an evaporating surface. Initially, when the stone is saturated, evaporation is characterized by high rates of moisture loss primarily controlled by external atmospheric conditions. However, as drying progresses, eventually the hydraulic continuity between the stone surface and subsurface is disrupted with recession of the drying front and a decrease in evaporation rates which become reliant on the ability of the material to transport water vapour to the block surface. Pore size distribution and connectivity, as well as other material properties, control the timing of each stage of evaporation and the nature of the transition. These experimental data highlight the complexity of evaporation, demonstrating that different regions of the same stone can exhibit varying moisture dynamics during drying and that the rate and nature of evaporative loss differs under different environmental conditions. The results identify the importance of material-environment interactions during drying and that stone micro-environmental conditions cannot be inferred from ambient data alone. These data have significance for understanding the spatial distribution of stone surface weathering-related morphologies in both the natural and built environments where mineralogical and/or structural heterogeneity creates differences in moisture flux and hence variable drying rates. Such differences may provide a

  4. Numerical modelling of thermal effects on biological tissue during laser-material interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latinovic, Z.; Sreckovic, M.; Janicijevic, M.; Ilic, J.; Radovanovic, J.

    2014-09-01

    Among numerous methods of the modelling of laser interaction with the material equivalent of biological tissue (including macroscopic and microscopic cell interaction), the case of pathogenic prostates is chosen to be studied. The principal difference between the inorganic and tissue equivalent material is the term which includes blood flow. Thermal modelling is chosen for interaction mechanisms, i.e. bio-heat equation. It was noticed that the principal problems are in selecting appropriate numerical methods, available mathematical program packages and finding all exact parameters for performing the needed calculations. As principal parameters, among them density, heat conduction, and specific heat, there are many other parameters which depend on the chosen approach (there could be up to 20 parameters, among them coefficient of time scaling, arterial blood temperature, metabolic heat source, etc). The laser type, including its wavelength which defines the quantity of absorbed energy and dynamic of irradiation, presents the term which could be modulated for the chosen problem. In this study, the program Comsol Multiphysics 3.5 is used in the simulation of prostate exposed to Nd3+:YAG laser in its fundamental mode.

  5. Environmentally responsive material to address human-system interaction in the automotive cockpit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehkopf, Jackie D.; Barbat, Saeed D.; Goldman, Neil M.; Samus, Marsha A.; Gold, Harris

    2001-06-01

    There is significant human-system interaction in an automotive cockpit, and for particular components this interaction can be ever-present while being transient in nature. It is envisioned that environmentally responsive materials can be used in some components to accommodate personal and transient differences in the desired human-system interaction. Systems containing responsive gels have been developed to provide user activation and adjustment of the physical properties of a particular interior automotive component. Proprietary reverse viscosification gel formulations were developed that are thermally responsive. Formulations were modified to adjust the dynamic modulus and viscosity in terms of magnitude, amount of change over the viscosification transition, and the temperature over which the transition occurs. Changes in the physical properties of two orders of magnitude and more were achieved over a narrow transition region. Preliminary human factors assessment indicates that this order of magnitude of change is desirable. As the system of responsive gel, encapsulating material and activation mechanism is developed further, additional human factors studies will refine the desired physical properties and thermal activation mechanism. Ultimately, this system will have to perform over the broad range of temperatures imposed on interior automotive components and exhibit long-term durability chemically, physically and mechanically.

  6. Ultrasonic excitation affects friction interactions between food materials and cutting tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Yvonne; Zahn, Susann; Schindler, Claudia; Rohm, Harald

    2009-06-01

    In the food industry, ultrasonic cutting is used to improve separation by a reduction of the cutting force. This reduction can be attributed to the modification of tool-workpiece interactions at the cutting edge and along the tool flanks because of the superposition of the cutting movement with ultrasonic vibration of the cutting tool. In this study, model experiments were used to analyze friction between the flanks of a cutting tool and the material to be cut. Friction force at a commercial cutting sonotrode was quantified using combined cutting-friction experiments, and sliding friction tests were carried out by adapting a standard draw-off assembly and using an ultrasonic welding sonotrode as sliding surface. The impact of material parameters, ultrasonic amplitude, and the texture of the contacting food surface on friction force was investigated. The results show that ultrasonic vibration significantly reduces the sliding friction force. While the amplitude showed no influence within the tested range, the texture of the contact surface of the food affects the intensity of ultrasonic transportation effects. These effects are a result of mechanical interactions and of changes in material properties of the contact layer, which are induced by the deformation of contact points, friction heating and absorption heating because of the dissipation of mechanical vibration energy.

  7. Interacting effects of strengthening and twin boundary migration in nanotwinned materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kartikey; Joshi, Shailendra P.

    Twin boundaries play a governing role in the mechanical characteristics of nanotwinned materials. They act as yield strengthening agents by offering resistance to non-coplanar dislocation slip. Twin boundary migration may cause yield softening while also enhancing the strain hardening response. In this work, we investigate the interaction between strengthening and twin boundary migration mechanisms by developing a length-scale dependent crystal plasticity framework for face-centered-cubic nanotwinned materials. The crystal plasticity model incorporates strengthening mechanisms due to dislocation pile-up via slip and slip-rate gradients and twin boundary migration via source-based twin partial nucleation and lattice dislocation-twin boundary interaction. The coupled effect of the load orientation and initial twin size on the speed of twin boundary is discussed and an expression for the same is proposed in terms of relevant material parameters. The efficacy of finite element simulations and the analytical expression in predicting evolution of nanotwinned microstructures comprising size and spatial distributions of twins is demonstrated.

  8. Direct evidence for a supernova interacting with a large amount of hydrogen-free circumstellar material

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Ami, Sagi; Mazzali, Paolo A; Modjaz, Maryam; Rabinak, Itay; Sullivan, Mark; Bildsten, Lars; Poznanski, Dovi; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S; Horesh, Assaf; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Nugent, Peter E; Ofek, Eran O; Perley, Daniel; Quimby, Robert; Xu, Dong

    2013-01-01

    We present our observations of SN 2010mb, a Type Ic SN lacking spectroscopic signatures of H and He. SN 2010mb has a slowly-declining light curve ($\\sim600\\,$days) that cannot be powered by $^{56}$Ni/$^{56}$Co radioactivity, the common energy source for Type Ic SNe. We detect signatures of interaction with hydrogen-free CSM including a blue quasi-continuum and, uniquely, narrow oxygen emission lines that require high densities ($\\sim10^9$cm$^{-3}$). From the observed spectra and light curve we estimate that the amount of material involved in the interaction was $\\sim3$M$_{\\odot}$. Our observations are in agreement with models of pulsational pair-instability SNe described in the literature.

  9. Interaction between pollutants produced in sewage sludge combustion and cement raw material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Araceli; Conesa, Juan A; Martín-Gullón, Ignacio; Font, Rafael

    2007-09-01

    Nowadays the use of waste as secondary fuel in clinker kilns is an extensive practice, but the interaction between cement raw material (CRM) and the combustion gases of the fuels has not been extensively studied. Because of that, in this work the effect of the interaction of exhaust from the combustion of sewage sludge and CRM has been studied in a laboratory furnace. The experiments were performed at 300 degrees C, close to the temperature at the cyclones in a cement industry. The behavior of volatile compounds, polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAH) and polychloro dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychloro dibenzofurans (PCCD/F) were analysed in the presence or absence of CRM. The results obtained show that the presence of CRM at the outlet of the combustion gases is beneficial for the decrease of pollutant emissions.

  10. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [and others

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  11. Non-von Neumann computing using plasmon particles interacting with phase change materials (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Toshiharu

    2016-09-01

    Control of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) excited on metal nanostructures has drawn attention for applications in dynamic switching of plasmonic devices. As a reversible active media for LSPR control, chalcogenide phase-change materials (PCMs) such as GeSbTe (GST) are promising for high-contrast robust plasmonic switching. Owing to the plasticity and the threshold behavior during both amorphization and crystallization of PCMs, PCM-based LSPR switching elements possess a dual functionality of memory and processing. Integration of LSPR switching elements so that they interact with each other will allow us to build non-von-Neumann computing devices. As a specific demonstration, we discuss the implementation of a cellular automata (CA) algorithm into interacting LSPR switching elements. In the model we propose, PCM cells, which can be in one of two states (amorphous and crystalline), interact with each other by being linked by a AuNR, whose LSPR peak wavelength is determined by the phase of PCM cells on the both sides. The CA program proceeds by irradiating with a light pulse train. The local rule set is defined by the temperature rise in the PCM cells induced by the LSPR of the AuNR, which is subject to the intensity and wavelength of the irradiating pulse. We also investigate the possibility of solving a problem analogous to the spin-glass problem by using a coupled dipole system, in which the individual coupling strengths can be modified to optimize the system so that the exact solution can be easily reached. For this algorithm, we propose an implementation based on an idea that coupled plasmon particles can create long-range spatial correlations, and the interaction of this with a phase-change material allows the coupling strength to be modified.

  12. Particularities of interaction of CO sub 2 -laser radiation with oxide materials

    CERN Document Server

    Salikhov, T P

    2002-01-01

    The results of experimental investigation of vapor phase influence on the interaction parameters of the infrared laser radiation with oxide materials (Al sub 2 O sub 3 , ZrO sub 2 , CeO sub 2) have been presented. A phenomenon of laser radiation by the samples investigated under laser heating has been experimentally discovered for the first time. This phenomenon connected with forming of the stable vapor shell above the irradiated samples was expressed as a sharp drop in temperature on the heating curve and called as an absorption flash. (author)

  13. Study of the failure mechanism for fiber composite materials taking account of physicochemical interaction of components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabolotskii, A.A.; Ignatova, N.P.

    1985-11-01

    An analytical approach is presented to study the failure process for fiber composite materials (CM). Failure processes are modelled in a computer, including a stage for model construction and a loading and failure stage for the model CM as a simulation of CM behavior. Three composite materials were considered with an aluminum matrix reinforced with fibers of carbon, boron (coated with B/sub 4/C), and silicon carbide. The authors found that failure of a CM develops by one of three micromechanisms depending on the ratio of mechanical characteristics of interaction, i.e., retention in the CM of fiber strength and matrix ductility and creation of strong component bonds. The sequence of elementary acts forming one or another failure macromechanism is presented.

  14. Materials Design via Optimized Intramolecular Noncovalent Interactions for High-Performance Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiaojie; Liao, Qiaogan; Manley, Eric F.; Wu, Zishan; Wang, Yulun; Wang, Weida; Yang, Tingbin; Shin, Young-Eun; Cheng, Xing; Liang, Yongye; Chen, Lin X.; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Marks, Tobin J.; Guo, Xugang

    2016-03-15

    We report the design, synthesis, and implemention in semiconducting polymers of a novel head-to-head linkage containing the TRTOR (3-alkyl-3'-alkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene) donor subunit having a single strategically optimized, planarizing noncovalent S···O interaction. Diverse complementary thermal, optical, electrochemical, X-ray scattering, electrical, photovoltaic, and electron microscopic characterization techniques are applied to establish structure-property correlations in a TRTOR-based polymer series. In comparison to monomers having double S···O interactions, replacing one alkoxy substituent with a less electron-donating alkyl one yields TRTOR-based polymers with significantly depressed (0.2-0.3 eV) HOMOs. Furthermore, the weaker single S···O interaction and greater TRTOR steric encumberance enhances materials processability without sacrificing backbone planarity. From another perspective, TRTOR has comparable electronic properties to ring-fused 5Hdithieno[ 3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyran (DTP) subunits, but a centrosymmetric geometry which promotes a more compact and ordered structure than bulkier, axisymmetric DTP. Compared to monosubstituted TTOR (3-alkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene), alkylation at the TRTOR bithiophene 3-position enhances conjugation and polymer crystallinity with contracted π-π stacking. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) data reveal that the greater steric hindrance and the weaker single S···O interaction are not detrimental to close packing and high crystallinity. As a proof of materials design, copolymerizing TRTOR with phthalimides yields copolymers with promising thin-film transistor mobility as high as 0.42 cm2/(V·s) and 6.3% power conversion efficiency in polymer solar cells, the highest of any phthalimide copolymers reported to date. The depressed TRTOR HOMOs imbue these polymers with substantially increased Ion/Ioff ratios and Voc’s versus analogous subunits with multiple electron donating

  15. Plume splitting in pico-second laser-material interaction under the influence of shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gacek, Sobieslaw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2010 H. M. Black Engineering Building Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2161 (United States); Wang Xinwei, E-mail: xwang3@iastate.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2010 H. M. Black Engineering Building Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2161 (United States)

    2009-09-07

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study the physics of plume splitting in pico-second laser material interaction in background gas. The velocity distribution shows a clear split into two distinctive components. Detailed atom trajectory track reveals the behavior of atoms within the peaks and uncovers the mechanisms of peak formation. The observed plume velocity splitting emerges from two distinguished parts of the plume. The front peak of the plume is from the faster moving atoms and smaller particles during laser-material ablation. This region experiences strong constraint from the ambient gas and has substantial velocity attenuation. The second (rear) peak of the plume velocity originates from the larger and slower clusters in laser-material ablation. These larger clusters/particles experience very little constraint from the background, but are affected by the relaxation dynamics of plume and appear almost as a standing wave during the evolution. Density splitting only appears at the beginning of laser-material ablation and quickly disappears due to spread-out of the slower moving clusters. It is found that higher ambient pressure and stronger laser fluence favor earlier plume splitting.

  16. Fracture of granular materials composed of arbitrary grain shapes: A new cohesive interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, A.; Artoni, R.; Richard, P.; Descantes, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Discrete Element Methods (DEM) are a useful tool to model the fracture of cohesive granular materials. For this kind of application, simple particle shapes (discs in 2D, spheres in 3D) are usually employed. However, dealing with more general particle shapes allows to account for the natural heterogeneity of grains inside real materials. We present a discrete model allowing to mimic cohesion between contacting or non-contacting particles whatever their shape in 2D and 3D. The cohesive interactions are made of cohesion points placed on interacting particles, with the aim of representing a cohesive phase lying between the grains. Contact situations are solved according to unilateral contact and Coulomb friction laws. In order to test the developed model, 2D unixial compression simulations are performed. Numerical results show the ability of the model to mimic the macroscopic behavior of an aggregate grain subject to axial compression, as well as fracture initiation and propagation. A study of the influence of model and sample parameters provides important information on the ability of the model to reproduce various behaviors.

  17. Present status of plasma-wall interactions research and materials development activities in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-08-01

    It is well known in the fusion engineering community that the plasma confinement performance in magnetic fusion devices is strongly affected by edge-plasma interactions with surface components. These plasma-material interactions (PMI) include fuel particle recycling and impurity generation both during normal and off-normal operation. To understand and then to control PMI effects, considerable effort has been made, particularly over the last decade in US, supported by Department of Energy, Division of Development and Technology. Also, because plasma-facing components are generally expected to receive significant amount of heat due to plasma bombardment and run-away electrons, materials must tolerate high-heat fluxes (HHF). The HHF-component research has been conducted in parallel with PMI research. One strong motivation for these research activities is that DT-burning experiments are currently planned in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR) in early 1990s. Several different but mutually complementary approaches have been taken in the PMI+HHF research. The first approach is to conduct PMI experiments using toroidal fusion devices such as TFTR. The second one is to simulate elemental processes involved in PMI using ion beams and electron beams, etc. The last one but not least is to use non-tokamak plasma facilities. Along with these laboratory activities, new materials have been developed and evaluated from the PMI+HHF point of view. In this paper, several major PMI+HHF research facilities in US and their activities are briefly reviewed. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, M A [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding.

  19. Interactions between organisms and parent materials of a constructed Technosol shape its hydrostructural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, M.; Grimaldi, M.; Lerch, T. Z.; Pando, A.; Gigon, A.; Blouin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Constructed Technosols provide an opportunity to recycle urban waste, and are an alternative to the uptake of topsoil from the countryside. Despite potential problems of erosion, compaction or water holding capacity, their physical properties and the resulting water regulation services are poorly documented. In a laboratory experiment, excavated deep horizons of soils and green waste compost (GWC) were mixed at six levels of GWC (from 0 to 50 %). Each mixture was set up in the presence/absence of plants and/or earthworms, in a full factorial design (n = 96). After 21 weeks, hydrostructural properties of constructed Technosols were characterized by soil shrinkage curves. Organisms explained the variance of hydrostructural characteristics (19 %) a little better than parent-material composition (14 %). The interaction between the effects of organisms and parent-material composition explained the variance far better (39 %) than each single factor. To summarize, compost and plants played a positive role in increasing available water in macropores and micropores; plants were extending the positive effect of compost up to 40 and 50 % GWC. Earthworms affected the void ratio for mixtures from 0 to 30 % GWC and available water in micropores, not in macropores. Earthworms also acted synergistically with plants by increasing their root biomass and the resulting positive effects on available water in macropores. Organisms and their interaction with parent materials thus positively affected the hydro-structural properties of constructed Technosols, with potential positive consequences on resistance to drought or compaction. Considering organisms when creating Technosols could be a promising approach to improve their fertility.

  20. Metal-Ligand Interactions and Salt Bridges as Sacrificial Bonds in Mussel Byssus-Derived Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byette, Frédéric; Laventure, Audrey; Marcotte, Isabelle; Pellerin, Christian

    2016-10-10

    The byssus that anchors mussels to solid surfaces is a protein-based material combining strength and toughness as well as a self-healing ability. These exceptional mechanical properties are explained in part by the presence of metal ions forming sacrificial bonds with amino acids. In this study, we show that the properties of hydrogel films prepared from a byssus protein hydrolyzate (BPH) can also be improved following the biomimetic formation of sacrificial bonds. Strengthening and toughening of the materials are both observed when treating films with multivalent ions (Ca(2+) or Fe(3+)) or at the BPH isoelectric point (pI) as a result of the formation of metal-ligand bonds and salt bridges, respectively. These treatments also provide a self-healing behavior to the films during recovery time following a deformation. While pI and Ca(2+) treatments have a similar but limited pH-dependent effect, the modulus, strength, and toughness of the films increase largely with Fe(3+) concentration and reach much higher values. The affinity of Fe(3+) with multiple amino acid ligands, as shown by vibrational spectroscopy, and the more covalent nature of this interaction can explain these observations. Thus, a judicious choice of treatments on polyampholyte protein-based materials enables control of their mechanical performance and self-healing behavior through the strategic exploitation of reversible sacrificial bonds.

  1. A study of interaction of materialism and money attitude and its impact on car purchase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimple Manchanda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates how the interaction of materialism and money attitude affects individuals choice of car price range in recent purchases (i.e., within the past six months. Car purchase behavior in terms of car price range has also been tested for different income groups, age groups and gender in National Capital Region (India. The data was collected through judgment sampling from 164 respondents, who recently purchased a new car for their personal use. The findings revealed that there is a significant association between materialism and different attitudes regarding the amount of money used by the respondents to purchase a car during the last six months. Level of materialism varies across different income levels and money attitude differs between males and females. Income was found to be the only variable that had significant association with choice of car price range. Age and gender did not seem to affect the car purchase behavior. This research has implications for the automobile industry and organizations in allied business activities, policy makers and marketers.

  2. Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions.

  3. Calcium-magnesium Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2015-01-01

    Particulates, like sand and volcanic ash, threaten the development of robust environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) that protect next-generation silicon-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine engine components from harsh combustion environments during service. The siliceous particulates transform into molten glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) when ingested by an aircraft engine operating at temperatures above 1200C. In this study, a sample of desert sand was melted into CMAS glass to evaluate high-temperature interactions between the sand glass and an advanced EBC material. Desert sand glass was added to the surface of hot-pressed EBC substrates, which were then heated in air at temperatures ranging from 1200C to 1500C. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate microstructure and phase compositions of specimens and the CMASEBC interface after heat treatments.

  4. Soy-based Polymers for Surface Modification and Interactions with Lignocellulosic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Araujo, Carlos Luis

    Recent environmental concerns about the use of synthetic materials that are often used to maintain our quality of life has triggered a significant amount of research to develop new technologies and to adopt sustainable, bio-based materials. Cellulose, lignin and other plant-derived macromolecules including proteins from soybeans have witnessed recent, renewed interest by the industrial and scientific communities. For example, soybean proteins have been proposed for a variety of applications, including wood adhesives, bio-plastics, composites and functional materials that may include synthetic polymers. Despite its importance in such systems or materials, very little is known about the fundamental nature of the interactions between soy proteins and other polymers. Therefore, this work addresses this issue by a systematic investigation of the interactions between soy proteins with the two most abundant macromolecules in the biosphere, namely, cellulose and lignin and with the most widely used synthetic polymer, polypropylene (PP). The adsorption of the main soy protein globulins, glycinin (11S) and beta-conglycinin (7S), was studied by using ultrathin films of cellulose, lignin and PP (as well as reference silica and organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) surfaces) that were used as substrates. The extent and dynamics of adsorption was monitored by using quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation (QCM-D), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) as well as complementary techniques including circular dichroism (CD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). QCM-D experiments indicated that soy protein adsorption was strongly affected by changes in the physicochemical environment. An increased adsorption of glycinin on silica (by 13%) and cellulose (by 89%) was observed with the increased ionic strength of the aqueous solution, from 0 to 0.1 M NaCl. This highlights the relevance of electrostatic interactions in the adsorption process. In contrast, the adsorption of beta

  5. Metacomprehension for educationally relevant materials: dramatic effects of encoding-retrieval interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ayanna K; McDaniel, Mark A

    2007-04-01

    As the metacomprehension literature has grown, important discoveries pertinent to education havebeen made. For example, as students are better able to assess their knowledge and implement appropriate study strategies, presumably their acquisition and retention of course material improves. Accordingly, we consider the metacomprehension literature with an emphasis on factors that impact metacomprehension accuracy. Several studies have demonstrated that metacomprehension prediction accuracy will improve to the extent that people engage in enriched-encoding activities. More recently, research by Thomas and McDaniel (in press) has suggested that enriched-encoding manipulations interact with retrieval to impact both retention and metacomprehension and, in turn, the effectiveness of controlling subsequent study. Thus, matching enriched-encoding activities with the criterial test plays a critical role in metacomprehension accuracy and control of studying.

  6. Sorption interactions of biochars and pyrogenic carbonaceous materials with anionic contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fristak, Vladimir; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo; Micháleková-Richveisová, Barbora; Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Bucheli, Thomas; Soja, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Biochar as a highly porous and carbon-rich material with a large surface area is a new player in the system of environmental remediation techniques. A wide range of valuable sorption properties of this carbonaceous pyrolysis product provides new options to solve contaminant problems in soil and water and thus may reduce the number of contaminated sites. The sorption capacity of agricultural wastes and wood processing-derived biochars has been found to be excellent due to high surface area, pore volume, and surface functional groups. However, sorption interactions and separation of xenobiotics from waste water, soil solutions or polluted surface water is very often affected by the concentration of contaminant, contact time, effects of competitive substances and mainly by the chemical form of the respective contaminant. The negative surface charge of biochar-based sorption materials supports significant sorption in particular for cationic forms of pollutants. On the other hand many environmentally critical substances occur in anionic forms (e.g. As, P, Mo, Tc). Therefore their retention and immobilization by biochar is frequently considered as problematic or limited. Besides, details about the mechanism of biochar interactions with anionic compounds and the options for surface modification are largely unexplored. This contribution presents a comparative study about production and characterization of unmodified, chemically pre-treated and post-treated biochars with respect to sorption processes of model anionic compounds (PO43-, AsO43-). The obtained results confirmed the crucial role of altering biochar properties (pH) and of surface modification for improving biochar sorption efficiency for anionic contaminants.

  7. Collaborative Research. Fundamental Science of Low Temperature Plasma-Biological Material Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David Barry [Univ. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oehrlein, Gottlieb [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    atmospheric pressure using several types of low temperature plasma sources, for which radical induced interactions generally dominate due to short mean free paths of ions and VUV photons. For these conditions we demonstrated the importance of environmental interactions when atmospheric pressure plasma sources are used to modify biomolecules. This is evident from both gas phase characterization data and in-situ surface characterization of treated biomolecules. Environmental interactions can produce unexpected outcomes due to the complexity of reactions of reactive species with the atmosphere which determines the composition of reactive fluxes and atomistic changes of biomolecules. Overall, this work clarified a richer spectrum of scientific opportunities and challenges for the field of low temperature plasma-biomolecule surface interactions than initially anticipated, in particular for plasma sources operating at atmospheric pressure. The insights produced in this work, e.g. demonstration of the importance of environmental interactions, are generally important for applications of APP to materials modifications. Thus one major contributions of this research has been the establishment of methodologies to more systematically study the interaction of plasma with bio-molecules. In particular, our studies of atmospheric pressure plasma sources using very well-defined experimental conditions enabled to combine atomistic surface modifications of biomolecules with changes in their biological function. The clarification of the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in deactivation of biomolecules during low pressure and atmospheric pressure plasma-biomolecule interaction has broad implications, e.g. for the emerging field of plasma medicine. The development of methods to detect the effects of plasma treatment on immune-active biomolecules will be helpful in many future studies.

  8. Interactive Near-Field Illumination for Photorealistic Augmented Reality with Varying Materials on Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Kai; Buschel, Wolfgang; Dachselt, Raimund; Grosch, Thorsten

    2015-12-01

    At present, photorealistic augmentation is not yet possible since the computational power of mobile devices is insufficient. Even streaming solutions from stationary PCs cause a latency that affects user interactions considerably. Therefore, we introduce a differential rendering method that allows for a consistent illumination of the inserted virtual objects on mobile devices, avoiding delays. The computation effort is shared between a stationary PC and the mobile devices to make use of the capacities available on both sides. The method is designed such that only a minimum amount of data has to be transferred asynchronously between the participants. This allows for an interactive illumination of virtual objects with a consistent appearance under both temporally and spatially varying real illumination conditions. To describe the complex near-field illumination in an indoor scenario, HDR video cameras are used to capture the illumination from multiple directions. In this way, sources of illumination can be considered that are not directly visible to the mobile device because of occlusions and the limited field of view. While our method focuses on Lambertian materials, we also provide some initial approaches to approximate non-diffuse virtual objects and thereby allow for a wider field of application at nearly the same cost.

  9. Interaction of graphene family materials with Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Strojny, Barbara; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Szeliga, Jacek; Hotowy, Anna; Lipińska, Ludwika; Koziński, Rafał; Jagiełło, Joanna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-01-01

    Graphene family materials have unique properties, which make them valuable for a range of applications. The antibacterial properties of graphene have been reported; however, findings have been contradictory. This study reports on the antimicrobial proprieties of three different graphene materials (pristine graphene (pG), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) against the food-borne bacterial pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica. A high concentration (250 μg/mL) of all the analyzed graphenes completely inhibited the growth of both pathogens, despite their difference in bacterial cell wall structure. At a lower concentration (25 μg/mL), similar effects were only observed with GO, as growth inhibition decreased with pG and rGO at the lower concentration. Interaction of the nanoparticles with the pathogenic bacteria was found to differ depending on the form of graphene. Microscopic imaging demonstrated that bacteria were arranged at the edges of pG and rGO, while with GO, they adhered to the nanoparticle surface. GO was found to have the highest antibacterial activity.

  10. Interactive rendering of acquired materials on dynamic geometry using frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagher, Mahdi Mohammad; Soler, Cyril; Subr, Kartic; Belcour, Laurent; Holzschuch, Nicolas

    2013-05-01

    Shading acquired materials with high-frequency illumination is computationally expensive. Estimating the shading integral requires multiple samples of the incident illumination. The number of samples required may vary across the image, and the image itself may have high- and low-frequency variations, depending on a combination of several factors. Adaptively distributing computational budget across the pixels for shading is a challenging problem. In this paper, we depict complex materials such as acquired reflectances, interactively, without any precomputation based on geometry. In each frame, we first estimate the frequencies in the local light field arriving at each pixel, as well as the variance of the shading integrand. Our frequency analysis accounts for combinations of a variety of factors: the reflectance of the object projecting to the pixel, the nature of the illumination, the local geometry and the camera position relative to the geometry and lighting. We then exploit this frequency information (bandwidth and variance) to adaptively sample for reconstruction and integration. For example, fewer pixels per unit area are shaded for pixels projecting onto diffuse objects, and fewer samples are used for integrating illumination incident on specular objects.

  11. Influence of Surface Topographical Interaction between Tool and Material in Micro-Deep Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tetsuhide; Murashige, Yushiro; Ito, Kuniyoshi; Manabe, Ken-Ichi

    In the miniaturization of dimensions for sheet metal forming, the relative ratio of the surface asperities of tools and blanks to the outside dimensions becomes larger than that in the case of the conventional macroscale process. This means that the surface asperities may affect frictional behavior, so that it would also affect processing characteristics and accuracy of products. In this report, micro-deep drawing for producing cups of 700μm diameter and 20μm thickness is conducted using microtools and stainless steel foils with different surface conditions. To evaluate the effects of surface properties on micro-formability and micro-forming accuracy, punch force, surface accuracy, and the thickness strain distribution of microcups are experimentally investigated. Additionally, using a finite element (FE) model that considers surface roughness, the effect of surface roughness on formability is analyzed under different tool and material surface conditions. Results show that the global forming behavior in microforming is subjected much more intensely to tribological contact behavior, which is caused by the difference of surface asperities, than that in the case of the macroscale region. Moreover, it is shown that predominant factor over this local tribological behavior is the interaction of both tool/material surface asperities that depends on the normal load condition.

  12. Plasma Wall Interaction Phenomena on Tungsten Armour Materials for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uytdenhouwen, I. [SCK.CEN - The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Massaut, V. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Van Oost, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-07-01

    One of the most attractive future complements to present energy sources is nuclear fusion. A large progress was made throughout the last decade from both the physical as the technological area leading to the construction of the ITER machine. One of the key issues that recently received a large interest at international level is focused on the Plasma Wall Interaction (PWI). One of the promising Plasma Facing Materials (PFM) are Tungsten (W) and Tungsten alloys. However, despite the worldwide use and industrial availability of W, the database of physical and mechanical properties is very limited. Especially after fusion relevant neutron irradiation and PWI phenomena, most of the properties are still unknown. The plasma fuel consists out of deuterium (D) and tritium (T). Tritium is radio-active and therefore an issue from the safety point of view. During steady-state plasma operation of future fusion power plants, the PFM need to extract a power density of {approx}10-20 MW/m{sup 2}. On top of this heat, transient events will deposit an additional non-negligible amount of energy (Disruptions, Vertical Displacement Events, Edge Localized Modes) during short durations. These severe heat loads cause cracking and even melting of the surface resulting in a reduced lifetime and the creation of dust. A contribution to the understanding of cracking phenomena under the severe thermal loads is described as well as the properties degradation under neutron irradiation. Several W grades were irradiated in the BR2 reactor (SCK.CEN) and the thermal loads were simulated with the electron-beam facility JUDITH (FZJ). Since knowledge should be gained about the Tritium retention in the PFM for safety and licensing reasons, a unique test facility at SCK.CEN is being set-up. The plasmatron VISION-I will simulate steady state plasmas for Tritium retention studies. The formation of surface cracks and dust, the initial porosity, neutron induced traps, re-deposited material - change the Tritium

  13. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-10-30

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π-conjugated molecules, oligomers, and polymers. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of noncovalent intermolecular interactions and briefly discuss the computational chemistry approaches used to understand the magnitude of these interactions. These methodologies are then exploited to illustrate how noncovalent intermolecular interactions impact important electronic properties-such as the electronic coupling between adjacent molecules, a key parameter for charge-carrier transport-through a comparison between the prototype organic semiconductor pentacene with a series of N-substituted heteropentacenes. Incorporating an understanding of these interactions into the design of organic semiconductors can assist in developing novel materials systems from this fascinating molecular class. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  14. [The Interaction of Oil Microcapsule Wall Materials between Whey Protein and Acacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Li, Ru-yi; Wang, Hui; Li, Qian; Li, De-jun; Tu, Zong-cai

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between whey protein and acacia which were used as wall material was studied on the formation of the oils microcapsules by the FTIR Spectroscopy and Computer Aided Analysis. The results indicated that whey protein changed obviously in amide A and amide I by high pressured homogenization and spray-drying. The amide A moved from 3 406.5 cm(-1) to 3 425.4 cm(-1) which was possibly due to covalent cross-linking between whey protein and acacia. Furthermore the amide I moved from 1 648.6 cm(-1) to 1 654.7 cm(-1) for intramolecular hydrogen bonding of protein had been weaken. After Gaussian fitting on amide I , it was found that the content of secondary structure of α-helix content and β-folding in whey protein reduced from 19.55% to 17.50% and from 30.59% to 25.63%, respectively. This suggests that protein intramolecular hydrogen bonding force was abated, resulting in abating the rigid structure of the protein molecules and enhancing of the toughness structure. The protein molecules showed some flexibility. The result of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis showed that whey protein--gum Arabic complexes produced covalent products in larger molecular weight. During the spray-drying process, covalent cross-linking produced between whey protein and gum Arabic which improved emulsifying activity of the complex whey protein and gum Arabic produced covalent cross-linking and improved the complex emulsifying activity. Observing the surface structure of the fish oil microcapsule by SEM, the compound of whey protein and acacia as wall material was proved better toughness, less micropore, and more compact structure.

  15. Interactions between six psychotherapeutic drugs and plastic containers. Influence of plastic material and infusion solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airaudo, C B; Gayte-Sorbier, A; Bianchi, C; Verdier, M

    1993-06-01

    The interactions of chlorpromazine, clomipramine, maprotiline and viloxazine hydrochlorides, and of clorazepate dipotassium salt and diazepam with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and Stedim 6 infusion bags were studied. Stedim 6, is anew multilayer film whose inner layer is made of polyethylene. The drugs were in 5% dextrose and 0.9% sodium chloride isotonic solutions and the influence of these was also considered. The remaining concentrations of each drug were determined at regular time intervals in a 24-h period, by a spectrofluorometric method for chlorpromazine hydrochloride and by ultraviolet spectrophotometric methods for the other drugs. No binding was observed for viloxazine and maprotiline hydrochlorides whatever the infusion solution and the plastic container. A slight retention in PVC bags, but not in Stedim 6 ones, was noted for clomipramine hydrochloride and clorazepate dipotassium salt. This was more marked in the sodium chloride solution than in the dextrose one. Diazepam and chlorpromazine hydrochloride were bound both in PVC and Stedim 6 bags, but more in the former and more again in the sodium chloride solution than in the dextrose one. The results were explained in terms of the degree of crystallinity of the plastic material and the degree of lipophilicity of the drugs. Practical consequences are discussed.

  16. Study of Interfacial Interactions Using Thing Film Surface Modification: Radiation and Oxidation Effects in Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2014-01-09

    ) multi-scale computational modeling involving first- principle molecular dynamics (FPMD) and coarse-grained dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) approaches to develop theories underlying the evolution and stability of structures and phases. Samples from Tasks 1 to 3 (above) will be rigorously characterized and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Rutherford back scatter spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Expected outcomes of the experimental work include a quantitative understanding film-substrate interface mixing, evolution of defects and other phases at the interface, interaction of interfaces with defects, and the ability of the Y and Ti films to mitigate irradiation-assisted oxidation.The aforementioned experimental work will be closely coupled with multi-scale molecular dynamics (MD) modeling to understand the reactions at the surface, the transport of oxidant through the thin film, and the stabilities of the deposited thin films under radiation and oxidation. Simulations of materials property changes under conditions of radiation and oxidation require multiple size domains and a different simulation scheme for each of these domains. This will be achieved by coupling the FPMD and coarse-grained kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). This will enable the comparison of the results of each simulation approach with the experimental results.

  17. Development of modifications to the material point method for the simulation of thin membranes, compressible fluids, and their interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, A.R. II [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering and Process Dept.

    1997-07-01

    The material point method (MPM) is an evolution of the particle in cell method where Lagrangian particles or material points are used to discretize the volume of a material. The particles carry properties such as mass, velocity, stress, and strain and move through a Eulerian or spatial mesh. The momentum equation is solved on the Eulerian mesh. Modifications to the material point method are developed that allow the simulation of thin membranes, compressible fluids, and their dynamic interactions. A single layer of material points through the thickness is used to represent a membrane. The constitutive equation for the membrane is applied in the local coordinate system of each material point. Validation problems are presented and numerical convergence is demonstrated. Fluid simulation is achieved by implementing a constitutive equation for a compressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid and by solution of the energy equation. The fluid formulation is validated by simulating a traveling shock wave in a compressible fluid. Interactions of the fluid and membrane are handled naturally with the method. The fluid and membrane communicate through the Eulerian grid on which forces are calculated due to the fluid and membrane stress states. Validation problems include simulating a projectile impacting an inflated airbag. In some impact simulations with the MPM, bodies may tend to stick together when separating. Several algorithms are proposed and tested that allow bodies to separate from each other after impact. In addition, several methods are investigated to determine the local coordinate system of a membrane material point without relying upon connectivity data.

  18. Using Concept Maps as Instructional Materials to Foster the Understanding of the Atomic Model and Matter-Energy Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Joana G.; Correia, Paulo R. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the use of concept maps (Cmaps) as instructional materials prepared by teachers, to foster the understanding of chemistry. We choose fireworks as a macroscopic event to teach basic chemical principles related to the Bohr atomic model and matter-energy interaction. During teachers' Cmap navigation, students can experience…

  19. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-01-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to…

  20. Measurement of the material in the ATLAS Inner Detector using hadronic interactions for an improvement in the track reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Kanai, Tsubasa

    The ATLAS is a high energy physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this experiment is a discovery of the new particles and new phenomena. In the experiment, the inner detector plays a crucial role in the track reconstruction of charged particles, and it is essential to reconstruct tracks precisely since the accuracy of the track reconstruction strongly affects physics results. Since particles passing through the detector are affected by the material, a precise description of the material in the detector is required for the Monte Carlo simulation to obtain a good agreement in tracking between the data from the detector and the simulation. However, it is hardly possible to put an exact amount of the materials in the simulation just from the design in the engineering point of view, thus datadriven method is adopted for the measurement of the detector materials. Although photon conversions are traditionally used for the material measurement, the method using hadronic interaction...

