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Sample records for ash quality characterization

  1. Characterization of ashes from biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, F.J.; Hansen, L.A. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. Dept. of Chemical Engineering (Denmark); Soerensen, H.S. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (Denmark); Hjuler, K. [dk-TEKNIK. Energy and Environment (Denmark)

    1998-02-01

    One motivation for initiating the present project was that the international standard method of estimating the deposit propensity of solid fuels, of which a number of variants exist (e.g. ISO, ASTM, SD, DIN), has shown to be unsuitable for biomass ashes. This goal was addressed by the development of two new methods for the detection of ash fusibility behaviour based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA) and High Temperature Light Microscopy (HTLM), respectively. The methods were developed specifically for ashes from biofuels, but are suitable for coal ashes as well. They have been tested using simple salt mixtures, geological standards and samples from straw CHP and coal-straw PF combustion plants. All samples were run in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C/min. In comparison with the standard method, the new methods are objective and have superior repeatability and sensitivity. Furthermore, the two methods enable the melting behavior to be characterized by a continuous measurement of melt fraction versus temperature. Due to this two-dimensional resolution of the results, the STA and HTLM methods provide more information than the standard method. The study of bottom ash and fly ash as well as deposit samples from straw test firings at the Haslev and Slagelse Combined Heat and Power plants resulted in a better understanding of mineral behaviour during straw grate firing. In these tests a number of straws were fired which had been carefully selected for having different qualities with respect to sort and potassium and chlorine contents. By studying bottom ashes from Slagelse it was found that the melting behaviour correlated with the deposition rate on a probe situated at the outlet part of the combustion zone. (EG)

  2. Fly ash quality and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B. [Inst. for Energy, Budapest (Hungary); Beer, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  3. Fly ash. Quality recycling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomster, D.; Leisio, C.

    1996-11-01

    Imatran Voima`s coal-fired power plants not only generate power and heat but also produce fly ash which is suitable raw material for recycling. This material for recycling is produced in the flue gas cleaning process. It is economical and, thanks to close quality control, is suitable for use as a raw material in the building materials industry, in asphalt production, and in earthworks. Structures made from fly ash are also safe from an environmental point of view. (orig.)

  4. Fusion characterization of biomass ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Teng; Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang;

    2016-01-01

    The ash fusion characteristics are important parameters for thermochemical utilization of biomass. In this research, a method for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash by Thermo-mechanical Analyzer, TMA, is described. The typical TMA shrinking ratio curve can be divided into two...... stages, which are closely related to ash melting behaviors. Several characteristics temperatures based on the TMA curves are used to assess the ash fusion characteristics. A new characteristics temperature, Tm, is proposed to represent the severe melting temperature of biomass ash. The fusion...... characteristics of six types of biomass ash have been measured by TMA. Compared with standard ash fusibility temperatures (AFT) test, TMA is more suitable for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. The glassy molten areas of the ash samples are sticky and mainly consist of K-Ca-silicates....

  5. Characterization of Ash Standards for the Residues Project

    CERN Document Server

    Westsik, G A

    2001-01-01

    Measurements have been completed to characterize the plutonium content and isotopic composition of ash standards that are or may be used as quality control check sources for the Residues Stabilization Project. These standards are for use as check sources for the Segmented Gamma Scan Assay System (SGSAS) employed for the Residues Stabilization Project.

  6. Characterization of fly ash from bio and municipal waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, Ana T.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul;

    2008-01-01

    Four different fly ashes are characterized in the present paper. The ashes differ in the original fuel type and were sampled at distinct plants. The investigation includes two different ashes from municipal solid waste incineration (with and without sorbents addition), a straw ash and an ash from...... on leaching characteristics, Cd is found mainly associated with carbonates in MSW fly ash and is associated with oxides in straw and co-combustion of wood and oil ash, while Cr is mainly associated with oxides in all studied fly ashes or with carbonates in straw ash. Among the studied parameters, crystalline...... minerals present in fly ash are discussed, measured by an XRD apparatus. Fuel is of main importance to determine Cd and Cr final concentration on fly ash, while flue gas temperature plays an important role as well. The goal of the present work is to underline the main parameters that determine fly ash...

  7. Effects of Metals Associated with Wildfire Ash on Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrato, J.; Clark, A.; Correa, N.; Ali, A.; Blake, J.; Bixby, R.

    2015-12-01

    The forests of the western United States are impacted dramatically by climate change and have suffered from large-scale increases in wildfire activity. This rise in wildfires introduces additional ash to ecosystems and can represent a serious and ongoing threat to water quality in streams and rivers from storm event runoff in burn areas. The effect of metals associated with wildfire ash (from wood collected from the Valles Caldera National Preserve, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico) on solution pH and dissolved oxygen was assessed through a series of laboratory experiments. Microscopy and spectroscopy analyses were conducted to characterize the elemental content and oxidation state of metals in unreacted and reacted ash. Certain metals (e.g., Ca, K, Al, Mg) were detected in ash from ponderosa pine, one of the dominant species in the Valles Caldera, with mean concentrations ranging from 400-1750 mg kg-1. Other metals (e.g., Na, Fe, Mn, V, Zn, Ni) were present at lower mean concentrations ranging from 12-210 mg kg-1. The initial pH after conducting batch experiments reacting ash with water started at 9.9 and the alkalinity of the water was 110 mg L-1 as CaCO3. Solution pH decreased to 8.0 after 48 hours of reaction, which is almost a delta of two pH units. Dissolved oxygen concentrations decreased by 2 mg L-1 over the course of 12 hours before the rate of reaeration surpassed the rate of consumption. This presentation will discuss how redox-active metals, such as Fe and Mn, could contribute to the increased dissolved oxygen demand and fluctuation of the oxidation/reduction potential in the system.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION AND COMPARISON OF TREATED AND UNTREATED RICH HUSH ASH & FLY ASH FOR METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Pal Singh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice Husk ash and fly ash are agricultural and coal wastes respectively. These are produced in abundance globally and poses risk to health as well as environment. Thus their effective, conducive and eco-friendly utilization has always been a challenge for scientific community. The fly ash has been used as reinforcement for improved mechanical properties of composites (1,3-5,9. Rice husk ash can also be used for similar applications as its composition is almost similar to that of fly ash. This paper mainly deals with identification ofcharacteristics of both the fly ash and rice husk ash using spectroscopic and microscopic analysis. SEM, XRD,XRF and FTIR spectroscopic methods were used for the characterization of treated and untreated ashes. The results were compared and it was observed that both ashes possesses nearly same chemical phases and otherfunctional groups thus proposing the use of rice husk ash as reinforcement like fly ash in Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs specifically for wear resistance applications.

  9. Zeolite from fly ash: synthesis and characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keka Ojha; Narayan C Pradhan; Amar Nath Samanta

    2004-12-01

    Coal fly ash was used to synthesize X-type zeolite by alkali fusion followed by hydrothermal treatment. The synthesized zeolite was characterized using various techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, BET method for surface area measurement etc. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain highly crystalline zeolite with maximum BET surface area. The maximum surface area of the product was found to be 383 m2/g with high purity. The crystallinity of the prepared zeolite was found to change with fusion temperature and a maximum value was obtained at 823 K. The cost of synthesized zeolite was estimated to be almost one-fifth of that of commercial 13X zeolite available in the market.

  10. Characterizing the Hydrological Properties of Wildfire Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, S.; Balfour, V.

    2010-12-01

    Wildfires are extreme disturbance events that can increase runoff and erosion rates by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Fire related sediment presents a significant geomorphic hazard in terms of debris flows and other catastrophic erosion events, but ultimately plays a key role in landscape evolution in fire prone regions. The hyper-dessicated ash and soil layers making up the near surface profile in recently burned areas respond very differently to rainfall than the litter and unburned soil that existed prior to the fire. Limited knowledge regarding the hydrological properties of the ash-soil profile, and the ash layer in particular, currently limits efforts to model the infiltration process in burned areas and hence predict the location and magnitude of post fire runoff and erosion events. In our ongoing research we are investigating and quantifying the hydrologic properties of wildfire ash. Wherever possible we use conventional laboratory techniques from soil hydrology but in some cases we have had to adapt these techniques to account for the distinct physical and chemical properties of ash, such as the variability in particle density and the partial solubility of many of the mineral components. Some of the hydrologic properties of ash, such as the hydraulic conductivity, are similar to those of a mineral soil with a comparable particle size distribution. For example, ash from Spain with a silty loam texture had a hydraulic conductivity of 7 x 10-4 cm s-1, which is within the range reported for mineral soils with the same texture. However, other properties such as the porosity are considerably different; an undisturbed ash sample with a sandy loam texture had a porosity of 93 percent compared to the typical range of 30 to 50 percent for mineral soils with this texture. Scanning electron microscopy analysis indicates that the contrasting hydrologic properties of ash and soil are due to differences in the particle shape, particle packing and pore structure. Using examples

  11. A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF POST-COMBUSTION AMMONIA INJECTION ON FLY ASH QUALITY: CHARACTERIZATION OF AMMONIA RELEASE FROM CONCRETE AND MORTARS CONTAINING FLY ASH AS A POZZOLANIC ADMIXTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Rathbone; Thomas L. Robl

    2002-04-11

    Work completed in this reporting period focused primarily on continuing measurements of the rate of ammonia loss from concrete, and the measurement of ammonia gas in the air above concrete and flowable fill immediately after placement. Concrete slabs were prepared to monitor the loss of ammonia during mixing, the concentration in the airspace above the slabs soon after placement, and the total quantity of ammonia evolved over a longer time period. Variables tested include temperature, ventilation rate, water:cementitious (W:C) ratio, and fly ash source. Short-term data indicate that for concrete placed in areas with poor air ventilation the fly ash NH{sub 3} concentration should not exceed about 90 to 145 mg/kg ash, depending on the water:cement ratio and the fly ash replacement rate, if a concentration of 10 ppm NH{sub 3} in the air is assumed to be the maximum acceptable level. Longer-term experiments showed that the ammonia loss rate is dependent on ammonia source (that is ammoniated ash vs. non-ammoniated ash with ammonia added to the water), and is also dependent on W:C ratio and temperature. Experiments were also conducted to study the loss of ammonia from fresh concrete during mixing. It was found that a high water:cementitious mix lost a greater percentage of ammonia than a low W:C mix, with a medium W:C mix losing an amount intermediate between these two. However, a larger batch size resulted in a smaller percentage of ammonia lost. The data suggest that a significant quantity of ammonia could be lost from Ready Mix concrete during transit, depending on the transit time, batch size, and mix proportions.

  12. A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF POST-COMBUSTION AMMONIA INJECTION ON FLY ASH QUALITY: CHARACTERIZATION OF AMMONIA RELEASE FROM CONCRETE AND MORTARS CONTAINING FLY ASH AS A POZZOLANIC ADMIXTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Rathbone; Thomas L. Robl

    2001-10-11

    Work completed in this reporting period focused on the measurement of the rate of ammonia loss from mortar and concrete, and the measurement of ammonia gas in the air above the materials immediately after placement. The majority of mortar experiments have been completed, and testing has begun on concrete. The mortar experiments indicate that the rate of ammonia loss is greater in mortars prepared using a higher water content and water:cement (W:C) ratio, although the higher rate is primarily observed within the first 2 days, after which the loss rates are nearly the same. The source of low-calcium (Class F) fly ash exerted a negligible influence on the loss rate. However, mortar prepared using a higher-calcium fly ash evolved ammonia at a slightly slower rate than the Class F ash mortars. The data also indicate that an increase in ventilation increases the ammonia loss rate from mortar, and suggest that a well-ventilated space could substantially increase the loss of ammonia from mortar and, by inference, a concrete slab. Analysis of ammonia concentrations in the air above freshly-placed mortars in an enclosed space indicate that the fly ash ammonia concentration should not exceed 100 mg N/kg ash in confined space applications. For most other applications with some ventilation the maximum acceptable concentration would be approximately 200 mg/kg. Early results from experiments on concrete suggest that, under similar conditions, ammonia diffusion from concrete occurs at a higher rate than in mortar. In addition, increasing the slump of concrete through the use of chemical admixtures has only a minor effect on the ammonia loss rate.

  13. Hot-Gas Filter Ash Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dockter, B.A.; Hurley, J.P.; Watne, T.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; O`Keefe, C.A. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Minerals Research Center

    1996-12-31

    Large-scale hot-gas testing over the past several years has revealed numerous cases of cake buildup on filter elements that have been difficult, if not impossible to remove. At times, the cake can bridge between candle filters, leading to high filter failure rates. Physical factors, including particle-size distribution, particle shape, the aerodynamics of deposition, and system temperature contribute to difficulty in removing the cake. It is speculated that chemical as well as physical effects are playing a role in leading the ash to bond to the filter or to itself. The Energy and Environmental research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota is working with Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and a consortium of companies in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform the research necessary to determine the factors that cause hot-gas cleanup filters to be blinded by ash or to develop deposits that can bridge the filters and cause them to fail. The objectives of this overall project are threefold: first, to determine the mechanisms by which difficult-to-clean ash is formed; second, to develop a method to determine the rate of blinding/bridging based on fuel and sorbent properties and operating conditions; finally, to provide suggestions fro ways to prevent filter blinding by the troublesome ash. The projects consists of four tasks: field sampling and archive sample analyses, laboratory-scale testing, bench-scale testing, and model and database development testing. This paper present preliminary data from Task 2 on determining the tensile strengths of coal ash particles at elevated temperatures and simulated combustor gas conditions.

  14. Temporal and spatial variations in fly ash quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hower, J.C.; Trimble, A.S.; Eble, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    Fly ash quality, both as the amount of petrographically distinguishable carbons and in chemistry, varies in both time and space. Temporal variations are a function of a number of variables. Variables can include variations in the coal blend organic petrography, mineralogy, and chemistry; variations in the pulverization of the coal, both as a function of the coal's Hardgrove grindability index and as a function of the maintenance and settings of the pulverizers; and variations in the operating conditions of the boiler, including changes in the pollution control system. Spatial variation, as an instantaneous measure of fly ash characteristics, should not involve changes in the first two sets of variables listed above. Spatial variations are a function of the gas flow within the boiler and ducts, certain flow conditions leading to a tendency for segregation of the less-dense carbons in one portion of the gas stream. Caution must be applied in sampling fly ash. Samples from a single bin, or series of bins, m ay not be representative of the whole fly ash, providing a biased view of the nature of the material. Further, it is generally not possible to be certain about variation until the analysis of the ash is complete. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hot-Gas Filter Ash Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, M.L.; Hurley, J.P.; Dockter, B.A.; O`Keefe, C.A.

    1997-07-01

    Large-scale hot-gas filter testing over the past 10 years has revealed numerous cases of cake buildup on filter elements that has been difficult, if not impossible, to remove. At times, the cake can blind or bridge between candle filters, leading to filter failure. Physical factors, including particle-size distribution, particle shape, the aerodynamics of deposition, and system temperature, contribute to the difficulty in removing the cake, but chemical factors such as surface composition and gas-solid reactions also play roles in helping to bond the ash to the filters or to itself. This project is designed to perform the research necessary to determine the fuel-, sorbent-, and operations-related conditions that lead to blinding or bridging of hot-gas particle filters. The objectives of the project are threefold: (1) Determine the mechanisms by which a difficult-to-clean ash is formed and how it bridges hot-gas filters (2) Develop a method to determine the rate of bridging based on analyses of the feed coal and sorbent, filter properties, and system operating conditions and (3) Suggest and test ways to prevent filter bridging.

  16. Optimizing and Characterizing Geopolymers from Ternary Blend of Philippine Coal Fly Ash, Coal Bottom Ash and Rice Hull Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ernesto Kalaw

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are inorganic polymers formed from the alkaline activation of amorphous alumino-silicate materials resulting in a three-dimensional polymeric network. As a class of materials, it is seen to have the potential of replacing ordinary Portland cement (OPC, which for more than a hundred years has been the binder of choice for structural and building applications. Geopolymers have emerged as a sustainable option vis-à-vis OPC for three reasons: (1 their technical properties are comparable if not better; (2 they can be produced from industrial wastes; and (3 within reasonable constraints, their production requires less energy and emits significantly less CO2. In the Philippines, the use of coal ash, as the alumina- and silica- rich geopolymer precursor, is being considered as one of the options for sustainable management of coal ash generation from coal-fired power plants. However, most geopolymer mixes (and the prevalent blended OPC use only coal fly ash. The coal bottom ash, having very few applications, remains relegated to dumpsites. Rice hull ash, from biomass-fired plants, is another silica-rich geopolymer precursor material from another significantly produced waste in the country with only minimal utilization. In this study, geopolymer samples were formed from the mixture of coal ash, using both coal fly ash (CFA and coal bottom ash (CBA, and rice hull ash (RHA. The raw materials used for the geopolymerization process were characterized using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF for elemental and X-ray diffraction (XRD for mineralogical composition. The raw materials’ thermal stability and loss on ignition (LOI were determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and reactivity via dissolution tests and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP analysis. The mechanical, thermal and microstructural properties of the geopolymers formed were analyzed using compression tests, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR

  17. Size fraction characterization of highly-calcareous fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itskos, Grigorios; Koukouzas, Nikolaos [Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, 357-359 Mesogeion Avenue, GR-152 31, Halandri, Athens (Greece); Itskos, Socrates [Department of Chemical Technology and the Environment, Steam Electric Station of Amynteon-Filotas, Public Power Corporation of Greece, GR-532 00, Amynteon (Greece)

    2010-11-15

    The chemical and mineralogical composition of lignite fly ash (FA) varies as a function of the prevalent conditions in both the processes of power production and lignite mining. The differentiation of the qualitative and quantitative composition of the highly-calcareous lignite fly ash, as a function of its particle size distribution, is verified in this paper. According to the results of the conducted research, a fine-grained fraction of considerable amount presents properties that obstruct the sustainable exploitation of calcareous lignite fly ash in cement industry applications. On the other hand, the same grain fraction (because of its hydraulic properties) can be utilized in other sort of applications, based on different criteria, i.e. in road constructions. The coarse-grained fraction (which reflects a low proportion to the total fly ash output) presents the same undesired characteristics as well. Rather, the intermediate grain fraction (75-150 {mu}m) presents the highly desirable properties when fly ash is utilized as a pozzolanic additive. In addition, the mechanism of the formation of the intermediate grain fraction strongly prevents the factors that cause the variation of fly ash-quality. It is therefore the optimum part of the whole amount of lignite FA, to be utilized as additive in cement manufacturing. The outcomes of this paper will hopefully contribute towards the crucial goal of the expansion of the utilization of calcareous lignite fly ash by proposing a more effective way of using this material, basically by taking advantage of its fundamental chemical and mineralogical properties. (author)

  18. Synthesis and characterization of geopolymer from bottom ash and rice husk ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggarini, Ufafa; Sukmana, Ndaru C.

    2016-02-01

    All Geopolymer (GP) has been synthesized from bottom ash and rice husk ash. This research aims to determine the effect of Si/Al ratio on geopolymer synthesis. Geopolymer was synthesized with various Si/Al ratio of 2, 3 and 4. The characterization result using XRD and SEM indicated that by using a different ratio of Si/A, it will produce geopolymer with varied structure and morphology. Diffractogram result shows that polymerization has been done for all samples (GP2, GP3, Gp4) with the presence of hump peak at 2θ = 27-35°. In GP4, no peak at 2θ = 18° indicating sodalite phase forming. Besides that, the morphology of geopolymer with a varied ratio of Si/Al shows that higher ratio will produce geopolymer with higher particle size. The highest compressive strength of geopolymer was obtained at a ratio of Si/Al = 4, with a maximum load of 12866 kgf.

  19. Chemical and ecotoxicological characterization of ashes obtained from sewage sludge combustion in a fluidised-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1999, the DEECA/INETI and the UBiA/FCT/UNL started a researching project on the partition of heavy metals during the combustion of stabilised sewage sludge (Biogran[reg]), in a fluidised-bed reactor, and on the quality of the bottom ashes and fly ashes produced. This project was entitled Bimetal and was funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology. In this paper only the results on the combustion of Biogran[reg]) are reported. The combustion process was performed in two different trials, in which different amounts of sewage sludge and time of combustion were applied. Several ash samples were collected from the bed (bottom ashes) and from two cyclones (first cyclone and second cyclone ashes). Sewage sludge, bed material (sand) and ash samples were submitted to the leaching process defined in the European leaching standard EN 12457-2. The eluates were characterized for a set of inorganic chemical species. The ecotoxicological levels of the eluates were determined for two biological indicators (Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna). The results were compared with the limit values of the CEMWE French Regulation. The samples were also ranked according to an index based on the chemical characterization of the eluates. It was observed an increase of the concentration of metals along the combustion system. The ashes trapped in the second cyclone, for both combustion trials, showed the highest concentration of metals in the eluates. Chemically, the ashes of the second cyclone were the most different ones. In the ecotoxicological point of view, the ecotoxicity levels of the eluates of the ashes, for both combustion cycles, did not follow the same pattern as observed for the chemical characterization. The ashes of the first cyclone showed the highest ecotoxicity levels for V. fischeri and D. magna. This difference on chemical and ecotoxicological results proves the need for performing both chemical and ecotoxicological characterizations of the sub

  20. Characterization of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash before and after electrodialytic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2003-01-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash, which has been treated electrodialytically for the removal of heavy metals, may have changed characteristics compared to untreated fly ash. In this study, MSWI fly ash was characterized with respect to leaching properties (pH static leaching...

  1. Fly ash: Analysis and characterization. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the analysis and characterization of fly ash. Topics cover x-ray classification, trace analysis, particle size distribution, ash morphology, surface adsorption, toxicity, and mutagenic fly ash. Fluidized-bed-combustion technology for coal-combustion systems to meet air-emission standards is examined. The use of fly ash in concrete and cement manufacturing is discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. Fly ash: Analysis and characterization. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the analysis and characterization of fly ash. Topics cover x-ray classification, trace analysis, particle size distribution, ash morphology, surface adsorption, toxicity, and mutagenic fly ash. Fluidized-bed-combustion technology for coal-combustion systems to meet air-emission standards is examined. The use of fly ash in concrete and cement manufacturing is discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  3. Synthesis and characterization of zeolites prepared from industrial fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franus, Wojciech; Wdowin, Magdalena; Franus, Małgorzata

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the possibility of using fly ash to produce synthetic zeolites. The synthesis class F fly ash from the Stalowa Wola SA heat and power plant was subjected to 24 h hydrothermal reaction with sodium hydroxide. Depending on the reaction conditions, three types of synthetic zeolites were formed: Na-X (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaOH, 75 °C), Na-P1 (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaOH, 95 °C), and sodalite (20 g fly ash, 0.8 dm(3) of 5 mol · dm(-3) NaOH + 0.4 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaCl, 95 °C). As synthesized materials were characterized to obtain mineral composition (X-ray diffractometry, Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometry), adsorption properties (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, N2 isotherm adsorption/desorption), and ion exchange capacity. The most effective reaction for zeolite preparation was when sodalite was formed and the quantitative content of zeolite from X-ray diffractometry was 90 wt%, compared with 70 wt% for the Na-X and 75 wt% for the Na-P1. Residues from each synthesis reaction were the following: mullite, quartz, and the remains of amorphous aluminosilicate glass. The best zeolitic material as characterized by highest specific surface area was Na-X at almost 166 m(2) · g(-1), while for the Na-P1 and sodalite it was 71 and 33 m(2) · g(-1), respectively. The ion exchange capacity decreased in the following order: Na-X at 1.8 meq · g(-1), Na-P1 at 0.72 meq · g(-1), and sodalite at 0.56 meq · g(-1). The resulting zeolites are competitive for commercially available materials and are used as ion exchangers in industrial wastewater and soil decontamination. PMID:24838802

  4. Utilization of mixed pond ash in integrated steel plant for manufacturing superior quality bricks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Piyush Kant Pandey; Raj Kumar Agrawal

    2002-10-01

    Fly ash (FA) poses serious problems to the industries. Integrated steel plants generate huge quantity of FA from their captive power plants and other furnaces. This ash is generally disposed off in the ash ponds along with other sludges and residues of steel making operations. This changes the constitution of FA and makes the brick manufacturing difficult. This paper has attempted to devise the ways for the use of this mixed ash for manufacturing mixed ash clay bricks successfully. The bricks thus made are superior in structural and aesthetic qualities and portents huge saving in the manufacturing costs with better consumer response.

  5. Wood fuel quality of two Salix viminalis stands fertilised with sludge, ash and sludge-ash mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Anneli [Department of Crop Production Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), P.O. Box 7043, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Riia 181, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Dimitriou, Ioannis; Aronsson, Paer; Verwijst, Theo; Weih, Martin [Department of Crop Production Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), P.O. Box 7043, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-10-15

    This study assessed the effects of stand structure and fertilisation with wood ash and/or sludge on wood fuel quality of Salix viminalis. The relative proportions of bark and wood in 1-, 2- and 3-year-old shoot populations were determined. The concentrations of essential elements (N, P, K) and heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Ni) in bark and wood were used to assess the wood fuel quality in harvestable shoot biomass. Controlled field experiments were conducted on two newly harvested commercial short-rotation willow coppice fields. Five treatments were applied: sewage sludge at the maximum legally permitted amount; ash; two sludge-ash mixtures supplying the maximum and twice the maximum permitted sludge-ash amount; and a control receiving mineral nutrients only. The proportion of bark in the willow stands was decreasing with the age of the shoot population. The shoot population with few large stems, compared to that with many small stems, had a lower proportion of element-rich bark in the harvestable shoot biomass, meaning better quality of the wood fuel. Overall, wood fuel quality in terms of mineral concentrations was influenced by the age of the shoot population at harvest, stand structure, management practices (e.g. planting density, fertilisation) and site conditions (soil type, element availability). Our results imply that harvestable shoot biomass of willows grown as few large stems have better wood fuel quality, compared to harvestable shoot biomass of many small stems. Increased length of cutting cycle improves the wood fuel quality. (author)

  6. Characterization of Coconut Shell Ash for Potential Utilization in Metal Matrix Composites for Automotive Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B Madakson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Coconut shell ash is agricultural waste. The waste is produced in abundance globally and poses risk to health as well as environment. Thus their effective, conducive and eco-friendly utilization has always been a challenge for scientific applications. This paper mainly deals with identification of characteristics of coconutshell ash using spectroscopic and microscopic analysis. Density, Particle size, Refractoriness, SEM, XRD,XRF and FTIR spectroscopic methods were used for the characterization of the coconut shell ash. The results were compared and it was observed that the ash possesses nearly same chemical phases and other functional groups as reinforcement like fly ash, rice husk ash, bagasse ash that have been in Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs specifically for automobile applications. Hence, coconut shell ash can be used as a low costreinforcement in Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs.

  7. Ceramic bricks made from municipal solid waste incineration-derived clay and ashes: a quality study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto García Ubaque

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents analytical data from tests on bricks made from different clay/ash mixtures. The ashes used were obtained from a Hoffmann-type brick-making furnace equipped for coal and municipal solid waste co-firing. The bricks were physically and chemically characterised and their quality was determined by porosimetry, water absorption, breaking load and tensile strength tests. Brick loading capacity increased by up to 10% with ash mixtures and decreased at higher percentages, whereas water absorption increased brick loading capacity for all mixtures. This study showed that clay/ash bricks complied with all the quality standards required in Colombia.

  8. Development of construction specifications and quality assurance criteria for compacted fly ash-cement feedlot pads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinski, M.E.; Bicudo, J.R.; Hippley, B.; Nanduri, S.R. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2005-05-01

    Numerous industrial uses have been identified for fly ash that economically benefits both the fly ash producer and the fly ash user. One such use is the construction of compacted fly ash-cement pads for hay storage and for livestock heavy traffic areas, including traffic lanes, feeding areas, watering sites, loafing lots, and feedlots. The use of a variety of pads (e.g. soil-cement, fly ash, geotextile-gravel) in feedlots has been shown to improve daily gain and reduce hoof disease in cattle. However quality assurance methods for construction of such pads are lacking. Therefore, a laboratory study was performed to develop a quantitative approach to construction quality assurance (CQA) testing of compacted fly ash-cement pads.

  9. Physicochemical characterizations of nano-palm oil fuel ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA) is known as a good supplementary cementing material due to its siliceous-rich content. The application of nanotechnology in the pozzolanic materials could invent new functions in the efficiency of physical and chemical properties of materials. Thus, the present study aims to generate nano-sized POFA and characterize the physicochemical properties of nano-palm oil fuel ash (nPOFA). The nPOFA was prepared by mechanically grinding micro POFA using a high intensity ball milling for 6 hours. The physicochemical properties of nPOFA were characterized via X-Ray Fluoresence (XRF), Scanning Emission microscopy- Energy Dispersive X-Ray (SEM-EDX), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The particle size of nPOFA acquired from TEM analysis was in the range of 20 nm to 90 nm, while the average crystallite size calculated from XRD diffractogram was 61.5 nm. The resulting nPOFA has a BET surface area of 145.35 m2/g, which is more than 85% increment in surface area compared to micro-sized POFA. The morphology and elemental studies showed the presence of spherical as well as irregularly shaped and fine nPOFA particles contains with high silicon content. The presence of α-quartz as the major phase of the nPOFA was identified through XRD analysis. The study concludes that nPOFA has the potential as a supplementary cementing material due to the high silica content, high surface area and the unique behaviors of nano-structured particles

  10. Physicochemical characterizations of nano-palm oil fuel ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajak, Mohd Azrul Abdul, E-mail: azrulrajak88@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Preparatory Centre of Science and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, 88400, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia); Majid, Zaiton Abdul, E-mail: zaiton@kimia.fs.utm.my [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Ismail, Mohammad [Department of Structure and Material, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA) is known as a good supplementary cementing material due to its siliceous-rich content. The application of nanotechnology in the pozzolanic materials could invent new functions in the efficiency of physical and chemical properties of materials. Thus, the present study aims to generate nano-sized POFA and characterize the physicochemical properties of nano-palm oil fuel ash (nPOFA). The nPOFA was prepared by mechanically grinding micro POFA using a high intensity ball milling for 6 hours. The physicochemical properties of nPOFA were characterized via X-Ray Fluoresence (XRF), Scanning Emission microscopy- Energy Dispersive X-Ray (SEM-EDX), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The particle size of nPOFA acquired from TEM analysis was in the range of 20 nm to 90 nm, while the average crystallite size calculated from XRD diffractogram was 61.5 nm. The resulting nPOFA has a BET surface area of 145.35 m{sup 2}/g, which is more than 85% increment in surface area compared to micro-sized POFA. The morphology and elemental studies showed the presence of spherical as well as irregularly shaped and fine nPOFA particles contains with high silicon content. The presence of α-quartz as the major phase of the nPOFA was identified through XRD analysis. The study concludes that nPOFA has the potential as a supplementary cementing material due to the high silica content, high surface area and the unique behaviors of nano-structured particles.

  11. The U.S. power industry's activities to expand coal ash utilization in face of lower ash quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golden, D.M. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The use of coal by electric power utilities results in more than 105 million tons of by products each year in the United States. More restrictive air quality emission limits have resulted in cleaner air, but this means the fly ash is more contaminated and cannot be used in its largest market, the concrete industry. For this reason, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted a 5 year program at increasing ash utilization in the cement and concrete market in the United States. This initiative was in response to recent concerns regarding the impacts on ash quality due to more aggressive nitrogen oxide (NOx) controls. The EPRI program provides the technical basis for protecting the bulk sale of coal ash in high-volume applications in cement and concrete and other high volume civil engineering applications. Fly ash derived from NOx control systems has higher carbon levels and ammonia levels. Problems with ammoniated ash are a major concern for coal-fired power plants. It was shown that there are four ways to minimize the impact of NOx controls that reduce ash quality directly affecting ash utilization. These are: (1) prevention of carbon accumulation in fly ash for use in sensitive markets, (2) carbon removal, (3) concentration of reactive ash fractions by removal of coarse fractions, and (4) ammonia removal. It was concluded that more studies are needed to examine long-term durability and other properties before any of these options can be exploited on an industrial scale. 21 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Mössbauer characterization of feed coal, ash and fly ash from a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was apply 57Fe Transmission Mössbauer Spectroscopy at room temperature in order to study the occurrence of iron-containing mineral phases in: 1) feed coal; 2) coal ash, obtained in different stages of the ASTM D3174 standard method; and 3) fly ash, produced when coal is burned in the TERMOPAIPA IV thermal power plant localized in Boyacá, Colombia. According to obtained results, we can conclude the occurrence of pyrite and jarosite in the feed coal; Fe2+ and Fe3+ crystalline paramagnetic phases, superparamagnetic hematite and hematite in coal ash; Fe2+ and Fe3+ noncrystalline and crystalline phases, magnetite and hematite in fly ash. Precisely, for a basic understanding, this work discusses some the possible transformations that take place during coal combustion

  13. Characterizing uncertainty in the motion, future location and ash concentrations of volcanic plumes and ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, P.; Patra, A. K.; Bursik, M. I.; Pitman, E. B.; Dehn, J.; Singh, T.; Singla, P.; Stefanescu, E. R.; Madankan, R.; Pouget, S.; Jones, M.; Morton, D.; Pavolonis, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Forecasting the location and airborne concentrations of volcanic ash plumes and their dispersing clouds is complex and knowledge of the uncertainty in these forecasts is critical to assess and mitigate the hazards that could exist. We show the results from an interdisciplinary project that brings together scientists drawn from the atmospheric sciences, computer science, engineering, mathematics, and geology. The project provides a novel integration of computational and statistical modeling with a widely-used volcanic particle dispersion code, to provide quantitative measures of confidence in predictions of the motion of ash clouds caused by volcanic eruptions. We combine high performance computing and stochastic analysis, resulting in real time predictions of ash cloud motion that account for varying wind conditions and a range of model variables. We show how coupling a real-time model for ash dispersal, PUFF, with a volcanic eruption model, BENT, allows for the definition of the variability in the dispersal model inputs and hence classify the uncertainty that can then propagate for the ash cloud location and downwind concentrations. We additionally analyze the uncertainty in the numerical weather prediction forecast data used by the dispersal model by using ensemble forecasts and assess how this affects the downwind concentrations. These are all coupled together and by combining polynomical chaos quadrature with stochastic integration techniques, we provide a quantitative measure of the reliability (i.e. error) of those predictions. We show comparisons of the downwind height calculations and mass loadings with observations of ash clouds available from satellite remote sensing data. The aim is to provide a probabilistic forecast of location and ash concentration that can be generated in real-time and used by those end users in the operational ash cloud hazard assessment environment.

  14. Multinuclear NMR approach to coal fly ash characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netzel, D.A.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the application of various nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to study the hydration kinetics and mechanisms, the structural properties, and the adsorption characteristics of coal fly ash. Coal fly ash samples were obtained from the Dave Johnston and Laramie River electric power generating plants in Wyoming. Hydrogen NMR relaxation times were measured as a function of time to observe the kinetics of hydration for the two coal fly ashes at different temperatures and water-to-cement ration. The kinetic data for the hydrated coal fly ashes were compared to the hydration of portland cement. The mechanism used to describe the kinetic data for the hydration of portland cement was applied, with reservation, to describe the hydration of the coal fly ashes. The results showed that the coal fly ashes differ kinetically from that of portland cement and from each other. Consequently, both coal fly ashes were judged to be poorer cementitious materials than portland cement. Carbon-13 NMR CP/MAS spectra were obtained for the anhydrous coal fly ashes in an effort to determine the type of organic species that may be present, either adsorbed on the surface or entrained.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of fly ash-zinc oxide nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Yeole

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash, generated in thermal power plants, is recognized as an environmental pollutant. Thus, measures are required to be undertaken to dispose it in an environmentally friendly method. In this paper an attempt is made to coat zinc oxide nano-particles on the surface of fly ash by a simple and environmentally friendly facile chemical method, at room temperature. Zinc oxide may serve as effective corrosion inhibitor by providing sacrificial protection. Concentration of fly ash was varied as 5, 10 and 15 (w/w % of zinc oxide. It was found that crystallinity increased, whereas particle size, specific gravity and oil absorption value decreased with increased concentration of fly ash in zinc oxide, which is attributed to the uniform distribution of zinc oxide on the surface of fly ash. These nanocomposites can potentially be used in commercial applications as additive for anticorrosion coatings.

  16. The Effect of Fly Ash Quality on the Engineering Properties of High-Performance Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yuchu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract:Fly ash is the most inexpensive cementitious material,and its presence in concrete has increased in recent years because it has become more durable and environmentally friendly.This study examines densified mixture concrete and the effect of fly ash quality on high-flow,high-strength concrete.Tests show that when the same mixture achieves identical flow standards(slump > 250 mm;slump flow > 600 ram),the fly ash quality affects the nature of the concrete;additionally,and adding Class F fly ash to concrete(loss on ignition =6%)is more workable than adding Class C fly ash(loss on ignition =3%).However,adding fly ash with a high loss on ignition(9%)to concrete requires a substantial increase in the mixing water and a dose of superplasticizer to achieve the required workability.This reduces the quality of the concrete,which subsequently deteriorates its safety and durability.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and conductivity studies of polypyrrole–fly ash composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M V Murugendrappa; Syed Khasim; M V N Ambika Prasad

    2005-10-01

    in situ polymerization of pyrrole was carried out in the presence of fly ash (FA) to synthesize polypyrrole–fly ash composites (PPy/FA) by chemical oxidation method. The PPy/FA composites have been synthesized with various compositions (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 wt%) of fly ash in pyrrole. The surface morphology of these composites was studied with scanning electron micrograph (SEM). The polypyrrole–fly ash composites were also characterized by employing X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). The a.c. conductivity behaviour has been investigated in the frequency range 102–106 Hz. The d.c. conductivity was studied in the temperature range from 40–200°C. The dimensions of fly ash in the matrix have a greater influence on the observed conductivity values. The results obtained for these composites are of greater scientific and technological interest.

  18. Hyperspectral imaging based procedures applied to bottom ash characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2007-09-01

    Bottom ash from Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators (MSWIs) is mainly land filled or used as material for the foundation of road in European countries. Bottom ash is usually first crushed to below 40 mm and separated magnetically to recover the steel scrap. The remaining material contains predominantly sand, sinters and pieces of stone, glass and ceramics, which could be used as building material if strict technical and environmental requirements are respected. The main problem is the presence of residual organic matter in the ash and the large surface area presented by the fine fraction that creates leaching values, for elements such as copper, that are above the accepted levels for standard building materials. Main aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility offered by hyperspectral imaging to identify organic matter inside the residues in order to develop control/selection strategies to be implemented inside the bottom ash recycling plant. Reflectance spectra of selected bottom ash samples have been acquired in the VIS-NIR field (400- 1000 nm). Results showed as the organic content of the different samples influences the spectral signatures, in particular an inverse correlation between reflectance level and organic matter content was found.

  19. Bacterial Treatment and Metal Characterization of Biomedical Waste Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Heera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical waste ash generated due to the incineration of biomedical waste contains large amounts of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, which is disposed of in regular landfills, and results in unfavorable amounts of hazardous materials seeping into the ground and may pollute surface water and groundwater. Therefore, it is essential to remove the toxicity of ash before disposal into landfills or reutilization. Environmental characteristic analysis of BMW ash showed increased hardness (1320 mg/L and chloride (8500 mg/L content in leachate compared to World Health Organization (WHO and Environment Protection Agency (EPA guidelines for drinking water (hardness, 300 mg/L; chloride, 250 mg/L. The alkalinity and pH of the ash leachate were 400 mg/L and 8.35, respectively. In this paper, study was carried out to investigate the metal tolerance level of bacterial isolates isolated from soil. The isolate Bacillus sp. KGMDI can tolerate up to 75 mg/L of metal concentration (Mn, Mo, Cr, Fe, Cu, and Zn in enriched growth medium. This shows that the isolated culture is capable of growing in presence of high concentration of heavy metals and acts as potential biological tool to reduce the negative impact of BMW ash on the environment during landfilling.

  20. Characterization of Fly Ash from Coal-Fired Power Plant and Their Properties of Mercury Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Jiang, Xiumin; Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo; Ren, Jianxing

    2015-12-01

    Recent research has shown that fly ash may catalyze the oxidation of elemental mercury and facilitate its removal. However, the nature of mercury-fly ash interaction is still unknown, and the mechanism of mercury retention in fly ash needs to be investigated more thoroughly. In this work, a fly ash from a coal-fired power plant is used to characterize the inorganic and organic constituents and then evaluate its mercury retention capacities. The as-received fly ash sample is mechanically sieved to obtain five size fractions. Their characteristics are examined by loss on ignition (LOI), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectra. The results show that the unburned carbon (UBC) content and UBC structural ordering decrease with a decreasing particle size for the five ashes. The morphologies of different size fractions of as-received fly ash change from the glass microspheres to irregular shapes as the particle size increases, but there is no correlation between particle size and mineralogical compositions in each size fraction. The adsorption experimental studies show that the mercury-retention capacity of fly ash depends on the particle size, UBC, and the type of inorganic constituents. Mercury retention of the types of sp2 carbon is similar to that of sp3 carbon.

  1. Geotechnical and Physico-Chemical Characterization of Low Lime Fly Ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Ali Baig Moghal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the possibility of using low-lime fly ashes, the physical and chemical properties which have a direct bearing on their geotechnical and geoenvironmental behaviors have been investigated. In this paper, two types of low-lime fly ashes, originating from India, have been used. A brief account of various methods adopted in characterizing their physical, chemical, and geotechnical properties is presented. The relative importance of each of these properties in enhancing the bulk applicability of fly ashes has been brought out.

  2. Thermal and Ash Characterization of Indonesian Bamboo and Its Potential for Solid Fuel and Waste Valorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilina Purbasari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo has been widely used in Indonesia for construction, handicrafts, furniture and other uses. However, the use of bamboo as a biomass for renewable energy source has not been extensively explored. This paper describes the thermal and ash characterization of three bamboo species found in Indonesia, i.e. Gigantochloa apus, Gigantochloa levis and Gigantochloa atroviolacea. Characterization of bamboo properties as a solid fuel includes proximate and ultimate analyses, calorific value measurement and thermogravimetric analysis. Ash characterization includes oxide composition analysis and phase analysis by X-Ray diffraction. The selected bamboo species have calorific value comparable with wood with low nitrogen and sulphur contents, indicating that they can be used as renewable energy sources. Bamboo ash contains high silicon so that bamboo ash has potential to be used further as building materials or engineering purposes. Ash composition analysis also indicates high alkali that can cause ash sintering and slag formation in combustion process. This implies that the combustion of bamboo requires the use of additives to reduce the risk of ash sintering and slag formation. Article History: Received May 15, 2016; Received in revised form July 2nd, 2016; Accepted July 14th, 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Purbasari, A., Samadhi, T.W. & Bindar, Y. (2016 Thermal and Ash Characterization of Indonesian Bamboo and its Potential for Solid Fuel and Waste Valorization. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(2, 95-100. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.2.96-100 

  3. Characterization of Class F Fly Ash Using STXM: Identifying Intraparticle Heterogeneity at Nanometer Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, J.; S. Chae; Chou, K.W.; Tyliszczak, T.; P.J.M. Monteiro

    2016-01-01

    Chemical and physical characterization of fly ash particles were conducted using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Compositional and spatial investigation and correlation among the main elemental constituents of fly ash (Al, Si, and Fe) were conducted based on microscopic and NEXAFS spectral analysis. Homogeneous oxidation and coordination state of Al and Fe were observed whereas Si shows spatial variation in its chemical state. We also identified that Si and Al are spatially cor...

  4. A Brief Description Of Characterization Of Frank Mccourt’ Novel Angela’S Ashes

    OpenAIRE

    Situngkir, Herlinda

    2010-01-01

    Kegiatan menulis memegang peranan penting dalam setiap pembelajaran ilmu bahasa. Menulis merupakan sarana untuk menuangkan ide atau pokok pikian dalam sebuah tulisan, dan tulisan tersebut berfungsi untuk menyampakan informasi pada pembaca. Kertas karya ini berjudul A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF CHARACTERIZATION OF FRANK McCOURT’ NOVEL ANGELA’S ASHES yang mempelajari tentang penokohan atau peran dari novel karya FRANK McCOURT yang berjudul ANGELA’S ASHES. Novel ini mengisahkan tentang perjuangan seor...

  5. Soil quality in a cropland soil treated with wood ash containing charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omil, Beatriz; Balboa, Miguel A.; Fonturbel, M. Teresa; Gartzia-Bengoetxea, Nahia; Arias-González, Ander; Vega, Jose A.; Merino, Agustin

    2014-05-01

    The strategy of the European Union "Europe 2020" states that by 2020, 20% of final energy consumption must come from renewables. In this scenario, there is an increasing use of biomass utilization for energy production. Indeed, it is expected that the production of wood-ash will increase in coming years. Wood ash, a mixture of ash and charcoal, generated as a by-product of biomass combustion in power plants, can be applied to soil to improve the soil quality and crop production. Since the residue contains significant content of charcoal, the application of mixed wood ash may also improve the SOM content and soil quality in the long term, in soils degraded as a consequence of intensive management. The objective of this study was asses the changes in SOM quality and soil properties in a degraded soils treated with wood ash containing charcoal. The study was carried out in a field devoted to cereal crops during the last decades. The soil was acidic (pH 4.5) with a low SOC content (3 %) and fine texture. The experiment was based on a randomised block design with four replicates. Each block included the following four treatments: Control, 16 Mg fly wood ash ha-1, 16 Mg mixed wood ash ha-1 (16 Mg) and 32 Mg mixed wood ash ha-1 (32 Mg). The application was carried out once. The ash used in the study was obtained from a thermal power plant and was mainly derived from the combustion of Pinus radiata bark and branches. The wood ash is highly alkaline (pH= 10), contains 10 % of highly condensed black carbon (atomic H/C ratio Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). These techniques were applied in bulk samples and aggregates of different sizes. The changes in microbial activity were studied by analysis of microbial biomass C and basal respiration. The soil bacterial community was studied by the Biolog method. Several physical properties, such soil aggregate distribution, hydraulic conductivity and available water contente were also determined. Three years after applications

  6. [Characterization of PAHs in fly ashes from coke production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Ling; Peng, Lin; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Bai, Hui-Ling; Zhang, Jian-Qiang

    2013-03-01

    In order to investigate the characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ashes from coking, PAHs in ashes from three coke production plants were analyzed with GC-MS, and the distribution characteristics of PAHs and potential toxicity risk were discussed. The sum of 16 EPA prior PAHs varied from 8.17 x 10(2) to 5.17 x 10(3) microg x g(-1). PAH contents from the coke oven (stamp charging) with the height of 3.2 m were two times higher than those from the one (top charging) with the height of 6.0 m, and PAHs in ashes from coal charging were significantly higher than those from coke pushing in the same plant. Four-ring and five-ring PAHs were the dominant species in ashes from coking and the sum of them accounted for more than 80.00% of total PAHs. Chrysene (Chr), benzo [a] anthracene (BaA) and benzo [b] fluoranthene (BbF) were abundant in all ash samples. The content of total BaP-based toxic equivalency (BaPeq) ranged from 1.64 x 10(2) to 9.57 x 10(2) microg x g(-1). From the carcinogenic point of view, besides benzo [a] pyrene (BaP), dibenz [a,h] anthracene (DbA) contributed most to the overall toxicity of PAHs, followed by BaA and BbF. BaPeq concentration from coal charging was 5.21-fold higher than that from coke pushing, indicating that different reuse ways should be considered based on their specific toxicity profiles of PAHs. PMID:23745428

  7. Kaliophilite from fly ash: synthesis, characterization and stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yao Zhitong; Xia Meisheng; Ye Ying; Zhang Lu

    2011-12-01

    Kaliophilite was synthesized by fusion method using fly ash as starting material. In this method, at first, alkaline fusion of fly ash with KOH occurs, followed by hydrothermal treatment in KOH medium. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations revealed that the synthesized kaliophilite (S-KAL) was a plate-like crystal. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed three characteristic diffraction peaks located at 2 = 19.56°, 20.78° and 28.71°, respectively. The thermal analysis indicated that the S-KAL had remarkable thermal stability when heated to 1000°C. Leaching test confirmed the high retention rate of potassium for S-KAL in boiling water for 10 h.

  8. Structural and Mechanical Characterization of Sustainable Composites Based on Recycled and Stabilized Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Besco

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results on the use of an innovative inert, based on stabilized fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration as a filler for polypropylene. The starting material, which contains large quantities of leachable Pb and Zn, was stabilized by means of an innovative process using rice husk ash as a waste silica source, together with other fly ashes, such as coal fly ash and flue gas desulfurization residues. The use of all waste materials to obtain a new filler makes the proposed technology extremely sustainable and competitive. The new composites, obtained by using the stabilized material as a filler for polypropylene, were characterized and their mechanical properties were also investigated. A comparison with a traditional polypropylene and calcium carbonate based compound was also done. This research activity was realized in the frame of the COSMOS-RICE project, financed by the EU Commission.

  9. Elemental characterization of coal ash and its leachates using sequential extraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 50 million tons of coal ash are produced annually in North America. Technological improvements in air pollution control have decreased stack emissions but have also increased contaminant concentrations in the ash of coal-fired boiler applications. The leaching of heavy metals and other elements during regulatory tests may cause coal ash to be classified as hazardous waste, complicating land disposal. The hazardous nature of coal ash remains unclear because current toxicity tests fail to effectively characterize the elemental distribution and chemical solubility of trace metals in the landfill environment. Leaching characteristics of ash samples can be investigated with various laboratory extraction procedures in association with multi-elemental analytical techniques (e.g., neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy). Such methods provide more thorough analyses of coal ash leaching dynamics than the regulatory assessments can demonstrate. Regulatory elements including Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se were shown to remain in largely insoluble forms while elements such as B and S leached at higher levels. Experimental results may assist operators of coal-fired boiler industries in selecting coal types and disposal options to curtail the leaching of potentially toxic inorganic contaminants. (author) 12 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  10. Quality assurance of MSWI bottom ash. Environmental properties; Kvalitetssaekring av slaggrus. Miljoemaessiga egenskaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flyhammar, Peter [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Engineering Geology

    2006-04-15

    In Sweden, several hundred tonnes of MSWI bottom ash are generated annually at 29 incineration plants for municipal solid waste. So far bottom ash has mainly been disposed in to landfills or used as cover material in landfills or in other construction works at landfills. A few applications of bottom ash in construction works outside landfills have been reported. A large problem for the market of bottom ash and other secondary materials outside Swedish waste treatment plants is the lack of roles and regulations for a non-polluting use. During 2002 Hartlen and Groenholm presented a proposal to a system to assure the quality of bottom ash after homogenization and stabilization. They notice that the leaching of salts and metals to ground water constitutes the largest risk for the environment during use of bottom ash. Therefore, a quality assurance of environmental properties should be based on leaching tests. The aim of this project was to study how the control of environmental properties of bottom ash (at first hand leaching properties) earlier described in e.g. a product information sheet should be worked out. The starting-point has been a control system for bottom ash developed by Sysav. Different leaching tests illustrate however different aspects of the environmental properties, e.g. short-term and long-term leaching. Limit and target values for different variables could affect both the possibilities to use bottom ash as well as the sampling from storage heaps. We have chosen to investigate pH, availability and leached amount and the connection between these variables. the possibilities to use pH or the availability to assess both short-term and longterm leaching properties. how the number of subsamples that should be collected from a storage heap is affected by different control variables and quality requirements. how bottom ash is stabilized by today's storage technology and how the technology could be improved. Our sample test of bottom ash from Swedish

  11. Quality assurance of MSWI bottom ash. Environmental properties; Kvalitetssaekring av slaggrus. Miljoemaessiga egenskaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flyhammar, Peter [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Engineering Geology

    2006-04-15

    In Sweden several hundred tonnes of MSWI bottom ash are generated annually at 29 incineration plants for municipal solid waste. So far bottom ash has mainly been disposed in to landfills or used as cover material in landfills or in other construction works at landfills. A few applications of bottom ash in construction works outside landfills have been reported. A large problem for the market of bottom ash and other secondary materials outside Swedish waste treatment plants is the lack of roles and regulations for a non-polluting use. During 2002 Hartlen and Groenholm (HG) presented a proposal to a system to assure the quality of bottom ash after homogenization and stabilization. A quality assurance of environmental properties should be based on leaching tests. The aim of this project was to study how the control of environmental properties of bottom ash earlier described in e.g. a product information sheet should be worked out. The starting-point has been a control system for bottom ash developed by the Sysav company. Different leaching tests illustrate however different aspects of the environmental properties, e.g. short-term and long-term leaching. Limit and target values for different variables could affect both the possibilities to use bottom ash as well as the sampling from storage heaps. We have chosen to investigate: pH, availability and leached amount and the connection between these variables; the possibilities to use pH or the availability to assess both short-term and long term leaching properties; how the number of subsamples that should be collected from a storage heap is affected by different control variables and quality requirements; how bottom ash is stabilized by today's storage technology and how the technology could be improved. Our sample test of bottom ash from Swedish incineration plants indicates that the availability of elements such as Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn in bottom ash usually is below Sysav's target values. Extreme values

  12. Characterization of Class F Fly Ash Using STXM: Identifying Intraparticle Heterogeneity at Nanometer Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and physical characterization of fly ash particles were conducted using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM. Compositional and spatial investigation and correlation among the main elemental constituents of fly ash (Al, Si, and Fe were conducted based on microscopic and NEXAFS spectral analysis. Homogeneous oxidation and coordination state of Al and Fe were observed whereas Si shows spatial variation in its chemical state. We also identified that Si and Al are spatially correlated at nanometer scale in which high concentration of Si and Al was concurrently and consistently observed within the 30 nm resolution whereas Fe distribution did not show any specific correlation to Al and Si. Results of this study indicate that fly ash chemical composition has heterogeneous distribution depending on the elements which would determine and result in the differences in the reactivity.