  1. Van der Waals Layered Materials: Surface Morphology, Interlayer Interaction, and Electronic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Po-Chun

    The search for new ultrathin materials as the "new silicon" has begun. In this dissertation, I examine (1) the surface structure, including the growth, the crystal quality, and thin film surface corrugation of a monolayer sample and a few layers of MoS2 and WSe2, and (2) their electronic structure. The characteristics of these electronic systems depend intimately on the morphology of the surfaces they inhabit, and their interactions with the substrate or within layers. These physical properties will be addressed in each chapter. This thesis has dedicated to the characterization of mono- and a few layers of MoS2 and WSe2 that uses surface-sensitive probes such as low-energy electron microscopy and diffraction (LEEM and LEED). Prior to our studies, the characterization of monolayer MoS2 and WSe2 has been generally limited to optical and transport probes. Furthermore, the heavy use of thick silicon oxide layer as the supporting substrate has been important in order to allow optical microscopic characterization of the 2D material. Hence, to the best of our knowledge, this has prohibited studies of this material on other surfaces, and it has precluded the discovery of potentially rich interface interactions that may exist between MoS 2 and its supporting substrate. Thus, in our study, we use a so-called SPELEEM system (Spectroscopic Photo-Emission and Low Energy Electron Microscopy) to address these imaging modalities: (1) real-space microscopy, which would allow locating of monolayer MoS2 samples, (2) spatially-resolved low-energy diffraction which would allow confirmation of the crystalline quality and domain orientation of MoS2 samples, and, (3) spatially-resolved spectroscopy, which would allow electronic structure mapping of MoS2 samples. Moreover, we have developed a preparation procedure for samples that yield, a surface-probe ready, ultra-clean, and can be transferred on an arbitrary substrate. To fully understand the physics in MoS2 such as direct

  2. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal, E-mail: ahmadsb@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); McNeill, Fiona E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Prestwich, William V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Byun, Soo Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seymour, Colin, E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Mothersill, Carmel E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some “bystander effects” that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 10{sup 10} protons mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  3. Quantifying electronic band interactions in van der Waals materials using angle-resolved reflected-electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Johannes; van der Torren, Alexander J. H.; Krasovskii, Eugene E.; Balgley, Jesse; Dean, Cory R.; Tromp, Rudolf M.; van der Molen, Sense Jan

    2016-11-01

    High electron mobility is one of graphene's key properties, exploited for applications and fundamental research alike. Highest mobility values are found in heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, which consequently are widely used. However, surprisingly little is known about the interaction between the electronic states of these layered systems. Rather pragmatically, it is assumed that these do not couple significantly. Here we study the unoccupied band structure of graphite, boron nitride and their heterostructures using angle-resolved reflected-electron spectroscopy. We demonstrate that graphene and boron nitride bands do not interact over a wide energy range, despite their very similar dispersions. The method we use can be generally applied to study interactions in van der Waals systems, that is, artificial stacks of layered materials. With this we can quantitatively understand the `chemistry of layers' by which novel materials are created via electronic coupling between the layers they are composed of.

  4. Pico-second laser materials interactions: mechanisms, material lifetime and performance optimization Ted Laurence(14-ERD-014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, Ted A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-14

    Laser-induced damage with ps pulse widths straddles the transition from intrinsic, multiphoton ionization- and avalanche ionization-based ablation with fs pulses to defectdominated, thermal-based damage with ns pulses. We investigated the morphology and scaling of damage for commonly used silica and hafnia coatings as well as fused silica. Using carefully calibrated laser-induced damage experiments, in situ imaging, and high-resolution optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, we showed that defects play an important role in laser-induced damage for pulse durations as short as 1 ps. Three damage morphologies were observed: standard material ablation, ultra-high density pits, and isolated absorbers. For 10 ps and longer, the isolated absorbers limited the damage performance of the coating materials. We showed that damage resulting from the isolated absorbers grows dramatically with subsequent pulses for sufficient fluences. For hafnia coatings, we used electric field modeling and experiments to show that isolated absorbers near the surface were affected by the chemical environment (vacuum vs. air) for pulses as short as 10 ps. Coupled with the silica results, these results suggested that improvements in the performance in the 10 -60 ps range have not reached fundamental limits. These findings motivate new efforts, including a new SI LDRD in improving the laser-damage performance of multi-layer dielectric coatings. A damage test facility for ps pulses was developed and automated, and was used for testing production optics for ARC. The resulting software was transferred to other laser test facilities for fs pulses and multiple wavelengths with 30 ps pulses. Additionally, the LDRD supported the retention and promotion of an important staff scientist in high-resolution dynamic microscopy and laser-damage testing.

  5. Interaction of electromagnetic energy with biological material - relation to food processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponne, C.T.; Bartels, P.V.

    1995-01-01

    For food scientists and technologists, the interaction of electromagnetic energy with enzymes, microorganisms and other food compounds is important in optimizing process efficiency and/or product quality. To be able to implement research findings on interaction of electromagnetic energy with matter;

  6. New directions in lubrication, materials, wear, and surface interactions - Tribology in the 80's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, W. R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    New directions in tribology are described. A range of topics is addressed, extending from fundamental research on tribological materials of all kinds and their surface effects, to final technological applications in mechanical components such as bearings, gears, and seals. The general topics addressed include: importance and definition of materials in tribology; future directions of research in adhesion and friction, wear and wear-resistant materials, and liquid lubricants and additives; status and new directions in elastohydrodynamic lubrication and solid lubricants; and tribological materials for mechanical components of the future.

  7. Multi-scale defect interactions in high-rate brittle material failure. Part I: Model formulation and application to ALON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Andrew L.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    Within this two part series we develop a new material model for ceramic protection materials to provide an interface between microstructural parameters and bulk continuum behavior to provide guidance for materials design activities. Part I of this series focuses on the model formulation that captures the strength variability and strain rate sensitivity of brittle materials and presents a statistical approach to assigning the local flaw distribution within a specimen. The material model incorporates a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state, micromechanics based damage growth, granular flow and dilatation of the highly damaged material, and pore compaction for the porosity introduced by granular flow. To provide initial qualitative validation and illustrate the usefulness of the model, we use the model to investigate Edge on Impact experiments (Strassburger, 2004) on Aluminum Oxynitride (AlON), and discuss the interactions of multiple mechanisms during such an impact event. Part II of this series is focused on additional qualitative validation and using the model to suggest material design directions for boron carbide.

  8. SN 2010mb: Direct evidence for a supernova interacting with a large amount of hydrogen-free circumstellar material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Rabinak, Itay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair; Ofek, Eran O. [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Mazzali, Paolo A. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University. Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Gnat, Orly [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Modjaz, Maryam [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, room 529, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Sullivan, Mark [Department of Physics (Astrophysics), University of Oxford, DWB, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Bildsten, Lars [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Poznanski, Dovi [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 Israel (Israel); Bloom, Joshua S.; Nugent, Peter E. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Perley, Daniel [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Quimby, Robert [Kavli IPMU, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Xu, Dong, E-mail: sagi.ben-ami@weizmann.ac.il [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-04-10

    We present our observations of SN 2010mb, a Type Ic supernova (SN) lacking spectroscopic signatures of H and He. SN 2010mb has a slowly declining light curve (LC) (∼600 days) that cannot be powered by {sup 56}Ni/{sup 56}Co radioactivity, the common energy source for Type Ic SNe. We detect signatures of interaction with hydrogen-free circumstellar material including a blue quasi-continuum and, uniquely, narrow oxygen emission lines that require high densities (∼10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}). From the observed spectra and LC, we estimate that the amount of material involved in the interaction was ∼3 M {sub ☉}. Our observations are in agreement with models of pulsational pair-instability SNe described in the literature.

  9. INTERACTION OF A SCREW DISLOCATION WITH AN INTERFACIAL EDGE CRACK IN A TWO-PHASE PIEZOELECTRIC MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jinxi; LIU Ai; JIANG Zhiqing

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of a screw dislocation with an interfacial edge crack in a two-phase piezoelectric medium is investigated. Closed-form solutions of the elastic and electrical fields induced by the screw dislocation are derived using the conformal mapping method in conjunction with the image principle. Based on the electroelastic fields derived, the stress and electric displacement intensity factors, the image force acting on the dislocation are given explicitly. We find that the stress and electric displacement intensity factors depend on the effective electroelastic material constants. In the case where one of two phases is purely elastic, the stress intensity factor and image force are plotted to illustrate the influences of electromechanical coupling effect, the position of the dislocation and the material properties on the interaction mechanism.

  10. Early dynamics of guest-host interaction in dye-doped liquid crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Thai V; Xu, Lei; Shen, Y R

    2003-05-16

    We have studied in detail the early dynamics of laser-induced molecular reorientation in a dye-doped liquid crystalline (LC) medium that exhibits a significant enhancement of the optical Kerr nonlinearity due to guest-host interaction. Experimental results agree quantitatively with theory based on a model in which the anisotropic dye excitation helps reorient the LC molecules through a mean-field intermolecular interaction.

  11. Interaction between adsorbed hydrogen and potassium on a carbon nanocone containing material as studied by photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiaofeng [Nesna University College, 8700 Nesna (Norway); Raaen, Steinar, E-mail: sraaen@ntnu.no [Physics Department, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-09-14

    Hydrogen adsorption on a potassium doped carbon nanocone containing material was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and work function measurement. The valence band spectra indicate that there is charge transfer from potassium to carbon. Upon deposition on carbon potassium is in its ionic state for lower doping and shows both ionic and metallic behavior at higher doping. Adsorption of hydrogen facilitates diffusion of potassium on the carbon material as seen by changes in the K{sub 2p} core level spectrum. Variations in the measured sample work function indicate that hydrogen initially adsorb on the K dopants and subsequently adsorb on the carbon cone containing material.

  12. A measurement of material in the ATLAS tracker using secondary hadronic interactions in 7 TeV pp collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bisanz, Tobias; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelijn, Remco; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudder, Andreas Christian; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Dührssen, Michael; Dumancic, Mirta; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanisch, Stefanie; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kentaro, Kawade; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koehler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; 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Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Ravinovich, Ilia; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turgeman, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tyndel, Mike; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Wenxiao; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wolf, Tim Michael Heinz; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Worm, Steven D; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the material in the ATLAS inner tracking detector is crucial in understanding the reconstruction of charged-particle tracks, the performance of algorithms that identify jets containing \\emph{b}-hadrons and is also essential to reduce background in searches for exotic particles that can decay within the inner detector volume. Interactions of primary hadrons produced in \\emph{pp} collisions with the material in the inner detector are used to map the location and amount of this material. The hadronic interactions of primary particles may result in secondary vertices, which in this analysis are reconstructed by an inclusive vertex-finding algorithm. Data were collected using minimum-bias triggers by the ATLAS detector operating at the LHC during 2010 at centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of $19$ nb$^{-1}$. Kinematic properties of these secondary vertices are used to study the validity of the modelling of hadronic interactions in simulation. Secondary-...

  13. Insights into the Interactions of Amino Acids and Peptides with Inorganic Materials Using Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Priyadip; Duanias-Assaf, Tal; Reches, Meital

    2017-03-06

    The interactions between proteins or peptides and inorganic materials lead to several interesting processes. For example, combining proteins with minerals leads to the formation of composite materials with unique properties. In addition, the undesirable process of biofouling is initiated by the adsorption of biomolecules, mainly proteins, on surfaces. This organic layer is an adhesion layer for bacteria and allows them to interact with the surface. Understanding the fundamental forces that govern the interactions at the organic-inorganic interface is therefore important for many areas of research and could lead to the design of new materials for optical, mechanical and biomedical applications. This paper demonstrates a single-molecule force spectroscopy technique that utilizes an AFM to measure the adhesion force between either peptides or amino acids and well-defined inorganic surfaces. This technique involves a protocol for attaching the biomolecule to the AFM tip through a covalent flexible linker and single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements by atomic force microscope. In addition, an analysis of these measurements is included.

  14. Hidden symmetry and enhanced Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction in P-N junctions of two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Zhang, Shuhui; Zhu, Jiaji; Chang, Kai

    Correlation between magnetic atoms (spins) in non-magnetic two-dimensional (2D) systems and materials is one of the central issues in condensed matter physics. Engineering this correlation relies heavily on the carrier-mediated Rudermann-Kittel- Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction. However, tailoring and direct detection of spin-spin correlation has been limited to spins separated by a few nanometers due to the rapid 1 /R2 decay of RKKY interaction with inter-spin distance R. Here we reveal a hidden symmetry - absent from the Hamiltonian - in planar P-N junctions, which could qualitatively change the spatial scaling of various response functions in a wide range of 2D systems and materials. In particular, it allows RKKY interaction to attain 1 / R decay, the slowest decay in extended systems. This dramatically enhances RKKY interaction and enables long-range correlation between distant spins, with applications in nanoscale magnetism, spintronics, and solid-state quantum computation. This work was supported by the MOST (Grant No. 2015CB921503, and No. 2014CB848700) and NSFC (Grant No. 11434010, No. 11274036, No. 11322542, and No. 11404043).

  15. Surface Modification of Cellulose-based Materials for Tailoring of Interfacial Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The awareness of our need for a sustainable society has encouraged the search for renewable, high quality materials that can replace oil-based products. This, in combination with increased competition in the forest industry, has stimulated a lot of research into different types of wood-based materials where cellulose-rich fibers are combined with different types of polymers. There is hence a great need to develop efficient fiber modification techniques by which the fibers can be tailored to o...

  16. Interaction of galactic wind with halo gas and the origin of multiphase extraplanar material

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Mahavir; Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    We study the interaction of galactic wind with hot halo gas with hydrodynamical simulation. We find that the outcome of this interaction depends crucially on the wind injection density and velocity. If the cooling time of the gas in the interaction zone between the wind and halo gas exceeds the dynamical time of the wind, then a significant amount of warm-hot gas is produced in the interaction zone, which we identify as warm circum-galactic medium (CGM) that can be detected through OVI absorption. If the cooling time is shorter, then the gas in interaction zone fragments into cold clouds. The clouds which form on the side walls of the wind cone, arising from eddies formed due to relative motion between the wind and halo gas, and can resemble high velocity clouds (HVCs). For high injection speed and density, the clouds formed in the thin shell on top of the wind are driven by ram pressure of the steady wind and represent the case of cold/warm clouds observed to be embedded in galactic outflows. We therefore fi...

  17. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.L. (ed.)

    1985-10-01

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

  18. Interaction studies and gamma-ray properties of some low-Z materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhosale Rameshwar R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In present work we use NaI(Tl detector in narrow-beam good geometry set-up for the gamma ray attenuation studies of some low-Z materials. The parameters such as mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities, atomic cross-sections, electronic cross-sections of materials for graphitic powder, polycarbonate, polyvinyl chloride, plaster of Paris, gypsum, and limestone were determined using gamma ray sources 57Co, 133Ba, 137Bs, 60Co, and 22Na at energies of 122, 356, 511, 662, 840, 1170, 1275, and 1330 keV. It was observed that the effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. An attempt was done to check the availability of these low-Z materials at large scales and obtainable at low cost as gamma ray shielding materials. The investigated data are useful in electronic industry, plastic industry, building materials, and agriculture fields.

  19. Development of new materials and structures based on managed physical-chemical factors of local interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakov, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    The paper states that assigning certain physical and chemical characteristics to pills and medical drugs solutions can substitute for the development of new drugs (which is essentially equivalent to the creation of new medicines). It is established that the purposeful change of physical and chemical characteristics of the standard ("old") materials (in other words, the known substances) is fundamental for the production of solid and liquid medicines, which allows us to get "new" structures and materials. The paper shows that assigning new physical and chemical properties to "old" materials and their further usage for the production of tablets and solutions from the "old" and well-known medicines can turn even very "old" medicine into very "novel" (moreover, even very fashionable) one with unprecedented (fantastic) pharmacological activity and new mechanisms of action.

  20. Refractive-index-matched hydrogel materials for modeling flow-structure interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Byron, Margaret L

    2012-01-01

    In imaging-based studies of flow around solid objects, it is useful to have materials that are refractive-index-matched to the surrounding fluid. However, materials currently in use are usually rigid and matched to liquids that are either expensive or highly viscous. This does not allow for measurements at high Reynolds number, nor accurate modeling of flexible structures. This work explores the use of two hydrogels (agarose and polyacrylamide) as refractive-index-matched models in water. These hydrogels are inexpensive, can be cast into desired shapes, and have flexibility that can be tuned to match biological materials. The use of water as the fluid phase allows this method to be implemented immediately in many experimental facilities and permits investigation of high Reynolds number phenomena. We explain fabrication methods and present a summary of the physical and optical properties of both gels, and then show measurements demonstrating the use of hydrogel models in quantitative imaging.

  1. Refractive-index-matched hydrogel materials for measuring flow-structure interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Margaret L.; Variano, Evan A.

    2013-02-01

    In imaging-based studies of flow around solid objects, it is useful to have materials that are refractive-index-matched to the surrounding fluid. However, materials currently in use are usually rigid and matched to liquids that are either expensive or highly viscous. This does not allow for measurements at high Reynolds number, nor accurate modeling of flexible structures. This work explores the use of two hydrogels (agarose and polyacrylamide) as refractive-index-matched models in water. These hydrogels are inexpensive, can be cast into desired shapes, and have flexibility that can be tuned to match biological materials. The use of water as the fluid phase allows this method to be implemented immediately in many experimental facilities and permits investigation of high-Reynolds-number phenomena. We explain fabrication methods and present a summary of the physical and optical properties of both gels, and then show measurements demonstrating the use of hydrogel models in quantitative imaging.

  2. Authentic L2 Interactions as Material for a Pragmatic Awareness-Raising Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tsui-Ping

    2016-01-01

    This study draws on conversation analysis to explore the pedagogical possibility of using audiovisual depictions of authentic disagreement sequences from L2 interactions as sources for an awareness-raising activity in an English as a Second Language (ESL) classroom. Video excerpts of disagreement sequences collected from two ESL classes were used…

  3. Teaching materials on language endangerment, an interactive e-learning module on the internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odé, C.; de Graaf, T.; Ostler, N.; Salverda, R.

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, in the framework of the NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) Research Programme on Endangered Languages, an interactive e-learning module has been developed on language endangerment. The module for students in secondary schools (15-18 years of age) is available free of cha

  4. Nutrient analysis explained for non-chemists by using interactive e-learning material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busstra, M.C.; Hulshof, P.J.M.; Houwen, J.; Elburg, L.; Hollman, P.C.H.

    2012-01-01

    The diverse educational and professional background of individuals involved in food composition data work presents challenges in their training. In particular, it is difficult to explain chemical analysis of nutrients to individuals lacking a background in chemistry. Therefore an interactive e-learn

  5. Controlling cell-material interactions with polymer nanocomposites by use of surface modifying additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole-Warren, L. A.; Farrugia, B.; Fong, N.; Hume, E.; Simmons, A.

    2008-11-01

    Polymer nanocomposites (NC) are fabricated by incorporating well dispersed nanoscale particles within a polymer matrix. This study focuses on elastomeric polyurethane (PU) based nanocomposites, containing organically modified silicates (OMS), as bioactive materials. Nanocomposites incorporating chlorhexidine diacetate as an organic modifier (OM) were demonstrated to be antibacterial with a dose dependence related to both the silicate loading and the loading of OM. When the non-antibacterial OM dodecylamine was used, both cell and platelet adhesion were decreased on the nanocomposite surface. These results suggest that OM is released from the polymer and can impact on cell behaviour at the interface. Nanocomposites have potential use as bioactive materials in a range of biomedical applications.

  6. Scientific report. Plasma-wall interaction studies related to fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temmerman, G. De

    2006-07-01

    This scientific report summarises research done on erosion and deposition mechanisms affecting the optical reflectivity of potential materials for use in the mirrors used in fusion reactors. Work done in Juelich, Germany, at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland, the JET laboratory in England and in Basle is discussed. Various tests made with the mirrors are described. Results obtained are presented in graphical and tabular form and commented on. The influence of various material choices on erosion and deposition mechanisms is discussed.

  7. Assessment of the interaction of Portland cement-based materials with blood and tissue fluids using an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembri Wismayer, P.; Lung, C. Y. K.; Rappa, F.; Cappello, F.; Camilleri, J.

    2016-01-01

    Portland cement used in the construction industry improves its properties when wet. Since most dental materials are used in a moist environment, Portland cement has been developed for use in dentistry. The first generation material is mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), used in surgical procedures, thus in contact with blood. The aim of this study was to compare the setting of MTA in vitro and in vivo in contact with blood by subcutaneous implantation in rats. The tissue reaction to the material was also investigated. ProRoot MTA (Dentsply) was implanted in the subcutaneous tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats in opposite flanks and left in situ for 3 months. Furthermore the material was also stored in physiological solution in vitro. At the end of the incubation time, tissue histology and material characterization were performed. Surface assessment showed the formation of calcium carbonate for both environments. The bismuth was evident in the tissues thus showing heavy element contamination of the animal specimen. The tissue histology showed a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate associated with the MTA. MTA interacts with the host tissues and causes a chronic inflammatory reaction when implanted subcutaneously. Hydration in vivo proceeds similarly to the in vitro model with some differences particularly in the bismuth oxide leaching patterns. PMID:27683067

  8. Fragment Produced by Nuclear Reaction of Heavy Ions Interacted with Tissue-equivalent Biological Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In heavy ion therapy and radiation biological effects the nuclear fragments from the heavy ion collisions may cause a significant alteration of the radiation field. Nuclear collision between beam particles and tissue nuclei along the penetration path of high-energy ions in tissue or biological-equivalent material causes a loss

  9. High Flux Laser Radiation and Residual Gas Interactions with Carbon-Based Structural Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    and (111) single crystal faces of Ti reacted with CO. The interest in titanium carbide is based on its importance as a high temperature material...artificial superlattices of titanium carbides and comparing their properties to that of naturally occurring titanium carbide which is a cubic metallic...conductor. Keywords: Carbon Monoxide; Titanium; Carbon; Sodium Chloride; Titanium Carbide .

  10. Peptidyl Materials Formed Through Click Chemistry Enhanced Coiled-Coil Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    Biologically derived materials offer a level of sophistication synthetically fabricated materials have only attempted to mimic. This level of complexity may be found in materials such as peptides. Implementing new theory and modeling, peptides with the propensity to form coiled-coil (CC) bundles were designed and synthesized. Through the use of this de novo approach, modeling allowed prediction of the feasibility to include non-natural amino acids conducive to click chemistry into the peptide. Amino acids showcasing thiol or alkyne functionalities were considered owing to the ability of these moieties to participate in the thiol-ene and copper click reactions respectively. Once synthesized, the peptides decorated with these clickable motifs were placed in solution and allowed to self-assemble into CC's. CD spectroscopy and DLS experiments confirmed the formation and assembly of CC's. Click reactions were then incited to link the CC assemblies together and form a network with predictable dimensionality and pore size between CC bundles. To incite network formation, click reactions between CC side chain residues and suitably functionalized crosslinkers were implemented. The linking of coiled-coils and material formation were assessed using DLS and TEM.

  11. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  12. The role of ionic interactions in the adherence of the Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesin SdrF to prosthetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Faustino A; Visai, Livia; Trivedi, Sheetal; Lowy, Franklin D

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are common complications of prosthetic device implantation. SdrF, a surface protein, appears to play a critical role in the initial colonization step by adhering to type I collagen and Dacron™. The role of ionic interactions in S. epidermidis adherence to prosthetic material was examined. SdrF was cloned and expressed in Lactococcus lactis. The effect of pH, cation concentration, and detergents on adherence to different types of plastic surfaces was assessed by crystal violet staining and bacterial cell counting. SdrF, in contrast with controls and other S. epidermidis surface proteins, bound to hydrophobic materials such as polystyrene. Binding was an ionic interaction and was affected by surface charge of the plastic, pH, and cation concentration. Adherence of the SdrF construct was increased to positively charged plastics and was reduced by increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) and Na(+). Binding was optimal at pH 7.4. Kinetic studies demonstrated that the SdrF B domain as well as one of the B subdomains was sufficient to mediate binding. The SdrF construct also bound more avidly to Goretex™ than the lacotococcal control. SdrF is a multifunctional protein that contributes to prosthetic devices infections by ionic, as well as specific receptor-ligand interactions.

  13. The Role of Ionic Interactions in the Adherence of the S. epidermidis Adhesin SdrF to Prosthetic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Faustino A.; Visai, Livia; Trivedi, Sheetal; Lowy, Franklin D.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are common complications of prosthetic device implantation. SdrF, a surface protein, appears to play a critical role in the initial colonization step by adhering to type I collagen and Dacron™. The role of ionic interactions in S. epidermidis adherence to prosthetic material was examined. SdrF was cloned and expressed in Lactococcus lactis. The effect of pH, cation concentration and detergents on adherence to different types of plastic surfaces was assessed by crystal violet staining and bacterial cell counting. SdrF, in contrast with controls and other S. epidermidis surface proteins, bound to hydrophobic materials such as polystyrene. Binding was an ionic interaction and was affected by surface charge of the plastic, pH and cation concentration. Adherence of the SdrF construct was increased to positively charged plastics and was reduced by increasing concentrations of Ca2+ and Na+. Binding was optimal at pH 7.4. Kinetic studies demonstrated that the SdrF B domain, as well as one of the B subdomains was sufficient to mediate binding. The SdrF construct also bound more avidly to Goretex™ than the lacotococcal control. SdrF is a multifunctional protein that contributes to prosthetic devices infections by ionic, as well as specific receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:23039791

  14. Plasma protein corona modulates the vascular wall interaction of drug carriers in a material and donor specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Sobczynski

    Full Text Available The nanoscale plasma protein interaction with intravenously injected particulate carrier systems is known to modulate their organ distribution and clearance from the bloodstream. However, the role of this plasma protein interaction in prescribing the adhesion of carriers to the vascular wall remains relatively unknown. Here, we show that the adhesion of vascular-targeted poly(lactide-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA spheres to endothelial cells is significantly inhibited in human blood flow, with up to 90% reduction in adhesion observed relative to adhesion in simple buffer flow, depending on the particle size and the magnitude and pattern of blood flow. This reduced PLGA adhesion in blood flow is linked to the adsorption of certain high molecular weight plasma proteins on PLGA and is donor specific, where large reductions in particle adhesion in blood flow (>80% relative to buffer is seen with ∼60% of unique donor bloods while others exhibit moderate to no reductions. The depletion of high molecular weight immunoglobulins from plasma is shown to successfully restore PLGA vascular wall adhesion. The observed plasma protein effect on PLGA is likely due to material characteristics since the effect is not replicated with polystyrene or silica spheres. These particles effectively adhere to the endothelium at a higher level in blood over buffer flow. Overall, understanding how distinct plasma proteins modulate the vascular wall interaction of vascular-targeted carriers of different material characteristics would allow for the design of highly functional delivery vehicles for the treatment of many serious human diseases.

  15. Haptics using a smart material for eyes free interaction in mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Kaleas, Dimosthenis; Ruuspakka, Roger; Tartz, Robert

    2012-04-01

    We present a proof of concept (POC) for haptic interaction when audio or visual feedback is not practical. The POC includes addressable arrays of two-way Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) springs which can operate at a lower voltage and temperature compatible with mobile devices. They will form different shapes due to the thermal effect as current travels through the springs. The POC can simultaneously realize multiple methods for conveying haptic information such as dimension, force, texture and temperature due to the flexible array design. The haptic interface can go back to the original shape by itself after the current is off due to the advance of two way SMA. We are developing applications with different POC designs for tangible interactions.

  16. A Unique Computational Algorithm to Simulate Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model Complex Material Point Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2010-01-01

    The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from the launch external tanks. The multi-factor has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points--the initial and final points. The exponent describes a monotonic path from the initial condition to the final. The exponent values are selected so that the described path makes sense in the absence of experimental data. In the present investigation, the data used was obtained by testing simulated specimens in launching conditions. Results show that the MFIM is an effective method of describing the divot weight ejected under the conditions investigated.

  17. Characterisation of CIME, an experimental chamber for simulating interactions between materials of the cultural heritage and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabas, A; Fouqueau, A; Attoui, M; Alfaro, S C; Petitmangin, A; Bouilloux, A; Saheb, M; Coman, A; Lombardo, T; Grand, N; Zapf, P; Berardo, R; Duranton, M; Durand-Jolibois, R; Jerome, M; Pangui, E; Correia, J J; Guillot, I; Nowak, S

    2015-12-01

    An approach consisting in combining in situ and laboratory experiments is often favoured for investigating the mechanisms involved in the weathering of the materials of the cultural heritage. However, the realistic simulation in the laboratory of the environmental conditions ruling the interactions of atmospheric compounds with materials is a very complex task. The aim of this work is to characterise CIME, a new chamber specially built to simulate the interactions between materials of the cultural heritage and the environment. The originality of this instrument is that beside the usual climatic parameters (temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation) and gaseous pollutants, it also allows the controlled injection of different types of particulate matter such as terrigenous, marine and anthropogenic. Therefore, varied realistic atmospheric environments (marine or urban) can be easily simulated within CIME. In addition to the technical description of CIME, this paper shows the first results obtained by the impact of gaseous pollutants on non-durable glass, bronze and limestone. The first experiments for the deposition of different particles (calcite, clays, soot and halite) are also presented.

  18. Fundamental Study of Interactions Between High-Density Pulsed Plasmas and Materials for Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    interactions studies (plasma too cold and too “dirty.”) We have built and tested a new, gas -fed, non- ablative, rep-rated capillary plasma source for our...those encountered in space propulsion devices including Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT), Magneto-Plasma Dynamic (MPD) thrusters and capillary plasma...based thrusters . The ongoing research work brings together a team of researchers from the University of Texas at Austin (UT) and the University of

  19. Modal interaction in ultrasonic welding block sonotrodes induced by the mistuning of the material properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouet, Francois; Twiefel, Jens; Wallaschek, Jörg

    2016-10-01

    In many ultrasonic applications, block sonotrodes are serially coupled with other tuned components to transmit the longitudinal vibration to the workpiece. Uniform vibration amplitude of the output surface is an important criterion for determining quality. It is known that amplitude uniformity is related to other non-tuned modes. In this paper, another type of modal interaction is used to quantify distortion of the first longitudinal mode, when the system exhibits a loss of symmetry (mistuning) and near natural frequencies.

  20. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I., E-mail: lotkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kashin, Oleg A., E-mail: okashin@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A., E-mail: yulia-k1970@mail.ru; Antonova, Larisa V., E-mail: antonova.la@mail.ru; Matveeva, Vera G., E-mail: matveeva-vg@mail.ru; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A., E-mail: sergeewa.ew@yandex.ru [Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, 650002 (Russian Federation); Kudryashov, Andrey N., E-mail: kudryashov@angioline.ru [Angioline Interventional Device Ltd, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture.

  1. Haptics using a smart material for eyes-free interaction in personal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Lane, William Brian; Pappas, Devin; Duque, Bryam; Leong, John

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a prototype using a dry ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) in interactive personal devices such as bracelet, necklace, pocket key chain or mobile devices for haptic interaction when audio or visual feedback is not possible or practical. This prototype interface is an electro-mechanical system that realizes a shape-changing haptic display for information communication. A dry IPMC will change its dimensions due to the electrostatic effect when an electrical potential is provided to them. The IPMC can operate at a lower voltage (less than 2.5V) which is compatible with requirements for personal electrical devices or mobile devices. The prototype consists of the addressable arrays of the IPMCs with different dimensions which are deformable to different shapes with proper handling or customization. 3D printing technology will be used to form supporting parts. Microcontrollers (about 3cm square) from DigiKey will be imbedded into this personal device. An Android based mobile APP will be developed to talk with microcontrollers to control IPMCs. When personal devices receive information signals, the original shape of the prototype will change to another shape related to the specific sender or types of information sources. This interactive prototype can simultaneously realize multiple methods for conveying haptic information such as dimension, force, and texture due to the flexible array design. We conduct several studies of user experience to explore how users' respond to shape change information.

  2. Neighboring Interactions in a Periodic Plasmonic Material for Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Musho, Terence D; Coppens, Zackary J

    2015-01-01

    A periodic plasmonic meta-material was studied using finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method to investigate the influence of neighboring particles on the near unity optical absorptivity. The meta-material was constructed as a silver nanoparticle (20-90nm) situated above an alumina (Al$_2$O$_3$) dielectric environment. A full parametric sweep of the particle width and the dielectric thickness was conducted. Computational results identified several resonances between the metal-dielectric and metal-air that have potential to broadening the response through stacked geometry. A significant coupled resonance between the metal-dielectric resonance and a cavity resonance between particles was capture as a function of dielectric thickness. This coupled resonance was not evident below dielectric thicknesses of 40nm and above cavity widths of 20nm. Additionally, a noticeable propagating surface plasmon polariton resonance was predicted when the particle width was half the unit cell length.

  3. High Velocity Impact Interaction of Metal Particles with Porous Heterogeneous Materials with an Inorganic Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazunov, A. A.; Ishchenko, A. N.; Afanasyeva, S. A.; Belov, N. N.; Burkin, V. V.; Rogaev, K. S.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Khabibulin, M. V.; Yugov, N. T.

    2016-03-01

    A computational-experimental investigation of stress-strain state and fracture of a porous heterogeneous material with an inorganic matrix, used as a thermal barrier coating of flying vehicles, under conditions of a high-velocity impact by a spherical steel projectile imitating a meteorite particle is discussed. Ballistic tests are performed at the velocities about 2.5 km/s. Numerical modeling of the high-velocity impact is described within the framework of a porous elastoplastic model including fracture and different phase states of the materials. The calculations are performed using the Euler and Lagrange numerical techniques for the velocities up to 10 km/s in a complete-space problem statement.

  4. Beryllium Dust Generation in PISCES-B Due to Plasma-Material Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, R.; Mays, C.; Hirooka, Y.; Luckhardt, S. C.; Sze, C. F.; Won, J.; Conn, R. W.

    1996-11-01

    The PISCES-B device has started plasma-beryllium experiments in its new location at U.C. San Diego. An improved controlled atmosphere enclosure was constructed to assure safe operation with beryllium materials. In the previous experimental campaign we found that a total of 600 mg of beryllium had been eroded during materials tests. This provided us with a unique opportunity to investigate the lost beryllium. Swipe sampling and vacuum sampling of the PISCES-B vacuum chamber revealed that 3% of the eroded beryllium resided as uniformly distributed loose dust within the vacuum chamber. An additional 33% of the eroded beryllium was coated onto the chamber wall. Filtering through a series of decreasing pore size meshes revealed a uniform distribution of particle sizes in the respirable range (between 10mm - 0.1mm), fewer larger particles (>50mm) were observed. This work is supported by USDOE under grant DE-FG03-95ER-54301.

  5. Analytical solution of magnetothermoelastic interaction in a fiber-reinforced anisotropic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiny, Aatef D.; Abbas, Ibrahim A.

    2016-12-01

    The present paper is concerned with the investigation of the analytical solution of a fiber-reinforced anisotropic material under generalized magnetothermoelastic theory using the eigenvalue approach. Based on the Lord-Shulman theory, the formulation is applied to generalized magnetothermoelasticity with one relaxation time. Based on eigenvalue approach, exponential Fourier transform and Laplace techniques, the analytical solutions has been obtained. The inverses of Fourier transforms are obtained analytically. Numerical computations for a fiber-reinforced-like material have been performed and the results are presented graphically. The results of the temperature, displacement components and stress components have been verified numerically and are represented graphically. Comparisons are made with the results predicted by the presence and absence of reinforcement.

  6. Interaction between High-Voltage Cathode Materials and Ionic Liquids for Novel Li-Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The fast-growing market on electronic portable devices is possibly due to the development of Li-ion batteries. Besides, such batteries are the most promising candidates as energy storage media in (hybrid) electric vehicles, in the near future. However, improvements on electrochemical performances and on safety need to be achieved. With respect to energy density, positive electrodes with a high voltage vs. Li/Li+ are favourable, provided they are stable against the rest of the battery material...

  7. METHODOLOGY FOR EXAMINING SYSTEM AGING DUE TO INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CHEMICALLY INCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. DENINGER; J. TANSKI

    1999-04-01

    We start with a stored and unused population of fielded engineered units that are composed of chemically incompatible materials. The units age primarily through heterogeneous chemical reactions between the materials resulting in possible degradation in performance. The engineered units are unused in storage, but may be called into actual service at any time. We sample several units from the population per year and perform a number of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as radiography, low-frequency vibration analysis, and ultrasonic imaging on the selected units. From those units, some are selected for destructive testing (D-test) involving disassembly and testing of internal parts and components. Chemical analyses, mechanical properties measurements and other tests are performed. All of the above steps provide information that is used in the system simulation mathematical model. The system simulation model incorporates chemical reactions and gas-solid transport processes, along with changes in both the surface and bulk properties of the solids. Model results are used to suggest improvements in NDE analyses of the units and improvements in component and material analyses. Model results give trending indications of individual component and overall system changes over time, plus some understanding of the mechanisms involved which allow science-based predictions of the aged state of the units in future times. The NDE, D-test, and model results can also be used to assess statistically the reliability and performance of the overall aging population of units.

  8. Progress in nano-electro optics characterization of nano-optical materials and optical near-field interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2005-01-01

    This volume focuses on the characterization of nano-optical materials and optical-near field interactions. It begins with the techniques for characterizing the magneto-optical Kerr effect and continues with methods to determine structural and optical properties in high-quality quantum wires with high spatial uniformity. Further topics include: near-field luminescence mapping in InGaN/GaN single quantum well structures in order to interpret the recombination mechanism in InGaN-based nano-structures; and theoretical treatment of the optical near field and optical near-field interactions, providing the basis for investigating the signal transport and associated dissipation in nano-optical devices. Taken as a whole, this overview will be a valuable resource for engineers and scientists working in the field of nano-electro-optics.

  9. Beam Interaction with Thin Materials: Heat Deposition, Cooling Phenomena and Damage Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M

    2012-01-01

    Thin targets, inserted into particle beams can serve various purposes, starting from beam emittance measurements like in wire scanner or scintillating screens up to beam content modifications like in case of stripper foils. The mechanisms of energy deposition in a thin target for various beam types are discussed, together with properties of particles produced in this kind of interaction. The cooldown processes, from heat transfer up to cooling by sublimation, and their efficiencies are presented. Finally, damage conditions are discussed and conclusions about typical damage limits are drawn. The experiments performed with the wire scanners at CERN accelerators and a mathematical model of heating and cooling of a wire are presented.

  10. FY04 LDRD Final Report: Interaction of Viruses with Membranes and Soil Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaldach, C M

    2005-02-08

    The influence of ionic strength on the electrostatic interaction of viruses with environmentally relevant surfaces was determined for three viruses, MS2, Q{beta} and Norwalk. The environmental surface is modeled as charged Gouy-Chapman plane with and without a finite atomistic region (patch) of opposite charge. The virus is modeled as a particle comprised of ionizable amino acid residues in a shell surrounding a spherical RNA core of negative charge, these charges being compensated for by a Coulomb screening due to intercalated ions. Surface potential calculations for each of the viruses show excellent agreement with electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential measurements as a function of pH. The results indicate that the electrostatic interaction between the virus and the planar surface, mitigated by the ionic strength of the solute, is dependent upon the spatial distribution of the amino acid residues in the different viruses. Specifically, the order of interaction energies with the patch (MS2 greatest at 5 mM; Norwalk greatest at 20 mM) is dependent upon the ionic strength of the fluid as a direct result of the viral coat amino acid distributions. We have developed an atomistic-scale method of calculation of the binding energy of viruses to surfaces including electrostatic, van der Waals, electron-overlap repulsion, surface charge polarization (images), and hydrophobic effects. The surface is treated as a Gouy-Chapman plane allowing inclusion of pH and ionic strength effects on the electrostatic potential at each amino acid charge. Van der Waals parameters are obtained from the DREIDING force field and from Hamaker constant measurements. We applied this method to the calculation of the Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV), a negatively charged virus at a pH of 7.0, and find that the viral-gold surface interaction is very long range for both signs of surface potential, a result due to the electrostatic forces. For a negative (Au) surface potential of -0.05 volts, a nearly

  11. Exciton Dynamics and Many Body Interactions in Layered Semiconducting Materials Revealed with Non-linear Coherent Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Prasenjit

    Atomically thin, semiconducting transition metal dichalogenides (TMDs), a special class of layered semiconductors, that can be shaped as a perfect two dimensional material, have garnered a lot of attention owing to their fascinating electronic properties which are achievable at the extreme nanoscale. In contrast to graphene, the most celebrated two-dimensional (2D) material thus far; TMDs exhibit a direct band gap in the monolayer regime. The presence of a non-zero bandgap along with the broken inversion symmetry in the monolayer limit brands semiconducting TMDs as the perfect candidate for future optoelectronic and valleytronics-based device application. These remarkable discoveries demand exploration of different materials that possess similar properties alike TMDs. Recently, III-VI layered semiconducting materials (example: InSe, GaSe etc.) have also emerged as potential materials for optical device based applications as, similar to TMDs, they can be shaped into a perfect two-dimensional form as well as possess a sizable band gap in their nano-regime. The perfect 2D character in layered materials cause enhancement of strong Coulomb interaction. As a result, excitons, a coulomb bound quasiparticle made of electron-hole pair, dominate the optical properties near the bandgap. The basis of development for future optoelectronic-based devices requires accurate characterization of the essential properties of excitons. Two fundamental parameters that characterize the quantum dynamics of excitons are: a) the dephasing rate, gamma, which represents the coherence loss due to the interaction of the excitons with their environment (for example- phonons, impurities, other excitons, etc.) and b) excited state population decay rate arising from radiative and non-radiative relaxation processes. The dephasing rate is representative of the time scale over which excitons can be coherently manipulated, therefore accurately probing the source of exciton decoherence is crucial for

  12. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists such as ...... also key figures in the philosophical discussions of nature and science - from philosophical tendencies like logical empiricism via critical rationalism to various neo-Kantian trends....

  13. Temperature Spectra from a Turbulent Free Thermal Plume and in Interaction with its Material Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zinoubi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we study the interaction of an axysymmetric thermal plume with a thermosiphon flow that surrounds it. The thermal plume is created by a circular disk heated by joule effect at constant temperature. The disk is placed at an open ended vertical cylinder on a quiet constant temperature. The internal wall of the cylinder heats up under the effect of thermal radiation emitted by the hot source. The confinement of the fluid causes, in the bottom part of the cylinder, an aspiration of the fresh air. It is a thermosiphon flow that comes to interact with the plume. By studying the average and fluctuating thermal fields it was found that the flow of the plume is strongly influenced by the presence of nearby walls. It was noted that the vertical transport becomes more intense and the structure of the flow becomes more turbulent. On the other hand, we attend a fast homogenization of the flow in the upper cylinder. To obtain more detailed information of this flow, we develops, during this study, a spectral analysis of the fluctuating thermal fields for the case of a plume evolving in unlimited and in an enclosed environment. The energy spectra study shows an important shift of the energy peaks toward the high frequencies under the effect of the thermosiphon. As destroying structures them on a big scale generated by the plume, the thermosiphon provokes a fast mixture of the fluid thus while leading to vortex of weaker size.

  14. Electronic structure, vibrational spectral and intervening orbital interactions studies of NLO material: Guanidinium 4-nitrobenzoate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikala, V.; Sajan, D.; Job Sabu, K.; Arumanayagam, T.; Murugakoothan, P.

    2015-03-01

    Single crystals of guanidinium 4-nitrobenzoate (GPNB) have been grown by slow evaporation method. Grown crystals were characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis absorption and UV-Vis transmission spectroscopies. Crystal defects and surface morphology were studied by etching method. Dielectric properties of the crystal such as dielectric constant, dielectric loss and AC electrical conductivity as function of frequency (50 Hz-5 MHz) at two temperatures (35 °C and 100 °C) were measured. The frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric behaviour were investigated. The equilibrium geometry, vibrational spectral analysis, intramolecular charge transfer interactions using NBO method, first order hyperpolarizability, molecular electrostatic potential and frontier molecular orbital analysis for GPNB have been studied using density functional theory at B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. Vibrational spectral study reveals the presence of moderate and weak Nsbnd H⋯O bonds in GPNB. NBO analysis also confirms the presence of intramolecular Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonding and investigates the stability as well as the intervening orbital interactions. The electronic absorption spectrum of the gas and water phases of GPNB were simulated using time dependent density functional theory and NBO transitions for the three lowest excited states were assigned and studied.

  15. New perspectives on van der Waals-London interactions of materials. From planar interfaces to carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajter, R F [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue Room 13-5034, Cambridge MA 02139 (United States); French, R H [DuPont Co. Central Research, Exp. Sta. E400-5207, Wilmington DE, 19880-0400 (United States)], E-mail: rickrajter@alum.mit.edu, E-mail: roger.h.french@usa.dupont.com

    2008-01-15

    The drive towards nanoscale assembly necessitates an accurate understanding of all the fundamental forces present in a given system to ensure the greatest chance of success. The van der Waals - London dispersion (vdW-Ld) interaction is the universal, long range, interaction that is present in all materials systems. However, scientists and engineers often either ignore or crudely approximate the vdW-Ld interactions because the calculations often appear impractical due to the 1) lack of the required full spectra optical properties and 2) lack of the proper geometrical formulation to give meaningful results. These two barriers are being actively eliminated by the introduction of robust ab initiocodes that can calculate anisotropic full spectral optical properties and by proper extensions to the Lifshitz vdW-Ld formulation that take into account anisotropic spectral optical properties as well as novel geometries. These new capabilities are of broad utility, especially in the biological community, because of the difficulty in experimental determination of full spectral optical properties of nanoscale, liquid phase biomolecules. Here we compare 3 levels of complexity of vdW-Ld interactions (optically isotropic planar, optically anisotropic planar, and optically anisotropic solid cylinder) as well as calculate and compare a variety of Hamaker coefficients relevant to these systems. For the latter two, more complex, cases, we use the ab initiooptical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Our results show the effects of strong optical anisotropy upon the overall vdW-Ld interaction strength as well as the presence of strong dispersion-driven torques in both anisotropic cases, which can play a role in CNT alignment with other CNTs and also preferred CNT alignment directions with optically anisotropic substrates.

  16. Synthetic Spectra and Light Curves of Interacting Binaries and Exoplanets with Circumstellar Material: SHELLSPEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaj, Ján

    2012-04-01

    Program SHELLSPEC is designed to calculate light-curves, spectra and images of interacting binaries and extrasolar planets immersed in a moving circumstellar environment which is optically thin. It solves simple radiative transfer along the line of sight in moving media. The assumptions include LTE and optional known state quantities and velocity fields in 3D. Optional (non)transparent objects such as a spot, disc, stream, jet, shell or stars may be defined (embedded) in 3D and their composite synthetic spectrum calculated. The Roche model can be used as a boundary condition for the radiative transfer. Recently, a new model of the reflection effect, dust and Mie scattering were incorporated into the code. ɛ Aurigae is one of the most mysterious objects on the sky. Prior modeling of its light-curve assumed a dark, inclined, disk of dust with a central hole to explain the light-curve with a sharp mid-eclipse brightening. Our model consists of two geometrically thick flared disks: an internal optically thick disk and an external optically thin disk which absorbs and scatters radiation. Shallow mid-eclipse brightening may result from eclipses by nearly edge-on flared (dusty or gaseous) disks. Mid-eclipse brightening may also be due to strong forward scattering and optical properties of the dust which can have an important effect on the light-curves. There are many similarities between interacting binary stars and transiting extrasolar planets. The reflection effect which is briefly reviewed is one of them. The exact Roche shape and temperature distributions over the surface of all currently known transiting extrasolar planets have been determined. In some cases (HAT-P-32b, WASP-12b, WASP-19b), departures from the spherical shape can reach 7-15%.

  17. The Interaction of Sound and Shock Waves with Flexible Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, James Fuller

    Several topics are studied which illustrate the role of flexibility in determining the acoustical properties of flexible porous materials. A power balance relation is obtained for the flexible porous material which explicitly identifies two loss mechanisms for sound absorption: the losses due to the irreversible deformation of the structure, and those attributed to the viscous drag between the fluid and the structure. The finite flexible porous layer backed by a rigid wall is then considered. Irreversible deformation of the structure is shown to be the dominant loss mechanism for closed layers. Three departures from the basic model-- a porous layer with anisotropic flow resistance and structure factor, periodic structures consisting of porous layers separated by air gaps, and the porous medium in bulk with mean fluid flow--are considered. The reflection of shock waves is also studied, and a quasi-linear theory is developed which reproduces the principal features of experimental results obtained previously by Ingard. The theory assumes that the propagating pulses in the air and structure are linear and the gross, zeroth order motion of the porous layer is modeled by including its energy and momentum in the conservation equations; these equations compare the system just before and just after the reflection of the incident shock from the front surface of the layer. The substantial motion of the layer and its dragging against a constraining boundary (in this case the walls of the shock tube) are found to introduce a dependence of the front reflection coefficient and maximal layer deformation on the peak pressure of the incident shock. Lastly, we address the question of measurement of the complex compressibility K, a key parameter used to describe the dynamics of a given flexible porous material. The standard long-wavelength assumption used to determine K from experimental measurements of the frequency dependent velocity transfer function across a sample is shown to

  18. Development of a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system on the Plasma Material Interaction System (PLAMIS-II) device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, I. J.; Lee, K. Y.; Lee, K. I.; Choi, Y.-S.; Cho, S. G.; Bae, M. K.; Lee, D.-H.; Hong, S. H.; Lho, T.; Chung, K.-S.

    2015-12-01

    A laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed for the plasma material interaction system (PLAMIS-II) device, which is equipped with a unique plasma gun composed of a LaB6 cathode and two anodes with electromagnets to generate a focused dense plasma. PLAMIS-II simulates the interactions of plasma with different materials and is to be used for the test of plasma facing components of fusion devices. The LIF system is composed of a seed laser with Littmann/Metcalf cavity and a master oscillator power amplifier to pump 3d4F7/2 metastable argon ion to 4p4D5/2 level at the wavelength of 668.61 nm, which has the following input parameters: laser power = 20 mW, line width 70 GHz. For in-situ measurement of laser wavelength, the wavelength spectrum of an iodine cell was measured by a photo-transistor during LIF measurement. To measure argon ion temperature (Ti) and drift velocity (vd) in PLAMIS-II, the fluorescence light with the wavelength of 442.72 nm, emitted from 4p4D5/2 level to 4s4P3/2 level and passing through 1 nm band-width filter, was collected by the photomultiplier tube combined with a lock-in amplifier and a chopper with frequency of 3 kHz. Initial data of Ti and vd were analysed in terms of gas flow rate and applied power.

  19. Effect of chromophore-chromophore electrostatic interactions in the NLO response of functionalized organic-inorganic sol-gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Esqueda, J.; Darracq, B.; García-Macedo, J.; Canva, M.; Blanchard-Desce, M.; Chaput, F.; Lahlil, K.; Boilot, J. P.; Brun, A.; Lévy, Y.

    2001-10-01

    In the last years, important non-linear optical (NLO) results on sol-gel and polymeric materials have been reported, with values comparable to those found in crystals. These new materials contain push-pull chromophores either incorporated as guest in a high Tg polymeric matrix (doped polymers) or grafted onto the polymeric matrix. These systems present several advantages, however they require significant improvement at the molecular level—by designing optimized chromophores with very large molecular figure of merit, specific to each application targeted. Besides, it was recently stated in polymers that the chromophore-chromophore electrostatic interactions, which are dependent of chromophore concentration, have a strong effect into their NLO properties. This has not been explored at all in sol-gel systems. In this work, the sol-gel route was used to prepare hybrid organic-inorganic thin films with different NLO chromophores grafted into the skeleton matrix. Combining a molecular engineering strategy for getting a larger molecular figure of merit and by controlling the intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions through both: the tuning of the push-pull chromophore concentration and the control of tetraethoxysilane concentration, we have obtained a r33 coefficient around 15 pm/V at 633 nm for the classical DR1 azo-chromophore and a r33 around 50 pm/V at 831 nm for a new optimized chromophore structure.

  20. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Interaction with Soft Materials as Fundamental Processes in Plasma Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Molecular-structure variation of organic materials irradiated with atmospheric pressure He plasma jet have been investigated. Optical emission spectrum in the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been measured. The spectrum shows considerable emissions of He lines, and the emission of O and N radicals attributed to air. Variation in molecular structure of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been observed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). These results via XPS and FT-IR indicate that the PET surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet was oxidized by chemical and/or physical effect due to irradiation of active species.

  1. Computational analysis of gas-solid interactions in materials for energy storage and conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Steen

    The extensive use of fossil fuels are harmful to the climate and the general standard of living due to global warming effects and pollution. Thus the rising energy needs in the World caused by an increase in both population and wealth especially in developing countries will have to be met...... by a renewable energy production. Sustainable energy sources such as solar or wind power are not constant and efficient methods firstly to convert electricity into chemical energy and secondly to store the high energy materials are needed. In this thesis both issues of conversion and storage are treated...... exchange and diffusion processes of water and ammonia in magnesium chloride hexammine and hexahydrate as a method for non-thermal release of ammonia. A mixed phase containing both water and ammonia have been shown to be stable in a small region around room temperature. It is possible to shift the release...

  2. Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  3. Surface Modification of Carbon Nanotubes with Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Fundamental Interactions and Applications in Composite Materials, Nanofibers, Electronics, and Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ezzeddine, Alaa

    2015-10-01

    Ever since their discovery, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been renowned to be potential candidates for a variety of applications. Nevertheless, the difficulties accompanied with their dispersion and poor solubility in various solvents have hindered CNTs potential applications. As a result, studies have been developed to address the dispersion problem. The solution is in modifying the surfaces of the nanotubes covalently or non-covalently with a desired dispersant. Various materials have been employed for this purpose out of which polymers are the most common. Non-covalent functionalization of CNTs via polymer wrapping represents an attractive method to obtain a stable and homogenous CNTs dispersion. This method is able to change the surface properties of the nanotubes without destroying their intrinsic structure and preserving their properties. This thesis explores and studies the surface modification and solublization of pristine single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes via a simple solution mixing technique through non-covalent interactions of CNTs with various anionic and cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs). The work includes studying the interaction of various poly(phenylene ethynylene) electrolytes with MWCNTs and an imidazolium functionalized poly(3-hexylthiophene) with SWCNTs. Our work here focuses on the noncovalent modifications of carbon nanotubes using novel CPEs in order to use these resulting CPE/CNT complexes in various applications. Upon modifying the CNTs with the CPEs, the resulting CPE/CNT complex has been proven to be easily dispersed in various organic and aqueous solution with excellent homogeneity and stability for several months. This complex was then used as a nanofiller and was dispersed in another polymer matrix (poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA). The PMMA/CPE/CNT composite materials were cast or electrospun depending on their desired application. The presence of the CPE modified CNTs in the polymer matrix has been proven to enhance

  4. Analysis of enhanced modal damping ratio in porous materials using an acoustic-structure interaction model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghwan Kook

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the enhancement of the damping ratio of a structure with embedded microbeam resonators in air-filled internal cavities. In this context, we discuss theoretical aspects in the framework of the effective modal damping ratio (MDR and derive an approximate relation expressing how an increased damping due to the acoustic medium surrounding the microbeam affect the MDR of the macrobeam. We further analyze the effect of including dissipation of the acoustic medium by using finite element (FE analysis with acoustic-structure interaction (ASI using a simple phenomenological acoustic loss model. An eigenvalue analysis is carried out to demonstrate the improvement of the damping characteristic of the macrobeam with the resonating microbeam in the lossy air and the results are compared to a forced vibration analysis for a macrobeam with one or multiple embedded microbeams. Finally we demonstrate the effect of randomness in terms of position and size of microbeams and discuss the difference between the phenomenological acoustic loss model and a full thermoacoustic model.

  5. Interaction of low-energy highly charged ions with matter; Wechselwirkung niederenergetischer hochgeladener Ionen mit Materie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzel, Rainer

    2010-06-09

    The thesis presented herein deals with experimental studies of the interaction between highly charged ions and neutral matter at low collision energies. The energy range investigated is of great interest for the understanding of both charge exchange reactions between ions comprising the solar wind and various astrophysical gases, as well as the creation of near-surface nanostructures. Over the course of this thesis an experimental setup was constructed, capable of reducing the kinetic energy of incoming ions by two orders of magnitude and finally focussing the decelerated ion beam onto a solid or gaseous target. A coincidence method was employed for the simultaneous detection of photons emitted during the charge exchange process together with the corresponding projectile ions. In this manner, it was possible to separate reaction channels, whose superposition presumably propagated large uncertainties and systematic errors in previous measurements. This work has unveiled unexpectedly strong contributions of slow radiative decay channels and clear evidence of previously only postulated decay processes in charge exchange-induced X-ray spectra. (orig.)

  6. Synthetic Spectra and Light Curves of Interacting Binaries and Exoplanets with Circumstellar Material: SHELLSPEC

    CERN Document Server

    Budaj, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Program SHELLSPEC is designed to calculate light-curves, spectra and images of interacting binaries and extrasolar planets immersed in a moving circumstellar environment which is optically thin. It solves simple radiative transfer along the line of sight in moving media. The assumptions include LTE and optional known state quantities and velocity fields in 3D. Optional (non)transparent objects such as a spot, disc, stream, jet, ufo, shell or stars may be defined (embedded) in 3D and their composite synthetic spectrum calculated. Roche model can be used as a boundary condition for the radiative transfer. Recently a new model of the reflection effect, dust and Mie scattering were incorporated into the code. $\\epsilon$ Aurigae is one of the most mysterious objects on the sky. Prior modeling of its light-curve assumed dark, inclined, disk of dust with the central hole to explain the light-curve with a sharp mid-eclipse brightening. Our model consists of two geometrically thick flared disks. Internal optically thi...

  7. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Yang; Qiang Han; Shuya Cao; Feng Huang; Molin Qin; Chenghai Guo; Mingyu Ding

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical an...

  8. [Darwinism, materialism and the revolution of 1848 in Germany. On the interaction of politics and science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, T

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, the question of national styles in science has received increasing attention. The different forms of Darwinism that emerged in the nineteenth century provide an impressive example of the role of non-scientific factors in the development of scientific ideas. Although the reception of Darwinian theory has been acknowledged to differ according to distinct national traditions even in Darwin's time, there have been few systematic efforts to understand the underlying causal factors. Usually these explanations have conceived of the relationship of science to its social and political context as a distortion of science by ideology. In contrast to this picture, I attempt to demonstrate here how a scientific research program was situated in a concrete historical context. The German tradition of Darwinism in the nineteenth century will be described as a coalition of political liberalism, materialism, and morphology. Whereas the liberals used Darwinism to give their anti-religious and progressive program a naturalistic foundation, the morphologists appreciated that Darwinian theory allowed them to dispense with the idealistic origins of their research program, and the materialist were provided with a naturalistic explanation of the origin of organic form.

  9. Interaction of ultra soft magnetic materials with the high-T{sub c} superconductor YBCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Claudia; Treiber, Sebastian; Schuetz, Gisela [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Heisenbergstrasse 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Walker, Patrick [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Heisenbergstrasse 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Aalen University, Beethovenstrasse 1, 73430 Aalen (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Aalen University, Beethovenstrasse 1, 73430 Aalen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We have grown bilayers of optimally doped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-δ} (YBCO) and ferromagnetic CoFeB on single-crystalline substrates by pulsed laser deposition and sputtering. These heterostructures are typically composed of about 100 nm YBCO and several 10 nm of CoFeB. Regarding the superconductor, the properties of the YBCO film change as a consequence of the vicinity of the ferromagnet. In detail we investigated the critical current density as a function of temperature, applied field and time as well as the transition temperature by SQUID magnetization measurements and quantitative magneto-optical measurements. The amorphous material CoFeB exhibits an in plane anisotropy and a very low coercivity. From magneto-optical images we find that the flux line lattice of the superconductor is mapped into the magnet and still visible as significant magnetic out-of-plane contrast at room temperature. We discuss this phenomenon as a new route to high-resolution mapping of the flux line distribution on a nanometer scale.

  10. Inelastic electron-solid interactions for the processing and characterization of soft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faney, Thibault

    Magnetic confinement fusion is a promising technology for electricity production due to available fuel and low waste products. However, the construction of a nuclear fusion reactor remains a scientific challenge. One of the main issues is the resistance of the plasma facing materials exposed to very harsh operating conditions. Tungsten is the leading candidate for the divertor, a crucial plasma facing component. This dissertation focuses on modeling the behavior of tungsten under irradiation conditions relevant to the divertor operations using a multi-scale modeling approach. In particular, high fluxes of helium ions at low energy impact the divertor and are responsible for changes in the tungsten microstructure such as the formation of helium blisters and ''fuzz"-like structures which can ultimately lead to erosion, degradation of materials performance and materials failure. A spatially dependent cluster dynamics model is introduced in order to model the evolution of the tungsten microstructure under irradiation. This continuum model is based on kinetic rate theory and handles each material defect type independently. Under the assumptions of a low dilute limit and no spatial correlation between defects, this leads to a large system of non-linear reaction-diffusion equations. Hence, the results addressed in this thesis consist in the determination of the kinetic parameters for the cluster dynamics model, the construction of a solver which efficiently deals with the large non-linear system of partial differential equations, the determination of the applicability of the model to fusion relevant conditions, and the model results for a variety of irradiation conditions. The input kinetic parameters to the cluster dynamics model are the defects' diffusion coefficients, binding energies and capture radii. These can be determined using a molecular dynamics and density functional theory simulations as well as empirical data. The challenge lies in obtaining a consistent set

  11. Numerical study of the interaction of a helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet with a dielectric material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Zheng, Yashuang; Jia, Shenli

    2016-10-01

    This is a computational modeling study of a cold atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet impinging on a dielectric surface placed normal to the jet axis. This study provides insights into the propagation mechanism of the plasma jet, the electrical properties, and the total accumulated charge density at the dielectric surface. For the radial streamer propagation along the dielectric surface, Penning ionization and the electron impact ionization of helium atoms are the major ionization reactions in the streamer head, while Penning ionization is the only dominant contributor along the streamer body. In addition, the plasma bullet velocity along the dielectric surface is 10-100 times lower than that in the plasma column. Increasing tube radius or helium flow rate lowers air entrainment in the plasma jet, leading to a decrease of the radial electric field and the accumulated charge density at the dielectric surface. Furthermore, the tube radius has weaker influence on the plasma properties as tube radius increases. For a target dielectric with lower relative permittivity, a higher radial electric field penetrates into the material, and the surface ionization wave along the dielectric surface extends farther. Higher relative permittivity of the treated dielectric results in more charging at the dielectric surface and more electron density in the plasma column.

  12. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-06-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to evaluate the (HIC) system, which incorporates augmented reality, virtual reality and cloud-classroom to teach basic materials science courses. The study followed a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental research design. A total of 92 students (aged 19-20 years), in a second-year undergraduate program, participated in this 18-week-long experiment. The students were divided into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group (36 males and 10 females) was instructed utilizing the HIC system, while the control group (34 males and 12 females) was led through traditional teaching methods. Pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest scores were evaluated by multivariate analysis of covariance. The results indicated that participants in the experimental group who used the HIC system outperformed the control group, in the both posttest and delayed posttest, across three learning dimensions. Based on these results, the HIC system is recommended to be incorporated in formal materials science learning settings.

  13. A new route for local probing of inner interactions within a layered double hydroxide/benzene derivative hybrid material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleutot, S; Dupin, J C; Baraille, I; Forano, C; Renaudin, G; Leroux, F; Gonbeau, D; Martinez, H

    2009-05-14

    This paper presents the preparation and characterization of hybrid hydrotalcite-type layered double hydroxides (Zn1-xAlx(OH)2HBSx.nH2O, with x=0.33) where HBS is the 4-phenol sulfonate, with a detailed analysis of the grafting process of this organic entity onto the host lattice. As a set of the usual techniques (XRD, TG-DT/MS, FTIR and 27Al MAS NMR) was used to characterize the hybrid materials, this work focuses on a joint study by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and some quantum-calculation modeling in order to highlight the nature of the interactions between the organic and the mineral sub-systems. For the as-prepared hybrid material, the main results lead to a quasi-vertical orientation of the organic molecules within the mineral sheets via H-bond stabilization. By heating the hybrid material up to 200 degrees C, the structure shrinks with the condensation of the organics; the different theoretical modeling done gives an energy-stable situation when a direct attachment of the HBS sulfonate group sets up with the mineral layers, in agreement with the recorded XPS experimental data.

  14. Fe-C interactions and soil organic matter stability in two tropical soils of contrasting parent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, E.; Thompson, A.; Plante, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The long residence time of soil organic matter (SOM) is a dynamic property, reflecting the diversity of stabilization mechanisms active within the soil matrix. Climate and ecosystem properties act at the broadest scale, while biochemical recalcitrance, physical occlusion and mineral association drive stability at the microscale. Increasing evidence suggests that the stability of SOM is dominated by organo-mineral interactions. However, the 2:1 clays that provide much of the stabilization capacity in temperate soils are typically absent in tropical soils due to weathering. In contrast, these soils may contain an abundance of iron and aluminium oxides and oxyhydroxides, known as short-range-order (SRO) minerals. These SRO minerals are capable of SOM stabilization through adsorption or co-precipitation, a faculty largely enabled by their high specific surface area (SSA). As such, despite their relatively small mass, SRO minerals may contribute substantially to the SOM stabilization capacity of tropical soils. The objective of this work is to characterize and quantify these Fe-C interactions. Surface (0-20 cm) soil samples were taken from 20 quantitative soil pits dug within the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory in northeast Puerto Rico. Soils were stratified across granodiorite and volcaniclastic parent materials. Four extraction procedures were used to isolate three different forms of Fe-C interactions: sodium pyrophosphate to isolate organo-metallic complexes, hydroxylamine and oxalate to isolate SRO Fe- and Al-hydroxides, and dithionite to isolate crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxides. Extracts were analysed for DOC and Fe and Al concentrations to estimate the amount of SOM associated with each mineral type. Soils were subjected to SSA and solid-phase C analyses before and after extraction to determine the contribution of the various Fe mineral types to soil SSA, and therefore to potential stabilization capacity through organo-mineral complexation. Preliminary results

  15. Simulation of Metal Flow During Friction Stir Welding Based on the Model of Interactive Force Between Tool and Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. Q.; Shi, Q. Y.; Fujiya, Y.; Horie, T.

    2014-04-01

    In this research, the three-dimensional flow of metal in friction stir welding (FSW) has been simulated based on computational fluid dynamics. Conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy were solved in three dimensions. The interactive force was imposed as boundary conditions on the tool/material boundary in the model. The strain rate- and temperature-dependent non-Newtonian viscosity was adopted for the calculation of metal flow. The distribution of temperature, velocity, and strain rate were simulated based on the above models. The simulated temperature distribution agreed well with the experimental results. The simulation results showed that the velocity on the pin was much higher than that on the shoulder. From the comparison between the simulation results and the experiments results, contours line, corresponding to strain rate = 4 s-1, reflected reasonably well the shape of stir zone, especially at the ground portion.

  16. Fumonisin concentrations and in vivo toxicity of nixtamalized Fusarium verticillioides culture material: evidence for fumonisin-matrix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, T D; Snook, M E; Riley, R T; Voss, K A

    2008-08-01

    The toxic potential of nixtamalized foods can be underestimated if, during cooking, reversible fumonisin-food matrix interactions reduce the amount of mycotoxin that is detected but not the amount that is bioavailable. Fusarium verticillioides culture material (CM) was nixtamalized as is (NCM) or after mixing with ground corn (NCMC). Additional portions were sham nixtamalized without (SCM) or with corn (SCMC). Nixtamalization and sham nixtamalization reduced FB(1); CM, NCM, and SCM diets contained 9.08, 2.08, and 1.19 ppm, respectively. FB(1) was further reduced in the NCMC (0.49 ppm) but not the SCMC (1.01 ppm) diets compared to their NCM and SCM counterparts. Equivalent weights of the cooked products, uncooked CM, corn (UC) or nixtamalized UC (NUC) were fed to rats for up to three weeks. Kidney lesions in the NCM-fed group were less severe than in the CM-fed, positive control group and no lesions were found in the NCMC and other groups. Group kidney sphinganine (biomarker of fumonisin exposure) concentrations decreased in the order: CM (absolute concentration (nmol/g)=600-800)>NCM (400-600)>SCM and SCMC (30-90)>NCMC, UC and NUC (<8). Together, these results suggest that mycotoxin-corn matrix interactions during nixtamalization reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of FB(1).

  17. Research on quasi-cw and pulse interaction of strong laser radiation with the military technical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycyk, Antoni; CzyŻ, Krzysztof; Sarzyński, Antoni; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Ostrowski, Roman; Strzelec, Marek; Jach, Karol; Świerczyński, Robert

    2016-12-01

    The paper describes work connected to the investigation of the interaction of strong laser radiation with selected metals, constituting typical materials applied in military technology, like aluminum, copper, brass and titanium. A special laser experimental stand was designed and constructed to achieve this objective. The system consisted of two Nd:YAG lasers working in the regime of free generation (quasi-cw) and another Nd:YAG laser, generating short pre-pulses in the Qswitching regime. During the concurrent operation of both quasi-cw systems it was possible to obtain pulse energies amounting to 10 J in a time period (pulses) of 1 ms. The synchronized, serial operation resulted in energy amounting to 5 J over a time period (pulse) of 2 ms. Variations of the target's surface reflection coefficient, caused by the interaction of short pre-pulses with high power density were determined. The experiments were performed using a standard Nd:YAG laser with amplifiers, generating output pulses whose duration amounted to 10 ns and energy to 1 J, with near Gaussian profile. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze the emission spectra of targets under the conditions of the interaction of destructive strong and weak as well as long and short excitation laser pulses. A decay of the spectra in the UV range from 200 to around 350 nm was observed when irradiating the target with a long, quasi-cw destructive pulse. Moreover, in the case of an Al target, some AlO molecular spectra appeared, suggesting a chemical reaction of the aluminum atoms with oxygen.

  18. Interaction of solutions containing phenothiazines exposed to laser radiation with materials surfaces, in view of biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Agota; Alexandru, Tatiana; Boni, Mihai; Damian, Victor; Stoicu, Alexandru; Dutschk, Victoria; Pascu, Mihail Lucian

    2014-11-20

    Phenothiazine drugs - chlorpromazine (CPZ), promazine (PZ) and promethazine (PMZ) - were exposed to 266 nm (fourth harmonic of the Nd:YAG pulsed laser radiation) in order to be modified at molecular level and to produce an enhancement of their antibacterial activity. The irradiated samples were analysed by several methods: pH and surface tension measurements, UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy, laser induced fluorescence and thin layer chromatography. The purpose of these investigations was to study and describe the modified properties of the medicines to further investigate their specific interactions with materials such as cotton, polyester and Parafilm M as a model smooth surface. The textile materials may be impregnated with phenothiazines drug solutions exposed to laser radiation in order to be used in treatments applied on the surface of the organism. Some of the phenothiazines solutions exposed prolonged time intervals to laser radiation have much better activity against several bacteria. Therefore, in the paper, it is reported the wetting behaviour of CPZ, PZ and PMZ solutions, irradiated for time intervals between 1 and 240 min, on the surfaces of the three textures in order to draw a conclusion about their wettability as a function of time.

  19. LBL coating of type I collagen and hyaluronic acid on aminolyzed PLLA to enhance the cell-material interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to assemble extracellular matrix components onto poly (L-lactic acid (PLLA films using layer-by-layer (LBL depositing method to enhance the cell-material interaction. To introduce charges onto the hydrophobic and neutral PLLA surface so that the electronic assembly can be processed, poly (ethylene imine (PEI was covalently bonded to modify the PLLA films. Positively charged collagen I (Col I was then deposited onto the aminolyzed PLLA film surface in a LBL assembly manner using hyaluronic acid (HA as a negatively charged polyelectrolyte. The PEI modification efficiency was monitored via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS measurements. The results of Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR and Water contact angle (WCA monitoring the LBL assemble process presented that the HA/Col I deposited alternately onto the PLLA surface. The surface topography of the films was observed by Atomic force microscope (AFM. In vitro osteoblast culture found that the presence of Col I layer greatly improved the cytocompatibility of the PLLA films in terms of cell viability, cell proliferation and Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP expression. Furthermore, osteoblast extensions were found to be directed by contact guidance of the aligned Col I fibrils. Thus, these very flexible systems may allow broad applications for improve the bioactivity of polymeric materials, which might be a potential application for bone tissue engineering.

  20. Silicic ash beds bracket Emeishan Large Igneous province to < 1 m.y. at ~ 260 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hu; Cawood, Peter A.; Hou, Ming-Cai; Yang, Jiang-Hai; Ni, Shi-Jun; Du, Yuan-Sheng; Yan, Zhao-Kun; Wang, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Claystone beds directly below and above the Emeishan basalts in SW China formed around the Guadalupian-Lopingian (G - L) boundary. Zircons from both levels give U-Pb ages of 260 Ma, and are identical within-error to ages reported for the Emeishan Large Igneous Province (LIP). The claystones lack Nb - Ta anomalies on primitive mantle normalized elemental diagrams; zircons from these claystones have a geochemical affinity to within-plate-type magmas. These features, combined with the strong negative Eu anomalies in the zircons and high Al2O3/TiO2 ratios, indicate that claystones around the G - L boundary have a silicic volcanic component related to Emeishan LIP. Zircons from the underlying claystone bed have much higher U/Yb and Th/Nb ratios and lower εHf(t) values than those overlying the LIP, suggesting that early-stage silicic volcanic rocks had a higher crustal contamination or assimilation during magmatic processes. In terms of stratigraphic correlation, our data demonstrate that silicic eruptions occurred not only at the end, but also at the beginning of the Emeishan LIP, and the overall duration of the main basaltic phase was short (< 1 m.y).

  1. Chemical interactions in complex matrices: Determination of polar impurities in biofuels and fuel contaminants in building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglayeva, Ganna

    The solutions to several real-life analytical and physical chemistry problems, which involve chemical interactions in complex matrices are presented. The possible interferences due to the analyte-analyte and analyte-matrix chemical interactions were minimized on each step of the performed chemical analysis. Concrete and wood, as major construction materials, typically become contaminated with fuel oil hydrocarbons during their spillage. In the catastrophic scenarios (e.g., during floods), fuel oil mixes with water and then becomes entrained within the porous structure of wood or concrete. A strategy was proposed for the efficient extraction of fuel oil hydrocarbons from concrete to enable their monitoring. The impacts of sample aging and inundation with water on the extraction efficiency were investigated to elucidate the nature of analytematrix interactions. Two extraction methods, 4-days cold solvent extraction with shaking and 24-hours Soxhlet extraction with ethylacetate, methanol or acetonitrile yielded 95-100 % recovery of fuel oil hydrocarbons from concrete. A method of concrete remediation after contamination with fuel oil hydrocarbons using activated carbon as an adsorbent was developed. The 14 days remediation was able to achieve ca. 90 % of the contaminant removal even from aged water-submerged concrete samples. The degree of contamination can be qualitatively assessed using transport rates of the contaminants. Two models were developed, Fickian and empirical, to predict long-term transport behavior of fuel oil hydrocarbons under flood representative scenarios into wood. Various sorption parameters, including sorption rate, penetration degree and diffusion coefficients were obtained. The explanations to the observed three sorption phases are provided in terms of analyte-matrix interactions. The detailed simultaneous analysis of intermediate products of the cracking of triacylglycerol oils, namely monocarboxylic acids, triacyl-, diacyl- and

  2. Laser-Material Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    from the spinner to the PL measurement setup, the time lapse before PL data collection being - 2-3 minutes. The deposition of sodium sulfide nano ...limitations of tsig u existing surface-emitting laser designs, particula .rly the I n this paper, we describe implementation of the novel i.diu; *high

  3. Coupled photo-thermal and time resolved reflectivity methods to original investigation of laser/material nanosecond interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmar, N.; Martan, J.; Cibulka, O.; Le Menn, E.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.