  13. Elemental characterization of coal, fly ash, and bottom ash using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 18 elements viz. Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Sr, V, Zn, Mn, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, Co, As and Cd were analyzed in coal, fly ash and bottom ash samples collected across India using an EDXRF technique. Various indices such as element enrichment ratio, enrichment factor (with respect to crustal average) and mineral composition were calculated. Around 95% of mass was reconstructed using the concentration of elements in this study for fly and bottom ash. - Highlights: • Concentrations of 18 elements were determined in coal and ash samples using EDXRF. • Mineral quantification up to 95% was carried out for fly and bottom ash samples. • Enrichment ratios of elements were calculated in combustion residue with respect to coal. • Enrichment factor with respect to crustal average was estimated for ash samples

  14. Preparation and characterization of carbon-enriched coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio, B.; Izquierdo, M.T.; Mayoral, M.C.; Bona, M.T.; Martinez-Tarazona, R.M. [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2008-09-15

    Carbon-enriched fractions have been obtained from two coal fly ash (FA) samples. The FA came from two pulverized-coal fired power stations (Lada and Escucha, Spain) and were collected from baghouse filters. Sieving was used to obtain carbon-enriched fractions, which were further subjected to two beneficiation processes: acid demineralization using HCl and HF, and oil agglomeration using soya oil-water. Yield in weight after sieving, unburned carbon content, and several physicochemical characteristics, of the obtained fractions were used to compare the performance of the beneficiation methods. Low carbon concentration was obtained by sieving. particularly in the case of Escucha FA. However, after acid demineralization or oil agglomeration, fractions containing unburned carbon in a range of 63% to 68% were obtained. These fractions showed differences in mineral phase composition and distribution depending on the FA and oil the beneficiation method used. The textural properties of the obtained fractions varied as a function of their carbon content and the beneficiation method used. However, no significant differences in morphology of the carbonaceous particles were found

  15. Metal contaminated biochar and wood ash negatively affect plant growth and soil quality after land application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D L; Quilliam, R S

    2014-07-15

    Pyrolysis or combustion of waste wood can provide a renewable source of energy and produce byproducts which can be recycled back to land. To be sustainable requires that these byproducts pose minimal threat to the environment or human health. Frequently, reclaimed waste wood is contaminated by preservative-treated timber containing high levels of heavy metals. We investigated the effect of feedstock contamination from copper-preservative treated wood on the behaviour of pyrolysis-derived biochar and combustion-derived ash in plant-soil systems. Biochar and wood ash were applied to soil at typical agronomic rates. The presence of preservative treated timber in the feedstock increased available soil Cu; however, critical Cu guidance limits were only exceeded at high rates of feedstock contamination. Negative effects on plant growth and soil quality were only seen at high levels of biochar contamination (>50% derived from preservative-treated wood). Negative effects of wood ash contamination were apparent at lower levels of contamination (>10% derived from preservative treated wood). Complete removal of preservative treated timber from wood recycling facilities is notoriously difficult and low levels of contamination are commonplace. We conclude that low levels of contamination from Cu-treated wood should pose minimal environmental risk to biochar and ash destined for land application. PMID:24915641

  16. Impact of the disposal and re-use of fly ash on water quality: the case of the Koradi and Khaperkheda thermal power plants (Maharashtra, India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadoni, M; Voltaggio, M; Sacchi, E; Sanam, R; Pujari, P R; Padmakar, C; Labhasetwar, P K; Wate, S R

    2014-05-01

    An increasing amount of fly ash from thermal power plants is produced in India every year. Its disposal is generally done in ponds after it is mixed together in suitable proportion of water to form a slurry. Fly ash from Koradi and Khaperkheda thermal power plants (Nagpur, Maharashtra) is commonly disposed in an area characterized by the presence of many small villages where the population uses the groundwater for drinking and domestic purposes. Here, the groundwater locally exceeds the concentration limits recommended by the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS, 2005) and by the World Health Organization (WHO, 2008) for Mg(2+), Ca(2+), NO3(-), SO4(2-), Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) and for some minor elements like As, Mo, V and U. A new geological map of the study area has been prepared to understand the possible water-rock interactions. An extensive geochemical survey of groundwater, stream water and fly ash was also carried out to clarify the possible origin of the pollutants by discriminating between geogenic and anthropogenic sources and to assess the influence of the ash ponds on water quality. The analytical results suggest that a large part of the sulfates in the groundwater of the villages of Masada, Khairi and Kawatha originate from the infiltration of industrial water from tens of factories that mix fly ash with relatively high quantities of gypsum and lime for the production of bricks. In addition, the interaction with the relatively U-rich Gondwana units, like Talchir formation, is probably the cause of the high concentration of this element. Results showed how the relatively high concentrations of Mo, As, B and F in circulating waters are linked to the leaching from fly ash, also pointing out a direct spatial correlation between the concentration of fluorides in the groundwater and their closeness to the ash ponds. PMID:24561295

  17. Impact of the disposal and re-use of fly ash on water quality: the case of the Koradi and Khaperkheda thermal power plants (Maharashtra, India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadoni, M; Voltaggio, M; Sacchi, E; Sanam, R; Pujari, P R; Padmakar, C; Labhasetwar, P K; Wate, S R

    2014-05-01

    An increasing amount of fly ash from thermal power plants is produced in India every year. Its disposal is generally done in ponds after it is mixed together in suitable proportion of water to form a slurry. Fly ash from Koradi and Khaperkheda thermal power plants (Nagpur, Maharashtra) is commonly disposed in an area characterized by the presence of many small villages where the population uses the groundwater for drinking and domestic purposes. Here, the groundwater locally exceeds the concentration limits recommended by the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS, 2005) and by the World Health Organization (WHO, 2008) for Mg(2+), Ca(2+), NO3(-), SO4(2-), Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) and for some minor elements like As, Mo, V and U. A new geological map of the study area has been prepared to understand the possible water-rock interactions. An extensive geochemical survey of groundwater, stream water and fly ash was also carried out to clarify the possible origin of the pollutants by discriminating between geogenic and anthropogenic sources and to assess the influence of the ash ponds on water quality. The analytical results suggest that a large part of the sulfates in the groundwater of the villages of Masada, Khairi and Kawatha originate from the infiltration of industrial water from tens of factories that mix fly ash with relatively high quantities of gypsum and lime for the production of bricks. In addition, the interaction with the relatively U-rich Gondwana units, like Talchir formation, is probably the cause of the high concentration of this element. Results showed how the relatively high concentrations of Mo, As, B and F in circulating waters are linked to the leaching from fly ash, also pointing out a direct spatial correlation between the concentration of fluorides in the groundwater and their closeness to the ash ponds.

  18. Characterization of fly ash from a power plant and surroundings by micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedes, A.; Valentim, B. [Centro de Geologia da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Prieto, A.C.; Sanz, A. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Cristalografia y Mineralogia. Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Flores, D.; Noronha, F. [Centro de Geologia da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Geologia da Faculdade de Ciencias, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2008-02-01

    Fly ash samples were collected from a Portuguese power plant that burns low-sulphur coals from South Africa, U.S.A., Colombia, and Australia. The fly ashes were collected from the hoppers of the economizers, air heaters, electrostatic precipitators, and from the stack. The power plant air monitoring system was also sampled. The fly ash characterization was conducted by micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS). The micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis permitted an efficient identification and characterization of different inorganic and organic materials present in fly ash: quartz, hematite, magnetite, calcite, glass, aluminium and calcium oxides, and different types of organic constituents. The study of the structural evolution of the unburned carbon/char material during their path through the power plant, though the use of Raman spectra and Raman parameters reveal that despite the high temperatures they reached, these materials are still structurally disordered. However, a structural evolution occurs in the char from the economizer up to the electrostatic precipitators where the char is structurally more disordered. The different features of the Raman spectra observed for carbon particles collected from the stack, together with the high range of variation of the Raman parameters, confirm the existence of different carbon particles in the stack, i.e., char and others (probably soot). The filters from the surroundings contain a variety of carbon particles with Raman parameters different from the ones obtained in the fly ash hoppers and stack. These are diesel particles as indicated by the values of W{sub D1}, FWHM{sub D1}, FWHM{sub G}, W{sub G} and ID1/IG obtained. (author)

  19. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of geopolymer synthesized from low calcium fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramar Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the mechanical and microstructural characterization of geopolymers synthesized from locally available fly ash. A low calcium fly ash was activated using a sodium silicate solution. Samples were characterized by means of flexural and compressive tests, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Porosity and pore size distributions were identified using mercury intrusion porosimetry and gas sorption. The compressive strength of the produced geopolymers, which is in the range of 1.6 to 53.3 N/mm2, is strongly related to the water content as well as SiO2/Na2O mass ratio of an alkali activator. The compressive strength significantly increased with decreases in the water content and increased silicon concentration used for the synthesis of geopolymers.

  20. Recovered fuels - The connection between fuel preparation, combustion equipments and ash quality; Returbraenslen - kopplingen mellan braensleberedning, foerbraenningsutrustning och askkvalitet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyllenhammar, Marianne; Johansson, Inge [S.E.P. Scandinavian Energy Project AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    The lack of bio fuel and new regulations of waste treatment have increased the interest of recovered fuels. Co-combustion is of great interest, but the consequences and permit handling involved in introducing a new fuel into a plant have to be investigated. The aim of this study is to see if it is possible to affect the ash quality by pre-treatment of the fuel, or by firing in different combustion equipments. Ashes can be used in several different types of applications. Few of these have uniform requirements of ash quality. The ongoing research will hopefully help generating unified regulations and recommendations for the uses of ashes. However, right now the knowledge is limited and very specific. Every type of ash has to be analysed for the appropriate use. It is especially the requirements of leaching that are difficult to make general. The work started with a survey of recovered fuels. It contains roughly which fuels exist and which of those are accessible for the energy market in Sweden. The survey showed that there are approximately 13 Mton/y wastes partly accessible to the energy market; 50 % are used for material recycling, 32 % for energy recovery, 1.5 % for composting and the rest are used as landfill. Three recovered fuels were chosen and studied more thoroughly. These were PTP (paper, wood and plastic), tires and impregnated wood. The project showed that the recovered fuels have different qualifications as fuels and have different possibilities at co-combustion which results in variable ash quality. A pre-treated fuel is more homogeneous which give better combustion and cleaner ashes. A fluidised bed demands a more pre-treated fuel than a grate and the fluidised bed generate more ashes because the ashes contain bed material. As a result of this the ashes from a fluidised bed is generally easier to utilize. In this project the composition of ashes from co-combustion of the three recovered fuels together with wood fuel has been estimated. The aim was to

  1. Fabrication and Characterization of A356.2-Rice Husk Ash Composite using Stir casting technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.SIVA PRASAD,

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication and characterization of A356.2 alloy reinforced with rice husk ash (RHA particles are dealt in the present study. The metal matrix composites (MMC’s were prepared by addition of 2, 4 and 8 wt% RHA particulates through stir casting technique. Scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer is used for micro structural characterization and the presence of silicon particles in the composites. Mechanical properties like density and hardness were measured for the composites. As the percentage of RHAparticles increases, the density of the composites decreases and there is slight increase in the hardness were observed.

  2. Transcriptomic signatures of ash (Fraxinus spp. phloem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Bai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ash (Fraxinus spp. is a dominant tree species throughout urban and forested landscapes of North America (NA. The rapid invasion of NA by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis, a wood-boring beetle endemic to Eastern Asia, has resulted in the death of millions of ash trees and threatens billions more. Larvae feed primarily on phloem tissue, which girdles and kills the tree. While NA ash species including black (F. nigra, green (F. pennsylvannica and white (F. americana are highly susceptible, the Asian species Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica is resistant to A. planipennis perhaps due to their co-evolutionary history. Little is known about the molecular genetics of ash. Hence, we undertook a functional genomics approach to identify the repertoire of genes expressed in ash phloem. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using 454 pyrosequencing we obtained 58,673 high quality ash sequences from pooled phloem samples of green, white, black, blue and Manchurian ash. Intriguingly, 45% of the deduced proteins were not significantly similar to any sequences in the GenBank non-redundant database. KEGG analysis of the ash sequences revealed a high occurrence of defense related genes. Expression analysis of early regulators potentially involved in plant defense (i.e. transcription factors, calcium dependent protein kinases and a lipoxygenase 3 revealed higher mRNA levels in resistant ash compared to susceptible ash species. Lastly, we predicted a total of 1,272 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 980 microsatellite loci, among which seven microsatellite loci showed polymorphism between different ash species. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The current transcriptomic data provide an invaluable resource for understanding the genetic make-up of ash phloem, the target tissue of A. planipennis. These data along with future functional studies could lead to the identification/characterization of defense genes involved in resistance of ash to A. planipennis

  3. Synthesis and characterization of zeolite material from coal ashes modified by surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal ash was used as starting material for zeolite synthesis by means of hydrothermal treatment. The surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) was prepared by adsorbing the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA-Br) on the external surface of the zeolite from coal ash. The zeolite structure stability was monitored during the characterization of the materials by FTIR, XDR and SEM. The structural parameters of surfactant-modified zeolite are very close to that of corresponding non-modified zeolite which indicates that the crystalline nature of the zeolite remained intact after required chemical treatment with HDTMA-Br molecules and heating treatment for drying. The most intense peaks in the FTIR spectrum of HDTMA-Br were observed in SMZ spectrum confirming adsorption of surfactant on zeolites. (author)

  4. Synthesis, characterization and low frequency a.c. conduction of polyaniline/fly ash composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Raghavendra; Syed Khasim; M Revanasiddappa; M V N Ambika Prasad; A B Kulkarni

    2003-12-01

    in situ polymerization of aniline was carried out in the presence of fly ash (FA) to synthesize polyaniline/fly ash (PANI/FA) composites. The PANI/FA composites have been synthesized with various compositions (15, 20, 30 and 40 wt%) of FA in PANI. The composites, thus synthesized have been characterized by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The morphology of these samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Further the a.c. conductivity of these composites have been investigated in the frequency range 102–106 Hz. The presence of polarons and bipolarons are made responsible for frequency dependence of a.c. conductivity in these composites. The Cole–Cole plots indicate clear shift in the distribution of relaxation times as the wt% of FA in PANI changes. These composites show almost symmetric semicircles of Cole–Cole plots indicating the Debye-type relaxation in their polarization response.

  5. Human urine and wood ash as plant nutrients for red beet (Beta vulgaris) cultivation: impacts on yield quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Surendra K; Holopainen, Jarmo K; Weisell, Janne; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi

    2010-02-10

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of human urine and wood ash fertilization on the yield and quality of red beet by measuring the microbial, nutrient, and antioxidant (betanin) content of the roots. Red beets were fertilized with 133 kg of N/ha as mineral fertilizer, urine and ash, and only urine with no fertilizer as a control. The mineral-fertilized plants and urine- and ash-fertilized plants also received 89 kg of P/ha. Urine and ash and only urine fertilizer produced 1720 and 656 kg/ha more root biomass, respectively, versus what was obtained from the mineral fertilizer. Few fecal coliforms and coliphage were detected in mineral-fertilized and urine- and ash-fertilized red beet roots. The protein and betanin contents in red beet roots were similar in all treatments. In conclusion, this study revealed that urine with or without ash can increase the yield of red beet and furthermore the microbial quality and chemical quality were similar to the situation in mineral-fertilized products. PMID:20050665

  6. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  7. Characterization of ashes from a 100 kWth pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed with oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.H.; Wang, C.B.; Tan, Y.W.; Jia, L.F.; Anthony, E.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Oxy-fuel combustion experiments have been carried out on an oxygen-fired 100 kW(th) mini-circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) facility. Coal and petroleum coke were used as fuel together with different limestones (and fixed Ca:S molar ratios) premixed with the fuel, for in situ SO{sub 2} capture. The bed ash (BA) and fly ash (FA) samples produced from this unit were collected and characterized to obtain physical and chemical properties of the ash samples. The characterization methods used included X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), char carbon and free lime analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and surface analysis. The main purpose of this work is to characterize the CFBC ashes from oxy-fuel firing to obtain a better understanding of the combustion process, and to identify any significant differences from the ash generated by a conventional air-fired CFBC. The primary difference in the sulfur capture mechanism between atmospheric air-fired and oxy-fuel FBC, at typical FBC temperatures (similar to 850{sup o}C), is that, in the air-fired case the limestone sorbents calcine, whereas the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} in oxy-fuel FBC is high enough to prevent calcination, and hence the sulfation process should mimic that seen in pressurized FBC (PFBC). Here, the char carbon content in the fly ash was much higher than that in the bed ash, and was also high by comparison with ash obtained from conventional commercial air-firing CFBC units. In addition, measurements of the free lime content in the bed and fly ash showed that the unreacted Ca sorbent was present primarily as CaCO{sub 3}, indicating that sulfur capture in the oxy-fuel combustor occurred via direct sulfation.

  8. A Multi-Sensor Approach for Volcanic Ash Cloud Retrieval and Eruption Characterization: The 23 November 2013 Etna Lava Fountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Corradini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic activity is observed worldwide with a variety of ground and space-based remote sensing instruments, each with advantages and drawbacks. No single system can give a comprehensive description of eruptive activity, and so, a multi-sensor approach is required. This work integrates infrared and microwave volcanic ash retrievals obtained from the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG-Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI, the polar-orbiting Aqua-MODIS and ground-based weather radar. The expected outcomes are improvements in satellite volcanic ash cloud retrieval (altitude, mass, aerosol optical depth and effective radius, the generation of new satellite products (ash concentration and particle number density in the thermal infrared and better characterization of volcanic eruptions (plume altitude, total ash mass erupted and particle number density from thermal infrared to microwave. This approach is the core of the multi-platform volcanic ash cloud estimation procedure being developed within the European FP7-APhoRISM project. The Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy volcano lava fountaining event of 23 November 2013 was considered as a test case. The results of the integration show the presence of two volcanic cloud layers at different altitudes. The improvement of the volcanic ash cloud altitude leads to a mean difference between the SEVIRI ash mass estimations, before and after the integration, of about the 30%. Moreover, the percentage of the airborne “fine” ash retrieved from the satellite is estimated to be about 1%–2% of the total ash emitted during the eruption. Finally, all of the estimated parameters (volcanic ash cloud altitude, thickness and total mass were also validated with ground-based visible camera measurements, HYSPLIT forward trajectories, Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI satellite data and tephra deposits.

  9. Characterization of high-calcium fly ash and its influence on ettringite formation in portland cement pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishmack, Jody Kathleen

    High-calcium Class C fly ashes derived from Powder River Basin coal are currently used as supplementary cementing materials in portland cement concrete. These fly ashes tend to contain significant amounts of sulfur, calcium, and aluminum, thus they are potential sources of ettringite. Characterization of six high-calcium fly ashes originating from Powder River Basin coal have been carried out. The hydration products formed in pastes made from fly ash and water were investigated. The principal phases produced at room temperature were ettringite, monosulfate, and stratlingite. The relative amounts formed varied with the specific fly ash. Removal of the soluble crystalline sulfur bearing minerals indicated that approximately a third of the sulfur is located in the fly ash glass. Pore solution analyses indicated that sulfur concentrations increased at later ages. Three fly ashes were selected for further study based on their ability to form ettringite. Portland cement-fly ash pastes made with the selected fly ashes were investigated to evaluate ettringite and monosulfate formation. Each of the fly ashes were mixed with four different types of portland cements (Type I, I/II, II, and III) as well as three different Type I cements exhibiting a range of C3A and sulfate contents. The pastes had 25% or 35% fly ash by total weight of solids and a water:cement-fly ash ratio of 0.45. The samples were placed in a curing room (R.H. = 100, 23°C) and were then analyzed at various ages by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine the principal hydration products. The hydration products identified by XRD were portlandite, ettringite (an AFt phase), monosulfate, and generally smaller amounts of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate (all AFm phases). Although the amount of ettringite formed varied with the individual cement, only a modest correlation with cement sulfate content and no correlation with cement C3A content was observed. DSC

  10. Radiological characterization of the coal ash and slag from Kastel Gomilica, Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovrencic, I.; Orescanin, V.; Barisic, D.; Mikelic, L.; Rozmaric Macefat, M.; Lulic, St. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Pavlovic, G. [Zagreb Univ., Faculty of Science, Dept. of Mineralogy and Petrography (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    objective of this study was radiological characterization of slag and ash produced in a thermo electric unit of the former 'Adriavinil' chemical factory as a by-product of coal combustion and deposited in the Kastel Gomilica region, Croatia. The waste material was deposited in the 'old' regulated and the 'new' unregulated part of the depot. 33 samples were analyzed to obtain a preliminary data on the present state of the new unregulated part of the depot. Activities of the selected radionuclides (40 K, 232 Th, 235 U and 226 Ra) were measured using gamma-spectrometry method. 238 U activity was calculated from the assumed natural 235 U /238 U activity ratio. It is found that there is a dependence of the activities of the selected radionuclides on the activities of the coal used for energy production in the power unit. The content of 232 Th, 226 Ra and 238 U in slag and ash increased several times during the combustion process. Investigated slag and ash showed a significant variability in their activities of selected radionuclides due to a different origin of coal used in the thermoelectric unit of the factory. The waste material was characterized by high activity of naturally occurring 238 U, 235 U and 226 Ra. 226 Ra and 238 U activities were up to 50 times higher than their average activities characteristic for surrounding soils developed on flysch sediments. 40 K and 232 Th showed no elevation compared to soil activities. Mineralogical analysis has been made as well. (authors)

  11. Ultrasonic characterization of GRC with high percentage of fly ash substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovés, V; Gosálbez, J; Miralles, R; Bonilla, M; Payá, J

    2015-07-01

    New applications of non-destructive techniques (NDT) with ultrasonic tests (attenuation and velocity by means of ultrasonic frequency sweeps) have been developed for the characterization of fibre-reinforced cementitious composites. According to new lines of research on glass-fibre reinforced cement (GRC) matrix modification, two similar GRC composites with high percentages of fly ash and different water/binder ratios will be studied. Conventional techniques have been used to confirm their low Ca(OH)(2) content (thermogravimetry), fibre integrity (Scanning Electron Microscopy), low porosity (Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry) and good mechanical properties (compression and four points bending test). Ultrasound frequency sweeps allowed the estimation of the attenuation and pulse velocity as functions of frequency. This ultrasonic characterization was correlated successfully with conventional techniques. PMID:25771299

  12. Characterization of a volcanic ash episode in southern Finland caused by the Grimsvötn eruption in Iceland in May 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.-M. Kerminen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The volcanic eruption of Grimsvötn in Iceland in May 2011 affected surface-layer air quality at several locations in Northern Europe. In Helsinki, Finland, the main pollution episode lasted for more than 8 h around the noon of 25 May. We characterized this episode by relying on detailed physical, chemical and optical aerosol measurements. The analysis was aided by air mass trajectory calculations, satellite measurements, and dispersion model simulations. During the episode, volcanic ash particles were present at sizes from less than 0.5 μm up to sizes >10 μm. The mass mean diameter of ash particles was a few μm in the Helsinki area, and the ash enhanced PM10 mass concentrations up to several tens of μg m−3. Individual particle analysis showed that some ash particles appeared almost non-reacted during the atmospheric transportation, while most of them were mixed with sea salt or other type of particulate matter. Also sulfate of volcanic origin appeared to have been transported to our measurement site, but its contribution to the aerosol mass was minor due the separation of ash-particle and sulfur dioxide plumes shortly after the eruption. The volcanic material had very little effect on PM1 mass concentrations or sub-micron particle number size distributions in the Helsinki area. The aerosol scattering coefficient was increased and visibility was slightly decreased during the episode, but in general changes in aerosol optical properties due to volcanic aerosols seem to be difficult to be distinguished from those induced by other pollutants present in a continental boundary layer. The case investigated here demonstrates clearly the power of combining surface aerosol measurements, dispersion model simulations and satellite measurements in analyzing surface air pollution episodes caused by volcanic eruptions. None of these three approaches alone would be sufficient to forecast, or even to unambiguously identify

  13. Characterization of a volcanic ash episode in southern Finland caused by the Grimsvötn eruption in Iceland in May 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.-M. Kerminen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The volcanic eruption of Grimsvötn in Iceland in May 2011, affected surface-layer air quality at several locations in Northern Europe. In Helsinki, Finland, the main pollution episode lasted for more than 8 h around the noon of 25 May. We characterized this episode by relying on detailed physical, chemical and optical aerosol measurements. The analysis was aided by air mass trajectory calculations, satellite measurements, and dispersion model simulations. During the episode, volcanic ash particles were present at sizes from less than 0.5 μm up to sizes >10 μm. The mass mean diameter of ash particles was a few μm in the Helsinki area, and the ash enhanced PM10 mass concentrations up to several tens of μg m−3. Individual particle analysis showed that some ash particles appeared almost non-reacted during the atmospheric transportation, while most of them were mixed with sea salt or other type of particulate matter. Also sulfate of volcanic origin appeared to have been transported to our measurement site, but its contribution to the aerosol mass was minor due the separation of ash-particle and sulfur dioxide plumes shortly after the eruption. The volcanic material had very little effect on PM1 mass concentrations or sub-micron particle number size distributions in the Helsinki area. The aerosol scattering coefficient was increased and visibility was slightly decreased during the episode, but in general changes in aerosol optical properties due to volcanic aerosols seem to be difficult to be distinguished from those induced by other pollutants present in a continental boundary layer. The case investigated here demonstrates clearly the power of combining surface aerosol measurements, dispersion model simulations and satellite measurements in analyzing surface air pollution episodes caused by volcanic eruptions. None of these three approaches alone would be sufficient to forecast, or even to unambiguously

  14. M(o)ssbauer spectroscopic studies the characterization of three China coal and the corresponding fly-ashes and bottom ashes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Duo-xi; ZHI Xia-chen

    2006-01-01

    Three fresh China coals (lignitie, bituminite and anthracite) from different geological origin and the corresponding fly and bottom ashes were studied by room temperature(RT) M(o)ssbauer spectroscopy(MS). The iron-bearing minerals were characterized to was found in bituminite and anthracite coal.The M(o)ssbauer spectra of the fly and bottom ashes as a result of pulverised coal combustion(PCC) in Xiaolongtan,Shuicheng and Luohuang Power Plants are comprised of superimposed sextets and doulets of oxides includes maghemite(γ-Fe2O3), magnitite(Fe3O4), haematite(α-Fe2O3), magnesioferite (MgFe2O4), Fe3+/Fe2+-mullite, Fe3+-glass silicate andmetallic iron. The studies also show that iron-bearing minerals in coals are largely dependant on geological regions and coal rank, the composition of the corresponding fly and bottom ashes will not only depend on the type and mineralogy of the feed coal but also on the local nature of combustion.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Microwave Sintered Silica Xerogel Produced from Rice Husk Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudiana, I. N.; Mitsudo, S.; Nishiwaki, T.; Susilowati, P. E.; Lestari, L.; Firihu, M. Z.; Aripin, H.

    2016-08-01

    Silica xerogel ceramic produced from rice husk ash (RHA) taken from South East Sulawesi Indonesia has been successfully sintered by using a millimeter waves (MMW) heating system with a 28 GHz gyrotron as radiation source. The ceramic was also sintered by using an electric furnace where served as a comparison. Densification, microstructural, and morphological characterization of the silica were then investigated by using an Archimedes densification measurement method device, a X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), respectively. Effect of microwave energy on the properties of silica xerogel ceramic were evaluated and discussed and compared to conventionally sintered results. The notably different densification and microstructure of sintered samples after sintering were found. The results suggest that microwave radiation provides a microwave effect during sintering.

  16. Preparation and characterization of a novel bone graft composite containing bone ash and egg shell powder

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gunasekaran Krithiga; Thotapalli P Sastry

    2011-02-01

    Egg shells which were hitherto discarded as wastes were collected, purified and powdered into a particle size in the range of 5–50 m. A composite bone graft material in cylindrical form was prepared using egg shell powder (ESP), bone ash (BA) and gelatin. These bone grafts were characterized for their FT–IR, TGA, XRD, SEM and mechanical properties. The mechanical studies indicate that the composite having a stoichiometric ratio of BA (3 g) and ESP (7 g) has shown better mechanical properties. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data indicated the crystallographic nature of BA is akin to hydroxyapatite (HA) and both BA and ESP did not lose their crystalline nature when bone grafts were prepared. This revealed that ESP may be used as a component in bone graft utilizing the solid waste from the poultry industry.

  17. Surface and bulk characterization of an ultrafine South African coal fly ash with reference to polymer applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, E. M.; Prinsloo, L. C.; Mathebula, C. L.; Swart, H. C.; Coetsee, E.; Doucet, F. J.

    2014-10-01

    South African coal-fired power stations produce about 25 million tons of fly ash per annum, of which only approximately 5% is currently reused. A growing concern about pollution and increasing landfill costs stimulates research into new ways to utilize coal fly ash for economically beneficial applications. Fly ash particles may be used as inorganic filler in polymers, an application which generally requires the modification of their surface properties. In order to design experiments that will result in controlled changes in surface chemistry and morphology, a detailed knowledge of the bulk chemical and mineralogical compositions of untreated fly ash particles, as well as their morphology and surface properties, is needed. In this paper, a combination of complementary bulk and surface techniques was explored to assess the physicochemical properties of a classified, ultrafine coal fly ash sample, and the findings were discussed in the context of polymer application as fillers. The sample was categorized as a Class F fly ash (XRF). Sixty-two percent of the sample was an amorphous glass phase, with mullite and quartz being the main identified crystalline phases (XRD, FTIR). Quantitative carbon and sulfur analysis reported a total bulk carbon and sulfur content of 0.37% and 0.16% respectively. The spatial distribution of the phases was determined by 2D mapping of Raman spectra, while TGA showed a very low weight loss for temperatures ranging between 25 and 1000 °C. Individual fly ash particles were characterized by a monomodal size distribution (PSD) of spherical particles with smooth surfaces (SEM, TEM, AFM), and a mean particle size of 4.6 μm (PSD). The BET active surface area of this sample was 1.52 m2/g and the chemical composition of the fly ash surface (AES, XPS) was significantly different from the bulk composition and varied considerably between spheres. Many properties of the sample (e.g. spherical morphology, small particle size, thermal stability) appeared

  18. Geochemical and Petrographic Characterization of Ash in the Cretaceous Eagle Ford Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronay, E.; Lee, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Eagle Ford Formation is composed of highly laminated, organic rich shales and marls interbedded with volcanic ash. Discrete ash beds are easy to identify in outcrop as recessed layers between more resistant rock. In the finely laminated shales, the ash cannot be identified visually, which fosters the questions of whether ash is present in these shales and how that can be determined. The ash is thought to come from volcanic activity in western North America during the Cenomanian and Turonian, depositing in the Western Interior Seaway in what is now South Texas. Samples of known ash-rich beds from the Eagle Ford were analyzed using micro-XRF and thin section petrography in conjunction with ICP-MS laser ablation to determine the geochemical composition of the samples. The high CaCO3 content of the marls diluted the ash in each sample so elemental data were used to separate the two components. The amount of Ca in the ash from the total measured Ca was unknown. Carbonate takes Sr but not Al, therefore the y-intercept of a Ca/Al vs. Sr/Al graph gave the concentration of Ca in the non-carbonate components. This method was used for every cation to gather a generalized overall composition of the present day ash. The ash was found to have been altered to clays, resulting in a substantial loss of Si and thereby making the original composition of the ash indeterminable. However, certain elements like Ti and Zr are not as significantly affected by weathering. Using an empirical relationship between Ti/Zr and SiO2 in magmatic rocks from the Cretaceous Peninsular Ranges batholith, the likely source of ash, our measured Ti/Zr was used to determine the original SiO2 percentage in the ash, giving a range of 60-75 wt%. This was also checked by a Ti/Al regression analysis from the same Peninsular Ranges data, which gave a range of 67-72 wt% SiO2. These results suggest that the ash came from andesitic to rhyolitic eruptions. The discrepancy in Ti/Al and Ti/Zr calculated SiO2

  19. Characterization of bottom ashes from coal pulverized power plants to determine their potential use feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menendez, E.; Alvaro, A. M.; Argiz, C.; Parra, J. L.; Moragues, A.

    2013-07-01

    The disposal of coal by products represents environmental and economical problems around the world. Therefore, the reuse and valorisation of this waste has become an important issue in the last decades. While high-value construction products containing fly ash were developed and its use is actually totally accepted as an addition to cement, the use of the bottom ash as supplementary cementitious material has not been allow. This paper examines the chemical and physical properties of fly ashes and bottom ashes from two different coal power plants in order to compare them and analyse the potential feasibility of bottom ash as cement replacement. The mechanical properties of cement mortars made with different percentages of both ashes were also study. The results obtained showed similar chemical composition of both kinds of ashes. The compressive strength values of mortars with 10 % and 25 % of cement replacement (at 28 days) were above the limits established in European standards and there were not significant differences between fly ash and bottom ash from both origins. (Author)

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and mercury adsorption properties of hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve prepared with fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve (HMAS) was prepared with fly ash and impregnated with zeolite A precursors. This improved the mercury adsorption of HMAS compared to original MCM-41. The HMAS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and 29Si and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. These showed that the HMAS structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A. But the surface area and pore diameter of HMAS decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution was studied on untreated MCM-41and HMAS. The mercury adsorption rate of HMAS was higher than that of origin MCM-41. The adsorption of mercury was investigated on HMAS regarding the pH of mercury solution, initial mercury concentration, and the reaction temperature. The experimental data fit well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Dublin–Radushkevich isotherm and the characterization show that the mercury adsorption on HMAS involved the ion-exchange mechanisms. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. The adsorption of mercury on HMAS followed the first order kinetics.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and mercury adsorption properties of hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve prepared with fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Minmin [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Hou, Li-an, E-mail: 11liuminmin@tongji.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Xunfeng [China Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 200012 (China)

    2013-05-15

    A novel hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve (HMAS) was prepared with fly ash and impregnated with zeolite A precursors. This improved the mercury adsorption of HMAS compared to original MCM-41. The HMAS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. These showed that the HMAS structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A. But the surface area and pore diameter of HMAS decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution was studied on untreated MCM-41and HMAS. The mercury adsorption rate of HMAS was higher than that of origin MCM-41. The adsorption of mercury was investigated on HMAS regarding the pH of mercury solution, initial mercury concentration, and the reaction temperature. The experimental data fit well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Dublin–Radushkevich isotherm and the characterization show that the mercury adsorption on HMAS involved the ion-exchange mechanisms. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. The adsorption of mercury on HMAS followed the first order kinetics.

  2. Characterization and electrodialytic treatment of wood combustion fly ash for removal of cadmium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2003-01-01

    -for the aim of recycling-was described. Initial characterisation of the experimental ash showed that the Cd content exceeded the limiting values for agricultural use and therefore needed treatment before being recycled. The pH in the ash was very high (13.3), and the Cd was not soluble at these alkaline...

  3. Fly ash characterization and application in Al-based Mg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuing study in metallurgical field calls for growing reinforcements of which fly ash plays an important role. In this study, Al alloys were reinforced with different solid fly ash particles. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses were used to identify the fly ash particles, and they were also applied to the composite alloys. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that the crystalline phase of the fly ash was an effective reinforced phase. Meanwhile, the SEM and optical micrographs of the composite samples indicated that fly ash could be reacted or settled in the matrix of the aluminium. The physical, tribological and microhardness analyses were also used to study the Al-fly ash composites. The best wear resistance corresponding to the lowest loss was obtained in the samples with as-received fly ash which were mostly in accordance with the results in the samples containing treated fly ash. Meanwhile, the proportion of the wear results to the hardness of the samples was observed. Finally, the light weight Al alloys was realized, and increasing the strength is a likeness.

  4. Soil quality, crop productivity and soil organic matter (SOM) priming in biochar and wood ash amended soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Eleanor Swain; Chadwick, David; Hill, Paul; Jones, Davey

    2016-04-01

    The application of energy production by-products as soil amendments to agricultural land is rapidly growing in popularity, however the increasing body of literature on primarily biochar but also wood ash have yielded contrary evidence of the range of these soil amendments function sensitivity in soil. This study aims to assess the efficacy of two by-products; biochar and wood ash to provide nutrients to grassland as well as the potential to improve overall soil quality. The study of soil amendments at field scale are scarce, and the agronomic benefits of biochar and wood ash in temperate soils remain unclear. We used replicated field plots with three soil treatments (biochar, wood ash and control) to measure the soil and crop properties over twelve months, including PLFA analysis to quantify the total soil microbial biomass and community structure. After a soil residency of one year, there were no significant differences in soil EC, total N, dissolved organic N (DON), dissolved organic C (DOC), NO3-N and NH4-N concentrations, between biochar amended, wood ash amended and un-amended soil. In contrast, the application of biochar had a significant effect on soil moisture, pH, PO4-P concentrations, soil organic carbon (SOC) and total organic carbon (TOC), whilst the wood ash amendment resulted in an increase in soil pH only. There were no significant treatment effects on the growth performance or nutrient uptake of the grass. In a parallel laboratory incubation study, the effects of biochar and wood ash on soil C priming was explored, in which soil with 14C-labelled native SOC was amended with either biochar or wood ash at the same rate as the field trial. The rates of 14CO2 (primed C) production was measured with a liquid scintillation counter over a 50 day period. The 14CO2 that evolved during decomposition likely originated from conversions in the (microbial) biomass. The results indicated that biochar application did not prime for the loss of native SOC (i.e. there

  5. Circulating fluidized bed combustion ash characterization. The case of the Provence 250 MW unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecuyer, I.; Leduc, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Lefevre, R.; Ausset, P. [Paris-12 Univ., Creteil (France). Lab. Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques

    1997-05-01

    The Provence 250 MW Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion Unit (Gardanne, France) is burning a high sulfur (2 to 4%), high ash content (30%) local lignite. This peculiar fuel already contains about 15% of CaO which allows it to capture the sulfur dioxide in situ without adding any complementary sorbent. The ash chemical composition (bed ash and ESP ash) that reflects the particularities of the coal is presented. SEM and DRX observations confirm the presence of anhydrite CaSO{sub 4}, lime, CaS, quartz and traces of hematite. Most of particles are roughly-shaped but microspheres can also be detected in fly ash. The very high sulfate content may be worrying for the environment in disposals. Hardened samples do not seem to retain compounds from leaching: high quantities of calcium and sulfates are still leached from these crushed samples. (author) 10 refs.

  6. Characterization of black carbon and organic contaminants in wood ash from different feedstocks and types of furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Agustin; Rey-Salgueiro, Ledicia; Omil, Beatriz; Martinez-Carballo, Elena; Simal-Gandara, Jesus

    2015-04-01

    Due to their important concentration of nutrient and charcoal, wood ash from biomass power plants (WA) can be used as a fertilizer and organic amendment in intensively managed soils. Unlike biochar produced in under anoxic conditions, the nature of the organic compounds present in wood ash has been scarcely studied. Due to the incomplete combustion, wood ash may contain a wide range of organic compounds, from charred to highly condensed refractory biomass, which determines the possibilities of WA as an organic amendment. In addition, the possible environmental risk of this practice must be assessed by determining the content of water-soluble and insoluble organic contaminants. due to the incomplete combustion of organic matter, organic pollutants, such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), can be formed and can remain in the combustion residue. Also, the four alkyl benzene volatile organic compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the ortho, para, and meta xylenes) can be formed, depending on certain conditions during combustion. For this study 15 biomass power stations in Spain were selected. In all of them the feedstock is pine or eucalyptus branches and bark. Nine of them were bottom wood ash generated from wood fires furnaces, obtained from grate-fired or water-tube boilers. Whereas four of them were fly ash, obtained in cyclone separators. The samples were collected following a common procedure to ensure the representiveness of the sampling. Bottom ash samples were fraccionated in three fractions: 5mm. Each fraction was characterized for organic matter and BTEX, styrene and total petroleum hydrocarbons Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. For each analyzes, three replicates were analyzed per sample. Mixes wood ash shows higher amounts of charred material than fly ash. The 13 C CPMAS NMR, DSC/TG and FTIR analysis showed the loss of carbohydrates and aliphatic constituents and revealed the formation of aromatic compounds. The atomic H/C ratios, NMR

  7. Acid mine drainage abatement using fluidized bed combustion ash grout after geophysical site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyritic coal refuse and pit cleanings buried in a 15-ha (37-acre) surface mine produce severe acid mine drainage (AMD). The pyritic material had been buried in discrete piles or pods in the backfill. The pods and the resulting contaminant plumes were initially defined using geophysical techniques and were confirmed by drilling. Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash, mixed with water to form a grout, was used in different ways to isolate the pyritic material from water and oxygen. In the first approach, grout was pressure injected directly into the buried pods to fill the void spaces within the pods and to coat the pyritic materials with a cementitious layer. A second approach used the grout to divert water from specific areas. Pods which did not accept grout because of a clay matrix were isolated from percolating water with a cap and trench seal of the grout. The grout was also used in certain areas to blanket the clay pit floor since clays are believed to be a primary source of aluminum at this site. In certain areas, the AMD migrates downward though fractures in the pit floor to the groundwater table. Grout was injected along the fractures in some of these areas to seal them. This would inhibit further AMD migration toward one of the receiving streams. The initial postgrouting water quality data have been encouraging

  8. Characterization of sugar cane bagasse ash as supplementary material for Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneth Torres Agredo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sugar Cane Bagasse is a by-product of the sugar agroindustry; it is partly used as fuel. However, bagasse ash (SCBA is considered waste, which creates a disposal problem. Furthermore, if sugar cane bagasse is burned under controlled conditions, the SCBA can be potentially reused. This paper considers the technical viability of using SCBA as a partial replacement for cement. Two samples of SCBA from a Colombian sugar industry were characterized. The chemical composition of the samples shows high percentages of silica, 76.3% and 63.2%. The mineralogical and morphological characteristics of the waste were determined by X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD, thermal analysis (TG/DTA and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The pozzolanic activity of SCBA was evaluated using the Frattini test and the strength activity index test (SAI. The ASTM C618 defines an SAI of at least 75% as a requirement for classifying material as a pozzolan. This condition was achieved in the experiments performed. The results indicate that SCBA produced in the manufacture of commercial cements can be recycled for use as pozzolanic material. This supplementary material can partially replace cement and therefore reduce CO2 emissions.

  9. Preparation and characterization of fly ash cenospheres supported CuO–BiVO4 heterojunction composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel CuO–BiVO4/FACs heterojunction composites have been synthesized. • CuO–BiVO4 are loaded on the surface of lightweight hollow microspheres. • The CuO–BiVO4/FACs exhibit enhanced absorption in the visible light region. • The CuO–BiVO4/FACs show efficient photocatalytic activities. • The composites are floatable and can be recovered easily. - Abstract: Novel fly ash cenospheres supported CuO–BiVO4 heterojunction composites (CuO–BiVO4/FACs) were prepared by modified metalorganic decomposition and impregnation methods. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), and UV–vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) techniques. The XPS and SEM analyses indicated that Cu was present as CuO dispersed on the surface of BiVO4. The DRS spectra revealed that the composites had improved optical adsorption in the visible light region, and the composites exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity for methylene blue (MB) degradation under visible light irradiation. It was found that the 5 wt% CuO-loaded composite showed the highest photocatalytic activity for MB dye wastewater treatment. FACs, a by-product generated in coal-firing power plants, were used as a low cost support which favored phase separation after the reaction owing to their low density

  10. Preparation and characterization of fly ash cenospheres supported CuO-BiVO4 heterojunction composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Cui, Hao; Wang, Bing; Li, Chuang; Zhai, Jianping; Li, Qin

    2014-05-01

    Novel fly ash cenospheres supported CuO-BiVO4 heterojunction composites (CuO-BiVO4/FACs) were prepared by modified metalorganic decomposition and impregnation methods. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), and UV-vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) techniques. The XPS and SEM analyses indicated that Cu was present as CuO dispersed on the surface of BiVO4. The DRS spectra revealed that the composites had improved optical adsorption in the visible light region, and the composites exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity for methylene blue (MB) degradation under visible light irradiation. It was found that the 5 wt% CuO-loaded composite showed the highest photocatalytic activity for MB dye wastewater treatment. FACs, a by-product generated in coal-firing power plants, were used as a low cost support which favored phase separation after the reaction owing to their low density.

  11. Improvement, characterization and use of waste corn cob ash in cement-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanmaneechot, P.; Nochaiya, T.; Julphunthong, P.

    2015-12-01

    This work investigates the development of waste corn cob ash as supplementary cement replacement materials. The study focused on the effects of heat treatment on chemical composition, physical properties and engineering properties of corn cob ash. The results suggest corn cob ash that was heat treated at 600°C for 4 h shows percentage of SiO2 + Al2O3 + Fe2O3 around 72%, which can be classified as Class N calcined natural pozzolan, as prescribed by ASTM C618. The X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that the amorphous silica phase increased with increasing calcining temperatures. The water requirement, initial setting time and final setting time of specimens increased with increasing replacement percentage of raw or treated corn cob ash. The morta cubes which used 20% of treated corn cob ash replaced cement showed 103% of the 28 days compressive strength as compared to reference samples. The corn cob ash that was treated at 600°C for 4 h samples shows slightly higher effectiveness for improving the splitting tensile strength and compressive strength of concrete when compared to the untreated corn cob ash.

  12. Ash chemistry in MSW incineration plants: Advanced characterization and thermodynamic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, Flemming J.; Laursen, Karin; Arvelakis, S. (and others)

    2004-07-15

    A number of ash samples where collected at four Danish municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plants. Samples of bottom ash/slag, 2nd-3rd pass ashes and ESP/E-filter ash were collected at the plants. The ashes were analyzed by a number of standard chemical analyses, and a number of advanced analytical techniques. The wet chemical analyses of the different ash fractions revealed that residual ash is formed on the grate by interaction of the main ash forming elements, Al, Ca, Fe and Si. Some of this ash is entrained from the grate and carried with the flue gas along the flue gas duct, where volatile species of K, Na, Pb, Zn, Cl and S starts to condense heterogeneously on the fly ash, thereby causing a dilution of the main ash forming elements. When compared plant-by-plant, the ash chemical analyses showed that the plant with the highest S-content in the fly ash is the one with the most often operational problems in relation to deposition, while a high Cl-content is indicative of a high corrosive potential. An existing Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) algorithm was extended with chemical classes covering Pb- and Zn-rich phases. This has made it possible also to analyze MSW-derived ashes by use of CCSEM. Representative samples of 2nd-3rd pass and ESP/E-filter ashes from the four plants have been analyzed by Quantitative X-Ray Diffraction (QXRD) analysis. Only a few crystalline phases were identified: KCl, NaCl, CaSO{sub 4}, SiO{sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3} being the main ones. No crystalline phases containing Pb or Zn were identified by QXRD. A comparison between CCSEM and QXRD revealed the expected surface nature of the CCSEM analysis. Samples of 2nd-3rd pass and ESP/E-filter ash from the four plants where investigated for melting behavior in the Simultaneous Thermal Analyzer (STA). It was shown that it is possible to quantify the melting behavior of these ashes, and that the melting goes on in two steps (salts followed by silicates/oxides). The

  13. Synthesis and characterization of calcium-alumino-silicate hydrates from oil shale ash - Towards industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janek Reinik; Ivo Heinmaa; Jyri-Pekka Mikkola; Uuve Kirso [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2008-08-15

    The influence of the alkaline medium on the hydrothermal activation of the oil shale fly ash with NaOH and KOH was studied using SEM/EDX, XRD, {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al high-resolution MAS-NMR spectra. In the presence of NaOH the silicon in the original fly ash was completely converted into calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrates, mainly into 1.1 nm tobermorite structure during 24-h treatment at 160{sup o}C. At similar reaction conditions, the activation with KOH resulted only to the formation of amorphous calcium-silica-hydrate gel on the surface of ash particles at temperature. The results obtained in this study indicate that the oil shale fly ash can be used for production of Al-substituted tobermorites when strongly alkaline media (NaOH) is applied. The synthesized product was used in a catalytic d-lactose isomerization reaction. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. An overview on characterization, utilization and leachate analysis of biomedical waste incinerator ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajor, Anita; Xaxa, Monika; Mehta, Ratika; Kunal

    2012-10-15

    Solid waste management is one of the major global environmental issues, as there is continuous increase in industrial globalization and generation of waste. Solid wastes encompass the heterogeneous mass of throwaways from the urban community as well as the homogeneous accumulations of agricultural, industrial and mineral wastes. Biomedical waste pose a significant impact on health and environment. A proper waste management system should be required to dispose hazardous biomedical waste and incineration should be the best available technology to reduce the volume of this hazardous waste. The incineration process destroys pathogens and reduces the waste volume and weight but leaves a solid material called biomedical waste ash as residue which increases the levels of heavy metals, inorganic salts and organic compounds in the environment. Disposal of biomedical waste ash in landfill may cause contamination of groundwater as metals are not destroyed during incineration. The limited space and the high cost for land disposal led to the development of recycling technologies and the reuse of ash in different systems. In order to minimize leaching of its hazardous components into the environment several studies confirmed the successful utilization of biomedical waste ash in agriculture and construction sector. This paper presents the overview on the beneficial use of ash in agriculture and construction materials and its leachate characteristics. This review also stressed on the need to further evaluate the leachate studies of the ashes and slag for their proper disposal and utilization. PMID:22647736

  15. Effect of Fly Ash Disposal on Ground Water Quality Near Parichha Thermal Power Plant, Jhansi – A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Kanchan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power plant generates a huge amount of fly ash on combustion of coal which is becoming a major environmental issue. Thermal power plants are greatly facing a fly ash management problem. Open dumping of fly ash can deteriorate the groundwater quality by runoff. In the present investigation, the ground water samples were collected from nearby areas of Parichha Thermal Power Plant at six locations during the period of Jan 2014 to May 2014. The samples were taken to the laboratory and analyzed for physico-chemical properties and heavy metal content. The physico-chemical analysis was done for the parameters like pH, Turbidity, Temperature, Electrical Conductivity, Alkalinity, Total Dissolved Solids, Total Hardness, Calcium Hardness and Magnesium Hardness. The concentration of Turbidity, EC and Alkalinity was exceeding the standard at all locations and shows that the groundwater of the area is not fit for drinking. The ground water samples were also analyzed for the presence of lead and cadmium and it was found that lead was exceeding the limit although cadmium was found within the limit.

  16. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in ceramic brick: product characterization and environmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiying, Zhang; Youcai, Zhao; Jingyu, Qi

    2011-02-01

    In this study, municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash was used as a blending in making ceramic brick based on its characterization and an orthogonal test was performed to determine the optimal mixture ratio of the materials. Besides, the fired bricks made in accordance with the optimal mixture ratio were characterized for performance, phase transformation, microstructure, leaching toxicity of the heavy metals in accordance with GB/T 2542-92 (Detection methods for bricks analysis, China) and by means of XRD, SEM and leaching toxicity analysis. It was found that the optimal mixture ratio of materials (MSWI fly ash:red ceramic clay:feldspar:gang sand) was 20:60:10:10 by mass, and the optimal sintering temperature was 950°C. Leaching results of heavy metals from sintered bricks were reduced considerably in comparison with those from green bricks prior to sintering process. The results as a whole suggested that utilization of MSWI fly ash in ceramic brick constituted a potential means of adding value. PMID:21067908

  17. The physical-chemical characterization of mechanically-treated CFBC fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaoru Fu; Qin Li; Jianping Zhai; Guanghong Sheng; Feihu Li [Nanjing University, Nanjing (China). State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment

    2008-03-15

    The physical-chemical characteristics of mechanically-treated circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) fly ash, such as 45 {mu}m sieve residue, granulometric distribution, water requirement, specific gravity, pH value, and mineralogical phases, were investigated. It was found that the grinding process can be divided into three stages. The increase in fineness of ground CFBC fly ash is very sharp in the first stage, then slows down in the second stage, and in the last stage it becomes almost invary. The water requirement decreases with prolonged grinding time, and slightly increases during the last stage of grinding. Ground CFBC fly ash shows a higher specific gravity due to the crushing of coarse particles and carbon particles. The pH of ground CFBC fly ash is greater than that of the original CFBC fly ash, indicating that ground samples react more rapidly with water. The mineralogical compositions remain unchanged with grinding, although the intensity of the crystalline phases decreases and the half peak width increases.

  18. Caracterização das cinzas de incineração de resíduos industriais e de serviços de saúde Characterization of incineration ashes of industrial and hospital solid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela Lopes Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Three ash samples from an incinerator in Belo Horizonte (Brazil were physically and chemically characterized. The chemical composition of the ashes was not always the same, neither in terms of the chemical species nor in terms of the quantities of those that are common to the three ashes. The ashes called CF1 and CF3D contain heavy metals above the detection limits of the analytical methods and the zinc concentration is high enough to justify treatment of the ashes. For these ashes, a high loss on ignition was found, indicating that the process of incineration might present failures.

  19. Characterization of Montserrat volcanic ash for the assessment of respiratory health hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volcanic ash, generated in the long-lived eruption of the Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat, is shown to contain respirable (sub-4 μm) particles and the crystalline silica polymorph, cristobalite. Respirable particles of cristobalite can cause silicosis, raising the possibility that volcanic ash is a respiratory health hazard. This study considers some of the main factors that affect human exposure to volcanic particles: the composition, proportions and surface reactivity of respirable ash and the composition and concentrations of re-worked and airborne suspended particulates. Dome-collapse ash-fall deposits are significantly richer in respirable particles (12 weight %) than the other tephra samples, in particular the matrices of dome-collapse pyroclastic-flow deposits (3 weight %). Within the respirable fraction, dome-collapse ash contains the highest proportion of crystalline silica particles (20-27 number %, of which 97 % is cristobalite), compared with other primary tephra types (0.4-5.6 number %). The results are explained by significant fractionation during fragmentation of pyroclastic flows due to the size and strength of particles and the selective elutriation of fines into the lofting ash plume. This result in a fines-depleted dome-collapse matrix and a fines-rich dome-collapse ash deposit. For all sample types, the sub-4 μm fraction comprises 45-55 weight % of the sub-10 μm fraction. Re-worked and airborne samples show enrichment of crystalline silica in the respirable fraction (10-18 number %) but have low proportions of respirable ash (∼ 3 weight %) compared to primary ash samples. The concentration of ash particles re-suspended by road vehicles on Montserrat is found to decrease exponentially with height above the ground, indicating higher exposure for children compared with adults: PM4 concentration at 0.9 m (height of two year old child) is three times that at 1.8m (adult height). Surface- and free-radical production has been closely linked to

  20. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline silver coating of fly ash cenosphere particles by electroless process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, S; Seal, S; Schwarz, S; Zhou, D

    2001-12-01

    Electroless nanocrystalline Ag coating of fly ash cenosphere particles utilizing a Sn-Pd catalyst system is demonstrated in this article. The deposition of pure metallic nanocrystalline Ag on the fly ash cenosphere particle surface is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Under the described conditions of electroless coating, average nanocrystalline Ag-coating thickness is observed to be approximately 220 nm, using a focused ion beam technique, which is less than that observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) (260-360 nm). TEM observation further reveals that the Ag-coating is made up of 50 nm Ag nanocrystallites, which is comparable with the size of approximately 37 nm obtained from the XRD data. The mechanism of the electroless Ag-coating process is discussed. Ag-coated fly ash particles find applications in manufacturing conducting polymers for electromagnetic interference shielding applications. PMID:12914083

  1. Characterization of hot-gas filter ash under PFBC operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.L.; Hurley, J.P.; Watne, E.M. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this program was to perform bench-scale dynamic tests of ash formation and long-term ash cake formation in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) systems to help in the development of methods to predict possible filter bridging problems and suggest possible strategies for mitigating these problems. During the program, four ash formation tests using a washed coal from the Consol Enlow Fork mine, with two size distributions of Plum Run dolomite at two different temperatures, were completed under conditions simulating the operation of the American Electric Power (AEP) Tidd PFBC. In addition, the same test matrix, plus two tests using no sorbent, was completed with the Belle Ayr Powder River Basin subbituminous coal, which will be used at the Southern Company Services (SCS) Wilsonville, Alabama, power systems development facility (PSDF).

  2. Characterization of hot-gas filter ash under PFBC operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.L.; Hurley, J.P.; Watne, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this program was to perform bench scale dynamic tests of ash formation and long-term ash cake formation in pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) systems to help in the development of methods to predict possible filter bridging problems and suggest possible strategies for mitigating these problems. During the program, four ash formation tests using a washed coal from the Consol Enlow Fork mine, with two size distributions of Plum Run dolomite at two different temperatures, were completed under conditions simulating the operation of the American Electric Power (AEP) Tidd PFBC. In addition, the same test matrix, plus two tests using no sorbent, was completed with the Belle Ayr Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal, which will be used at the Southern Company Services (SCS) Wilsonville, Alabama, power systems development facility (PSDF).