    2006-05-01

    A high number of papers were published on the simulation of laser/surface interaction at the level of nanosecond scale. Several assumptions on thermal properties data, laser spot homogeneity, were assumed for describing as well as possible the boundary conditions, the mathematical writing and finally the numerical or the analytical results. A few tentative of surface temperature monitoring during laser processing were proposed for the numerical validation. Also, simulation of the melting kinetics is rarely directly compared to in situ experiments. It is very hard to determine the time duration of a melting pool by in situ experiments. It should be the same for the surface temperature. A new method to plot the thermal history of the surface by using a combination of the Time Resolved Reflectivity (TRR) and the Pulsed Photo-Thermal (PPT) or Infrared Radiometry (IR) methods is proposed in this paper. Surface temperature, melting kinetics, threshold of melting and threshold of plasma formation are determined in the case of KrF laser spot in interaction with several materials. In the first step, the experimental setup including fast detectors (IR, UV, Vis.) and related optical devices is described. In the second step, typical results (TRR and IR spectra) for monocrystaline silicon are presented and discussed. Namely, phase change transitions (melting and resolidification) are detected versus fluence change and number of laser shots change. TRR and IR spectra of metallic surfaces (Cu, Mo, Ni, Stainless steel 15330 and 17246, Sn, Ti), are measured. For each sample the surface temperature during heating, the threshold of melting, melting duration and the threshold of plasma formation are directly deduced.

  4. A tutorial for sandstone petrology: architecture and development of an interactive program for teaching highly visual material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choh, Suk-Joo; Milliken, Kitty L.; McBride, Earle F.

    2003-11-01

    We have developed an interactive computer-based tutorial in sandstone petrology for undergraduate-level students. The goal of this tutorial is to provide students exposure to the highly visual subject matter of petrography outside the confines of organized laboratory exercises. This paper describes the architecture and development procedures of the current version of the sandstone petrography tutorial, and offers a possible model for similar development approaches in other fields of petrography or in any other field that utilizes large quantities of visual material such as remote sensing image interpretation or seismic interpretation. The tutorial is an interactive photomicrograph archive with sufficient content and flexible architecture that functions as a virtual laboratory instructor as well as a stand-alone reference. The current tutorial was programmed using Macromedia Authorware v.6.0 and supports both Windows-based and MacOS personal computers. The tutorial is constructed around the Folk sandstone classification scheme (quartzarenite, arkose, and litharenite), and an additional section addresses grains other than quartz, feldspar, and lithic fragments and sandstones dominated by these grains. The user interface is designed to take minimal portion of the screen area so that the screen can closely mimic the type of view seen by a student peering down a microscope. Each photomicrograph in the tutorial is basically unadorned until the user actively calls up information that is temporarily displayed over the image, inducing the user to search for information and actively "ask" to be informed with a mouse click. The structure of the tutorial permits multiple strategies of program use, as a linear tutorial, tutorial driven by thumbnail browser, and as a searchable reference.

  5. An advanced regime of the anomalous acousto-optical interaction with tangential phase matching in crystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Alexandre S.; Arellanes, Adan O.

    2016-09-01

    Regime of effective non-collinear acousto-optical interaction with tangential phase matching had been identified and previously observed only in two limiting cases: in tellurium dioxide (TeO2) at low acoustic frequencies ( 60 MHz) and in rutile (TiO2) at ultra-high frequencies ( 5 GHz). Both these limits are motivated by optical properties of the chosen materials. Low frequencies in TeO2 admit designing a wide-aperture acousto-optical cell, but limit the frequency bandwidth. While an acousto-optical cell made of TiO2 has very small aperture and exhibits low spectral resolution due to the effect of linear acoustic attenuation. Instead of those limits, we propose an advanced regime of the anomalous acousto-optical interaction with tangential phase matching, which allows us varying the frequency range and optimizing all the performances (for instance, the spectral resolution) of a wide-aperture acousto-optical cell made of the chosen crystal, as the case requires. Recently, we had suggested and successfully tested experimentally the revealed additional degree of freedom, i.e. the action of the tilt angle within the refractive indices ellipsoids to manipulate by the performances of crystalline acousto-optical cells. Now, we consider an opportunity of refining this additional degree of freedom within those ellipsoids of crystalline acousto-optical cell through some declination of the acoustic beam. For our investigations, the lithium niobate (LiNbO3) and rutile (TiO2) crystals of about 5 cm length, operating with the slow-shear acoustic mode along the acoustic axes had been selected. The needed theoretical analysis, numerical estimations, and 3D-vector diagrams have been developed to reveal potential benefits of the proposed technique.

  6. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper.

  7. Research on the interaction of hydrogen-bond acidic polymer sensitive sensor materials with chemical warfare agents simulants by inverse gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Huang, Feng; Qin, Molin; Guo, Chenghai; Ding, Mingyu

    2015-06-02

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper.

  8. Polydopamine-Gelatin as Universal Cell-Interactive Coating for Methacrylate-Based Medical Device Packaging Materials: When Surface Chemistry Overrules Substrate Bulk Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Walle, Elke; Van Nieuwenhove, Ine; Vanderleyden, Els; Declercq, Heidi; Gellynck, Karolien; Schaubroeck, David; Ottevaere, Heidi; Thienpont, Hugo; De Vos, Winnok H; Cornelissen, Maria; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Dubruel, Peter

    2016-01-11

    Despite its widespread application in the fields of ophthalmology, orthopedics, and dentistry and the stringent need for polymer packagings that induce in vivo tissue integration, the full potential of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and its derivatives as medical device packaging material has not been explored yet. We therefore elaborated on the development of a universal coating for methacrylate-based materials that ideally should reveal cell-interactivity irrespective of the polymer substrate bulk properties. Within this perspective, the present work reports on the UV-induced synthesis of PMMA and its more flexible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based derivative (PMMAPEG) and its subsequent surface decoration using polydopamine (PDA) as well as PDA combined with gelatin B (Gel B). Successful application of both layers was confirmed by multiple surface characterization techniques. The cell interactivity of the materials was studied by performing live-dead assays and immunostainings of the cytoskeletal components of fibroblasts. It can be concluded that only the combination of PDA and Gel B yields materials possessing similar cell interactivities, irrespective of the physicochemical properties of the underlying substrate. The proposed coating outperforms both the PDA functionalized and the pristine polymer surfaces. A universal cell-interactive coating for methacrylate-based medical device packaging materials has thus been realized.

  9. Design of a high particle flux hydrogen helicon plasma source for used in plasma materials interaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL; Baity Jr, F Wallace [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Existing linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) facilities all use plasma sources with internal electrodes. An rf-based helicon source is of interest because high plasma densities can be generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. Work has begun at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a large (15 cm) diameter helicon source producing hydrogen plasmas with parameters suitable for use in a linear PMI device: n(e) >= 10(19)m(-3), T(e) = 4-10 eV, particle flux Gamma(p) > 10(23) m(-3) s(-1), and magnetic field strength |B| up to I T in the source region. The device, whose design is based on a previous hydrogen helicon source operated at ORNL[1], will operate at rf frequencies in the range 10 - 26 MHz, and power levels up to similar to 100 kW. Limitations in cooling will prevent operation for pulses longer than several seconds, but a major goal will be the measurement of power deposition on device structures so that a later steady state version can be designed. The device design, the diagnostics to be used, and results of rf modeling of the device will be discussed. These include calculations of plasma loading, resulting currents and voltages in antenna structures and the matching network, power deposition profiles, and the effect of high |B| operation on power absorption.

  10. New lubrication concepts for environmental friendly machines. Tribological, thermophysical and viscometric properties of lubricants interacting with triboactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.; Klingenberg, G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Woydt, M. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    high wear resistance can additionally be used on aluminium liners to increase the resistance of critical components against wear, adhesive wear and thermomechanical stresses. For given tribological test conditions all APS coatings on piston rings showed no friction reducing effect. The coefficient of friction is more determined by the lubricants than by the materials or by an individual interaction between lubricants and a specific material or tribopairing. Lubricious oxides or triboactive materials and/or polar base oils may substitute the extreme pressure (EP) and anti-wear (AW) properties realized by the additives, thus enabling long drains and responding to 'eco-tox' or 'bio-no-tox' requirements as well as restrictions from the 'chemical box'. Overall, the different polymer-free bionotox and low-ash prototype engine oils with reduced additive contents displayed isoperformance regarding the tribological behaviour against cast iron with high carbon content and triboreactive materials. (orig.)

  11. A dose calculation algorithm with correction for proton-nucleus interactions in non-water materials for proton radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Sato, S.; Kohno, R.

    2016-01-01

    In treatment planning for proton radiotherapy, the dose measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling by stopping power ratio {ρ\\text{S}} . Since the body tissues are chemically different from water, this approximation may cause dose calculation errors, especially due to differences in nuclear interactions. We proposed and validated an algorithm for correcting these errors. The dose in water is decomposed into three constituents according to the physical interactions of protons in water: the dose from primary protons continuously slowing down by electromagnetic interactions, the dose from protons scattered by elastic and/or inelastic interactions, and the dose resulting from nonelastic interactions. The proportions of the three dose constituents differ between body tissues and water. We determine correction factors for the proportion of dose constituents with Monte Carlo simulations in various standard body tissues, and formulated them as functions of their {ρ\\text{S}} for patient dose calculation. The influence of nuclear interactions on dose was assessed by comparing the Monte Carlo simulated dose and the uncorrected dose in common phantom materials. The influence around the Bragg peak amounted to  -6% for polytetrafluoroethylene and 0.3% for polyethylene. The validity of the correction method was confirmed by comparing the simulated and corrected doses in the materials. The deviation was below 0.8% for all materials. The accuracy of the correction factors derived with Monte Carlo simulations was separately verified through irradiation experiments with a 235 MeV proton beam using common phantom materials. The corrected doses agreed with the measurements within 0.4% for all materials except graphite. The influence on tumor dose was assessed in a prostate case. The dose reduction in the tumor was below 0.5%. Our results verify that this algorithm is practical and accurate for proton radiotherapy treatment planning, and

  12. Early Career. Harnessing nanotechnology for fusion plasma-material interface research in an in-situ particle-surface interaction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allain, Jean Paul [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-08-08

    This project consisted of fundamental and applied research of advanced in-situ particle-beam interactions with surfaces/interfaces to discover novel materials able to tolerate intense conditions at the plasma-material interface (PMI) in future fusion burning plasma devices. The project established a novel facility that is capable of not only characterizing new fusion nanomaterials but, more importantly probing and manipulating materials at the nanoscale while performing subsequent single-effect in-situ testing of their performance under simulated environments in fusion PMI.

  13. Air plasma-material interactions at the oxidized surface of the PM1000 nickel-chromium superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panerai, Francesco, E-mail: panerai@vki.ac.be [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Rhode-Saint-Genèse (Belgium); Marschall, Jochen [Molecular Physics Program, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Thömel, Jan [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Rhode-Saint-Genèse (Belgium); Vandendael, Isabelle; Hubin, Annick [Department of Materials and Chemistry, Research Group of Electrochemical and Surface Engineering, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Chazot, Olivier [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Rhode-Saint-Genèse (Belgium)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A detail investigation on behavior of a Ni–Cr superalloy under air plasma is proposed. • The response of PM1000 specimens at high temperature/low pressure is characterized. • High volatility of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale in presence of oxygen is found experimentally. • Stability of NiO scale at the surface is observed. • Computed thermodynamic volatility diagrams confirm the experimental observations. - Abstract: Nickel-based superalloys are promising options for the thermal protection systems of hypersonic re-entry vehicles operating under moderate aerothermal heating conditions. We present an experimental study on the interactions between PM1000, an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-chromium superalloy, and air plasma at surface temperatures between 1000 and 1600 K and pressures of 1500, 7500 and 10,000 Pa. Pre-oxidized PM1000 specimens are tested in high-enthalpy reactive air plasma flows generated by the Plasmatron wind tunnel at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics. Microscopic analysis of plasma-exposed specimens shows enhanced damage to the chromia scale at the lowest plasma pressure. Elemental surface analysis reveals the loss of Cr and the enhancement of Ni at the scale surface. A thermodynamic analysis supports the accelerated volatilization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the relative stability of NiO in the presence of atomic oxygen. Changes in the reflectance and emissivity of the oxidized surfaces due to plasma-exposure are presented. The catalytic efficiencies for dissociated air species recombination are determined as a function of surface temperature and pressure through a numerical rebuilding procedure and are compared with values presented in the literature for the same material.

  14. A new model for humic materials and their interactions with hydrophobic organic chemicals in soil-water or sediment-water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A generalized model of humic materials in soils and sediments, which is consistent with their observed properties, is presented. This model provides a means of understanding the interaction of hydrophobic pollutants with humic materials. In this model, it is proposed that the humic materials in soils and sediments consist of a number of different oligomers and simple compounds which result from the partial degradation of plant remains. These degradation products are stabilized by incorporation into humic aggregates bound together by weak bonding mechanisms, such as hydrogen bonding, pi bonding, and hydrophobic interactions. The resulting structures are similar to micelles or membranes, in which the interiors of the structures are hydrophobic and the exteriors are hydrophilic. Hydrophobic compounds will partition into the hydrophobic interiors of the humic micelles or "membrane-like" structures. ?? 1986.

  15. Multi-scale defect interactions in high-rate failure of brittle materials, Part II: Application to design of protection materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Andrew L.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    Micromechanics based damage models, such as the model presented in Part I of this 2 part series (Tonge and Ramesh, 2015), have the potential to suggest promising directions for materials design. However, to reach their full potential these models must demonstrate that they capture the relevant physical processes. In this work, we apply the multiscale material model described in Tonge and Ramesh (2015) to ballistic impacts on the advanced ceramic boron carbide and suggest possible directions for improving the performance of boron carbide under impact conditions. We simulate both dynamic uniaxial compression and simplified ballistic loading geometries to demonstrate that the material model captures the relevant physics in these problems and to interrogate the sensitivity of the simulation results to some of the model input parameters. Under dynamic compression, we show that the simulated peak strength is sensitive to the maximum crack growth velocity and the flaw distribution, while the stress collapse portion of the test is partially influenced by the granular flow behavior of the fully damaged material. From simulations of simplified ballistic impact, we suggest that the total amount of granular flow (a possible performance metric) can be reduced by either a larger granular flow slope (more angular fragments) or a larger granular flow timescale (larger fragments). We then discuss the implications for materials design.

  16. Multi-modal applicability of a reversed-phase/weak-anion exchange material in reversed-phase, anion-exchange, ion-exclusion, hydrophilic interaction and hydrophobic interaction chromatography modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmerhofer, Michael; Nogueira, Raquel; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    We recently introduced a mixed-mode reversed-phase/weak anion-exchange type separation material based on silica particles which consisted of a hydrophobic alkyl strand with polar embedded groups (thioether and amide functionalities) and a terminal weak anion-exchange-type quinuclidine moiety. This stationary phase was designed to separate molecules by lipophilicity and charge differences and was mainly devised for peptide separations with hydroorganic reversed-phase type elution conditions. Herein, we demonstrate the extraordinary flexibility of this RP/WAX phase, in particular for peptide separations, by illustrating its applicability in various chromatographic modes. The column packed with this material can, depending on the solute character and employed elution conditions, exploit attractive or repulsive electrostatic interactions, and/or hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions as retention and selectivity increments. As a consequence, the column can be operated in a reversed-phase mode (neutral compounds), anion-exchange mode (acidic compounds), ion-exclusion chromatography mode (cationic solutes), hydrophilic interaction chromatography mode (polar compounds), and hydrophobic interaction chromatography mode (e.g., hydrophobic peptides). Mixed-modes of these chromatographic retention principles may be materialized as well. This allows an exceptionally flexible adjustment of retention and selectivity by tuning experimental conditions. The distinct separation mechanisms will be outlined by selected examples of peptide separations in the different modes.

  17. The project of the Spanish Nuclear Industry Forum to develop an interactive educational material on Radiological Protection; El Proyecto de Foro de la Industria Nuclear espanola para elaborar un material didactico interactivo sobre Proteccion Radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Real, A.; Cruz, T. de la; Girona, L.; Montesinos, L.; Sanchez, P.

    2012-07-01

    The Training Department of the Spanish Nuclear Industry Forum has undertaken a new project to develop an interactive educational material on Radiological Protection. The objective was to develop an attractive, comprehensive and interactive material, to facilitate students and teachers of Elementary, Middle and High schools, to become familiar with ionising radiations. The novelly of the project, is that based on the European framework of key competencies for file long learning, which are defined as a set of knowledge, skills and altitudes that all individuals need for personal fulfilment and employment. The material presented in this paper, is based in an integrated structure of tasks, activities and exercises, which will facilitate the acquisition of as may key competencies as possible. Besides, the material also includes reference texts, links to pertinent web sites and videos. Students, through the development of a specific task (and related activities and exercises), will learn the differences between ionizing and non ionising radiation, the origin, characteristics and types of types of ionising radiation, how to detect and measure them, the potential detrimental health effects, the principles of radiation protection and the beneficial applications can have for man. The material is freely available in www.rinconeducativo.org. (Author) 4 refs.

  18. The crucial role of the K+-aluminium oxide interaction in K+-promoted alumina- and hydrotalcite-based materials for CO2 sorption at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walspurger, Stéphane; Boels, Luciaan; Cobden, Paul D; Elzinga, Gerard D; Haije, Wim G; van den Brink, Ruud W

    2008-01-01

    CO(2)-free hydrogen can be produced from coal gasification power plants by pre-combustion decarbonisation and carbon dioxide capture. Potassium carbonate promoted hydrotalcite-based and alumina-based materials are cheap and excellent materials for high-temperature (300-500 degrees C) adsorption of CO(2), and particularly promising in the sorption-enhanced water gas shift (SEWGS) reaction. Alkaline promotion significantly improves CO(2) reversible sorption capacity at 300-500 degrees C for both materials. Hydrotalcites and promoted hydrotalcites, promoted magnesium oxide and promoted gamma-alumina were investigated by in situ analytical methods (IR spectroscopy, sorption experiments, X-ray diffraction) to identify structural and surface rearrangements. All experimental results show that potassium ions actually strongly interact with aluminium oxide centres in the aluminium-containing materials. This study unambiguously shows that potassium promotion of aluminium oxide centres in hydrotalcite generates basic sites which reversibly adsorb CO(2) at 400 degrees C.

  19. A study of materials used for muon chambers at the CMS Experiment at the LHC: interaction with gas, new materials and new technologies for detector upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Colafranceschi, Stefano

    This thesis lays its foundation in both technological and theoretical stud- ies carried out between several aspects of applied engineering. There are several original contributions within the material science. The first is the detailed studies about the CMS RPC gas filters, which required an intense 3 years data-taking and ended up with a complete characterization of purifier materials. On top of this a stable ad − hoc setup (GGM) has been devel- oped for the CMS Experiment in order to monitor the RPC muon chamber working point. Finally a complete new detector has been designed, build and tested using new technology and new electronics establishing the word’s record in size for this kind of detector, which is taken under consideration for the upgrade of the high-η region of the CMS Experiment.

  20. Self-assemblies based on the "outer-surface interactions" of cucurbit[n]urils: new opportunities for supramolecular architectures and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xin-Long; Xiao, Xin; Cong, Hang; Zhu, Qian-Jiang; Xue, Sai-Feng; Tao, Zhu

    2014-04-15

    Supramolecular architectures and materials have attracted immense attention during the last decades because they not only open the possibility of obtaining a large variety of aesthetically interesting structures but also have applications in gas storage, sensors, separation, catalysis, and so on. On the other hand, cucurbit[n]urils (Q[n]s), a relatively new class of macrocyclic hosts with a rigid hydrophobic cavity and two identical carbonyl fringed portals, have attracted much attention in supramolecular chemistry. Because of the strong charge-dipole and hydrogen bonding interactions, as well as hydrophobic and hydrophilic effect derived from the negative portals and rigid cavities of Q[n]s, nearly all research in Q[n]s has been focused on utilizing the portals and cavities to construct supramolecular assemblies similar to other macrocyclic receptors such as cyclodextrin and calixarenes. Interestingly, a recent study revealed that other weak noncovalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding and π···π stacking, as well as C-H···π and ion-dipole interactions, could also be defined as "outer-surface interactions", which are derived from the electrostatically positive outer surface of Q[n]s. These interactions could be the driving forces in the formation of various novel Q[n]-based supramolecular architectures and functional materials. In this Account, we provide a comprehensive overview of supramolecular self-assemblies based on the outer-surface interactions of Q[n]s. These outer-surface interactions include those between Q[n]s, Q[n]s and aromatic molecules, Q[n]s and calixarenes, Q[n]s and inorganic complex ions, and Q[n]s and polyoxometalates. Pioneering work has shown that such weak noncovalent interactions play very important roles in the formation of various Q[n]-based functional materials and supramolecular architectures. For example, hydrogen bonds in outer-surface interactions between Q[n] molecules not only function as the sole driving force in the

  1. Mesoscopic modelling of the interaction of infrared lasers with composite materials: an application to human dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila Verde, A.; Ramos, Marta M. D.; Stoneham, Marshall; Mendes Ribeiro, R.

    2004-11-01

    The mesostructure and composition of composite materials determine their mechanical, optical and thermal properties and, consequently, their response to incident radiation. We have developed general finite element models of porous composite materials under infrared radiation to examine the influence of pore size on one of the determining parameters of the stress distribution in the material: the temperature distribution. We apply them to the specific case of human dental enamel, a material which has nanometer scale pores containing water/organic, and predict the maximum temperature reached after a single 0.35 μs laser pulse of sub-ablative fluence by two lasers: Er:YAG (2.9 μm) and CO2 (10.6 μm). For the Er:YAG laser, the results imply a strong dependence of the maximum temperature reached at the pore on the area-to-volume ratio of the pore, whereas there is little such dependence for CO2 lasers. Thus, CO2 lasers may produce more reproducible results than Er:YAG lasers when it comes to enamel ablation, which may be of significant interest during clinical practice. More generally, when ablating composite materials by infrared lasers researchers should account for the material's microstructure and composition when designing experiments or interpreting results, since a more simplistic continuum approach may not be sufficient to explain differences observed during ablation of materials with similar optical properties or of the same material but using different wavelengths.

  2. Materials Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian Tomlinson

    2005-01-01

    @@ Introduction Materials development is both a field of study and a practical undertaking. As a field it studies the principles and procedures of the design, implementation and evaluation and adaptation of language teaching materials, by teachers for their own classrooms and by materials writers for sale or distribution. Ideally these two aspects of materials development are interactive in that the theoretical studies inform and are informed by the development and use of classroom materials (e. g. Tomlinson 1998c).

  3. Interaction of water, hydrogen and their mixtures with SnO2 based materials: the role of surface hydroxyl groups in detection mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelko, Roman G; Daly, Helen; Hardacre, Christopher; Vasiliev, Alexey A; Llobet, Eduard

    2010-03-20

    DRIFTS, TGA and resistance measurements have been used to study the mechanism of water and hydrogen interaction accompanied by a resistance change (sensor signal) of blank and Pd doped SnO(2). It was found that a highly hydroxylated surface of blank SnO(2) reacts with gases through bridging hydroxyl groups, whereas the Pd doped materials interact with hydrogen and water through bridging oxygen. In the case of blank SnO(2) the sensor signal maximum towards H(2) in dry air (R(0)/R(g)) is observed at approximately 345 degrees C, and towards water, at approximately 180 degrees C, which results in high selectivity to hydrogen in the presence of water vapors (minor humidity effect). In contrast, on doping with Pd the response to hydrogen in dry air and to water occurred in the same temperature region (ca. 140 degrees C) leading to low selectivity with a high effect of humidity. An increase in water concentration in the gas phase changes the hydrogen interaction mechanism of Pd doped materials, while that of blank SnO(2) is unchanged. The interaction of hydrogen with the catalyst doped SnO(2) occurs predominantly through hydroxyl groups when the volumetric concentration of water in the gas phase is higher than that of H(2) by a factor of 1000.

  4. Osteoblasts Interaction with PLGA Membranes Functionalized with Titanium Film Nanolayer by PECVD. In vitro Assessment of Surface Influence on Cell Adhesion during Initial Cell to Material Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Terriza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available New biomaterials for Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR, both resorbable and non-resorbable, are being developed to stimulate bone tissue formation. Thus, the in vitro study of cell behavior towards material surface properties turns a prerequisite to assess both biocompatibility and bioactivity of any material intended to be used for clinical purposes. For this purpose, we have developed in vitro studies on normal human osteoblasts (HOB® HOB® osteoblasts grown on a resorbable Poly (lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA membrane foil functionalized by a very thin film (around 15 nm of TiO2 (i.e., TiO2/PLGA membranes, designed to be used as barrier membrane. To avoid any alteration of the membranes, the titanium films were deposited at room temperature in one step by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. Characterization of the functionalized membranes proved that the thin titanium layer completely covers the PLGA foils that remains practically unmodified in their interior after the deposition process and stands the standard sterilization protocols. Both morphological changes and cytoskeletal reorganization, together with the focal adhesion development observed in HOB osteoblasts, significantly related to TiO2 treated PLGA in which the Ti deposition method described has revealed to be a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of PLGA membranes, by combining cell nanotopography cues with the incorporation of bioactive factors.

  5. Eu-doped Mg-Al layered double hydroxide as a responsive fluorescent material and its interaction with glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yufeng; Li, Fei; Yu, Gensheng; Wei, Junchao

    2012-10-01

    The paper describes a study on the fluorescence of a Eu-doped Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (Eu-doped LDH) response to glutamic acid (Glu). Various characterizations (UV-Vis transmittance, TG-DTA and IR-spectrum) indicated that there is an interaction between the Eu-doped LDH and Glu. Fluorescent study was found that the red emissions resulted from (5)D(0)-(7)F(J) transition (J=1, 2) of Eu(3+) markedly decreased, while the blue emission at 440 nm contributed to Glu shifted to low energy after the addition of Glu to the Eu-doped LDH. The fluorescent changes may be relevant to the hydrogen-bond interaction between the Eu-doped LDH and Glu, and the mechanism of the interaction between Eu-doped LDH and Glu was discussed.

  6. Mutually induced variations in dissipation and elasticity for oscillations in hysteretic materials: non-simplex interaction regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V Yu; Gusev, V E; Zaytsev, Yu V

    2005-08-01

    Self-action and effects mutually induced by oscillations interacting in hysteretic media are investigated analytically and numerically. Special attention is paid to non-simplex processes for which presence of intermediate extrema results in appearance of minor nested loops inside the main hysteretic stress-strain loop. Non-simplex regimes are typical of interaction of excitations having different frequencies and amplitudes, but comparable strain rates. It is found that, due to transition between the regimes, frequency and amplitude dependencies of the variations in elasticity and dissipation induced by one wave for another one may become non-monotonous. Either additional dissipation or induced transparency may occur in different regimes. The results obtained are important for correct interpretation of experimental data on nonlinear acoustic interactions in rocks and many other microstructured (mesoscopic) solids that are known to exhibit elastic hysteresis and memory properties.

  7. Photon interaction study of organic nonlinear optical materials in the energy range 122-1330 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasarmol, Vishal V.; Gaikwad, Dhammajyot K.; Raut, Siddheshwar D.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the mass attenuation coefficient (μm) of six organic nonlinear optical materials has been calculated in the energy range 122-1330 keV and compared with the obtained values from the WinXCOM program. It is found that there is a good agreement between theoretical and experimental values (method with a view to utilize the material for radiation dosimetry. Investigated samples are good material for radiation dosimetry due their low effective atomic number. The mass attenuation coefficient (μm), linear attenuation coefficients (μ), total atomic cross section (σt, a), total electronic cross section (σt, el), effective atomic numbers (Zeff), molar extinction coefficient (ε), mass energy absorption coefficient (μen/ρ) and effective atomic energy absorption cross section (σa, en) of all sample materials have been carried out and transmission curves have been plotted. The transmission curve shows that the variation of all sample materials decreases with increasing photon energy.

  8. Effective atomic numbers of different types of materials for proton interaction in the energy region 1 keV-10 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2014-10-01

    The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) of different types of materials such as tissues, tissue equivalents, organic compounds, glasses and dosimetric materials have been calculated for total proton interactions in the energy region 1 keV-10 GeV. Also, effective atomic numbers relative to water (Zeff RW) have been presented in the entire energy region for the materials that show better water equivalent properties. Some human tissues such as adipose tissue, bone compact, muscle skeletal and muscle striated have been investigated in terms of tissue equivalency by comparing Zeff values and the better tissue equivalents have been determined for these tissues. With respect to the variation of Zeff with kinetic energy, it has been observed that Zeff seems to be more or less the same in the energy region 400 keV-10 GeV for the given materials except for the photographic emulsion, calcium fluoride, silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide and Teflon. The values of Zeff have found to be constant for photographic emulsion after 1 GeV, for calcium fluoride between 1 MeV and 1 GeV and for silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide and Teflon between 400 keV and 1 GeV. This constancy clearly shows the availability of using Zeff in estimating radiation response of the materials at first glance.

  9. Effective atomic numbers of different types of materials for proton interaction in the energy region 1 keV–10 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    The effective atomic numbers (Z{sub eff}) of different types of materials such as tissues, tissue equivalents, organic compounds, glasses and dosimetric materials have been calculated for total proton interactions in the energy region 1 keV–10 GeV. Also, effective atomic numbers relative to water (Z{sub eff}RW) have been presented in the entire energy region for the materials that show better water equivalent properties. Some human tissues such as adipose tissue, bone compact, muscle skeletal and muscle striated have been investigated in terms of tissue equivalency by comparing Z{sub eff} values and the better tissue equivalents have been determined for these tissues. With respect to the variation of Z{sub eff} with kinetic energy, it has been observed that Z{sub eff} seems to be more or less the same in the energy region 400 keV–10 GeV for the given materials except for the photographic emulsion, calcium fluoride, silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide and Teflon. The values of Z{sub eff} have found to be constant for photographic emulsion after 1 GeV, for calcium fluoride between 1 MeV and 1 GeV and for silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide and Teflon between 400 keV and 1 GeV. This constancy clearly shows the availability of using Z{sub eff} in estimating radiation response of the materials at first glance.

  10. Interactions of nitrogen and hydrogen with various 1D and 3D carbon materials probed via in-situ vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Paramita

    Nanostructured carbon materials are perhaps the most widely studied adsorbents, and cryogenic nitrogen adsorption is likely the most common method to assess textural properties of adsorbents. Yet, in-situ vibrational spectroscopic studies of nitrogen's interactions with three nanostructured carbon materials have provided new insight into carbon-nitrogen interactions. In this dissertation I present the work of 2 projects: (i) Study of the interaction of N2 with different carbon geometries at a molecular level and (ii) exploration of novel C-H interactions on carbon materials via mechano-chemistry. Both of these projects utilize in-situ Raman spectroscopy for exploring gas-surface interactions. Chapters 2 and 3 explore the interaction of molecular Nitrogen on carbon surfaces. With complementary theoretical studies and systematic experimental studies at various temperatures and pressures for different surfaces, I demonstrate how the spectroscopic peak features of N2 gives an indication of gas-surface binding energy, pore structure, and surface chemistry. Using 1D and 3D carbon architectures, spectroscopic perturbation of N2 is probed as a function of adsorption potential and pore dimension, and the spectroscopic response is mapped to the cryogenic volumetric adsorption isotherms. Whereas the latter required multiple days and ˜100 mg of sample, the spectroscopic technique provided similar structural information in the matter of a few hours for a few micrograms of the sample. It is anticipated that the development of the site-specific spectroscopic technique will advance the understanding of adsorbent geometry versus chemical functionality in a way not possible with deconstruction of bulk gas adsorption measurements of pore dimension, surface area, and diffusivity. The second project probed mechanochemical means to polymerize aromatics and hydro-aromatics in the presence of hydrogen in an attempt to form localized carbon cages that trap hydrogen. Interesting aspects of

  11. Properties and toxicological effects of particles from the interaction between tyres, road pavement and winter traction material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Mats [Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), SE-581 95 Linkoeping (Sweden)], E-mail: mats.gustafsson@vti.se; Blomqvist, Goeran [Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), SE-581 95 Linkoeping (Sweden); Gudmundsson, Anders; Dahl, Andreas [Division of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology, Department of Design Sciences, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Swietlicki, Erik [Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bohgard, Mats [Division of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology, Department of Design Sciences, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Lindbom, John; Ljungman, Anders [Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2008-04-15

    In regions where studded tyres and traction material are used during winter, e.g. the Nordic countries, northern part of USA, Canada, and Japan, mechanically generated particles from traffic are the main reason for high particle mass concentrations in busy street and road environments. In many Nordic municipalities the European environmental quality standard for inhalable particles (PM{sub 10}) is exceeded due to these particles. In this study, particles from the wear of studded and studless friction tyres on two pavements and traction sanding were generated using a road simulator. The particles were characterized using particle sizers, Particle Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis and electron microscopy. Cell studies were conducted on particles sampled from the tests with studded tyres and compared with street environment, diesel exhaust and subway PM{sub 10}, respectively. The results show that in the road simulator, where resuspension is minimized, studded tyres produce tens of times more particles than friction tyres. Chemical analysis of the sampled particles shows that the generated wear particles consist almost entirely of minerals from the pavement stone material, but also that Sulfur is enriched for the submicron particles and that Zink is enriched for friction tyres for all particles sizes. The chemical data can be used for source identification and apportionment in urban aerosol studies. A mode of ultra-fine particles was also present and is hypothesised to originate in the tyres. Further, traction material properties affect PM{sub 10} emission. The inflammatory potential of the particles from wear of pavements seems to depend on type of pavement and can be at least as potent as diesel exhaust particles. The results imply that there is a need and a good potential to reduce particle emission from pavement wear and winter time road and street operation by adjusting both studded tyre use as well as pavement and traction material properties.

  12. Communication: Phase behavior of materials with isotropic interactions designed by inverse strategies to favor diamond and simple cubic lattice ground states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Avni; Errington, Jeffrey R; Truskett, Thomas M

    2013-10-14

    We use molecular simulation to construct equilibrium phase diagrams for two recently introduced model materials with isotropic, soft-repulsive pair interactions designed to favor diamond and simple cubic lattice ground states, respectively, over a wide range of densities [Jain et al., Soft Matter 9, 3866 (2013)]. We employ free energy based Monte Carlo simulation techniques to precisely trace the inter-crystal and fluid-crystal coexistence curves. We find that both model materials display rich polymorphic phase behavior featuring stable crystals corresponding to the target ground-state structures, as well as a variety of other crystalline (e.g., hexagonal and body-centered cubic) phases and multiple reentrant melting transitions.

  13. A pilot study combining Go4Life® materials with an interactive voice response system to promote physical activity in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquib, Juliann; King, Abby C; Castro, Cynthia M; Tinker, Lesley F; Sims, Stacy; Shikany, James M; Bea, Jennifer W; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Van Horn, Linda; Stefanick, Marcia L

    2016-01-01

    Telephone-based interactive voice response (IVR) systems could be an effective tool for promotion of physical activity among older women. To test IVR feasibility, we enrolled 30 older women in a 10-week physical activity intervention designed around National Institute on Aging (NIA) Go4Life® educational materials with IVR coaching. Participants (mean age = 76 years) significantly increased physical activity by a mean 79 ± 116 (SD) minutes/week (p < .001). Participants reported that the Go4Life® materials, pedometer, and IVR coaching (70% reported easy technology) were useful tools for change. This pilot study demonstrates IVR acceptability as an evidence-based physical activity program for older women.

  14. Influence of carbon nanoparticles/epoxy matrix interaction on mechanical, electrical and transport properties of structural advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadagno, Liberata; Naddeo, Carlo; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Barra, Giuseppina; Vertuccio, Luigi; Russo, Salvatore; Lafdi, Khalid; Tucci, Vincenzo; Spinelli, Giovanni; Lamberti, Patrizia

    2017-03-01

    The focus of this study is to design new nano-modified epoxy formulations using carbon nanofillers, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers and graphene-based nanoparticles (CpEG), that reduce the moisture content and provide additional functional performance. The chemical structure of epoxy mixture, using a non-stoichiometric amount of hardener, exhibits unique properties in regard to the water sorption for which the equilibrium concentration of water (C eq) is reduced up to a maximum of 30%. This result, which is very relevant for several industrial applications (aeronautical, shipbuilding industries, wind turbine blades, etc), is due to a strong reduction of the polar groups and/or sites responsible to bond water molecules. All nanofillers are responsible of a second phase at lower glass transition temperature (Tg). Compared with other carbon nanofillers, functionalized graphene-based nanoparticles exhibit the best performance in the multifunctionality. The lowest moisture content, the high performance in the mechanical properties, the low electrical percolation threshold (EPT) have been all ascribed to particular arrangements of the functionalized graphene sheets embedded in the polymeric matrix. Exfoliation degree and edge carboxylated groups are responsible of self-assembled architectures which entrap part of the resin fraction hindering the interaction of water molecules with the polar sites of the resin, also favouring the EPT paths and the attractive/covalent interactions with the matrix.

  15. Material dependence of Casimir interaction between a sphere and a plate: First analytic correction beyond proximity force approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Teo, L P

    2013-01-01

    We derive analytically the asymptotic behavior of the Casimir interaction between a sphere and a plate when the distance between them, $d$, is much smaller than the radius of the sphere, $R$. The leading order and next-to-leading order terms are derived from the exact formula for the Casimir interaction energy. They are found to depend nontrivially on the dielectric functions of the objects. As expected, the leading order term coincides with that derived using the proximity force approximation. The result on the next-to-leading order term complements that found by Bimonte, Emig and Kardar [Appl. Phys. Lett. \\textbf{100}, 074110 (2012)] using derivative expansion. Numerical results are presented when the dielectric functions are given by the plasma model or the Drude model, with the plasma frequency (for plasma and Drude models) and relaxation frequency (for Drude model) given respectively by 9eV and 0.035eV, the conventional values used for gold metal. It is found that if plasma model is used instead of Drude...