  3. INF 336 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    MADURA

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com INF 336 Week 1 DQ 1 Risk Management (Ash) INF 336 Week 1 DQ 2 Organizational Structure (Ash) INF 336 Week 2 DQ 1 Supply Process Improvements (Ash) INF 336 Week 2 DQ 2 Outsourcing (Ash) INF 336 Week 2 Assignment Article Review (Ash) INF 336 Week 3 DQ 1 Capital Goods (Ash) INF 336 Week 3 DQ 2 Quality (Ash) INF 336 Week 3 Assignment Need Definition (Ash) INF 336 Week 4 DQ 1 Procuring Services (Ash) ...

  4. Characterization of volcanic ash soils in southwestern Tanzania: Morphology, physicochemical properties, and classification

    OpenAIRE

    MSANYA, Balthazar Michael; OTSUKA, Hiroo; Araki, Shigeru; Fujitake, Nobuhide

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the characteristics of volcanic ash soils in southwestern Tanzania. Twelve pedons of volcanic origin were studied, and 66 soil samples were analyzed. Soil morphology revealed volcanic ash layers of varying thicknesses. Most pedons had a dark thick humus surface and buried A, AB, and BA horizons with melanic indices of 1.7 or less. Except in two pedons, the NaF pH was 9.4 or more, reflecting an exchange complex dominated by amorphous materials and/or Al–humus complexes. The...

  5. Studies of detailed biofilm characterization on fly ash concrete in comparison with normal and superplasticizer concrete in seawater environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarmaa, Vinita; George, R P; Ramachandran, D; Anandkumar, B; Mudalib, U Kamachi

    2014-01-01

    In cooling water systems, many concrete structures in the form of tanks, pillars and reservoirs that come in contact with aggressive seawater are being deteriorated by chemical and biological factors. The nuclear industry has decided to partially replace the Portland cement with appropriate pozzolans such as fly ash, which could densify the matrix and make the concrete impermeable. Three types of concrete mixes, viz., normal concrete (NC), concrete with fly ash and superplasticizer (FA) and concrete with only superplasticizer (SP) were fabricated for short- and long-term exposure studies and for screening out the better concrete in seawater environments. Biofilm characterization studies and microscopic studies showed excellent performance of FA concrete compared to the other two. Laboratory exposure studies in pure cultures of Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Fusarium oxysporum were demonstrated for the inhibition of microbial growth on fly ash. Epifluorescence and scanning electron microscopic studies supported the better performance of the FA specimen. Thus, the present study clearly showed that FA concrete is less prone to biofilm formation and biodeterioration. PMID:24600839

  6. Synthesis and characterization of novel solid base catalyst from fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deepti Jain; Chitralekha Khatri; Ashu Rani [University of Kota, Rajasthan (India). Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry

    2011-06-15

    A new type of solid base catalyst was synthesized by chemical and thermal activation of fly ash, collected from Thermal Super Power Station situated in Kota, Rajasthan, India. The chemical activation was carried out by 50 wt.% NaOH followed by thermal activation at 450{sup o}C. The modified physiochemical property of solid base fly ash (SBFA) was determined by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption studies and Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. The results reveal that the catalyst is nano-crystalline in nature with crystallite size 11 nm and particle size in the range 840 nm to 6.95 {mu}m. The surface basicity and therefore, catalytic activity in SBFA was originated by increased hydroxyl content as compared to fly ash, suggesting that the catalyst possess higher surface active sites. The basicity of the catalyst was measured by liquid phase, solvent free, single step condensation of benzaldehyde with cyclohexanone giving higher conversion ({gt}70%) and selectivity ({gt}80%) of desired product a,a'-dibenzylidenecyclohexanone. This excellent conversion shows that the catalyst has sufficient basic sites both on the surface and in the bulk, responsible for the catalytic activity. Furthermore, this catalyst may replace conventional environmentally hazardous homogeneous liquid bases making an ecofriendly, solvent free, solid base catalyzed process. The application of fly ash to synthesize a solid base catalyst finds a noble way to utilize this abundant waste material. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Coal Fly Ash Ceramics: Preparation, Characterization, and Use in the Hydrolysis of Sucrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pires dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal ash is a byproduct of mineral coal combustion in thermal power plants. This residue is responsible for many environmental problems because it pollutes soil, water, and air. Thus, it is important to find ways to reuse it. In this study, coal fly ash, obtained from the Presidente Médici Thermal Power Plant, was utilized in the preparation of ceramic supports for the immobilization of the enzyme invertase and subsequent hydrolysis of sucrose. Coal fly ash supports were prepared at several compaction pressures (63.66–318.30 MPa and sintered at 1200°C for 4 h. Mineralogical composition (by X-ray diffraction and surface area were studied. The ceramic prepared with 318.30 MPa presented the highest surface area (35 m2/g and amount of immobilized enzyme per g of support (76.6 mg/g. In assays involving sucrose inversion, it showed a high degree of hydrolysis (around 81% even after nine reuses and 30 days’ storage. Therefore, coal fly ash ceramics were demonstrated to be a promising biotechnological alternative as an immobilization support for the hydrolysis of sucrose.

  8. Physical, mechanical and microscopic characterization of cold bonded fly ash lightweight aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Videla, C.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of the different tests carried out on fly ash lightweight aggregates produced with three different kinds of binders: Lime, Portland cement and Pozzolan Portland cement. The elaboration process used for the aggregates consisted in an agglomeration system by agitation under cold bonded hardening conditions. The tests carried out were a physical characterization of the aggregates, the determination of mechanical properties with a crushing test and, finally, the study of the microstructure of the aggregates with scanning electron microscopy (SEM and dispersive energy X ray (EDX. From the point of view of mechanical strength, the results indicate that the best kind of aggregate is the one made with a 5% Pozzolan Portland cement. This result was confirmed by the microstructure analysis, which shows that this kind of aggregate presents the highest hydration speed.

    El estudio presenta los resultados obtenidos de ensayos realizados sobre áridos ligeros de cenizas volantes fabricados con tres tipos de conglomerantes: cal, cemento Portland puro y cemento portland puzolánico. El proceso de fabricación empleado para la elaboración de los áridos consistió en un sistema de aglomeración por agitación bajo condiciones de endurecimiento enfrío. Los ensayos efectuados comprenden la caracterización física de los áridos, la determinación de las propiedades mecánicas por medio de un ensayo de trituración y, finalmente, el estudio de la microestructura de los áridos con técnicas de microscopía de barrido (SEM y energía dispersiva de rayos X (EDX. Desde el punto de vista de resistencia mecánica los resultados indican que el mejor tipo de árido es el fabricado con un 5% de cemento portland puzolánico. Este resultado se confirma con el análisis de la microestructura que demuestra que este tipo de árido presenta la mayor velocidad de hidratación.

  9. One-step purification and characterization of cellulase-free xylanase produced by alkalophilic Bacillus subtilis ash

    OpenAIRE

    Sanghi, Ashwani; Garg, Neelam; Gupta, V. K.; Mittal, Ashwani; R.C. Kuhad

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes the one-step purification and characterization of an extracellular cellulase-free xylanase from a newly isolated alkalophilic and moderately thermophilic strain of Bacillus subtilis ASH. Xylanase was purified to homogeneity by 10.5-fold with ~43% recovery using ion-exchange chromatography through CM-Sephadex C-50. The purified enzyme revealed a single band on SDS-PAGE gel with a molecular mass of 23 kDa. It showed an optimum pH at 7.0 and was stable over the pH ran...

  10. Quality criteria for bottom ashes for civil construction. Part II Technical characteristics of bottom ashes; Kvalitetskriterier foer bottenaskor till vaegoch anlaeggningsbyggnad. Etapp II Bottenaskors tekniska egenskaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, Bo von; Loorents, Karl-Johan; Ekvall, Annika; Arvidsson, Haakan [SP Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2006-01-15

    This report is the presentation of the second of two stages. This stage deals mainly with the testing of three different types of ashes and the evaluation and suitability of the chosen test methods. The project only relates to the technical aspects of ashes. The report is written in such a way that both ash owners (e.g. Energy companies) and those who build roads and constructions will find it meaningful. All test methods that are used for traditional materials (gravel and crushed rock) is not fitting for ashes. New test methods for some properties that will be tested must therefore be presented, tested practically and evaluated. The project encompasses both road and construction building but has a focus on road construction since there the highest and comprising demands are defined. Three bottom ashes of different types have been studied regarding some tenfold mechanical/physical parameters, essential for the functionality of the ash as a construction material. An important conclusion is that ash is from a functionality and characterisation point of view, an undefined concept that encloses materials with widely different properties. Despite that only three ashes have been looked into the range of results are varying large for some properties. This is especially true for the loose bulk density, water absorption and grain size distribution. It is also clear that some of the standard test methods for aggregates need to be exchanged by other methods, which are more adapted to alternative materials. One such example is water absorption, a property that further influences frost resistance, frost heave and such. All the proposed test methods that been used in the project is considered fitting for its purpose. The test methods can be divided into two categories the ones that yield easy assessable results and those that yield results hard to appraise. To the first group belong grain size distribution, loose bulk density, thermal conductivity, permeability and frost heave

  11. Artificial senses for characterization of food quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yan-bo; LAN Yu-bin; R.E. Lacey

    2004-01-01

    Food quality is of primary concern in the food industry and to the consumer. Systems that mimic human senses have been developed and applied to the characterization of food quality. The five primary senses are: vision, hearing, smell, taste and touch.In the characterization of food quality, people assess the samples sensorially and differentiate "good" from "bad" on a continuum.However, the human sensory system is subjective, with mental and physical inconsistencies, and needs time to work. Artificial senses such as machine vision, the electronic ear, electronic nose, electronic tongue, artificial mouth and even artificial the head have been developed that mimic the human senses. These artificial senses are coordinated individually or collectively by a pattern recognition technique, typically artificial neural networks, which have been developed based on studies of the mechanism of the human brain. Such a structure has been used to formulate methods for rapid characterization of food quality. This research presents and discusses individual artificial sensing systems. With the concept of multi-sensor data fusion these sensor systems can work collectively in some way. Two such fused systems, artificial mouth and artificial head, are described and discussed. It indicates that each of the individual systems has their own artificially sensing ability to differentiate food samples. It further indicates that with a more complete mimic of human intelligence the fused systems are more powerful than the individual systems in differentiation of food samples.

  12. Contaminated biomass fly ashes--Characterization and treatment optimization for reuse as building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudart de la Grée, G C H; Florea, M V A; Keulen, A; Brouwers, H J H

    2016-03-01

    The incineration of treated waste wood generates more contaminated fly ashes than when forestry or agricultural waste is used as fuel. The characteristics of these biomass fly ashes depend on the type of waste wood and incineration process parameters, and their reuse is restricted by their physical, chemical and environmental properties. In this study, four different fly ash types produced by two different incineration plants were analysed and compared to Dutch and European standards on building materials. A combined treatment was designed for lowering the leaching of contaminants and the effect of each treatment step was quantified. A pilot test was performed in order to scale up the treatment. It was found that chlorides (which are the main contaminant in all studied cases) are partly related to the amount of unburnt carbon and can be successfully removed. Other contaminants (such as sulphates and chromium) could be lowered to non-hazardous levels. Other properties (such as particle size, LOI, oxide and mineralogical compositions) are also quantified before and after treatment. PMID:26786402

  13. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on lime spray dryer (LSD) ash using different extraction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, P.; Weavers, L.K.; Taerakul, P.; Walker, H.W. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2006-01-01

    In this study, traditional Soxhlet, automatic Soxhlet and ultrasonic extraction techniques were employed to determine the speciation and concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on lime spray dryer (LSD) ash samples collected from the baghouse of a spreader stoker boiler. To test the efficiencies of different extraction methods, LSD ash samples were doped with a mixture of 16 US EPA specified PAHs to measure the matrix spike recoveries. The results showed that the spike recoveries of PAHs were different using these three extraction methods with dichloromethane (DCM) as the solvent. Traditional Soxhlet extraction achieved slightly higher recoveries than automatic Soxhlet and ultrasonic extraction. Different solvents including toluene, DCM:acetone (1:1 V/V) and hexane:acetone (1:1 V/V) were further examined to optimize the recovery using ultrasonic extraction. Toluene achieved the highest spike recoveries of PAHs at a spike level of 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1}. When the spike level was increased to 50 {mu}g kg{sup -1}, the spike recoveries of PAHs also correspondingly increased. Although the type and concentration of PAHs detected on LSD ash samples by different extraction methods varied, the concentration of each detected PAH was consistently low, at {mu}g kg{sup -1} levels.

  14. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on lime spray dryer (LSD) ash using different extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Weavers, Linda K; Taerakul, Panuwat; Walker, Harold W

    2006-01-01

    In this study, traditional Soxhlet, automatic Soxhlet and ultrasonic extraction techniques were employed to determine the speciation and concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on lime spray dryer (LSD) ash samples collected from the baghouse of a spreader stoker boiler. To test the efficiencies of different extraction methods, LSD ash samples were doped with a mixture of 16 US EPA specified PAHs to measure the matrix spike recoveries. The results showed that the spike recoveries of PAHs were different using these three extraction methods with dichloromethane (DCM) as the solvent. Traditional Soxhlet extraction achieved slightly higher recoveries than automatic Soxhlet and ultrasonic extraction. Different solvents including toluene, DCM:acetone (1:1 V/V) and hexane:acetone (1:1 V/V) were further examined to optimize the recovery using ultrasonic extraction. Toluene achieved the highest spike recoveries of PAHs at a spike level of 10 microg kg(-1). When the spike level was increased to 50 microg kg(-1), the spike recoveries of PAHs also correspondingly increased. Although the type and concentration of PAHs detected on LSD ash samples by different extraction methods varied, the concentration of each detected PAH was consistently low, at microg kg(-1) levels. PMID:15990154

  15. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals in ashes released from a forest fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, I.; Abrantes, N.; Pereira, P.; Vale, C.; Ferreira, A.; Keizer, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    Wildfires have become a permanent source of environmental and societal concerns. Whilst the impacts of wildfire on hydrological and erosion processes are well documented, the stocks and export of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals have received considerably less research attention. The ashes produced by wildfires, which include polluting substances such as PAHs and metals, are subject to transport processes by wind and especially by overland flow and water infiltrating into the soil and possibly reaching ground water bodies. In the framework of the FIRECNUTS project, we are studying the stocks of PAHs and selected metals in recently burnt forest stands in north-central Portugal, and their subsequent export by overland flow. The present work, however, will focus on the stocks in the ashes, both immediately after wildfire and three months later. These ashes were collected at two burnt slopes with contrasting forest types, i.e. a eucalypt and a maritime pine stand, the two pre-dominant forest types in the study region. The sixteen PAHs identified by US EPA as priority contaminants were analysed by gas chromatograph, after extraction and column clean up. The contents of vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were analysed by inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), after an acid digestion, while mercury (Hg) was analysed by pyrolysis atomic absorption spectrometry with gold amalgamation. The total concentration of PAHs immediately after the wildfire ranged from 314 ng/g dry weight in the maritime pine stand to 597 ng/g dry weight in the eucalypt stand. Three months later, the total concentration has decreased with 33% in the pine stand but only half (16%) in the eucalypt stand. The composition the PAHs by ring size was dominated by three-rings PAHs. This was true for all samples. The concentrations of various metals differed for the two sampling

  16. Agglomeration in Stripper Ash Coolers and Its Possible Remedial Solutions: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravi Inder

    2016-04-01

    The bottom ash of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler contains large amounts of physical heat. When low quality coals are used in these types of boilers, the ash content is normally more than 40 % and the physical heat loss is approximately 3 % if the bottom ash is discharged without cooling. Bottom ash cooler (BAC) is often used to treat the high temperature bottom ash to reclaim heat, and to facilitate the easily handling and transportation of ash. The CFB boiler at BLA Power, Newari, MP (India) is facing problems of clinker formation in strip ash coolers of plant since the installation of unit. These clinkers are basically agglomerates, which leads to defluidization of stripper ash cooler (BAC) units. There are two strip ash coolers in unit. Each strip ash cooler is capable of working independently. The proper functioning of both strip coolers is very important as it is going to increase the combustion efficiency of boiler by stripping of fine unburnt coal particles from ash, which are injected into the furnace. In this paper causes, characterization of agglomerates, thermo gravimetric analysis of fuel used, particular size distribution of coal and sand and possible remedial solution to overcome these agglomerates in strip ash coolers has also been presented. High temperature in compact separators, non uniform supply of coal and not removing small agglomerates from stripper ash cooler are among main causes of agglomeration in stripper ash cooler. Control of compact separator temperature, replacing 10-12 % of bed material and cleaning stripper ash cooler periodically will decrease agglomeration in stripper ash cooler of unit.

  17. Twelve Months of Air Quality Monitoring at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Southwestern Rural Nevada, U.S.A (EMSI April 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; Shafer, David S; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; McCurdy, Greg; Kohl, Steven D; Nikolich, George; Sheetz, Larry

    2011-08-01

    The one year of air quality monitoring data collected at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was the final part of the air quality "Scoping Studies" for the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) in southern and central Nevada. The objective of monitoring at Ash Meadows was to examine aerosol and meteorological data, seasonal trends in aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as to examine evidence for long distance transport of some constituents. The 9,307 hectare refuge supports more than 50 springs and 24 endemic species, including the only population of the federally listed endangered Devil’s Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1990). Ash Meadows NWR is located in a Class II air quality area, and the aerosol measurements collected with this study are compared to those of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites. Measurements taken at Ash Meadows NWR over a period of 12 months provide new baseline air quality and meteorological information for rural southwestern Nevada, specifically Nye County and the Amargosa Valley.

  18. HCA 375 (ASH) course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com     HCA 375 Week 1 DQ 1 Management versus Leadership (Ash) HCA 375 Week 1 DQ 2 Implementation and Barriers (Ash) HCA 375 Week 2 DQ 1 Measurement (Ash) HCA 375 Week 2 DQ 2 Quality and Outcomes (Ash) HCA 375 Week 2 Assignment Customer Satisfaction and Quality Care (Ash) HCA 375 Week 3 DQ 1 Teamwork in Health Care (Ash) HCA 375 Week 3 DQ 2 The Impact of Nursing (Ash) HCA 375 Week 3 Ass...

  19. INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

    2000-11-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

  20. Material and structural characterization of alkali activated low-calcium brown coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvára, Frantisek; Kopecký, Lubomír; Smilauer, Vít; Bittnar, Zdenek

    2009-09-15

    The waste low-calcium Czech brown coal fly ash represents a considerable environmental burden due to the quantities produced and the potentially high content of leachable heavy metals. The heterogeneous microstucture of the geopolymer M(n) [-(Si-O)(z)-Al-O](n).wH(2)O, that forms during the alkaline activation, was examined by means of microcalorimetry, XRD, TGA, DSC, MIP, FTIR, NMR MAS ((29)Si, (27)Al, (23)Na), ESEM, EDS, and EBSD. The leaching of heavy metals and the evolution of compressive strength were also monitored. The analysis of raw fly ash identified a number of different morphologies, unequal distribution of elements, Fe-rich rim, high internal porosity, and minor crystalline phases of mullite and quartz. Microcalorimetry revealed exothermic reactions with dependence on the activator alkalinity. The activation energy of the geopolymerization process was determined as 86.2kJ/mol. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed no additional crystalline phases associated with geopolymer formation. Over several weeks, the (29)Si NMR spectrum testified a high degree of polymerization and Al penetration into the SiO(4) tetrahedra. The (23)Na NMR MAS spectrum hypothesized that sodium is bound in the form of Na(H(2)O)(n) rather than Na(+), thus causing efflorescence in a moisture-gradient environment. As and Cr(6+) are weakly bonded in the geopolymer matrix, while excellent immobilization of Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Cr(3+) are reported.

  1. Separation and chemical characterization of finely-sized fly-ash particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of 43 major, minor, and trace elements were measured by x-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption, and instrumental neutron activation for nine well-defined size fractions, with mass median diameters of 0.5 μ to 50 μm, of fly ash from a western coal-fired steam plant. There was generally good agreement in concentrations of elements analyzed by more than one technique. Concentration profiles as a function of mean particle size were established for various elements. Based on the concentration profiles, the elements can be divided into three distinct groups. One group consists primarily of the volatile elements or elements partially volatilized during coal combustion (examples include As, Se, Zn, Ga, etc.), and their concentrations decrease with increasing particle size. A second group, which shows a minor or direct dependence on particle size, as in the case of Si, is apparently associated primarily with the fly-ash matrix. The last group of elements, which includes Ca, Sr, Y, and the rare earths, shows small changes in their concentration profiles with a maximum in concentration at approximately 5 μm. 6 tables, 6 figures

  2. Single-particle characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) ash particles using low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, HeeJin; Ro, Chul-Un

    Environmentally benign treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) ashes has been a worldwide issue since more countries are implementing incineration to reduce waste volume. A single-particle analytical technique, named low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low- Z particle EPMA) was applied to characterize MSW fly- and bottom-ash particle samples collected from two municipal incinerators in Korea. According to their chemical composition, many distinctive particle types were identified. For fly ash sample collected in one incinerator (sample S1), where lime slurry injection is used for acid-gas treatment, CaCO 3-containing particles (28.4%) are the most abundantly encountered, followed by carbonaceous (23.6%), SiO 2-containing (13.8%), NaCl-containing (13.1%), and iron-containing (10.5%) particles. For fly ash sample collected at the other incinerator (sample S2), NaCl-containing particles (40.4%) are the most abundantly encountered, followed by iron-containing (29.1%), carbonaceous (11.8%), CaCO 3-containing (2.2%), and SiO 2-containing (7.0%) particles. For bottom ash sample collected at one incinerator (sample S3), iron-containing particles (46.6%) are the most abundantly encountered, followed by CaCO 3-containing (17.3%), carbonaceous (16.6%), and Si and/or Al oxide-containing (15.8%) particles. For bottom ash sample collected in the other incinerator (sample S4), iron-containing particles (63.4%) are also the most abundantly encountered, followed by carbonaceous (14.0%), CaCO 3-containing (10.0%), and Si and/or Al oxide-containing (6.1%) particles. Chemical compositions of the two bottom ash samples are not much different compared to those of the two fly ash samples. It was demonstrated that the single-particle characterization using this low- Z particle EPMA technique provided detailed information on various types of chemical species in the MSW ash samples. In addition, the technique has advantage over conventional analytical techniques in the

  3. Chemical characterization of bottom ashes generated during combustion of a Colombian mineral coal in a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottom ashes generated during combustion of a mineral coal from Colombia were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The interest in this particular coal is due to the fact that it will be used by a thermal power plant in Ceara, Northeastern Brazil, where it could produce over 900 tons of different residues/combustion products every day. Results from Xray fluorescence allowed identification and quantification of elements present in the sample: silicon (59,17%), aluminum (13,17%), iron (10,74%), potassium (6,11%), titanium (2,91%), calcium (4,97%), sulphur (0,84%) and others (2,09%). The X-ray diffraction revealed patterns from silica, mullite, calcium sulphate and hydrated sodium. Results obtained so far indicate that the material is a potential raw-material for use in the formulation of ceramic components (author)

  4. Real-Time Cell-Electronic Sensing of Coal Fly Ash Particulate Matter for Toxicity-Based Air Quality Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Birget; Yuan, Chungang; Li, Jinhua; Du, Haiying; Gabos, Stephan; Le, X Chris; Li, Xing-Fang

    2016-06-20

    The development of a unique bioassay for cytotoxicity analysis of coal fly ash (CFA) particulate matter (PM) and its potential application for air quality monitoring is described. Using human cell lines, A549 and SK-MES-1, as live probes on microelectrode-embedded 96-well sensors, impedance changes over time are measured as cells are treated with varying concentrations (1 μg/mL-20 mg/mL) of CFA samples. A dose-dependent impedance change is determined for each CFA sample, from which an IC50 histogram is obtained. The assay was successfully applied to examine CFA samples collected from three coal-fired power plants (CFPs) in China. The samples were separated into three size fractions: PM2.5 (10 μm). Dynamic cell-response profiles and temporal IC50 histograms of all samples show that CFA cytotoxicity depends on concentration, exposure time (0-60 h), and cell-type (SK-MES-1 > A549). The IC50 values differentiate the cytotoxicity of CFA samples based on size fraction (PM2.5 ≈ PM10-2.5 ≫ PM10) and the sampling location (CFP2 > CFP1 ≈ CFP3). Differential cytotoxicity measurements of particulates in human cell lines using cell-electronic sensing provide a useful tool for toxicity-based air quality monitoring and risk assessment. PMID:27124590

  5. Characterization of morphology and hydration products of high-volume fly ash paste by monochromatic scanning x-ray micro-diffraction (μ-SXRD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study focuses on identification and micro-structural characterization of the hydration products formed in high-volume fly ash (HVFA)/portland cement (PC) systems using monochromatic scanning x-ray micro-diffraction (μ-SXRD) and SEM-EDS. Pastes with up to 80% fly ash replacement were studied. Phase maps for HVFA samples using μ-SXRD patterns prove that μ-SXRD is an effective method to identify and visualize the distribution of phases in the matrix. μ-SXRD and SEM-EDS analysis shows that the C-S-H formed in HVFA system containing 50% or more of fly ash has a similar structure as C-S-H(I) with comparatively lower Ca/Si ratio than the one produced in PC system. Moreover, coexistence of C-S-H(I) and strätlingite is observed in the system containing 80% of fly ash, confirming that the amount of alumina and silicate phases provided by the fly ash is a major factor for the formation of C-S-H(I) and strätlingite in HVFA system. - Highlights: • High-volume fly ash (HVFA) paste was studied by scanning x-ray micro-diffraction. • Coexistence of C-S-H(I) and strätlingite in the HVFA system is clearly shown. • The distribution of minor phases in the HVFA system is shown. • Differences between inner and outer products of fly ash are observed by SEM-EDS

  6. Characterization of morphology and hydration products of high-volume fly ash paste by monochromatic scanning x-ray micro-diffraction (μ-SXRD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sungchul [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Meral, Cagla [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Civil Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Oh, Jae-eun [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Juhyuk [Civil Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Kunz, Martin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@ce.berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The present study focuses on identification and micro-structural characterization of the hydration products formed in high-volume fly ash (HVFA)/portland cement (PC) systems using monochromatic scanning x-ray micro-diffraction (μ-SXRD) and SEM-EDS. Pastes with up to 80% fly ash replacement were studied. Phase maps for HVFA samples using μ-SXRD patterns prove that μ-SXRD is an effective method to identify and visualize the distribution of phases in the matrix. μ-SXRD and SEM-EDS analysis shows that the C-S-H formed in HVFA system containing 50% or more of fly ash has a similar structure as C-S-H(I) with comparatively lower Ca/Si ratio than the one produced in PC system. Moreover, coexistence of C-S-H(I) and strätlingite is observed in the system containing 80% of fly ash, confirming that the amount of alumina and silicate phases provided by the fly ash is a major factor for the formation of C-S-H(I) and strätlingite in HVFA system. - Highlights: • High-volume fly ash (HVFA) paste was studied by scanning x-ray micro-diffraction. • Coexistence of C-S-H(I) and strätlingite in the HVFA system is clearly shown. • The distribution of minor phases in the HVFA system is shown. • Differences between inner and outer products of fly ash are observed by SEM-EDS.

  7. Ash in fire affected ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Jordan, Antonio; Cerda, Artemi; Martin, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    the role of ash in fire affected areas. Acknowledgments The 'Litfire' Project (MIP-048/2011; 181 Pereira) funded by the Lithuanian Research Council, Soil quality, erosion control and plant cover recovery under different post-firemanagement scenarios (POSTFIRE), funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (CGL2013-47862-C2-1-R), Preventing and Remediating Degradation of Soils in Europe Through Land Care (RECARE) funded by the European Commission (FP7-ENV-2013-TWO STAGE) and European Research Project LEDDRA (243857) and COST action ES1306 (Connecting European connectivity research). References Balfour, V.N., Determining wildfire ash saturated hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity with laboratory and field methods. Catena. doi:10.1016/j.catena.2014.01.009 Barreiro, A., Fontúrbel, M.T., Lombao, A., Martín, C., Vega, J.A., Fernández, C., Carballas, T., Díaz-Raviña, M., Using phospholipid fatty acid and community level physiological profiling techniques to characterize soil microbial communities following an experimental fire and different stabilization treatments. Catena. doi:10.1016/j.catena.2014.07.011 Bodi, M., Martin, D.A., Santin, C., Balfour, V., Doerr, S.H., Pereira, P., Cerda, A., Mataix-Solera, J. (2014) Wildland fire ash: production, composition and eco-hydro-geomorphic effects. Earth-Science Reviews, 130, 103-127. Bodí, M.B., Doerr, S.H., Cerdà, A. and Mataix-Solera, J. (2012) Hydrological effects of a layer of vegetation ash on underlying wettable and water repellent soils. Geoderma, 191, 14-23. Burjachs, F., Expósito, I., Charcoal and pollen analysis: examples of Holocene fire dynamics in Mediterranean Iberian Peninsula. Catena. doi:10.1016/j.catena.2014.10.006 Burns, K., Gabet, E., The effective viscosity of slurries laden with vegetative ash. Catena. doi:10.1016/j.catena.2014.06.008 Cerdà, A. Doerr, S.H. (2008). The effect of ash and needle cover on surface runoff and erosion in the immediate post-fire period. Catena, 74 , 256

  8. MSWI Boiler Ashes: Production and Quality Through the Horizontal Section of a Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    SUMMARY: the central role of waste-to-energy (WtE) plants in Denmark asks for a deep knowledge of all different residues produced by these facilities. The main objective of solid residues characterization is the optimization of their management system. In this study we present the results of the...... first phase of a wider study about the solid residues produced at the heat recovery system (boiler) of a waste incineration plant. The characterization was carried out not on the total output of the boiler but on the different solid residues produced at ten different horizontal sections. The aim was to...... characterize the different streams in order to identify differences that can justify potentially different utilization/disposal options. First results showed differences between sections in terms of chemical composition, leaching behavior and content of dioxins, but additional results are needed to cope with...

  9. Performance evaluation and microstructure characterization of metakaolin-based geopolymer containing oil palm ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawa, Abideng; Tonnayopas, Danupon; Prachasaree, Woraphot

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on the microstructure, compressive strength, and drying shrinkage of metakaolin (MK) based geopolymers produced by partially replacing MK by oil palm ash (OPA). The OPA was used as raw material producing different molar ratios of SiO₂/Al₂O₃ and CaO/SiO₂. The geopolymer samples were cured at 80°C for 1, 2, or 4 hours and kept at ambient temperature until testing. The compressive strength was measured after 2, 6, and 24 hours and 7 and 28 days. The testing results revealed that the geopolymer with 5% OPA (SiO₂  : Al₂O₃ = 2.88 : 1) gave the highest compressive strength. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the 5% OPA sample had a dense-compact matrix and less unreacted raw materials which contributed to the higher compressive strength. In the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, the change of the crystalline phase after heat curing for 4 hours was easily detectable compared to the samples subjected to a shorter period of heat curing.

  10. Performance Evaluation and Microstructure Characterization of Metakaolin-Based Geopolymer Containing Oil Palm Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abideng Hawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on the microstructure, compressive strength, and drying shrinkage of metakaolin (MK based geopolymers produced by partially replacing MK by oil palm ash (OPA. The OPA was used as raw material producing different molar ratios of SiO2/Al2O3 and CaO/SiO2. The geopolymer samples were cured at 80°C for 1, 2, or 4 hours and kept at ambient temperature until testing. The compressive strength was measured after 2, 6, and 24 hours and 7 and 28 days. The testing results revealed that the geopolymer with 5% OPA (SiO2 : Al2O3 = 2.88 : 1 gave the highest compressive strength. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM indicated that the 5% OPA sample had a dense-compact matrix and less unreacted raw materials which contributed to the higher compressive strength. In the X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns, the change of the crystalline phase after heat curing for 4 hours was easily detectable compared to the samples subjected to a shorter period of heat curing.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION AND PRODUCTION OF CONDUCTIVE FILLER FROM OIL PALM ASH AND ITS PERFORMANCE IN EPOXY MATRIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OTHMAN MAMAT

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oil Palm Ash (OPA was investigated and the FESEM studies showed medium sized particle with a crushed structure. An XRD diffractogram of OPA showed that the obtained OPA contain aluminum, silicon and they exist in their oxide form as indicated by the high percentage of oxygen (36% with little traces of potassium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide. while FTIR analysis indicated the occurrence of functional groups such as OH groups, silanol hydroxyl groups of silica or the N-H stretching vibration free imines, aromatic C-H and C-Br alkyl functional group and the presence of methyl CH3. OPA was carbonized in a furnace with the control flow of nitrogen and ball milled at 100 rpm for 3 hours to obtain a carbonized particle with a diameter of 77.9- 140.9 nm. The synthesized carbon black (CB Particle was dispersed in epoxy resin (DGEBA at different loading to produce an electrically conductive polymer with a well-dispersed network of electrical conducting particles.

  12. One-step purification and characterization of cellulase-free xylanase produced by alkalophilic Bacillus subtilis ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwani Sanghi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the one-step purification and characterization of an extracellular cellulase-free xylanase from a newly isolated alkalophilic and moderately thermophilic strain of Bacillus subtilis ASH. Xylanase was purified to homogeneity by 10.5-fold with ~43% recovery using ion-exchange chromatography through CM-Sephadex C-50. The purified enzyme revealed a single band on SDS-PAGE gel with a molecular mass of 23 kDa. It showed an optimum pH at 7.0 and was stable over the pH range 6.0-9.0. The optimum temperature for enzyme activity was 55 ºC. The purified xylanase did not lose any activity up to 45 ºC, however, it retained 80% and 51% of its activity after pre-incubation at 55 ºC and 60 ºC, respectively. The enzyme obeyed Michaelis-Menton kinetics towards birch wood xylan with apparent Km 3.33 mg/ml and Vmax 100 IU/ml. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by Hg2+ and Cu2+ while enhanced by Co2+ and Mn2+. The purified enzyme could be stored at 4 ºC for six weeks without any loss of catalytic activity. The faster and economical purification of the cellulase-free xylanase from B. subtilis ASH by one-step procedure together with its appreciable stability at high temperature and alkaline pH makes it potentially effective for industrial applications.

  13. Characterization of starch and other components from African crops and quality evaluation of derived products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research was carried out on African staple foods on characterization of components of cereals and tubers, and quality evaluation of foods manufactured from composite flours. Cereal starch, alimentary fiber and minerals from cassava were investigated. Starch was isolated under conditions of minimum damage from seeds of three sorghum and two fonio cultivars, and its physico-chemical properties were compared with commercial wheat starch. Fiber, ash and mineral content of samples of genetically improved varieties of cassava from Ghana were determined to understand the role of factors that influence texture of cooked products. Bread and pasta were produced from either triticale alone or in combination with different amounts of cassava flour, and by varying the amount of wheat flour. The organoleptic quality of the raw materials and final products were determined. (author). 15 refs, 10 tabs

  14. Evaluation of Vitrification Processing Step for Rocky Flats Incinerator Ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wigent, W.L.; Luey, J.K.; Scheele, R.D.; Li, H.

    1999-04-08

    In 1997, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff developed a processing option for incinerator ash at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS). This work was performed with support from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Safe Sites of Colorado (SSOC). A description of the remediation needs for the RFETS incinerator ash is provided in a report summarizing the recommended processing option for treatment of the ash (Lucy et al. 1998). The recommended process flowsheet involves a calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material followed by a vitrification processing step for a mixture of glass tit and calcined incinerator ash. Using the calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material reduced process upsets for the vitrification step, allowed for increased waste loading in the final product, and improved the quality of the final product. Figure 1.1 illustrates the flow sheet for the recommended processing option for treatment of RFETS incinerator ash. In 1998, work at PNNL further developed the recommended flow sheet through a series of studies to better define the vitrification operating parameters and to address secondary processing issues (such as characterizing the offgas species from the calcination process). Because a prototypical rotary calciner was not available for use, studies to evaluate the offgas from the calcination process were performed using a benchtop rotary calciner and laboratory-scale equipment (Lucy et al. 1998). This report focuses on the vitrification process step after ash has been calcined. Testing with full-scale containers was performed using ash surrogates and a muffle furnace similar to that planned for use at RFETS. Small-scale testing was performed using plutonium-bearing incinerator ash to verify performance of the waste form. Ash was not obtained from RFETS because of transportation requirements to calcine the incinerator ash prior to shipment of the material. Because part of

  15. Metals accumulations during thermal processing of sewage sludge - characterization of bottom ash and air pollution control (APC) residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasina, Monika; Kowalski, Piotr R.; Michalik, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Due to increasing mass of sewage sludge, problems in its management have appeared. Over years sewage sludge was landfilled, however due to EU directives concerning environmental issues this option is no longer possible. This type of material is considered hazardous due to highly concentrated metals and harmful elements, toxic organic substances and biological components (e.g. parasites, microbes). Currently in Europe, incineration is considered to be the most reasonable method for sewage sludge treatment. As a result of sludge incineration significant amount of energy is recovered due to high calorific value of sewage sludge but bottom ash and APC residues are being produced. In this study we show the preliminary results of chemical and mineral analyses of both bottom ash and APC residues produced in fluidized bed boiler in sewage sludge incineration plant in Poland, with a special emphasis on metals which, as a part of incombustible fraction can accumulate in the residual materials after thermal processing. The bottom ash was a SiO2-P2O5-Fe2O3-CaO-Al2O3 dominated material. Main mineral phases identified in X-ray diffraction patterns were: quartz, feldspar, hematite, and phosphates (apatite and scholzite). The bottom ash was characterized by high content of Zn - 4472 mg kg‑1, Cu - 665.5 mg kg‑1, Pb - 138 mg kg‑1, Ni - 119.5 mg kg‑1, and interestingly high content of Au - 0.858 mg kg‑1 The APC residues composition was dominated by soluble phases which represent more than 90% of the material. The XRD patterns indicated thenardite, halite, anhydrite, calcite and apatite as main mineral phases. The removal of soluble phases by dissolution in deionised water caused a significant mass reduction (ca. 3% of material remained on the filters). Calcite, apatite and quartz were main identified phases. The content of metals in insoluble material is relatively high: Zn - 6326 mg kg‑1, Pb - 514.3 mg kg‑1, Cu - 476.6 mg kg‑1, Ni - 43.3 mg kg‑1. The content of Cd

  16. Characterization of fly ashes from a municipal solid waste incinerator to explore its using in construction; Caracterizacion de cenizas procedentes de plantas de incineracion de residuos solidos urbanos para su posible utilizacion en construccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alaejos Gutierrez, M. P.

    2002-07-01

    The paper describes the physical and chemical characterization of fly ashes from municipal solid waste incinerator. The objective is to explore potential applications of this residue in construction products. The results show the no pozzolanic nature of the fly ashes, so its utilization as mineral admixture is discarded. however, the study reveals the expansive character of the fly ashes when are mixed with water. The results of X-ray diffraction confirm the presence of metallic aluminium in the fly ash as the origin of this expansion. This chemical reaction generates a considerable amount of hydrogen, inflammable gas. Three ways to avoid this reaction are proposed. On the other way, the expansive behaviour of the fly ashes allow to explore its possible application to produce cellular mortars, as the traditional production of these mortars have several similarities with the reaction of fly ash and water. (Author) 9 refs.

  17. Characterizing Water Quality in Students' Own Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, S. K.; Speelman, Nicole; Yeary, Amber; Slattery, William

    2007-01-01

    The surface water quality studies are developed to help first year college students who are preparing to become high school teachers. These water quality impact studies allow students to correlate geologic conditions and chemistry.

  18. Characterization of Pozzolanic Reaction and Its Effect on the C-S-H Gel in Fly Ash-cement Paste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; HE Zhen; CAI Xinhua

    2011-01-01

    High resolution solid-state 29Si MAS NMR, combined with XRD, SEM and FTIR were used to characterize the pozzolanic activity of FA, type of main pozzolanic reaction products, and the effect of pozzolanic reaction on the C-S-H microstructure in fly ash-cement (FC) paste. The experimental results indicate that in the hydrated FC paste with 30% dosage of FA at 3 d, FA partially participated in the pozzolanic reaction, while, at 120 d, FA largely reacts. During the hydration of FCpaste at laboratory temperature, the pozzolanic reaction products are C-S-H gel rather than zeolitic gel.Moreover, after the covalent bonds of Si-O-Si, Si-O-Al and Al-O-Al in the structure of FA are broken,monosilicates Si-OH and Al-OH groups form, these chemical species can connect C-S-H dimers, thus producing more Al-free C-S-H and aluminous C-S-H than in the plain cement paste. The increased content of Al for Si substitution in the bridging tetrahedra of C-S-H may decrease the stability of C-S-H, which results in a rather obvious loss in the mechanical strength of hardened FC paste.

  19. Preparation and characterization of fly ash cenospheres supported CuO–BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jin [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, and School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); School of Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, Nanjing Xiaozhuang University, Nanjing 211171 (China); Cui, Hao; Wang, Bing; Li, Chuang; Zhai, Jianping [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, and School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Li, Qin, E-mail: qli@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, and School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel CuO–BiVO{sub 4}/FACs heterojunction composites have been synthesized. • CuO–BiVO{sub 4} are loaded on the surface of lightweight hollow microspheres. • The CuO–BiVO{sub 4}/FACs exhibit enhanced absorption in the visible light region. • The CuO–BiVO{sub 4}/FACs show efficient photocatalytic activities. • The composites are floatable and can be recovered easily. - Abstract: Novel fly ash cenospheres supported CuO–BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction composites (CuO–BiVO{sub 4}/FACs) were prepared by modified metalorganic decomposition and impregnation methods. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), and UV–vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) techniques. The XPS and SEM analyses indicated that Cu was present as CuO dispersed on the surface of BiVO{sub 4}. The DRS spectra revealed that the composites had improved optical adsorption in the visible light region, and the composites exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity for methylene blue (MB) degradation under visible light irradiation. It was found that the 5 wt% CuO-loaded composite showed the highest photocatalytic activity for MB dye wastewater treatment. FACs, a by-product generated in coal-firing power plants, were used as a low cost support which favored phase separation after the reaction owing to their low density.

  20. Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-30

    This quality assurance plan identifies the data necessary, and techniques designed to attain the required quality, to meet the specific data quality objectives associated with the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report specifies sampling, waste testing, and analytical methods for transuranic wastes.

  1. Preparation and characterization of Cobalt Sulfophthalocyanine/TiO{sub 2}/fly-ash cenospheres photocatalyst and study on degradation activity under visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo Pengwei [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Jiangsu, Xuefu Road 301, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yan Yongsheng, E-mail: henanhuo@yahoo.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Jiangsu, Xuefu Road 301, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Li Songtian; Li Huaming; Huang Weihong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Jiangsu, Xuefu Road 301, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2009-05-15

    Cobalt Sulfophthalocyanine (CoSPc) sensitized TiO{sub 2} sol samples were prepared through a Sol-Gel method using Cobalt Sulfophthalocyanine as a sensitizer. Loading and modified floating photocatalyst was prepared by hydrothermal method using fly-ash cenospheres as a carrier. The properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (DRS). Photocatalytic activity was studied by degrading wastewater of methylene blue under visible light. The results indicate that the fly-ash cenospheres are covered by modified TiO{sub 2} film which composed of the anatase, brookite and rutile misch crystal phase. CoSPc/TiO{sub 2}/fly-ash cenospheres samples have good catalytic activity under visible light, and have strong absorbency during 600-700 nm. The sensitization of CoSPc can enhance visible light catalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}/fly-ash cenospheres. The degradation rate of methylene blue reaches 73.36% in 180 min under the visible light illumination. But too much CoSPc can decrease its catalytic activity.

  2. Preparation and characterization of Cobalt Sulfophthalocyanine/TiO2/fly-ash cenospheres photocatalyst and study on degradation activity under visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobalt Sulfophthalocyanine (CoSPc) sensitized TiO2 sol samples were prepared through a Sol-Gel method using Cobalt Sulfophthalocyanine as a sensitizer. Loading and modified floating photocatalyst was prepared by hydrothermal method using fly-ash cenospheres as a carrier. The properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (DRS). Photocatalytic activity was studied by degrading wastewater of methylene blue under visible light. The results indicate that the fly-ash cenospheres are covered by modified TiO2 film which composed of the anatase, brookite and rutile misch crystal phase. CoSPc/TiO2/fly-ash cenospheres samples have good catalytic activity under visible light, and have strong absorbency during 600-700 nm. The sensitization of CoSPc can enhance visible light catalytic activity of TiO2/fly-ash cenospheres. The degradation rate of methylene blue reaches 73.36% in 180 min under the visible light illumination. But too much CoSPc can decrease its catalytic activity.

  3. A study on the chemical and mineralogical characterization of MSWI fly ash using a sequential extraction procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash is of environmental concern due to their leaching potential in landfill environments. Sequential chemical extraction was performed on fly ash samples from a large-scale municipal solid waste incineration plant in East China. The transformation of the mineralogical species of fly ash during the sequential extraction was studied using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The leaching behavior of heavy metals such as zinc, lead, cadmium and copper in MSWI fly ash was considered to have a dependency relationship with the components of calcium, such as aphthitalite, calcite, anhydrite and calcium aluminate or calcium aluminosilicate

  4. Ashes from biofuels and mixed fuels - amount and qualities; Askor fraan biobraenslen och blandbraenslen - maengder och kvalitet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjurstroem, Henrik; Ilskog, Elisabeth; Berg, Magnus [AaF Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-04-01

    In this study, ashes from biofuels used in the energy utilities, the pulp and paper industry and the wood-working industries have been inventoried. The selection of plants to which enquiries were addressed consists of about 50 utilities, all pulp and paper plants and about 20 wood-working industries (e.g. sawmills). The purpose of the study was to estimate the quantities of bio ashes that are recycled to the forests and those that could be recycled. The background to this study is that logging slash is harvested from ca 30,000 ha per year, while ash is recycled only to 2 to 4,000 ha per year. A working hypothesis has been that logging slash or clean wooden fuels are mixed with other fuels to such an extent that the ash is too contaminated to be recycled. The consequence would be that there is a shortage of suitable ash. Therefore, it was desirable that motives for mixing fuels be chartered. In Sweden, approximately one million ton ashes are produced each year and the share of the three industries that have been studied is estimated as: 200 - 340,000 tons from utilities about 275,000 tons from the pulp and paper industry and 100,000 tons from the woodworking industry. These quantities include unburned carbon, water added when the ash is extracted from the boilers etc. Additional quantities of ash are those produced by waste combustion (447,000 tons), wood-burning in residential buildings (50 - 100,000 tons) etc. In all, ash that may be recycled should total about 300,000 tons (Recyclable ash in t/a: Utilities - 80,000; Pulp and Paper Industry - 100-130,000; Woodworking Industry 100,000). Logging slash is seldom burned alone in the boilers at the utilities, but are almost always mixed with other wood fuel fractions such as waste from sawmills. The mixtures can be very complex. Clean mixtures of wood fuel fractions represent ca 4,500 GWh of the ca 7,800 GWh in this study. Other fuels that are often used in mixtures are peat and Salix, which does not necessarily lead

  5. Characterization of various organic waste nanofillers obtained from oil palm ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. S. Abdul Khalil

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The byproducts of palm oil production (nut shells, fibers, and EFB were combusted to obtain organic waste nanofillers. The prepared nano-filler was characterized by different techniques, viz. XRD for degree of crystallinity, particle size, morphology, and spectroscopic methods. The average diameter found was between 93.39 and 192.20 nm, and the width was between 18.17 and 43.45 nm. The SEM images revealed various morphological arrangements of particles. XRD studies exhibited crystalline nature of both the raw and ground nanofillers. The elemental analysis of nanofillers was carried out by EDX, and FT-IR was used to assign the degree of stretching of various functional groups. In addition to C, N, and O, elemental analysis revealed the presence of Al, Mg, Si, P, K, Ca, Fe, S, Ti, and Mn.

  6. Use of ashes and ash-and-slad wastes in construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lahtinen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of ash waste saves expenses on main materials without compromising the quality of the product, while solving the problem of disposal of ash materials. The aim of this work is classification of ashes and evaluation its use in construction.Classification of ash-and-slad wastes based on type of burned coal, way of incineration, flame temperature, way of ash disposal is made. The chemical composition and behavior of shale ash, its main deposits, its advantages as a mineral concrete admixture are analysed. Fly ashes are divided into siliceous ashes and basic ashes.Various application areas of ash-and-slad wastes in construction are considered, the examples of its use are given.

  7. Caracterização de cinzas volantes para aproveitamento cerâmico Characterization of fly ash for ceramic use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Warpechowski da Silva

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinzas volantes são minerais produzidos a partir da queima de carvão mineral. A Usina Termelétrica de Candiota, RS produz aproximadamente 1.000.000 toneladas/ano de cinzas, sendo que 80% volantes e 20% pesadas. O aproveitamento deste material em compostos cerâmicos é altamente recomendável pois, como resíduo sólido da queima do carvão, sua disposição no meio ambiente acarreta vários problemas ambientais sérios e custos volumosos. Mineralogicamente as cinzas volantes são constituídas por mulita, quartzo e hematita, e material amorfo determinado por difração de raios X; na caracterização química foram determinados os elementos maiores e como menores Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Hg, Cr, Cd e Ni. Para a caracterização física realizou-se ensaios de análise granulométrica, superfície específica, MEG, limites de Atterberg e índice de atividade pozolânica (cimento e cal.Fly ashes are minerals produced in the combustion of mineral coal. The Candiota Power Station, at RS State, produces approximately 1,000,000 ton/yr. ashes. A fraction of around 80% of this quantity is constituted by fly ash and just 20% by bottom ash. The maximum capacity of production of ashes is close to 1,900,000 ton/yr. The utilization of this material in ceramic composites is highly recommended since, as solid reject from coal combustion, the disposal of this residue in the environment gives rise to severe environmental problems and high costs for correction. X-ray analyses have determined the mineralogical constitution of fly ash; the material is made of mullite, quartz and hematite, in addition to amorphous material. The chemical characterization has identified the major elements and Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Hg, Cr, Cd and Ni as minor constituents. For the physical characterization, the tests were particle size analysis and the measurement of specific surface, MEG, Atterberg’s limit and the index of pozolanic activity (for cement and lime.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of zeolite material from coal ashes modified by surfactant; Sintese e caracterizacao de material zeolitico de cinzas de carvao modificado por surfactante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fungaro, D.A., E-mail: dfungaro@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CQMA/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente; Borrely, S.I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CTR/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes

    2010-07-01

    Coal ash was used as starting material for zeolite synthesis by means of hydrothermal treatment. The surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) was prepared by adsorbing the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA-Br) on the external surface of the zeolite from coal ash. The zeolite structure stability was monitored during the characterization of the materials by FTIR, XDR and SEM. The structural parameters of surfactant-modified zeolite are very close to that of corresponding non-modified zeolite which indicates that the crystalline nature of the zeolite remained intact after required chemical treatment with HDTMA-Br molecules and heating treatment for drying. The most intense peaks in the FTIR spectrum of HDTMA-Br were observed in SMZ spectrum confirming adsorption of surfactant on zeolites. (author)

  9. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Appendix A4 to A6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeft, H.; Jensen, Peter A.; Nesterov, I.; Hyks, J.; Astrup, T. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Glostrup (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. The appendices deal with collection of slags for the rotary kiln experiments; overview of the thermal treatment experiments - phase 1; a journal paper with the title ''Quantification of leaching from waste incineration bottom ash treated in a rotary kiln

  10. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Appendix A7 to A10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyks, J.; Astrup, T.; Jensen, Peter A.; Nesterov, I.; Boejer, M.; Frandsen, F.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Hedegaard Madsen, O.; Lundtorp, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Glostrup (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. The appendices deal with the influence of kiln treatment on incineration bottom ash leaching; the influence of kiln treatment on corrosive species in deposits; operational strategy for rotary kiln; alkali/chloride release during refuse incineration on a grate. (Author)

  11. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Appendix A1 to A3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesterov, I.; Jensen, Peter A.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Kloeft, H.; Boejer, M. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Esbjerg (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. The appendices deal with incineration bottom ash leaching properties; design and construction of rotary kiln facility; manual to rotary kiln experiments. (Author)

  12. Characterization of moderate ash-and-gas explosions at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala, from infrasound waveform inversion and thermal infrared measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, S. De; Lamb, O. D.; Lamur, A.; Hornby, A. J.; Aulock, F. W.; Chigna, G.; Lavallée, Y.; Rietbrock, A.

    2016-06-01

    The rapid discharge of gas and rock fragments during volcanic eruptions generates acoustic infrasound. Here we present results from the inversion of infrasound signals associated with small and moderate gas-and-ash explosions at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala, to retrieve the time history of mass eruption rate at the vent. Acoustic waveform inversion is complemented by analyses of thermal infrared imagery to constrain the volume and rise dynamics of the eruption plume. Finally, we combine results from the two methods in order to assess the bulk density of the erupted mixture, constrain the timing of the transition from a momentum-driven jet to a buoyant plume, and to evaluate the relative volume fractions of ash and gas during the initial thrust phase. Our results demonstrate that eruptive plumes associated with small-to-moderate size explosions at Santiaguito only carry minor fractions of ash, suggesting that these events may not involve extensive magma fragmentation in the conduit.

  13. National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Area-Characterization Toolbox

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is release 1.0 of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Area-Characterization Toolbox. These tools are designed to be accessed using ArcGIS Desktop...

  14. Management of data quality of high level waste characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, W.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-12

    Over the past 10 years, the Hanford Site has been transitioning from nuclear materials production to Site cleanup operations. High-level waste characterization at the Hanford Site provides data to support present waste processing operations, tank safety programs, and future waste disposal programs. Quality elements in the high-level waste characterization program will be presented by following a sample through the data quality objective, sampling, laboratory analysis and data review process. Transition from production to cleanup has resulted in changes in quality systems and program; the changes, as well as other issues in these quality programs, will be described. Laboratory assessment through quality control and performance evaluation programs will be described, and data assessments in the laboratory and final reporting in the tank characterization reports will be discussed.

  15. Characterization of multi-scale porous structure of fly ash/phosphate geopolymer hollow sphere structures: from submillimeter to nano-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruifeng; Wu, Gaohui; Jiang, Longtao; Sun, Dongli

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the porous structure of fly ash/phosphate geopolymer hollow sphere structures (FPGHSS), prepared by pre-bonding and curing technology, has been characterized by multi-resolution methods from sub-millimeter to nano-scale. Micro-CT and confocal microscopy could provide the macroscopic distribution of porous structure on sub-millimeter scale, and hollow fly ashes with sphere shape and several sub-millimeter open cells with irregular shape were identified. SEM is more suitable to illustrate the distribution of micro-sized open and closed cells, and it was found that the open cells of FPGHSS were mainly formed in the interstitial porosity between fly ashes. Mercury porosimeter measurement showed that the micro-sized open cell of FPGHSS demonstrated a normal/bimodal distribution, and the peaks of pore size distribution were mainly around 100 and 10 μm. TEM observation revealed that the phosphate geopolymer was mainly composed of the porous area with nano-pores and dense areas, which were amorphous Al-O-P phase and α-Al2O3 respectively. The pore size of nano-pores demonstrated a quasi-normal distribution from about 10 to 100 nm. Therefore, detailed information of the porous structure of FPGHSS could be revealed using multiple methods.

  16. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Appendix A11 to A14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedegaard Madsen, O.; Boejer, M.; Jensen, Peter A.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Lundtorp, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Glostrup (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. The appendices deal with electrical efficiency by dividing the combustion products; release of potentially corrosive constituents from the grate; CFD modeling of grate with and without vertical divider. (Author)

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF AIR EMISSIONS AND RESIDUAL ASH FROM OPEN BURNING OF ELECTRONIC WASTES DURING SIMULATED RUDIMENTALRY RECYCLING OPERATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air emissions and residual ash measurements were made from open, uncontrolled combustion of electronic waste (e-waste) during simulations of practices associated with rudimentary e-waste recycling operations. Circuit boards and insulated wires were separately burned to simulate p...

  18. Characterization of coal fly ash nanoparticles and induced oxidative DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A. [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ali, Al-Yousef Sulaiman [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Science, University of Dammam, P.O. Box 1683, Hafr Al Batin-31991 (Saudi Arabia); Musarrat, Javed, E-mail: musarratj1@yahoo.com [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Agricultural Microbiology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, AMU, Aligarh202002 (India)

    2012-10-15

    The nano-sized particles present in coal fly ash (CFA) were characterized through the X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses. The XRD data revealed the average crystallite size of the CFA nanoparticles (CFA-NPs) as 14 nm. TEM and SEM imaging demonstrated predominantly spherical and some polymorphic structures in the size range of 11 to 25 nm. The amount of heavy metal associated with CFA particles ({mu}g/g) were determined as Fe (34160.0 {+-} 1.38), Ni (150.8 {+-} 0.78), Cu (99.3 {+-} 0.56) and Cr (64.0 {+-} 0.86). However, the bioavailability of heavy metals in terms of percent release was in the order as Cr > Ni > Cu > Fe in CFA-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) extract. The comet and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assays revealed substantial genomic DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells treated with CFA-NPs in Aq and DMSO extracts. About 1.8 and 3.6 strand breaks per unit of DNA were estimated through alkaline unwinding assay at 1:100 DNA nucleotide/CFA ppm ratios with the Aq and DMSO extracts, respectively. The DNA and mitochondrial damage was invariably greater with CFA-DMSO extract vis-a-vis -Aq extract. Generation of superoxide anions (O{sub 2} Bullet {sup -}) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) through metal redox-cycling, alteration in mitochondrial potential and 8-oxodG production elucidated CFA-NPs induced oxidative stress as a plausible mechanism for CFA-induced genotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFA consists of spherical crystalline nanoparticles in size range of 11-25 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline unwinding assay revealed single-strandedness in CFA treated ctDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFA nanoparticles exhibited the ability to induce ROS and oxidative DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comet and CBMN assays revealed DNA and chromosomal

  19. Characterization of residues from waste combustion in fluidized bed boilers. Evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report a thorough characterization of the solid residues from municipal solid waste combustion in a Kvaerner EnviroPower bubbling fluidized bed boiler in Lidkoeping, is presented. Three different end products are generated, namely bottom ash, cyclone ash, and filter ash. The bottom ash, consisting of bed ash and hopper ash, is screened and useful bed material recycled. In the characterization, also the primary constituents bed ash and hopper ash have been included. A chemical characterization have been performed including total inorganic contents, content of unburnt matter, leaching behaviour (availability tests, column tests, pH-static tests) and leaching tests according to certain standards for classification (AFX31-210, DIN38414, TCLP). Physical characterization have included grain size distribution, grain density, compaction properties and stabilization of cyclone ash with subsequent testing of comprehensive strength and saturated hydraulic conductivity. From an environmental point of view, the quality of the bottom ash and probably the cyclone ash from fluidized bed combustion as determined in this study, indicate a potential for utilization. Utilization of the bottom ash could be accepted in certain countries, e.g. France, according to their current limit values. In other countries, e.g. Sweden, no general limit values are given and utilization have to be applied for in each case. The judgement is then based, not only on total contents in the residue and its leaching behaviour, but also on the specific environmental conditions at the site. 7 refs, 17 figs, 12 tabs

  20. EDU 626 ASH

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 40 course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com     Product Description EDU 626 Week 1 Research Topic (Ash) EDU 626 Week 2 Annotated Bibliography (Ash) EDU 626 Week 2 Critical Thinking Questions (Ash) EDU 626 Week 3 Procedures or Methods (Ash) EDU 626 Week 4 Critical Thinking Questions (Ash) EDU 626 Week 5 Critical Thinking Questions (Ash) EDU 626 Week 6 Final Paper (Ash)  

  1. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

    2006-03-01

    The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

  2. ASH and NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglioni, F; Ciccia, S; Marino, M; Bedogni, G; Bellentani, S

    2011-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) have a similar pathogenesis and histopathology but a different etiology and epidemiology. NASH and ASH are advanced stages of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD). NAFLD is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver (steatosis), without any other evident causes of chronic liver diseases (viral, autoimmune, genetic, etc.), and with an alcohol consumption ≤20-30 g/day. On the contrary, AFLD is defined as the presence of steatosis and alcohol consumption >20-30 g/day. The most common phenotypic manifestations of primary NAFLD/NASH are overweight/obesity, visceral adiposity, type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and hypertension. The prevalence of NAFLD in the general population in Western countries is estimated to be 25-30%. The prevalence and incidence of NASH and ASH are not known because of the impossibility of performing liver biopsy in the general population. Up to 90% of alcoholics have fatty liver, and 5-15% of these subjects will develop cirrhosis over 20 years. The risk of cirrhosis increases to 30-40% in those who continue to drink alcohol. About 10-35% of alcoholics exhibit changes on liver biopsy consistent with alcoholic hepatitis. Natural histories of NASH and ASH are not completely defined, even if patients with NASH have a reduced life expectancy due to liver-related death and cardiovascular diseases. The best treatment of AFLD/ASH is to stop drinking, and the most effective first-line therapeutic option for NAFLD/NASH is non-pharmacologic lifestyle interventions through a multidisciplinary approach including weight loss, dietary changes, physical exercise, and cognitive-behavior therapy. PMID:21734385

  3. Characterization of a wollastonite glass-ceramic material prepared using sugar cane bagasse ash (SCBA) as one of the raw materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Silvio R., E-mail: rainho@fct.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia — FCT, 19060-900 Presidente Prudente — SP (Brazil); Souza, Agda E. [Universidade Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia — FCT, 19060-900 Presidente Prudente — SP (Brazil); Carvalho, Claudio L.; Reynoso, Victor C.S. [Universidade Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira — FEIS, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira – SP (Brazil); Romero, Maximina; Rincón, Jesús Ma. [Instituto de Ciencias de la Construccion Eduardo Torroja — IETCC, CSIC, 28033 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Glass-ceramic material prepared with sugar cane bagasse ash as one of the raw materials was characterized to determine some important properties for its application as a coating material. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that wollastonite-2M (CaSiO{sub 3}) was the major glass-ceramic phase. The Rietveld method was used to quantify the crystalline (60 wt.%) and vitreous (40 wt.%) phases in the glass-ceramic. The microstructure (determined by scanning electron microscopy) of this material had a marble appearance, showing a microporous network of elongated crystals with some areas with dendritic, feather-like ordering. Microhardness data gave a mean hardness value of 564.4 HV (Vickers-hardness), and light microscopy disclosed a greenish brown colored material with a vitreous luster. - Highlights: • We studied the properties of a glass-ceramic material obtained from sugarcane ash. • This material has the appearance and hardness of natural stones. • A refining method gave information about its amorphous and crystalline phases. • This material has potential to be used as coating plates for buildings.

  4. Characterization of a wollastonite glass-ceramic material prepared using sugar cane bagasse ash (SCBA) as one of the raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass-ceramic material prepared with sugar cane bagasse ash as one of the raw materials was characterized to determine some important properties for its application as a coating material. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that wollastonite-2M (CaSiO3) was the major glass-ceramic phase. The Rietveld method was used to quantify the crystalline (60 wt.%) and vitreous (40 wt.%) phases in the glass-ceramic. The microstructure (determined by scanning electron microscopy) of this material had a marble appearance, showing a microporous network of elongated crystals with some areas with dendritic, feather-like ordering. Microhardness data gave a mean hardness value of 564.4 HV (Vickers-hardness), and light microscopy disclosed a greenish brown colored material with a vitreous luster. - Highlights: • We studied the properties of a glass-ceramic material obtained from sugarcane ash. • This material has the appearance and hardness of natural stones. • A refining method gave information about its amorphous and crystalline phases. • This material has potential to be used as coating plates for buildings

  5. Preparation and Characterization of a Carbon/Fly Ash Composite Adsorbent%C/粉煤灰复合吸附材料的制备及表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德懿; 马颖; 王毅; 冯辉霞; 雒和明; 满新伟; 郝远

    2011-01-01

    以粉煤灰和蔗糖为原料,浓硫酸为炭化剂,制备了一种新型的C/粉煤灰复合吸附材料.采用X光电子能谱、红外吸收光谱、场发射扫描电子显微镜、X射线衍射及N2气吸附实验对所制备复合材料进行了表征.结果表明,粉煤灰表面被类石墨态炭纳米颗粒所包裹,复合材料表面密集分布着大量的介孔,Brunauer-Emmett-Teller(BET)比表面积SBET =5.4 m2/g,并且在该复合材料表面含有丰富的-SO3H、-COOH和-OH等含氧官能团.考察了所制备的复合材料对典型阳离子型染料亚甲基蓝及重金属离子的吸附能力,结果表明,该复合材料具有优异的吸附性能,其对亚甲基蓝的吸附能力达到活性炭的83.7%,对典型重金属离子的吸附能力优于市售活性炭.所制备复合材料可作为活性炭的一种替代品,用于水中有机染料和重金属离子的吸附处理.%Fly ash, a kind of industrial solid waste material produced during the combustion of coal in the electricity generation, was utilized to prepare a novel carbon/fly ash composite adsorbent with core-shell structures by a partial carbonization and sulfonation process. The prepared composite adsorbent was characterized with XPS, FT-IR, SEM, XRD and gas adsorption experiments. The results showed that fly ash was coated by graphite-like carbon nanoparticles. The carbon, oxygen, silica and sulfur are the main elements on the surface of the prepared composite adsorbent. Among them, the carbon and oxygen elements are the dominant superficial elements. An abundant of mesopores existed on the surface of the composite adsorbent. The Brunauer Emmett Teller ( BET) surface area SBET is 5.4 mVg. Meanwhile, an abundant of oxygen functional groups, such as carboxyl, hydroxyl and sulfonic groups, which were very effective in capturing cationic organic dyes and heavy metal ions and acted as the main adsorption sites of the composite adsorbent, were successfully introduced on the composite

  6. Preparation and characterization of electron-beam treated HDPE composites reinforced with rice husk ash and Brazilian clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We examine changes in HDPE properties when waste and clay are used as reinforcement. • The addition of only 3% of clay leads to important gains in HDPE properties. • The use of electron-beam contributes to greater improvements in material properties. • We observe 85% of cross-linking degree for the HDPE when treated with e-beam. - Abstract: This work evaluates the morphology, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. HDPE reinforced with rice husk ashes (80:20 wt%), HDPE reinforced with clay (97:3 wt%) and HDPE reinforced with both rice husk ashes and clay(77:20:3 wt%) were obtained. The Brazilian bentonite chocolate clay was used in this study. This Brazilian smectitic clay is commonly used to produce nanocomposites. The composites were produced by melting extrusion process and then irradiation was carried out in a 1.5 MeV electron-beam accelerator (room temperature, presence of air). Comparisons using the irradiated and non-irradiated neat polymer, and the irradiated and non-irradiated composites were made. The materials obtained were submitted to tensile, flexural and impact tests. Additionally HDT, SEM and XRD analyses were carried out along with the sol–gel analysis which aimed to assess the cross-linking degree of the irradiated materials. Results showed great improvement in most HDPE properties and a high cross-linking degree of 85% as a result of electron-beam irradiation of the material

  7. Preparation and characterization of electron-beam treated HDPE composites reinforced with rice husk ash and Brazilian clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, A.V., E-mail: angelortiz@ipen.br [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, São Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Teixeira, J.G.; Gomes, M.G.; Oliveira, R.R. [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, São Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Díaz, F.R.V. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Polytechnic School, University of São Paulo Av. Prof. Mello de Morais 2463, São Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil); Moura, E.A.B. [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, São Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We examine changes in HDPE properties when waste and clay are used as reinforcement. • The addition of only 3% of clay leads to important gains in HDPE properties. • The use of electron-beam contributes to greater improvements in material properties. • We observe 85% of cross-linking degree for the HDPE when treated with e-beam. - Abstract: This work evaluates the morphology, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. HDPE reinforced with rice husk ashes (80:20 wt%), HDPE reinforced with clay (97:3 wt%) and HDPE reinforced with both rice husk ashes and clay(77:20:3 wt%) were obtained. The Brazilian bentonite chocolate clay was used in this study. This Brazilian smectitic clay is commonly used to produce nanocomposites. The composites were produced by melting extrusion process and then irradiation was carried out in a 1.5 MeV electron-beam accelerator (room temperature, presence of air). Comparisons using the irradiated and non-irradiated neat polymer, and the irradiated and non-irradiated composites were made. The materials obtained were submitted to tensile, flexural and impact tests. Additionally HDT, SEM and XRD analyses were carried out along with the sol–gel analysis which aimed to assess the cross-linking degree of the irradiated materials. Results showed great improvement in most HDPE properties and a high cross-linking degree of 85% as a result of electron-beam irradiation of the material.

  8. Characterization of Nanoporous Ceramic Granules Made with Coal Fly Ash and Their Utilization in Phenol Removal from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoqian Jing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal fly ash has been evaluated as low-cost material for pollutants adsorption. But powdered fly ash is difficult to be separated from the adsorbate and solution after saturation. When it is made into granules, this problem can be solved. Granules with uniform diameter of 6 mm were prepared and used as adsorbents for phenol removal from aqueous solution. The physical and chemical characteristics of the granules were investigated. The data indicated that the granules were abundant with nanosize pores of 9.8 nm on average. The specific surface area and porosity reached 130.5 m2/g and 60.1%, respectively. The main components in the granules were SiO2, Al2O3, MgO, Fe2O3, CaO, K2O, and unburned carbon. The adsorption batch experiments showed that this granular material was an efficient adsorbent for phenol removal. Phenol adsorption on the granules was mainly influenced by dosage and contact time. Increase in the dosage could enhance phenol adsorption effectively. More than 90% phenol could be removed under normal temperature and neutral pH with initial concentration of 100 mg/L, contact time of 90 min, and dosage of 140 g/L. The adsorption of phenol on the granules was spontaneous and complied well with the pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir isotherm model.

  9. Utilization of ash fractions from alternative biofuels used in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaisen, L.; Hinge, J.; Christensen, I. (Danish Technological Inst., Aarhus (Denmark)); Dahl, J. (Force Technology, Broendby (Denmark)); Arendt Jensen, P. (DTU-CHEC, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Soendergaard Birkmose, T. (Dansk Landbrugsraadgivning, Landscentret, Aarhus (Denmark)); Sander, B. (DONG Energy, Fredericia (Denmark)); Kristensen, O. (Kommunekemi A/S, Nyborg (Denmark))

    2008-07-15

    It is expected, that demand for the traditional biomass resources wood and straw will increase over the next years. In other projects a number of agro industrial waste products has been tested and characterized as fuels for power plants. The annual production in Denmark of these fuels is estimated at roughly 400.000 tons of Dry Matter per year, so the potential is substantial. The agro industrial biomass products include: Grain screening waste, pea shells, soy waste, cocoa waste, sugar beet waste, sunflower waste, shea waste, coffee waste, olive waste, rice shell waste, potato waste, pectin waste, carrageen waste, tobacco waste, rape seed waste and mash from breweries. In the PSO project 5075, 5 different types of fuel pellets was produced, which were rendered suitable for combustion in power plants. In this project, ash is produced from the above mentioned 5 mixtures together with another 2 mixtures produced especially for this project. From the 5 mixtures from PSO 5075, ash is produced at Danish Technological Institute's slag analyzer. These ash products are rendered comparable to ash from grate fired boilers at power plants. The ash/slag from the combustion in the slag analyzer was then grinded - thus resulting in a total of 5 ash products. At DTU CHEC's Entrained Flow Reactor, ash products from the 5+2 mixtures were produced. These ash products are rendered comparable to ash produced form suspension fired boilers at power plants. For each of the 7 mixtures, bottom-, cyclone and filter ash was taken out separately resulting in a total of 21 ash samples. The produced ashes have been evaluated for their properties as directly applied fertilizer. Furthermore, scenarios have been set up to assess the feasibility in producing artificial fertilizer from the ash products, based on known processes. In the main components the content of Na, S, Cl and K is significantly higher in filter ashes, whereas the content of Mg, Al, Si and Ca is significantly lower. The

  10. A participatory sensing approach to characterize ride quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgelall, Raj

    2014-03-01

    Rough roads increase vehicle operation and road maintenance costs. Consequently, transportation agencies spend a significant portion of their budgets on ride-quality characterization to forecast maintenance needs. The ubiquity of smartphones and social media, and the emergence of a connected vehicle environment present lucrative opportunities for cost-reduction and continuous, network-wide, ride-quality characterization. However, there is a lack of models to transform inertial and position information from voluminous data flows into indices that transportation agencies currently use. This work expands on theories of the Road Impact Factor introduced in previous research. The index characterizes road roughness by aggregating connected vehicle data and reporting roughness in direct proportion to the International Roughness Index. Their theoretical relationships are developed, and a case study is presented to compare the relative data quality from an inertial profiler and a regular passenger vehicle. Results demonstrate that the approach is a viable alternative to existing models that require substantially more resources and provide less network coverage. One significant benefit of the participatory sensing approach is that transportation agencies can monitor all network facilities continuously to locate distress symptoms, such as frost heaves, that appear and disappear between ride assessment cycles. Another benefit of the approach is continuous monitoring of all high-risk intersections such as rail grade crossings to better understand the relationship between ride-quality and traffic safety.

  11. Effects of an experimental phytase on performance, egg quality, tibia ash content and phosphorus bioavailability in laying hens fed on maize- or barley-based diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesch, M; Broz, J; Brufau, J

    2005-06-01

    A 24-week performance trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of an experimental phytase on performance, egg quality, tibia ash content and phosphorus excretion in laying hens fed on either a maize- or a barley-based diet. At the end of the trial, an ileal absorption assay was conducted in order to determine the influence of phytase supplementation on the apparent absorption of calcium and total phosphorus (P). Each experimental diet was formulated either as a positive control containing 3.2 g/kg non-phytate phosphorus (NPP), with the addition of dicalcium phosphate (DCP), or as a low P one, without DCP addition. Both low P diets (containing 1.3 or 1.1 g/kg NPP) were supplemented with microbial phytase at 0, 150, 300 and 450 U/kg. The birds were housed in cages, allocating two hens per cage as the experimental unit. Each of 10 dietary treatments was assigned to 16 replicates. Low dietary NPP (below 1.3 g/kg) was not able to support optimum performance of hens during the laying cycle (from 22 to 46 weeks of age), either in maize or barley diets. Rate of lay, daily egg mass output, feed consumption, tibia ash percentage and weight gain were reduced in hens fed low NPP diets. The adverse effects of a low P diet were more severe in hens on a maize diet than in those on a barley diet. Low dietary NPP reduced egg production, weight gain, feed consumption and tibia ash content and microbial phytase supplementation improved these parameters. Hens given low NPP diets supplemented with phytase performed as well as the hens on positive control diets containing 3.2 g/kg of NPP. A 49% reduction of excreta P content was achieved by feeding hens on low NPP diets supplemented with phytase, without compromising performance. Phytase addition to low NPP diets increased total phosphorus absorption at the ileal level, from 0.25 to 0.51 in the maize diet and from 0.34 to 0.58 in the barley diet. Phosphorus absorption increased linearly with increasing levels of dietary phytase

  12. APhoRISM FP7 project: the Multi-platform volcanic Ash Cloud Estimation (MACE) infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merucci, Luca; Corradini, Stefano; Bignami, Christian; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    APHORISM is an FP7 project that aims to develop innovative products to support the management and mitigation of the volcanic and the seismic crisis. Satellite and ground measurements will be managed in a novel manner to provide new and improved products in terms of accuracy and quality of information. The Multi-platform volcanic Ash Cloud Estimation (MACE) infrastructure will exploit the complementarity between geostationary, and polar satellite sensors and ground measurements to improve the ash detection and retrieval and to fully characterize the volcanic ash clouds from source to the atmosphere. The basic idea behind the proposed method consists to manage in a novel manner, the volcanic ash retrievals at the space-time scale of typical geostationary observations using both the polar satellite estimations and in-situ measurements. The typical ash thermal infrared (TIR) retrieval will be integrated by using a wider spectral range from visible (VIS) to microwave (MW) and the ash detection will be extended also in case of cloudy atmosphere or steam plumes. All the MACE ash products will be tested on three recent eruptions representative of different eruption styles in different clear or cloudy atmospheric conditions: Eyjafjallajokull (Iceland) 2010, Grimsvotn (Iceland) 2011 and Etna (Italy) 2011-2012. The MACE infrastructure will be suitable to be implemented in the next generation of ESA Sentinels satellite missions.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of zeolite from coal ashes modified by cationic surfactant; Sintese e caracterizacao de zeolita de cinzas de carvao modificada por surfactante cationico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fungaro, D.A.; Borrely, S.I., E-mail: dfungaro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    Zeolite synthesized from coal fly ash was modified with different concentrations (2 and 20 mmol.L{sup -1}) of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA-Br). The Non-Modified Zeolite (NMZ) and Surfactant-Modified Zeolites (SMZ) were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, among others. The SMS presented negative charge probably due to the formation of a partial bilayer of HDTMA on exchangeable active sites on the external surface of NMZ. A decrease in surface area was observed for SMZ as compared to NMZ indicating zeolite surface coverage with HDTMA-Br molecules. The crystalline nature of the zeolite remained intact after adsorption of surfactant and heating for drying. FTIR analysis indicated that there were no significant changes in the structure of the zeolite after adsorption of surfactant. (author)

  14. Chemical changes in different types of coal ash during prolonged, large scale, contact with seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoham-Frider, E.; Shelef, G.; Kress, N. [Nationall Institute of Oceanography, Haifa (Israel)

    2003-07-01

    The chemical changes occurring in coal ash exposed to prolonged (300 days), large scale, contact with running seawater were followed. Four major components (Al, Ca, Mg, Fe) and seven minor and trace elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb, Hg) were measured in four coal ash types: fly and bottom ash freshly obtained from coal-fired power plant, and old ash (crushed and blocks) recovered from the sea after 3-5 years contact with seawater. Changes occurred in the chemical composition of the coal ash along the experiment: Fe increased in fresh ash, Al increased in old ash and Ca increased in all ash types except old ash blocks. Cu and Hg decreased in fresh fly ash while Cr increased, Cd decreased in all ash types except bottom ash, and Mn decreased in bottom ash. Most of the changes occurred in the fresh fly ash, and not in the old ash, indicating equilibrium after prior exposure to seawater. In addition, more changes occurred in fresh fly ash than in bottom ash, emphasizing the differences between the two ash types. While the changes in the concentrations of the major elements may be an indication of the integrity of the ash matrix, the only elements of environmental significance released to the environment were Hg and Cd. However, calculated seawater concentrations were much lower than seawater quality criteria and therefore the coal ash was considered suitable for marine applications concerning seawater quality.

  15. Synthesis of zeolites from boiler fly ash: physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization; Sintese de zeolitas a partir de cinza volante de caldeiras: caracterizacao fisica, quimica e mineralogica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha Junior, C.A.F.; Santos, S.C.A.; Souza, C.A.G., E-mail: augustorocha2@gmail.com [Programa de Pos Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica (PPEQ-UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil); Angelica, R.S.; Neves, R.F. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Geologia e Geoquimica, Instituto de Geociencias (PPGG-IG-UFPA), Ananindeua, PA (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    Along the years, worldwide industrial development has causing a growing generation of residues, bringing potentials environmental problems. A study of the characteristics of these wastes, as well as the development of techniques for their use in new processes becomes indispensable for the environment preservation. The main purpose of this work is to evaluate the possible use of two important industrial residues from the Amazon region for zeolite synthesis: (a) the fly ash (particle size < 100 {mu}m) that comes from burning of mineral coal in boiler; and (b) the micro silica, a by-product of the reaction between quartz and coal in the production of metallic silicon and alloys iron-silicon.The following chemical, physical and mineralogical characterization methods were carried out: X-ray diffractometry, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, granulometric analysis, differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TG). The analyses were carried out at the following conditions: 60, 100, 150 and 190 deg C, Na{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratio of 5 and Si/Al molar ratio ranging from 2.12 to 15, and reaction time of 24 h. The results of the fly characterization demonstrate its enormous potential as raw material for the zeolite synthesis. SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} represent more than 50% of its composition, mineralogical phases defined, low humidity content, low particle size (d{sub 90} < 10 {mu}m), among others. Mineralogical analyses of the synthesized products showed the formation of some zeolite types, as follow: analcime, phillipsite, sodalite, zeolite P and tobermorite. The results show that the mixture fly ash-micro silica in these reaction conditions point to a promising material for zeolite synthesis (author)

  16. Leachate Geochemical Results for Ash Samples from the June 2007 Angora Wildfire Near Lake Tahoe in Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Philip L.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Martin, Deborah A.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Adams, Monique; Lamothe, Paul J.; Todorov, Todor; Anthony, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    This report releases leachate geochemical data for ash samples produced by the Angora wildfire that burned from June 24 to July 2, 2007, near Lake Tahoe in northern California. The leaching studies are part of a larger interdisciplinary study whose goal is to identify geochemical characteristics and properties of the ash that may adversely affect human health, water quality, air quality, animal habitat, endangered species, debris flows, and flooding hazards. The leaching study helps characterize and understand the interactions that occur when the ash comes in contact with rain or snowmelt, and helps identify the constituents that may be mobilized as run-off from these materials. Similar leaching studies were conducted on ash and burned soils from the October 2007 southern California wildfires (Hageman and others, 2008; Plumlee and others, 2007).

  17. Characterization of fly ash from low-sulfur and high-sulfur coal sources: Partitioning of carbon and trace elements with particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hower, J.C.; Trimble, A.S.; Eble, C.F.; Palmer, C.A.; Kolker, A.

    1999-01-01

    Fly ash samples were collected in November and December of 1994, from generating units at a Kentucky power station using high- and low-sulfur feed coals. The samples are part of a two-year study of the coal and coal combustion byproducts from the power station. The ashes were wet screened at 100, 200, 325, and 500 mesh (150, 75, 42, and 25 ??m, respectively). The size fractions were then dried, weighed, split for petrographic and chemical analysis, and analyzed for ash yield and carbon content. The low-sulfur "heavy side" and "light side" ashes each have a similar size distribution in the November samples. In contrast, the December fly ashes showed the trend observed in later months, the light-side ash being finer (over 20 % more ash in the -500 mesh [-25 ??m] fraction) than the heavy-side ash. Carbon tended to be concentrated in the coarse fractions in the December samples. The dominance of the -325 mesh (-42 ??m) fractions in the overall size analysis implies, though, that carbon in the fine sizes may be an important consideration in the utilization of the fly ash. Element partitioning follows several patterns. Volatile elements, such as Zn and As, are enriched in the finer sizes, particularly in fly ashes collected at cooler, light-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) temperatures. The latter trend is a function of precipitation at the cooler-ESP temperatures and of increasing concentration with the increased surface area of the finest fraction. Mercury concentrations are higher in high-carbon fly ashes, suggesting Hg adsorption on the fly ash carbon. Ni and Cr are associated, in part, with the spinel minerals in the fly ash. Copyright ?? 1999 Taylor & Francis.

  18. Characterization of Glasses in One Type of Alumina Rich Fly Ash by Chemical Digestion Methods: Implications for Alumina Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, one type of alumina rich fly ash (ARFA with about 50 wt% of alumina has been extensively investigated for alumina extraction in China. Due to the silica in ARFA, alumina extraction would have to generate a huge amount of solid waste. There is a growing interest in the glasses in ARFA, because they are composed mainly of silica and could be removed prior to alumina extraction. In this work, the glasses in ARFA have been investigated by chemical methods, that is, acid and base digestions. The chemical compositions have been measured by XRF for ARFA from the digestion processes. The K2O standard, XRD, and FTIR spectroscopies were successfully used to define the digestions processes, and size analysis and SEM-EDX provided rich information on particle transformations. As a result, acid and base digestion methods were found to produce very similar results for the glasses in ARFA. The K2O standard was attributed to the formation of glasses by illites, and TiO2 and Fe2O3 were proposed to originate from ilmenite in alumina rich coals (ARC. Some implications of the results were also discussed for the alumina extraction from ARFA.

  19. Bacteria associated with oak and ash on a TCE-contaminated site: Characterization of isolates with potential to avoid evapotranspiration of TCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; Barac, T.; Boulet, J.; Artois, T.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2009-11-01

    Along transects under a mixed woodland of English Oak (Quercus robur) and Common Ash (Fraxinus excelsior) growing on a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater plume, sharp decreases in TCE concentrations were observed, while transects outside the planted area did not show this remarkable decrease. This suggested a possibly active role of the trees and their associated bacteria in the remediation process. Therefore, the cultivable bacterial communities associated with both tree species growing on this TCE-contaminated groundwater plume were investigated in order to assess the possibilities and practical aspects of using these common native tree species and their associated bacteria for phytoremediation. In this study, only the cultivable bacteria were characterized because the final aim was to isolate TCE-degrading, heavy metal resistant bacteria that might be used as traceable inocula to enhance bioremediation. Cultivable bacteria isolated from bulk soil, rhizosphere, root, stem, and leaf were genotypically characterized by amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) of their 16S rRNA gene and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria that displayed distinct ARDRA patterns were screened for heavy metal resistance, as well as TCE tolerance and degradation, as preparation for possible future in situ inoculation experiments. Furthermore, in situ evapotranspiration measurements were performed to investigate if the degradation capacity of the associated bacteria is enough to prevent TCE evapotranspiration to the air. Between both tree species, the associated populations of cultivable bacteria clearly differed in composition. In English Oak, more species-specific, most likely obligate endophytes were found. The majority of the isolated bacteria showed increased tolerance to TCE, and TCE degradation capacity was observed in some of the strains. However, in situ evapotranspiration measurements revealed that a significant amount of TCE and its metabolites

  20. Characterization of the image quality in neutron radioscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J.; Engelhardt, M.; Frei, G.; Gildemeister, A.; Lehmann, E.; Hillenbach, A.; Schillinger, B.

    2005-04-01

    Neutron radioscopy, or dynamic neutron radiography, is a non-destructive testing method, which has made big steps in the last years. Depending on the neutron flux, the object and the detector, for single events a time resolution down to a few milliseconds is possible. In the case of repetitive processes the object can be synchronized with the detector and better statistics in the image can be reached by adding radiographies of the same phase with a time resolution down to 100 μs. By stepwise delaying the trigger signal a radiography movie can be composed. Radiography images of a combustion engine and an injection nozzle were evaluated quantitatively by different methods trying to characterize the image quality of an imaging system. The main factors which influence the image quality are listed and discussed.

  1. Characterization of effluent water qualities from satellite membrane bioreactor facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirani, Zakir M; Bukhari, Zia; Oppenheimer, Joan; Jjemba, Patrick; LeChevallier, Mark W; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2013-09-15

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are often a preferred treatment technology for satellite water recycling facilities since they produce consistent effluent water quality with a small footprint and require little or no supervision. While the water quality produced from centralized MBRs has been widely reported, there is no study in the literature addressing the effluent quality from a broad range of satellite facilities. Thus, a study was conducted to characterize effluent water qualities produced by satellite MBRs with respect to organic, inorganic, physical and microbial parameters. Results from sampling 38 satellite MBR facilities across the U.S. demonstrated that 90% of these facilities produced nitrified (NH4-N <0.4 mg/L-N) effluents that have low organic carbon (TOC <8.1 mg/L), turbidities of <0.7 NTU, total coliform bacterial concentrations <100 CFU/100 mL and indigenous MS-2 bacteriophage concentrations <21 PFU/100 mL. Multiple sampling events from selected satellite facilities demonstrated process capability to consistently produce effluent with low concentrations of ammonia, TOC and turbidity. UV-254 transmittance values varied substantially during multiple sampling events indicating a need for attention in designing downstream UV disinfection systems. Although enteroviruses, rotaviruses and hepatitis A viruses (HAV) were absent in all samples, adenoviruses were detected in effluents of all nine MBR facilities sampled. The presence of Giardia cysts in filtrate samples of two of nine MBR facilities sampled demonstrated the need for an appropriate disinfection process at these facilities. PMID:23871258

  2. Chemical composition of coal and coke ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluzhnikov, A.I.; Tsymbal, G.L.

    1983-05-01

    Karaganda Metals uses low sulphur coal from Karaganda and Kuzbass coalfields and is seeking ways of improving coke in terms of ash and its effect on blast furnace operations, chiefly coke rate reduction. Ash in coke has a critical effect on iron quality, slag composition and desulphurisation. The index used to demonstrate the change in coke consistency during incineration in the blast furnace is that of pyrolytic change: this closely reflects changes in coal charge composition. Control of coke ash content by suitably selecting the charge can be used to influence slag basicity and iron quality.

  3. High-resolution nanoprobe X-ray fluorescence characterization of heterogeneous calcium and heavy metal distributions in alkali-activated fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provis, John L; Rose, Volker; Bernal, Susan A; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2009-10-01

    The nanoscale distribution of elements within fly ash and the aluminosilicate gel products of its alkaline activation ("fly ash geopolymers") are analyzed by means of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence using a hard X-ray Nanoprobe instrument. The distribution of calcium within a hydroxide-activated (fly ash/KOH solution) geopolymer gel is seen to be highly heterogeneous, with these data providing for the first time direct evidence of the formation of discrete high-calcium particles within the binder structure of a geopolymer synthesized from a low-calcium (geopolymer gel binder structure surrounding the unreacted fly ash particles. This has important implications for the understanding of calcium chemistry within aluminosilicate geopolymer gel phases. Additionally, chromium and iron are seen to be very closely correlated within the structures of both fly ash and the geopolymer product and remain within the regions of the geopolymer which can be identified as unreacted fly ash particles. Given that the potential for chromium release has been one of the queries surrounding the widespread utilization of construction materials derived from fly ash, the observation that this element appears to be localized within the fly ash rather than dispersed throughout the gel binder indicates that it is unlikely to be released problematically into the environment.

  4. Characterization and determination of 28 elements in fly ashes collected in a thermal power plant in Argentina using different instrumental techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different techniques were selected for comprehensive characterization of seven samples of fly ashes collected from the electrostatic precipitator of the San Nicolas thermal power plant (Buenos Aires, Argentina). Particle size was measured using laser based particle size analyzer. X-ray diffraction powder (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the mineral phase present in the matrix consisting basically of aluminosilicates and large amounts of amorphous material. The predominant crystalline phases were mullite and quartz. Major and minors elements (Al, Ca, Cl, Fe, K, Mg, Na, S, Si and Ti) were detected by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, V and Zn) content was quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Different acid mixtures and digestion procedures were compared for subsequent ICP OES measurements of the dissolved samples. The digestion procedures used were: i) a mixture of FH + HNO3 + HClO4 (open system digestion); ii) a mixture of FH + HNO3 (MW-assisted digestion); iii) a mixture of HF and aqua regia (MW-assisted digestion). Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was employed for the determination of As, Ba, Co, Cr, Ce, Cs, Eu, Fe, Gd, Hf, La, Lu, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U and Yb. The validation of the procedure was performed by the analysis of two certified materials namely, i) NIST 1633b, coal fly ash and ii) GBW07105, rock. Mean elements content spanned from 41870 μg g-1 for Fe to 1.14 μg g-1 for Lu. The study showed that Fe (41870 μg g-1) >> V (1137 μg g-1) > Ni (269 μg g-1) > Mn (169 μg g-1) are the main components. An enrichment, with respect to crustal average, in many elements was observed especially for As, V and Sb that deserve particular interest from the environmental and human health point of view

  5. Characterization of homocysteine γ-lyase from submerged and solid cultures of Aspergillus fumigatus ASH (JX006238).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S; Khalaf, Salwa A; Aziz, Hani A

    2013-04-01

    Among 25 isolates, Aspergillus fumigatus ASH (JX006238) was identified as a potent producer of homocysteine gamma- lyase. The nutritional requirements to maximize the enzyme yield were optimized under submerged (SF) and solid-state fermentation (SSF) conditions, resulting in a 5.2- and 2.3-fold increase, respectively, after the last purification step. The enzyme exhibited a single homogenous band of 50 kDa on SDS-PAGE, along with an optimum pH of 7.8 and pH stability range of 6.5 to 7.8. It also showed a pI of 5.0, as detected by pH precipitation with no glycosyl residues. The highest enzyme activity was obtained at 37-40 degrees C, with a Tm value of 70.1 degrees C. The enzyme showed clear catalytic and thermal stability below 40 degrees C, with T1/2 values of 18.1, 9.9, 5.9, 3.3, and 1.9 h at 30 degrees C, 35 degrees C, 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C, and 60 degrees C, respectively. Additionally, the enzyme Kr values were 0.002, 0.054, 0.097, 0.184, and 0.341 S-1 at 30 degrees C, 35 degrees C, 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C, and 60 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme displayed a strong affinity to homocysteine, followed by methionine and cysteine when compared with non-S amino acids, confirming its potency against homocysteinuriarelated diseases, and as an anti-cardiovascular agent and a specific biosensor for homocysteinuria. The enzyme showed its maximum affinity for homocysteine (Km 2.46 mM, Kcat 1.39 × 10(-3) s(-1)), methionine (Km 4.1 mM, Kcat 0.97 × 10(-3) s(-1)), and cysteine (Km 4.9 m M, Kcat 0.77 × 10(-3) s(-1)). The enzyme was also strongly inhibited by hydroxylamine and DDT, confirming its pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) identity, yet not inhibited by EDTA. In vivo, using Swiss Albino mice, the enzyme showed no detectable negative effects on platelet aggregation, the RBC number, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, or creatinine titer when compared with negative controls.

  6. Effects of the addition of oil shale ash and coal ash on physic-chemical properties of CPJ45 cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabih K.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We focused our research on recycling industrial wastes, fly ash (F.A, bottom ash (B.A and oil shale ash (S.A in cement production. The study concerns physico-chemical characterization of these products and the influence of their addition on the mechanical proprieties of the CPJ45 cement. XRF allowed us to rank the three additives used according to their contents on major oxides. Coal ashes belong to the class F, and thus possess poozzolanic properties and oil shale ash belongs to the class C and possesses hydraulic and poozolanic properties. The crystalline phases constituting each ash were analysed by XRD. We observe in bottom ash the presence of quartz and mullite. The same crystals are found in fly ash with hematite and magnetite. Oil shale ash is composed of quartz, anhydrite, gehlenite, wollastonite and periclase. The microstructures of fly ash and bottom ash were studied using SEM. The bottom ash was composed respectively of fine particles that are generally irregularly shaped, their dimensions are between 5 and 28μm and of big particles(300 μm. The EDX analysis coupled with an electronic microscope provided some information about the major elements that constitute our samples. The dehydrations of anhydrous and three days hydrated cement were examined by DSC. For hydrated cements we noticed endothermic peaks related to the dehydration of CSH, CH and decomposition of carbonates. The study of the mechanical properties of CPJ45 cement by adding different proportions of fly ash, bottom ash and oil shale ash helped clarifying the percentage of ash that leaded to improve the 28 days mechanical strength. The results show that the cements studied have their maximum mechanical resistance with the addition at 7% of fly ash or 10% of oil shale ash.

  7. Automated quality characterization of 3D printed bone scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Liang Bill Tseng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of design is an important step in obtaining tissue engineering scaffolds with appropriate shapes and inner microstructures. Different shapes and sizes of scaffolds are modeled using UGS NX 6.0 software with variable pore sizes. The quality issue we are concerned is the scaffold porosity, which is mainly caused by the fabrication inaccuracies. Bone scaffolds are usually characterized using a scanning electron microscope, but this study presents a new automated inspection and classification technique. Due to many numbers and size variations for the pores, the manual inspection of the fabricated scaffolds tends to be error-prone and costly. Manual inspection also raises the chance of contamination. Thus, non-contact, precise inspection is preferred. In this study, the critical dimensions are automatically measured by the vision camera. The measured data are analyzed to classify the quality characteristics. The automated inspection and classification techniques developed in this study are expected to improve the quality of the fabricated scaffolds and reduce the overall cost of manufacturing.

  8. Nano-mineralogical investigation of coal and fly ashes from coal-based captive power plant (India): An introduction of occupational health hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal derived nano-particles has been received much concern recently around the world for their adverse effects on human health and the environment during their utilization. In this investigation the mineral matter present in some industrially important Indian coals and their ash samples are addressed. Coal and fly ash samples from the coal-based captive power plant in Meghalaya (India) were collected for different characterization and nano-mineralogy studies. An integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS analysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to know their extent of risks to the human health when present in coal and fly ash. The study has revealed that the coals contain mainly clay minerals, whilst glass fragments, spinel, quartz, and other minerals in lesser quantities were found to be present in the coal fly ash. Fly ash carbons were present as chars. Indian coal fly ash also found to contain nanominerals and ultrafine particles. The coal-fired power plants are observed to be the largest anthropogenic source of Hg emitted to the atmosphere and expected to increase its production in near future years. The Multi Walled Carbon Nano-Tubes (MWCNTs) are detected in our fly ashes, which contains residual carbonaceous matter responsible for the Hg capture/encapsulation. This detailed investigation on the inter-relationship between the minerals present in the samples and their ash components will also be useful for fulfilling the clean coal technology principles. - Highlights: • We research changes in the level of ultrafine and nanoparticles about coal–ash quality. • Increasing dates will increase human health quality in this Indian coal area. • Welfare effects depend on ex-ante or ex-post assumptions about

  9. 水泥粉煤灰稳定碎石基层施工和质量控制的分析%Analysis on the Fly Ash Cement Stabilized Macadam Base Construction and Quality Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾爱军

    2015-01-01

    水泥粉煤灰稳定碎石基层有着施工操作性能较好、早期强度较高的优点,能够满足当前路面设计的要求和规范。文章立足于施工实践,对水泥粉煤灰稳定碎石基层的施工工艺流程以及质量控制的要点,进行了详细的探讨。%Fly ash cement stabilized gravel base has good operation performance , the advantages of high early strength, can meet the requirements of the current pavement design and specifications. Based on the construction practice, the main points of the construction process and quality control of the fly ash cement stabilized gravel base is discussed concretely in the paper.

  10. [Ash Meadows Purchase Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A proposal sent to the Richard King Mellon Foundation for a loan to fund the purchase of Ash Meadows by the Nature Conservancy. Ash Meadows, set outside of Las...

  11. Ash and heavy metals in fluidized bed-combustion; Tuhka ja raskasmetallit puuperaeisen jaetteen kerrosleijupoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaessi, T.; Aittoniemi, P. [IVO International, Vantaa (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    Combustion ashes and submicron fly ash particles were characterized in two industrial boilers (bubbling vs. circulating fluidized bed) burning paper mill deinking sludge and bark or wood as support fuel. Bulk samples from fly ash, circulating ash and bottom ash were analyzed. Fine particles in fly ash were monitored and sampled for microscopic studies. The mass size distribution of fly ash was measured and the chemical composition according to particle size was analyzed. The results showed that ash consists of large and friable clusters formed by sintering of small mineral particles originating from paper fillers. Very few ash particles were fused and they were found only among the smallest particles. No agglomerates of fused particles were found. If the residence time in furnace is long enough sintering may proceed further and ash structure grows more dense. No indication of ash vaporization was detected. These results were similar for bubbling and circulating fluidized bed boilers. (author)

  12. Characterizing changing stream water quality in a glacierized tropical watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, B. G.; Eddy, A. M.; Baraer, M.; McKenzie, J. M.; Walsh, E.; Fernandez, A.; Wigmore, O.; Battista, R.; Guittard, A.

    2013-12-01

    Glacier recession in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru has been causing downstream hydrologic transformations, altering the amount, timing and chemical quality of stream water. Increased demand from multiple water resource users, particularly industrial-scale agricultural irrigation along the desert coast, underscores the need for accurate source attribution and treatment of pollutants. Water quality assessment is challenging given natural geologic controls on water chemistry concentrations, and a lack of consistent historical monitoring. Here we present results from an analytical characterization of spatial and temporal variability in the dissolved loads of major ions, isotopes and select trace metals in the Pacific-draining Santa River and tributaries. Our approach incorporates multi-year synoptic sampling of water chemistry and stream discharge along the river course and at tributary pour points, along with weekly sampling at single point along the upper Santa. Samples were taken predominately during the austral winter months of June, July, and August in 2004 - 2009 and 2011 - 2013 at 20-30 stream localities. Digitized maps of geology, land use and hydrography permit geographic visualization and exploratory GIS-based data analysis. Results indicate that the dominant hydrochemical processes throughout the Santa watershed include silicate weathering, coupled pyrite oxidation with silicate weathering, and to a lesser extent, carbonate weathering. Low pH and high concentrations of sulfate are found in the presence of high-silica granitic and metamorphic surface lithology in some sites proximal to receding glaciers, reflecting an environment that is driven by coupled sulfide-oxidation and silicate dissolution. Numerous sites had elevated concentrations of trace metals (such as As, Cd, and Pb) indicating potential local sources of contamination, some in excess of World Health Organization. Weekly sampling show dilution of certain trace metals during the wet season, and

  13. Fundamental study of low-NOx combustion fly ash utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over fifty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives

  14. Column leaching from biomass combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    this study, a fly ash sample from an operating Danish power plant based on wood biomass was collected, chemically characterized and investigated for its leaching release of nutrients and heavy metals. A column leaching test was employed. The strongly alkaline pH of all the collected eluates suggested...... the potential suitability of the ash as a liming material. Although high contents of nutrients were detected, differences in their leaching release were found. Heavy metals were detected within typical literature contents for Nordic countries ashes....

  15. ASH MELTING TEMPERATURE PREDICTION FROM CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF BIOMASS ASH

    OpenAIRE

    Holubcik, Michal; Jandacka, Jozef; Malcho, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Solid fuels, including biomass, consist of combustible, ash and water. Ash in fuel is result of reaction of minerals presented in the biomass. Minerals and other different substances which form ash got into biomass during growth. Ash is solid residue resulted from the perfect laboratory combustion of fuel. It is composed of minerals that are present in the fuel. Some species of biomass ash have low ash melting temperature and can cause various problems in combustion boilers. Ash slags and sin...

  16. Tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum sous vide: characterization and quality parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane de Cássia Pontes Ramos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological, physical and physico-chemical quality parameters of sous vide preparation of pen-reared tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum. To prepare the tambaqui sous vide, 200 g of fillet, 50 g of basil sauce (1:4 fish fillet:sauce ratio and 10 mL of 5% sodium lactate were used. The product was then vacuum-packaged, pasteurized at 65 ºC for 12.5 min and refrigerated. The presence of Salmonella spp., sulfite-reducing Clostridium and Listeria monocytogenes was not detected in the samples analyzed. The coliform count at 45 ºC and coagulase-positive staphylococci were below the limit (103 permitted by the law in vigor. Water retention capacity and chloride content analyses revealed that the tambaqui fillet differed significantly (P<0.05 from the sous vide because of the addition of basil sauce. The total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS content of the fillet and sous vide were below the limits established by the law, indicating good quality. The lightness (L* and yellow color (b* of the fillet and the sous vide did not differ significantly (P>0.05, but the red color (a* decreased in the sous vide, which is related to the addition of basil sauce. The chroma (C* and hue angle (ho differed significantly (P<0.05, and the fillet samples were lighter in color, whereas the sous vide was characterized by yellow color. The n-6/n-3 ratios found for the fillet and the sous vide are within the recommended values, which is important for human metabolism. The fillet and sous vide also had high calcium, zinc, magnesium and potassium concentrations. It is concluded that tambaqui sous vide is a good source of nutrients, rich in fatty acids and minerals essential for human health.

  17. "无钠低灰"煤沥青对预焙阳极质量的改善%"Sodium-free and Low-ash" Coal Tar Pitch on Prebaked Anode Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢林峰; 徐香

    2011-01-01

    Shanxi Coking Co., Ltd. imported from Germany, super-centrifuge for removing water and slag, and licensed from France the advanced alkali IRH coal tar processing technology, the coal tar pitch thus produced had no sodium and with only little ash. The paper expatiates on the impact on the quality of the prebaked anode by the sodium ion and ash that exist in the coal tar pitch. Through analysis of the ash in the "sodium-free and low-ash" coal tar pitch and the sodium ion content, it can be predicted that the anode carbon consumption shall be reduced by 15kg/t of aluminum in the electroanalysis process of aluminum. This is a new way for the utilization of the excellent coal tar pitch.%介绍了山西焦化股份有限公司采用德国进口超级离心机脱水脱渣,引进法国IRH先进的后加碱煤焦油加工技术,生产的"无钠低灰"煤沥青产品质量指标.详细阐述了煤沥青在预焙阳极生产中的作用,重点分析了煤沥青中的灰分和钠离子对预焙阳极质量的影响.通过分析"无钠低灰"煤沥青的灰分及钠离子含量的数据,预测在电解铝过程中,该煤沥青可降低阳极炭耗约15kg/t铝,为优质煤沥青的利用找到一条出路.

  18. Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan required each US Department of Energy (DOE) site that characterizes transuranic waste to be sent the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan that addresses applicable requirements specified in the QAPP

  19. Characterization of non equilibrium effects on high quality critical flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camelo, E.; Lemonnier, H.; Ochterbeck, J. [Commissariat a l Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The appropriate design of various pieces of safety equipment such as relief systems, relies on the accurate description of critical flow phenomena. Most of the systems of industrial interest are willing to be described by one-dimensional area-averaged models and a large fraction of them involves multi-component high gas quality flows. Within these circumstances, the flow is very likely to be of an annular dispersed nature and its description by two-fluid models requires various closure relations. Among the most sensitive closures, there is the interfacial area and the liquid entrained fraction. The critical flowrate depends tremendously on the accurate description of the non equilibrium which results from the correctness of the closure equations. In this study, two-component flows are emphasized and non equilibrium results mainly form the differences in the phase velocities. It is therefore of the utmost importance to have reliable data to characterize non equilibrium phenomena and to assess the validity of the closure models. A comprehensive description of air-water nozzle flows, with emphasis on the effect of the nozzle geometry, has been undertaken and some of the results are presented here which helps understanding the overall flow dynamics. Besides the critical flowrate, the presented material includes pressure profiles, droplet size and velocity, liquid film flowrate and liquid film thickness.

  20. Using the conceptual site model approach to characterize groundwater quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand groundwater quality, the first step is to develop a conceptual site model (CSM) that describes the site history, describes the geology and the hydrogeology of the site, identifies potential release areas or sources, and evaluates the fate and transport of site related compounds. After the physical site setting is understood and potential release areas are identified, appropriate and representative groundwater monitoring wells may be used to evaluate groundwater quality at a site and provide a network to assess impacts from potential future releases. To develop the CSM, the first step to understand the different requirements from each of the regulatory stakeholders. Each regulatory agency may have different approaches to site characterization and closure (i.e., different groundwater and soil remediation criteria). For example, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state governments have published guidance documents that proscribe the required steps and information needed to develop a CSM. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has a proscriptive model for the Historical Site Assessment under the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM), and contains requirements for developing a conceptual site model in NUREG 1757. Federal and state agencies may also have different closure criteria for potential contaminants of concern. Understanding these differences before starting a groundwater monitoring program is important because the minimum detectable activity (MDA), lowest limit detection (LLD), and sample quantitation limit (SQL) must be low enough so that data may be evaluated under each of the programs. After a Historical Site Assessment is completed a work plan is developed and executed to not only collect physical data that describes the geology and hydrogeology, but to also characterize the soil, groundwater, sediments, and surface water quality of each potentially impacted areas. Although the primary

  1. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  2. Development of a system for characterizing biomass quality of lignocellulosic feedstocks for biochemical conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick Thomas

    The purpose of this research was twofold: (i) to develop a system for screening lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks for biochemical conversion to biofuels and (ii) to evaluate brown midrib corn stover as feedstock for ethanol production. In the first study (Chapter 2), we investigated the potential of corn stover from bm1-4 hybrids for increased ethanol production and reduced pretreatment intensity compared to corn stover from the isogenic normal hybrid. Corn stover from hybrid W64A X A619 and respective isogenic bm hybrids was pretreated by aqueous ammonia steeping using ammonium hydroxide concentrations from 0 to 30%, by weight, and the resulting residues underwent simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF) to ethanol. Dry matter (DM) digested by SSCF increased with increasing ammonium hydroxide concentration across all genotypes (P>0.0001) from 277 g kg-1 DM in the control to 439 g kg-1 DM in the 30% ammonium hydroxide pretreatment. The bm corn stover materials averaged 373 g kg-1 DM of DM digested by SSCF compared with 335 g kg-1 DM for the normal corn stover (Pcell-wall carbohydrate hydrolysis of corn stover, (ii) the lowest initial cell-wall carbohydrate concentration, (iii) the lowest dry matter remaining after pretreatment, and (iv) the highest amount of monosaccharides released during enzymatic hydrolysis. However, bm corn stover did not reduce the severity of aqueous ammonia steeping pretreatment needed to maximize DM hydrolysis during SSCF compared with normal corn stover. In the remaining studies (Chapters 3 thru 5), a system for analyzing the quality of lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks for biochemical conversion to biofuels (i.e., pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation) was developed. To accomplish this, a carbohydrate availability model was developed to characterize feedstock quality. The model partitions carbohydrates within a feedstock material into fractions based on their availability to be converted to fermentable

  3. Sewage sludge ash--A promising secondary phosphorus source for fertilizer production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzel, Hannes; Krüger, Oliver; Hermann, Ludwig; Adam, Christian

    2016-01-15

    Sewage sludge incineration is extensively practiced in some European countries such as the Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria and Germany. A survey of German sewage sludge ash showed that the recovery potential is high, approx. 19,000 t of phosphorus per year. However, the survey also discovered that the bioavailability of phosphorus in the sewage sludge ash is poor and that more than half of the ashes cannot be used as fertilizers due to high heavy metal content. A new thermochemical process for sewage sludge ash treatment was developed that transforms the ash into marketable fertilizer products. Sewage sludge ash was thermochemically treated with sodium and potassium additives under reducing conditions, whereby the phosphate-bearing mineral phases were transformed into plant available phosphates. High P-bioavailability was achieved with a molar Na/P ratio >1.75 in the starting materials. Sodium sulfate, carbonate and hydroxide performed comparably as additives for this calcination process. Potassium carbonate and -hydroxide have to be added in a molar K/P ratio >2.5 to achieve comparable P-solubility. The findings of the laboratory scale investigations were confirmed by an industrial demonstration trial for an ash treatment with sodium sulfate. Simultaneously, the volatile transition metal arsenic (61% removal) as well as volatile heavy metals such as cadmium (80%), mercury (68%), lead (39%) and zinc (9%) were removed via the off-gas treatment system. The product of the demonstration trial is characterized by high bioavailability and a toxic trace element mass fraction below the limit values of the German fertilizer ordinance, thus fulfilling the quality parameters for a P-fertilizer. PMID:26321235

  4. Characterization and modeling of urban environmental quality indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco de Assis Cruz Melo; Mariko Ueno

    2013-01-01

    Environmental problems in the urban area of Belém, Pará, Brazil, deny a large portion of the population critical environmental quality. The present study evaluated the environmental quality of the urban village of União, in a neighborhood called Terra Firme, Belém, Pará. An integrated urban environmental quality index was proposed, based on the modeling of indicators of urban environmental quality, urban livability and quality of treated water. These three indices encompass the variables of w...