  16. Influence of carbon nanoparticles/epoxy matrix interaction on mechanical, electrical and transport properties of structural advanced materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadagno, Liberata; Naddeo, Carlo; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Barra, Giuseppina; Vertuccio, Luigi; Russo, Salvatore; Lafdi, Khalid; Tucci, Vincenzo; Spinelli, Giovanni; Lamberti, Patrizia

    2017-03-03

    The focus of this study is to design new nano-modified epoxy formulations using carbon nanofillers, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers and graphene-based nanoparticles (CpEG), that reduce the moisture content and provide additional functional performance. The chemical structure of epoxy mixture, using a non-stoichiometric amount of hardener, exhibits unique properties in regard to the water sorption for which the equilibrium concentration of water (C eq) is reduced up to a maximum of 30%. This result, which is very relevant for several industrial applications (aeronautical, shipbuilding industries, wind turbine blades, etc), is due to a strong reduction of the polar groups and/or sites responsible to bond water molecules. All nanofillers are responsible of a second phase at lower glass transition temperature (Tg). Compared with other carbon nanofillers, functionalized graphene-based nanoparticles exhibit the best performance in the multifunctionality. The lowest moisture content, the high performance in the mechanical properties, the low electrical percolation threshold (EPT) have been all ascribed to particular arrangements of the functionalized graphene sheets embedded in the polymeric matrix. Exfoliation degree and edge carboxylated groups are responsible of self-assembled architectures which entrap part of the resin fraction hindering the interaction of water molecules with the polar sites of the resin, also favouring the EPT paths and the attractive/covalent interactions with the matrix.

  17. Investigation of the electron-surface phonon interaction effects in graphene on a substrate made of polar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdouani, M.

    2017-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electron- surface phonon interaction in mono-layer graphene (1LG) on polar substrates such as SiO2,HfO2, SiC and hexagonal BN . Thus we have used the eigen energies derived from the tight-binding Hamiltonian in mono-layer graphene. Our results indicate that the electron-surface phonon interaction depends on the polar substrate. Such polar substrates allow for the existence of polar optical phonons localized near the graphene-substrate interface which could be an important scattering source for graphene carriers through the long-range Fröhlich coupling. Likewise, we have investigated the effect of various dielectrics on the SO phonon-limited mobility, the SO phonon-limited resistivity, the SO phonon-limited conductivity and the scattering rate in single layer graphene by considering the effects of the SO optical phonon scattering arising from the polar substrates and by varying the temperature, the charge carrier density and the physical separation between graphene and interface of dielectric substrate.

  18. Auger and carrier-surface phonon interaction processes in graphene on a substrate made of polar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdouani, M.; Bourguiga, R.

    2017-02-01

    We present a theoretical study of two specific dynamical optical properties, namely Auger and surface electron-phonon interaction processes in monolayer graphene on polar substrates such as SiO2 , HfO2 , SiC and hexagonal BN. Thus the eigenenergies have been derived from the tight-binding Hamiltonian in monolayer graphene. Our results indicate that both Auger and electron-surface phonon interaction processes depend on the polar substrate. Such polar substrates allow for the presence of polar optical phonons localized near the graphene-substrate interface which could be a significant scattering source for graphene carriers across the long-range Fröhlich coupling. Furthermore, the linear, gapless band structure of graphene provides ideal conditions for Auger processes which are Auger recombination (AR) and impact ionization (IMI). These processes are of fundamental interest because they strongly influence the relaxation dynamics of carriers. Likewise, we have investigated the effect of various dielectrics on both Auger and electron-surface phonon scattering rates in single layer graphene by varying the temperature, the charge carrier density and the physical separation between the interface of the dielectric substrate and graphene.

  19. Plasma–wall interaction in laser inertial fusion reactors: novel proposals for radiation tests of first wall materials

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez Ruiz, Jesus; Rivera de Mena, Antonio; Mima, K.; Garoz, D.; Gonzalez Arrabal, Raquel; Gordillo Garcia, Nuria; Fuchs, J; Tanaka, K.; Fernández, I.; Briones, F.; Perlado Martin, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Dry-wall laser inertial fusion (LIF) chambers will have to withstand strong bursts of fast charged particles which will deposit tens of kJ m−2 and implant more than 1018 particles m−2 in a few microseconds at a repetition rate of some Hz. Large chamber dimensions and resistant plasma-facing materials must be combined to guarantee the chamber performance as long as possible under the expected threats: heating, fatigue, cracking, formation of defects, retention of light species, swelling and er...

  20. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of modified cellulose fiber-based materials and related interactions with water vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedane, Alemayehu H., E-mail: Alemayehu.Bedane@unb.ca; Xiao, Huining, E-mail: hxiao@unb.ca; Eić, Mladen, E-mail: meic@unb.ca; Farmahini-Farahani, Madjid, E-mail: Madjid.Farahani@unb.ca

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Coating on paper increases the specific surface area but decreases the pore diameter. • Pore size reduction and decrease of hydrophilic property caused reduction in WVTRs. • The low monolayer moisture content of the sample is generally related to the low WVTR. • The net isosteric heats of adsorption decreased with increased sample moisture content. • FT-IR results reveal the formation of water clusters at higher relative humidities. - Abstract: In this study, the surface characteristics, water vapor interactions, and state of water adsorbed on unmodified and coated paper samples were investigated in an attempt to obtain a better understanding of the fundamental principles related to thermodynamics of this process, as well as to provide essential insight that could be used for further improvement of the papers’ barrier properties. Based on the BET measurement, the coated paper samples showed higher specific surface areas than unmodified paper; however, their mean pore diameters are smaller. The BJH method was used for pore size distribution analysis. Hydrophobic properties of the paper samples were determined from experimental isotherms, e.g., monolayer moisture content, and these results have been related to the water vapor transfer rates (WVTRs) showing a complex nature of these relations. The highest peak corresponding to the modified samples with smaller pore sizes was found to be in the range of 1–30 nm, while it was in the 30–100 nm pore size range for unmodified paper. The net isosteric heats of sorption for different unmodified and modified paper samples were determined from water vapor adsorption isotherms measured at 15, 25, and 35 °C. The net isosteric heats of sorption decreased with an increase of moisture content after reaching the maximum values at 12.53, 15.25, 14.71, 23.2, and 22.77 kJ/mol for unmodified, zein grafted, calendered coated, PLA, and PHBV coated papers, respectively. The state of adsorbed water and water

  1. Natural frequency of bottom-fixed offshore wind turbines considering pile-soil-interaction with material uncertainties and scouring depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Jin-Hak; Kim, Sun-Bin; Yoon, Gil-Lim;

    2015-01-01

    include pile-soil-interaction (PSI) effects, realization of dynamically stable designs to avoid resonances, and quick and safe installation in remote areas. In this study, the effects of PSI on the dynamic properties of bottom-fixed OWTs, including monopile-, tripod-and jacket-supported OWTs, were......Monopileshave been most widely used for supporting offshore wind turbines (OWTs) in shallow waterareas. However, multi-member lattice-type structures such as jackets and tripods are also considered good alternatives to monopile foundations for relatively deep waterareaswith depth ranging from 25......–50 m owing to their technical and economic feasibility. Moreover, jacket structures have been popular in the oil and gas industry for a long time. However, several unsolved technical issues still persist in the utilization of multi-member lattice-type supporting structures for OWTs; these problems...

  2. Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe- and Cu-Sulfide Earth Materials: A Connection between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities, and Bonded Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Downs, R. T.; Spackman, M. A.

    2007-03-01

    Bond critical point and local energy density properties together with net atomic charges were calculated for theoretical electron density distributions, F(r), generated for a variety of Fe and Cu metal-sulfide materials with high- and low-spin Fe atoms in octahedral coordination and high-spin Fe atoms in tetrahedral coordination. The electron density, F(rc), the Laplacian, 32F(rc), the local kinetic energy, G(rc), and the oxidation state of Fe increase as the local potential energy density, V(rc), the Fe-S bond lengths, and the coordination numbers of the Fe atoms decrease. The properties of the bonded interactions for the octahedrally coordinated low-spin Fe atoms for pyrite and marcasite are distinct from those for high-spin Fe atoms for troilite, smythite, and greigite. The Fe-S bond lengths are shorter and the values of F(rc) and 32F(rc) are larger for pyrite and marcasite, indicating that the accumulation and local concentration of F(r) in the internuclear region are greater than those involving the longer, high-spin Fe-S bonded interactions. The net atomic charges and the bonded radii calculated for the Fe and S atoms in pyrite and marcasite are also smaller than those for sulfides with high-spin octahedrally coordinated Fe atoms. Collectively, the Fe-S interactions are indicated to be intermediate in character with the low-spin Fe-S interactions having greater shared character than the highspin interactions. The bond lengths observed for chalcopyrite together with the calculated bond critical point properties are consistent with the formula Cu+Fe3+S2. The bond length is shorter and the F(rc) value is larger for the FeS4 tetrahedron displayed by metastable greigite than those displayed by chalcopyrite and cubanite, consistent with a proposal that the Fe atom in greigite is tetravalent. S-S bond paths exist between each of the surface S atoms of adjacent slabs of FeS6 octahedra comprising the layer sulfide smythite, suggesting that the neutral Fe3S4 slabs are

  3. A reaction-diffusion model for atomic oxygen interacting with spacecraft surface protective materials in low earth orbit environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN LaiWen; WANG JingHua; LEE Chun-Hian

    2009-01-01

    When hyperthermal atomic oxygen collides with a silicon surface, an ultrathin oxidation regime characterized by fractional atomic-oxygen anions having low diffusive and reactive barriers, along with their enhanced diffusion due to both the electric field and image potential, will form on the surface. In accordance with these properties, an attempt was made in the present study to modify the AlmeidaGoncalves-Baumvol (AGB) model by setting the diffusivity and reaction rate constant to be diffusion-length dependence. According to the modified model, numerical parametric studies for oxidation thin growth were performed. The dependencies of the diffusion coefficient, the reaction rate constant,the attenuation length, and the adjustable parameter upon the translational kinetic energy, flux, temperature, and tangential flux of atomic oxygen were analyzed briefly via the fitting of the experimental data given by Tagawa et al. The numerical results confirmed the rationality of the modified diffusion-reaction model. The model together with the computer code developed in this study would be a useful tool for thickness evaluation of the protective film against the oxidation of atomic oxygen toward spacecraft surface materials in LEO environment.

  4. A reaction-diffusion model for atomic oxygen interacting with spacecraft surface protective materials in low earth orbit environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE; Chun-Hian

    2009-01-01

    When hyperthermal atomic oxygen collides with a silicon surface, an ultrathin oxidation regime characterized by fractional atomic-oxygen anions having low diffusive and reactive barriers, along with their enhanced diffusion due to both the electric field and image potential, will form on the surface. In ac- cordance with these properties, an attempt was made in the present study to modify the Almeida- Goncalves-Baumvol (AGB) model by setting the diffusivity and reaction rate constant to be diffu- sion-length dependence. According to the modified model, numerical parametric studies for oxidation thin growth were performed. The dependencies of the diffusion coefficient, the reaction rate constant, the attenuation length, and the adjustable parameter upon the translational kinetic energy, flux, tem- perature, and tangential flux of atomic oxygen were analyzed briefly via the fitting of the experimental data given by Tagawa et al. The numerical results confirmed the rationality of the modified diffu- sion-reaction model. The model together with the computer code developed in this study would be a useful tool for thickness evaluation of the protective film against the oxidation of atomic oxygen toward spacecraft surface materials in LEO environment.

  5. Mean deformation metrics for quantifying 3D cell-matrix interactions without requiring information about matrix material properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, David A; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Estrada, Jonathan B; Toyjanova, Jennet; Kesari, Haneesh; Reichner, Jonathan S; Franck, Christian

    2016-03-15

    Mechanobiology relates cellular processes to mechanical signals, such as determining the effect of variations in matrix stiffness with cell tractions. Cell traction recorded via traction force microscopy (TFM) commonly takes place on materials such as polyacrylamide- and polyethylene glycol-based gels. Such experiments remain limited in physiological relevance because cells natively migrate within complex tissue microenvironments that are spatially heterogeneous and hierarchical. Yet, TFM requires determination of the matrix constitutive law (stress-strain relationship), which is not always readily available. In addition, the currently achievable displacement resolution limits the accuracy of TFM for relatively small cells. To overcome these limitations, and increase the physiological relevance of in vitro experimental design, we present a new approach and a set of associated biomechanical signatures that are based purely on measurements of the matrix's displacements without requiring any knowledge of its constitutive laws. We show that our mean deformation metrics (MDM) approach can provide significant biophysical information without the need to explicitly determine cell tractions. In the process of demonstrating the use of our MDM approach, we succeeded in expanding the capability of our displacement measurement technique such that it can now measure the 3D deformations around relatively small cells (∼10 micrometers), such as neutrophils. Furthermore, we also report previously unseen deformation patterns generated by motile neutrophils in 3D collagen gels.

  6. Influence of environmental parameters and of their interactions on the release of metal(loid)s from a construction material in hydraulic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmukat, A; Duester, L; Goryunova, E; Ecker, D; Heininger, P; Ternes, T A

    2016-03-05

    Besides the leaching behaviour of a construction material under standardised test-specific conditions with laboratory water, for some construction materials it is advisable to test their environmental behaviour also under close to end use conditions. The envisaged end use combined with the product characteristics (e.g. mineral phases) is decisive for the choice of environmental factors that may change the release of substance that potentially cause adverse environmental effects (e.g. fertilisation or ecotoxicity). At the moment an experimental link is missing between mono-factorial standardised test systems and non standardised complex incubation experiments such as mesocosms which are closer to environmental conditions. Multi-factorial batch experiments may have the potential to close the gap. To verify this, batch experiments with copper slag were performed which is used as armour stones in hydraulic engineering. Design of experiments (DoE) was applied to evaluate the impact of pH, ionic strength, temperature and sediment content on the release of As, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn. The study shows that release and sediment-eluent partitioning of metal(loid)s are impacted by interactions between the studied factors. Under the prevalent test conditions sediment acts as a sink enhancing most strongly the release of elements from the material.

  7. Titanium alloys as alternative material for the supercontainer shell in the KBS-3H concept. A preliminary Ti-clay interaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, Paul (Gruner Ltd (Switzerland)); Grolimund, Daniel (Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland)); Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Kiviranta, Leena (BandTech Oy (Finland)); Brendle, Jocelyne (University of Mulhouse (France)); Snellman, Margit (Saanio and Riekkola Oy (Finland))

    2010-12-15

    Ti alloys have been proposed as alternative materials to steel for the supercontainer shell surrounding the bentonite buffer in the KBS-3H disposal concept. Ti-based materials display high strength and are known to behave chemically inert under a variety of conditions. This preliminary study addresses the suitability of titanium as supercontainer material with regard to the performance of the clay buffer. Thus, possible titanium-bentonite interactions which may adversely affect the buffer's safety functions are evaluated by means of a literature and a preliminary experimental assessment. Titanium metals display very low corrosion rates (< 1 nm/a) over a large range of pH and Eh conditions. The corrosion behaviour is governed by the low solubility of tetravalent TiO{sub 2} which forms a passive surface corrosion layer under both oxic and reducing conditions. The interactions between titanium and clay have been barely studied so far. Preliminary long-term data obtained by Prof. Olefjord and co-workers from Chalmers (S) in the 1980s (as part of SKB's canister program) suggests similar corrosion rates in compacted bentonite compared to those measured in water, i.e. <1 nm/a. So far, no work on reaction products from this interaction process has been carried out. Even the speciation of Ti in natural clays is uncertain. In principle, four possible reaction products resulting from Ti-clay interactions are possible: (i) Ti sorbed to the clay surface via cation exchange or specific adsorption, (ii) Ti incorporated in the octahedral or tetrahedral clay structure, (iii) Ti precipitated as separate TiO{sub 2} or mixed (Fe, Ti) oxide, (iv) Ti precipitated as separate silicate phase and (v) polymerized as cross-linked TiO{sub 2} units in the interlayer (Ti pillared clay). The latter two transformation products would have the strongest impact on the buffer, but are improbable on the basis of current knowledge. A preliminary batch-type investigation has been carried out

  8. Titanium alloys as alternative material for the supercontainer shell in the KBS-3H concept. A preliminary Ti-clay interaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, Paul (Gruner Ltd (Switzerland)); Grolimund, Daniel (Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland)); Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Kiviranta, Leena (BandTech Oy (Finland)); Brendle, Jocelyne (University of Mulhouse (France)); Snellman, Margit (Saanio and Riekkola Oy (Finland))

    2010-12-15

    Ti alloys have been proposed as alternative materials to steel for the supercontainer shell surrounding the bentonite buffer in the KBS-3H disposal concept. Ti-based materials display high strength and are known to behave chemically inert under a variety of conditions. This preliminary study addresses the suitability of titanium as supercontainer material with regard to the performance of the clay buffer. Thus, possible titanium-bentonite interactions which may adversely affect the buffer's safety functions are evaluated by means of a literature and a preliminary experimental assessment. Titanium metals display very low corrosion rates (< 1 nm/a) over a large range of pH and Eh conditions. The corrosion behaviour is governed by the low solubility of tetravalent TiO{sub 2} which forms a passive surface corrosion layer under both oxic and reducing conditions. The interactions between titanium and clay have been barely studied so far. Preliminary long-term data obtained by Prof. Olefjord and co-workers from Chalmers (S) in the 1980s (as part of SKB's canister program) suggests similar corrosion rates in compacted bentonite compared to those measured in water, i.e. <1 nm/a. So far, no work on reaction products from this interaction process has been carried out. Even the speciation of Ti in natural clays is uncertain. In principle, four possible reaction products resulting from Ti-clay interactions are possible: (i) Ti sorbed to the clay surface via cation exchange or specific adsorption, (ii) Ti incorporated in the octahedral or tetrahedral clay structure, (iii) Ti precipitated as separate TiO{sub 2} or mixed (Fe, Ti) oxide, (iv) Ti precipitated as separate silicate phase and (v) polymerized as cross-linked TiO{sub 2} units in the interlayer (Ti pillared clay). The latter two transformation products would have the strongest impact on the buffer, but are improbable on the basis of current knowledge. A preliminary batch-type investigation has been carried out

  9. Titanium alloys as alternative material for the supercontainer shell in the KBS-3H concept: A preliminary Ti-clay interaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P. [Gruner Ltd, Basel (Switzerland); Grolimund, D. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Kumpulainen, S.; Kiviranta, L. [B and Tech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Brendle, J. [Mulhouse Univ. (France); Snellman, M. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-12-15

    Ti alloys have been proposed as alternative materials to steel for the supercontainer shell surrounding the bentonite buffer in the KBS-3H disposal concept. Ti-based materials display high strength and are known to behave chemically inert under a variety of conditions. This preliminary study addresses the suitability of titanium as supercontainer material with regard to the performance of the clay buffer. Thus, possible titanium-bentonite interactions which may adversely affect the buffer's safety functions are evaluated by means of a literature and a preliminary experimental assessment. Titanium metals display very low corrosion rates (< 1 nm/a) over a large range of pH and Eh conditions. The corrosion behaviour is governed by the low solubility of tetravalent TiO{sub 2} which forms a passive surface corrosion layer under both oxic and reducing conditions. The interactions between titanium and clay have been barely studied so far. Preliminary long-term data obtained by Prof. Olefjord and co-workers from Chalmers (S) in the 1980ies (as part of SKB's canister program) suggests similar corrosion rates in compacted bentonite compared to those measured in water, i.e. 1 nm/a. So far, no work on reaction products from this interaction process has been carried out. Even the speciation of Ti in natural clays is uncertain. In principle, four possible reaction products resulting from Ti-clay interactions are possible: (i) Ti sorbed to the clay surface via cation exchange or specific adsorption, (ii) Ti incorporated in the octahedral or tetrahedral clay structure, (iii) Ti precipitated as separate TiO{sub 2} or mixed (Fe, Ti) oxide, (iv) Ti precipitated as separate silicate phase and (v) polymerized as cross-linked TiO{sub 2} units in the interlayer (Ti pillared clay). The latter two transformation products would have the strongest impact on the buffer, but are improbable on the basis of current knowledge. A preliminary batch-type investigation has been carried out

  10. Titanium alloys as alternative material for the supercontainer shell in the KBS-3H concept: A preliminary Ti-clay interaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P. [Gruner Ltd, Basel (Switzerland); Grolimund, D. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Kumpulainen, S.; Kiviranta, L. [B and Tech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Brendle, J. [Mulhouse Univ. (France); Snellman, M. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-12-15

    Ti alloys have been proposed as alternative materials to steel for the supercontainer shell surrounding the bentonite buffer in the KBS-3H disposal concept. Ti-based materials display high strength and are known to behave chemically inert under a variety of conditions. This preliminary study addresses the suitability of titanium as supercontainer material with regard to the performance of the clay buffer. Thus, possible titanium-bentonite interactions which may adversely affect the buffer's safety functions are evaluated by means of a literature and a preliminary experimental assessment. Titanium metals display very low corrosion rates (< 1 nm/a) over a large range of pH and Eh conditions. The corrosion behaviour is governed by the low solubility of tetravalent TiO{sub 2} which forms a passive surface corrosion layer under both oxic and reducing conditions. The interactions between titanium and clay have been barely studied so far. Preliminary long-term data obtained by Prof. Olefjord and co-workers from Chalmers (S) in the 1980ies (as part of SKB's canister program) suggests similar corrosion rates in compacted bentonite compared to those measured in water, i.e. 1 nm/a. So far, no work on reaction products from this interaction process has been carried out. Even the speciation of Ti in natural clays is uncertain. In principle, four possible reaction products resulting from Ti-clay interactions are possible: (i) Ti sorbed to the clay surface via cation exchange or specific adsorption, (ii) Ti incorporated in the octahedral or tetrahedral clay structure, (iii) Ti precipitated as separate TiO{sub 2} or mixed (Fe, Ti) oxide, (iv) Ti precipitated as separate silicate phase and (v) polymerized as cross-linked TiO{sub 2} units in the interlayer (Ti pillared clay). The latter two transformation products would have the strongest impact on the buffer, but are improbable on the basis of current knowledge. A preliminary batch-type investigation has been carried out

  11. Modifications on A-F hardening rule to assess ratcheting response of materials and its interaction with fatigue damage under uniaxial stress cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadehrishehri, Gholamreza

    stress levels. The constructed calibration curves were employed to determine strain rate coefficients required to assess ratcheting response of materials under uniaxial loading conditions at various cyclic stress levels. The predicted ratcheting strain values based on the modified hardening rule were found in good agreements with the experimentally obtained ratcheting data over stages I and II under uniaxial loading conditions. The capability of the modified hardening rule to assess ratcheting deformation of materials under multi-step uniaxial loading spectra was also assessed. Subsequent load steps were considerably affected by previous load steps in multi-step loading conditions. Ratcheting strains for low-high stress steps were successfully predicted by the modified hardening rule. High-low loading sequences however resulted in an overestimated reversed ratcheting strain in the later load steps. The modified hardening rule proposed in this thesis was then employed to predict the ratcheting strain and its concurrent interaction with fatigue damage over stress cycles in steel alloys. The interaction of ratcheting and fatigue damage was defined based on mechanistic parameters involving the effects of mean stress, stress amplitude, and cyclic softening/hardening response of materials. The extent of ratcheting effect on the overall damage of steel samples was defined by means of the product of the average ratcheting strain rate over the stress cycles and the applied maximum cyclic stress, while fatigue damage was analysed based on earlier developed energy-based models of Xia-Ellyin and Smith-Watson-Topper. Overall damage induced by both ratcheting and fatigue was calibrated through a weighting factor at various ratios of mean stress/cyclic amplitude stress (sigmam/sigmaa). The estimated lives based on the proposed algorithm at different mean stresses and stress amplitudes showed good agreements as compared with experiments.

  12. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    as an interpretation of palpability, comprising usability as well as patient empowerment and socially performative issues. We present a prototype environment for video recording during physiotherapeutical consultation which illustrates our current thoughts on explicit interaction and serves as material for further......We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction...

  13. Degradation and in vitro cell–material interaction studies on hydroxyapatite-coated biodegradable porous iron for hard tissue scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurizzati Mohd Daud

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes degradation and cell–material interaction studies on hydroxyapatite (HA-coated biodegradable porous iron proposed for hard tissue scaffolds. Porous iron scaffolds are expected to serve as an ideal platform for bone regeneration. To couple their inherent mechanical strength, pure HA and HA/poly(ε-caprolactone (HA/PCL were coated onto porous iron using dip coating technique. The HA/PCL mixture was prepared to provide a more stable and flexible coating than HA alone. Degradation of the samples was evaluated by weight loss and potentiodynamic polarisation. Human skin fibroblast (HSF and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC were put in contact with the samples and their interaction was observed. Results showed that coated samples degraded ∼10 times slower (0.002 mm/year for HA/PCL-Fe, 0.003 mm/year for HA-Fe than the uncoated ones (0.031 mm/year, indicating an inhibition effect of the coating on degradation. Both HSF and hMSC maintained high viability when in contact with the coated samples (100–110% control for hMSC during 2–5 days of incubation, indicating the effect of HA in enhancing cytocompatibility of the surface. This study provided early evidence of the potential translation of biodegradable porous iron scaffolds for clinical use in orthopedic surgery. However, further studies including in vitro and in vivo tests are necessary.

  14. Reaction Cross Section Calculations in Neutron Induced Reactions and GEANT4 Simulation of Hadronic Interactions for the Reactor Moderator Material BeO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veli ÇAPALI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BeO is one of the most common moderator material for neutron moderation; due to its high density, neutron capture cross section and physical-chemical properties that provides usage at elevated temperatures. As it’s known, for various applications in the field of reactor design and neutron capture, reaction cross–section data are required. The cross–sections of (n,α, (n,2n, (n,t, (n,EL and (n,TOT reactions for 9Be and 16O nuclei have been calculated by using TALYS 1.6 Two Component Exciton model and EMPIRE 3.2 Exciton model in this study. Hadronic interactions of low energetic neutrons and generated isotopes–particles have been investigated for a situation in which BeO was used as a neutron moderator by using GEANT4, which is a powerful simulation software. In addition, energy deposition along BeO material has been obtained. Results from performed calculations were compared with the experimental nuclear reaction data exist in EXFOR.

  15. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  16. Microscopical characterization of carbon materials derived from coal and petroleum and their interaction phenomena in making steel electrodes, anodes and cathode blocks for the Microscopy of Carbon Materials Working Group of the ICCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predeanu, G.; Panaitescu, C.; Bălănescu, M.; Bieg, G.; Borrego, A.G.; Diez, M. A.; Hackley, Paul C.; Kwiecińska, B.; Marques, M.; Mastalerz, Maria; Misz-Kennan, M.; Pusz, S.; Suarez-Ruiz, I.; Rodrigues, S.; Singh, A. K.; Varma, A. K.; Zdravkov, A.; Zivotić, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of petrographic textures representing the structural organization of the organic matter derived from coal and petroleum and their interaction phenomena in the making of steel electrodes, anodes and cathode blocks.This work represents the results of the Microscopy of Carbon Materials Working Group in Commission III of the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology between the years 2009 and 2013. The round robin exercises were run on photomicrograph samples. For textural characterization of carbon materials the existing ASTM classification system for metallurgical coke was applied.These round robin exercises involved 15 active participants from 12 laboratories who were asked to assess the coal and petroleum based carbons and to identify the morphological differences, as optical texture (isotropic/anisotropic), optical type (punctiform, mosaic, fibre, ribbon, domain), and size. Four sets of digital black and white microphotographs comprising 151 photos containing 372 fields of different types of organic matter were examined. Based on the unique ability of carbon to form a wide range of textures, the results showed an increased number of carbon occurrences which have crucial role in the chosen industrial applications.The statistical method used to evaluate the results was based on the “raw agreement indices”. It gave a new and original view on the analysts' opinion by not only counting the correct answers, but also all of the knowledge and experience of the participants. Comparative analyses of the average values of the level of overall agreement performed by each analyst in the exercises during 2009–2013 showed a great homogeneity in the results, the mean value being 90.36%, with a minimum value of 83% and a maximum value of 95%.

  17. Simulation experiment of interaction of plasma facing materials and transient heat loads in ITER divertor by use of magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, M.; Ando, K.; Higashi, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2009-11-01

    Interaction of plasma facing materials and transient head loads such as type I ELMs is one of the critical issues in ITER divertor. The heat load to the ITER divertor during type I ELMs is estimated to be 0.5-3 MJ/m^2 with a pulse length of 0.1-0.5 ms. We have developed a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for the simulation experiment of transient heat load during type I ELMs in ITER divertor. The MCPG has inner and outer electrodes made of stainless steel 304. In addition, the inner electrode is covered with molybdenum so as to suppress the release of impurities from the electrode during the discharge. The diameters of inner and outer electrodes are 0.06 m and 0.14 m, respectively. The power supply for the MCPG is a capacitor bank (7 kV, 1 mF, 25 kJ). The plasma velocity estimated by the time of flight measurement of the magnetic fields was about 50 km/s, corresponding to the ion energy of 15 eV (H) or 30 eV (D). The absorbed energy density of the plasma stream was measured a calorimeter made of graphite. It was found that the absorbed energy density was 0.9 MJ/m^2 with a pulse width of 0.5 ms at the distance of 100 mm from the inner electrode. In the conference, experimental results of plasma exposure on the plasma facing materials in ITER divertor will be shown.

  18. Hybrid luminescence materials assembled by [Ln(DPA)3]3- and mesoporous host through ion-pairing interactions with high quantum efficiencies and long lifetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing-Feng; Yue, Dan; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Xinlei; Li, Chunyang; Wang, Zhenling

    2015-02-01

    A kind of mesoporous hybrid luminescence material was assembled through the ion exchange method between [Ln(DPA)3]3- and ionic liquid functionalized SBA-15. [Ln(DPA)3]3- was successfully anchored onto positive-charge modified SBA-15 by the strong electrostatic interaction. In [Ln(DPA)3]3-, Ln3+ ions are in 9-fold coordination through six oxygen atoms of carboxyl groups and three nitrogen atoms of pyridine units, leaving no coordination site for water molecules. Therefore the hybrids possess prominent luminescent properties, SBA-15-IMI-Tb(DPA)3 and SBA-15-IMI-Eu(DPA)3 exhibit high quantum yield values of 63% and 79%, and long lifetimes values of 2.38 ms and 2.34 ms, respectively. Especially, SBA-15-IMI-Eu(DPA)3 presents a high color purity, and the red/orange intensity ratio is as high as 7.6. The excellent luminescence properties and ordered mesoporous structures give rise to many potential applications in optical and electronic areas.

  19. Interaction of Rare Earth Ions in Sr2MgSi2O7:Eu2+, Dy3+ Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAI Ou; JIANG Hongyi; XU Dong; WANG Yahui; ZHENG Wei; LUO Ting

    2016-01-01

    To discuss the function of Eu and Dy and their interaction in Sr2MgSi2O7: Eu2+, Dy3+long afterglow material, the Eu and Dy single doped and their co-doped Sr2MgSi2O7: Eu2+, Dy3+ were prepared. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), decay curves, photoluminescence (PL), and thermoluminescence (TL). The results indicate that Sr2MgSi2O7: Eu has afterglow properties, and the doping of Eu ion in Sr2MgSi2O7: Eu2+, Dy3+ can lower the depth of traps. Eu ion can not only serve as luminescence center, but also produce traps in the matrix, meanwhile, it also exerts certain inlfuences on the traps produced by Dy in Sr2MgSi2O7: Eu2+, Dy3+. The Dy ion can not act as luminescence center but relates to the change of the traps in the Sr2MgSi2O7 matrix.

  20. Generalized form of boundary value problems method for material modeled as micro-polar media subjecting to the thermo-mechanical interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Long; Chu, Zhongxiang; Peng, Song

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the periodic structure material is modeled as the continuum homogeneous micro-polar media subjecting to thermo-mechanical interaction. Meanwhile, a series of equivalent quantities such as the equivalent stress, couple stress, displacement gradient and torsion tensor were defined by the integral forms of the boundary values of the external surface force, moment, displacement and the angular displacement, and were proved to satisfy the equivalence conditions of virtual work. Based on above works, the displacement boundary value problem was established to deduce the equivalent constitutive equation. Assume the representative volume element is composed of the spatial cross-framework, and applying the boundary value problem of displacement on frame structures, the equivalent elastic coefficients, temperature coefficients of equivalent stress and the temperature gradient coefficients of equivalent couple stress are deduced. In addition, themethod can also be extended to the stress boundary value problem to deduce the equivalent constitutive equation. The calculations indicate that the equivalent result can be obtained from the two kinds of boundary value problems.

  1. Um potencial de interação para o estudo de materiais e simulações por dinâmica molecular An interaction potential for materials and molecular dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    The Vashishta-Rahman effective interaction potential, based on the Pauling's concept of "ionic radii", has been successfully employed to investigate structural and dynamical properties of different classes of material. By celebrating Pauling's birth centenary, we review the building up of the Vashishta-Rahman potential and we present molecular-dynamics simulation results for structure and dynamics of superionic materials, chalcogenide glasses and metallic oxides.

  2. Bioresponsive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yue; Aimetti, Alex A.; Langer, Robert; Gu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    'Smart' bioresponsive materials that are sensitive to biological signals or to pathological abnormalities, and interact with or are actuated by them, are appealing therapeutic platforms for the development of next-generation precision medications. Armed with a better understanding of various biologically responsive mechanisms, researchers have made innovations in the areas of materials chemistry, biomolecular engineering, pharmaceutical science, and micro- and nanofabrication to develop bioresponsive materials for a range of applications, including controlled drug delivery, diagnostics, tissue engineering and biomedical devices. This Review highlights recent advances in the design of smart materials capable of responding to the physiological environment, to biomarkers and to biological particulates. Key design principles, challenges and future directions, including clinical translation, of bioresponsive materials are also discussed.

  3. Interaction Effects between Exposure to Sexually Explicit Online Materials and Individual, Family, and Extrafamilial Factors on Hong Kong High School Students' Beliefs about Gender Role Equality and Body-Centered Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Siu-ming; Kan, Siu-mee Iu; Ngai, Steven Sek-yum

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the interaction effects between Hong Kong adolescents' exposure to sexually explicit online materials (SEOM) and individual, family, peer, and cultural factors on their beliefs about gender role equality and body-centered sexuality. Based on a survey design with a sample of 503 high school students in Hong Kong, the results…

  4. In-vitro interactions of human chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells, and of mouse macrophages with phospholipid-covered metallic implant materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Willumeit

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipid-coatings on metallic implant surfaces were evaluated in terms of adhesion, proliferation and matrix production of skeletal cells, and of macrophage stimulation. The working hypothesis is that mimicking a model biomembrane by phospholipids on surfaces to which cells adhere, the surface recognition by surrounding cells is altered. In this study, 1 mirror-like polished Ti-6Al-7Nb and 2 porous Ti-6Al-4V specimens were covered with the phospholipids POPE (palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and POPC (palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidyl-choline, and the interactions of a human articular chondrocytes (HAC, b human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSC, and c mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 were tested in vitro. On POPE-covered polished surfaces adherence of HAC (42% of seeded cells after 2 hrs and metabolic activity (MTT after 3 days were reduced, while on porous surfaces 99% HAC adhered, and metabolic activity was significantly increased, compared to respective native surfaces. On both POPE-covered surfaces the chondrocyte phenotype was present. After 3 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation, cartilage matrix production (measuring chondroitin sulphate per HAC number was significantly increased by about 30% on both POPE-covered metallic surfaces. On both POPC-covered surfaces nearly no adhering and surviving HAC were found. HMSC grown on POPE-covered porous substrates showed osteogenic differentiation by improved osteopontin and collagen I expression in RT-PCR, and osteocalcin fluorescence and bone nodule formation was only detectable on POPE-covered porous surfaces. In contrast to POPC and other phospholipids used as positive controls, POPE did not stimulate the NO production in mouse macrophage cultures. We therefore conclude that a phospholipid coating by POPE shows potential as surface modification for metallic implant materials.

  5. Materials for Fusion Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Matějíček

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview of materials foreseen for use or already used in fusion devices is given. The operating conditions, material requirements and characteristics of candidate materials in several specific application segments are briefly reviewed. These include: construction materials, electrical insulation, permeation barriers and plasma facing components. Special attention will be paid to the latter and to the issues of plasma-material interaction, materials joining and fuctionally graded interlayers.

  6. Analysis of 440 GeV proton beam–matter interaction experiments at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkart, F. [CERN-AB, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland and Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Schmidt, R.; Wollmann, D. [CERN-AB, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Raginel, V. [CERN-AB, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland and TU Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Tahir, N. A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Shutov, A. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Piriz, A. R. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2015-08-07

    In a previous paper [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we presented the first results on beam–matter interaction experiments that were carried out at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN. In these experiments, extended cylindrical targets of solid copper were irradiated with beam of 440 GeV protons delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The beam comprised of a large number of high intensity proton bunches, each bunch having a length of 0.5 ns with a 50 ns gap between two neighboring bunches, while the length of this entire bunch train was about 7 μs. These experiments established the existence of the hydrodynamic tunneling phenomenon the first time. Detailed numerical simulations of these experiments were also carried out which were reported in detail in another paper [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 063112 (2014)]. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental measurements and the simulation results that validate our previous simulations done using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam of 7 TeV protons [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.--Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. According to these simulations, the range of the full LHC proton beam and the hadronic shower can be increased by more than an order of magnitude due to the hydrodynamic tunneling, compared to that of a single proton. This effect is of considerable importance for the design of machine protection system for hadron accelerators such as SPS, LHC, and Future Circular Collider. Recently, using metal cutting technology, the targets used in these experiments have been dissected into finer pieces for visual and microscopic inspection in order to establish the precise penetration depth of the protons and the corresponding hadronic shower. This, we believe will be helpful in studying the very important phenomenon of hydrodynamic tunneling in a more quantitative manner. The details of this experimental work together with a comparison with the

  7. Materials Research Society Spring Meeting Symposium KK: Microbial Life on Surfaces: Biofilm-Material Interactions: Life at Interfaces. Held in San Francisco, California on 25-27 April 2011 (Abstracts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    surface treatment were exposed in inoculated and control ( sterile ) reactors fed with filter sterilized natural seawater for 7 months. Upon their recovery...appreciable pitting was detected on surfaces of sterile controls, regardless of temperature. The study provides evidence that bacterial biofilms can...34 Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; 2Division for Materials Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

  8. Puppets on a String in a Theatre of Display? Interactions of Image, Text, Material, Space and Motion in "The Family of Man" (ca. 1950s-1960s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priem, Karin; Thyssen, Geert

    2013-01-01

    In the past few decades, increasing attention has been devoted within various disciplines to aspects previously considered trivial, among which are images, material objects and spaces. While the visual, the material and the spatial are receiving ever more consideration and the myriad issues surrounding them are being tackled, their convergence in…

  9. Research on materials for advanced electronic and aerospace application. [including optical and magnetic data processing, stress corrosion and H2 interaction, and polymeric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Development and understanding of materials most suitable for use in compact magnetic and optical memory systems are discussed. Suppression of metal deterioration by hydrogen is studied. Improvement of mechanical properties of polymers is considered, emphasizing low temperature ductility and compatibility with high modulus fiber materials.