  5. Shedding of ash deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zbogar, Ana; Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2009-01-01

    Ash deposits formed during fuel thermal conversion and located on furnace walls and on convective pass tubes, may seriously inhibit the transfer of heat to the working fluid and hence reduce the overall process efficiency. Combustion of biomass causes formation of large quantities of troublesome....... Low melting temperatures make straw ashes especially troublesome, since their stickiness is higher at lower temperatures, compared to coal ashes. Increased stickiness will eventually lead to a higher collection efficiency of incoming ash particles, meaning that the deposit may grow even faster...

  6. Heavy metals in MSW incineration fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2003-01-01

    related to the combustion of MSW and the formation of fly ash, especially in what concerns heavy metals. Treatment of the flue gas in air pollution control equipment plays an important role and the basic processes to accomplish this are explained. Fly ash from a semi-dry flue gas treatment system......Incineration is a common solution for dealing with the increasing amount of municipal solid waste (MSW). During the process, the heavy metals initially present in the waste go through several transformations, ending up in combustion products, such as fly ash. This article deals with some issues...... is characterized regarding its physical-chemical properties: pH, solubility, chemical composition, and leaching, amongst others. Results indicate a high alkalinity and the presence of large amounts of calcium, chlorides, sulfates, carbonates, sodium and potassium. Metal concentrations in fly ash are: 6,2 g...

  7. Validation of a kinetic-diffusive model to characterize pozzolanic reaction kinetics in sugar cane straw-clay ash/lime systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villar-Cociña, E.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic-diffusive model proposed by the authors in previous papers to describe pozzolanic reaction kinetics in sugar cane straw-clay ash (SCSCA/calcium hydroxide (CH systems is validated in this study. Two different methods (direct and indirect for determining pozzolanic activity were applied and their effect on pozzolanic reaction rate kinetic constants evaluated. Determined by fitting a model to the data, these constants are used to quantitatively characterize pozzolanic activity. The values of the kinetic constants calculated with the model were similar for the two methods. Classic kinetic models, such as the Jander, modified Jander and Zhuravlev models, were also applied to the system studied and the results were compared to the figures calculated with the model proposed. The kinetic-diffusive approach proposed was found to be valid regardless of the method for determining pozzolanic activity used, and to be the most suitable model for describing pozzolanic reaction kinetics in the SCSCA/lime system.

    Se valida la aplicación de un modelo cinético-difusivo propuesto por los autores en trabajos anteriores para describir la cinética de reacción puzolánica en sistemas ceniza de paja de caña-arcilla (CPCAñúdróxido de calcio (CH. Se aplican 2 métodos diferentes de actividad puzolánica (directo e indirecto y se valora el efecto que pudieran tener los mismos sobre las constantes cinéticas de velocidad de reacción de la reacción puzolánica. Estas constantes cinéticas son determinadas en el proceso de ajuste del modelo y permiten caracterizar cuantitativamente la actividad puzolánica. Los resultados muestran la similitud de las constantes cinéticas de velocidad de reacción calculadas, aplicando el modelo a los resultados experimentales obtenidos por ambos métodos. Además, fueron aplicados al sistema estudiado modelos cinéticos el chicos como: modelo de Jander, modelo de Jander Modificado y el modelo de Zhuravlev y

  8. Characterization and modeling of urban environmental quality indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis Cruz Melo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental problems in the urban area of Belém, Pará, Brazil, deny a large portion of the population critical environmental quality. The present study evaluated the environmental quality of the urban village of União, in a neighborhood called Terra Firme, Belém, Pará. An integrated urban environmental quality index was proposed, based on the modeling of indicators of urban environmental quality, urban livability and quality of treated water. These three indices encompass the variables of water supply, garbage collection, vegetation, sewage, road paving, infrastructure condition of households, the existence of urban equipment for common use, public transport, accessibility, family income, employment conditions, education and quality of treated water. The results of the indicators are: urban environmental quality index, 50.0 points (indicating a regular level of environmental quality; urban livability index, 48.6 points (representing moderate level of livability; and quality index of the treated water, 98.1 points (which is an optimal level of water quality. The arithmetic average of the three indices generated an integrated urban environmental quality of 65.6 points, a good environmental quality level of the urban village housing in União. The interpretation of this integrated index reflects the indicators measured in each index. We conclude that the modeling of urban environmental quality indicators was an important tool for the analysis of urban environmental quality in micro or macro scales, and this allowed us to propose more efficient management and restructuring of the urban environment.

  9. Combustion experiments in a small furnace using natural biogenic solid fuels. Emissions and ash quality. Final report; Verbrennungsversuche mit naturbelassenen biogenen Festbrennstoffen in einer Kleinfeuerungsanlage. Emissionen und Aschequalitaet. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Launhardt, T.; Hartmann, H.; Link, H.; Schmid, V.

    2000-09-01

    Emissions and ash qualities of the fuels were compared in order to assess their pollutant emissions CO, dust, C{sub n}H{sub m}, NO{sub x}, particle size distribution of airborne dust, organic and inorganic chlorinated pollutants (including PCDD/F), PAH and heavy metals. Quality characteristics of the fuels and ashes were investigated as well (nutrient and pollutant concentrations including heavy metals, chlorine, PCDD/F, PAH). The focus was on agricultural biomass, which was compared with chopped pinewood. [German] Ziel des Messvorhabens ist eine umfassende Analyse der Emissionen und der Aschenqualitaet beim Einsatz verschiedener biogener Festbrennstoffe in einer Kleinfeuerungsanlage (50 kW{sub th}). Dadurch soll eine vergleichende Bewertung der unterschiedlichen Brennstoffarten und Aufbereitungsformen (Pellet, Haeckselgut) moeglich werden und eine generelle Aussage ueber das Niveau des Schadstoffausstosses inklusive hochtoxischer organischer Komponenten abgeleitet werden. Ergaenzend dazu soll eine Quantifizierung moeglicher Einfluesse durch den Wassergehalt im Brennstoff und die Heizlast der Feuerungsanlage vorgenommen werden. Zielgroessen der Untersuchung sind der Wirkungsgrad der Feuerungsanlage, die Standard-Emissionsgroessen CO, Staub, C{sub n}H{sub m} und NO{sub x}, die Partikelgroessenverteilung des Flugstaubes, organisch und anorganisch chlorierte Schadstoffe (u.a. PCDD/F), PAK und Schwermetalle. Zusaetzlich werden eine Reihe von Qualitaetsmerkmalen im Brennstoff und in den Aschen betrachtet (Naehr- und Schadstoffgehalte, einschliesslich Schwermetalle, Chlor, PCDD/F, PAK). Im Vordergrund stehen die Biomassebrennstoffe, die speziell in der Landwirtschaft erzeugt werden. Sie werden mit dem Referenzbrennstoff Fichtenhackgut verglichen. (orig.)

  10. Cleaner phosphogypsum, coal combustion ashes and waste incineration ashes for application in building materials: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Reijnders [University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-02-15

    Application of phosphogypsum, coal combustion ashes and waste incineration ashes in building materials has been limited by the presence of minor components that are hazardous, such as radioactive substances, chlorinated dioxins and heavy metals, or have a negative impact on product quality or production economics, such as phosphate, fluoride, carbon and chloride. Source reduction, destruction of persistent organics and separation techniques may reduce the concentrations of such components. With a few exceptions, separation techniques currently lead to significantly higher (private) costs. Higher waste disposal costs, tighter regulations and higher prices for competing virgin minerals could make the use of the purified phosphogypsum and ashes in building materials more attractive.

  11. Application of the electrical characterization to the study of the hydrated phases of the cement with coal bottom ash; Aplicacion de la caracterizacion electrica al estudio de las fases hidratadas de cemento con adicion de escorias de centrales termicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menendez, E.; Frutos, J. de; Alvaro, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    The present paper investigates the influence of using Bottom and Fly Ash as partial replacement of cement in the hydration process. Through measurements of electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X -ray diffraction (XRD), we analyze from the early stages to the hydration process to the end. Values of EIS, XRD and its relation, are used to determine transformation of hydrated phases, and for each of the substitutions, is indicated as modified the hydrated phase as a function of time and compared it with the reference material. It also proves the relevance of using EIS measures in real time, and as non destructive testing to characterize the hydration process of these materials. (Author)

  12. Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servranckx, R.; Stunder, B.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDM) have been used operationally since the mid 1990's by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) designated Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) to provide ash forecast guidance. Over the years, significant improvements in the detection and prediction of airborne volcanic ash have been realized thanks to improved models, increases in computing power, 24-hr real time monitoring by VAACs / Meteorological Watch Offices and close coordination with Volcano Observatories around the world. Yet, predicting accurately the spatial and temporal structures of airborne volcanic ash and the deposition at the earth's surface remains a difficult and challenging problem. The forecasting problem is influenced by 3 main components. The first one (ERUPTION SOURCE PARAMETERS) comprises all non-meteorological parameters that characterize a specific eruption or volcanic ash cloud. For example, the volume / mass of ash released in the atmosphere, the duration of the eruption, the altitude and distribution of the ash cloud, the particle size distribution, etc. The second component (METEOROLOGY) includes all meteorological parameters (wind, moisture, stability, etc.) that are calculated by Numerical Weather Prediction models and that serve as input to the VATDM. The third component (TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION) combines input from the other 2 components through the use of VATDM to transport and disperse airborne volcanic ash in the atmosphere as well as depositing it at the surface though various removal mechanisms. Any weakness in one of the components may adversely affect the accuracy of the forecast. In a real-time, operational response context such as exists at the VAACs, the rapid delivery of the modeling results puts some constraints on model resolution and computing time. Efforts are ongoing to evaluate the reliability of VATDM forecasts though the use of various methods, including ensemble techniques. Remote sensing data

  13. Environmental impact of manganese due to its leaching from coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Bably; Mondal, Kajal K R

    2009-01-01

    In India, so far not much efforts have been made to use coal ash as backfill material in underground/ open cast mines and to predict its subsequent effect on ground water quality. One of the main problems in disposing of big quantities of coal ash is the possible leaching of different pollutants, including manganese. A thorough investigation regarding leaching of manganese from different fly ashes is required to know the impact of manganese due to its leaching from fly ash to ground water as well as surface water. In the present study, short term and long term leaching studies have been carried out on fly ash, bottom ash, pond ash and weathered ash of Chandrapura thermal power plant, Bokaro, Jharkhand and Ramagundam thermal power plant, Ramagundam, Andhra Pradesh. The amount of manganese released in different experiments has been evaluated. The leachate of Chandrapura fly ash has more manganese concentration (0.2001 mg/L) than the leachate of bottom ash, pond ash and weathered ash. A field investigation at Damoda abandoned open cast mine, filled with pond ash of Chandrapura thermal power plant revealed that concentration of manganese in ground water beneath the ash filled mine has been found very high (maximum up to 6.0 mg/L). But its migration to a long distance has not been seen. Remedial measures for coal ash disposal have also been formulated.

  14. A study on fiy ash: ballistic separation of a fly ash

    OpenAIRE

    Peris Mora, Eduardo; Payá, Jordi; Monzó, José

    1991-01-01

    The object of this study is the characterization of several sized fractions from a "spanish fly ash" originating in the thermoelectric power plant in Andorra (Teruel). Physical (size distributions, densities) chemical (chemical composition) and mineralogical characteristics (X-ray diffractograms and infrared spectra) for those sized fractions have been analyzed. Initial fly ash was ballistically separated (horizontal draft) into four fractions using an aerodynamic tunnel with hori...

  15. Characterization of red ceramic pastes incorporated with sugarcane bagasse ash wastes; Caracterizacao de massa ceramica vermelha incorporada com residuo de cinzas de bagaco de cana-de-acucar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, K.C.P.; Gurgel, R.F.; Holanda, J.N.F., E-mail: katiacpfaria@hotmail.co, E-mail: holanda@uenf.b [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (LAMAV/UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais Avancados. Grupo de Materiais Ceramicos

    2010-07-01

    The alcohol industry is one sector that stands out most in the Brazilian agribusiness. Currently there is an increasing demand for sugar and ethanol for use as fuel. The processes of manufacturing these products generate large amounts of waste, the sugarcane bagasse ash waste one of the most abundant. For its chemical and mineralogical characteristics, this waste has aroused the interest of its reuse in the field of red ceramic. This study analyzes the characteristics of a red ceramic paste incorporated with up to 20 wt.% of waste. The following characteristics were performed: chemical composition, X-ray diffraction, particle size, morphology, and Atterberg limits. The results show that the incorporation of sugarcane bagasse ash waste influences the physical-chemical and mineralogical characteristics of red ceramic paste. (author)

  16. Chemical composition of ash in coal and coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluzhnikov, A.I.; Tsymbal, G.L.

    1983-05-01

    Ash content in coke influences coke consumption rate by blast furnaces. In the Karaganda steelworks a 1% ash content decrease in coke reduces coke consumption by a blast furnace by 1 to 1.6%. Ash content in coke depends on ash content in a coal mixture and ash content in a coal mixture depends on ash content and washability of coal components. Not all ash components are of identical importance for blast furnace coke production. Investigations show that silica and aluminium oxides are only slightly influenced by thermal degradation and reduction reactions which take place during coking. Coal pyrolysis decisively influences content of sodium oxides, potassium oxides or iron oxides. Sodium and potassium carbonates are also unstable and undergo degradation. Taking into consideration that silica and aluminium oxides are not influenced by thermal degradation during coking an increase in the two oxides in a coal mixture used for coking causes an ash content increase in coke. Examples of coal from the Kuzbass and the Vorkuta mines are given. Replacing 5% of the KZh and K coal from Karaganda with G6 coal from the Kuzbass characterized by the identical ash content but by higher content of silica and aluminium oxides causes an increase in ash content in coke ranging from 1.6 to 1.8%. (8 refs.)

  17. Characteristic of elements in coal bottom ash and fly ash by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal-fired power plant and industrial stacks that using coal produce solid waste such as bottom ash and fly ash. Determination of elements in these wastes qualitatively and quantitatively is usually the first step taken for subsequent evaluation of the associated environmental and biological risks. In this study, the determination of trace elements in bottom ash and fly ash by instrumental neutron activation analysis was carried out. The samples were irradiated at rabbit facility in G.A. Siwabessy reactor with neutron flux ~ 1013 n.cm-2.s-1, and then counted by HPGe spectrometer gamma detector. The validation of method was performed by characterization of standard reference material (SRM) 1633b coal fly ash from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Some elements such as Al, As, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Mn, Na, Sc, Sm, Ti and V were detected in both samples. The concentration of environmentally toxic elements, As and Cr in bottom ash were 6.24 and 137.4 mg/kg, whereas in fly ash were 6.37 and 39.0 mg/kg respectively. Arsenic concentrations had been over the standard value based on PP no.85/1999. (author)

  18. Regular Recycling of Wood Ash to Prevent Waste Production (RecAsh). Technical Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Lars E-mail: lars.t.andersson@skogsstyreslen.se

    2007-03-15

    At present, the extraction of harvest residues is predicted to increase in Sweden and Finland. As an effect of the intensified harvesting, the export of nutrients and acid buffering substances from the growth site is also increased. Wood ash could be used to compensate forest soils for such losses. Most wood fuel ash is today often deposited in landfills. If the wood ash is recycled, wood energy is produced without any significant waste production. Ash recycling would therefore contribute to decreasing the production of waste, and to maintaining the chemical quality of forest waters and biological productivity of forest soils in the long term. The project has developed, analysed and demonstrated two regular ash-recycling systems. It has also distributed knowledge gathered about motives for ash recycling as well as technical and administrative solutions through a range of media (handbooks, workshops, field demonstrations, reports, web page and information videos). Hopefully, the project will contribute to decreasing waste problems related to bio-energy production in the EU at large. The project has been organised as a separate structure at the beneficiary and divided in four geographically defined subprojects, one in Finland and three in Sweden (Central Sweden, Northern Sweden, and South-western Sweden). The work in each subproject has been lead by a subproject leader. Each subproject has organised a regional reference group. A project steering committee has been established consisting of senior officials from all concerned partners. The project had nine main tasks with the following main expected deliverables and output: 1. Development of two complete full-scale ash-recycling systems; 2. Production of handbooks of the ash recycling system; 3. Ash classification study to support national actions for recommendations; 4. Organise regional demonstrations of various technical options for ash treatment and spreading; 5. Organise national seminars and demonstrations of

  19. ACC 305 ASH

    OpenAIRE

    admn

    2015-01-01

    ACC 305 ASH Check this A+ tutorial guideline at   http://www.assignmentcloud.com/ACC-305-ASH/ACC-305-ASH-Complete-Class ACC 305 Week 1 Assignments E 3-18, E 3-20, J Case 3-5 ACC 305 Week 1 DQ 1 FASB and Ethics ACC 305 Week 1 DQ 2 Cash versus Accrual & Financial Disclosures ACC 305 Week 2 DQ 1 Earnings Management Case 4-3 ACC 305 Week 2 DQ 2 Revenue Recognition Case 5-2 ACC 305 Week 2 Problem E4-16 Bluebonnet Bakers ACC 305 Week 2 Problem E4-19 ...

  20. Assessing Risk Posed By Land Application Of Ash From The Combustion Of Wood And Tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    The total and leachable metal concentrations in ash from the combustion of waste wood and vehicle tires (WT ash) were characterized. These data were then used to examine a variety of issues associated with determining whether the WT ash could be beneficially used outside of a la...

  1. HIS 204 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    JOHN

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HIS 204 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) HIS 204 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) HIS 204 Week 3 Assignment Women Right, Sacrifices & Independence (Ash) HIS 204 Week 3 DQ 1 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 3 DQ 2 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 4 DQ 1 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 4 DQ 2 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 4 Quiz (Ash) HIS 204 Week 5 DQ 1 (Ash) ...

  2. Characterizing air quality data from complex network perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xinghua; Wang, Li; Xu, Huihui; Li, Shasha; Tian, Lixin

    2016-02-01

    Air quality depends mainly on changes in emission of pollutants and their precursors. Understanding its characteristics is the key to predicting and controlling air quality. In this study, complex networks were built to analyze topological characteristics of air quality data by correlation coefficient method. Firstly, PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) indexes of eight monitoring sites in Beijing were selected as samples from January 2013 to December 2014. Secondly, the C-C method was applied to determine the structure of phase space. Points in the reconstructed phase space were considered to be nodes of the network mapped. Then, edges were determined by nodes having the correlation greater than a critical threshold. Three properties of the constructed networks, degree distribution, clustering coefficient, and modularity, were used to determine the optimal value of the critical threshold. Finally, by analyzing and comparing topological properties, we pointed out that similarities and difference in the constructed complex networks revealed influence factors and their different roles on real air quality system.

  3. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal. Volume 1 contains the dissertation of Ghosal which covers the characterization of fly ash and the measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  4. Adsorption of Crystal Violet Dye from Aqueous Solution onto Zeolites from Coal Fly and Bottom Ashes

    OpenAIRE

    Tharcila Colachite Rodrigues Bertolini; Juliana C. Izidoro; Carina P. Magdalena; Denise A. Fungaro

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption of the cationic dye Crystal Violet (CV) over zeolites from coal fly ash (ZFA) and bottom ash (ZBA) was evaluated. The coal fly ash (CFA) and the coal bottom ash (CBA) used in the synthesis of the zeolites by alkaline hydrothermal treatment were collected in Jorge Lacerda coal-fired power plant located at Capivari de Baixo County, in Santa Catarina State, Brazil. The zeolitic materials were characterized predominantly as hydroxy-sodalite and X. The dye adsorption equilibrium was...

  5. Experimental characterization of CFL bulbs for power quality assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, van P.; Timens, R.B.; Stievano, I.S.; Leferink, F.B.J.; Canavero, F.G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a systematic set of voltage and current transient measurements aimed at characterizing the electrical behavior of a typical energy efficient compact fluorescent light bulb. The considered device represents a well-known example of a number of nonlinear loads that ar

  6. Blackberry wines mineral and heavy metal content determination after dry ashing: multivariate data analysis as a tool for fruit wine quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidžić Klarić, Daniela; Klarić, Ilija; Mornar, Ana; Velić, Darko; Velić, Natalija

    2015-08-01

    This study brings out the data on the content of 21 mineral and heavy metal in 15 blackberry wines made of conventionally and organically grown blackberries. The objective of this study was to classify the blackberry wine samples based on their mineral composition and the applied cultivation method of the starting raw material by using chemometric analysis. The metal content of Croatian blackberry wine samples was determined by AAS after dry ashing. The comparison between an organic and conventional group of investigated blackberry wines showed statistically significant difference in concentrations of Si and Li, where the organic group contained higher concentrations of these compounds. According to multivariate data analysis, the model based on the original metal content data set finally included seven original variables (K, Fe, Mn, Cu, Ba, Cd and Cr) and gave a satisfactory separation of two applied cultivation methods of the starting raw material.

  7. Potential fly-ash utilization in agriculture: A global review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manisha Basu; Manish Pande; P.B.S. Bhadoria; S.C. Mahapatra

    2009-01-01

    Though in last four decades various alternate energy sources have come into the limelight, the hyperbolic use of coal as a prime energy source cannot be counterbalanced. Disposal of high amount of fly-ash from thermal power plants absorbs huge amount of water, energy and land area by ash ponds. In order to meet the growing energy demand, various environmental, economic and social problems associated with the disposal of fly-ash would continue to increase. Therefore, fly-ash management would remain a great concern of the century. Fly-ash has great potentiality in agriculture due to its efficacy in modification of soil health and crop performance. The high concentration of elements (K, Na, Zn, Ca, Mg and Fe) in fly-ash increases the yield of many agricultural crops. But compared to other sectors, the use of fly-ash in agriculture is limited. An exhaustive review of numerous studies of last four decades took place in this paper, which systematically covers the importance, scope and apprehension regarding utilization of fly-ash in agriculture. The authors concluded that though studies have established some solutions to handle the problems of radioactivity and heavy metal content in flyash, long-term confirmatory research and demonstration are necessary. This paper also identified some areas, like proper handling of dry ash in plants as well as in fields, ash pond management (i.e., faster decantation, recycling of water, vertical expansion rather than horizontal), monitoring of soil health, crop quality, and fate of fly-ash in time domain, where research thrust is required. Agricultural lime application contributes to global warming as Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assumes that all the carbon in agricultural lime is finally released as CO2to the atmosphere. It is expected that use of fly-ash instead of lime in agriculture can reduce net CO2emission, thus reduce global warming also.

  8. Potential application of machine vision technology to saffron (Crocus sativus L.) quality characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Sajad; Minaei, Saeid

    2016-12-01

    Saffron quality characterization is an important issue in the food industry and of interest to the consumers. This paper proposes an expert system based on the application of machine vision technology for characterization of saffron and shows how it can be employed in practical usage. There is a correlation between saffron color and its geographic location of production and some chemical attributes which could be properly used for characterization of saffron quality and freshness. This may be accomplished by employing image processing techniques coupled with multivariate data analysis for quantification of saffron properties. Expert algorithms can be made available for prediction of saffron characteristics such as color as well as for product classification.

  9. Tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) sous vide: characterization and quality parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiane de Cássia Pontes Ramos; Lúcia Fátima Henriques Lourenço; Maria Regina Sarkis Peixoto Joele; Consuelo Lúcia Sousa; Suezilde Conceição do Amaral Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological, physical and physico-chemical quality parameters of sous vide preparation of pen-reared tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum). To prepare the tambaqui sous vide, 200 g of fillet, 50 g of basil sauce (1:4 fish fillet:sauce ratio) and 10 mL of 5% sodium lactate were used. The product was then vacuum-packaged, pasteurized at 65 ºC for 12.5 min and refrigerated. The presence of Salmonella spp., sulfite-reducing Clostridium and Listeria mo...

  10. Effects of water availability on emerald ash borer larval performance and phloem phenolics of Manchurian and black ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sourav; Whitehill, Justin G A; Hill, Amy L; Opiyo, Stephen O; Cipollini, Don; Herms, Daniel A; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2014-04-01

    The invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle is a significant threat to the survival of North American ash. In previous work, we identified putative biochemical and molecular markers of constitutive EAB resistance in Manchurian ash, an Asian species co-evolved with EAB. Here, we employed high-throughput high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection and mass spectrometry (HPLC-PDA-MS) to characterize the induced response of soluble phloem phenolics to EAB attack in resistant Manchurian and susceptible black ash under conditions of either normal or low water availability, and the effects of water availability on larval performance. Total larval mass per tree was lower in Manchurian than in black ash. Low water increased larval numbers and mean larval mass overall, but more so in Manchurian ash. Low water did not affect levels of phenolics in either host species, but six phenolics decreased in response to EAB. In both ashes, pinoresinol A was induced by EAB, especially in Manchurian ash. Pinoresinol A and pinoresinol B were negatively correlated with each other in both species. The higher accumulation of pinoresinol A in Manchurian ash after attack may help explain the resistance of this species to EAB, but none of the responses measured here could explain increased larval performance in trees subjected to low water availability.

  11. Effects of water availability on emerald ash borer larval performance and phloem phenolics of Manchurian and black ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sourav; Whitehill, Justin G A; Hill, Amy L; Opiyo, Stephen O; Cipollini, Don; Herms, Daniel A; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2014-04-01

    The invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle is a significant threat to the survival of North American ash. In previous work, we identified putative biochemical and molecular markers of constitutive EAB resistance in Manchurian ash, an Asian species co-evolved with EAB. Here, we employed high-throughput high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection and mass spectrometry (HPLC-PDA-MS) to characterize the induced response of soluble phloem phenolics to EAB attack in resistant Manchurian and susceptible black ash under conditions of either normal or low water availability, and the effects of water availability on larval performance. Total larval mass per tree was lower in Manchurian than in black ash. Low water increased larval numbers and mean larval mass overall, but more so in Manchurian ash. Low water did not affect levels of phenolics in either host species, but six phenolics decreased in response to EAB. In both ashes, pinoresinol A was induced by EAB, especially in Manchurian ash. Pinoresinol A and pinoresinol B were negatively correlated with each other in both species. The higher accumulation of pinoresinol A in Manchurian ash after attack may help explain the resistance of this species to EAB, but none of the responses measured here could explain increased larval performance in trees subjected to low water availability. PMID:24125060

  12. Mineralogy and phase transition of oil sands coke ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heemun Jang; Thomas H. Etsell [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2006-08-15

    Coke obtained from Syncrude and Suncor was investigated to characterize the metals and minerals by ashing it at various temperatures. Samples were collected by high temperature ashing at 100{sup o}C intervals from 400 to 1200{sup o}C. Samples were also obtained from low temperature ashing (LTA) which gives little effect on the mineral assemblage compared to HTA samples. X-ray diffraction patterns of Suncor and Syncrude coke ash were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively to characterize the mineral phases in the sample and their thermal transition behavior. In Suncor ash, kaolinite, illite, gypsum, anhydrite, microcline, anorthite, hematite, sillimanite and quartz were dominant phases in ash from the LTA temperature up to 700{sup o}C, and mullite, cristobalite, hercynite, albite, anorthite, pseudobrookite and other iron-titanium oxides were dominant mineral phases from 700 to 1200{sup o}C. In Syncrude ash, illite, anhydrite, quartz, anorthite, microcline, sillimanite and hematite were dominant up to 700{sup o}C, and hercynite, anorthite, albite, pseudobrookite and other iron-titanium oxides were dominant up to 1200{sup o}C. The higher quantities of Ca, K and Na, and the lower quantities of V, Fe and Ni in Syncrude ash resulted in higher amorphocity and the different mineral phases. 32 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Microbiological and Physicochemical Quality Characterization of Commercial Red Pepper Powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten commercially available red pepper powders were investigated for their hygienic quality (total aerobic count, yeasts and molds, and coliforms) and physicochemical properties (moisture content, pH, Hunters color values, American Spice Trade Association (ASTA) color and particle size). Microbial analysis resulted in 103-106 CFU/g of total aerobic count and same of yeasts and molds, where 2 samples were positive (103 CFU/g) for coliforms. The moisture contents (7.25% to 12.73%) were with in the range as described in the Korean Food Standards Codex. Noteworthy variations were observed in pH (4.97 to 5.15), Hunters E values (47.19 to 58.04) and ASTA color values (89.31 to 98.61). Although the color differences were evident among the samples, but the Hunter values were not in good correlations with ASTA color values. The average particle sizes of the all samples were comparable ranging from 605 μm to 1251 μm with few exceptions. There was a great variation in the key quality attributes of commercially available red pepper powders that should be considered for their various uses in food products. (author)

  14. COAL ASH RESOURCES RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced �cars�) is the core coal combustion by-product (CCB) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCBs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. CARRC continued the partnership of industry partners, university researchers, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) addressing needs in the CCB industry through technical research and development projects. Technology transfer also continued through distribution and presentation of the results of research activities to appropriate audiences, with emphasis on reaching government agency representatives and end users of CCBs. CARRC partners have evolved technically and have jointly developed an understanding of the layers of social, regulatory, legal, and competition issues that impact the success of CCB utilization as applies to the CCB industry in general and to individual companies. Many CARRC tasks are designed to provide information on CCB performance including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC activities from 1993�1998 included a variety of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. The tasks summarized in this report are 1) The Demonstration of CCB Use in Small Construction Projects, 2) Application of CCSEM (computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy) for Coal Combustion By-Product Characterization, 3) Development of a Procedure to Determine Heat of Hydration for Coal Combustion By-Products, 4) Investigation of the Behavior of High

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Fly Ash-based Geopolymer%粉煤灰基地聚合物的制备及性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛彩红; 聂金合; 高莉; 李小宁; 蔡文亮

    2016-01-01

    以电厂废渣Ⅱ级低钙粉煤灰为原料,利用碱激发搅拌法制备了粉煤灰基地质聚合物。当水玻璃模数为1.2,nSi/nAl为1.96,养护温度为60℃时,强度最高为41.13 MPa,体积密度为1.66 g/cm3;水玻璃的模数、nSi/nAl、养护温度对地质聚合物的强度、体积密度影响较大,随着参数的增加,抗压强度都表现为先增加后降低的趋势;粉煤灰地质聚合物XRD谱图与原灰相比,在29.508°处出现非晶的漫散射宽峰,且莫来石、石英衍射峰降低,说明地质聚合反应已发生,形成一种“半晶态”物质。%AbstractBased on power plant waste residueⅡ level low calcium lfy ash as raw material, lfy ash-based geopolymer was prepared by alkali excitation mixing method. Modulus sodium silicate was 1.2, thenSi/nAl was 1.96, the curing temperature of 60℃, The compressive strength of geopolymer by optimum process was 41.13 MPa, volume density was 1.66 g/cm3; Modulus of sodium silicate,nSi/nAl, curing temperature had a great inlfuence on the strength and bulk density of the geopolymer, with the increase of parameters, the compressive strength was ifrst increased after reducing trend; X-ray Diffraction (XRD) of lfy ash geopolymer compared with the original grey, at 29.508° amorphous non-relfecting wide peak, and mullite, quartz to reduce the diffraction peak, explain geological polymerization has occurred, “semi-crystalline materials” was synthesized.

  16. Metabolomics Provides Quality Characterization of Commercial Gochujang (Fermented Pepper Paste).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyu Min; Suh, Dong Ho; Jung, Eun Sung; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    To identify the major factors contributing to the quality of commercial gochujang (fermented red pepper paste), metabolites were profiled by mass spectrometry. In principal component analysis, cereal type (wheat, brown rice, and white rice) and species of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum, C. annuum cv. Chung-yang, and C. frutescens) affected clustering patterns. Relative amino acid and citric acid levels were significantly higher in wheat gochujang than in rice gochujang. Sucrose, linoleic acid, oleic acid, and lysophospholipid levels were high in brown-rice gochujang, whereas glucose, maltose, and γ-aminobutyric acid levels were high in white-rice gochujang. The relative capsaicinoid and luteolin derivative contents in gochujang were affected by the hot pepper species used. Gochujang containing C. annuum cv. Chung-yang and C. frutescens showed high capsaicinoid levels. The luteolin derivative level was high in gochujang containing C. frutescens. These metabolite variations in commercial gochujang may be related to different physicochemical phenotypes and antioxidant activity. PMID:27428946

  17. Metabolomics Provides Quality Characterization of Commercial Gochujang (Fermented Pepper Paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyu Min Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To identify the major factors contributing to the quality of commercial gochujang (fermented red pepper paste, metabolites were profiled by mass spectrometry. In principal component analysis, cereal type (wheat, brown rice, and white rice and species of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum, C. annuum cv. Chung-yang, and C. frutescens affected clustering patterns. Relative amino acid and citric acid levels were significantly higher in wheat gochujang than in rice gochujang. Sucrose, linoleic acid, oleic acid, and lysophospholipid levels were high in brown-rice gochujang, whereas glucose, maltose, and γ-aminobutyric acid levels were high in white-rice gochujang. The relative capsaicinoid and luteolin derivative contents in gochujang were affected by the hot pepper species used. Gochujang containing C. annuum cv. Chung-yang and C. frutescens showed high capsaicinoid levels. The luteolin derivative level was high in gochujang containing C. frutescens. These metabolite variations in commercial gochujang may be related to different physicochemical phenotypes and antioxidant activity.

  18. Characterizing the Quality Workforce in Private U.S. Child and Family Behavioral Health Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, J Curtis; Raffol, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Behavioral health agencies have been encouraged to monitor performance and improve service quality. This paper characterizes the workforce charged with these tasks through a national survey of 238 behavioral health quality professionals. A latent class analysis suggests only 30 % of these workers report skills in both basic research and quality-specific skills. Respondents wanted to learn a variety of research and data analytic skills. The results call into question the quality of data collected in behavioral health agencies and the conclusions agencies are drawing from their data. Professional school and continuing education programs are needed to prepare this workforce. PMID:26108643

  19. Chemical characterization of bottom ashes generated during combustion of a Colombian mineral coal in a thermal power plant; Caracterizacao quimica das cinzas de fundo originadas pela combustao, em usina termoeletrica, de um carvao mineral do nordeste da Colombia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, H.S.; Nogueira, R.E.F.Q.; Lobo, C.J.S.; Nobre, A.I.S.; Sales, J.C.; Silva, C.J.M., E-mail: hspfisica@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia. Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2012-07-01

    Bottom ashes generated during combustion of a mineral coal from Colombia were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The interest in this particular coal is due to the fact that it will be used by a thermal power plant in Ceara, Northeastern Brazil, where it could produce over 900 tons of different residues/combustion products every day. Results from Xray fluorescence allowed identification and quantification of elements present in the sample: silicon (59,17%), aluminum (13,17%), iron (10,74%), potassium (6,11%), titanium (2,91%), calcium (4,97%), sulphur (0,84%) and others (2,09%). The X-ray diffraction revealed patterns from silica, mullite, calcium sulphate and hydrated sodium. Results obtained so far indicate that the material is a potential raw-material for use in the formulation of ceramic components (author)

  20. Utilization of MSWI Fly Ash in Making Ceramic Brick and Product Characterization%生活垃圾焚烧飞灰制陶瓷砖表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海英; 赵由才; 祈景玉

    2011-01-01

    为了探索生活垃圾焚烧飞灰资源化利用途径,在对飞灰化学组成及矿物成分分析的基础上,利用飞灰、黄陶土、耐火砂及长石研制陶瓷砖,最佳配比方案为:飞灰20%,黄陶土61%,长石10%,耐火砂10%,分析了最佳配比制品的吸水率、抗压强度、微观结构及水平振荡浸出毒性.结果表明:飞灰属SiO-AlO-金属氧化物体系,主要矿物成分是钙硅酸盐及铝硅酸盐等,可用于制陶瓷砖;最佳配比制品达MU15强度等级,满足抗风化的要求;随煅烧温度的升高,制品结构不断密实化,960℃烧成的制品显示出完全烧结的特点,960~1 000℃烧成的制品中出现明显的晶化、玻璃化过程.最佳配比制品重金属浸出毒性完全达标,重金属的浸出率与坯体相比大大降低.%Based on chemical and mineralogical composition analysis, MSWI fly ash, together with yellow ceramic clay,ripe sand and feldspar, was used to make ceramic brick, to explore a new way of fly ash recycling. An orthogonal test was designed to determine the optimum mixing ratio of materials, which registers 20% fly ash,60% yellow ceramic clay, 10%feldspar and 10% ripe sand. Besides, water absorption, compressive strength, microstructure and HVEP leaching toxicity were performed on ceramic bricks made in accordance with the optimum mixing ratio of materials. It is found that main mineralogical components of fly ash are calcium silicates and alumino-silicates, registering as a SiO2-Al2O3-metal oxides system, which can be used as a raw material of ceramic brick. Ceramic bricks made in accordance with the optimum mixing ratio register MU15 in terms of compressive strength and meet requirements of anti-weathering based on its water absorption.The bricks are much more hardened with increase of sintering temperature. The bricks sintered at 960 ℃ show characteristics of complete sintering, and obvious crystallization and vitrification process was seen in bricks sintered

  1. Sustainable High Quality Recycling of Aggregates from Waste-to-Energy, Treated in a Wet Bottom Ash Processing Installation, for Use in Concrete Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Van den Heede

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, more efforts towards sustainability are required from the concrete industry. Replacing traditional aggregates by recycled bottom ash (BA from municipal solid waste incineration can contribute to this goal. Until now, only partial replacement has been considered to keep the concrete workability, strength and durability under control. In this research, the feasibility of a full aggregate replacement was investigated for producing prefabricated Lego bricks. It was found that the required compressive strength class for this purpose (C20/25 could be achieved. Nevertheless, a thorough understanding of the BA properties is needed to overcome other issues. As BA is highly absorptive, the concrete’s water demand is high. This workability issue can be dealt with by subjecting the fine BA fraction to a crushing operation to eliminate the porous elements and by pre-wetting the fine and coarse BA fractions in a controlled manner. In addition, a reactive NaOH washing is needed to avoid formation of longitudinal voids and the resulting expansion due to the metallic aluminum present in the BA. Regarding the long-term behavior, heavy metal leaching and freeze-thaw exposure are not problematic, though there is susceptibility to acetic and lactic acid attack and maybe increased sensitivity to alkali-silica reaction.

  2. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

    2003-05-20

    The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

  3. MAT 126 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    stylia

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MAT 126 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Written Assignment (Arithmetic and geometric sequence) (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Assignment Is It Fat Free (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Assignment Quadratic Equations (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126...

  4. Evaluation of water quality management problems caused by agricultural drainage water entering Modoc national wildlife refuge and the Ash Creek wildlife management area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this investigation was to determine water quality problems or potential problems caused by agricultural drainage water entering the Modoc National...

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1994 quality program status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This status report is for calendar year 1994. It summarizes the annual activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP or Project) quality assurance program. By identifying the accomplishments of the quality program, a baseline is established that will assist in decision making, improve administrative controls and predictability, and allow us to annually identify adverse trends and to evaluate improvements. This is the fourth annual status report

  6. Technical work plan for the privatization waste characterization data quality objective process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work plan addresses the activities necessary to complete the data quality objectives process for the purpose of providing sufficient characterization information to successfully stage, pretreat, and immobilize low-activity waste per the requirements and specifications identified in the Tank Waste Remediation System Privatization Request for Proposal. The scope of this task is to complete the data quality objectives process, the results of which will provide a technical basis for sampling and characterization needs related to privatization of pretreatment and low-activity waste immobilization

  7. Electrodialytic treatment of fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie;

    Heavy metals are removed from the fly ashes by an electrodialytic treatment with the aim of up-grading the ashes for reuse in stead of disposal in landfill.A great potential for upgrading of bio- and waste incineration ashes by electrodialytic treatment exists. In the future, the applicability...

  8. Effects Of Crystallographic Properties On The Ice Nucleation Properties Of Volcanic Ash Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Beranek, Josef; Madaan, Nitesh; Devaraj, Arun; Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Varga, Tamas

    2015-04-28

    Specific chemical and physical properties of volcanic ash particles that could affect their ability to induce ice formation are poorly understood. In this study, the ice nucleating properties of size-selected volcanic ash and mineral dust particles in relation to their surface chemistry and crystalline structure at temperatures ranging from –30 to –38 °C were investigated in deposition mode. Ice nucleation efficiency of dust particles was higher compared to ash particles at all temperature and relative humidity conditions. Particle characterization analysis shows that surface elemental composition of ash and dust particles was similar; however, the structural properties of ash samples were different.

  9. HONEY-BASED "AGUA-MEL" CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND MICROBIOLOGICAL QUALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel, Maria Graça; Antunes, Maria Dulce; Aazza, S.; Duarte, J.; Faleiro, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    In Mediterranean countries such as Italy and Portugal an ancient practice among beekepers is the production of a honey-based product that is called "agua-mel" (Portuguese designation) or "abbamele" (Italian designation) that have not only food applications but also medicinal purposes. However, the characterization of such foodstuff is completely absent in Portugal. In our study the main goal was to provide the general chemical characterization and the microbiological quality of samples of "ag...

  10. Spectroscopic and Microscopic Characterization of Volcanic Ash from Puyehue-(Chile Eruption: Preliminary Approach for the Application in the Arsenic Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Lia Botto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash from Puyehue Cordon Caulle Volcanic Complex (Chile, emitted on June 4, 2011, and deposited in Villa La Angostura at ~40 km of the source, was collected and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, surface area (BET, and chemical analysis (ICP-AES-MS technique. The mineralogical and physicochemical study revealed that the pyroclastic mixture contains iron oxides in the form of magnetite and hematite as well as pyroxene and plagioclase mineral species and amorphous pumiceous shards. Carbonaceous material was also identified. Physicochemical techniques allow us to select two representative samples (average composition and Fe-rich materials which were used to analyze their performances in the adsorption process to remove arsenic from water. Additional iron activation by means of ferric salts was performed under original sample. Results showed that the low-cost feedstock exhibited a good adsorption capacity to remove the contaminant, depending on the iron content and the water pH.

  11. X radiation qualities characterization following the standard IEC 61267 recommendations at the calibration laboratory of IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a methodology for the X radiation qualities characterization following the new recommendations of the standard 61267 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) to establish a new procedure for calibration of dosimetric systems used in the field of diagnostic radiology. The reference qualities radiation of IEC 61267: RQR 2 to RQR 10, RQA 2 to RQA 10, RQB 2 to RQB 10 and RQN 2 to RQN 10 were implanted at the calibration laboratory of IPEN (LCI). Their characteristics were analyzed through measurements of beam parameters such as: Practical peak voltage (PPV), specific additional filtrations for each qualities (high purity aluminum of about 99.9%), 1st and 2nd Half Value Layers, homogeneity coefficient. The inherent filtration of the X ray tube was also determined. With the establishment of these radiation qualities, the LCI will be ready to calibrate the measuring instruments of radiation in the new qualities, allowing an improvement in radiological services offered by IPEN. (author)

  12. MGT 330 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    alfoniz

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 330 Week 1 Individual Assignment Functions of Management Paper (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 3 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 Summary (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Team Assignment External Internal Factors Paper (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Individual Assignment Delegation (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Summary (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 330 W...

  13. Preparation and quality characterization of soy milk based non-dairy ice cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samreen Ahsan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Soy milk made from soybean has prospective to be used as a substitute of milk due to its health benefits. It is a rich source of iso-flavones, omega-3-fatty acid, dietary fiber, vitamin C, carotenoids, protein and oligosaccharides. The current study was designed to examine the effects of galacto-manan on ice cream by using commercially available (silk and locally prepared soy milk. Galacto-mannan (guar gum was used in different concentration (0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6% for the preparation of ice cream. Ice cream was analyzed for physico-chemical and sensory characteristics at 0, 30 and 60 days of storage interval. Overrun, meltdown, viscosity, total solids, pH and acidity were affected significantly by ice cream samples as well as storage. While non-significant effects of stabilizer and storage were found on fat, protein, and ash contents of ice cream. On organoleptic evaluation, the highest scores were awarded to the ice cream sample prepared with 0.5% of guar gum. Ice cream manufactured with locally prepared soy milk and guar gum revealed comparable quality with lower cost.

  14. Preparation and quality characterization of soy milk based non-dairy ice cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samreen Ahsan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Soy milk made from soybean has prospective to be used as a substitute of milk due to its health benefits. It is a rich source of iso-flavones, omega-3-fatty acid, dietary fiber, vitamin C, carotenoids, protein and oligosaccharides. The current study was designed to examine the effects of galacto-manan on ice cream by using commercially available (silk and locally prepared soy milk. Galacto-mannan (guar gum was used in different concentration (0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6% for the preparation of ice cream. Ice cream was analyzed for physico-chemical and sensory characteristics at 0, 30 and 60 days of storage interval. Overrun, meltdown, viscosity, total solids, pH and acidity were affected significantly by ice cream samples as well as storage. While non-significant effects of stabilizer and storage were found on fat, protein, and ash contents of ice cream. On organoleptic evaluation, the highest scores were awarded to the ice cream sample prepared with 0.5% of guar gum. Ice cream manufactured with locally prepared soy milk and guar gum revealed comparable quality with lower cost.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project: 1991 quality program status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This status report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's (YMP) quality assurance program for calendar year 1991. The report is divided into three Sections: Program Activities, Verification Activities, and Trend Analysis

  16. Characterization and Factors Associated with Sleep Quality in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roybal, Donna J.; Chang, Kiki D.; Chen, Michael C.; Howe, Meghan E.; Gotlib, Ian H.; Singh, Manpreet K.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is an early marker for bipolar disorder (BD) onset in youth. We characterized sleep quality in adolescents experiencing mania within the last 6-12 months. We examined the association between mood and sleep in 27 adolescents with BD and 24 matched healthy controls (HC). Subjects were assessed by parent and teen report of sleep, a…

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1995 quality program status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This status report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's (YMP's) quality assurance program for January 1 to September 30, 1995. The report includes major sections on program activities and trend analysis

  18. Methodology for Quantitative Characterization of Fluorophore Photoswitching to Predict Superresolution Microscopy Image Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittel, Amy M.; Nickerson, Andrew; Saldivar, Isaac S.; Dolman, Nick J.; Nan, Xiaolin; Gibbs, Summer L.

    2016-07-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) image quality and resolution strongly depend on the photoswitching properties of fluorophores used for sample labeling. Development of fluorophores with optimized photoswitching will considerably improve SMLM spatial and spectral resolution. Currently, evaluating fluorophore photoswitching requires protein-conjugation before assessment mandating specific fluorophore functionality, which is a major hurdle for systematic characterization. Herein, we validated polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a single-molecule environment to efficiently quantify the photoswitching properties of fluorophores and identified photoswitching properties predictive of quality SMLM images. We demonstrated that the same fluorophore photoswitching properties measured in PVA films and using antibody adsorption, a protein-conjugation environment analogous to labeled cells, were significantly correlated to microtubule width and continuity, surrogate measures of SMLM image quality. Defining PVA as a fluorophore photoswitching screening platform will facilitate SMLM fluorophore development and optimal image buffer assessment through facile and accurate photoswitching property characterization, which translates to SMLM fluorophore imaging performance.

  19. Potential application of machine vision technology to saffron (Crocus sativus L.) quality characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Sajad; Minaei, Saeid

    2016-12-01

    Saffron quality characterization is an important issue in the food industry and of interest to the consumers. This paper proposes an expert system based on the application of machine vision technology for characterization of saffron and shows how it can be employed in practical usage. There is a correlation between saffron color and its geographic location of production and some chemical attributes which could be properly used for characterization of saffron quality and freshness. This may be accomplished by employing image processing techniques coupled with multivariate data analysis for quantification of saffron properties. Expert algorithms can be made available for prediction of saffron characteristics such as color as well as for product classification. PMID:27374547

  20. MAT 221 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    mirat

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MAT 221 Week 1 Assignment 1 Simplifying Expressions (Ash) MAT 221 Week 1 DQ 1 Evaluating Algebraic Expressions (Ash) MAT 221 Week 2 Assignment 2 Inequalities (Ash) MAT 221 Week 2 DQ 1 Formulas (Ash) MAT 221 Week 3 Assignment 3 Two-Variable Inequality (Ash) MAT 221 Week 3 DQ 1 Parallel and Perpendicular (Ash) MAT 221 Week 4 Assignment 4 Financial Polynomials (Ash) MAT 221 Week 4 DQ 1 Initial Investme...

  1. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-03-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  2. Fly ash effects. II. The active effect of fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiqin Wang; Chengzhi Zhang; Wei Suna [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Department of Materials Science and Engineering

    2004-11-01

    This paper examines the method for determining the hydration degree of cement clinker and the pozzolanic reaction degree of fly ash in the system of cement and fly ash. In the base, the active effect of fly ash is studied. The studied results show that the active effect includes two aspects: (1) Fly ash has stronger pozzolanic activity and can react with Ca(OH)2, and (2) it can promote the hydration of cement. When the content of fly ash is less, its pozzolanic activity can exert well, but its promoting role to the hydration of cement is weaker. When the content of fly ash is more, it is less than its pozzolanic activity can be used, but its promoting role to the hydration of cement is stronger.

  3. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2016-03-02

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  4. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines. PMID:26931824

  5. Merging two waste streams, wood ash and biowaste, results in improved composting process and end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Delgado Juárez, M; Gómez-Brandón, M; Insam, H

    2015-04-01

    A trial was carried out to evaluate the influence of wood ash admixture on biowaste composting. The aim was to find the optimal dosage of ash addition to enhance the composting process without endangering the final compost characteristics and use. Six treatments including an unamended control (K0) and composts with additions of 3% (K3), 6% (K6), 9% (K9), 12% (K12) and 15% (K15) of wood ash (w/w) were studied. The composting process was monitored in situ for 49days, by measuring temperature, CO2, O2, and CH4 in the piles and pH, electric conductivity (EC), and inorganic N in the laboratory. At the end of the process, the products were tested for Reifegrad (maturity), toxicity and quality. The addition of up to 15% of wood ash to biowaste did not negatively affect the composting process, and the initial differences found between both the low and high ash-treated composts were attenuated with the ongoing process development. Nevertheless, and mainly due to Cd level, composts with higher ash amendment did not comply with the highest quality standards established by the Austrian Compost Ordinance. The failure of obtaining class A+ quality after ash amendment emphasizes the need for a rigid quality selection of (bottom) ashes and thus reducing environmental risks related to high pollutant loads originating from the ashes. PMID:25536175

  6. Ashes for organic farming

    OpenAIRE

    Kousa, T.; Heinonen, M; Suoniitty, T.; Peltonen, K

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays only eight percent of the cultivated field area is used for organic farming. The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry has published the guidelines for the program of organic farming to diversify the supply and the consumption of organic food. The aim is to increase organically arable land to 20% by the year 2020.The demand of organic fertilizer products is strongly increasing. Interest in forestry by-products (ash, bark, zero fiber, etc.) for use in organic production has recently be...

  7. Ash Management Review—Applications of Biomass Bottom Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpuneet S. Ghuman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In industrialized countries, it is expected that the future generation of bioenergy will be from the direct combustion of residues and wastes obtained from biomass. Bioenergy production using woody biomass is a fast developing application since this fuel source is considered to be carbon neutral. The harnessing of bioenergy from these sources produces residue in the form of ash. As the demand for bioenergy production increases, ash and residue volumes will increase. Major challenges will arise relating to the efficient management of these byproducts. The primary concerns for ash are its storage, disposal, use and the presence of unburned carbon. The continual increase in ash volume will result in decreased ash storage facilities (in cases of limited room for landfill expansion, as well as increased handling, transporting and spreading costs. The utilization of ash has been the focus of many studies, hence this review investigates the likely environmental and technological challenges that increased ash generation may cause. The presence of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, chlorine, sulphur and silicon influences the reactivity and leaching to the inorganic phases which may have significant impacts on soils and the recycling of soil nutrient. Discussed are some of the existing technologies for the processing of ash. Unburned carbon present in ash allows for the exploration of using ash as a fuel. The paper proposes sieve fractionation as a suitable method for the separation of unburnt carbon present in bottom ash obtained from a fixed-bed combustion system, followed by the application of the gasification technology to particle sizes of energy importance. It is hoped that this process will significantly reduce the volume of ash disposed at landfills.

  8. Melting Behavior of Volcanic Ash relevant to Aviation Ash Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash is one of the major hazards caused by volcanic eruptions. In particular, the threat to aviation from airborne volcanic ash has been widely recognized and documented. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in-flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The primary cause of engine thrust loss is that the glass in volcanic ash particles is generated at temperatures far lower than the temperatures in the combustion chamber of a jet engine ( i.e. > 1600 oC) and when the molten volcanic ash particles leave this hottest section of the engine, the resolidified molten volcanic ash particles will be accumulated on the turbine nozzle guide vanes, which reduced the effective flow of air through the engine ultimately causing failure. Thus, it is essential to investigate the melting process and subsequent deposition behavior of volcanic ash under gas turbine conditions. Although few research studies that investigated the deposition behavior of volcanic ash at the high temperature are to be found in public domain, to the best our knowledge, no work addresses the formation of molten volcanic ash. In this work, volcanic ash produced by Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala in November 8, 2012 was selected for study because of their recent activity and potential hazard to aircraft safety. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the sintering and fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by using characteristic temperatures by means of hot stage microscope (HSM), different thermal analysis (DTA) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) to

  9. INF 325 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    SINDHU

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com INF 325 Week 1 DQ 1 Network Management (Ash) INF 325 Week 1 DQ 2 Ethernet Network (Ash) INF 325 Week 1 Commercial Internet Expansion (Ash) INF 325 Week 2 DQ 1 UTP Cord Problem (Ash) INF 325 Week 2 DQ 2 Managed Switches (Ash) INF 325 Week 2 Leased Lines (Ash) INF 325 Week 3 DQ 1 WPA (Ash) INF 325 Week 3 DQ 2 Remote Access Management (Ash) INF 325 Week 3 Mobile Service (Ash) INF 325 Week 4 DQ 1 Ro...

  10. MGT 401 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    kennith

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 401 Week 1 Individual Assignment Strategic Management Process Paper (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 Class Activity Week 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 Learning Team Business Model Comparison Example (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 Class Activity (Ash) MGT 401 Week 3 Individual Assignment Business Plan Evaluation (Ash) ...