  10. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, Santiago D

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.

  11. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Summary Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip–sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young’s modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip–sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information. PMID:27335746

  12. The Effect of Micro/Nano-metrics Size on the Interaction of Jordanian Aluminosilicate Raw Materials with High pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldabsheh, Islam; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martinez, Salvador

    2014-05-01

    Environmental preservation has become a driving force behind the search for new sustainable and environmentally friendly composites to replace conventional concrete produced from ordinary Portland cement (OPC). Current researches concentrate on developing building products (geopolymers) through geopolymerization. The goal is to produce low cost construction materials for green housing. Geopolymerization is the process of polymerizing minerals with high silica and alumina at low temperature by the use of alkali solutions. Dissolution is the most important process for supplying the high initial Al and Si concentrations to produce the gel phase that is responsible for geopolymerization. This study has been focused on the influence of different micrometric particle sizes of three Jordanian raw materials on their dissolution behavior in sodium hydroxide solution. The samples are kaolinite, volcanic tuff and silica sand. The dissolution properties of each material, alone and mixed with the other two materials were studied in different concentrations (5 and 10 M) using (NaOH) at 25ºC, and shaking time for 24 and 168 h. To better understand the dissolution process, the alkaline solution was renewed after the desired time in order to know if the Al-Si raw material is completely dissolved or not. Different analytical techniques were used to characterize raw materials physically, mineralogically, chemically and thermally. All processed samples either centrifuged solutions or solid residues were fully characterized. The leached concentrations of Al and Si were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP). X-ray Diffraction Technique (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used to evaluate the solid residue characterization compared with the original ones. The three aluminosilicate raw materials have indicated variable degrees of solubility under highly alkaline conditions. The method for the size reduction of the used raw

  13. Why Do People Reject New Technologies and Stymie Organizational Changes of Which They Are in Favor? Exploring Misalignments between Social Interactions and Materiality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between users' interpretations of a new technology and failure of organizational change. I suggest that people form interpretations of a new technology not only based on their conversations with others, but also through their use of technology's material features directly. Through qualitative and quantitative…

  14. Interparticle interactions in composites of nanoparticles of ferrimagnetic (gamma-Fe2O3) and antiferromagnetic (CoO,NiO) materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Cathrine; Ostenfeld, Christopher Worsøe; Xu, M.;

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic properties of mixtures of ferrimagnetic gamma-Fe2O3 (maghemite) and antiferromagnetic NiO or CoO nanoparticles have been studied by use of Fe-57 Mossbauer spectroscopy, neutron powder diffraction and magnetization measurements. The studies showed that the interaction with antiferroma......The magnetic properties of mixtures of ferrimagnetic gamma-Fe2O3 (maghemite) and antiferromagnetic NiO or CoO nanoparticles have been studied by use of Fe-57 Mossbauer spectroscopy, neutron powder diffraction and magnetization measurements. The studies showed that the interaction...... with antiferromagnetic particles has a significant influence on the magnetic properties of the gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. It was found that mixing the gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with NiO nanoparticles resulted in a faster superparamagnetic relaxation and a reduced coercivity compared to a sample consisting solely...

  15. Interaction of graphite and ablative materials with CO2-laser, carbon-arc, and xenon-arc radiation. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., Washington, D. C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The behavior of graphite and several charring ablators in a variety of high radiative heat flux environments was studied in various radiative environments produced by a CO2 laser and a carbon arc facility. Graphite was also tested in xenon arc radiation. Tests were conducted in air nitrogen, helium, and a mixture of CO2 and nitrogen, simulating the Venus atmosphere. The experimental results are compared with theoretical results obtained with a one dimensional charring ablator analysis and a two dimensional subliming ablator analysis. Photomicroscopy showed no significant differences in appearance or microstructure of the charring ablators or graphite after testing in the three different facilities, indicating that the materials respond fundamentally the same to the radiation of different frequencies. The performance of phenolic nylon and graphite was satisfactorily predicted with existing analyses and published material property data.

  16. Plasma-electrochemical deposition of porous zirconia on titanium-based dental material and in vitro interactions with primary osteoblasts cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluđerović, Milena R; Schreckenbach, Joachim P; Graf, Hans-Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Three new porous zirconia-coated titanium materials using anodic plasma-electrochemical oxidation have been fabricated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis and X-ray diffraction. These ZrO2/TiO2 surfaces contained up to 43 wt% of ZrO2, 49 wt% TiO2 ( M1: - M3: ) and 8 wt% P2O5 ( M2: , M3: ). Zirconium titanate was detected as dominant microcrystalline phase. Primary human osteoblast cells were used for in vitro investigations. Cell proliferation and immunohistochemical analyses of morphology and expression of bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin were performed. Novel coatings M2: and M3: were shown to induce proliferation and expression of osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein to the extent comparable to that of Ticer, a material already employed in clinical practice.

  17. Electronics materials research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The electronic materials and is aimed at the establishment of quantitative relationships underlying crystal growth parameters, materials properties, electronic characteristics and device applications. The overall program evolves about the following main thrust areas: (1) crystal growth novel approaches to engineering of semiconductor materials; (2) investigation of materials properties and electronic characteristics on a macro and microscale; (3) surface properties and surface interactions with the bulk and ambients; (4) electronic properties controlling device applications and device performance.

  18. Investigations of high power laser beam interaction with material by means of hybrid FVM-FEM and digital image correlation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawińska, M.; Łapka, P.; Malesa, M.; Malowany, K.; Prasek, M.; Marczak, J.

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the new approach to the analysis of interaction between a high power laser beam and matter. The method relies on the combined experimental-numerical spatio-temporal analysis of temperature, displacement and strain maps which are generated at a surface of an object illuminated by a high power laser beam. Transient heat transfer numerical simulations were carried out applying the FVM, while the quasi-transient structural analyses were performed with the aid of the FEM. The displacement maps were captured by means of 3D Digital Image Correlation method, and temperature maps were provided by a high speed IR camera. The experimental data are compared to the initial model of laser induced heat transfer in an object and resulting displacements/strains. The first approach to hybrid experimental-numerical method which aims in indirect determination of laser beam profile is described. The monitoring of displacement/strain maps directly at an illuminated object may be also used for a structural integrity analysis of a target. In the paper at first the numerical simulations applied to model laser beam thermal interaction with solid bodies are presented. Next the laboratory experimental stand is described and the results of the initial tests performed at aluminum and bronze samples are shown and compared with numerical simulations. The advantages and disadvantages of the proposed methodology are discussed in relation to the two applications mentioned above.

  19. Plasma-wall interactions data compendium-2. ''Hydrogen retention property, diffusion and recombination coefficients database for selected plasma-facing materials''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuhiro, Kenjirou [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Iwakiri, Hirotomo [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Hirooka, Yoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamamura, Yasunori [Okayama Univ. of Scinece, Okayama (Japan); Morita, Kenji [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    This report will present additional data to those included in the previous report of this series. These new data are on the hydrogen (deuterium) trapping properties of graphite materials. The units on the data on hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and surface recombination coefficients have been updated to adopt the SI unit system. Also, the graphic representations of previously compiled data on hydrogen (deuterium) retention have been improved for better understanding. For the sake of completeness, this report will present all these data in the improved format. (author)

  20. Plasma-wall interactions data compendium-1. ''Hydrogen retention property, diffusion and recombination coefficients database for selected plasma-facing materials''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakiri, Hirotomo [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Matsuhiro, Kenjirou [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Hirooka, Yoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamamura, Yasunori [Okayama Univ. of Scinece, Okayama (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    A summary on the recent activities of the plasma-wall interactions database task group at the National Institute for Fusion Science is presented in this report. These activities are focused on the compilation of literature data on the key parameters related to wall recycling characteristics that affect dynamic particle balance during plasma discharges and also on-site tritium inventory. More specifically, in this task group a universal fitting formula has been proposed and successfully applied to help compile hydrogen implantation-induced retention data. Also, presented here are the data on hydrogen diffusion and surface recombination coefficients, both critical in modeling dynamic wall recycling behavior. Data compilation has been conducted on beryllium, carbon, tungsten and molybdenum, all currently used for plasma-facing components in magnetic fusion experiments. (author)

  1. Topological, non-topological and instanton droplets driven by spin-transfer torque in materials with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentieri, Mario; Tomasello, Riccardo; Zivieri, Roberto; Finocchio, Giovanni

    2015-11-09

    The interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction can modify the topology of droplets excited by a localized spin-polarized current. Here, we show that, in addition to the stationary droplet excitations with skyrmion number either one (topological) or zero (non-topological), there exists, for a fixed current, an excited mode with a non-stationary time behavior. We call this mode "instanton droplet", which is characterized by time domain transitions of the skyrmion number. These transitions are coupled to an emission of incoherent spin-waves that can be observed in the frequency domain as a source of noise. Our results are interesting from a fundamental point of view to study spin-wave emissions due to a topological transition in current-driven systems, and could open the route for experiments based on magnetoresistance effect for the design of a further generation of nanoscale microwave oscillators.

  2. Topological, non-topological and instanton droplets driven by spin-transfer torque in materials with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentieri, Mario; Tomasello, Riccardo; Zivieri, Roberto; Finocchio, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya Interaction can modify the topology of droplets excited by a localized spin-polarized current. Here, we show that, in addition to the stationary droplet excitations with skyrmion number either one (topological) or zero (non-topological), there exists, for a fixed current, an excited mode with a non-stationary time behavior. We call this mode “instanton droplet”, which is characterized by time domain transitions of the skyrmion number. These transitions are coupled to an emission of incoherent spin-waves that can be observed in the frequency domain as a source of noise. Our results are interesting from a fundamental point of view to study spin-wave emissions due to a topological transition in current-driven systems, and could open the route for experiments based on magnetoresistance effect for the design of a further generation of nanoscale microwave oscillators. PMID:26548898

  3. Topological, non-topological and instanton droplets driven by spin-transfer torque in materials with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentieri, Mario; Tomasello, Riccardo; Zivieri, Roberto; Finocchio, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    The interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction can modify the topology of droplets excited by a localized spin-polarized current. Here, we show that, in addition to the stationary droplet excitations with skyrmion number either one (topological) or zero (non-topological), there exists, for a fixed current, an excited mode with a non-stationary time behavior. We call this mode “instanton droplet”, which is characterized by time domain transitions of the skyrmion number. These transitions are coupled to an emission of incoherent spin-waves that can be observed in the frequency domain as a source of noise. Our results are interesting from a fundamental point of view to study spin-wave emissions due to a topological transition in current-driven systems, and could open the route for experiments based on magnetoresistance effect for the design of a further generation of nanoscale microwave oscillators.

  4. The interaction of human microbial pathogens, particulate material and nutrients in estuarine environments and their impacts on recreational and shellfish waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malham, Shelagh K; Rajko-Nenow, Paulina; Howlett, Eleanor; Tuson, Karen E; Perkins, Tracy L; Pallett, Denise W; Wang, Hui; Jago, Colin F; Jones, Davey L; McDonald, James E

    2014-09-20

    Anthropogenic activities have increased the load of faecal bacteria, pathogenic viruses and nutrients in rivers, estuaries and coastal areas through point and diffuse sources such as sewage discharges and agricultural runoff. These areas are used by humans for both commercial and recreational activities and are therefore protected by a range of European Directives. If water quality declines in these zones, significant economic losses can occur. Identifying the sources of pollution, however, is notoriously difficult due to the ephemeral nature of discharges, their diffuse source, and uncertainties associated with transport and transformation of the pollutants through the freshwater-marine interface. Further, significant interaction between nutrients, microorganisms and particulates can occur in the water column making prediction of the fate and potential infectivity of human pathogenic organisms difficult to ascertain. This interaction is most prevalent in estuarine environments due to the formation of flocs (suspended sediment) at the marine-freshwater interface. A range of physical, chemical and biological processes can induce the co-flocculation of microorganisms, organic matter and mineral particles resulting in pathogenic organisms becoming potentially protected from a range of biotic (e.g. predation) and abiotic stresses (e.g. UV, salinity). These flocs contain and retain macro- and micro- nutrients allowing the potential survival, growth and transfer of pathogenic organisms to commercially sensitive areas (e.g. beaches, shellfish harvesting waters). The flocs can either be transported directly to the coastal environment or can become deposited in the estuary forming cohesive sediments where pathogens can survive for long periods. Especially in response to storms, these sediments can be subsequently remobilised releasing pulses of potential pathogenic organisms back into the water column leading to contamination of marine waters long after the initial

  5. Interaction between particle precipitation and creep behavior in the NI-base Alloy 617B: Microstructural observations and constitutive material model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, J., E-mail: j.haan@iwm.rwth-aachen.de; Bezold, A., E-mail: a.bezold@iwm.rwth-aachen.de; Broeckmann, C., E-mail: c.broeckmann@iwm.rwth-aachen.de

    2015-07-29

    The creep behavior of the Ni-base Alloy 617B was analyzed at 725 °C with the focus on microstructural changes during temperature and stress exposure. High resolution electron microscopy of crept specimens reveals the precipitation behavior of secondary phases such as Cr-rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6}-carbides and the γ'-phase. Physical models are used to describe the Ostwald coarsening of the γ' particles and the evolution of the yield strength of the alloy. Together with the results from hot tensile tests and hardness measurements, a constitutive model for Alloy 617B has been developed. This model takes account of precipitation strengthening which is consistent with the microstructural observations, internal back stress due to dislocation hardening and material damage, all by evolutionary equations.

  6. Material musical como acervo de conocimiento: sujeto, acción e interacción en procesos de improvisación musical = Musical material as stock of knowledge: subject, action and interaction within processes of musical improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueroa-Dreher, Silvana K.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta contribuição explora a potencialidade da abordagem subjetiva representada na teoria fenomenonológica de Alfred Schutz para explicar processos de improvisação musical a partir de uma perspectiva sociológica. Isto constitui um desafio para a teoria de Schutz, uma vez que sua ideia de projetos de ação tipificados podem explicar ação improvisatória e interação apenas parcialmente. Contudo, esta mesma teoria abre um novo caminho – ainda menos explorado – para explicar fenômenos de improvisação com a noção de estoque de conhecimento subjetivo e social. A principal contribuição deste artigo é conectar a noção de estoque de conhecimento com o de material musical e, com isso, vincular ação improvisatória e interação

  7. Virtual Reality for Materials Design Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to research and develop materials through applied virtual reality to enable interactive "materials-by-design." Extensive theoretical and computational...

  8. Research of spin wave function and exchange coupling interactions in metal magnetic materials%磁性金属材料中交换耦合作用和自旋波的研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Exchange coupling is one of the most important fundamental interactions in ferromagnetic systems. Understanding of the parameters in this interaction may help describe numerous properties of metal magnetic materials. However, in the localized electron theory or itinerant electron theory there are also certain difficulties when utilizing this approximation method to study magnetic ordering problems for multi-atom systems. In realistic magnets exchange coupling is also related to the coexistence of localized and itinerant degrees of freedom. In this case Heisenberg exchange relationship has some limitations. If the exchange relationship only depends on the structure of the magnet, and is not related to energy differences between the phases, we can better avoid the Heisenberg exchange limits. Based on this, we use the general principle of the exchange coupling theory to analyse the usual approximation, and discuss the opportunity to calculate the parameters of such coupling rigorously without specific assumptions about the range of magnetic order or any approximation about the form of magnetization density. We propose a method for calculating the exchange coupling parameter to any approximation. The range of applicability of the above relation is discussed quantitatively for real magnetic systems (magnetic metal materials Gd, Fe, Ni) and spin waves, and the relevance for the exchange coupling is also analysed. This analysis for metal magnetic system (Fe, Ni and Gd) shows that the most significant improvement is obtained for exchange coupling between nearest magnetic atoms and for spin wave spectrum at finite wave vectors. It can be described by the relationship between the exchange coupling approximation and spin wave spectrum, and also interaction between the nearest neighbor magnetic atoms in ferromagnetic systems;these will give reasonable description to the large wave vectors part of spin wave spectra in any magnet with not fully localized magnetism. This point of

  9. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physical Processes in Laser-Materials Interaction, which was the 9th course of the Europhysics School of Quantum Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    1983-01-01

    It is a pleasure to write a few words as an introduction to the proceedings of the 1980 NATO ASI on "Physical Processes in Laser­ Naterial Interaction." This ASI is the ninth course of a series devoted to lasers and their applications, held under the responsibility of the Quantum Electronics Division of the European Physical Society, and for this reason known as the "Europhysics School of Quantum Electronics." Since 1971 the School has been operating with the joint direc­ tion of myself as representative of the academic research, and Dr. D. Roess (formerly with Siemens AEG, Munich, and now with Sick, Optik und Electronik, GmbH, Munich) for the industrial applications. Indeed the aim of the School is to alternate fundamental and applied frontier topics in the area of quantum electronics and modern optics, in order to introduce young research people from universities and industrial R&D laboratories to the new aspects of research opened by the laser.

  10. Interface interaction and inter-osmosis effect of Fex (SiO2)1-x nanocomposite materials on magnetic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊永红; 熊曹水; 李铁; 李玉芝; 王德兴

    1999-01-01

    Fex(SiC2 )1 - x nanocomposites prepared by using mechanical alloying method were reported. The mi-crostructure character and magnetic properties of Fex (SiO2) 1 - x nanocomposite samples with different Fe content and different ball milling time were studied by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mossbauer spectroscopy, and Faraday magnetic balance in a wide temperature range. The results indicate that the mi-crostructure and magnetic properties are closely related to ball milling time and Fe content. When Fe content is less than 20 wt% , the sample after 80-h ball milling has very complex microstructure. Small α-Fe grains and Fe cluster are implanted in SiO2 matrix. And there are not only isolated α-Fe granular and Fe cluster, but also nanometer scaled sandwich network-like structure. Fex (SiO2) 1 - x nanocomposite samples display a rich variety of physical and chemical properties as a result of their unique nanostructure, strong interface interaction and inter

  11. 运动激波与气泡串相互作用的多介质数值模拟%MULTI-MATERIAL NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MOVING SHOCK INTERACTING WITH CONSECUTIVE BUBBLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军; 任登凤; 谭俊杰

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed on the interface with large deformation induced by the interaction between a moving shock and two consecutive bubbles. The high performance of the level set method for multi-material interfaces is demonstrated. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method is used to solve Eulerian equations. And the fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is used to solve the level set equation for capturing multi-material interfaces. The ghost fluid method is used to deal with the interfacial boundary condition. Results are obtained for two bubble interacting with a moving shock. The contours of the constant density and the pressure at different time are given. In the computational domain, three different cases are considered, i.e. two helium bubbles, a helium bubble followed by an R22 bubble in the direction of the moving shock, and an R22 bubble followed by a helium bubble. Computational results indicate that multi-material interfaces can be properly captured by the level set method. Therefore, for problems involving the flow of three different materials with two different interfaces, each interface separating two different materials can be similarly handled.%通过对激波和流体界面相互作用而诱导的大变形界面演化的数值模拟,验证了Level set 方法精确模拟多个流体界面的有效性.采用间断有限元Galerkin方法求解欧拉方程得到流场解,采用5阶WENO格式求解Level set方程追踪多流体界面,界面附近的边界条件由虚拟流体方法处理.对运动激波和两个气泡相互作用过程进行了数值模拟,得到了不同时刻的压力和密度等值线分布,并分析了计算域中两个气泡同是氦气泡,以及一个是氦气泡,一个是R22气泡情况下的计算结果.计算结果表明:利用多界面Level set方程可高质量地捕捉多个流体界面,处理3种多介质流场数值模拟问题.

  12. Analysis of microbiological processes and interactions with inorganic materials to solubilise / fix inorganic pollutants and to model results for the completion of the seepage water prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinka, J.; Karnatz, F.; Glombitza, F. [G.E.O.S. Freiberg Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, Freiberg (Germany); Richter, J.; Kahnt, R. [C-W-H GmbH, Kaendler (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    Microbiological processes are able to affect water quality substantially. Concentrations of pollutants in seepage water are affected as a result of decomposition of organic material, of solubilisation or fixation of inorganic compounds forced by microorganisms. The standard elution of contaminated soils often leads to an insufficient and unrealistic prognosis of the composition of formed seepage water. Therefore the tests are extended by a microbiological term, which includes the microbiologi-cal inventory to correct the prediction of the seepage water concentration in saturated and unsaturated soil zones. The data, which are received from column and shaker tests, are input for kinetic variables in models to recalculate the concentration of seepage water. Modelling represents the link be-tween the column tests and the prognosis. Its task consists in the improvement of the column concept and the transfer of the findings into field scale. Modelling includes three parts: 1. Modelling of local geochemical equilibrium reactions and kinetic limited reactions with PHREEQC, 2. Accompanying modelling of flow and transport during the column tests, 3. Identifying of the optimal software for the selected pollutants and soils for the prediction of the seepage water quality. The aim of this work is to derive an application tool which contains recommendations and instructions for the praxis. This tool shall describe the course of action in presence of certain microorganisms and pollutants to improve the seepage water prediction. (orig.)

  13. Mitigation of plasma–material interactions via passive Li efflux from the surface of a flowing liquid lithium limiter in EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, G. Z.; Hu, J. S.; Maingi, R.; Ren, J.; Sun, Z.; Yang, Q. X.; Chen, Z. X.; Xu, H.; Tritz, K.; Zakharov, L. E.; Gentile, C.; Meng, X. C.; Huang, M.; Xu, W.; Chen, Y.; Wang, L.; Yan, N.; Mao, S. T.; Yang, Z. D.; Li, J. G.; EAST Team

    2017-04-01

    A new flowing liquid Li limiter (FLiLi) based on the concept of a thin flowing film has been successfully designed and tested in the EAST device in 2014. A bright Li radiative mantle at the plasma edge was observed during discharges using FLiLi, resulting from passive Li injection and transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma. Li particle efflux from the FLiLi surface into the plasma was estimated at  >5  ×  1020 atom s‑1, due to surface evaporation and sputtering, and accompanied with a few small Li droplets ~1 mm diameter that were ejected from FLiLi. The Li efflux from FLiLi was ionized by the SOL plasma and formed a Li radiation band that originated from the FLiLi surface, and then spread toroidally by SOL plasma flow. The Li radiative mantle appeared to partly isolate the plasma from the wall, reducing impurity release from the wall materials, and possibly leading to a modest improvement in confinement. In addition, strong Li radiation reduced the particle and heat fluxes impacting onto the divertor plate, with certain similarities to heat flux reduction and detachment onset via low-Z impurity injection.

  14. Implicit Partitioned Cardiovascular Fluid-Structure Interaction of the Heart Cycle Using Non-newtonian Fluid Properties and Orthotropic Material Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlhausen, M-P; Janoske, U; Oertel, H

    2015-03-01

    Although image-based methods like MRI are well-developed, numerical simulation can help to understand human heart function. This function results from a complex interplay of biochemistry, structural mechanics, and blood flow. The complexity of the entire system often causes one of the three parts to be neglected, which limits the truth to reality of the reduced model. This paper focuses on the interaction of myocardial stress distribution and ventricular blood flow during diastole and systole in comparison to a simulation of the same patient-specific geometry with a given wall movement (Spiegel, Strömungsmechanischer Beitrag zur Planung von Herzoperationen, 2009). The orthotropic constitutive law proposed by Holzapfel et al. (Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. Ser. A, 367:3445-3475, 2009) was implemented in a finite element package to model the passive behavior of the myocardium. Then, this law was modified for contraction. Via the ALE method, the structural model was coupled to a flow model which incorporates blood rheology and the circulatory system (Oertel, Prandtl-Essentials of Fluid Mechanics, 3rd edn, Springer Science + Business Media, 2010; Oertel et al., Modelling the Human Cardiac Fluid Mechanics, 3rd edn, Universitätsverlag Karlsruhe, 2009). Comparison reveals a good quantitative and qualitative agreement with respect to fluid flow. The motion of the myocardium is consistent with physiological observations. The calculated stresses and the distribution are within the physiological range and appear to be reasonable. The coupled model presented contains many features essential to cardiac function. It is possible to calculate wall stresses as well as the characteristic ventricular fluid flow. Based on the simulations we derive two characteristics to assess the health state quantitatively including solid and fluid mechanical aspects.

  15. Towards highly efficient red thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials by the control of intra-molecular π-π stacking interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunge; Zhang, Dongdong; Cai, Minghan; Li, Yilang; Zhang, Deqiang; Qiu, Yong; Duan, Lian

    2016-03-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials have attracted much attention as they can achieve 100% theoretical internal quantum efficiency without using expensive noble metals. However, efficient red TADF emitters are hard to realize according to the energy gap law. Here, three donor-acceptor-donor type TADF emitters with the same acceptor of o-phthalodinitrile (PN) but different donors (9, 9-dimethyl-9, 10-dihydroacridine (DMAC), phenoxazine (PXZ), and phenothiazine (PTZ) for DMAC-PN, PXZ-PN, and PTZ-PN, respectively) have been synthesized, and it is observed that the performance of the emitters can be improved by reducing the intra-molecular π-π stacking. DMAC-PN with reduced intra-molecular π-π stacking shows a photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 20.2% in degassed toluene solution, much higher than those of PXZ-PN, and PTZ-PN (0.8%, 0.2%, respectively). An organic light-emitting diode (OLED) employing DMAC-PN doped into 4,4‧-bis(9H-carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) as the emitting layer exhibits a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 10.2% with the emission peak at 564 nm. Moreover, when DMAC-PN is doped into a polar host, bis[2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl] ether oxide (DPEPO), the OLED shows a large redshift of the emission maximum to 594 nm, while maintaining a peak EQE as high as 7.2%, indicating that efficient red TADF OLEDs can be fabricated by doping orange TADF emitters into hosts with proper polarity.

  16. Virtual materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Dorte Marie

    to bullying practices in school. The theoretical question concerns the conceptual challenges that arise from empirical data which contain 1. children’s narratives about matter and meaning as they intertwine in their nightly dreams, 2. the observations of children’s’ computer gaming practices as well...... the character and effects of the skeleton army, which came across the sea to drown the boys in Phillip’s school class: a central scene in one of the dreams he recounted? Are the boat and the water in that dream materialities? Discourse? Part of some kind of enacted subjectivity? How will our decision of which......, experiences etc. Among these many interacting forces technologies play a crucial part – as do bodies, whether they are fighting, playing, dreaming, loving or hating bodies. And as do weapons - whether in the shape of virtual weapons of the computer games (as in e.g. Battlefield, Counter Strike, Grand Theft...

  17. Synthesis and studies of polypeptide materials: Self-assembled block copolypeptide amphiphiles, DNA-condensing block copolypeptides and membrane-interactive random copolypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrsta, Michael Dmytro

    A new class of transition metal initiators for the controlled polymerization of alpha-aminoacid-N-carboxyanhydrides (alpha-NCAs), has been developed by Deming et al. This discovery has allowed for the synthesis of well-defined "protein-like" polymers. Using this chemistry we have made distinct block/random copolypeptides for biomedical applications. Drug delivery, gene delivery, and antimicrobial polymers were the focus of our research efforts. The motivation for the synthesis and study of synthetic polypeptide based materials comes from proteins. Natural proteins are able to adopt a staggeringly large amount of uniquely well-defined folded structures. These structures account for the diversity in properties of proteins. As catalysts (enzymes) natural proteins perform some of the most difficult chemistry with ease and precision at ambient pressures and temperatures. They also exhibit incredible structural properties that directly result from formation of complex hierarchical assemblies. Self-assembling block copolymers were synthesized with various compositions and architectures. In general, di- and tri-block amphiphiles were studied for their self-assembling properties. Both spherical and tubular vesicles were found to assemble from di- and tri-block amphiphiles, respectively. In addition to self-assembly, pH responsiveness was engineered into these amphiphiles by the incorporation of basic residues (lysine) into the hydrophobic block. Another form of self-assembly studied was the condensation of DNA using cationic block copolymers. It was found that cationic block copolymers could condense DNA into compact, ordered, water-soluble aggregates on the nanoscale. These aggregates sufficiently protected DNA from nucleases and yet were susceptible to proteases. These studies form the basis of a gene delivery platform. The ease with which NCAs are polymerized renders them completely amenable to parallel synthetic methods. We have employed this technique to discover new

  18. Strongly Correlated Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H.; Si, Qimiao

    2013-01-01

    Strongly correlated materials are profoundly affected by the repulsive electron-electron interaction. This stands in contrast to many commonly used materials such as silicon and aluminum, whose properties are comparatively unaffected by the Coulomb repulsion. Correlated materials often have remarkable properties and transitions between distinct, competing phases with dramatically different electronic and magnetic orders. These rich phenomena are fascinating from the basic science perspective ...

  19. Interactions between industrial organic pollutants and rhizosphere components and documentation of material streams in plant-based wastewater treatment plants - laboratory experiments; Wechselwirkungen industrieller organischer Schadstoffe mit Rhizosphaerenkomponenten und Bilanzierung von Stoffstroemen in Pflanzenklaeranlagen - Laborversuche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plugge, J.

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the suitability of plant/soil systems for cleaning organically polluted effluents and to assess the influence of plant growth and dissolved humic substances on processes leading to the elimination of organic pollutants. This involved an examination of sorption interactions between selected pollutants on the one hand and sand and root material on the other, use of vertically irrigated plant-bearing sand columns for simulating real plant-based wastewater treatment plants, assessment of the cleaning efficiency of these systems with respect to the employed model pollutants and determination of the contamination of the filter material and plants with pollutants. Radiotracer techniques were used to determine pollution paths of phenanthrene and its microbial degradation in the model system. [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde die Eignung von Pflanze/Boden-Systemen zur Reinigung carbochemisch belasteter Abwaesser untersucht und der Einfluss eines Pflanzenbewuchses sowie geloester Huminstoffe auf die Prozesse, die zur Entfernung organischer Schadstoffe fuehren, bewertet. Die Bearbeitung dieses Themas umfasste Untersuchungen zu Sorptionswechselwirkungen ausgewaehlter Schadstoffe mit Sand- und Wurzelmaterial, die Anwendung vertikal durchstroemter, bepflanzter Sandsaeulen zur Nachbildung realer Pflanzenklaeranlagen, die Erfassung der Reinigungseffizienz dieser Systeme fuer die Modellschadstoffe sowie die Bestimmung der Schadstoffkontamination des Filtermaterials und der Pflanzen. Unter Anwendung der Radiotracertechnik erfolgte darueber hinaus die Bestimmung der Schadstoffpfade von Phenanthren einschliesslich des mikrobiellen Abbaus im Modellsystem. (orig.)

  20. Mechanics of materials model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Jeffrey P.

    1987-01-01

    The Mechanics of Materials Model (MOMM) is a three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis code for use as an early design stage tool for hot section components. MOMM is a stiffness method finite element code that uses a network of beams to characterize component behavior. The MOMM contains three material models to account for inelastic material behavior. These include the simplified material model, which assumes a bilinear stress-strain response; the state-of-the-art model, which utilizes the classical elastic-plastic-creep strain decomposition; and Walker's viscoplastic model, which accounts for the interaction between creep and plasticity that occurs under cyclic loading conditions.

  1. Electrode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amine, Khalil; Abouimrane, Ali; Belharouak, Ilias

    2017-01-31

    A process for forming a surface-treatment layer on an electroactive material includes heating the electroactive material and exposing the electroactive material to a reducing gas to form a surface-treatment layer on the electroactive material, where the surface-treatment layer is a layer of partial reduction of the electroactive material.

  2. Mathematical Modelling of Laser/Material Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-25

    translated to the model input. Even an experimental mode print can also be digitalised for the model. In trying to describe high order modes matliematically...4. Mazumder J. Steen W.M. "Welding of Ti 6al - 4V by continuous wave CO2 laser". Metal construction Sept. 1980 pp423 - 427. 5. Kogelnik H, Li.T Proc

  3. Light-matter interaction in nanostructured materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst

    Se quantum dots in Si inverse opals showing that absorption has a limiting but not prohibitive effect. In addition, we discuss how the resonant nature of the phenomenon puts rather severe restrictions on the stabilization of the system in possible experiments. Last, we examine the influence on the decay...

  4. Heat Source - Materials Interactions during Fusion Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-30

    Lister and S. N. Flengas, Can. J. Chem., 1965, Vol. 43, pp. 2947-2969. 2. J. E. Dutrizac and S. N. Flengas, in Advances in Extractive Metallurgy , Institution...N. Flengas, in Extractive Metallurgy of the Refractory Metals, H. Y. Sohn; 0. N. Carlson, and J. T. Smith, editors, AIME, Metals Park, 1981, pp. 107

  5. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  6. 纳米离子材料中离子相互作用与流变性能调控%Tuning of Ionic Interaction and Rheological Properties of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洋健; 阮英波; 张宝庆; 乔昕; 刘琛阳

    2016-01-01

    制备了2种离子相互作用强度不同的纳米离子材料(相对强度SiO2-SIT-M2070>SiO2-SIT-Ethomeen).结果表明,分散相SiO2在纳米离子材料中稳定存在,未出现聚集.纳米离子材料中外层低聚物的结晶受到抑制,且离子相互作用越强,结晶抑制作用越明显,对动态流变性质也有显著影响.在相同固含量条件下,纳米离子材料SiO2-SIT-Ethomeen的动态剪切模量和黏度比SiO2-SIT-M2070小1~3个数量级.在动态大应变剪切条件下,高固含量的SiO2-SIT-M2070表现出软玻璃流变学特性;而SiO2-SIT-Ethomeen体系表现出强应变过冲现象,并且随着固含量的升高,其动态模量和黏度出现极大值时所对应的应变值逐渐减小,而且应变过冲的程度逐渐变小.因此通过调节组分间离子相互作用可有效地调节纳米离子材料的流变特性.%We prepared two kinds of silica-based nanoscale ionic materials( NIMs) with increasing SiO2 con-tents, and also with different relative ionic interaction strengths between their constituents( SiO2-SIT-M2070>SiO2-SIT-Ethomeen for the relative ionic interaction strength) . The results of transmission electron microscope ( TEM) and small-angle X-ray scattering ( SAXS ) investigations indicated that there was no obvious nano-particle aggregate in both kinds of NIMs. The differential scanning calorimetry( DSC) results showed that the ionic interactions prohibited the crystallization of out-shell block copolymers in the prepared NIMs. Moreover, the crystallization suppression was more serious with increasing the ionic interaction strength. Ionic interaction also displayed the dramatic influence on the dynamic rheological behavior of as-prepared NIMs. The dynamic shear moduli and viscosities of SiO2-SIT-Ethomeen were about 1—3 orders of magnitude lower than those of SiO2-SIT-M2070 with the same solid contents. Under the shear of large dynamic strain, SiO2-SIT-M2070 with the relatively high solid contents showed

  7. Selecting materials in product design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kesteren, I.E.H.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis exists of several studies and design steps that resulted in a new material selection technique for user-centred design, which is supported by tools. The tools use examples of materials in products and stimulate the discussions about the user-interaction aspects of those materials desired

  8. Biointegrating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amédée, J.; Bordenave, L.; Durrieu, M.-C.; Fricain, J.-C.; Pothuaud, L.

    The extraordinary increase in human longevity explains the growing need for replacement organs. The remarkable successes of conventional transplants (associated with the development of effective antirejection drugs and improved control of their administration) are also accompanied by certain drawbacks. First on the list is an inadequate supply of replacement organs: the number of candidates for transplants grows larger, opposition to the removal of organs increases, and the number of transplants has reached a ceiling. Furthermore, it has come to light over the past few years that organ transplants carry a significant risk of transmitting pathogens. Finally, the main drawback lies in the need to pursue an immunosuppression treatment. Scientists and doctors have long been in search of alternatives to human organ transplants. According to the definition drawn up in Chester in 1986 at the Consensus Conference organised under the aegis of the European Society for Biomaterials, biomaterials are non-viable materials used in a medical device and destined to interact with biological systems, whether they contribute to the constitution of a diagnostic device, a tissue or organ substitute, or a device designed to provide functional assistance or replacement.

  9. Interaction improves perception of gloss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller Lichtenauer, Matthias; Schuetz, Philipp; Zolliker, Peter

    2013-12-18

    Rendering materials on displays becomes ubiquitous in industrial design, architecture, and visualization. Yet the experience of the material from other modes of perception is missing in that representation. This forces observers to rely on visual cues only while judging material properties. In the present study, we compare judgments of rough and glossy surfaces by interacting and passive observers. We investigate whether observers actively exploring rendered stimuli judge properties differently than observers passively watching renderings. Resulting interobserver agreement is significantly higher for interacting observers.

  10. Building Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Building Materials Sub-council of CCPIT is the other sub-council in construction field. CCPIT Building Materials Sub-council (CCPITBM), as well as CCOIC Build-ing Materials Chamber of Commerce, is au-thorized by CCPIT and state administration of building materials industry in 1992. CCPITBM is a sub-organization of CCPIT and CCOIC.

  11. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  12. Lasers in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Ossi, Paolo; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    This book covers various aspects of lasers in materials science, including a comprehensive overview on basic principles of laser-materials interactions and applications enabled by pulsed laser systems.  The material is organized in a coherent way, providing the reader with a harmonic architecture. While systematically covering the major current and emerging areas of lasers processing applications, the Volume provides examples of targeted modification of material properties achieved through careful control of the processing conditions and laser irradiation parameters. Special emphasis is placed on specific strategies aimed at nanoscale control of material structure and properties to match the stringent requirements of modern applications.  Laser fabrication of novel nanomaterials, which expands to the domains of photonics, photovoltaics, sensing, and biomedical applications, is also discussed in the Volume. This book assembles chapters based on lectures delivered at the Venice International School on Lasers...

  13. Contributions ECN biomass to 'Developments in thermochemical biomass conversion' conference. 17-22 September 2000, Tyrol, Austria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerrigter, H.; Daey Ouwens, C.; Van Doorn, J.; Van der Drift, A.; Hofmans, H.; Huijnen, H.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Kiel, J.H.A.; Moonen, R.H.W.; Mozaffarian, M.; Neeft, J.P.A.; Oosting, T.P.; Den Uil, H.; Visser, H.J.M.; Zwart, R.W.R. [ECN , Biomass, Petten (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    This report contains the contributions (7) of the business unit ECN Biomass of the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) in Petten, Netherlands, to the title conference. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the seven papers: (1) Effect of fuel size and process temperature on fuel gas quality from CFB gasification of biomass; (2) Gas mixing in a pilot scale (500 KW{sub th}) air blown circulating fluidised bed biomass gasifier; (3) Guideline for sampling and analysis of 'tars' and particles in biomass producer gases; (4) Biomass ash - bed material interactions leading to agglomeration in fluidised bed combustion and gasification; (5) Production of substitute natural gas by biomass hydrogasification; (6) CASST. A new and advanced process for biomass gasification; and (7) New developments in the field of tri-generation from biomass and waste. A survey.

  14. Surface Chemistry in Nanoscale Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex V. Hamza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although surfaces or, more precisely, the surface atomic and electronic structure, determine the way materials interact with their environment, the influence of surface chemistry on the bulk of the material is generally considered to be small. However, in the case of high surface area materials such as nanoporous solids, surface properties can start to dominate the overall material behavior. This allows one to create new materials with physical and chemical properties that are no longer determined by the bulk material, but by their nanoscale architectures. Here, we discuss several examples, ranging from nanoporous gold to surface engineered carbon aerogels that demonstrate the tuneability of nanoporous solids for sustainable energy applications.

  15. Laser-surface interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the interaction of laser radiation with various surfaces at variable parameters of radiation. As a basic principle of classification we chose the energetic or intensity level of interaction of laser radiation with the surfaces. These two characteristics of laser radiation are the most important parameters defining entire spectrum of the processes occurring on the surfaces during interaction with electromagnetic waves. This is a first book containing a whole spectrum of the laser-surface interactions distinguished by the ranges of used laser intensity. It combines the surface response starting from extremely weak laser intensities (~1 W cm-2) up to the relativistic intensities (~1020 W cm-2 and higher). The book provides the basic information about lasers and acquaints the reader with both common applications of laser-surface interactions (laser-related printers, scanners, barcode readers, discs, material processing, military, holography, medicine, etc) and unusual uses of the processes on t...

  16. Hazardous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can cause cancer. Know how to use the material and how to store it or throw it away when you are done. Other tips include: Never enter an area where radiation ... materials from one area to another. Check bottles, containers, ...

  17. Analytic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, Graeme W

    2016-01-01

    The theory of inhomogeneous analytic materials is developed. These are materials where the coefficients entering the equations involve analytic functions. Three types of analytic materials are identified. The first two types involve an integer $p$. If $p$ takes its maximum value then we have a complete analytic material. Otherwise it is incomplete analytic material of rank $p$. For two-dimensional materials further progress can be made in the identification of analytic materials by using the well-known fact that a $90^\\circ$ rotation applied to a divergence free field in a simply connected domain yields a curl-free field, and this can then be expressed as the gradient of a potential. Other exact results for the fields in inhomogeneous media are reviewed. Also reviewed is the subject of metamaterials, as these materials provide a way of realizing desirable coefficients in the equations.

  18. Collocated Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E. Fischer, Joel; Porcheron, Martin; Lucero, Andrés;

    2016-01-01

    , and wearable technologies, spaces and spatial interaction, and those interested in the social aspects of interaction, such as conversation analysis and ethnomethodology. These communities have matured considerably, and produced significant exemplars of systems, methods, and studies concerned with collocated...

  19. The materiality of materials and artefacts used in science classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowie, Bronwen; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Moreland, Judy

    and ends of artefacts/ materials. They explored artefacts/materials and how they could be used and through this exemplified materiality in the objects. More deliberate and focused attention to what constitutes materiality can support collaboration and communication to support and enhance learning...... materials as natural objects in this world and artefacts as manmade objects. We are aware that in a classroom material objects and artefacts shape, and are shaped by classroom practice through the way they selectively present scientific explanations. However, materials and artefacts have no intrinsic...... and constrain forms of action and insights that are likely to “emerge” (Wells, 2003). Methods The study's teachers considered that students enjoy and benefit from “hands–on” learning activities and many commented that tasks and interactions incorporated the use of materials. These included material objects...

  20. Aerospace materials and material technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Wanhill, R

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive compilation of chapters on materials (both established and evolving) and material technologies that are important for aerospace systems. It considers aerospace materials in three Parts. Part I covers Metallic Materials (Mg, Al, Al-Li, Ti, aero steels, Ni, intermetallics, bronzes and Nb alloys); Part II deals with Composites (GLARE, PMCs, CMCs and Carbon based CMCs); and Part III considers Special Materials. This compilation has ensured that no important aerospace material system is ignored. Emphasis is laid in each chapter on the underlying scientific principles as well as basic and fundamental mechanisms leading to processing, characterization, property evaluation and applications. A considerable amount of materials data is compiled and presented in appendices at the end of the book. This book will be useful to students, researchers and professionals working in the domain of aerospace materials.

  1. MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. BISHOP

    2000-09-01

    This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

  2. Strongly correlated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H; Si, Qimiao

    2012-09-18

    Strongly correlated materials are profoundly affected by the repulsive electron-electron interaction. This stands in contrast to many commonly used materials such as silicon and aluminum, whose properties are comparatively unaffected by the Coulomb repulsion. Correlated materials often have remarkable properties and transitions between distinct, competing phases with dramatically different electronic and magnetic orders. These rich phenomena are fascinating from the basic science perspective and offer possibilities for technological applications. This article looks at these materials through the lens of research performed at Rice University. Topics examined include: Quantum phase transitions and quantum criticality in "heavy fermion" materials and the iron pnictide high temperature superconductors; computational ab initio methods to examine strongly correlated materials and their interface with analytical theory techniques; layered dichalcogenides as example correlated materials with rich phases (charge density waves, superconductivity, hard ferromagnetism) that may be tuned by composition, pressure, and magnetic field; and nanostructure methods applied to the correlated oxides VO₂ and Fe₃O₄, where metal-insulator transitions can be manipulated by doping at the nanoscale or driving the system out of equilibrium. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting prospects for this class of materials.

  3. Mechanics of moving materials

    CERN Document Server

    Banichuk, Nikolay; Neittaanmäki, Pekka; Saksa, Tytti; Tuovinen, Tero

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with theoretical aspects of modelling the mechanical behaviour of manufacturing, processing, transportation or other systems in which the processed or supporting material is travelling through the system. Examples of such applications include paper making, transmission cables, band saws, printing presses, manufacturing of plastic films and sheets, and extrusion of aluminium foil, textiles and other materials.   The work focuses on out-of-plane dynamics and stability analysis for isotropic and orthotropic travelling elastic and viscoelastic materials, with and without fluid-structure interaction, using analytical and semi-analytical approaches.  Also topics such as fracturing and fatigue are discussed in the context of moving materials. The last part of the book deals with optimization problems involving physical constraints arising from the stability and fatigue analyses, including uncertainties in the parameters.   The book is intended for researchers and specialists in the field, providin...

  4. Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    MIT for the use of facilities. Supporting Online Material www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/ full /318/5856/1618/DC1 Materials and Methods SOM Text Figs. S1...AFRL-RZ-ED-TR-2012-0034 Nanostructured Materials Joseph M. Mabry Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQRP 10 E. Saturn Blvd...ORGANIZATION REPORT NO. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQRP 10 E. Saturn Blvd Edwards AFB CA 93524-7680 9. SPONSORING

  5. Material Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Brath; Mortensen, Henrik Rubæk; Mullins, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes and reflects upon the results of an investigative project which explores the setting up of a material system - a parametric and generative assembly consisting of and taking into consideration material properties, manufacturing constraints and geometric behavior. The project...... approaches the subject through the construction of a logic-driven system aiming to explore the possibilities of a material system that fulfills spatial, structural and performative requirements concurrently and how these are negotiated in situations where they might be conflicting....

  6. Effects of Corroded and Non-Corroded Biodegradable Mg and Mg Alloys on Viability, Morphology and Differentiation of MC3T3-E1 Cells Elicited by Direct Cell/Material Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Mostofi

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of biodegradable Mg and Mg alloys on selected properties of MC3T3-E1 cells elicited by direct cell/material interaction. The chemical composition and morphology of the surface of Mg and Mg based alloys (Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and EDX, following corrosion in cell culture medium for 1, 2, 3 and 8 days. The most pronounced difference in surface morphology, namely crystal formation, was observed when Pure Mg and Mg2Ag were immersed in cell medium for 8 days, and was associated with an increase in atomic % of oxygen and a decrease of surface calcium and phosphorous. Crystal formation on the surface of Mg10Gd was, in contrast, negligible at all time points. Time-dependent changes in oxygen, calcium and phosphorous surface content were furthermore not observed for Mg10Gd. MC3T3-E1 cell viability was reduced by culture on the surfaces of corroded Mg, Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd in a corrosion time-independent manner. Cells did not survive when cultured on 3 day pre-corroded Pure Mg and Mg2Ag, indicating crystal formation to be particular detrimental in this regard. Cell viability was not affected when cells were cultured on non-corroded Mg and Mg alloys for up to 12 days. These results suggest that corrosion associated changes in surface morphology and chemical composition significantly hamper cell viability and, thus, that non-corroded surfaces are more conducive to cell survival. An analysis of the differentiation potential of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on non-corroded samples based on measurement of Collagen I and Runx2 expression, revealed a down-regulation of these markers within the first 6 days following cell seeding on all samples, despite persistent survival and proliferation. Cells cultured on Mg10Gd, however, exhibited a pronounced upregulation of collagen I and Runx2 between days 8 and 12, indicating an enhancement of osteointegration by this alloy that could be valuable for

  7. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin;

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  8. Handbook of luminescent semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is an important approach for examining the optical interactions in semiconductors and optical devices with the goal of gaining insight into material properties. With contributions from researchers at the forefront of this field, Handbook of Luminescent Semiconductor Materials explores the use of this technique to study semiconductor materials in a variety of applications, including solid-state lighting, solar energy conversion, optical devices, and biological imaging. After introducing basic semiconductor theory and photoluminescence principles, the book focuses

  9. Materials characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, N.W.; Nicolet, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on the methods used in the chemical analysis of materials. Topics considered at the symposium included emerging techniques for materials microanalysis, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, crystal lattices, computerized tomography using synchrotron radiation, epitaxy, photoconductivity, elastic properties, neutron-induced particle track mapping of elemental distributions, and point defects in crystals.

  10. Environmental Interactions Working Group Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, N. J.; Wiskerchen, M.

    1984-01-01

    Interactions between spacecraft systems and the space charged particle environment are reviewed and recommendations are presented for both near-term and far-term research considerations. Transient environment models, large space structures, solar and nuclear power systems/environment interactions, single event upsets, material degradation, and planetary missions are addressed.

  11. Materiality, Practice and Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Stine Liv; Skovbjerg-Karoff, Helle

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand the interaction between human and technology, the relationship must be emphasized as a triangulation between materiality, body and practice. By introducing play situations from a just finished empirical study in three bigger cities in Denmark, this paper will address...... the interplay from the human‟s point of view, as a body doing a certain practice, which is constantly produced by taking approaches which comes from phenomenology and practice theory. We introduce aspects of play understood as a dynamic between materiality, body and practice with the goal of inspiring not only...

  12. Materials for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Züttel

    2003-09-01

    The goal is to pack hydrogen as close as possible, i.e. to reach the highest volumetric density by using as little additional material as possible. Hydrogen storage implies the reduction of an enormous volume of hydrogen gas. At ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure, 1 kg of the gas has a volume of 11 m3. To increase hydrogen density, work must either be applied to compress the gas, the temperature decreased below the critical temperature, or the repulsion reduced by the interaction of hydrogen with another material.

  13. Composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  14. Periodontal materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, I

    2011-06-01

    Periodontics is more associated with debridement of periodontal pockets and not generally thought of as using dental materials in the treatment of patients. However, the last 30 years have seen the development of materials used in regeneration of the periodontal tissues following periodontal disease, guided tissue regeneration, and the use of these materials in bone regeneration more recently, guided bone regeneration. The materials used include bone grafts and membranes, but also growth factors and cells-based therapies. This review provides an overview of the materials currently used and looks at contemporary research with a view to what may be used in the future. It also looks at the clinical effectiveness of these regenerative therapies with an emphasis on what is available in Australia.

  15. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  16. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter;

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing interest in considering aesthetic aspects in the design of interactive systems. A set of approaches are emerging each representing different applications of the terminology as well as different inherent assumptions on the role of the user, designer and interaction ideals....... In this paper, we use the concept of Pragmatist Aesthetics to provide a framework for distinguishing between different approaches to aesthetics. Moreover, we use our own design cases to illustrate how pragmatist aesthetics is a promising path to follow in the context of designing interactive systems......, as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  17. Radioactive Material

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Group of the Safety Commission is responsible for shipping of radioactive material from CERN to any external institute or organisation. The RP group is equally responsible for the reception of radioactive material shipped to any of the CERN sites. Anyone who needs to ship from or import into CERN radioactive material must contact the Radioactive Shipping Service of the RP group in advance. Instructions are available at: http://cern.ch/rp-shipping or in the Radiation Protection Procedure PRP13: https://edms.cern.ch/document/346823 Radiation Protection Group

  18. Cultivating objects in interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    is chapter explores patterns of repeated orientations to physical objects in interactants’ visuo-spatial and haptic surround. A number of examples are presented from advice-giving activities in various institutional settings, where participants-in-interaction initially draw on material objects...... on these associations for describing, disambiguating or clarifying aspects of the relatively complex procedural frameworks discussed in the settings. is suggests that the temporal stability of material objects available to participants makes them an ideal resource to be developed as visual motifs....

  19. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry....... The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro-thermal behavior......, viscoelastic behavior, and internal stress states. Other physical properties considered are thermal and electrical conductivities, diffusion coefficients, dielectric constants and magnetic permeability. Special attention is given to the effect of pore shape on the mechanical and physical behavior of porous...

  20. Talk, Mobility and Materialities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    The intersection of the quotidian practices of social interaction, learning and mobility outside of the classroom – for example, the ways in which talk shapes how children learn to be actively mobile – has been little studied until recently. This paper develops a social interactional approach...... to analysing talk and mobile action in what are arguably two quintessentially Nordic mobility practices, namely cycling and skiing. More specifically the focus is on investigating and comparing how a child learns to cycle in a bike-friendly urban infrastructure, and how a child learns to ski cross...... is collaboratively constructed in interaction by the participants as part and parcel of their kinaesthetic experience of the respective material environment and infrastructure. Especially when skiing, the more malleable snowscape is (re)territorialised by laying down tracks, which can be reused by participants, both...

  1. Propulsion materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Edward J. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Sullivan, Rogelio A. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Gibbs, Jerry L. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  2. Encountering Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2016-01-01

    DHT researcher Connie Svabo and artist Charlotte Grum did a joint performance presentation titled Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal at the international conference Encountering Materiality – Transdisciplinary Conversations, held in Geneve, Schwitzerland, June 23-25 2016.......DHT researcher Connie Svabo and artist Charlotte Grum did a joint performance presentation titled Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal at the international conference Encountering Materiality – Transdisciplinary Conversations, held in Geneve, Schwitzerland, June 23-25 2016....

  3. Étude des interactions mécaniques et physico-chimiques entre les argiles et les fluides de forage. Application à l'argile de Boom (Belgique A Study O the Mechanical and Physicochemical Interactions Between the Clay Materials and the Drilling Fluids. Application to the Boom Clay (Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshibangu J. P.

    2006-11-01

    pour sa disponibilité et, d'autre part, pour la grande quantité d'informations disponibles sur ce matériau. General ConsiderationsThis work deals with problems encountered regarding the stability of wells drilled in the clay material formations with water based muds. In fact, clays or shales have a property of taking water, thus causing the instability of wells either because of the swelling of some mineral species, or because the supporting pressure is suppressed by modification of the pore pressure. The aim here is to experimentally emphasize the principal mechanisms driving the phenomenon of instability, and to try to quantify the importance of these mechanisms in order to include them in calculation models. The behaviour of a shale put in contact of a water based fluid depends on its initial water activity and on the composition of the fluid. According to the situation, the shale will take or expel water, with a consequence of swelling or shrinkage. Three factors play an important role in the water activity of shales :- The electrostatic interaction which is related to the cation exchange. This mechanism consists in a cation passing from the solution to the surface of a layer and an interlayer cation of the clay doing the opposite path. Clay materials are characterized by the Cation Exchange Capacity or CEC;- The salt concentration which is related to the osmotic phenomenon. If a shale, and especially a montmorillonite, is put in contact with a pure solvent, in addition of the ion hydration, the solvent will be taken by the shale in order to dilute the high ionic concentration of that shale. This last mechanism is macroscopically expressed by a difference of osmotic pressure between the external solvent and the pore fluid of the shale. If we consider the case in which the solvent is pure water the osmotic pressure is expressed by equation (2 in which awi is the water activity of the shale and vw the partial molar volume of water (we suppose here that this vw has

  4. Material control system simulator program reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollstien, R.B.

    1978-01-24

    A description is presented of a Material Control System Simulator (MCSS) program for determination of material accounting uncertainty and system response to particular adversary action sequences that constitute plausible material diversion attempts. The program is intended for use in situations where randomness, uncertainty, or interaction of adversary actions and material control system components make it difficult to assess safeguards effectiveness against particular material diversion attempts. Although MCSS may be used independently in the design or analysis of material handling and processing systems, it has been tailored toward the determination of material accountability and the response of material control systems to adversary action sequences.

  5. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  6. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  7. Neutrino Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    McFarland, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes a series of three lectures on interactions of neutrinos . The lectures begin with a pedagogical foundation and then explore topics of interest to current and future neutrino oscillation and cross-section experiments.

  8. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi;

    2015-01-01

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...

  9. Orbital interactions in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, Thomas A; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Explains the underlying structure that unites all disciplines in chemistry Now in its second edition, this book explores organic, organometallic, inorganic, solid state, and materials chemistry, demonstrating how common molecular orbital situations arise throughout the whole chemical spectrum. The authors explore the relationships that enable readers to grasp the theory that underlies and connects traditional fields of study within chemistry, thereby providing a conceptual framework with which to think about chemical structure and reactivity problems. Orbital Interactions

  10. 油脂微胶囊壁材乳清蛋白与阿拉伯胶相互作用研究%The Interaction of Oil Microcapsule Wall Materials between Whey Protein and Acacia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石燕; 李如一; 王辉; 李倩; 李德俊; 涂宗财

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between whey protein and acacia which were used as wall material was studied on the formation of the oils microcapsules by the FTIR Spectroscopy and Computer Aided Analysis.The results indicated that whey protein changed ob-viously in amide A and amideⅠ by high pressured homogenization and spray-drying.The amide A moved from 3 406.5 cm-1 to 3 425.4 cm-1 which was possibly due to covalent cross-linking between whey protein and acacia.Furthermore the amide Ⅰmoved from 1 648.6 cm-1 to 1 654.7cm-1 for intramolecular hydrogen bonding of protein had been weaken.After Gaussian fit-ting on amide Ⅰ,it was found that the content of secondary structure of α-helix content andβ-fol.ding in whey protein reduced from 19.55% to 17.50% and from 30.59% to 25.63%,respectively.This suggests that protein intramolecular hydrogen bond-ing force was abated,resulting in abating the rigid structure of the protein molecules and enhancing of the toughness structure. The protein molecules showed some flexibility.The result of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis showed that whey protein-gum Arabic complexes produced covalent products in larger molecular weight.During the spray-drying process,covalent cross-linking pro-duced between whey protein and gum Arabic which improved emulsifying activity of the complex whey protein and gum Arabic produced covalent cross-linking and improved the complex emulsifying activity.Observing the surface structure of the fish oil mi-crocapsule by SEM,the compound of whey protein and acacia as wall material was proved better toughness,less micropore,and more compact structure.%利用傅里叶红外光谱法和计算机辅助分析法研究壁材乳清蛋白和阿拉伯胶在油脂微胶囊形成过程中的相互作用。结果表明,经高压均质和喷雾干燥后,乳清蛋白的酰胺 A 带向高波数方向移动,这可能是由于乳清蛋白和阿拉伯胶发生了共价交联,而酰胺Ⅰ带向高波数移动了6.1 cm-1则是由于

  11. Interactive Karyotyping Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kotwaliwale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the wide use of newer techniques in genetic diagnostics, there remains a need for technologists to learn human chromosome morphology, identify abnormal metaphases and report clinical abnormalities. Global short age of cytogenetic trainers and a time consuming training process makes Karyotyping training difficult. We have developed a web based interactive Karyotyping training tool, KaryoTutor©, that allows technologists to learn karyotyping in an interactive environment and aids the trainer in the training process. KaryoTutor©provides visual clues for identifying abnormal chromosomes, provides instant test scores and includes a reference library of ideograms,sample chromosome images and reference materials. Trainees are able to recursively work on a case till a satisfactory result is achieved,with KaryoTutor providing interactive inputs.Additionally, trainers can assign cases and monitor trainee progress using audit trail management and other administrative features.

  12. Utopian Materialities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgaard-Jensen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    In various ways, this paper makes the counter-intuitive claim that the utopian and the material are thoroughlyinterdependent, rather than worlds apart. First, through a reading of Thomas More's Utopia, it is argued thatUtopia is the product of particular kinds of relations, rather than merely...... a detachment from the known world.Second, the utopianism of a new economy firm is examined. It is argued that the physical set-up of the firm -in particular the distribution of tables and chairs - evoke a number of alternatives to ordinary work practice.In this way the materialities of the firm are crucial...

  13. Electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kwok, H L

    2010-01-01

    The electronic properties of solids have become of increasing importance in the age of information technology. The study of solids and materials, while having originated from the disciplines of physics and chemistry, has evolved independently over the past few decades. The classical treatment of solid-state physics, which emphasized classifications, theories and fundamental physical principles, is no longer able to bridge the gap between materials advances and applications. In particular, the more recent developments in device physics and technology have not necessarily been driven by new conc

  14. Interactive Workspaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst

    Many application domains such as architecture, engineering, industrial design, city planning, environmental supervision, health care etc. share the properties of users working collaboratively with complex mixtures of physical and digital materials. Studies in such domains show that it is hard...

  15. Educational Multimedia Materials in Academic Medical Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kołodziejczak Barbara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview of generally available applications for creating multimedia and interactive educational materials, such as presentations, instructional videos, self-tests and interactive repetitions. With the use of the presented tools, pilot materials were developed to support the teaching of biostatistics at a medical university. The authors conducted surveys among students of faculties of medicine in order to evaluate the materials used in terms of quality and usefulness. The article presents the analysis of the results obtained.

  16. Touching Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Rosén

    2012-01-01

    Dripping ink pens, colourful paint on skin, vegetables pots on a school roof. In interviews with three generations of former school pupils, memories of material objects bore a relation to everyday school life in the past. Interwoven, these objects entered the memorising processes, taking...

  17. Background Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Hyytiäinen, Kari; Saraiva, Sofia;

    2016-01-01

    This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders....

  18. Emerging Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Breinbjerg, Morten; Pold, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The authors examine how materiality emerges from complex chains of mediation in creative software use. The primarily theoretical argument is inspired and illustrated by interviews with two composers of electronic music. The authors argue that computer mediated activity should not primarily...

  19. Hadronic Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding hadronic interactions is crucial for investigating the properties of unstable hadrons, since measuring physical quantities for unstable hadrons including the resonance mass and decay width requires simultaneous calculations of final scattering states. Recent studies of hadronic scatterings and decays are reviewed from this point of view. The nuceon-nucleon and multi-nucleon interactions are very important to understand the formation of nucleus from the first principle of QCD. These interactions have been studied mainly by two methods, due originally to L\\"uscher and to HALQCD. The results obtained from the two methods are compared in three channels, $I=2$ two-pion, H-dibaryon, and two-nucleon channels. So far the results from the two methods for the two-nucleon channels are different even at the level of the presence or absence of bound states. We then discuss possible uncertainties in each method. Recent results on the binding energy for helium nuclei are also reviewed.

  20. Interaction Widget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Mads

    2003-01-01

    This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced in t...... in the pattern. The intended audience of the pattern is developers and researchers within the field of human computer interaction.......This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced...

  1. Interactive governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Torfing, Jacob; Peters, B. Guy

    Governance has become one of the most commonly used concepts in contemporary political science. It is, however, often used to mean a variety of different things. This book helps to clarify this conceptual muddle by concentrating on one variety of governance-interactive governance. The authors argue...... that although the state may remain important for many aspects of governing, interactions between state and society represent an important, and perhaps increasingly important, dimension of governance. These interactions may be with social actors such as networks, with market actors or with other governments......, but all these forms represent means of governing involving mixtures of state action with the actions of other entities.This book explores thoroughly this meaning of governance, and links it to broader questions of governance. In the process of explicating this dimension of governance the authors also...

  2. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  3. Surface physics of materials materials science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Blakely, J M

    2013-01-01

    Surface Physics of Materials presents accounts of the physical properties of solid surfaces. The book contains selected articles that deal with research emphasizing surface properties rather than experimental techniques in the field of surface physics. Topics discussed include transport of matter at surfaces; interaction of atoms and molecules with surfaces; chemical analysis of surfaces; and adhesion and friction. Research workers, teachers and graduate students in surface physics, and materials scientist will find the book highly useful.

  4. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Make cool stuff. If you're a designer or artist without a lot of programming experience, this book will teach you to work with 2D and 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, and electronic circuitry to create all sorts of interesting and compelling experiences -- online and off. Programming Interactivity explains programming and electrical engineering basics, and introduces three freely available tools created specifically for artists and designers: Processing, a Java-based programming language and environment for building projects on the desktop, Web, or mobile phonesArduino, a system t

  5. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... to reveal bodily potential in relation to three design themes – kinesthetic development, kinesthetic means and kinesthetic disorder; and seven design parameters – engagement, sociality, movability, explicit motivation, implicit motivation, expressive meaning and kinesthetic empathy. The framework is a tool...

  6. Materials Science with Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bernas, Harry

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces materials scientists and designers, physicists and chemists to the properties of materials that can be modified by ion irradiation or implantation. These techniques can help design new materials or to test modified properties; novel applications already show that ion-beam techniques are complementary to others, yielding previously unattainable properties. Also, ion-beam interactions modify materials at the nanoscale, avoiding the often detrimental results of lithographic or chemical techniques. Here, the effects are related to better-known quasi-equilibrium thermodynamics, and the consequences to materials are discussed with concepts that are familiar to materials science. Examples addressed concern semiconductor physics, crystal and nanocluster growth, optics, magnetism, and applications to geology and biology.

  7. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  8. Perceptual qualities and material classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Roland W; Wiebel, Christiane; Gegenfurtner, Karl

    2013-07-11

    Under typical viewing conditions, we can easily group materials into distinct classes (e.g., woods, plastics, textiles). Additionally, we can also make many other judgments about material properties (e.g., hardness, rigidity, colorfulness). Although these two types of judgment (classification and inferring material properties) have different requirements, they likely facilitate one another. We conducted two experiments to investigate the interactions between material classification and judgments of material qualities in both the visual and semantic domains. In Experiment 1, nine students viewed 130 images of materials from 10 different classes. For each image, they rated nine subjective properties (glossiness, transparency, colorfulness, roughness, hardness, coldness, fragility, naturalness, prettiness). In Experiment 2, 65 subjects were given the verbal names of six material classes, which they rated in terms of 42 adjectives describing material qualities. In both experiments, there was notable agreement between subjects, and a relatively small number of factors (weighted combinations of different qualities) were substantially independent of one another. Despite the difficulty of classifying materials from images (Liu, Sharan, Adelson, & Rosenholtz, 2010), the different classes were well clustered in the feature space defined by the subjective ratings. K-means clustering could correctly identify class membership for over 90% of the samples, based on the average ratings across subjects. We also found a high degree of consistency between the two tasks, suggesting subjects access similar information about materials whether judging their qualities visually or from memory. Together, these findings show that perceptual qualities are well defined, distinct, and systematically related to material class membership.

  9. Magnetocaloric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppesen, Stinus

    2008-10-15

    New and improved magnetocaloric materials are one of the cornerstones in the development of room temperature magnetic refrigeration. Magnetic refrigeration has been used since the 1930ies in cryogenic applications, but has since the discovery of room temperature refrigerants received enormous attention. This Ph.D. work has been mainly concerned with developing a new technique to characterize the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) and using this technique in the investigations on new and improved magnetocaloric materials. For this purpose a novel differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with applied magnetic fields was developed for measuring heat capacity as function of magnetic field. Measurements using the developed DSC demonstrate a very high sensitivity, fast measurements and good agreement with results obtained by other techniques. Furthermore, two material systems have been described in this work. Both systems take basis in the mixed-valence manganite system La{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} well known from research on colossal magnetoresistance (CMR). The mixed-valence manganite crystallizes in the perovskite structure of general formula ABO{sub 3}. The first material system is designed to investigate the influence of low level Cu doping on the B-site. Six different samples were prepared with over-stoichiometric compositions La{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}Mn{sub 1.05}Cu{sub x}O{sub 3}, x=0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5%. All compositions crystallized well in the same perovskite structure, but the morphology of the samples changed drastically with doping. Investigation on the magnetocaloric properties revealed that small levels of Cu up to around 3% could improve the magnetocaloric performance of the materials. Furthermore, Cu could be used to tune the temperature interval without deteriorating the MCE, which is a much desired characteristic for potential use in magnetic refrigerators. A less comprehensive part of the work has been concerned with the investigation of doping on the A

  10. Audiovisual Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karandreas, Theodoros-Alexandros

    importance of each modality with respect to the overall quality evaluation. The results show that this was not due to specific interactions between stimuli but rather because the auditory modality dominated over the visual modality. Furthermore, for all experiments where less than optimal stimuli...

  11. Interactive Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik; Reng, Lars

    2015-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2015, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in November/December 2015. The 18 revised full papers and 13 short papers presented together with 9 posters, 9 workshop descriptions, an...

  12. Interactive Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean K.

    1997-01-01

    Presents guiding principles for developing interactive lessons for the World Wide Web. Describes "Amazing Space: Education Online from the Hubble Space Telescope", a program where students study spectacular Hubble Space Telescope images of stars and star-forming regions to learn about the life cycle of stars and the creation of atoms. (JRH)

  13. Biomedical Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Jiang; ZHOU Yanling

    2011-01-01

    @@ Biomedical materials, biomaterials for short, is regarded as "any substance or combination of substances, synthetic or natural in origin, which can be used for any period of time, as a whole or as part of a system which treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ or function of the body" (Vonrecum & Laberge, 1995).Biomaterials can save lives, relieve suffering and enhance the quality of life for human being.

  14. Strategic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Titanium exists primarily in the minerals anatase , brookite, ilmenite, perovskite, rutile , titanite (sphene), as well in many iron ores. Of these minerals...raw materials ( anatase , ilmenite, and rutile ) are estimated at over 2 billion tons (U.S.G.S., 2007, p. 175). Due to its tendency to react with air at...only rutile (titanium dioxide) and ilmenite (iron-titanium oxide) have any economic importance. Unfortunately, high concentrations of the mineral

  15. Material monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, W.; Zirker, L.; Hancock, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    Waste Reduction Operations Complex (WROC) facilities are located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The overall goal for the Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization Unit is to identify and establish the correct amount of waste generated so that it can be reduced. Quarterly, the INEL Pollution Prevention (P2) Unit compares the projected amount of waste generated per process with the actual amount generated. Examples of waste streams that would be addresses for our facility would include be are not limited to: Maintenance, Upgrades, Office and Scrap Metal. There are three potential sources of this variance: inaccurate identification of those who generate the waste; inaccurate identification of the process that generates the waste; and inaccurate measurement of the actual amount generated. The Materials Monitoring Program was proposed to identify the sources of variance and reduce the variance to an acceptable level. Prior to the implementation of the Material Monitoring Program, all information that was gathered and recorded was done so through an informal estimation of waste generated by various personnel concerned with each processes. Due to the inaccuracy of the prior information gathering system, the Material Monitoring Program was established. The heart of this program consists of two main parts. In the first part potential waste generators provide information on projected waste generation process. In the second part, Maintenance, Office, Scrap Metal and Facility Upgrade wastes from given processes is disposed within the appropriate bin dedicated to that process. The Material Monitoring Program allows for the more accurate gathering of information on the various waste types that are being generated quarterly.

  16. Materials analysis fast ions

    CERN Document Server

    Denker, A; Rauschenberg, J; Röhrich, J; Strub, E

    2006-01-01

    Materials analysis with ion beams exploits the interaction of ions with the electrons and nuclei in the sample. Among the vast variety of possible analytical techniques available with ion beams we will restrain to ion beam analysis with ion beams in the energy range from one to several MeV per mass unit. It is possible to use either the back-scattered projectiles (RBS – Rutherford Back Scattering) or the recoiled atoms itself (ERDA – Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis) from the elastic scattering processes. These techniques allow the simultaneous and absolute determination of stoichiometry and depth profiles of the detected elements. The interaction of the ions with the electrons in the sample produces holes in the inner electronic shells of the sample atoms, which recombine and emit X-rays characteristic for the element in question. Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) has shown to be a fast technique for the analysis of elements with an atomic number above 11.

  17. FOREWORD: Materials metrology Materials metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Seton; Valdés, Joaquin

    2010-04-01

    It seems that so much of modern life is defined by the materials we use. From aircraft to architecture, from cars to communications, from microelectronics to medicine, the development of new materials and the innovative application of existing ones have underpinned the technological advances that have transformed the way we live, work and play. Recognizing the need for a sound technical basis for drafting codes of practice and specifications for advanced materials, the governments of countries of the Economic Summit (G7) and the European Commission signed a Memorandum of Understanding in 1982 to establish the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS). This project supports international trade by enabling scientific collaboration as a precursor to the drafting of standards. The VAMAS participants recognized the importance of agreeing a reliable, universally accepted basis for the traceability of the measurements on which standards depend for their preparation and implementation. Seeing the need to involve the wider metrology community, VAMAS approached the Comité International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM). Following discussions with NMI Directors and a workshop at the BIPM in February 2005, the CIPM decided to establish an ad hoc Working Group on the metrology applicable to the measurement of material properties. The Working Group presented its conclusions to the CIPM in October 2007 and published its final report in 2008, leading to the signature of a Memorandum of Understanding between VAMAS and the BIPM. This MoU recognizes the work that is already going on in VAMAS as well as in the Consultative Committees of the CIPM and establishes a framework for an ongoing dialogue on issues of materials metrology. The question of what is meant by traceability in the metrology of the properties of materials is particularly vexed when the measurement results depend on a specified procedure. In these cases, confidence in results requires not only traceable

  18. LEGO Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talapin, Dmitri V

    2008-06-01

    Two papers in this issue report important developments in the field of inorganic nanomaterials. Chen and O'Brien discuss self-assembly of semiconductor nanocrystals into binary nanoparticle superlattices (BNSLs). They show that simple geometrical principles based on maximizing the packing density can determine BNSL symmetry in the absence of cohesive electrostatic interactions. This finding highlights the role of entropy as the driving force for ordering nanoparticles. The other paper, by Weller and co-workers, addresses an important problem related to device integration of nanoparticle assemblies. They employ the Langmuir-Blodgett technique to prepare long-range ordered monolayers of close-packed nanocrystals and transfer them to different substrates.

  19. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume II. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in high heat flux materials and component development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.A.; Boyd, R.D.; Easor, J.R.; Gauster, W.B.; Gordon, J.D.; Mattas, R.F.; Morgan, G.D.; Ulrickson, M.A,; Watson, R.D.; Wolfer, W.G,

    1984-06-01

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas for high heat flux materials and components (HHFMC) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be of critical importance for the successful operation of near-term fusion experiments and for the feasibility and attractiveness of long-term fusion reactors. A number of subgroups were formed to assess the critical HHFMC issues along the following major lines: (1) source conditions, (2) systems integration, (3) materials and processes, (4) thermal hydraulics, (5) thermomechanical response, (6) electromagnetic response, (7) instrumentation and control, and (8) test facilities. The details of the technical assessment are presented in eight chapters. The primary technical issues and needs for each area are highlighted.

  20. Materializing Superghosts

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Victor; Losev, Andrei; Lysov, Vyacheslav

    2007-01-01

    We construct the off-shell BV realization of N=1, d=10 SYM with 7 auxillary fields. This becomes possible due to materialized ghost phenomenon. Namely, supersymmetry ghosts are coordinates on a manifold B of 10-dimensional spinors with pure spinors cut out. Auxillary fields are sections of a bundle over B, and supersymmetry transformations are nonlinear in ghosts. By integrating out axillary fields we obtain on-shell supersymmetric BV action with terms quadratic in antifields. Exactly this on-shell BV action was obtained in our previous paper after integration out of auxiliary fields in the framework of Pure Spinor Superfield Formalism.

  1. Atmospheric materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    experience and, consequently, to the conceptual and methodological shifts in the production of space, and hence in the way we think about materiality. In this context, architectural space is understood as a contingent construction – a space of engagement that appears to us as a result of continuous...... characteristics of atmosphere as a spatial phenomenon, the aim of this text is to illustrate these associations and draw out design protocols, focusing on ways in which atmosphere can be conditioned architecturally. In other words, the objective is to trace the conceptual contours of ‘atmospheric materiality’....

  2. Energy materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Duncan W; Walton, Richard I

    2011-01-01

    In an age of global industrialisation and population growth, the area of energy is one that is very much in the public consciousness. Fundamental scientific research is recognised as being crucial to delivering solutions to these issues, particularly to yield novel means of providing efficient, ideally recyclable, ways of converting, transporting and delivering energy. This volume considers a selection of the state-of-the-art materials that are being designed to meet some of the energy challenges we face today. Topics are carefully chosen that show how the skill of the synthetic chemist can

  3. Casting materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  4. Construction material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Antink, Allison L.