  11. INF 410 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    MADHURA

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com     INF 410 Week 1 DQ 1 Project Life Cycle (Ash) INF 410 Week 1 DQ 2 The Importance of Project Management (Ash) INF 410 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) INF 410 Week 2 DQ 1 Project Charter (Ash) INF 410 Week 2 DQ 2 Project Management Plan (Ash) INF 410 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) INF 410 Week 3 DQ 1 Risk Identification (Ash) INF 410 Week 3 DQ 2 Triple Constraint (Ash) INF 410 Week 3 Quiz (Ash) INF 410 Week 4 DQ...

  12. Ash in the Soil System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, P.

    2012-04-01

    Ash is the organic and inorganic residue produced by combustion, under laboratory and field conditions. This definition is far away to be accepted. Some researchers consider ash only as the inorganic part, others include also the material not completely combusted as charcoal or biochar. There is a need to have a convergence about this question and define clear "what means ash". After the fire and after spread ash onto soil surface, soil properties can be substantially changed depending on ash properties, that can be different according to the burned residue (e.g wood, coal, solid waste, peppermill, animal residues), material treatment before burning, time of exposition and storage conditions. Ash produced in boilers is different from the produced in fires because of the material diferent propertie and burning conditions. In addition, the ash produced in boilers is frequently treated (e.g pelletization, granulation, self curing) previously to application, to reduce the negative effects on soil (e.g rapid increase of pH, mycorrhiza, fine roots of trees and microfauna). These treatments normally reduce the rate of nutrients dissolution. In fires this does not happen. Thus the implications on soil properties are logically different. Depending on the combustion temperature and/or severity, ash could have different physical (e.g texture, wettability) and chemical properties (e.g amount and type of total and leached nutrients) and this will have implications on soil. Ash can increase and decrease soil aggregation, wettablity and water retention, bulk density, runoff and water infiltration. Normally, ash increases soil pH, Electrical Conductivity, and the amount of some basic nutrients as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. However it is also a potential source of heavy metals, especially if ash pH is low. However the effect of ash on soil in space and time depends especially of the ash amount and characteristics, fire temperature, severity, topography, aspect

  13. Full-scale ash deposition measurements at Avedøre Power Plant unit 2 during suspension-firing of wood with and without coal ash addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    along with the fly ash and bottom ash from the plant were characterized extensively by SEM-EDS, ICP-OES/IC and XRD. Based on the results from the present work, the deposit formation and shedding mechanisms under different operational conditions were proposed and discussed. The influence of coal ash......The formation of deposits during suspension-firing of wood at Avedøre Power Plant unit 2 (AVV2) was studied by using an advanced deposit probe system. The tests were conducted both with and without coal ash addition, and at two different locations with flue gas temperatures of 1250-1300 oC and 750...... addition on deposit formation during wood suspension-firing at AVV2 was evaluated. It was revealed that the addition of coal fly ash could significantly influence the ash deposition/shedding behaviors and the deposit properties. The effect was evident at both measurement locations. At the location...

  14. Electroremediation of straw and co-combustion ash under acidic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, Ana T.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.

    2009-01-01

    Biomass, such as wood and straw, is currently used in EU as a renewable energy source for energy production and this application is expected to rise in coming years. Combined heat and power installations produce fly ash, which is considered hazardous waste. The fly ash management issue should...... be addressed before biomass combustion is considered a truly sustainable technology. The electrodialytic process is a remediation technique able to assist the management of fly ash. For this work, straw and co-combustion of wood ash are briefly characterized and their electrodialytic treatment is carried out...... similarities with wood ash alone. However, further characterization should be carried out before any comparison regarding applicable legislation. Under acidic conditions, the electrodialytic treatment was not effective for the co-combustion wood ash. The heavy metals appeared in the least soluble fraction...

  15. Characterization of Nonparaxial Truncated Cosine-Gaussian Beams and the Beam Quality in the Far Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Xiao-Ping; L(U) Bai-Da

    2006-01-01

    @@ The analytical expression characterizing the propagation of nonparaxial truncated cosine-Gaussian (CoG) beams in free space is derived, and some special cases are discussed. The extended power in the bucket (PIB) is proposed to characterize the beam quality of nonparaxial truncated beams in the far field. It is shown that the extended PIB is applicable to nonparaxial truncated beams, and the PIB of nonparaxial truncated CoG beams depends on the decentred parameter, waist-width-to-wavelength ratio, truncation parameter, and bucket size chosen.

  16. Effective use of fly ash slurry as fill material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, S; Kawaguchi, M; Yasuhara, K

    2000-09-15

    A lot of effort has been put into increasing coal ash utilization; however, 50% of total amount is disposed of on land and in the sea. Several attempts have been reported recently concerning slurried coal fly ash use for civil engineering materials, such as for structural fill and backfill. The authors have studied this issue for more than 15 years and reported its potential for (1) underwater fills, (2) light weight backfills, and (3) light weight structural fills, through both laboratory tests and construction works. This paper is an overview of the results obtained for slurry, focusing on the following. (1) Coal fly ash reclaimed by slurry placement shows lower compressibility, higher ground density, and higher strength than by the other methods. This higher strength increases stability against liquefaction during earthquake. (2) Higher stability of the fly ash ground formed by slurry placement is caused by higher density and its self-hardening property. (3) Stability of fly ash reclaimed ground can be increased by increasing density and also by strength enhancement by cement addition. (4) Technical data obtained through a man-made island construction project shows the advantages of fly ash slurry in terms of mechanical properties such as higher stability against sliding failure, sufficient ground strength, and also in terms of cost saving. (5) Concentration in leachates from the placed slurry is lower than the Japanese environmental law. (6) In order to enlarge the fly ash slurry application toward a lightweight fill, mixtures of air foam, cement and fly ash were examined. Test results shows sufficient durability of this material against creep failure. This material was then used as lightweight structural fill around a high-rise building, and showed sufficient quality. From the above data, it can be concluded that coal fly ash slurry can be effectively utilized in civil engineering projects.

  17. Evaluation of quantitative satellite-based retrievals of volcanic ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. J.; Pavolonis, M. J.; Bojinski, S.; Siddans, R.; Thomas, G.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash clouds are a serious hazard to aviation, and mitigation requires a robust system of volcano monitoring, eruption detection, characterization of cloud properties, forecast of cloud movement, and communication of warnings. Several research groups have developed quantitative satellite-based volcanic ash products and some of these are in operational use by Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers around the world to aid in characterizing cloud properties and forecasting regions of ash hazard. The algorithms applied to the satellite data utilize a variety of techniques, and thus produce results that differ. The World Meteorological Organization has recently sponsored an intercomparison study of satellite-based retrievals with four goals: 1) to establish a validation protocol for satellite-based volcanic ash products, 2) to quantify and understand differences in products, 3) to develop best practices, and 4) to standardize volcanic cloud geophysical parameters. Six volcanic eruption cases were considered in the intercomparison: Eyjafallajökull, Grimsvötn, Kelut, Kirishimayama, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, and Sarychev Peak. Twenty-four algorithms were utilized, which retrieved parameters including: ash cloud top height, ash column mass loading, ash effective radius, and ash optical depth at visible and thermal-infrared wavelengths. Results were compared to space-based, airborne, and ground-based lidars; complementary satellite retrievals; and manual "expert evaluation" of ash extent. The intercomparison results will feed into the International Civil Aviation Organization "Roadmap for International Airways Volcano Watch", which integrates volcanic meteorological information into decision support systems for aircraft operations.

  18. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental-Waste Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) identifies the quality of data necessary to meet the specific objectives associated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental-Waste Characterization Program (the Program). This experimental-waste characterization program is only one part of the WIPP Test Phase, both in the short- and long-term, to quantify and evaluate the characteristics and behavior of transuranic (TRU) wastes in the repository environment. Other parts include the bin-scale and alcove tests, drum-scale tests, and laboratory experiments. In simplified terms, the purpose of the Program is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data describing the characteristics of the wastes that will be emplaced in the WIPP, while the remaining WIPP Test Phase is directed at examining the behavior of these wastes in the repository environment. 50 refs., 35 figs., 33 tabs

  19. Distribution of arsenic and mercury in lime spray dryer ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panuwat Taerakul; Ping Sun; Danold W. Golightly; Harold W. Walker; Linda K. Weavers [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science

    2006-08-15

    The partitioning of As and Hg in various components of lime spray dryer (LSD) ash samples from a coal-fired boiler was characterized to better understand the form and fate of these elements in flue gas desulfurization byproducts. LSD ash samples, collected from the McCracken Power Plant on the Ohio State University campus, were separated by a 140-mesh (106 {mu}m) sieve into two fractions: a fly-ash-/unburned-carbon-enriched fraction (> 106 {mu}m) and a calcium-enriched fraction (< 106 {mu}m). Unburned carbon and fly ash in the material > 106 {mu}m were subsequently separated by density using a lithium heteropolytungstate solution. The concentrations of As and Hg were significant in all fractions. The level of As was consistently greater in the calcium-enriched fraction, while Hg was evenly distributed in all components of LSD ash. Specific surface area was an important factor controlling the distribution of Hg in the different components of LSD ash, but not for As. Comparing the LSD ash data to samples collected from the economizer suggests that As was effectively captured by fly ash at 600{sup o}C, while Hg was not. Leaching tests demonstrated that As and Hg were more stable in the calcium-enriched fraction than in the fly-ash- or carbon-enriched fractions, potentially because of the greater pH of the leachate and subsequently greater stability of small amounts of calcium solids containing trace elements in these fractions. 37 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Dielectric properties of fly ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Raghavendra; R L Raibagkar; A B Kulkarni

    2002-02-01

    This paper reports the dielectric properties of fly ash. The dielectric measurements were performed as a function of frequency and temperature. The sample of fly ash shows almost similar behaviour in the frequency and temperature range studied. The large value of dielectric constant in the typical frequency range is because of orientation polarization and tight binding force between the ions or atoms in the fly ash. The sample of fly ash is of great scientific and technological interest because of its high value of dielectric constant (104).

  1. The relation between pre-eruptive bubble size distribution, ash particle morphology, and their internal density: Implications to volcanic ash transport and dispersion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Parameterization of volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models strongly depends on particle morphology and their internal properties. Shape of ash particles affects terminal fall velocities (TFV) and, mostly, dispersion. Internal density combined with particle size has a very strong impact on TFV and ultimately on the rate of ash cloud thinning and particle sedimentation on the ground. Unlike other parameters, internal particle density cannot be measured directly because of the micron scale sizes of fine ash particles, but we demonstrate that it varies greatly depending on the particle size. Small simple type ash particles (fragments of bubble walls, 5-20 micron size) do not contain whole large magmatic bubbles inside and their internal density is almost the same as that of volcanic glass matrix. On the other side, the larger compound type ash particles (>40 microns for silicic fine ashes) always contain some bubbles or the whole spectra of bubble size distribution (BSD), i.e. bubbles of all sizes, bringing their internal density down as compared to simple ash. So, density of the larger ash particles is a function of the void fraction inside them (magmatic bubbles) which, in turn, is controlled by BSD. Volcanic ash is a product of the fragmentation of magmatic foam formed by pre-eruptive bubble population and characterized by BSD. The latter can now be measured from bubble imprints on ash particle surfaces using stereo-scanning electron microscopy (SSEM) and BubbleMaker software developed at UNH, or using traditional high-resolution X-Ray tomography. In this work we present the mathematical and statistical formulation for this problem connecting internal ash density with particle size and BSD, and demonstrate how the TFV of the ash population is affected by variation of particle density.

  2. Fly ash based zeolitic pigments for application in anticorrosive paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ruchi; Tiwari, Sangeeta

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the utilization of waste fly ash in anticorrosive paints. Zeolite NaY was synthesized from waste fly ash and subsequently modified by exchanging its nominal cation Na+ with Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions. The metal ion exchanged zeolite was then used as anticorrosive zeolitic pigments in paints. The prepared zeolite NaY was characterized using X-Ray diffraction technique and Scanning electron microscopy. The size, shape and density of the prepared fly ash based pigments were determined by various techniques. The paints were prepared by using fly ash based zeolitic pigments in epoxy resin and the percentages of pigments used in paints were 2% and 5%. These paints were applied to the mild steel panels and the anticorrosive properties of the pigments were assessed by the electrochemical spectroscopy technique (EIS).

  3. Fly ashes from coal and petroleum coke combustion: current and innovative potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Aixa; Navia, Rodrigo; Moreno, Natalia

    2009-12-01

    Coal fly ashes (CFA) are generated in large amounts worldwide. Current combustion technologies allow the burning of fuels with high sulfur content such as petroleum coke, generating non-CFA, such as petroleum coke fly ash (PCFA), mainly from fluidized bed combustion processes. The disposal of CFA and PCFA fly ashes can have severe impacts in the environment such as a potential groundwater contamination by the leaching of heavy metals and/or particulate matter emissions; making it necessary to treat or reuse them. At present CFA are utilized in several applications fields such as cement and concrete production, agriculture and soil stabilization. However, their reuse is restricted by the quality parameters of the end-product or requirements defined by the production process. Therefore, secondary material markets can use a limited amount of CFA, which implies the necessity of new markets for the unused CFA. Some potential future utilization options reviewed herein are zeolite synthesis and valuable metals extraction. In comparison to CFA, PCFA are characterized by a high Ca content, suggesting a possible use as neutralizers of acid wastewaters from mining operations, opening a new potential application area for PCFA that could solve contamination problems in emergent and mining countries such as Chile. However, this potential application may be limited by PCFA heavy metals leaching, mainly V and Ni, which are present in PCFA in high concentrations.

  4. Fly ashes from coal and petroleum coke combustion: current and innovative potential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A.; Navia, R.; Moreno, N. [University La Frontera, Temuco (Chile). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-12-15

    Coal fly ashes (CFA) are generated in large amounts worldwide. Current combustion technologies allow the burning of fuels with high sulfur content such as petroleum coke, generating non-CFA, such as petroleum coke fly ash (PCFA), mainly from fluidized bed combustion processes. The disposal of CFA and PCFA fly ashes can have severe impacts in the environment such as a potential groundwater contamination by the leaching of heavy metals and/or particulate matter emissions; making it necessary to treat or reuse them. At present CFA are utilized in several applications fields such as cement and concrete production, agriculture and soil stabilization. However, their reuse is restricted by the quality parameters of the end-product or requirements defined by the production process. Therefore, secondary material markets can use a limited amount of CFA, which implies the necessity of new markets for the unused CFA. Some potential future utilization options reviewed herein are zeolite synthesis and valuable metals extraction. In comparison to CFA, PCFA are characterized by a high Ca content, suggesting a possible use as neutralizers of acid wastewaters from mining operations, opening a new potential application area for PCFA that could solve contamination problems in emergent and mining countries such as Chile. However, this potential application may be limited by PCFA heavy metals leaching, mainly V and Ni, which are present in PCFA in high concentrations.

  5. LATENT VARIABLE MODELING TO ASSIST PRODUCT QUALITY CHARACTERIZATION IN THE FOOD AND PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    Ottavian, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    The pressure of the global competition, continuously asking for lower costs and improved productivity, is forcing companies to seek global supply chains to cut production costs down. As a result, it is becoming more and more difficult to accurately monitor each step of a production process and to protect products from economically motivated fraud, adulterations and counterfeiting. In such context, traditional methods for product quality characterization, such as lab assays, are expensive, des...

  6. Characterization and Factors Associated with Sleep Quality in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Roybal, Donna J.; Chang, Kiki D.; Chen, Michael C.; Howe, Meghan E.; Gotlib, Ian H.; Singh, Manpreet K.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is an early marker for bipolar disorder (BD) onset in youth. We characterized sleep quality in adolescents experiencing mania within the last 6–12 months. We examined the association between mood and sleep in 27 adolescents with BD and 24 matched healthy controls (HC). Subjects were assessed by parent and teen report of sleep, a semi-structured clinical interview, the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), and the Childhood Depression Rating Scale (CDRS-R). Average BD youth YMRS (...

  7. Environmental adaptability of Canavalia virosa and Flemingia congesta to sandy ash soil of Merapi Volcano, Java

    OpenAIRE

    S. S. Wardoyo; A. Z. P. B. Santosa

    2016-01-01

    Studies on volcanic ash of Mount Merapi erupted in 2010 are limited to only characterization of mineralogical, physical, chemical, and biological properties of the volcanic ash. In order to speed up rehabilitation of soils affected by the volcanic ash, it is necessary to study the application of suitable plant species, which is called bio-mechanic conservation. The purpose of this study was to test the environmental adaptability of Canavalia virosa and Flemingia congesta in sandy soil covered...

  8. Aerodynamic characteristics of popcorn ash particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkaduvasala, V.; Murphy, D.W.; Ban, H.; Harrison, K.E.; Monroe, L.S. [University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Popcorn ash particles are fragments of sintered coal fly ash masses that resemble popcorn in low apparent density. They can travel with the flow in the furnace and settle on key places such as catalyst surfaces. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are often used in the design process to prevent the carryover and settling of these particles on catalysts. Particle size, density, and drag coefficient are the most important aerodynamic parameters needed in CFD modeling of particle flow. The objective of this study was to experimentally determine particle size, shape, apparent density, and drag characteristics for popcorn ash particles from a coal-fired power plant. Particle size and shape were characterized by digital photography in three orthogonal directions and by computer image analysis. Particle apparent density was determined by volume and mass measurements. Particle terminal velocities in three directions were measured in water and each particle was also weighed in air and in water. The experimental data were analyzed and models were developed for equivalent sphere and equivalent ellipsoid with apparent density and drag coefficient distributions. The method developed in this study can be used to characterize the aerodynamic properties of popcorn-like particles.

  9. HYDROTHERMAL SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NAP1 ZEOLITE AND GISOMDINE FROM SLUDGE INCINERATION ASH%污泥焚烧残渣水热合成NaPl型沸石和水钙沸石的性质研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小亮; 谷麟; 王艳; 朱南文; 楼紫阳

    2011-01-01

    Zeolite is effective in the ammonia removal in waste water treatment process, while the raw materials for the zeolite are limited. In this work, bottom ash from the incineration plant for sewage sludge was applied to produce NaP1 zeolite and Gisomdine by traditional hydrothermal reaction and the index of correlation were characterized. According to the X-ray diffraction, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and the infrared spectroscopy analysis, zeolite NaP1 and Gismondine were predominated in these products with the radial crystal structure and the zeolitic framework structure. The specific surface area and the cation exchange capacity values of the zeolite was 93.8 mZ-g-1 and 126 mmol.100 g-1, with 47 times and 17 times more than that of the sludge before combustion. In addition, the analysis of adsorption isothermal curves of NH4+ was demonstrated that synthesised zeolite had a good potential for ammonia adsorption at 25 ~C, and the maximum quantity for NH4+ removal was 34.9 mg-g-1 ,which also provides an effective way for the utilization of sludge incineration ash.%本文以污泥焚烧残渣为原料,以传统水热合成方法制得NaPl型沸石和水钙沸石,并对其相关指标进行表征.经x射线衍射、扫描电镜和红外光谱测定表明,制得的产物为无其它杂晶生成的NaPl型沸石和水钙沸石,且具有放射束片状晶体形貌和沸石骨架结构.与原污泥焚烧残渣相比,合成沸石的比表面积和阳离子交换容量提高了47倍、17倍,分别达到93.8m^2·g^-1、126mmol·100g^-1.而合成沸石在25℃下对氨氮的吸附等温线结果显示,其氨氮的最大吸附量为34.9mg·g^-1,吸附性能良好.从而本研究也为实现污泥焚烧残渣的再生资源化提供了一条有效途径.

  10. Physical Mapping Technologies for the Identification and Characterization of Mutated Genes to Crop Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improvement of quality traits in food and industrial crops is an important breeding objective for both developed and developing countries in order to add value to the crop and thereby increasing farmers' income. It has been well established that the application of mutagens can be a very important approach for manipulating many crop characteristics including quality. While mutation induction using nuclear techniques such as gamma irradiation is a power tool in generating new genotypes with favourable alleles for improving crop quality in plant breeding, a more thorough understanding of gene expression, gene interactions, and physical location will improve ability to manipulate and control genes, and directly lead to crop improvement. Physical mapping technologies, molecular markers and molecular cytogenetic techniques are tools available with the potential to enhance the ability to tag genes and gene complexes to facilitate the selection of desirable genotypes in breeding programmes, including those based on mutation breeding. This Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Physical Mapping Technologies for the Identification and Characterization of Mutated Genes Contributing to Crop Quality' was conducted under the overall IAEA project objective of 'Identification, Characterization and Transfer of Mutated Genes'. The specific objectives of the CRP were to assist Member States in accelerating crop breeding programmes through the application of physical mapping and complementary genomic approaches, and the characterization and utilization of induced mutants for improvement of crop quality. The IAEA-TECDOC describes the success obtained in the application of molecular cytology, molecular markers, physical mapping and mutation technologies since the inception of the CRP in 2003. The CRP also resulted in two book chapters, 35 peer reviewed papers, 25 conference proceedings, one PhD thesis, and 22 published abstracts. In addition, thirteen sequences were submitted to the

  11. Influence of Bed Ash and Fly Ash Replacement in Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Summoogum-Utchanah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluates the influence of fly ash and bottom ash as partial cement substitutes in mortars by studying the particle size distribution, consistency, flow, fresh density, air content, compressive strength and flexural strength characteristics. The results revealed that fly ash and cement had relatively the same particle size distribution unlike bottom ash. In the fresh state, as the amount of pozzolans increased in the mixtures, the mortars showed an enhancement in workability, were susceptible to water loss by bleeding, and exhibited a decline in fresh density. The early strength gains of the fly ash samples were low but reached higher than the control after 28 days of curing. The flexural strength increased as the fly ash content rose to reach a maximum at 20 % replacement. However, the 2-day compressive strength of bottom ash samples was higher than the control but decreased after 28 days of curing while the flexural strength declined with addition of bottom ash except at 5 % substitution.

  12. Can ash clog soil pores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoof, Cathelijne; Stoof, Cathelijne; Gevaert, Anouk; Gevaert, Anouk; Baver, Christine; Baver, Christine; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Morales, Veronica; Morales, Veronica; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Martin, Deborah; Martin, Deborah; Steenhuis, Tammo; Steenhuis, Tammo

    2015-04-01

    Wildfire can greatly increase a landscape's vulnerability to flooding and erosion events, and ash is thought to play a large role in controlling runoff and erosion processes after wildfire. Although ash can store rainfall and thereby reduce runoff and erosion for a limited period after wildfires, it has also been hypothesized to clog soil pores and reduce infiltration. Several researchers have attributed the commonly observed increase in runoff and erosion after fire to the potential pore-clogging effect of ash. Evidence is however incomplete, as to date, research has solely focused on identifying the presence of ash in the soil, with the actual flow processes associated with the infiltration and pore-clogging of ash remaining a major unknown. In several laboratory experiments, we tested the hypothesis that ash causes pore clogging to the point that infiltration is hampered and ponding occurs. We first visualized and quantified pore-scale infiltration of water and ash in sand of a range of textures and at various infiltration rates, using a digital bright field microscope capturing both photo and video. While these visualization experiments confirm field and lab observation of ash washing into soil pores, we did not observe any clogging of pores, and have not been able to create conditions for which this does occur. Additional electrochemical analysis and measurement of saturated hydraulic conductivity indicate that pore clogging by ash is not plausible. Electrochemical analysis showed that ash and sand are both negatively charged, showing that attachment of ash to sand and any resulting clogging is unlikely. Ash also had quite high saturated conductivity, and systems where ash was mixed in or lying on top of sand had similarly high hydraulic conductivity. Based on these various experiments, we cannot confirm the hypothesis that pore clogging by ash contributes to the frequently observed increase in post-fire runoff, at least for the medium to coarse sands

  13. Reducing carbon-in-ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigel S. Dong [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    High levels of carbon-in-ash lead to reduced power plant efficiency and higher fuel costs, degrade the performance of electrostatic precipitators and increase emissions of particulates. Increased carbon levels in the fly ash can lead to problems with ash use in cement/concrete production. This report reviews current measures and technologies that can be used to prevent excessive carbon-in-ash in pulverised coal combustion (PCC) power plants. These include coal cleaning, coal fineness improvement, reduction of distribution imbalance of coal among burners, increasing coal-air mixing rates at both burner and OFA levels and optimising excess air ratios. A plasma-assisted combustion enhancement technology can help achieve better ignition and more stable flame for coals that are normally difficult to burn. Computer-based combustion optimisation using expert systems, neural network systems and coal combustion simulation is becoming an invaluable means to tackle the carbon-in-ash issue. This report also reviews the regulations in nine major coal-consuming countries, which stipulate the maximum unburnt carbon levels permitted for fly ash for use in concrete/cement production. The Loss on Ignition (LOI) parameter is used in all national standards, although it is considered inadequate and may exclude some usable fly ash from being utilised. Performance-based regulations are more appropriate and have been adopted by Canada and USA. The EU and Canada now permit the use of fly ash produced from co-combustion of coal and biomass. China and Russia allow very high LOI levels for certain fly ash but the other countries require similar LOI limits for fly ash for use in concrete. Finally, this report discusses measures and technologies for reduction of carbon-in-ash, including classification, froth flotation, triboelectrostatic separators, thermal processes and carbon surface modification. 146 refs., 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum–fly ash nano composites made by ultrasonic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Nano structured fly ash has been produced by 30 h milling time. ► Al–fly ash nano composites were produced by ultrasonic cavitation route. ► A homogeneous distribution of nano fly ash particles was observed in the matrix. ► No additional contamination in the nano composites from the atmosphere. ► Presence of nano fly ash leads to improvement in the strength of the composites. -- Abstract: In this paper an attempt has been made to modify the micro sized fly ash into nano structured fly ash using high energy ball mill. Ball milling was carried out for the total duration of 30 h. The sample was taken out after every 5 h of milling for characterizing. The nano structured fly ash was characterized for its crystallite size and lattice strain by using X-ray diffractometer. It was found that a steady decrease in the crystallite size and increased lattice strain was observed with milling time; the crystallite size at 30 h milling time was found to be 23 nm. The fresh fly ash particles are mostly spherical in shape; whereas the shape of the 30 h milled fly ash particles is irregular and the surface morphology is rough. Al–fly ash nano composites were produced by ultrasonic cavitation route successfully. Scanning electron microscopy images of nano composites reveal a homogeneous distribution of the nano fly ash particles in the AA 2024 matrix. Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis of nano composites reveals that the fabricated nano composite did not contain any additional contamination from the atmosphere. As the amount of nano fly ash is increasing the hardness of the composite also increasing. The nano fly ash addition leads to improvement in the compression strength of the composites.

  15. BUS 611 Ash course tutorial / uophelp

    OpenAIRE

    uophelp

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uophelp.com   BUS 611 Week 1 Assignment Article Review (Ash Course) BUS 611 Week 2 Assignment Project Risk (Ash Course) BUS 611 Week 3 Assignment WBS (Ash Course) BUS 611 Week 4 Assignment Integrated Project Management Tools (Ash Course) BUS 611 Week 5 Assignment Monthly Status Reports (Ash Course) BUS 611 Week 6 Final Research Paper (Ash Course)  

  16. Measurement of natural activity in peat ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High proportions of radioactive materials in peat ashes may involve radiation hazards during handling and deposition of these waste materials. Measurements have been performed to determine the content of radioactive materials in ashes from peat burning. The activities in fly ash and ''solid'' ash in seven peat-fired power plants in Sweden are presented. The methods of analysing and measuring peat ashes for activity from different radionuclides are described. The activity levels in ash samples are given

  17. ECO 316(ASH) course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    naresh 1

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   ECO 316 Week 1 DQ 1 Should You Invest Short Term (Ash) ECO 316 Week 1 DQ 2 Treasury Inflation Protection Bonds (Ash) ECO 316 Week 1 Quiz (Chapter 1-6) (Ash) ECO 316 Week 2 DQ 1 New Product, Will I Be Rich (Ash) ECO 316 Week 2 DQ 2 Mutual Fund Regulation (Ash) ECO 316 Week 2 Quiz (Chapter 7-12) (Ash) ECO 316 Week 3 DQ 1 Exchange Rate Risk (Ash) ECO 316 Week 3 DQ 2 Should I Expect a Bail Out (Ash) ...

  18. CRJ 303 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    naresh 1

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   Product Description CRJ 303 Week 1 DQ 1 Goals of Sentencing (Ash) CRJ 303 Week 1 DQ 2 Sentencing Techniques (Ash) CRJ 303 Week 2 DQ 1 Punishment (Ash) CRJ 303 Week 2 DQ 2 Privatizing Prisons (Ash) CRJ 303 Week 2 Assignment Jails vs. Prisons (Ash) CRJ 303 Wee 3 DQ 1 Probation and Parole (Ash) CRJ 303 Week 3 DQ 2 Civil Commitments (Ash) CRJ 303 Week 3 Assignment Juvenile Detainees (Ash) CRJ 303...

  19. PSY 496 ASH Tutorial Course / Uoptutorial

    OpenAIRE

    John Allen

    2015-01-01

    PSY 496 Week 1 Assignment Foundations for the Final Paper (Ash) PSY 496 Week 2 Assignment Finalized Resources and Revisions for the Final Paper (Ash) PSY 496 Week 1 DQ 1 Approaches to Research (Ash) PSY 496 Week 1 DQ 2 Measuring Change (Ash) PSY 496 Week 2 DQ 1 Protecting Participants from Harm (Ash) PSY 496 Week 2 DQ 2 Areas of Competence (Ash) PSY 496 Week 2 Journal Ethics in Research and Practice (Ash) PSY 496 Week 3 Assignment Final Paper Draft (Ash) PSY 49...

  20. MGT 415 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    kennith archi

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 415 Week 1 DQ 1 Organizational Design (Ash) MGT 415 Week 1 DQ 2 The Research Project (Ash) MGT 415 Week 2 DQ 1 Group Development Process (Ash) MGT 415 Week 2 DQ 2 Influence of Informal Groups (Ash)  MGT 415 Week 3 DQ 1 Group Cohesion and Productivity (Ash) MGT 415 Week 3 DQ 2 Norms and Conformity (Ash) MGT 415 Week 3 Assignment Best Workplace (Ash) MGT 415 Week 4 DQ 1 Group Decisions (Ash) ...

  1. HIS 103 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HIS 103 Week 1 DQ 1 (Transition to Agriculture) (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 DQ 2 (Early Complex Societies) (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 Assignment (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 Assignment Greco Roman Influence Paper (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 DQ 1 Chinese Social and Political Order Systems (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 DQ 2 Caste System (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) HIS 103 Week 3 Assignment Black Death Dra...

  2. MAT 222 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    mirat

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MAT 222 Week 1 Solving Proportions (Ash) MAT 222 Week 1 DQ 1 Can't Cancel Terms (Ash) MAT 222 Week 2 DQ 1 One-Variable Compound Inequalities (Ash) MAT 222 Week 2 Two-Variable Inequalities (Ash) MAT 222 Week 3 DQ 1 Simplifying Radicals (Ash) MAT 222 Week 3 Real World Radical Formulas (Ash) MAT 222 Week 4 DQ 1 Solving Quadratic Equations (Ash) MAT 222 Week 4 Real World Quadratic Functions (Ash) ...

  3. BUS 642 Ash course tutorial / uophelp

    OpenAIRE

    uophelp

    2015-01-01

    www.uophelp.com     BUS 642 Week 1 DQ 1 Scientific Thinking (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 1 DQ 2 Making Research Decisions (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 1 Exercises (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 2 DQ 1 Ethics in Business Research (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 2 DQ 2 Design of Research (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 2 Exercises (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 3 DQ 1 Measurement Scales (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 3 DQ 2 Clarifying the Research Questions (Ash Course) BUS...

  4. Volcanic ash - Terrestrial versus extraterrestrial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeefe, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A principal difference between terrestrial and extraterrestrial lavas may consist in the greater ability of terrestrial lavas to form thin films (like those of soap bubbles) and hence foams. It would follow that, in place of the pumice and spiny shards found in terrestrial volcanic ash, an extraterrestrial ash should contain minute spherules. This hypothesis may help to explain lunar microspherules.

  5. Leaching from biomass combustion ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    in water. The content of the selected heavy metals (i.e. Cr, Ni, Pb and Cd) complied with the Danish Statutory Order on the use of bio-ash for agricultural purposes; however, critical releases of Cr were detected in the leachate extracts, especially in the fly ash. High alkaline pHs were measured in all...

  6. Melting and Sintering of Ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug

    1997-01-01

    in the ashes lead to increased melt fractions in the temperature range 600-750°C.b) Bottom ashes from straw combustion consist purely of silicates, with varying ratios of the quite refractory Al-silicates and quartz to the less refractory K- and Ca-silicates. Bottom ashes melt in the temperature range 800......-1300°C, and a trend of higher fusion temperatures with increasing contents of Al-silicates and quartz was found.c) Fly ashes, bottom ashes and deposits from coal/straw co-firing were all found to consist mainly of metal-alumina and alumina-silicates. These ashes all melt in the temperature range 1000......The thesis contains an experimental study of the fusion and sintering of ashes collected during straw and coal/straw co-firing.A laboratory technique for quantitative determination of ash fusion has been developed based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA). By means of this method the fraction...

  7. Ash Properties of Alternative Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capablo, Joaquin; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Pedersen, Kim Hougaard;

    2009-01-01

    The ash behavior during suspension firing of 12 alternative solid biofuels, such as pectin waste, mash from a beer brewery, or waste from cigarette production have been studied and compared to wood and straw ash behavior. Laboratory suspension firing tests were performed on an entrained flow...

  8. 生物质电厂飞灰用作肥料的可行性评价%Feasibility evaluation of biomass fly ashes from power station using as fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张振; 韩宗娜; 盛昌栋

    2016-01-01

    purposes and their environmental impact. Two fly ashes (A and B) were respectively collected from two grate-fired power plants, both burning mixed fuels of crop straws and wood barks.The ashes were characterized systematically with various methods. Based on the analysis results, their applications on agricultural and forest soils and corresponding environmental impact were evaluated based on the relevant standards. Following standard methods, the basic properties of the two fly ashes including the contents of moisture, content of ash and total organic carbon, the pH value, electrical conductivity and their size cuts were measured. The contents of nutrient and heavy metal elements were determined with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy, respectively. For evaluating the environmental impact, the leaching behavior of the fly ashes was also analyzed following the national standard of solid waste-extraction procedure for leaching toxicity. The results showed that both the fly ashes were strongly alkaline with the pH values greater than 12. They were high in total organic carbon content (18.39% and 7.79% for ash A and B, respectively) and rich in nutrient elements including K, Ca, Mg and P. Both ashes were lower in heavy metal elements and their contents of the main heavy metal elements were below the limits set by the standards of some European countries for utilizing biomass ashes on agricultural and forestry soils and by China national standard for using coal fly ashes. The high pH value and Ca content implied that the two ashes could be used as soil conditioner. The high content carbons of the two ashes were beneficial to improve soil quality. Nevertheless, the contents of K2O plusP2O5 were 9.62% and 6.04% for fly ash A and B, respectively, much lower than those required for compound fertilizer. However, it did not exclude their use as soil conditioner materials of compound fertilizer on soils. In all

  9. Feasibility evaluation of biomass fly ashes from power station using as fertilizer%生物质电厂飞灰用作肥料的可行性评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张振; 韩宗娜; 盛昌栋

    2016-01-01

    toxicity. The results showed that both the fly ashes were strongly alkaline with the pH values greater than 12. They were high in total organic carbon content (18.39% and 7.79% for ash A and B, respectively) and rich in nutrient elements including K, Ca, Mg and P. Both ashes were lower in heavy metal elements and their contents of the main heavy metal elements were below the limits set by the standards of some European countries for utilizing biomass ashes on agricultural and forestry soils and by China national standard for using coal fly ashes. The high pH value and Ca content implied that the two ashes could be used as soil conditioner. The high content carbons of the two ashes were beneficial to improve soil quality. Nevertheless, the contents of K2O plusP2O5 were 9.62% and 6.04% for fly ash A and B, respectively, much lower than those required for compound fertilizer. However, it did not exclude their use as soil conditioner materials of compound fertilizer on soils. In all, the two fly ashes can be used as a fertilizer or soil conditioner in agriculture and forest. The characterization on the size cuts of the two ashes suggested that the application may even be improved by pre-treating the ashes with size fractionation. Moreover, the leaching of the main heavy metals in the fly ashes were, much lower than 1% except 1.274% for Cr in fly ash A. Thus the utilization was not likely to pollute the agricultural or forest soil.%为了研究炉排燃烧生物质电厂飞灰在农林方面的应用价值和可能产生的环境影响,根据欧盟相关标准分析了2种飞灰(A、B)的基础特性(水分、灰分、总有机碳含量、pH值和电导率),并利用电感耦合等离子体光谱仪、质谱仪分析了飞灰中营养元素和有害元素的含量;参考中国固体废物浸出毒性浸出方法标准研究了营养元素和有害元素的浸出特性。结果表明,2种飞灰pH值均大于12,呈较强的碱性;并且二者不仅含有

  10. Comparing soil and pond ash feedlot pen surfaces for environmental management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Removing manure and replacing soil to maintain pen surfaces is expensive. Pond ash (PA), a coal-fired electrical generation by-product, has good support qualities. A study was conducted comparing the performance of pond ash (PA) surfaced pens with soil surface (SS) pens. Four pens of an eight pen se...

  11. Using fly ash for construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenti, M.

    1995-05-01

    Each year electrical utilities generate 80 million tons of fly ash, primarily from coal combustion. Typically, utilities dispose of fly ash by hauling it to landfills, but that is changing because of the increasing cost of landfilling, as well as environmental regulations. Now, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in Palo Alto, Calif., its member utilities, and manufacturers of building materials are finding ways of turning this energy byproduct into the building blocks of roads and structures by converting fly ash into construction materials. Some of these materials include concrete and autoclaved cellular concrete (ACC, also known as aerated concrete), flowable fill, and light-weight aggregate. EPRI is also exploring uses for fly ash other than in construction materials. One of the more high-end uses for the material is in metal matrix composites. In this application, fly ash is mixed with softer metals, such as aluminum and magnesium, to strengthen them, while retaining their lighter weight.

  12. Characterization Of Station Quality From The CHILE RAMP Deployment - Direct Burial Sensor Installation And Its Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, E. Y.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Barstow, N.; Slad, G.

    2010-12-01

    IRIS PASSCAL supported a NSF-funded project to collect an open community dataset from a portable seismograph deployment following the magnitude 8.8 earthquake that occurred off the coast of Chile on February 27, 2010 (an experiment of the Rapid Array Mobilization Program - RAMP). In part, due to logistical constraints, the broadband sensors (Guralp CMG3T) for this deployment were buried directly in soil. Direct burial refers to installation of a broadband sensor in a small hand-dug hole, encased in plastic bags, and ideally backfilled with well tamped and dampened sand. Field conditions did not provide ideal installations in all cases. Because of the variability in actual installation practices, the Chile RAMP data provide an opportunity to examine the impact of several factors on the direct burial data quality. Using McNamara and Boaz (2005) PQLX statistical analysis software, which calculates the power spectral density (PSD) and plots the probability density function (PDF)(McNamara and Buland, 2004), we characterize the background seismic noise levels and signal quality for 58 directly buried installations at the Chile RAMP. Data return and data quality during the deployment (April -September 2010) will be evaluated considering a variety of parameters including installation technique, site characteristics, and equipment performance. Preliminary results using data from two service runs (April - June), suggest variation in the data quality and recovery due to slightly different installation practices and/or possibly environmental factors. We seek to evaluate and characterize parameters that affect the resulting data recovery and their quality; this study is an important test case for future PASSCAL and RAMP installations. If possible we would like to compare data from other local networks to identify distinctive characteristics from different installation set-ups.

  13. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isamu Yoshitake

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability.

  14. Relationship between Structural Characteristics of Fly Ash and Reactivity under Autoclave Curing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The reactivity of autoclaved materials is conventionally estimated by their chemical composition. In this paper, after determining the chemical composition of various types of fly ash, a series of new tests which included X-ray Diffraction (XRD), infrared spectral analysis (IR) and bound water testing, were applied to investigate the performance of autoclaved fly ash products. The relationship between the infrared spectral analysis of Si-O wavenumber (about 1 100 cm-1) and its autoclaved chemical reactivity, and compressive strength of its autoclaved samples, is analyzed. The results show that fly ash with a lower wavenumber will have stronger autoclaved chemical reactivity and higher compressive strength for its autoclaved sample. Thus, the Si-O stretching vibration wavelength can be used to estimate autoclaved chemical reactivity of fly ash, so as to control the quality of fly ash to be autoclaved, and to predict the compressive strength of autoclaved fly ash products.

  15. Study on Type C Coal Fly ash as an Additive to Molding Sand for Steel Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Jayanthi

    2016-05-01

    Study of physio-chemical properties studies such as granulometric analysis, moisture, X ray fluorescence etc. were performed with Type C coal—combustion fly ash to investigate their potential as a distinct option for molding sand in foundry, thereby reducing the dependency on latter. Technological properties study such as compressive strength, tensile strength, permeability and compaction of various compositions of fly ash molding sand (10, 20 and 30 % fly ash substitute to chemically bonded sand) were performed and compared with silica molding sand. Steel casting production using this fly ash molding sand was done and the casting surface finish and typical casting parameters were assessed. It was noted that a good quality steel casting could be produced using type C fly ash molding sand, which effectively replaced 20 % of traditional molding sand and binders thereby providing greater financial profits to the foundry and an effective way of fly ash utilization (waste management).

  16. Developments in analysis of basaltic ash applied to recent activity at Stromboli and Etna volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautze, Nicole; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Andronico, Daniele; Tornetta, Lauretta; Cannata, Chiara; Cristaldi, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic ash is widely distributed and therefore generally safe to collect in real-time, however, there is a paucity of published studies that characterize the textural properties of ash (relative to larger clasts), probably because its small size makes ash inherently difficult to analyze. Recent advances in analytical techniques enable automated, relatively quick, quantitative classification of the morphoscopy and surface chemistry of a hundreds of ash particles using a Field Emission SEM. We present results of such analysis on eight samples of ash collected at different locations from a weak ash-producing event at Etna on 24 November 2006, and seven samples of ash collected during the 2007 eruptive crisis of Stromboli. The latter includes ash from lava-sea water interaction, the paroxysmal explosion on 15 March, and Strombolian explosions at the summit craters. The morphoscopy data can be compared to grain size data collected by conventional techniques, while the surface chemistry data can be considered a proxy for component analysis, as it reflects the degree of crystallinity and alteration of the particles. Our data show that insight into the particle source and eruptive dynamics of both volcanoes can be obtained from this detailed analysis of the ash. In particular, the different sources of ash at Stromboli have distinctive alteration signatures, while the Etna samples show subtle differences that can be related to relatively small-scale plume zonations.

  17. Genome-wide chromatin occupancy analysis reveals a role for ASH2 in transcriptional pausing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Lluch, Sílvia; Blanco, Enrique; Carbonell, Albert; Raha, Debasish; Snyder, Michael; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat

    2011-06-01

    An important mechanism for gene regulation involves chromatin changes via histone modification. One such modification is histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), which requires histone methyltranferase complexes (HMT) containing the trithorax-group (trxG) protein ASH2. Mutations in ash2 cause a variety of pattern formation defects in the Drosophila wing. We have identified genome-wide binding of ASH2 in wing imaginal discs using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with sequencing (ChIP-Seq). Our results show that genes with functions in development and transcriptional regulation are activated by ASH2 via H3K4 trimethylation in nearby nucleosomes. We have characterized the occupancy of phosphorylated forms of RNA Polymerase II and histone marks associated with activation and repression of transcription. ASH2 occupancy correlates with phosphorylated forms of RNA Polymerase II and histone activating marks in expressed genes. Additionally, RNA Polymerase II phosphorylation on serine 5 and H3K4me3 are reduced in ash2 mutants in comparison to wild-type flies. Finally, we have identified specific motifs associated with ASH2 binding in genes that are differentially expressed in ash2 mutants. Our data suggest that recruitment of the ASH2-containing HMT complexes is context specific and points to a function of ASH2 and H3K4me3 in transcriptional pausing control.

  18. Damping properties of fly ash/epoxy composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Gu; Gaohui Wu; Xiao Zhao

    2008-01-01

    An inexpensive fly ash (FA), which is from a waste product, was employed to prepare fly ash/epoxy composites. The purpose of this study is to characterize the contributions of matrix viscoelasticity, hollow structure characteristic (porosity), and filler/matrix interface friction to the high vibration damping capacity of such composites. The damping properties of the composites were investigated in the temperature range of-40 to 150℃C and in the frequency range of 10 to 800 Hz by using a tension-compression mode. The results indicate that the peak value of damping loss factor (tanδ) for the fly ash/epoxy composites can reach 0.70-0.90 in test specification, and the attenuation of damping loss factor is inconspicuous with increasing frequency. In addition, scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe the morphology of the fly ash as well as its distribution in the matrix, which will help to analyze the effect of fly ash on the damping properties of the fly ash/epoxy composites.

  19. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. This first project period, experiments were carried out to better understand the fundamental nature of the ozonation effect on ash. Carbon surfaces were characterized by surfactant adsorption, and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy before and after oxidation, both by air at 440 C and by ozone at room temperature. The results strongly suggest that the beneficial effect of ozonation is in large part due to chemical modification of the carbon surfaces

  20. Incinerated sewage sludge ash as alternative binder in cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejcirikova, Barbora; Goltermann, Per; Hodicky, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Sewage sludge ash is characterized by its pozzolanic properties, as cement is. This predetermines its use in a substitution of cement and cementitious materials. Utilization of sewage sludge ash does not only decrease the consumption of cement, one of the largest cause of CO2 emissions, but also...

  1. Leaching Study in Immobilization of Cesium and Cobalt Radionuclides In Fly Ash- Zeolite Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fly ash-zeolite cement was synthesized from industrial by-product fly ash obtained from the thermal electric power station. The synthesis process is based on the hydrothermal-calcination-route of the fly ash. The microstructure of fly ash-zeolite cement was characterized by X-ray diffraction, FT infrared spectroscopy and surface area (F-N2). The efficiency of innovative matrices for immobilizing cesium and cobalt radionuclides is presented in this work. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of solidifying 137Cs and 60Co radionuclides in synthetic fly ash zeolite cement. Leaching behavior of the radionuclides have been studied. The leachability index measured indicated that fly ash zeolite cement matrix can be utilized as an efficient material for immobilizing cesium and cobalt radionuclides than portland cement.

  2. Characterization of Polymer Layered Silicate Nanocomposites by Rheology and Permeability Methods: Impact of the Interface Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waché Rémi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymer clay nanocomposites are mostly described as materials with improved properties. However, many studies are not concluding about the possible benefits. This work reports permeability measurements on different polyolefins nanocomposites. Clay exfoliation has been proved by various techniques. Unfortunately, the nanocomposite does not exhibit good barrier properties. Hence, permeability coefficients were found to increase. A poor quality of the interface between filler and medium is likely to be responsible for this degradation. Insufficient interactions between silicate layers and the surrounding polymer lead to preferential pathways for diffusion. Organoclay exfoliation does not necessarily lead to better barrier properties. A good quality of the interface between polymer and filler is required to reach a high performance level. The standard techniques used to characterize exfoliation degree do not permit to highlight this kind of phenomena.

  3. Cements in radioactive waste management. Characterization requirements of cement products for acceptance and quality assurance purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementitious materials are used as immobilizing matrices for low (LLW) and medium-level wastes (MLW) and are also components of the construction materials in the secondary barriers and the repositories. This report has concerned itself with a critical assessment of the quality assurance aspects of the immobilization and disposal of MLW and LLW cemented wastes. This report has collated the existing knowledge of the use and potential of cementitious materials in radioactive waste immobilization and highlighted the physico-chemical parameters. Subject areas include an assessment of immobilization objectives and cement as a durable material, waste stream and matrix characterization, quality assurance concepts, nature of cement-based systems, chemistry and modelling of cement hydration, role and effect of blending agents, radwaste-cement interaction, assessment of durability, degradative and radiolytic processes in cements and the behaviour of cement-based matrices and their near-field interactions with the environment and the repository conditions

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Mass Produced High Quality Few Layered Graphene Sheets via a Chemical Method

    KAUST Repository

    Khenfouch, Mohammed

    2014-04-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional crystal of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice. It is a zero band gap semimetal with very unique physical and chemical properties which make it useful for many applications such as ultra-high-speed field-effect transistors, p-n junction diodes, terahertz oscillators, and low-noise electronic, NEMS and sensors. When the high quality mass production of this nanomaterial is still a big challenge, we developed a process which will be an important step to achieve this goal. Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Scanning tunneling microscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray system were investigated to characterize and examine the quality of this product.

  5. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental-Waste Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) identifies the quality of data necessary to meet the specific objectives associated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental-Waste Characterization Program (the Program). DOE plans to conduct experiments in the WIPP during a Test Phase of approximately 5 years. These experiments will be conducted to reduce the uncertainties associated with the prediction of several processes (e.g., gas generation) that may influence repository performance. The results of the experiments will be used to assess the ability of the WIPP to meet regulatory requirements for the long-term protection of human health and the environment from the disposal of TRU wastes. 37 refs., 25 figs., 18 tabs

  6. Air Quality Measurements And Characterization - A Resource For Sustainable Development In Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    My assignment in this paper is to present an overview of a proposed research work on air quality measurements and characterization in Nigeria, using Niger Delta region and Benue State as a case study. A preliminary study indicates that ambient air quality in the country far exceeds the international Ambient Air Quality Standards (AAQS). And, there is a strong indication that concentration levels of particle mass, elements, and organic compounds, et alia. are being elevated and that daily respiratory-related emergency visits could be correlated with the ambient and aerosol concentrations. Indeed, the environmental impact matrices of tile patients versus airborne diseases in Benue State indicate that the inferno is already affecting the quality of life and productivity of the people. Observations also show that the Niger Delta's main environmental challenges result from gas flaring, oil spills and deforestation. Although the monetary losses due to air pollution in Nigeria is yet to be quantified, Nigeria loses about $ 2.5 billion per annum due to gas flaring alone. The paper presents background to the problem, program of work/methodology, Physics of air pollutants, energy conservation (material balances), air pollutants and associated diseases, anticipated benefits of the proposed research and its relevance to the nation building

  7. Wildfire Ash: Chemical Composition, Ash-Soil Interactions and Environmental Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna; Hamzi, Seham; Wittenberg, Lea

    2015-04-01

    Of the five classical factors of soil formation, climate, parent material, topography, time, organisms, and recently recognized human activity, it is the latter factor which discretely includes fire and post-burn impact. However, it is considered that soil undergoing fire just experience a temporary removal of the top organic horizon, thus slightly modified and often labeled as 'temporarily disturbed' soil or soil 'under restoration/rehabilitation'. In fact the suggested seventh factor, post-burned produced ash, can act both dependently and independently of the other soil forming factors (Levin et al., 2013; Certini 2013). They are interdependent in cases where ash influences occur on time scales similar to 'natural' soil formation (Keesstra et ai., 2014) such as changes in vegetation. On the other hand, in post-fire areas a strong dependency is expected between soil-water retention mechanism, climate and topography. Wild-land fires exert many changes on the physical, chemical, mineralogical, biological, and morphological properties of soil that, in turn, affect the soil's hydrology and nutrient flux, modifying its ability to support vegetation and resist erosion. The ash produced by forest fires is a complex mixture composed of organic and inorganic particles characterized by vary physical-chemical and morphological properties. The importance of this study is straightforwardly related to the frequency and large-scales wildfires in Mediterranean region. In fact, wildfires are major environmental and land management concern in the world, where the number and severity of wildfires has increased during the past decades (Bodi, 2013). Certini (2013) assumed that cumulatively all of the vegetated land is burned in about 31 years annually affecting 330-430 Mha (over 3% of the Earth's surface) and wide range of land cover types worldwide including forests, peatlands, shrublands and grasslands. Whereas, the fire is identified as an important factor in soil formation, the

  8. Trends in the Rare Earth Element Content of U.S.-Based Coal Combustion Fly Ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Ross K; Hower, James C; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2016-06-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are critical and strategic materials in the defense, energy, electronics, and automotive industries. The reclamation of REEs from coal combustion fly ash has been proposed as a way to supplement REE mining. However, the typical REE contents in coal fly ash, particularly in the United States, have not been comprehensively documented or compared among the major types of coal feedstocks that determine fly ash composition. The objective of this study was to characterize a broad selection of U.S. fly ashes of varied geological origin in order to rank their potential for REE recovery. The total and nitric acid-extractable REE content for more than 100 ash samples were correlated with characteristics such as the major element content and coal basin to elucidate trends in REE enrichment. Average total REE content (defined as the sum of the lanthanides, yttrium, and scandium) for ashes derived from Appalachian sources was 591 mg kg(-1) and significantly greater than in ashes from Illinois and Powder River basin coals (403 and 337 mg kg(-1), respectively). The fraction of critical REEs (Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Y, and Er) in the fly ashes was 34-38% of the total and considerably higher than in conventional ores (typically less than 15%). Powder River Basin ashes had the highest extractable REE content, with 70% of the total REE recovered by heated nitric acid digestion. This is likely due to the higher calcium content of Powder River Basin ashes, which enhances their solubility in nitric acid. Sc, Nd, and Dy were the major contributors to the total REE value in fly ash, based on their contents and recent market prices. Overall, this study shows that coal fly ash production could provide a substantial domestic supply of REEs, but the feasibility of recovery depends on the development of extraction technologies that could be tailored to the major mineral content and origins of the feed coal for the ash. PMID:27228215

  9. Knowledge Transfer from the Forestry Sector to the Agricultural Sector concerning Ash Recycling; Kunskapsoeverfoering fraan skogssektorn till jordbrukssektorn angaaende askaaterfoering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Johanna; Salomon, Eva

    2009-02-15

    Cultivation of energy crops on arable land is increasing in Sweden. More than half these crops can be used for combustion, increasing the amount of ash that can be recycled to arable land. Ash is an interesting agricultural fertiliser, but more knowledge is needed before it can be applied and handled in a controlled way. Knowledge and experience concerning recycling of ash within the forest sector can be transferred to the agricultural sector. This project examined ways for ash producers to ensure safe long-term disposal of ash and to improve plant nutrient recycling. The overall aims were to identify experiences and knowledge within forestry that could be applied in agriculture; to identify gaps in knowledge and research requirements regarding ash recycling to arable land; and to produce recommendations on how to increase ash recycling. Literature describing the conditions for ash application to arable land and existing knowledge about ash recycling to forestry were reviewed. Nutrient balances were drawn up for phosphorus, cadmium, zinc and copper, which are relevant in biofuel ash recycling to agriculture. Data on ash application, mainly on forest land, were collected through telephone interviews. For ash to be more attractive for farmers, the ash product must be a realistic alternative to artificial fertilisers. Research and demonstration projects are needed to study the effects of ash on yield and quality in different crops. Different biofuel ash products have differing qualities and can thus have different fields of application within agriculture and can be applied in varying amounts. For example, clean straw ash has a low P and Cd content and mainly supplies potassium and lime. The balance calculations showed that the highest quality ash for arable land is bottom ash from grate combustion of forest trash with 2-5 % of willow. There are both differences and similarities between ash application in agriculture and forestry. An important feature is the

  10. Ash formation under pressurized pulverized coal combustion conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila Latorre, Aura Cecilia

    Coal combustion is a source of inorganic particulate matter (ash), which can deposit in boilers and also be emitted into the atmosphere becoming part of ambient fine particulate matter (PM 2.5). In order to decrease coal combustion emissions per unit of power produced, higher efficiency systems have been proposed, including systems operating at elevated pressures. These new operating conditions will affect pollutant formation mechanisms, particularly those associated with the conversion of mineral matter to ash. Ash particle formation mechanisms are particularly sensitive to changes in pressure as they are related to the structure of coal char particles at early stages of combustion. To assess the importance of pressure on ash particle formation, pyrolyzed chars and ash particles from pressurized pulverized combustion of two bituminous and one subbituminous U.S. coals at operating pressures up to 30 atm were studied. Pressure changes the distribution of char particle types, changing the spatial distribution of the minerals during the combustion process and therefore affecting particle formation mechanisms. Chars were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and classified into two different types (cenospheric and solid) depending on porosity and wall thickness. A correlation for estimating the amount of these cenospheric char particles was then proposed for bituminous coals based on the operating conditions and coal maceral analysis. The ash particle size distribution of the coals combusted at different operating pressures was measured using Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM). The results of the char characterization and ash particle size distribution measurements were then incorporated into an ash particle formation algorithm that was proposed and implemented. The model predicts ash particle size and composition distributions at elevated pressures under conditions of complete char burnout. Ash predictions were calculated by first

  11. Characteristics of the ultrafine component of fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.R. Jones; A. McCarthy; A.P.P.G. Booth [University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom). Concrete Technology Unit, Division of Civil Engineering

    2006-11-15

    Post-production processing of fly ash (FA) is an important issue for its use in concrete. Given (i) the need for environmental protection, (ii) the measures being applied on coal-fired power stations to reduce acidic gas emissions and (iii) the effect these have had on fly ash quality, there is a need to consider efficient post-production processing to enhance fly ash characteristics. This is particularly important for fly ash used as a cement in concrete production, since the additional residual carbon content and decreased fineness significantly affect its quality. This paper details the material characteristics of an ultrafine, low-lime fly ash (UF-FA), produced, in this case, by processing a coarse FA (referred to as parent FA) from a bituminous coal-fired power station via air-cyclonic separation. The UF-FA is shown to have much improved material characteristics compared to the parent FA in terms of morphology, mineralogy and chemical composition. Further results are presented on the effect of UF-FA on the properties of cementitious systems. Improved consistence and compressive strengths of combined Portland cement (PC) and UF-FA mortars were observed, whilst enhanced PC hydration and a high degree of FA reactivity were concluded from heat of hydration measurements and calcium hydroxide contents of pastes. 20 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than...