    2008-07-22

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  5. Photovoltaic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational

  6. Obtaining material identification with cosmic ray radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C. L.; Borozdin, Konstantin; Bacon, Jeffrey; Chen, Elliott; Lukic, Zarija; Milner, Edward; Miyadera, Haruo; Perry, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Schwellenbach, Dave; Aberle, Derek; Dreesen, Wendi; Green, J. Andrew; McDuff, George G. [National Security Technologies, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Nagamine, Kanetada [KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan) and UC-Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Sossong, Michael [Decision Sciences, 12345 First American Way, Suite 130, Poway, CA 92064 (United States); Spore, Candace; Toleman, Nathan [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The passage of muons through matter is dominated by the Coulomb interaction with electrons and nuclei in the matter. The muon interaction with the electrons leads to continuous energy loss and stopping of the muons. The muon interaction with nuclei leads to angular diffusion. Using both stopped muons and angle diffusion interactions allows us to determine density and identify materials. Here we demonstrate material identification using data taken at Los Alamos with a particle tracker built from a set of sealed drift tubes with commercial electronics and software, the Mini Muon Tracker (MMT).

  7. Obtaining material identification with cosmic ray radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Morris

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The passage of muons through matter is dominated by the Coulomb interaction with electrons and nuclei in the matter. The muon interaction with the electrons leads to continuous energy loss and stopping of the muons. The muon interaction with nuclei leads to angular diffusion. Using both stopped muons and angle diffusion interactions allows us to determine density and identify materials. Here we demonstrate material identification using data taken at Los Alamos with a particle tracker built from a set of sealed drift tubes with commercial electronics and software, the Mini Muon Tracker (MMT.

  8. Electromagnetic interaction of metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Peter R.

    The observation of extraordinary transmission through subwavelength apertures has propelled a great interest in understanding its nature. It defies classical theories of electromagnetic interaction by demanding a closer examination of the surface properties. Traditionally, as surface features become much smaller in size than a single wavelength of interest, the structure is essentially continuous. Any periodic subwavelength corrugation or aperture array should not interact strongly with an incident field and therefore not contribute to any significant transmission through the film. We find that this is not always the case and that we may tune the surface geometry at these scales to affect the overall medium behavior. It is possible that a material may transcend its own natural properties and, in essence, become a metamaterial. The following analysis examines the concepts of metamaterials from a fundamental viewpoint. It does not seek to disrupt classical theories but instead demonstrates their validity to describe a new phenomenon. Several theories have been proposed that offer unique surface interactions as evidence of enhanced transmission. It is proposed that a fundamental Maxwell representation is sufficient in predicting the interaction of an electromagnetic wave with a metamaterial. In particular, a formalism has been developed to analyze enhanced transmission through a metallic grating structure. To experimentally validate this model, a fabrication procedure has been developed that allows for the production of quality thick film structures with subwavelength features. Finally, the analysis of metamaterials looks towards the RF spectrum to demonstrate a novel design to achieve conformal waveguides and antennas.

  9. Diatomic interaction potential theory applications

    CERN Document Server

    Goodisman, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Diatomic Interaction Potential Theory, Volume 2: Applications discusses the variety of applicable theoretical material and approaches in the calculations for diatomic systems in their ground states. The volume covers the descriptions and illustrations of modern calculations. Chapter I discusses the calculation of the interaction potential for large and small values of the internuclear distance R (separated and united atom limits). Chapter II covers the methods used for intermediate values of R, which in principle means any values of R. The Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction schemes des

  10. Wood–water interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2011-01-01

    must first know in which parts of the wood structure, water is located. If parts of the water in wood are held in capillaries in the wood structure, these water molecules interact with the material differently than those held within wood cell walls. In this study, the occurrence of capillary water......, for wood in equilibrium with surrounding climate in the RH range 0-99.5 %, water is only significantly present within cell walls. A structural model of a wood cell is developed in this study using Finite Element Method for predicting the mechanical performance of wood. The starting point for the model...... is the physical behaviour on the molecular level since water interferes with wood at this level. The elastic material properties of the wood cell wall are explained by the organisation of wood constituents and their properties. The effect of water as well as temperature is incorporated by considering the amount...

  11. Cultivating objects in interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    is chapter explores patterns of repeated orientations to physical objects in interactants’ visuo-spatial and haptic surround. A number of examples are presented from advice-giving activities in various institutional settings, where participants-in-interaction initially draw on material objects...... at hand while pursuing a particular line of explanation, and then return to these objects at later intervals. e analysis suggests that the objects are afforded representational properties through their being anchored to some referent in the talk, and that participants subsequently draw...... on these associations for describing, disambiguating or clarifying aspects of the relatively complex procedural frameworks discussed in the settings. is suggests that the temporal stability of material objects available to participants makes them an ideal resource to be developed as visual motifs....

  12. Materializing superghosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, V.; Krotov, D.; Losev, A.; Lysov, V.

    2007-12-01

    The off-shell Batalin-Vilkovysky (BV) realization has been constructed for N = 1, d = 10 super-Yang-Mills theory with seven auxiliary fields. This becomes possible due to the materialized ghost phenomenon. Namely, supersymmetry ghosts are coordinates on a manifold B of ten-dimensional spinors with the pure spinors cut out. Auxiliary fields are sections of a bundle over B, and supersymmetry transformations are nonlinear in ghosts. By integrating out the auxiliary fields, we obtain an on-shell supersymmetric BV action with quadratic terms in the antifields. Exactly this on-shell BV action was obtained in our previous paper after integration out of auxiliary fields in the framework of a pure spinor superfield formalism.

  13. Materializing ideas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandvad, Sara Malou

    2011-01-01

    to investigate how the evolving object may form an active part in the collaborative process of its making. The article identifies three moments when the evolving object becomes decisive for the collaboration: the idea has to be detached to enable collaboration; attachments between collaborators are made via...... the evolving object; and closure of the product is postponed to enhance creative development. Thus, the article suggests that cultural objects and the processes of their making are co-produced, evolve simultaneously and are mutually constitutive. In this way, the object may have effects even while......Based on a qualitative study of development processes in the Danish film industry, this article sketches a socio-material perspective for analysing the production of culture. Whereas previous studies of cultural production have identified social factors in cultural production, this article sets out...

  14. Interacting Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard M.; Reining, Lucia; Ceperley, David M.

    2016-06-01

    Preface; Part I. Interacting Electrons: Beyond the Independent-Particle Picture: 1. The many electron problem: introduction; 2. Signatures of electron correlation; 3. Concepts and models for interacting electrons; Part II. Foundations of Theory for Many-Body Systems: 4. Mean fields and auxiliary systems; 5. Correlation functions; 6. Many-body wavefunctions; 7. Particles and quasi-particles; 8. Functionals in many-particle physics; Part III. Many-Body Green's Function Methods: 9. Many-body perturbation theory: expansion in the interaction; 10. Many-body perturbation theory via functional derivatives; 11. The RPA and the GW approximation for the self-energy; 12. GWA calculations in practice; 13. GWA calculations: illustrative results; 14. RPA and beyond: the Bethe-Salpeter equation; 15. Beyond the GW approximation; 16. Dynamical mean field theory; 17. Beyond the single-site approximation in DMFT; 18. Solvers for embedded systems; 19. Characteristic hamiltonians for solids with d and f states; 20. Examples of calculations for solids with d and f states; 21. Combining Green's functions approaches: an outlook; Part IV. Stochastic Methods: 22. Introduction to stochastic methods; 23. Variational Monte Carlo; 24. Projector quantum Monte Carlo; 25. Path integral Monte Carlo; 26. Concluding remarks; Part V. Appendices: A. Second quantization; B. Pictures; C. Green's functions: general properties; D. Matsubara formulation for Green's functions for T ̸= 0; E. Time-ordering, contours, and non-equilibrium; F. Hedin's equations in a basis; G. Unique solutions in Green's function theory; H. Properties of functionals; I. Auxiliary systems and constrained search; J. Derivation of the Luttinger theorem; K. Gutzwiller and Hubbard approaches; References; Index.

  15. Interactive Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Governance analysis has exploded in recent years, and it has become nearly impossible to tell what difference the concept and practice of governance makes from those of government and state. In addition governance analysis has been placed more and more in the shadow of the new institutionalisms and...... and growth. However, interactive governance is not a property or effect of institutions; nor does it apply solely to those individuals who seek success above everything else. It is connective more than individualistic or collectivistic in nature; and it manifests a governability capacity which...

  16. Photovoltaic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational

  17. Material Science Smart Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, A. I. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Sabirianov, R. F. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Namavar, Fereydoon [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The contribution of electrostatic interactions to the free energy of binding between model protein and a ceramic implant surface in the aqueous solvent, considered in the framework of the nonlocal electrostatic model, is calculated as a function of the implant low-frequency dielectric constant. We show that the existence of a dynamically ordered (low-dielectric) interfacial solvent layer at the protein-solvent and ceramic-solvent interface markedly increases charging energy of the protein and ceramic implant, and consequently makes the electrostatic contribution to the protein-ceramic binding energy more favorable (attractive). Our analysis shows that the corresponding electrostatic energy between protein and oxide ceramics depends nonmonotonically on the dielectric constant of ceramic, εC. Obtained results indicate that protein can attract electrostatically to the surface if ceramic material has a moderate εC below or about 35 (in particularly ZrO2 or Ta2O5). This is in contrast to classical (local) consideration of the solvent, which demonstrates an unfavorable electrostatic interaction of protein with typical metal oxide ceramic materialsC>10). Thus, a solid implant coated by combining oxide ceramic with a reduced dielectric constant can be beneficial to strengthen the electrostatic binding of the protein-implant complex.

  18. Environmental TEM in Materials Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    Over the last decades, electron microscopy has played a large role in materials research. The increasing use of particularly environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) in materials science provides new possibilities for investigating nanoscale components at work. Careful experimentation...... provides input for the development of new materials for e.g. energy production. In order to design experiments with the highest chance of a successful outcome, a detailed understanding of both the interaction of electrons with gas molecules, the effect of gas on high‐resolution imaging and the behavior...... in this environment is necessary. If data is to be interpreted quantitatively, interaction of the electrons with gas molecules must be taken into account. Whereas conventional TEM samples are usually thin (below 10‐20 nm), the dilute gas fills the entire gap between the pole pieces and is thus not spatially localized...

  19. Sibling interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Rosemary H

    2013-01-01

    Sibling interactions traditionally were conceived psychoanalytically in "vertical" and parentified oedipal terms and overlooked in their own right, for complicated reasons (Colonna and Newman 1983). Important work has been done to right this, from the 1980s and onward, with conferences and writings. Juliet Mitchell's 2000 and, in particular, her 2003 books, for example, have brought "lateral" sibling relations forcefully to the forefront of insights, especially about sex and violence, with the added interdisciplinary impact of illuminating upheaval in global community interactions as well as having implications for clinicians. A clinical example from the analysis of an adult woman with a ten-years-younger sister will show here how we need both concepts to help us understand complex individual psychic life. The newer "lateral" sibling emphasis, including Mitchell's "Law of the Mother" and "seriality," can be used to inform the older "vertical" take, to enrich the full dimensions of intersubjective oedipal and preoedipal reciprocities that have been foundational in shaping that particular analysand's inner landscape. Some technical recommendations for heightening sensitivity to the import of these dynamics will be offered along the way here, by invoking Hans Loewald's useful metaphor of the analytic situation as theater.

  20. Clues for biomimetics from natural composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidot, Shaul; Meirovitch, Sigal; Sharon, Sigal; Heyman, Arnon; Kaplan, David L; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Bio-inspired material systems are derived from different living organisms such as plants, arthropods, mammals and marine organisms. These biomaterial systems from nature are always present in the form of composites, with molecular-scale interactions optimized to direct functional features. With interest in replacing synthetic materials with natural materials due to biocompatibility, sustainability and green chemistry issues, it is important to understand the molecular structure and chemistry of the raw component materials to also learn from their natural engineering, interfaces and interactions leading to durable and highly functional material architectures. This review will focus on applications of biomaterials in single material forms, as well as biomimetic composites inspired by natural organizational features. Examples of different natural composite systems will be described, followed by implementation of the principles underlying their composite organization into artificial bio-inspired systems for materials with new functional features for future medicine. PMID:22994958

  1. Materiality in a practice-based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2009-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the vocabulary for materiality which is used by practice-based approaches to organizational knowing. Common terms for materiality are 'artifact' and 'object'. The interaction between social and material realities is grasped as several processes: object-oriented a......The paper provides an overview of the vocabulary for materiality which is used by practice-based approaches to organizational knowing. Common terms for materiality are 'artifact' and 'object'. The interaction between social and material realities is grasped as several processes: object......-oriented activity, symbolization, embodiment, performance, alignment and mediation. Material artifacts both stabilize and destabilize organizational action. They may ensure coordination, communication, and control, but they may also create disturbance and conflict....

  2. Interaction of Nanoparticles with Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this work we have studied the interaction and adsorption of engineered nanoparticles such as TiO2, ZnO, CeO2 , and carbon nanotubes with biofilms. Biofilm is an extracellular polymeric substance coating comprised of living material and it is an aggregation of bacteria, algae, ...

  3. Modeling graphene-substrate interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amlaki, Taher

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I focussed on the interactions between graphene-like materials (grapheme and germanene) and various substrates. The attractive properties of graphene like a high carrier mobility, its single-atomic thickness and its theoretical magic have made graphene a very popular and promising can

  4. Labeled Postings for Asynchronous Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ChanLin, Lih-Juan; Chen, Yong-Ting; Chan, Kung-Chi

    2009-01-01

    The Internet promotes computer-mediated communications, and so asynchronous learning network systems permit more flexibility in time, space, and interaction than synchronous mode of learning. The key point of asynchronous learning is the materials for web-aided teaching and the flow of knowledge. This research focuses on improving online…

  5. Energy-dispersive study of the interaction of fast neutrons with matter. Common final report of the DFG projects GR 1674/2 and FR 575/5 together with the institute for nuclear and particle physics, technical university Dresden; Energiedispersive Untersuchung der Wechselwirkung schneller Neutronen mit Materie. Gemeinsamer Abschlussbericht der DFG Projekte GR 1674/2 und FR 575/5, zusammen mit dem Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altstadt, E.; Beckert, C. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR) (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung; Beyer, R. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (DE). Inst. fuer Kern- und Hadronenphysik] [and others

    2005-04-01

    In this final report on the research project ''Energy-dispersive study of the interaction of fast neutrons with matter, especially materials for fusion and materials from fission reactors the status reached after three years promotion is described. The aim of this project is the construction and first usage of a very complex time-of-flight system for the study of the interaction of fast neutrons with construction materials for fusion and fission reactors as well as with long-lived radioisotopes. Furthermore astrophysically relevant experiments on problems of the element synthesis shall be performed. The whole project is devided into two sections: 1. Development, construction and test of a pulsed photoneutron source at the ELBE accelerator of the FZ Rossendorf, 2. Application of the photoneutron sources for measurements of cross sections induced by fast, energy-selected neutrons.

  6. Obtaining material identification with cosmic ray radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Christopher; Bacon, Jeffrey; Chen, Elliott; Lukić, Zarija; Milner, Edward; Miyadera, Haruo; Perry, John; Schwellenbach, Dave; Aberle, Derek; Dreesen, Wendi; Green, J Andrew; McDuff, George G; Nagamine, Kanetada; Sossong, Michael; Spore, Candace; Toleman, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The passage of muons through matter is mostly affected by their Coulomb interactions with electrons and nuclei. The muon interactions with electrons lead to continuous energy loss and stopping of muons, while their scattering off nuclei lead to angular 'diffusion'. By measuring both the number of stopped muons and angular changes in muon trajectories we can estimate density and identify materials. Here we demonstrate the material identification using data taken at Los Alamos with the Mini Muon Tracker.

  7. Electromagnetic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bosanac, Slobodan Danko

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to theoretical methods used in the extreme circumstances of very strong electromagnetic fields. The development of high power lasers, ultrafast processes, manipulation of electromagnetic fields and the use of very fast charged particles interacting with other charges requires an adequate theoretical description. Because of the very strong electromagnetic field, traditional theoretical approaches, which have primarily a perturbative character, have to be replaced by descriptions going beyond them. In the book an extension of the semi-classical radiation theory and classical dynamics for particles is performed to analyze single charged atoms and dipoles submitted to electromagnetic pulses. Special attention is given to the important problem of field reaction and controlling dynamics of charges by an electromagnetic field.

  8. Electromagnetic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosanac, Slobodan Danko [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia). Physical Chemistry

    2016-07-01

    This book is devoted to theoretical methods used in the extreme circumstances of very strong electromagnetic fields. The development of high power lasers, ultrafast processes, manipulation of electromagnetic fields and the use of very fast charged particles interacting with other charges requires an adequate theoretical description. Because of the very strong electromagnetic field, traditional theoretical approaches, which have primarily a perturbative character, have to be replaced by descriptions going beyond them. In the book an extension of the semi-classical radiation theory and classical dynamics for particles is performed to analyze single charged atoms and dipoles submitted to electromagnetic pulses. Special attention is given to the important problem of field reaction and controlling dynamics of charges by an electromagnetic field.

  9. Liquid Crystalline Materials for Biological Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Aaron M; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2012-03-13

    Liquid crystals have a long history of use as materials that respond to external stimuli (e.g., electrical and optical fields). More recently, a series of investigations have reported the design of liquid crystalline materials that undergo ordering transitions in response to a range of biological interactions, including interactions involving proteins, nucleic acids, viruses, bacteria and mammalian cells. A central challenge underlying the design of liquid crystalline materials for such applications is the tailoring of the interface of the materials so as to couple targeted biological interactions to ordering transitions. This review describes recent progress toward design of interfaces of liquid crystalline materials that are suitable for biological applications. Approaches addressed in this review include the use of lipid assemblies, polymeric membranes containing oligopeptides, cationic surfactant-DNA complexes, peptide-amphiphiles, interfacial protein assemblies and multi-layer polymeric films.

  10. Materials Frontiers to Empower Quantum Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoinette Jane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sarrao, John Louis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Richardson, Christopher [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-06-11

    This is an exciting time at the nexus of quantum computing and materials research. The materials frontiers described in this report represent a significant advance in electronic materials and our understanding of the interactions between the local material and a manufactured quantum state. Simultaneously, directed efforts to solve materials issues related to quantum computing provide an opportunity to control and probe the fundamental arrangement of matter that will impact all electronic materials. An opportunity exists to extend our understanding of materials functionality from electronic-grade to quantum-grade by achieving a predictive understanding of noise and decoherence in qubits and their origins in materials defects and environmental coupling. Realizing this vision systematically and predictively will be transformative for quantum computing and will represent a qualitative step forward in materials prediction and control.

  11. Designing "Interaction": How Do Interaction Design Students Address Interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlgren, Klas; Ramberg, Robert; Artman, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Interaction design is usually described as being concerned with interactions with and through artifacts but independent of a specific implementation. Design work has been characterized as a conversation between the designer and the situation and this conversation poses a particular challenge for interaction design as interactions can be elusive…

  12. Teaching Materials Should be Authentic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞莹

    2008-01-01

    <正>In terms of the teaching materials,we hold the opinion that authentic materials should be adapted in the process of teaching,and students should have access to the original language. According to Richards(2001),authentic materials refer to the use in teaching of texts,photographs, video selections,and other teaching resources that were not specially prepared for pedagogical purposes.Created materials refer to textbooks and other specially developed instructional resources. The use of authentic materials in an EFL classroom is what many teachers involved in foreign language teaching have discussed in recent years.Most of the teachers throughout the world agree that authentic texts or materials are beneficial to the language learning process.Authentic materials enable learners to interact with the real language and content rather than the form.Learners feel that they are learning a target language as it is used outside the classroom.Exposing students to authentic materials can also help them better understand the target culture and envision how they might participate in this community.

  13. Working with the NCL - Material Transfer Agreement - Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    To share and safeguard Research Material, intellectual property and proprietary information, the NCL's interaction with extramural researchers and vendors will normally be conducted under a Material Transfer Agreement (MTA).

  14. 采用二色向性阐述反铁磁材料中的磁相互作用%Using Dichroism to Elucidate the Nature of Magnetic Interactions in Antiferromagnetic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K R Hoffman; D J Lockwood

    2008-01-01

    William (familiarly known as Bill by all his colleagues) Yen's life-long scientific interest in the magnetic properties of rutile structured antiferromagnetic materials (AFMs) began with his involvement in the discovery in 1965 of the magnon sidebands of MnF2 in optical absorption[1]. A basic outline of this discovery is given elsewhere in this special issue of the Chinese Journal of Luminescence[2]. A narrative discussion of events leading to this discovery appears in a contribution written by Bill and Robert White for a special edition of Low Temperature Physics on Antiferromagnetism[3]. A quote from that remembrance highlights a quality that remained with Bill throughout his career: "The identification of these sidebands by a pair of young students and two post-docs illustrates how serendipity, a touch of good luck and reckless youthful enthusiasm often plays a role in scientific discovery".Bill's forever youthful enthusiasm coupled with creative insights into current research questions led to numerous pioneering discoveries throughout his career. This paper reviews Bill's contributions to developing techniques to exploit dichroism to study the magnetic properties of AFMs. Bill's publications in this area span more than 30 years, from 1971 to 2004.

  15. A Selected Interactive Videodisc Bibliography. TDC Research Report No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Rae; Sayre, Scott

    This bibliography lists 360 monographs, journal articles, research reports, and conference proceedings on interactive videodisc and educational applications of this technology. Materials through December 1988 are included. A sidebar provides background on interactive video technology. (MES)

  16. Bacteria-surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuson, Hannah H; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-05-14

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field.

  17. Cloud Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 1 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 258.8 East (101.2 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara

  18. Laju Penetrasi Korosi pada Material Alternatif Bangunan Kapal

    OpenAIRE

    Prantasi Harmi Tjahjanti; Eko Panunggal; Darminto Darminto; Wibowo Harso Nugroho

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion is the event of a material damage due to undesired interactions between material and environment. Corrosion is a natural phenomenon that cannot be avoided, but that can be done is to control the corrosion process by pressing the corrosion penetration rate, so that the expected lifespan and quality durable material. Ship building alternative material used is a composite material with aluminum alloy matrix AlSi10Mg(b) a ship building materials based on European Nation (EN) Aluminum Ca...

  19. Judgment in an auditor's materiality assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Rikke Holmslykke

    2015-01-01

    and qualitative components of materiality judgments, which include both task, person and interpersonal interactions in line with general audit judgment and decision-making theory. This analysis offers an enhanced understanding of what the »black box« of professional materiality judgment contains. The analysis...

  20. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2016-03-29

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer resin, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  1. Study on Abrasion Properties of Common Materials for Fluid Mechanical Impeller at Interactive Erosion and Cavitation Wear%流体机械叶轮常用材料冲蚀与空蚀交互磨损特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞佑霞; 李彬; 刘厚才; 唐勇

    2013-01-01

    模拟流体机械冲蚀与空蚀交互磨损工况,通过对比材料的绝对失重量与试验时间的变化曲线、24 h 试验的磨痕演变规律以及 SEM微观形貌,研究 Q235、45#和40Cr 钢及 HT200铸铁4种叶轮常用金属材料的磨蚀特性。结果表明:在冲蚀与空蚀交互磨损下,材料的失重量与磨损时间接近正比;试件的磨痕沿水流方向,在空蚀孔两边呈彗星状分布;沙粒对 Q235等塑性材料微切削过程中,动能转化为材料的塑性变形功,使材料产生塑性流动,形成犁沟状磨痕;对于脆性材料 HT200,空泡溃灭和沙粒的冲击超过其弹塑性变形极限,使材料产生微裂纹、微体积疲劳剥落,形成蜂窝状蚀坑。相同硬度下,塑性材料耐交互磨蚀性能优于脆性材料。%Through simulating turbine working condition on interactive erosion and cavitation wear,the abrasion charac-teristics of Q235,45 and 40Cr steel,and HT200 cast iron were studied,and the change curves between material’s abso-lute weight loss with experimental time were obtained.The wear scar evolution of four materials during the 24 h experiment was compared and the specimen microstructure was observed by SEM.The results show that the weight loss of material is a-bout in direct proportion to the abrasion time under interactive wear;the specimen wear scar along the flow direction takes a comet formation distribution on both sides of the cavitation hole;during the process of sand micro-cutting on plastic mate-rial such as Q235 steel,the kinetic energy is converted to plastic deformation work,which causes material plastic flow and forms furrow-like wear scar;brittle material like HT200 cast iron,the bubble collapse and sand impact exceeds its elastic-plastic deformation limit,as a result,micro-cracks,fatigue spalling and honeycomb pits are generated for material;the wear resistance of plastic material is better than that of brittle material at the same

  2. Repurposing a Feature Film for Interactive Multimedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Sharon; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes how a videodisc of Alfred Hitchcock's film "North by Northwest" was repurposed by adding digitized and computer-generated sound, text, and graphics, to show users the capabilities of interactive multimedia. Recommendations are offered both for working in a design team and for the design of interactive materials. (LRW)

  3. Skyrmions in magnetic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Seki, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    This brief reviews current research on magnetic skyrmions, with emphasis on formation mechanisms, observation techniques, and materials design strategies. The response of skyrmions, both static and dynamical, to various electromagnetic fields is also covered in detail. Recent progress in magnetic imaging techniques has enabled the observation of skyrmions in real space, as well as the analysis of their ordering manner and the details of their internal structure. In metallic systems, conduction electrons moving through the skyrmion spin texture gain a nontrivial quantum Berry phase, which provides topological force to the underlying spin texture and enables the current-induced manipulation of magnetic skyrmions. On the other hand, skyrmions in an insulator can induce electric polarization through relativistic spin-orbit interaction, paving the way for the control of skyrmions by an external electric field without loss of Joule heating. Because of its nanometric scale, particle nature, and electric controllabil...

  4. A new direction in mathematics for materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first volume of the SpringerBriefs in the Mathematics of Materials and provides a comprehensive guide to the interaction of mathematics with materials science. The anterior part of the book describes a selected history of materials science as well as the interaction between mathematics and materials in history. The emergence of materials science was itself a result of an interdisciplinary movement in the 1950s and 1960s. Materials science was formed by the integration of metallurgy, polymer science, ceramics, solid state physics, and related disciplines. We believe that such historical background helps readers to understand the importance of interdisciplinary interaction such as mathematics–materials science collaboration. The middle part of the book describes mathematical ideas and methods that can be applied to materials problems and introduces some examples of specific studies—for example, computational homology applied to structural analysis of glassy materials, stochastic models for ...

  5. Materialism and Well-Being in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Hebben Wadey, A.

    2011-01-01

    Past research on materialism has focussed on adults and adolescents, with very little attention paid to younger children. In older populations, materialism has been linked to low self-esteem, increased aggression and delinquency, low prosocial behaviour and increased narcissism. This study aimed to identify whether these results could be replicated in pre-teen children, with particular attention paid to the impact of materialism-narcissism interactions on behavioural outcomes. Seventy-five ch...

  6. Material Developing for ADS Beam Window

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUYong-li; XUYuan-chao; LIHua-qing; NINGGuang-sheng; WANFa-rong; ZHAOFei

    2003-01-01

    The irradiation damage and the chemical interaction with the coolant for the ADS target and the structure materials are the key issues in ADS engineering. The developing of the materials that are irradiation and corrosion resistance is the important topic in ADS program in many countries. In this case,a topic of the material developing for the beam window has been proposed in our ADS program.

  7. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Han

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (rediscovery of various two dimensional (2D materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  8. Hybrid And Smart Topologically Interlocking Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Khandelwal, Somesh

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the mechanical properties of a new class of multifunctional architectured materials, Topologically Interlocking Materials (TIMs). These materials are created as an assembly of unit elements arranged in an interlocking pattern such that the load transfer between unit elements occurs by contact only. In the absence of adhesive interaction, the tensile component of the load is carried by complementary tensile elements in the form of external constraints or integrated filamen...

  9. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  10. ITER Materials R & D Data Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shigeru; Matera, R.; Kalinin, G.; Barabash, V.; Mohri, K.

    To keep traceability of many valuable raw data that were experimentally obtained in the ITER Technology R&D Tasks related to materials for In-Vessel Components, and to easily make the best use of these data in design activities, the `ITER Materials R&D Data Bank' has been built up, with the use of Excel TM spread sheets. Compared with existing material data banks, this data bank is unique in the following respects: (1) In addition to thermo-mechanical properties of single materials (beryllium, tungsten, carbon-based materials, copper alloys and stainless steels), thermo-mechanical properties (including neutron irradiation effects) for various kinds of joints between these materials, and the results of thermal fatigue tests of mock-ups are collected. (2) As for plasma facing materials (beryllium, tungsten and carbon), experimental data on plasma-material interactions such as sputtering, disruption erosion, and hydrogen-isotope trapping and release are collected.

  11. Acoustomechanical constitutive theory for soft materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengxian Xin; Tian Jian Lu

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic wave propagation from surrounding medium into a soft material can generate acoustic radiation stress due to acoustic momentum transfer inside the medium and material, as well as at the interface between the two. To analyze acoustic-induced deformation of soft materials, we establish an acoustomechanical constitutive theory by com-bining the acoustic radiation stress theory and the nonlinear elasticity theory for soft materials. The acoustic radiation stress tensor is formulated by time averaging the momen-tum equation of particle motion, which is then introduced into the nonlinear elasticity constitutive relation to construct the acoustomechanical constitutive theory for soft materials. Considering a specified case of soft material sheet subjected to two counter-propagating acoustic waves, we demonstrate the nonlinear large deformation of the soft material and ana-lyze the interaction between acoustic waves and material deformation under the conditions of total reflection, acoustic transparency, and acoustic mismatch.

  12. Unification of Electromagnetic Interactions and Gravitational Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUNing

    2002-01-01

    Unified theory of gravitational interactions and electromagnetic interactions is discussed in this paper.Based on gauge principle,electromagnetic interactions and gravitational interactions are formulated in the same manner and are unified in a semi-direct product group of U(1) Abelian gauge group and gravitational gauge group.

  13. Unification of Electromagnetic Interactions and Gravitational Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ning

    2002-01-01

    Unified theory of gravitational interactions and electromagnetic interactions is discussed in this paper.Based on gauge principle, electromagnetic interactions and gravitational interactions are formulated in the same mannerand are unified in a semi-direct product group of U(1) Abelian gauge group and gravitational gauge group.

  14. PREFACE: Focus on Materials Nanoarchitectonics Focus on Materials Nanoarchitectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Masakazu

    2011-08-01

    On behalf of the International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), I wish to express our gratitude for the publication of this special issue of Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM), which highlights our recent research activities at MANA. In this preface, I would like to briefly describe the history and then outline the direction of research at MANA. In 2007, Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) launched the World Premier International Research Center Initiative (WPI Program) to create several frontier research centers in Japan. The aim was to facilitate cutting-edge research by promoting the participation of leading scientists from around the world and by providing an attractive research environment. One of the six centers of the WPI Program is MANA, established at the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) in October 2007. The direction of research at MANA is symbolized by the term 'nanoarchitectonics', which is part of the name MANA. What is nanoarchitectonics? In the past quarter century, nanotechnology has made impressive advances and has become an important pillar in the development of new materials. However, to explore its full potential, nanotechnology needs to stay on the path of innovation. In particular, the conventional analytic view of nanotechnology must yield to a certain synthetic approach. This is conducive to creating new functions that can be exhibited by nanoscale structural units through mutual interactions, even though these functions are not present in the isolated units. We coined the term nanoarchitectonics (first used in the name of the 1st International Symposium on Nanoarchitectonics Using Suprainteractions (NASI-1), organized by the author and his colleagues at Tsukuba, Japan, in November 2000) to express this innovation of nanotechnology. More specifically, nanoarchitectonics is a technology system where the aim is arranging nanoscale structural units, which

  15. The materials physics companion

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer-Cripps, Anthony C

    2014-01-01

    Introduction to Materials Physics: Structure of matter. Solid state physics. Dynamic properties of solids. Dielectric Properties of Materials: Dielectric properties. Ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Dielectric breakdown. Applications of dielectrics. Magnetic Properties of Materials: Magnetic properties. Magnetic moment. Spontaneous magnetization. Superconductivity.

  16. Laser processing of materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Dutta Majumdar; I Manna

    2003-06-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) is a coherent and monochromatic beam of electromagnetic radiation that can propagate in a straight line with negligible divergence and occur in a wide range of wavelength, energy/power and beam-modes/configurations. As a result, lasers find wide applications in the mundane to the most sophisticated devices, in commercial to purely scientific purposes, and in life-saving as well as life-threatening causes. In the present contribution, we provide an overview of the application of lasers for material processing. The processes covered are broadly divided into four major categories; namely, laser-assisted forming, joining, machining and surface engineering. Apart from briefly introducing the fundamentals of these operations, we present an updated review of the relevant literature to highlight the recent advances and open questions. We begin our discussion with the general applications of lasers, fundamentals of laser-matter interaction and classification of laser material processing. A major part of the discussion focuses on laser surface engineering that has attracted a good deal of attention from the scientific community for its technological significance and scientific challenges. In this regard, a special mention is made about laser surface vitrification or amorphization that remains a very attractive but unaccomplished proposition.

  17. Materials Microcharacterization Collaboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James C. Mabon; Gernot Metze; Ivan Petrov

    2003-02-20

    The Center for Microanalysis of Materials (CMM) is one of the four electron microscopy and microcharacterization user facilities participating in the Materials Microcharacterization Collaboratory (MMC) supported by the DOE-SC, Office of Basic Energy Science, and DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Program, Office of Transportation Technology. The MMC unites the four DOE BES electron microscopy user facilities at ANL, LBNL, ORNL, and the CMM at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Also participating in the MMC are the DOE EE microcharacterization user center at ORNL and the NAMT program at NIST. MMC also has several industrial partners. The purpose of the MMC is to bring the microanalytical and microcharacterization tools and expertise at these centers of excellence and other participating facilities together in an on-line interactive collaboratory and make them available to educators and researchers working in industry, universities, and government laboratories through telepresence access and operation. The MMC, however, is about remote collaboration, not just remote instrument control. The approach of the MMC also emphasizes providing the tools for establishing a sense of community and performing research using the MMC. The CMM has several instruments and peripherals available on-line emphasizing a Web-centric approach with varying levels of access and functionality. This program has developed and implemented hardware and software tools for remote and collaborative operation.

  18. Photorefractive Materials and Their Applications 2 Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Günter, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Photorefractive Materials and Their Applications 2: Materials is the second of three volumes within the Springer Series in Optical Sciences. The book gives a comprehensive review of the most important photorefractive materials and discusses the physical properties of organic and inorganic crystals as well as poled polymers. In this volume, photorefractive effects have been investigated at wavelengths covering the UV, visible and near infrared. Researchers in the field and graduate students of solid-state physics and engineering will gain a thorough understanding of the properties of materials in photorefractive applications. The other two volumes are: Photorefractive Materials and Their Applications 1: Basic Effects. Photorefractive Materials and Their Applications 3: Applications.

  19. MaterialVis: material visualization tool using direct volume and surface rendering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyan, Erhan; Güdükbay, Uğur; Bulutay, Ceyhun; Heinig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-05-01

    Visualization of the materials is an indispensable part of their structural analysis. We developed a visualization tool for amorphous as well as crystalline structures, called MaterialVis. Unlike the existing tools, MaterialVis represents material structures as a volume and a surface manifold, in addition to plain atomic coordinates. Both amorphous and crystalline structures exhibit topological features as well as various defects. MaterialVis provides a wide range of functionality to visualize such topological structures and crystal defects interactively. Direct volume rendering techniques are used to visualize the volumetric features of materials, such as crystal defects, which are responsible for the distinct fingerprints of a specific sample. In addition, the tool provides surface visualization to extract hidden topological features within the material. Together with the rich set of parameters and options to control the visualization, MaterialVis allows users to visualize various aspects of materials very efficiently as generated by modern analytical techniques such as the Atom Probe Tomography.

  20. Solar Sail: Materials and Space Environmental Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Kezerashvili, Roman Ya

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of a solar sail material degradation are presented when the solar electromagnetic and corpuscular forms of radiation were considered as sources of degradation. The analysis of the interaction of two components of solar radiation, the electromagnetic radiation and radiation of low- and high-energy electrons, protons, and helium ions emitted by the Sun with the solar-sail materials is discussed. The physical processes of the interactions of photons, electrons, protons and alpha-particles with sail material atoms and nuclei, leading to the degradation and ionization of solar sail materials are analyzed. The dependence of reflectivity and absorption for solar sail materials on temperature and on wavelength of the electromagnetic spectrum of solar radiation is investigated. It is shown that the temperature of a solar sail increases approximately as T r^(-2/5), with the decrease of the heliocentric distance r, when are taking into account the temperature dependence of optical parameters of the s...

  1. Noncovalent interaction of carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, Deivasigamani; Panigrahi, Swati; Sastry, Garikapati Narahari

    2014-08-19

    -nucleobase interactions has become quite important. The nucleobases are physisorbed on the surface of CNSs in the order G > T ≈ A > C > U, exhibiting π-π-stacking type of interaction. These interactions become stronger as the curvature of the CNSs decreases. It is also indispensable to study the interaction of nanomaterials with proteins and especially with amino acids at a molecular level to understand the drug delivery mechanism of CNSs. We have shown that the CNSs interact with small molecules by means of physisorption and thus show potential for sensor applications. The prime requisite for the exploitation of these CNSs in nanoelectronics is the tunable energy gap. We have revealed that metal ion doping modulates the HOMO-LUMO energy gap of the nanotubes significantly and thus provides a handle to tune the electronic and conductivity properties of CNTs. Moreover, metal ions tend to selectively bind with nanotubes of different chirality such as armchair and zigzag nanotubes. The reduction of planar hydrocarbon materials by lithium atoms has also been studied very systematically. We also illustrate the way in which noncovalent interactions can be used to optimize and fine-tune the properties of CNSs.

  2. Photochromic organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Rosario; Zayat, Marcos; Levy, David

    2011-02-01

    Photochromic organic-inorganic hybrid materials have attracted considerable attention owing to their potential application in photoactive devices, such as optical memories, windows, photochromic decorations, optical switches, filters or non-l