  13. Characterizing Objective Quality of Life and Normative Outcomes in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Exploratory Latent Class Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop-Fitzpatrick, Lauren; Hong, Jinkuk; Smith, Leann E.; Makuch, Renee A.; Greenberg, Jan S.; Mailick, Marsha R.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to extend the definition of quality of life (QoL) for adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, n = 180, ages 23-60) by: (1) characterizing the heterogeneity of normative outcomes (employment, independent living, social engagement) and objective QoL (physical health, neighborhood quality, family contact, mental health issues); and…

  14. Evaluation of robustness of fly ash stabilized sewage sludge (FSS) as liner - Durability, percolation and drainage water quality; Bedoemning av laangtidsegenskaper hos taetskikt bestaaende av flygaskastabiliserat avloppsslam, FSA - Bestaendighet, taethet och ytutlakning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macsik, Josef; Laendell, Maerta; Haakansson, Karsten

    2012-02-15

    This project shows that fly ash stabilized sewage sludge (FSS) is watertight and resistant as liner in landfills. The presented results can lead to that more landfills will use FSS as liner, and landfills already using FSS together with geomembrane, can leave out the latter without risking contamination of the drainage water collected by the closure construction

  15. BUS 620 Ash course tutorial / uophelp

    OpenAIRE

    uophelp

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uophelp.com   BUS 620 Week 1 DQ 1 What is Marketing (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 1 DQ 2 Marketing Strategies (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 1 The Future of the New York Times (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 2 DQ 1 Buyer Behavior (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 2 DQ 2 Customer Needs (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 2 Industry Forecasting (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 3 DQ 1 Braining Nordstrom (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 3 DQ 2 Marketing Segmentat...

  16. GEN 499 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com       GEN 499 Week 1 DQ 1 Final Research Paper Topic and Plan (Ash) GEN 499 Week 1 DQ 2 Social Media (Ash) GEN 499 Week 2 DQ 1 Professional Resume and Cover Letter (Ash) GEN 499 Week 2 Assignment Critiquing Internet Sources (Ash) GEN 499 Week 3 DQ 1 Social Capital (Ash) GEN 499 Week 3 DQ 2 Federal Policy (Ash) GEN 499 Week 3 Assignment Annotated Bibliography (Ash) GEN 499 Week 4 DQ 1...

  17. BUS 372 ASH Material - bus372dotcom

    OpenAIRE

    lucky108

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.bus372.com       BUS 372 Week 1 DQ 1 The Role of Unionization (Ash Course) BUS 372 Week 1 DQ 2 Meeting Member Needs (Ash Course) BUS 372 Week 2 DQ 1 Profit Interest and Employee Interest (Ash Course) BUS 372 Week 2 DQ 2 Union Requirements (Ash Course) BUS 372 Week 2 Assignment Changing Landscape of Unions (Ash Course) BUS 372 Week 2 Quiz (Ash Course) BUS 372 Week 3 DQ 1 Strikes (Ash Course) BUS ...

  18. EDU 623 ASH COURSE Tutorial/UOPHELP

    OpenAIRE

    dgfvbhn

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uophelp.com   EDU 623 Week 1 No Child Left Behind (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 1 DQ 1 Skills Needed for Master of Education (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 1 DQ 2 Effective Teachers (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 Writing and Researching Skills Self-Assessment (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 DQ 1 Evaluating Research (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 DQ 2 Diversity in Schools (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 3 Lesson Plan Critique (Ash Course) ...

  19. HCA 430(ASH) course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HCA 430 Week 1 DQ 1 Perspective (Ash) HCA 430 Week 1 DQ 2 Trends in Vulnerable Populations (Ash) HCA 430 Week 2 DQ 1 Vulnerable Populations (Ash) HCA 430 Week 2 DQ 2 Resource Availability (Ash) HCA 430 Week 2 DQ 3 Race, Ethnicity, and Healthcare (Ash) HCA 430 Week 2 Assignment Critical Thinking Paper (Ash) HCA 430 Week 3 DQ 1 Continuum of Care (Ash) HCA 430 Week 3 DQ 2 Paying for Healthcar...

  20. ENG 328 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com     ENG 328 Week 1 DQ 1 What is Technical Writing (Ash) ENG 328 Week 1 DQ 2 Target Audience (Ash) ENG 328 Week 2 DQ 1 Collaborative Writing Process (Ash) ENG 328 Week 2 DQ 2 Design and Graphics (Ash) ENG 328 Week 3 DQ 1 Web Design and Readability (Ash) ENG 328 Week 3 DQ 2 Online Technical Documents (Ash) ENG 328 Week 4 DQ 1 Writing Instructions (Ash) ENG 328 Week 4 DQ 2 Writing Proposa...

  1. EDU 623 ASH COURSES TUTORIAL/UOPHELP

    OpenAIRE

    ROOSER12

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uophelp.com   EDU 623 Week 1 No Child Left Behind (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 1 DQ 1 Skills Needed for Master of Education (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 1 DQ 2 Effective Teachers (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 Writing and Researching Skills Self-Assessment (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 DQ 1 Evaluating Research (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 DQ 2 Diversity in Schools (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 3 Lesson Plan Critique (Ash Course) ...

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1992 quality program status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This status report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's quality assurance program for calendar year 1992. The report includes major sections on Program Activities and Trend Analysis. Program Activities are discussed periodically at quality meetings. The most significant issue addressed in 1992 has been the timely revision of quality administrative procedures. The procedure revision process was streamlined from 55 steps to 7. The number of forms in procedures was reduced by 38%, and the text reduced by 29%. This allowed revision in 1992 of almost half of all implementing procedures. The time necessary to complete the revision process (for a procedure) was reduced from 11 months to 3 months. Other accomplishments include the relaxation of unnecessarily strict training requirements, requiring quality assurance reviews only from affected organizations, and in general simplifying work processes. All members of the YMP received training to the new Orientation class Eleven other training classed were held. Investigators submitted 971 records to the Project and only 37 were rejected. The software program has 115 programs approved for quality-affecting work. The Project Office conducted 3 audits and 1 survey of Los Alamos activities. We conducted 14 audits and 4 surveys. Eight corrective action reports were closed, leaving only one open. Internally, 22 deficiencies were recognized. This is a decrease from 65 in 1991. Since each deficiency requires about 2 man weeks to resolve, the savings are significant. Problems with writing acceptable deficiency reports have essentially disappeared. Trend reports for 1992 were examined and are summarized herein. Three adverse trends have been closed; one remaining adverse trend will be closed when the affected procedures are revised. The number of deficiencies issued to Los Alamos compared to other participants is minimal

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1992 quality program status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, S.L.; Burningham, A.; Chavez, P. [and others

    1994-03-01

    This status report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project`s quality assurance program for calendar year 1992. The report includes major sections on Program Activities and Trend Analysis. Program Activities are discussed periodically at quality meetings. The most significant issue addressed in 1992 has been the timely revision of quality administrative procedures. The procedure revision process was streamlined from 55 steps to 7. The number of forms in procedures was reduced by 38%, and the text reduced by 29%. This allowed revision in 1992 of almost half of all implementing procedures. The time necessary to complete the revision process (for a procedure) was reduced from 11 months to 3 months. Other accomplishments include the relaxation of unnecessarily strict training requirements, requiring quality assurance reviews only from affected organizations, and in general simplifying work processes. All members of the YMP received training to the new Orientation class Eleven other training classed were held. Investigators submitted 971 records to the Project and only 37 were rejected. The software program has 115 programs approved for quality-affecting work. The Project Office conducted 3 audits and 1 survey of Los Alamos activities. We conducted 14 audits and 4 surveys. Eight corrective action reports were closed, leaving only one open. Internally, 22 deficiencies were recognized. This is a decrease from 65 in 1991. Since each deficiency requires about 2 man weeks to resolve, the savings are significant. Problems with writing acceptable deficiency reports have essentially disappeared. Trend reports for 1992 were examined and are summarized herein. Three adverse trends have been closed; one remaining adverse trend will be closed when the affected procedures are revised. The number of deficiencies issued to Los Alamos compared to other participants is minimal.

  4. Electrodialytic extraction of Cu, Pb and Cl from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash suspended in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Lima, Ana Teresa; Pedersen, Anne Juul;

    2006-01-01

    that is least soluble. Hence electrodialytic treatment of the ash suspended in water is not a solution to improve the ash quality in terms of Pb. The water-soluble Cl content per unit weight of the original ash was 12.4%. The removal of water-soluble Cl was efficient and >98% of Cl was removed (calculated......The possibility of using fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) in, for example, concrete is considered. MSWI fly ash, however, has too high a concentration of heavy metals, which may cause leaching problems during use or problems with waste handling at the end of the lifetime...... of the concrete. The Cl content in MSWI fly ash is also too high and will cause corrosion problems in reinforced concrete. The possibility of removing some of the unwanted heavy metals (Cu and Pb) together with Cl from an MSWI fly ash suspended in water using an electrodialytic separation method was investigated...

  5. AshMeadowsNaucorid_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Naucorid (Ambrysus amargosus) occur. "Nevada, Nye County. Point of Rocks Springs and...

  6. Cooking quality of upland and lowland rice characterized by different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diva Mendonça Garcia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Rice cooking quality is usually evaluated by texture and stickiness characteristics using many different methods. Gelatinization temperature, amylose content, viscosity (Brookfield viscometer and Rapid Visco Analyzer, and sensory analysis were performed to characterize culinary quality of rice grains produced under two cropping systems and submitted to different technologies. All samples from the upland cropping system and two from the irrigated cropping system presented intermediate amylose content. Regarding stickiness, BRS Primavera, BRS Sertaneja, and BRS Tropical showed loose cooked grains. Irrigated cultivars presented less viscosity and were softer than upland cultivars. Upland grain samples had similar profile on the viscoamylografic curve, but the highest viscosity peaks were observed for BRS Alvorada, IRGA 417, and SCS BRS Piracema among the irrigated cropping system samples. In general, distinct grain characteristics were observed between upland and irrigated samples by cluster analysis. The majority of the upland cultivars showed soft and loose grains with adequate cooking quality confirmed by sensory tests. Most of the irrigated cultivars, however, presented soft and sticky grains. Different methodologies allowed to improve the construction of the culinary profile of the varieties studied.

  7. Characterization of constituents, quality and stability of pomegranate seed oil (Punica granatum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Illana Louise Pereira de MELO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to characterize pomegranate seed oil and evaluate its quality and stability parameters against those of linseed oil. The profile of fatty acids and phytosterols and the content of tocopherols were analyzed by gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The quality of both oils was assessed as recommended by the American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS and stability was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, β-carotene bleaching (coupled oxidation of β-carotene/linoleic acid and Rancimat® assays. While α-linolenic acid (52% was the most abundant fatty acid in linseed oil (LO, punicic acid (55% was highest in pomegranate seed oil (PSO. Tocopherols and phytosterols (175 and 539 mg/100 g, respectively were greater in PSO than in LO (51 and 328 mg/100 g, respectively. Both oils met quality standards. The β-carotene bleaching and the DPPH assays showed greater oxidative stability for PSO than for LO. The Rancimat® method, on the other hand, indicated low stability for both oils.

  8. Development and characterization of a cell culture manufacturing process using quality by design (QbD) principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Daniel M; Gao, Jinxin; Griffiths, Kristi; Froggatt, Christopher; Wang, Tongtong; Wei, Gan

    2014-01-01

    The principles of quality by design (QbD) have been applied in cell culture manufacturing process development and characterization in the biotech industry. Here we share our approach and practice in developing and characterizing a cell culture manufacturing process using QbD principles for establishing a process control strategy. Process development and characterization start with critical quality attribute identification, followed by process parameter and incoming raw material risk assessment, design of experiment, and process parameter classification, and conclude with a design space construction. Finally, a rational process control strategy is established and documented. PMID:23828505

  9. Utilize Cementitious High Carbon Fly Ash (CHCFA) to Stabilize Cold In-Place Recycled (CIR) Asphalt Pavement as Base Coarse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Haifang; Li, Xiaojun; Edil, Tuncer; O' Donnell, Jonathan; Danda, Swapna

    2011-02-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cementitious high carbon fly ash (CHCFA) stabilized recycled asphalt pavement as a base course material in a real world setting. Three test road cells were built at MnROAD facility in Minnesota. These cells have the same asphalt surface layers, subbases, and subgrades, but three different base courses: conventional crushed aggregates, untreated recycled pavement materials (RPM), and CHCFA stabilized RPM materials. During and after the construction of the three cells, laboratory and field tests were carried out to characterize the material properties. The test results were used in the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) to predict the pavement performance. Based on the performance prediction, the life cycle analyses of cost, energy consumption, and greenhouse gasses were performed. The leaching impacts of these three types of base materials were compared. The laboratory and field tests showed that fly ash stabilized RPM had higher modulus than crushed aggregate and RPM did. Based on the MEPDG performance prediction, the service life of the Cell 79 containing fly ash stabilized RPM, is 23.5 years, which is about twice the service life (11 years) of the Cell 77 with RPM base, and about three times the service life (7.5 years) of the Cell 78 with crushed aggregate base. The life cycle analysis indicated that the usage of the fly ash stabilized RPM as the base of the flexible pavement can significantly reduce the life cycle cost, the energy consumption, the greenhouse gases emission. Concentrations of many trace elements, particularly those with relatively low water quality standards, diminish over time as water flows through the pavement profile. For many elements, concentrations below US water drinking water quality standards are attained at the bottom of the pavement profile within 2-4 pore volumes of flow.

  10. Indoor air assessment: A review of indoor-air-quality risk characterization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk assessment methodologies provide a mechanism for incorporating scientific evidence and judgments into the risk management decision process. A risk characterization framework has been developed to provide a systematic approach for analysis and presentation of risk characterization study results. The framework was used as a tool to review published studies that provide quantitative risk estimates associated with exposure to indoor air pollutants. Comparisons of both the methods and the resulting risk estimates are presented. Critical assumptions concerning risk estimates and exposure estimates for each study are recorded on the framework. Fourteen risk characterization studies were reviewed include three studies for radon, six for environmental tobacco smoke, three for volatile organics, one for formaldehyde only, and one for asbestos. The quality and rigor of analysis varied greatly among the studies reviewed. Some of the studies clearly state that they are intended to be preliminary analyses or screening studies, others are reported as sensitivity analyses, and others are detailed risk assessments. Studies which are technically rigorous in some risk components (e.g., dose-response relationships) are often less rigorous in other components (e.g. exposure assessment)

  11. Secondary Industrial Minerals from Coal Fly Ash and Aluminium Anodising Waste Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Nugteren, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    Minerals that are extracted from the earth’s crust to be directly used for their properties are called industrial minerals. This research shows that such minerals can also be produced from industrial residues, hence the name secondary industrial minerals. In this thesis coal fly ash is chosen as one of the industrial residues to work with. Since reuse of coal fly ash is restricted by its technical and environmental quality, the first approach was to improve its quality and thereby extend its ...

  12. Ash production and dispersal from sustained low-intensity Mono-Inyo eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Benjamin A.; Manga, Michael; Andrews, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Recent rhyolitic volcanism has demonstrated that prolonged low-intensity ash venting may accompany effusive dome formation. We examine the possibility and some consequences of episodes of extended, weak ash venting at the rhyolitic Mono-Inyo chain in Eastern California. We describe ash-filled cracks within one of the youngest domes, Panum Crater, which provide a textural record of ash venting during dome effusion. We use synchrotron-based X-ray computed tomography to characterize the particles in these tuffisites. Particle sizes in well-sorted tuffisite layers agree well with grain size distributions observed during weak ash venting at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, and yield approximate upper and lower bounds on gas velocity and mass flux during the formation of those layers. We simulate ash dispersal with Ash3d to assess the consequences of long-lived Mono-Inyo ash venting for ash deposition and the accompanying volcanic hazards. Our results highlight the sensitivity of large-scale outcomes of volcanic eruptions to small-scale processes.

  13. Modeling the formation of the quench product in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkaew, Kanawut; Saffarzadeh, Amirhomayoun; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated changes in bottom ash morphology and mineralogy under lab-scale quenching conditions. The main purpose was to clarify the mechanisms behind the formation of the quench product/layer around bottom ash particles. In the experiments, the unquenched bottom ashes were heated to 300°C for 1h, and were quenched by warm water (65°C) with different simulated conditions. After having filtered and dried, the ashes were analyzed by a combination of methodologies namely, particle size distribution analysis, intact particle and thin-section observation, X-ray diffractometry, and scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicated that after quenching, the morphology and mineralogy of the bottom ash changed significantly. The freshly quenched bottom ash was dominated by a quench product that was characterized by amorphous and microcrystalline calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) phases. This product also enclosed tiny minerals, glasses, ceramics, metals, and organic materials. The dominant mineral phases produced by quenching process and detected by XRD were calcite, Friedel's salt, hydrocalumite and portlandite. The formation of quench product was controlled by the fine fraction of the bottom ash (particle size conceptual model of the ash-water reactions and formation of the quench product in the bottom ash was proposed. PMID:27079853

  14. Metallothionein response in earthworms Lampito mauritii (Kinberg) exposed to fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maity, S.; Hattacharya, S.; Chaudhury, S. [Visva Bharati, Santini Ketan (India)

    2009-10-15

    Among pollutants, the coal fly ash occupies a significant position in industrial wastes. The fly ash matrix is a complex mixture of various organic (polyhalogenated compounds) and inorganic (Si, Al, Fe, As, Cd, Bi, Hg, etc.) chemicals. The application of fly ash for agricultural purposes and as landfills may lead to the contamination of the land with some of the toxic chemical compounds present in fly ash. Thus prior to the application of fly ash for developmental activities, it requires bio-monitoring and risk characterization. In order to achieve this objective adult Lampito mauritii were exposed to different proportions of fly ash in soil for 30 d and the concentrations of metallothionein in earthworm were assessed. The results revealed that up to 50% of fly ash amendment does not apparently harm the earthworm in respect of their survival and growth. A significant increase in tissue metallothionein level was recorded in L mauritii exposed to fly ash amended soil without tissue metal accumulation indicating that metallothionein is involved in scavenging of free radicals and reactive oxygen species metabolites. It is concluded that this biochemical response observed in L mauritii exposed to fly ash amended soil could be used in ecotoxicological field monitoring.

  15. Potential application of coal-fuel oil ash for the manufacture of building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, R; Marroccoli, M; Sansone, L; Santoro, L

    2005-09-30

    In this paper coal-fuel oil ash has been characterized in terms of leaching behaviour and reactivity against lime and gypsum in hydratory systems for the manufacture of building materials. Its behaviour was also compared to that of coal ash. Metal release was measured in a dynamic leaching test with duration up to 16 days. The results have shown that coal-fuel oil ash behaves very similarly to coal ash. The reactivity of coal-fuel oil ash against lime and gypsum was measured in mixtures containing only lime and in mixtures containing both lime and gypsum. These systems were hydrated at 25 and 40 degrees C under 100% R.H. The results have shown that the main hydration products are the same as those that are usually formed in similar coal ash-based systems. That is, calcium silicate hydrate in coal-fuel oil ash/lime systems and calcium silicate hydrate plus calcium trisulphoaluminate hydrate in coal-fuel oil ash/lime/gypsum systems. From the quantitative point of view, hydration runs showed that the amounts of both chemically combined water and reacted lime measured in the case under investigation are very similar to those found in similar coal ash-based systems. Finally, the measurement of unconfined compressive strength proved that the systems have potentiality for the manufacture of pre-formed building blocks. PMID:15985327

  16. Development of Scientific Tools at the USGS to Prepare for Ash-Producing Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mastin, L. G.; Wallace, K.; Schneider, D. J.; Neal, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has undertaken a focused effort over the past several years to develop scientific tools to improve capabilities to forecast, assess, and mitigate the adverse impacts of ash-producing eruptions. To improve forecasting capabilities, USGS scientists developed a Eulerian ash dispersion and deposition model, Ash3D, with output designed for operational use by other agencies. For ashfall hazards, Ash3D output includes forecasts of time of arrival and duration of ashfall, as well as traditional isopach maps. We coordinated with colleagues at the National Weather Service in Alaska to ensure Ash3D output is useable by NWS in its official ashfall advisories, and we are developing methods to generate long-term probabilistic ashfall hazard maps for DOE. For ash-cloud hazards, Ash3D output includes animations of cloud height, mass load, concentration, and arrival times over airports. To improve assessment capabilities, diverse approaches were pursued: a portable Doppler radar was acquired and successfully used to characterize ash plumes during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska; a database system was created to manage ashfall collection and observations, including by the public ('Is Ash Falling?' at www.avo.alaska.edu/ashfall/ashreport.php); a display-and-analysis tool was developed that accesses public satellite data from a variety of sensors and platforms ('Volcview' at volcview.wr.usgs.gov/). To improve mitigation capabilities, the USGS hosts a website (volcanoes.usgs.gov/ash), developed by the partners of IAVCEI's International Volcanic Ashfall Impacts Working Group and recently revamped, that provides practical guidance about how to prepare for and recover from ash eruptions, organized by affected sector (buildings, transportation, power supply, health, agriculture, water supply, communications). With these various tools now available, scientists and citizenry are better prepared for ash eruptions.

  17. Bronchiolitis obliterans from exposure to incinerator fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, R T; McCunney, R J

    1995-07-01

    Inhalation of toxic substances in the workplace can result in a variety of respiratory disorders. One relatively rare sequela of the inhalation of toxic fumes is bronchiolitis obliterans, a condition characterized by fibrosis and narrowing of the small airways. Several substances have been reported to cause bronchiolitis obliterans, including ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, phosgene, and other irritant fumes. Little has been reported on the pulmonary effects of fly ash produced by the incineration of coal and oil. We report a case of bronchiolitis obliterans with a component of partially reversible airway obstruction in a 39-year-old male occupationally exposed to incinerator fly ash. PMID:7552470

  18. Municipal solid waste combustor ash demonstration program `the boathouse`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roethel, F.J.; Breslin, V.T.

    1995-08-01

    The report presents the results of a research program designed to examine the engineering and environmental acceptability of using municipal solid waste (MSW) combustor ash as an aggregate substitute in the manufacture of construction quality cement blocks. 350 tons of MSW combustor ash was combined with Portland and Cement to form standard hollow masonary blocks. These stabilized combustor ash (SCA) blocks were used to construct a boathouse on the campus of the University at Stony Brook. Air samples collected within the boathouse were examined and compared to ambient air samples for the presence and concentrations of suspended particulate, and vapor phase PCDD/PCDF, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds and volatile mercury. Rainwater samples following contact with the boathouse walls were collected and analyzed for the presence of trace elements. Soil samples were collected prior to and following the construction of the boathouse.

  19. Sorption and Desorption Behaviors of Methylene Blue in Soils Amended with Rice-Straw Ash and Biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinzhong; Chen, Rongguo; Weng, Rengui; Chen, Yilan; Peng, Lei; Xiu, Furong

    2012-06-01

    The ash (Ash) and biochar (BC) derived from the partial combustion of rice-straw are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and can potentially affect the environmental fate of organic contaminants. In this study, the effects of Ash and BC on the sorption and desorption behaviors of methylene blue (MB) were investigated. Ash was obtained from the direct burning of the rice-straw, and BC was separated from Ash by HCl treatment. SEM, BET, FT-IR, and pore size distribution analyses were used to characterize the Ash and BC prepared. Sorption capacities of MB on Ash-amended soil (AS) and BC-amended soil (BS) increased significantly with increasing contents of Ash and BC in soils. Sorption isotherms of soil amended with various amounts of Ash or BC fitted better to the Langmuir equation. The significant increase of apparent desorption hysteresis could be observed with increasing content of Ash or BC in the soils, especially in the case of BC, presumably due to the presence of micropores, hydroxyl groups and relatively higher specific surface area. It is believed that the presence of small amounts of BC produced from the rice-straw-derived ash in soil can have a marked effect on the transfer behavior of dye contaminations.

  20. Microstructure and some mechanical properties of fly ash particulate reinforced AA6061 aluminum alloy composites prepared by compocasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Fabrication of AA6061/fly ash AMC by compocasting method. ► Incorporation of fly ash particles into the semi solid aluminum melt. ► No interfacial reaction between the aluminum matrix and fly ash particle. ► Uniform distribution of fly ash particles having clear interface and good bonding. ► Fly ash particles enhanced the mechanical properties of the AMC. - Abstract: Fly ash has gathered widespread attention as a potential reinforcement for aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) to enhance the properties and reduce the cost of production. Aluminum alloy AA6061 reinforced with various amounts (0, 4, 8 and 12 wt.%) of fly ash particles were prepared by compocasting method. Fly ash particles were incorporated into the semi solid aluminum melt. X-ray diffraction patterns of the prepared AMCs revealed the presence of fly ash particles without the formation of any other intermetallic compounds. The microstructures of the AMCs were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The AMCs were characterized with the homogeneous dispersion of fly ash particles having clear interface and good bonding to the aluminum matrix. The incorporation of fly ash particles improved the microhardness and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the AMCs

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION FOR UTILIZATION OF ASH IN SOIL STABILIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David J. Hassett; Loreal V. Heebink

    2001-08-01

    The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) approved the use of coal ash in soil stabilization, indicating that environmental data needed to be generated. The overall project goal is to evaluate the potential for release of constituents into the environment from ash used in soil stabilization projects. Supporting objectives are: (1) To ensure sample integrity through implementation of a sample collection, preservation, and storage protocol to avoid analyte concentration or loss. (2) To evaluate the potential of each component (ash, soil, water) of the stabilized soil to contribute to environmental release of analytes of interest. (3) To use laboratory leaching methods to evaluate the potential for release of constituents to the environment. (4) To facilitate collection of and to evaluate samples from a field runoff demonstration effort. The results of this study indicated limited mobility of the coal combustion fly ash constituents in laboratory tests and the field runoff samples. The results presented support previous work showing little to negligible impact on water quality. This and past work indicates that soil stabilization is an environmentally beneficial CCB utilization application as encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This project addressed the regulatory-driven environmental aspect of fly ash use for soil stabilization, but the demonstrated engineering performance and economic advantages also indicate that the use of CCBs in soil stabilization can and should become an accepted engineering option.

  2. Quick monitoring of pozzolanic reactivity of waste ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinthaworn, Suppachai; Nimityongskul, Pichai

    2009-05-01

    This article proposes a quick method of monitoring for pozzolanic reactivity of waste ashes by investigating the electrical conductivity of the suspension at an elevated temperature. This suspension is obtained by mixing tested pozzolan with an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) solution produced by mixing ordinary Portland cement with water. For comparison, silica fume, metakaolin, rice husk ash and river sand - whose pozzolanic reactivities range from reactive to inert - were used in the experimental investigation. The electrical conductivity of the suspension was continually recorded by using an electrical conductivity meter and stored by using a personal computer for a period of slightly over 1day. The indicative parameters that can be related to pozzolanic reactivity were discussed and analyzed in detail. It was found that it is possible to determine the pozzolanic reactivity of fly ash within 28h by using the proposed technique, as compared to 7 or 28 days for the determination of strength activity index according to ASTM. This technique would help concrete technologists to speedily investigate the quality of fly ash for use as a cement replacement in order to alleviate pollution caused by cement production and solve disposal problems of waste ashes.

  3. Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    What is quality? How do you achieve it? How do you keep it once you have got it. The answer for industry at large is the three-step hierarchy of quality control, quality assurance and Total quality Management. An overview is given of the history of quality movement, illustrated with examples from Schlumberger operations, as well as the oil industry's approach to quality. An introduction of the Schlumberger's quality-associated ClientLink program is presented. 15 figs., 4 ills., 16 refs

  4. Ash-Based Building Panels Production and Demonstration of Aerock Decking Building Product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Western Research Institute (WRI) of Laramie, Wyoming and AeRock, LLC of Eagar, Arizona (formerly of Bellevue, Washington) partnered, under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE-NETL), to support the development of rapid-setting, ash-based, fiber-incorporated ''green'' building products. Green building materials are a rapidly growing trend in the building and construction industry in the US. A two phase project was implemented wherein Phase I assessed, through chemical and physical testing, ash, ash-based cement and fiber composites exhibiting superior structural performance when applied to the AeRock mixing and extrusion process and involved the conduct of pilot-scale production trials of AeRock products, and wherein Phase II involved the design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale plant to confirm production issues and to produce panels for performance evaluations. Phase I optimized the composite ingredients including ash-based cement, Class F and Class C DFGD ash, and various fiber reinforcements. Additives, such as retardants and accelerators, were also evaluated as related to extruder performance. The optimized composite from the Phase I effort was characterized by a modulus of rupture (MOR) measured between 1,931 and 2,221 psi flexural strength, comparable to other wood and non-wood building materials. Continuous extrusion of the optimum composite in the AeRock pilot-scale facility produced an excellent product that was assembled into a demonstration for exhibit and durability purposes. Finishes, from plain to marbled, from bright reds to muted earth tones and with various textures, could easily be applied during the mixing and extrusion process. The successful pilot-scale demonstration was in turn used to design the production parameters and extruder dies for a commercial scale demonstration at Ultrapanel Pty, Ltd of Ballarat, Australia under Phase II. The initial commercial-scale production

  5. Experimental studies on pulp and paper mill sludge ash behavior in fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latva-Somppi, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology

    1998-11-01

    Ash formation during the fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of pulp and paper mill sludges has been experimentally studied on an industrial and bench scale. The methods included aerosol measurements, chemical and crystalline composition analyses, thermogravimetry and electron microscopy. Fly ash mass and number size distributions and elemental enrichment in submicron particles and bottom ash were measured. Fly ash, bottom ash and ash deposits were characterized and their formation mechanisms are discussed. During combustion the fine paper-making additives in sludge, clay minerals and calcite, sintered fanning porous agglomerates. The fly ash mass mean size was 7.5 - 15 lam and the supermicron particles included 93.6 - 97.3 % of the fly ash. Condensation of the volatilized inorganic species formed spherical submicron particles in the fly ash. Their mass concentration was almost negligible when co-firing paper mill sludges and wood. This suggests that the fraction of the volatilized inorganic species in the paper mill sludges was low. Results from pulp mill sludge and bark co-firing were different. A clear mass mode below 0.3 pm, presenting 2.2 - 5.0 weight-% of the fly ash was detected. The condensed species included K, Na, S and Cl. Their mass fraction was higher in the pulp mill sludge than in the paper mill sludge. Evidently this resulted in increased volatilization and formation of condensed particles. The following trace elements were enriched in the submicron ash during pulp mill sludge and wood co-firing: As, Cd, Rb and Pb. The main part of the volatile species was, however, captured in the bulk ash. Presumably, this was due to the high surface area concentration in the bulk ash. Sludge moisture was observed to reduce the inorganic species volatilization. Probably steam vaporization from the wet sludge through the burning layer decreased combustion temperatures on char surface and less char was produced. Hence, the volatilization of ash forming species was

  6. Use of sugarcane straw ash for zeolite synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Alves Fungaro, Thais Vitória da Silva Reis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount of biomass combustion residue is growing nowadays due to constant increasing demands of biomass utilization. The biomass ash produced currently is disposed on agricultural fields. The presence of metals, chlorine, sulphur and other species may have significant impacts on soils and the recycling of soil nutrient. The main challenge is related to the increase of possible applications of this byproduct. Sugarcane straw ash (SCSA was used in a study on synthesis of zeolitic material by alkaline conventional hydrothermal treatment. Different experimental conditions, such as, reaction time, alkali hydroxide concentration and liquid/solid ratio were studied. Raw ash material and synthesis products were characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy powder, X-ray diffraction, cation exchange capacity and scanning electron microscopic. The presence of zeolite hydroxysodalite confirms successful conversion of native SCSA into zeolitic material. Sugarcane straw ash utilization minimizes the environmental impact of disposal problems and further appears as an alternative for the future sustainable large-scale management of biomass ash.

  7. Incorporating Detailed Chemical Characterization of Biomass Burning Emissions into Air Quality Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsanti, K.; Hatch, L. E.; Yokelson, R. J.; Stockwell, C.; Orlando, J. J.; Emmons, L. K.; Knote, C. J.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 500 Tg/yr of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) are emitted by biomass burning (BB) to the global atmosphere, leading to the photochemical production of ozone (O3) and secondary particulate matter (PM). Until recently, in studies of BB emissions, a significant mass fraction of NMOCs (up to 80%) remained uncharacterized or unidentified. Models used to simulate the air quality impacts of BB thus have relied on very limited chemical characterization of the emitted compounds. During the Fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-IV), an unprecedented fraction of emitted NMOCs were identified and quantified through the application of advanced analytical techniques. Here we use FLAME-IV data to improve BB emissions speciation profiles for individual fuel types. From box model simulations we evaluate the sensitivity of predicted precursor and pollutant concentrations (e.g., formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and terpene oxidation products) to differences in the emission speciation profiles, for a range of ambient conditions (e.g., high vs. low NOx). Appropriate representation of emitted NMOCs in models is critical for the accurate prediction of downwind air quality. Explicit simulation of hundreds of NMOCs is not feasible; therefore we also investigate the consequences of using existing assumptions and lumping schemes to map individual NMOCs to model surrogates and we consider alternative strategies. The updated BB emissions speciation profiles lead to markedly different surrogate compound distributions than the default speciation profiles, and box model results suggest that these differences are likely to affect predictions of PM and important gas-phase species in chemical transport models. This study highlights the potential for further BB emissions characterization studies, with concerted model development efforts, to improve the accuracy of BB predictions using necessarily simplified mechanisms.

  8. Atmospheric fate and transport of fine volcanic ash: Does particle shape matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. M.; Allard, M. P.; Klewicki, J.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Mulukutla, G.; Genareau, K.; Sahagian, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash presents hazards to infrastructure, agriculture, and human and animal health. In particular, given the economic importance of intercontinental aviation, understanding how long ash is suspended in the atmosphere, and how far it is transported has taken on greater importance. Airborne ash abrades the exteriors of aircraft, enters modern jet engines and melts while coating interior engine parts causing damage and potential failure. The time fine ash stays in the atmosphere depends on its terminal velocity. Existing models of ash terminal velocities are based on smooth, quasi-spherical particles characterized by Stokes velocity. Ash particles, however, violate the various assumptions upon which Stokes flow and associated models are based. Ash particles are non-spherical and can have complex surface and internal structure. This suggests that particle shape may be one reason that models fail to accurately predict removal rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. The present research seeks to better parameterize predictive models for ash particle terminal velocities, diffusivity, and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer. The fundamental hypothesis being tested is that particle shape irreducibly impacts the fate and transport properties of fine volcanic ash. Pilot studies, incorporating modeling and experiments, are being conducted to test this hypothesis. Specifically, a statistical model has been developed that can account for actual volcanic ash size distributions, complex ash particle geometry, and geometry variability. Experimental results are used to systematically validate and improve the model. The experiments are being conducted at the Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH. Terminal velocities and dispersion properties of fine ash are characterized using still air drop experiments in an unconstrained open space using a homogenized mix of source particles. Dispersion and sedimentation dynamics are quantified using particle image

  9. Deposit formation in a full-scale pulverized wood-fired power plant with and without coal fly ash addition

    OpenAIRE

    Hao WU; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Sander, Bo; Glarborg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Ash transformation and deposition in a pulverized wood-fired power plant boiler of 800 MWth were studied with and without the addition of coal fly ash. The transient ash deposition behavior was investigated by using an advanced deposit probe system at two different boiler locations with flue gas temperatures of ~1300oC and ~800oC, respectively. It was found that during pulverized wood combustion, the deposit formation at the hightemperature location was characterized by a slow and continuous ...

  10. EDU 623 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com     EDU 623 Week 1 No Child Left Behind (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 1 DQ 1 Skills Needed for Master of Education (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 1 DQ 2 Effective Teachers (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 Writing and Researching Skills Self-Assessment (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 DQ 1 Evaluating Research (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 DQ 2 Diversity in Schools (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 3 Lesson Plan Critiqu...

  11. HCA 421(ASH) course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HCA 421 Week 1 DQ 1 (Basic Strategy) (Ash) HCA 421 Week 1 DQ 2 (Internal Audit of Strategic Assets) (Ash) HCA 421 Week 2 Assignment Competition in Healthcare (Ash) HCA 421 Week 2 DQ 1 (Strategic External Assessment Industry and Competition) (Ash) HCA 421 Week 2 DQ 2 (Market Segments) (Ash) HCA 421 Week 3 Assignment The Future Direction of Health Care (Five challenges) (Ash) HCA 421 Week 3 DQ 1 (Pr...

  12. HCA 415(ASH) course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HCA 415 Week 1 DQ 1 Historical Contributions of Public Health (Ash) HCA 415 Week 1 DQ 2 Poverty and Health (Ash) HCA 415 Week 2 DQ 1 U.S. Health Care System Critical Issues (Ash) HCA 415 Week 2 DQ 2 Role of Prevention in Health Status (Ash) HCA 415 Week 2 Assignment Public Health and the Law (Ash) HCA 415 Week 3 DQ 1 Tools for Assessing Community Health (Ash) HCA 415 Week 3 DQ 2 Essential Ser...

  13. Controlling formaldehyde emissions with boiler ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Jennifer; Abu-Daabes, Malyuba; Banerjee, Sujit

    2005-07-01

    Fluidized wood ash reduces formaldehyde in air from about 20 to formaldehyde reduction increases with increasing moisture content of the ash. Sorption of formaldehyde to ash can be substantially accounted for by partitioning to the water contained in the ash followed by rate-controlling binding to the ash solids. Adsorption occurs at temperatures of up to 165 degrees C; oxidation predominates thereafter. It is proposed that formaldehyde could be stripped from an air stream in a fluidized bed containing ash, which could then be returned to a boiler to incinerate the formaldehyde.

  14. Characterization of Soil Quality Under Vegetable Production Along an Urban-Rural Gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG MINGKUI; WANG MEIQING; LIU XINGMEI; JIANG HONG; XU JIANMING

    2003-01-01

    Human activity and urbanization result in urban-rural environmental gradients. Understanding effect of the gradients on soil properties is necessary for management of the soils around urban areas. In this study, soil quality of some vegetable fields was characterized along an urban-rural gradient in Shaoxing County, Zhejiang Province. Fifteen soil physical and chemical properties were evaluated by using principal component analysis.Results showed that there was a great variation in the soil quality along the gradient. From rural to urban zones, soil organic matter, water-stable aggregates, cation exchangeable capacity (CEC), total N and P, and available K increased, whereas soil pH value decreased. In addition, Pb, Cu, Ni, Co, Zn and Cr in the soils tended to be accumulated toward the urban zone. Sequential chemical extraction showed that mobility of all the heavy metals in the soils tended to increase from the rural to the urban zones. The variation of soil properties accounted for by the first principal component was significantly explained by the difference in application rates of municipal wastes.

  15. Satellite Characterization of Fire Emissions of Aerosols and Gases Relevant to Air-Quality Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, C. M.; Ellison, L.; Yue, Y.; Wang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Because of the transient and widespread nature of wildfires and other types of open biomass burning, satellite remote sensing has become an indispensable technique for characterizing their smoke emissions for modeling applications, especially at regional to global scales. Fire radiative energy (FRE), whose instantaneous rate of release or fire radiative power (FRP) is measurable from space, has been found to be proportional to both the biomass consumption and emission of aerosol particulate matter. We have leveraged this relationship to generate a global, gridded smoke-aerosol emission coefficients (Ce) dataset based on FRP and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements from the MODIS sensors aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. Ce is a simple coefficient to convert FRE to smoke aerosol emissions, in the same manner as traditional emission factors are used to convert burned biomass to emissions. The first version of this Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER.v1) global gridded Ce product at 1°x1° resolution is available at http://feer.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Based on published emission ratios, the FEER.v1 Ce product for total smoke aerosol has also been used to generate similar products for specific fire-emitted aerosols and gases, including those that are regulated as 'criteria pollutants' under the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), such as particulate matter (PM) and carbon monoxide (CO). These gridded Ce products were used in conjunction with satellite measurements of FRP to derive emissions of several smoke constituents, which were applied to WRF-Chem fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model simulations, with promising results. In this presentation, we analyze WRF-Chem simulations of surface-level concentrations of various pollutants based on FEER.v1 emission products to illustrate their value for air-quality modeling, particularly in parts of Africa and southeast Asia where ground-based air-quality

  16. Progress in characterizing the multidimensional color quality properties of white LED light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, Kees; Hoelen, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    With the introduction of solid state light sources, the variety in emission spectra is almost unlimited. However, the set of standardized parameters to characterize a white LED light source, such as correlated color temperature (CCT) and CIE general color rendering index (Ra), is known to be limited and insufficient for describing perceived differences between light sources. Several characterization methods have been proposed over the past decades, but their contribution to perceived color quality has not always been validated. To gain more insight in the relevant characteristics of the emission spectra for specific applications, we have conducted a perception experiment to rate the attractiveness of three sets of objects, including fresh food, packaging materials and skin tones. The objects were illuminated with seven different combinations of Red, Green, Blue, Amber and White LEDs, all with the same CCT and illumination level, but with differences in Ra and color saturation. The results show that, in general, object attractiveness does not correlate well with Ra, but shows a positive correlation with saturation increase for two out of three applications. There is no clear relation between saturation and skin tone attractiveness, partly due to differences in preference between males and females. A relative gamut area index (Ga) represents the average change in saturation and a complementary color vector graphic shows the direction and magnitude of chromatic differences for the eight CIE-1974 test-color samples. Together with the CIE general color rendering index (Ra) they provide useful information for designing and optimizing application specific emission spectra.

  17. Role of aluminous component of fly ash on the durability of Portland cement-fly ash pastes in marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The durability, of mixtures of two kinds of Spanish fly ashes from coal combustion (ASTM class F) with 0, 15 and 35% replacement of Portland cement by fly ash, in a simulated marine environment (Na2SO4+NaCl solution of equivalent concentration to that of sea water: 0.03 and 0.45 M for sulphate and chloride, respectively), has been studied for a period of 90 days. The resistance of the different mixtures to the attack was evaluated by means of the Koch-Steinegger test. The results showed that all the mixtures were resistant, in spite of the great amount of Al2O3 content of the fly ash. The diffusion of SO42-, Na+ and Cl- ions through the pore solution activated the pozzolanic reactivity of the fly ashes causing the corresponding microstructure changes, which were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). As a result, the flexural strength of the mixtures increased, principally for the fly ash of a lower particle size and 35% of addition

  18. Screen film vs full-field digital mammography: image quality, detectability and characterization of lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to compare screen-film mammography (SFM) to full-field digital mammography (FFDM) regarding image quality as well as detectability and characterization of lesions using equivalent images of the same patient acquired with both systems. Two mammography units were used, one with a screen-film system (Senographe DMR) and the other with a digital detector (Senographe 2000D, both GEMS). Screen-film and digital mammograms were performed on 55 patients with cytologically or histologically proven tumors on the same day. Together with these, 75 digital mammograms of patients without tumor and the corresponding previous screen-film mammograms not older than 1.5 years were reviewed by three observers in a random order. Contrast, exposure, and the presence of artifacts were evaluated. Different details, such as the skin, the retromamillary region, and the parenchymal structures, were judged according to a three-point ranking scale. Finally, the detectability of microcalcifications and lesions were compared and correlated to histology. Image contrast was judged to be good in 76%, satisfactory in 20%, and unsatisfactory in 4% of screen-film mammograms. Digital mammograms were judged to be good in 99% and unsatisfactory in 1% of cases. Improper exposure of screen-film system occurred in 18% (10% overexposed and 8% underexposed). Digital mammograms were improperly exposed in 4% of all cases but were of acceptable quality after post-processing. Artifacts, most of them of no significance, were found in 78% of screen-film and in none of the digital mammograms. Different anatomical regions, such as the skin, the retromamillary region, and dense parenchymal areas, were better visualized in digital than in screen-film mammography. All malignant tumors were seen by the three radiologists; however, digital mammograms allowed a better characterization of these lesions to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADSZZZ;) categories (FFDM better than

  19. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--January 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    1996-09-01

    The objective is to investigate the kinetics of beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7--2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash beneficiation have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550--750{degrees}C. The P{sub 02} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively.

  20. MANUFACTURING OF ALUMINUM/FLY ASH COMPOSITE WITH LIQUID REACTIVE SINTERING TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.F. Zhang; D.J. Wang; G. Xie

    2002-01-01

    The Al/fly ash composites are fabricated by liquid reactive sintering P/M process withfly ash particles as intensifying phases. The reactivity and newly formed phases dur-ing liquid sintering process have been analyzed by combing Thermochemical data basecalculation and XRD characterization. The results show that some of constituents infly ash have reacted with liquid aluminum so that the elemental Si, Fe, Ti as well assome amount of intermetallic compounds occur. The properties of aluminum/fly ashcomposites have been improved. With the fraction of fly ash increase, the compositedensity decreases; the hardness and the modulus of the composite increases, and thecomposite wear resistance are significantly increased. The fly ash reinforced compos-ires represent a sort of low cost product with possible widespread applications in theautomotive, small engine, and electromechanical machinery sectors.

  1. Composite Ni-Co-fly ash coatings on 5083 aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagopoulos, C.N., E-mail: chpanag@metal.ntua.gr [Laboratory of Physical Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, 15780 Athens (Greece); Georgiou, E.P.; Tsopani, A.; Piperi, L. [Laboratory of Physical Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, 15780 Athens (Greece)

    2011-03-15

    Ni-Co-fly ash coatings were deposited on zincate treated 5083 wrought aluminium alloy substrates with the aid of the electrodeposition technique. Structural and chemical characterization of the produced composite coatings was performed with the aid of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) techniques. The Ni-Co-fly ash coatings were found to consist of a crystalline Ni-Co solid solution with dispersed fly ash particles. In addition, chemical analysis of the Ni-Co matrix showed that it consisted of 80 wt.% Ni and 20 wt.% Co. The co-deposition of fly ash particles leads to a significant increase of the microhardness of the coating. The corrosion behaviour of the Ni-Co-fly ash/zincate coated aluminium alloy, in a 0.3 M NaCl solution (pH = 3.5), was studied by means of potentiodynamic corrosion experiments.

  2. Comparison of seven water quality assessment methods for the characterization and management of highly impaired river systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, X.; Dahlgren, RA; Zhang, M.

    2016-01-01

    © 2015, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. In the context of water resource management and pollution control, the characterization of water quality impairments and identification of dominant pollutants are of critical importance. In this study, water quality impairment was assessed on the basis of 7 hydrochemical variables that were monitored bimonthly at 17 sites in 2010 along the rural-suburban-urban portion of the Wen-Rui Tang River in eastern China. Seven methods were used to ...

  3. Particle dispersion at road building using fly ash - model review, investigation of influence of humidity content for dust emission and fly ash particle characterisation; Partikelspriding vid byggnation av vaeg med aska - modelloeversikt, undersoekning av fuktighetsgradens betydelse foer damning och karaktaerisering av partiklar fraan flygaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Mats; Wik, Ola; Frogner-Kockum, Paul

    2009-03-15

    at moisture contents above about 15%. The particle characterization study showed that ash specific chemical signal elements are preferred in the characterization. Important signal elements of ash can be S, Hg, Cd, and the ratio Mg/Al, but elements most appropriate might vary between specific types of ash and applications. The project has brought new knowledge about the possibilities to characterize ash particles and on the moisture needed to avoid dusting from ash. A method to try dusting from ash surfaces has been evaluated in laboratory and the project has also shown available, but in some respects inadequate, models for emission and dispersion of dust from handling of ash

  4. Characterizing multi-pollutant air pollution in China: Comparison of three air quality indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianlin; Ying, Qi; Wang, Yungang; Zhang, Hongliang

    2015-11-01

    Multi-pollutant air pollution (i.e., several pollutants reaching very high concentrations simultaneously) frequently occurs in many regions across China. Air quality index (AQI) is used worldwide to inform the public about levels of air pollution and associated health risks. The current AQI approach used in China is based on the maximum value of individual pollutants, and does not consider the combined health effects of exposure to multiple pollutants. In this study, two novel alternative indices--aggregate air quality index (AAQI) and health-risk based air quality index (HAQI)--were calculated based on data collected in six megacities of China (Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shjiazhuang, Xi'an, and Wuhan) during 2013 to 2014. Both AAQI and HAQI take into account the combined health effects of various pollutants, and the HAQI considers the exposure (or concentration)-response relationships of pollutants. AAQI and HAQI were compared to AQI to examine the effectiveness of the current AQI in characterizing multi-pollutant air pollution in China. The AAQI and HAQI values are higher than the AQI on days when two or more pollutants simultaneously exceed the Chinese Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) 24-hour Grade II standards. The results of the comparison of the classification of risk categories based on the three indices indicate that the current AQI approach underestimates the severity of health risk associated with exposure to multi-pollutant air pollution. For the AQI-based risk category of 'unhealthy', 96% and 80% of the days would be 'very unhealthy' or 'hazardous' if based on AAQI and HAQI, respectively; and for the AQI-based risk category of 'very unhealthy', 67% and 75% of the days would be 'hazardous' if based on AAQI and HAQI, respectively. The results suggest that the general public, especially sensitive population groups such as children and the elderly, should take more stringent actions than those currently suggested based on the AQI approach during

  5. Prairie stream water quality in sub-basins characterized by differing degrees of wetland drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, N. N.; Westbrook, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    The prairie pothole region is dotted with millions of pothole wetlands. These wetlands provide important habitat for numerous wildlife species. Potholes are small, shallow marshes that typically lack surface water connections and have been shown to trap nutrients, ions, and bacteria from catchment runoff. Approximately 70% of the potholes located in the Canadian prairies have been drained since 1900 to increase agricultural production; recently there have been renewed efforts to drain potholes. Wetland drainage has been shown to increase stream discharge and is perceived to impact downstream water quality as previously isolated wetlands become connected to streams via drainage ditches. Our objective was to determine the extent to which stream water quality was influenced by wetland drainage. We compared time series of water quality for four sub-basins of Smith Creek watershed, southeastern Saskatchewan. The stream drains into the Assiniboine River and then Lake Winnipeg where excessive N and P loadings are causing eutrophication. Wetland distribution in the sub-basins was historically similar, but recently the sub-basins have been subject to differing degrees of drainage (extreme, high, moderately-high, and low). Stream water sampling and discharge measurement occurred daily during peak flow (spring runoff) and weekly during low flows in 2009 at the outlet of each sub-basin. Export coefficients for nutrients, DOC, salts and bacteria were compared among sub-basins. The sub-basin characterized by extreme drainage (81% wetland reduction) had the largest nutrient and DOC export coefficients while the low drainage sub-basin (23% wetland reduction) had the lowest. Concentrations of TP and ortho-P were greater in the moderately-high and high drainage sub-basins than in the low drainage sub-basin during the snowmelt period. TP concentrations exceeded the Saskatchewan Watershed Authority Lake Stewardship Program objective of 0.1 mg/L. N concentrations were greatest in the

  6. Ash deposition impacts in the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been great strides in understanding the fundamental underpinnings of the slagging and fouling phenomena. Unfortunately as fuel quality changes due to coal pricing, mine closures, government regulations, market forces, etc., boilers and boiler operators continue to be plagued by poorer operating performance than desired. While improvements have been made, the need to address fundamental coal quality issues and how they affect deposition, emissions, handling, and combustion continues to be relevant. This paper presents the results of a study to assess how prevalent coal quality issues are to the power generation industry. A survey of selected EPRI members was made to determine the major areas where coal quality effects power generation and a reliability and availability assessment of the NERC GADS database for the years 1995 to 2004 was completed. This database was used to determine the lost generation through either forced outages, forced derates or planned outages and derates due to coal quality or slagging and fouling issues. The results clearly demonstrated that slagging, fouling, corrosion and fuel blending continue to be the leading coal quality concerns of utility personnel. Ash chemistry resulting from fuel blending and new coals being utilized continue to be the main area for needed utility support. A minimum estimated annual economic impact of over $1.2 billion was calculated for all coal- and lignite-fired boilers in the US based on coal quality and deposition occurrences. While this annual economic loss is huge, these outages and derates account for only about 1.6% of the total number of outages and derate occurrences and 2.5% of the total lost MW-hour generation. An annual evaluation of the coal quality and deposition-based outages and derates did not show a clear trend. In fact, the coal quality-based outages and derates generally increased over the ten-year period. (author)

  7. Synthesis and Heavy Metal Immobilization Behaviors of Fly Ash based Gepolymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yunsheng; SUN Wei; SHE Wei; SUN Guowei

    2009-01-01

    Two aspects of studies were carried out:1)synthesis of geopolymer by using fly ash and metakaolin;2)Immobilization behaviors of fly ash based geopolymer in a presence of Pb and Cu ions.As for the synthesis of fly ash based geopolymer,4 different fly ash content(10%,30%, 50%,70%)and 3 types of curing regimes(standard curing,steam curing and autoclave curing)were investigated to obtain the optimum synthesis condition based on the compressive and flexural strength.The experimental results show that geopolymer,containing 30%fly ash and synthesized at steam curing(80℃ for 8 h),exhibits higher mechanical strengths.The compressive and flexural strengths of fly ash based geopolymer reach 32.2 Mpa and 7.15 Mpa,respectively.Additionally,In-frared (IR) and X-ray diffraction(XRD)techniques were used to characterize the microstructure of the fly ash geopolymer.IR spectra shows that the absorptive band at 1086 cm ~(-1) shifts to lower wave number around 1033 cm ~(-1) ,and the 6-coordinated Al transforms into 4-coordination during the syn-thesis of fly ash based geopolymer.The resulting geopolymeric products were X-ray amorphous ma-terials.As for immobilization of heavy metals,the leaching tests were employed to investigate the immobilization behaviors of the fly ash based geopolymer synthesized under the above optimum condition.The leaching tests showed that fly ash based geopolymer can effectively immobilize Cu and Pb heavy metal ions,and the immobilization efficiency reached 90% greater when heavy metals were incorporated in the fly ash geopolymer in the range of 0.1% to 0.3%.The Pb exhibits better immobilization efficiency than the Cu,especially in the case of large dosages of heavy metals.

  8. Characterization of hydrology and water quality of Piceance Creek in the Alkali Flat area, Rio Blanco County, Colorado, March 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Judith C.

    2015-12-07

    Previous studies by the U.S. Geological Survey identified Alkali Flat as an area of groundwater upwelling, with increases in concentrations of total dissolved solids, and streamflow loss, but additional study was needed to better characterize these observations. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, White River Field Office, conducted a study to characterize the hydrology and water quality of Piceance Creek in the Alkali Flat area of Rio Blanco County, Colorado.

  9. Ash analysis of flour sample by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Gonca; Sezer, Banu; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Berberoglu, Halil; Koksel, Hamit; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2016-10-01

    Ash content is a measure of total mineral content in flour. It is also an important quality parameter in terms of nutritional labeling as well as processing properties of various cereal products. However, laboratory analysis takes a long time (5-6 h) and results in considerable waste of energy. Therefore, the aim of the study was to develop a new method for ash analysis in wheat flour by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is a multi-elemental, quick and simple spectroscopic method. Unlike basic ash analysis method, it has the potential to analyze a sample in a considerably short time. In the study, wheat flours with different ash contents were analyzed using LIBS and the spectra were evaluated with partial least squares (PLS) method. The results were correlated with the ones taken from standard ash analysis method. Calibration graph showed good linearity with the ash content between 0.48 and 1.39%, and 0.992 coefficient of determination (R2). Limit of detection for ash analysis was calculated as 0.026%. The results indicated that LIBS is a promising and reliable method with high sensitivity for routine ash analysis in flour samples.

  10. Rising from the ashes: Coal ash in recycling and construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naquin, D.

    1998-02-01

    Beneficial Ash Management (BAM, Clearfield, Pa.) has won an environmental award for its use of ash and other waste to fight acid mine drainage. The company`s workers take various waste materials, mainly fly ash from coal-burning plants, to make a cement-like material or grouting, says Ernest Roselli, BAM president. The grouting covers the soil, which helps prevent water from contacting materials. This, in turn, helps control chemical reactions, reducing or eliminating formation of acid mine drainage. The company is restoring the 1,400-acre Bark Camp coal mine site near Penfield in Clearfield County, Pa. Under a no-cost contract with the state of Pennsylvania, BAM is using boiler slag, causticizing byproducts (lime) and nonreclaimable clarifier sludge from International Paper Co. (Erie, Pa.). The mine reclamation techniques developed and monitored at the site include using man-made wetlands to treat acid mine drainage and testing anhydrous ammonia as a similar treatment agent. BAM researches and tests fly ash mixed with lime-based activators as fill material for land reclamation, and develops and uses artificial soil material from paper mill and tannery biosolids.

  11. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  12. Settling characteristics of some Indian fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, M.K.; Sastry, B.S. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharapur (India). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2003-07-01

    The paper examines the aspects of the solid liquid separation (settling characteristics) of some of the fly ash obtained from coal-fired power plants in India. The application of a coagulating or flocculating agent (polymer) to improve the two properties as indicated is a typical industrial practice. The sources for this study comprise of fly ash, pond ash, and bottom ash and the settling characteristics are studied in conjunction with the flocculating agent polyacrylamide. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Use of Incineration MSW Ash: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Charles H. K. Lam; Alvin W. M. Ip; John Patrick Barford; Gordon McKay

    2010-01-01

    This study reviews the characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) ashes, with a main focus on the chemical properties of the ashes. Furthermore, the possible treatment methods for the utilization of ash, namely, separation processes, solidification/stabilization and thermal processes, are also discussed. Seven types of MSWI ash utilization are reviewed, namely, cement and concrete production, road pavement, glasses and ceramics, agriculture, stabilizing agent, adsorbents and...

  14. Permeation Properties and Pore Structure of Surface Layer of Fly Ash Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study on the nature of permeation properties and pore structure of concrete surface layers containing fly ash. Concretes containing different dosages of fly ash as a replacement for cement (15% and 30% by weight of total cement materials, respectively were investigated. Concrete without any fly ash added was also employed as the reference specimen. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the surface layer properties of concrete including chloride transport, apparent water permeability and pore structure. The results demonstrate that incorporation of fly ash, for the early test period, promotes the chloride ingress at the surface layer of concrete but substituting proportions of fly ash may have little impact on it. With the process of chloride immersion, the chloride concentration at the surface layer of concrete with or without fly ash was found to be nearly the same. In addition, it is suggested that the water permeability at the concrete surface area is closely related to the fly ash contents as well as the chloride exposure time. Pore structure was characterized by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP test and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM images. The modification of pore structure of concrete submersed in distilled water is determined by the pozzolanic reaction of fly ash and the calcium leaching effect. The pozzolanic reaction was more dominant at the immersion time of 180 days while the calcium leaching effect became more evident after 270 days.

  15. Effect of porosity on damping behavior of aluminum matrix-fly ash composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU Zuo-yong; WU Gao-hui; JIANG Long-tao; DING Bai-suo; CAO Jin-hua

    2006-01-01

    The hollow sphere fly ash/6061Al composite with about 43% porosity in volume fraction (produced by the addition of hollow sphere fly ash particles) was fabricated by squeeze casting technique. Using the same technique, the fly ash/7075Al composite with all the porosity in hollow sphere fly ash infiltrated by molten aluminum was fabricated for partially studying the ash/6061Al composite reached (20.2-26.9)×10-3 and was about 8 times of the value tested by forced vibration method (in the were consistent by the two testing methods and were in the range of (1.1-7.7)×10-3. The effect of temperature on the damping behavior of the materials was also studied. The related damping mechanisms have also been discussed in light of data from the characterization of microstructure and damping capacity. Due to the inferior mechanical properties of the fly ash particles, the tensile strength of the FA/Al composites was lower than that of the corresponding aluminum alloy matrix and was 70.1 MPa and 180.6 MPa for the 'porous' fly ash/6061Al and ‘dense' fly ash/7075Al composite, respectively.

  16. Radon emanation fractions from concretes containing fly ash and metakaolin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Lange, Sarah C., E-mail: taylorlanges@utexas.edu [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, 1 University Station C1748, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Juenger, Maria C.G. [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, 1 University Station C1748, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Siegel, Jeffrey A. [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, 1 University Station C1748, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Department of Civil Engineering, 35 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A4 (Canada)

    2014-01-01

    Radon ({sup 222}Rn) and progenies emanate from soil and building components and can create an indoor air quality hazard. In this study, nine concrete constituents, including the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) fly ash and metakaolin, were used to create eleven different concrete mixtures. We investigated the effect of constituent radium specific activity, radon effective activity and emanation fraction on the concrete emanation fraction and the radon exhalation rate. Given the serious health effects associated with radionuclide exposure, experimental results were coupled with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate predictive differences in the indoor radon concentration due to concrete mixture design. The results from this study show that, on average, fly ash constituents possessed radium specific activities ranging from 100 Bq/kg to 200 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 1.1% to 2.5%. The lowest emitting concrete mixture containing fly ash resulted in a 3.4% reduction in the concrete emanation fraction, owing to the relatively low emanation that exists when fly ash is part of concrete. On average, the metakaolin constituents contained radium specific activities ranging from 67 Bq/kg to 600 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 8.4% to 15.5%, and changed the total concrete emanation fraction by roughly ± 5% relative to control samples. The results from this study suggest that SCMs can reduce indoor radon exposure from concrete, contingent upon SCM radionucleotide content and emanation fraction. Lastly, the experimental results provide SCM-specific concrete emanation fractions for indoor radon exposure modeling. - Highlights: • Fly ash or metakaolin SCMs can neutralize or reduce concrete emanation fractions. • The specific activity of constituents is a poor predictor of the concrete emanation fraction. • Exhalation from fly ash concretes represents a small fraction of the total indoor radon concentration.

  17. Radon emanation fractions from concretes containing fly ash and metakaolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon (222Rn) and progenies emanate from soil and building components and can create an indoor air quality hazard. In this study, nine concrete constituents, including the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) fly ash and metakaolin, were used to create eleven different concrete mixtures. We investigated the effect of constituent radium specific activity, radon effective activity and emanation fraction on the concrete emanation fraction and the radon exhalation rate. Given the serious health effects associated with radionuclide exposure, experimental results were coupled with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate predictive differences in the indoor radon concentration due to concrete mixture design. The results from this study show that, on average, fly ash constituents possessed radium specific activities ranging from 100 Bq/kg to 200 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 1.1% to 2.5%. The lowest emitting concrete mixture containing fly ash resulted in a 3.4% reduction in the concrete emanation fraction, owing to the relatively low emanation that exists when fly ash is part of concrete. On average, the metakaolin constituents contained radium specific activities ranging from 67 Bq/kg to 600 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 8.4% to 15.5%, and changed the total concrete emanation fraction by roughly ± 5% relative to control samples. The results from this study suggest that SCMs can reduce indoor radon exposure from concrete, contingent upon SCM radionucleotide content and emanation fraction. Lastly, the experimental results provide SCM-specific concrete emanation fractions for indoor radon exposure modeling. - Highlights: • Fly ash or metakaolin SCMs can neutralize or reduce concrete emanation fractions. • The specific activity of constituents is a poor predictor of the concrete emanation fraction. • Exhalation from fly ash concretes represents a small fraction of the total indoor radon concentration

  18. Rice Husk Ash Sandcrete Block as Low Cost Building Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P.Sangeetha,

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a widely used construction material for various types of structures due to its structural stability and strength. The construction industry is today consuming more than 400 million tonnes of concrete every year .Most of the increase in cement demand will be met by the use of supplementary cementing materials, as each ton of Portland cement clinker production is associated with similar amount of CO2 emission, which is a major source of global warming. Partial replacement of ordinary Portland cement with mineral admixtures like fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, metakaolin, Rice husk Ash (RHA,etc with plasticizers eliminates these drawbacks. The use of rice husk modifies the physical qualities of fresh cement paste as well as microstructure of paste after hardening. By burning the rice husk under a uncontrolled temperature in the atmosphere, a highly reactive RHA was obtained and the ash was utilized as a supplementary cementing material. This paper presents the effects of using Rice Husk Ash (RHA as a partial cement replacement material in mortar mixes. This work is based on an experimental study of mortar made with replacement of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC with 10%, 20% 30% & 40% RHA. The properties investigated were the compressive strength, setting time, consistency, workability and specific gravity. Finally, a cost analysis was also done to compare the efficiency of rice husk ash sandcrete blocks. From the test results it can be concluded that rice husk ash can be utilized in day today life of manufacturing building blocks which are more economical and more eco-friendly than the cement concrete blocks which are produced now-a-days.

  19. Critical aspects of biomass ashes utilization in soils: Composition, leachability, PAH and PCDD/F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Márcia; Lopes, Helena; Tarelho, Luís A C

    2015-12-01

    Bottom and fly ashes streams collected along a year in several biomass thermal plants were studied. The bulk composition of ashes and other chemical characteristics that may impact soil application showed a high variability depending on the ash stream, combustion technology and ash management practice at the power plants. The acid neutralization capacity (ANC) and metal's availability for leaching at fixed pH 7 and 4 was performed according with EA NEN 7371, as a quick evaluation method to provide information on the long-term behavior of ashes, regarding heavy metals and also plant nutrients release. Also the pH dependence leachability study was performed according to CEN/TS 14429 for predicting the leaching behavior under different scenarios. Leachability profiles were established between pH 3 and 12, allowing to distinguish different solubility control phenomena of toxic heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, Zn, Pb) as well as other salts (Ca, K, Mg, Na, Cl). The ANC of fly ashes at pH 4 (3.6-9.6 molH(+)/kg) were higher than that observed for the bottom ashes (1.2-2.1 molH(+)/kg). Ashes were also characterized for persistent organic pollutants (POP), such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and paradibenzodioxines and furanes (PCDD/F). Contents were found to be much higher in fly ash than in bottom ash streams. None of the PAH levels did reach the current national limit value of sewage sludge application in soils or the guide value for ash in north European countries. However, PCDD/F contents, which are not regulated, varied from non-detectable levels to high amounts, regardless the level of loss on ignition (LOI) or unburned carbon content in fly ashes. Given the current ash management practices and possible use of blends of bottom and fly ash streams as soil conditioners resembles clear the urgent need to regulate ash utilization in soils, incorporating limit values both for heavy metals, PAH and PCDD/F.

  20. ASH position paper: hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindheimer, Marshall D; Taler, Sandra J; Cunningham, F Gary

    2009-04-01

    The American Society of Hypertension is publishing a series of Position Papers in their official journals throughout the 2008-2009 years. The following Position Paper originally appeared: JASH. 2008;2(6):484-494. Hypertension complicates 5% to 7% of all pregnancies. A subset of preeclampsia, characterized by new-onset hypertension, proteinuria, and multisystem involvement, is responsible for substantial maternal and fetal morbidity and is a marker for future cardiac and metabolic disease. This American Society of Hypertension, Inc (ASH) position paper summarizes the clinical spectrum of hypertension in pregnancy, focusing on preeclampsia. Recent research breakthroughs relating to etiology are briefly reviewed. Topics include classification of the different forms of hypertension during pregnancy, status of the tests available to predict preeclampsia, and strategies to prevent preeclampsia and to manage this serious disease. The use of antihypertensive drugs in pregnancy, and the prevention and treatment of the convulsive phase of preeclampsia, eclampsia, with intravenous magnesium sulfate is also highlighted. Of special note, this guideline article, specifically requested, reviewed, and accepted by ASH, includes solicited review advice from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

  1. Interspecific Proteomic Comparisons Reveal Ash Phloem Genes Potentially Involved in Constitutive Resistance to the Emerald Ash Borer

    OpenAIRE

    Justin G A Whitehill; Alexandra Popova-Butler; Green-Church, Kari B.; Koch, Jennifer L; Herms, Daniel A.; Pierluigi Bonello

    2011-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive wood-boring beetle that has killed millions of ash trees since its accidental introduction to North America. All North American ash species (Fraxinus spp.) that emerald ash borer has encountered so far are susceptible, while an Asian species, Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica), which shares an evolutionary history with emerald ash borer, is resistant. Phylogenetic evidence places North American black ash (F. nigra) and Manchurian ash in ...

  2. Wood pellet fly ash and bottom ash as an effective liming agent and nutrient source for rye grass (Lolium perenne L.) and oats (Avena sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nathan D; Michael Rutherford, P; Thring, Ronald W; Helle, Steve S

    2012-01-01

    Fly ash (FA) and bottom ash (BA) from a softwood pellet boiler were characterized and evaluated as soil amendments. In a greenhouse study, two plant species (rye grass, Lolium perenne L. and oats, Avena sativa) were grown in three different treatments (1% FA, 1% BA, non-amended control) of a silty loam soil. Total concentrations of plant nutrients Ca, K, Mg, P and Zn in both ashes were elevated compared to conventional wood ash. Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Pb, Se and Zn were found to be elevated in the FA relative to BA and the non-amended soil. At 28 d, oat above-ground biomass was found to be significantly greater in soil amended with FA. Potassium and Mo plant tissue concentrations were significantly increased by addition of either ash, and FA significantly increased Zn tissue concentrations. Cadmium and Hg tissue concentrations were elevated in some cases. As soil amendments, either pellet ash is an effective liming agent and nutrient source, but high concentrations of Cd and Zn in FA may preclude its use as an agricultural soil amendment in some jurisdictions. Lower ash application rates than those used in this study (i.e. <1%) may still provide sufficient nutrients and effective neutralization of soil acidity.

  3. DURABILITY OF HARDENED FLY ASH PASTE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical properties and durability ( mainly frost-resistance and carbonation resistance ) of fly ash-CaO-CaSO4 .2H2O hardened paste are studied. The relationship among durability of harden ed fly ash paste, the quantity and distribution of hydrates and the initial p aste texture of hardened fly ash paste is presented.

  4. A method for treating bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rem, P.C.; Van Craaikamp, H.; Berkhout, S.P.M.; Sierhuis, W.; Van Kooy, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    A method for treating bottom ash from a waste incineration plant. The invention relates in particular to a method for treating bottom ash from a domestic waste incineration plant. In accordance with the invention bottom ash having a size ranging up to 2 mm is treated by removing a previously determi

  5. Assessing the environmental impact of ashes used in a landfill cover construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travar, I; Lidelöw, S; Andreas, L; Tham, G; Lagerkvist, A

    2009-04-01

    Large amounts of construction materials will be needed in Europe in anticipation for capping landfills that will be closed due to the tightening up of landfill legislation. This study was conducted to assess the potential environmental impacts of using refuse derived fuel (RDF) and municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) ashes as substitutes for natural materials in landfill cover designs. The leaching of substances from a full-scale landfill cover test area built with different fly and bottom ashes was evaluated based on laboratory tests and field monitoring. The water that drained off above the liner (drainage) and the water that percolated through the liner into the landfill (leachate) were contaminated with Cl(-), nitrogen and several trace elements (e.g., As, Cu, Mo, Ni and Se). The drainage from layers containing ash will probably require pre-treatment before discharge. The leachate quality from the ash cover is expected to have a minor influence on overall landfill leachate quality because the amounts generated from the ash covers were low, modelling indicated that precipitation of clay minerals and other secondary compounds in the ash liner was possible within 3 years after construction, which could contribute to the retention of trace elements in the liner in the long term. Hence, from an environmental view point, the placement of ashes in layers above the liner is more critical than within the liner. PMID:19081235

  6. Optimization of the recycle used oil and its fuel quality characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyitayo A. AFOLABI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of recycling of used engine oil with clay sample has been studied using Response Surface Methodology. Acid concentration, activation temperature and time were the independent variables considered in optimizing the recycling of used oil and six responses evaluated. The surface characterization of the clay samples was performed using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectra and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET analyses. The relationship between independent variables and response was described by a second order polynomial equation. Statistical testing of the model was performed with F-test to obtain the correlation between the experimental data and predicted results for all responses. The adequacy of the model equations were evaluated by the Adjusted and Predicted R2 coefficients observed to be close to each other for all the six responses. Data obtained from recycling used oil using clay sample showed the optimum condition as; activation temperature of 106.80oC, acid concentration of 3M and activation time of 180 minutes. A yield of 66.28% was obtained at optimum condition and characterized fuel qualities found close to fresh oil used as standard in this work. The surface area and adsorption capacity of raw clay and activated clay samples was observed to have increase from 19.8m2/g to 437.83m2/g and 1.41 mg/g to 8.64 mg/g respectively. This difference adequately described the improvement of the adsorption phenomena of the activated clay over raw clay samples.

  7. Co-sintering of treated APC-residues with bottom ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergfeldt, B.; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Vehlow, J.;

    2001-01-01

    the influence of co-sintering of Ferrox products with bottom ashes on the quality of the residues and the effects on the combustion process. Only few elements showed higher concentrations in the bottom ashes of these co-combustion tests compared to reference tests. No significant effect on the leaching...... behaviour of the bottom ashes could be found. During the co-combustion process an increase in SO2 concentrations in the raw gas and slightly lower temperatures in the fuel bed could be observed....

  8. Methods to characterize environmental settings of stream and groundwater sampling sites for National Water-Quality Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Naomi; Hitt, Kerie J.; Price, Curtis V.; Falcone, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of natural and anthropogenic features that define the environmental settings of sampling sites for streams and groundwater, including drainage basins and groundwater study areas, is an essential component of water-quality and ecological investigations being conducted as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment program. Quantitative characterization of environmental settings, combined with physical, chemical, and biological data collected at sampling sites, contributes to understanding the status of, and influences on, water-quality and ecological conditions. To support studies for the National Water-Quality Assessment program, a geographic information system (GIS) was used to develop a standard set of methods to consistently characterize the sites, drainage basins, and groundwater study areas across the nation. This report describes three methods used for characterization-simple overlay, area-weighted areal interpolation, and land-cover-weighted areal interpolation-and their appropriate applications to geographic analyses that have different objectives and data constraints. In addition, this document records the GIS thematic datasets that are used for the Program's national design and data analyses.

  9. Wildfire Ash: Chemical Composition, Ash-Soil Interactions and Environmental Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna; Hamzi, Seham; Wittenberg, Lea

    2015-04-01

    Of the five classical factors of soil formation, climate, parent material, topography, time, organisms, and recently recognized human activity, it is the latter factor which discretely includes fire and post-burn impact. However, it is considered that soil undergoing fire just experience a temporary removal of the top organic horizon, thus slightly modified and often labeled as 'temporarily disturbed' soil or soil 'under restoration/rehabilitation'. In fact the suggested seventh factor, post-burned produced ash, can act both dependently and independently of the other soil forming factors (Levin et al., 2013; Certini 2013). They are interdependent in cases where ash influences occur on time scales similar to 'natural' soil formation (Keesstra et ai., 2014) such as changes in vegetation. On the other hand, in post-fire areas a strong dependency is expected between soil-water retention mechanism, climate and topography. Wild-land fires exert many changes on the physical, chemical, mineralogical, biological, and morphological properties of soil that, in turn, affect the soil's hydrology and nutrient flux, modifying its ability to support vegetation and resist erosion. The ash produced by forest fires is a complex mixture composed of organic and inorganic particles characterized by vary physical-chemical and morphological properties. The importance of this study is straightforwardly related to the frequency and large-scales wildfires in Mediterranean region. In fact, wildfires are major environmental and land management concern in the world, where the number and severity of wildfires has increased during the past decades (Bodi, 2013). Certini (2013) assumed that cumulatively all of the vegetated land is burned in about 31 years annually affecting 330-430 Mha (over 3% of the Earth's surface) and wide range of land cover types worldwide including forests, peatlands, shrublands and grasslands. Whereas, the fire is identified as an important factor in soil formation, the

  10. A comparison between sludge ash and fly ash on the improvement in soft soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Deng-Fong; Lin, Kae-Long; Luo, Huan-Lin

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the strength of soft cohesive subgrade soil was improved by applying sewage sludge ash as a soil stabilizer. Test results obtained were compared with earlier tests conducted on soil samples treated with fly ash. Five different proportions of sludge ash and fly ash were mixed with soft cohesive soil, and tests such as pH value, compaction, California bearing ratio, unconfined compressive strength (UCS), and triaxial compression were performed to understand soil strength improvement because of the addition of both ashes. Results indicate that pH values increase with extending curing age for soil with sludge ash added. The UCS of sludge ash/soil were 1.4-2 times better than untreated soil. However, compressive strength of sludge ash/soil was 20-30 kPa less than fly ash/soil. The bearing capacities for both fly ash/soil and sludge ash/soil were five to six times and four times, respectively, higher than the original capacity. Moreover, the cohesive parameter of shear strength rose with increased amounts of either ash added. Friction angle, however, decreased with increased amounts of either ash. Consequently, results show that sewage sludge ash can potentially replace fly ash in the improvement of the soft cohesive soil. PMID:17269231

  11. Radioactivity of wood ash; Puun tuhkan radioaktiivisuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantavaara, A.; Moring, M

    2000-01-01

    STUK (Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority) has investigated natural and artificial radioactivity in wood ash and radiation exposure from radionuclides in ash since 1996. The aim was to consider both handling of ash and different ways of using ash. In all 87 ash samples were collected from 22 plants using entirely or partially wood for their energy production in 1996-1997. The sites studied represented mostly chemical forest industry, sawmills or district heat production. Most plants used fluidised bed combustion technique. Samples of both fly ash and bottom ash were studied. The activity concentrations of radionuclides in samples of, e.g., dried fly ash from fuel containing more than 80% wood were determined. The means ranged from 2000 to less than 50 Bq kg{sup -1}, in decreasing order: {sup 137}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 210}Pb,{sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 235}U. In bott radionuclide contents decreased in the same order as in fly ash, but were smaller, and {sup 210}Pb was hardly detectable. The NH{sub 4}Ac extractable fractions of activities for isotopes of alkaline elements (K, Cs) in bottom ash were lower than in fly ash, whereas solubility of heavier isotopes was low. Safety requirements defined by STUK in ST-guide 12.2 for handling of peat ash were fulfilled at each of the sites. Use of ash for land-filling and construction of streets was minimal during the sampling period. Increasing this type of ash use had often needed further investigations, as description of the use of additional materials that attenuate radiation. Fertilisation of forests with wood ash adds slightly to the external irradiation in forests, but will mostly decrease doses received through use of timber, berries, mushrooms and game meat. (orig.)

  12. Temporal evolution of wildfire ash and its implications for water pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan H.; Otero, Xose L.; Chafer, Chris J.

    2015-04-01

    soluble major and trace elements. 'Aged ash' was richer in soil-derived elements (Al, Si and Fe) and exhibited higher bulk density and a lower rainfall storage capacity. We will discuss the similarities and differences between 'fresh' and 'aged' ash properties and identify the potential main threats to water quality derived from each of them. The water contamination potential from wildfire ash varies depending, among other factors, on the time between the production and transport of the ash into the hydrological system. Therefore, to evaluate the threat of wildfire ash to water quality, not only its intrinsic characteristics, but also its temporal evolution in conjunction with the probability of ash erosion to occur at a given time, need to be evaluated. These additional parameters highlight the complexity of the interaction of many different factors in the post-fire landscape.

  13. Estimation and characterization of physical and inorganic chemical indicators of water quality by using SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Muntadher A.; Toumi, Abdelmalek; Khenchaf, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Recently, remote sensing is considering one of the most important tools in studies of water scattering and water characterization. Traditional methods for monitoring pollutants depended on optical satellite rather than Radar data. Thus, many of Water Quality Parameters (WQP) from optical imagery are still limited. In this paper, a new approach based on the TerraSAR-X images has been presented which it is used to map the region of interest and to estimate physical and chemical WQPs. This approach based on a Small Perturbation Model (SPM) for the electromagnetic scattering is applied by using the Elfouhaily spectrum. A series of inversions have been included in this model started by finding the reflectivity from backscattering coefficients which are calculated from SAR images. Another inversion has been applied to find dielectric constant from the calculation models of the reflectivity (in HH and VV polarizations). Then, a Stogryn Debye formulation has been used to estimate temperature and salinity of water surface from SAR images. After many derivations we got a new model able to estimate temperature and salinity directly from backscattering coefficients obtained from radar images. Inorganic chemical parameters which are represented by Total Dissolved Salts (TDS) and the Electrical Conductivity (EC) are estimated directly from salinity. A tow dataset of instu data have been used to validate this work. The validation included a comparison between parameters measured in situ and those estimated from Terra SAR-X image.

  14. Characterization of bone quality in prostate cancer bone metastases using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaohong; Patil, Chetan; Morrissey, Colm; Roudier, Martine P.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common primary tumor in men, with a high propensity to metastasize to bone. Bone metastases in prostate cancer are associated with active pathologic bone remodeling, leading to increased mortality and morbidity. Detailed characterization of bone metastases is important in the management of prostate cancer. Raman spectroscopy was applied in this study to investigate the structure and composition of metastatic bone in prostate cancer with the ultimate goal of identifying spectral features that are related to the alterations in bone quality as the bone metastases develop. Osteoblastic-, osteolytic- and tumor-absent bone specimens from prostate cancer patients were investigated using bench-top Raman microspectroscopy. Raman derived measurements of collagen mineralization, mineral crystallinity, and carbonate substitution were calculated. The osteolytic lesions demonstrated significantly lower collagen mineralization, determined by phosphate ν1/proline, and higher carbonate substitution than normal and osteoblastic bones. Mineral crystallinity was significantly lower in both blastic and lytic specimens. In addition, a significant increase in the ratio of hydroxyproine: proline was observed in the osteoblastic specimen, indicating an increase in the content of hydroxyproline at the blastic lesions. This study demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy shows promise in determining alterations in osteoblastic and osteolytic bone metastases as well as assessing the response of metastatic bone to therapies.

  15. The reuse of bio ash for the production of concrete : a Danish case study[Held jointly with the 4. Canadian organic residuals and biosolids managment conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjersgaard, D.; Jacobsen, B.N. [Avedoere Wastewater Services, Hvidovre (Denmark); Rindel, K. [Lynettefaellesskabet, Copenhagen K (Denmark); Andreasen, L.; Larsen, F. [Unicon Ltd., Copenhagen S (Denmark); Nyegaard, P.; Pade, C.; Bodker, J. [Danish Technological Inst., Taastrup (Denmark)

    2007-07-01

    Urban wastewater treatment plants are continuously modifying and optimizing the handling and disposal of produced solid waste. In Europe, an increasing part of the produced solid waste or sludge is incinerated. One option for the reuse of sludge ash is to use the dry sludge ash as an ingredient for the production of concrete since fly ash has been used for several years as a valuable constituent in concrete production recipes. This paper presented information on biocrete, a project that is being undertaken in order facilitate and increase the reuse of bio ash or sludge ash for the production of concrete. The paper discussed the project partners; installation of full scale equipment; and analytical characterization of bio ash. Convenient equipment for the handling of dry bio ash was installed at two Danish wastewater treatment plants and at 3 ready-mixed concrete production plants. In 2006, 1100 tons of bio ash was reused for the production of concrete. The paper also discussed the technical and environmental properties of bio ash concrete. It was concluded that it is feasible to use bio ash for concrete production. In addition, bio ash has less pozzolanic properties than fly ash, providing good function as a filler in concrete. 4 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Contribution of Ash Content Related to Methane Adsorption Behaviors of Bituminous Coals

    OpenAIRE

    Yanyan Feng; Wen Yang; Wei Chu

    2014-01-01

    Methane adsorption isotherms on coals with varying ash contents were investigated. The textural properties were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm at 77 K, and methane adsorption characteristics were measured at pressures up to 4.0 MPa at 298 K, 313 K, and 328 K, respectively. The Dubinin-Astakhov model and the Polanyi potential theory were employed to fit the experimental data. As a result, ash content correlated strongly to methane adsorption capacity. Over the ash range stu...

  17. Use of Incineration MSW Ash: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H. K. Lam

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI ashes, with a main focus on the chemical properties of the ashes. Furthermore, the possible treatment methods for the utilization of ash, namely, separation processes, solidification/stabilization and thermal processes, are also discussed. Seven types of MSWI ash utilization are reviewed, namely, cement and concrete production, road pavement, glasses and ceramics, agriculture, stabilizing agent, adsorbents and zeolite production. The practical use of MSWI ash shows a great contribution to waste minimization as well as resources conservation.

  18. Sorption and chemical transformation of PAHs on coal fly ash. Technical progress report No. 1, [October--December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamantov, G.; Wehry, E.L.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this research is to characterize the interactions of coal fly ash with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their derivatives, and to understand the influence of the surface properties of coal ash (and other atmospheric particles) on the chemical transformations of polycyclic aromatic compounds. Studies to be carried out in this project include: (1) Fractionation of heterogeneous coal fly ash samples into different particle types varying in size and chemical composition (carbonaceous, mineral-magnetic, and mineral nonmagnetic); (2) Measurement of the rates of chemical transformation of PAHs and PAH derivatives (especially nitro-PAHs) and the manner in which the rates of such processes are influenced by the chemical and physical properties of coal fly ash particles; (3) Chromatographic and spectroscopic studies of the nature of the interactions of coal fly ash particles with PAHs and PAH derivatives; (4) Characterization of the fractal nature of fly ash particles (via surface area measurements) and the relationships of ``surface roughness`` of fly ash particles to the chemical behavior of PAHs sorbed on coal ash particles; (5) Identification of the major products of chemical transformation of PAHs on coal ash particles, and examination of any effects that may exist of the nature of the coal ash surface on the identities of PAH transformation products; and (6) Studies of the influence of other sorbed species on the chemical behavior of PAHs and PAH derivatives on fly ash surfaces. PAHs are deposited, under controlled laboratory conditions, onto coal ash surfaces from the vapor phase, in order to mimic the processes by which PAHs are deposited onto particulate matter in the atmosphere.

  19. Fresh State and Mechanical Properties of Self Compacting Concrete Incorporating High Volume Fly Ash

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad N; Zulaika M. S.; Samad A. A. A.; Goh W. I.; Hadipramana J.; Wirdawati A.

    2016-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete is considered as a concrete which can be placed and compacted under its own weight without vibration. The elimination of the need for compaction leads to better quality concrete and substantial improvement of working conditions. This paper investigates the fresh state and mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete incorporating high volume fly ash. Fly Ash (FA) was mixed into self-compacting concrete (SCC) as a replacement for cement. Portland cement (PC) was p...

  20. Characterization of the Water Quality Status on a Stretch of River Lérez around a Small Hydroelectric Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Valero

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The renewable energy emerged as a solution to the environmental problems caused by the conventional sources of energy. Small hydropower (SHP is claimed to cause negligible effects on the ecosystem, although some environmental values are threatened and maintenance of an adequate water quality should be ensured. This work provides a characterization of the water quality status in a river stretch around a SHP plant on river Lérez, northwest Spain, for four years after its construction. The ecological and chemical status of the water as well as the ecological quality of the riparian habitat, were used as measures of quality. Data were compared with the water quality requirements. The variations in the quality parameters were analyzed over time and over the river sections with respect to the SHP plant elements. Two years after construction, the temperature and dissolved oxygen values achieved conditions for salmonid water and close to the reference condition, while pH values were low. The Iberian Biological Monitoring Working Party (IBMWP index showed a positive trend from two years after the construction and stabilized at “unpolluted or not considerably altered water”. Quality parameters did not present significant differences between sampling points. The SHP plant construction momentarily altered the quality characteristics of the water.

  1. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, January--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    1996-09-01

    The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the benefication of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7-2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash benefication have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550-750{degrees}C. The P{sub O{sub 2}} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aughenbaugh, Katherine; Stutzman, Paul; Juenger, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS), calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS), a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  3. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  4. Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Edmiston, C. Scott; Taylor, Michelle L.; Leemon, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Fish Creek, an approximately 25-kilometer-long tributary to Snake River, is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Fish Creek is an important water body because it is used for irrigation, fishing, and recreation and adds scenic value to the Jackson Hole properties it runs through. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek has been increasing since the early 2000s. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the hydrology, water quality, and biologic communities of Fish Creek during 2007–11. The hydrology of Fish Creek is strongly affected by groundwater contributions from the area known as the Snake River west bank, which lies east of Fish Creek and west of Snake River. Because of this continuous groundwater discharge to the creek, land-use activities in the west bank area can affect the groundwater quality. Evaluation of nitrate isotopes and dissolved-nitrate concentrations in groundwater during the study indicated that nitrate was entering Fish Creek from groundwater, and that the source of nitrate was commonly a septic/sewage effluent or manure source, or multiple sources, potentially including artificial nitrogen fertilizers, natural soil organic matter, and mixtures of sources. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate and orthophosphate, which are key nutrients for growth of aquatic plants, generally were low in Fish Creek and occasionally were less than reporting levels (not detected). One potential reason for the low nutrient concentrations is that nutrients were being consumed by aquatic plant life that increases during the summer growing season, as a result of the seasonal increase in temperature and larger number of daylight hours. Several aspects of Fish Creek’s hydrology contribute to higher productivity and biovolume of aquatic plants in Fish Creek than typically observed in streams of its size in

  5. ACAA fly ash basics: quick reference card

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Fly ash is a fine powdery material created when coal is burned to generate electricity. Before escaping into the environment via the utility stacks, the ash is collected and may be stored for beneficial uses or disposed of, if necessary. The use of fly ash provides environmental benefits, such as the conservation of natural resources, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and eliminating the needed for ash disposal in landfills. It is also a valuable mineral resource that is used in construction and manufacturing. Fly ash is used in the production of Portland cement, concrete, mortars and stuccos, manufactured aggregates along with various agricultural applications. As mineral filler, fly ash can be used for paints, shingles, carpet backing, plastics, metal castings and other purposes. This quick reference card is intended to provide the reader basic source, identification and composition, information specifically related to fly ash.

  6. Control methods for mitigating biomass ash-related problems in fluidized beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvuka, D; Zografos, D; Alevizos, G

    2008-06-01

    Embodiment of biomass combustion technologies in the Cretan energy system will play an important role and will contribute to the local development. The main biomass fuels of Crete are the agricultural residues olive kernel and olive tree wood. Future applications of these biofuels may create, among others, operational problems related to ash effects. In this regard, the thermal behavior of the ashes during lab-scale fluidized bed combustion tests was examined, in terms of slagging/fouling and agglomeration of bed material. Control methodologies for mitigating ash problems were applied, such as leaching the raw fuels with water and using different mineral additives during combustion. The ashes and the bed material were characterized in terms of mineralogical, chemical and morphological analyses and the slagging/fouling and agglomeration propensities were determined. The results showed that fly ashes were rich in Ca, Si and Fe minerals and contained substantial amounts of alkali, falling within the range of "certain or probable slagging/fouling". Leaching of the raw fuels with water resulted in a significant reduction of the problematic elements K, Na, Cl and S in the fly ashes. The use of fuel additives decreased the concentrations of alkali and iron minerals in the fly ashes. With clay additives calcium compounds were enriched in the bottom ash, while with carbonate additives they were enriched in the fly ash. Fuel additives or water leaching reduced the slagging/fouling potential due to alkali. Under the conditions of the combustion tests, no signs of ash deposition or bed agglomeration were noticed. PMID:17826986

  7. Modelling the resuspension of volcanic ash from the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, H. F.; Wallace, K.

    2015-12-01

    The 1912 eruption of Novarupta-Katmai was the world's most voluminous eruption since the 1815 eruption of Tombora. The eruption produced 17 km3 of ashfall and 11 km3 of pyroclastic flow deposits that filled nearby valleys, creating what is today known as the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes. These voluminous pyroclastic deposits continue to pose hazards when strong winds in the valley resuspend ash in times of low snow cover. These resuspension events may be confined to the valley and only recorded when there are local observations (web camera images, field crew). Occasionally, however, these events can loft ash up to altitudes of several kilometers and extend up to 250 km downwind, where it becomes an aviation hazard. A compilation of satellite observations and pilot reports indicate that such significant events occurred on at least 19 occasions since 2003. The longest duration events occurred in the autumn months of September and October. Predicting the resuspension of ash requires estimates of when the ash is exposed (low snow cover), the magnitude of surface wind gusts, and the threshold friction velocity (u*). Models of u* require a characterization of the source ash (density, grain-size distribution) as well as soil moisture. We have sampled source deposits and have installed instruments in the Katmai region to record the relevant meteorological parameters in order to better predict these resuspension events. Using real-time measurements coupled with high-resolution (6 km, 1 hour) meteorological forecast products and a reanalysis of conditions that produced historic events, we constrain the parameters applicable the resuspension of Novarupta ash thus improving our ability to forecast this potential ash hazard. The volcanic ash dispersion and deposition model, Ash3d, will be used to forecast the transport of the resuspended ash.

  8. Copper speciation in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash leachates; Kopparformer i lakvatten fraan energiaskor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Susanna; Gustafsson, Jon Petter [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Schaik, Joris van; Berggren Kleja, Dan [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Hees, Patrick van [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    The formation of copper (Cu) complexes with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in bottom ash from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) may increase the total amount of Cu released but at the same time reduce its toxicity. In this study, DOC in a MSWI bottom ash leachate was characterized and the Cu-binding properties of different DOC fractions in the ash leachate and in a soil solution were studied. This knowledge may be used for improved environmental assessment of MSWI bottom ash in engineering applications. The Cu{sup 2+} activity at different pH values was measured potentiometrically using a Cu-ion selective electrode (Cu-ISE). Experimental copper complexation results were compared to speciation calculations made in Visual MINTEQ with the NICA-Donnan model and the Stockholm Humic Model (SHM). The MSWI bottom ash leachate contained a larger proportion of hydrophilic organic carbon than the investigated soil solution and other natural waters. The hydrophilic fraction of both samples showed Cu{sup 2+} binding properties similar to that of the bulk, cation-exchanged, leachate. For the ash leachate, the pH dependence of the Cu activity was not correctly captured by neither the SHM nor the NICA-Donnan model, but for the soil solution the model predictions of Cu speciation were in good agreement with the obtained results. The complex formation properties of the ash DOC appears to be less pH-dependent than what is assumed for DOC in natural waters. Hence, models calibrated for natural DOC may give inconsistent simulations of Cu-DOC complexation in MSWI bottom ash leachate. A Biotic Ligand Model for Daphnia Magna was used to provide an estimate of the copper concentrations at LC50 for a simulated bottom ash leachate. It was concluded that the Cu concentrations in certain bottom ash leachates are high enough to pose an ecotoxicological risk; however, after dilution and soil sorption, the risks for neighboring water bodies are most likely negligible. Three processes were

  9. Treatment and recycling of incinerated ash using thermal plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T W; Chu, J P; Tzeng, C C; Chen, Y S

    2002-01-01

    To treat incinerated ash is an important issue in Taiwan. Incinerated ashes contain a considerable amount of hazardous materials such as dioxins and heavy metals. If these hazardous materials are improperly treated or disposed of, they shall cause detrimental secondary contamination. Thermal plasma vitrification is a robust technology to treat and recycle the ash residues. Under the high temperature plasma environment, incinerated ashes are vitrified into benign slag with large volume reduction and extreme detoxification. Several one-step heat treatment processes are carried out at four temperatures (i.e. 850, 950, 1,050 and 1,150 degrees C) to obtain various "microstructure materials". The major phase to form these materials is a solid solution of gehlenite (Ca2Al2SiO7) and åkermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7) belonging to the melilite group. The physical and mechanical properties of the microstructure materials are improved by using one-step post-heat treatment process after plasma vitrification. These microstructure materials with good quality have great potential to serve as a viable alternative for construction applications.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of chitosan-graft-poly(acrylic acid)/rice husk ash hydrogels composites; Sintese e caracterizacao de hidrogeis compositos de cinza da casca de arroz e quitosana enxertada com poli(acido acrilico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Francisco H.A. [Universidade Estadual Vale do Acarau - UVA, Sobral, CE (Brazil); Lopes, Gabriel V.; Pereira, Antonio G.B.; Fajardo, Andre R.; Muniz, Edvani C. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa - UEM, PR (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    According to environmental concerns, super absorbent hydrogel composites were synthesized based on rice husk ash (RHA), an industrial waste, and Chitosan-graft-poly(acrylic acid). The WAXS and FTIR data confirmed the syntheses of hydrogel composites. The effect of crystalline or amorphous RHA on water uptake was investigated. It was found that the RHA in crystalline form induces higher water capacity (W{sub eq}) of composites hydrogels due to the fact that the intra-interactions among silanol groups on RHA make available new sites in the polymer matrix, which could interact to water. (author)

  11. Uses of -Fe2O3 and fly ash as solid adsorbents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Shakhapure; H Vijayanand; S Basavaraja; V Hiremath; A Venkataraman

    2005-12-01

    Solid adsorbents have shown great promise for control of particulate and non-particulate matter and as gas sensing devices in recent times. In the present study, adsorption of environmental toxic pollutant such as lead ions on solid adsorbents viz. -Fe2O3 and fly ash, are reported. Considerable adsorption was observed on fly ash when compared to -Fe2O3 surface. These studies are characterized by employing solid state and solution studies.

  12. Utilization of zeolites synthesized from coal ash for methylene blue removal from water

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Alves Fungaro; Mariza Bruno

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of methylene blue from aqueous solution was carried out using zeolites synthesized from coal ash as low-cost adsorbents. The coal ash sample was converted to zeolites by hydrothermal treatment using different synthesis parameters. The materials were characterized by physical-chemical analysis, XRD and SEM studies. The adsorption isotherms can be fitted by Freundlich model. The values of the adsorption capacity of adsorbents were similar for adsorbents. Kinetic studies indicate ...

  13. Hail formation triggers rapid ash aggregation in volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eaton, Alexa; Mastin, Larry G.; Herzog, M.; Schwaiger, Hans F.; Schneider, David J.; Wallace, Kristi; Clarke, Amanda B

    2015-01-01

    During explosive eruptions, airborne particles collide and stick together, accelerating the fallout of volcanic ash and climate-forcing aerosols. This aggregation process remains a major source of uncertainty both in ash dispersal forecasting and interpretation of eruptions from the geological record. Here we illuminate the mechanisms and timescales of particle aggregation from a well-characterized ‘wet’ eruption. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska incorporated water from the surface (in this case, a glacier), which is a common occurrence during explosive volcanism worldwide. Observations from C-band weather radar, fall deposits, and numerical modeling demonstrate that volcanic hail formed rapidly in the eruption plume, leading to mixed-phase aggregation of ~95% of the fine ash and stripping much of the cloud out of the atmosphere within 30 minutes. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanism of hail-like aggregation that contributes to the anomalously rapid fallout of fine ash and the occurrence of concentrically-layered aggregates in volcanic deposits.

  14. Characterizing eye movements during temporal and global quality assessment of h.264 compressed video sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantel, Claire; Guyader, Nathalie; Ladret, Patricia; Ionescu, Gelu; Kunlin, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Studies have shown that the deployment of visual attention is closely link to the assessment of image or video quality, though this link is not yet fully understood. The influence of rating temporal quality of compressed videos over the way an observer deploys his attention is investigated in this paper. We set-up a subjective experiment in which the eye movements of observers are recorded during three different tasks: a free-viewing task (FT), a global quality assessment task and a temporal quality assessment task. The FT acts as a reference to which we compare the eye movements during the two other tasks. As previously shown, observers assessing global quality gaze at locations dissimilar to those fixated during the FT. For temporal quality assessment, it seems that the fixated locations are closer to FT than the global quality assessment fixated locations. Our results suggest that the locations observers look at do not depend on the displayed video quality level. Quality however influences the way participants look at videos: the lower the quality, the longer they gaze at a precise location. The area fixated seems to be much smaller during the quality assessment tasks than during the FT for either perfect or poor quality level. The evolution over time of all indicators suggests that, during the first 1 or 2 seconds, the signal properties of the videos are the main attractors for the participants' eye movements. Instructions only seem to play a role afterwards on the deployment of the participants' visual attention.

  15. Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Leemon, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Fish Creek, a tributary to the Snake River, is about 25 river kilometers long and is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek have been increasing in recent years. To address this concern, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the water quality and biological communities in Fish Creek. Water-quality samples were collected for analyses of physical properties and water chemistry (nutrients, nitrate isotopes, and wastewater chemicals) between March 2007 and October 2008 from seven surface-water sites and three groundwater wells. During this same period, aquatic plant and macroinvertebrate samples were collected and habitat characteristics were measured at the surface-water sites. The main objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate nutrient concentrations (that influence biological indicators of eutrophication) and potential sources of nutrients by using stable isotope analysis and other indicator chemicals (such as caffeine and disinfectants) that could provide evidence of anthropogenic sources, such as wastewater or septic tank contamination in Fish Creek and adjacent groundwater, and (2) characterize the algal, macrophyte, and macroinvertebrate communities and habitat of Fish Creek. Nitrate was the dominant species of dissolved nitrogen present in all samples and was the only bioavailable species detected at concentrations greater than the laboratory reporting level in all surface-water samples. Average concentrations of dissolved nitrate in surface water were largest in samples collected from the two sites with seasonal flow near Teton Village and decreased downstream; the smallest concentration was at downstream site A-Wck. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate in groundwater were consistently greater than concentrations in corresponding surface-water sites during the same sampling event

  16. Effect of additives in reducing ash sintering and slagging in biomass combustion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liang

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate sintering and slagging behaviors of biofuels during combustion processes. Biofuels tested are derived from the agricultural sector, wood and furniture industry as well as from municipal sewage sludge. It was also the aim to test and evaluate additives that can prevent and abate biomass ash sintering by conducting laboratory and industrial scale tests. Sintering characteristics of sewage sludge ashes at elevated temperatures were investigated by means of different laboratory methods. Utilizing of phosphorus participation agents Al2(SO4)3 or Fe2(SO4)3 caused substantially high contents of aluminum or iron in the studied sewage sludge ashes, respectively. High initial melting temperatures over 1100 degrees C and low sintering tendencies were observed from the sewage sludge ashes rich in aluminum. It was related to presence and formation of the inert mineral phases such as aluminum oxide, quartz and calcium aluminum silicates in the aluminum rich sewage sludge ashes at elevated temperatures. A low melting temperature, about 994 degree C, was detected from the iron rich sewage sludge ash. Severe sintering of this sewage sludge ash was mainly due to generation of low temperature melting iron silicates, as results of interaction and re-assemblage of hematite (Fe2O3), quartz (SiO2) and alkali feldspars under heating. Fusion behaviors of corn cob ashes under rising temperatures were characterized. The work revealed that chemical compositions of corn cob ashes are dominated by potassium, silicon, chlorine and phosphorus. However, the relative concentrations of these principal elements are considerably different for three studied corn cob ashes, which have major influence on ash transformation reactions and sintering tendencies. Compared with the other two, the chemical composition of the Waimanalo corn cob (WCob) was characterized with the highest K/Cl, Si/(Ca+Mg) and (Si+P+K)/(Ca+Mg) molar ratios, which was favorable for

  17. Initial Characterization and Water Quality Assessment of Stream Landscapes in Northern Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Hofmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive monitoring project (2006–2013 provided data on hydrology, hydromorphology, climatology, water physico-chemistry, sedimentology, macroinvertebrate community and fish diversity in the Kharaa River basin in northern Mongolia, thus enabling, for the first time, a detailed characterization of the stream landscapes. Surface waters were categorized into separate “water bodies” according to their identifiable abiotic and biocoenotic features, subsequently creating the smallest management sub-units within the river basin. Following the approach of the European Water Framework Directive (EC-WFD, in order to obtain a good ecological status (GES, four clearly identifiable water bodies in the Kharaa River main channel and seven water bodies consisting of the basin’s tributaries were delineated. The type-specific undisturbed reference state of various aquatic ecosystems was identified in the assessment and used to set standards for restoration goals. With regards to water quality and quantity, the upper reaches of the Kharaa River basin in the Khentii Mountains were classified as having a “good” ecological and chemical status. Compared with these natural reference conditions in the upper reaches, the initial risk assessment identified several “hot spot” regions with impacted water bodies in the middle and lower basin. Subsequently, the affected water bodies are at risk of not obtaining a level of good ecological and/or chemical status for surface waters. Finally, a matrix of cause-response relationships and stressor complexes has been developed and is presented here. The applicability of management approaches is discussed to better foster the development of a sustainable river basin management plan. The application of natural references states offers a sound scientific base to assess the impact of anthropogenic activities across the Kharaa River basin.

  18. Caracterização física e mecânica de argamassas à base de cimento Portland e cinza de casca de arroz residual Physical and mechanical characterization on Portland cement mortar with rice husk ash addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S Rodrigues

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A casca de arroz, utilizada como fonte de energia em indústrias de beneficiamento de arroz, converte-se, depois da queima, em uma cinza residual. Esse resíduo, ainda sem um destino adequado, é muitas vezes depositado em grandes áreas abertas e provoca elevado impacto ambiental. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a viabilidade de utilização da cinza de casca de arroz (CCA residual na produção de argamassas, como substituta parcial do cimento. A caracterização da CCA foi realizada por meio da análise de fluorescência de raios-X (composição química, análise do teor de carbono e difração de raios-X; também foi realizada análise granulométrica a laser. Os corpos de prova foram submetidos a dois tipos de exposição: ambientes externo e interno, com duração máxima de cinco meses. Foram realizados os ensaios de resistência à compressão simples e não destrutivo (velocidade do pulso ultrassônico - VPU. Embora as argamassas tenham apresentado bom desempenho mecânico, os ensaios de pozolanicidade indicaram que a cinza de casca de arroz residual utilizada não é uma pozolana, mas pode ser utilizada em matrizes cimentícias como material inerte (filler.Rice husk, employed as an energy source at milling industries in Brazil generates, after burning, a dark ash. This residue is not yet conveniently disposed, being currently dumped on large areas, causing environmental problems. This research intended to evaluate the applications of residual rice husk ashes (RHA as a partial replacement of cement for mortar production. Rice husk ash was chemically characterized through X-ray fluorescence, determination of carbon content, X-ray diffraction, and laser granulometric analysis. Mortar specimens were submitted to two different exposure conditions: internal and external environments at a maximum period of five months. Physical-mechanical testing were compressive strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV. Although presenting good

  19. Hydrologic and water-quality characterization and modeling of the Chenoweth Run basin, Jefferson County, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary R.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Shipp, Allison A.

    2001-01-01

    Rainfall, streamflow, and water-quality data collected in the Chenoweth Run Basin during February 1996?January 1998, in combination with the available historical sampling data, were used to characterize hydrologic conditions and to develop and calibrate a Hydrological Simulation Program?Fortran (HSPF) model for continuous simulation of rainfall, streamflow, suspended-sediment, and total-orthophosphate (TPO4) transport relations. Study results provide an improved understanding of basin hydrology and a hydrologic-modeling framework with analytical tools for use in comprehensive waterresource planning and management. Chenoweth Run Basin, encompassing 16.5 mi2 in suburban eastern Jefferson County, Kentucky, contains expanding urban development, particularly in the upper third of the basin. Historical water-quality problems have interfered with designated aquatic-life and recreation uses in the stream main channel (approximately 9 mi in length) and have been attributed to organic enrichment, nutrients, metals, and pathogens in urban runoff and wastewater inflows. Hydrologic conditions in Jefferson County are highly varied. In the Chenoweth Run Basin, as in much of the eastern third of the county, relief is moderately sloping to steep. Also, internal drainage in pervious areas is impeded by the shallow, fine-textured subsoils that contain abundant silts and clays. Thus, much of the precipitation here tends to move rapidly as overland flow and (or) shallow subsurface flow (interflow) to the stream channels. Data were collected at two streamflowgaging stations, one rain gage, and four waterquality- sampling sites in the basin. Precipitation, streamflow, and, consequently, constituent loads were above normal during the data-collection period of this study. Nonpoint sources contributed the largest portion of the sediment loads. However, the three wastewatertreatment plants (WWTP?s) were the source of the majority of estimated total phosphorus (TP) and TPO4 transport

  20. Ultrasonic ash/pyrite liberation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yungman, B.A.; Buban, K.S.; Stotts, W.F.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a coal preparation concept which employed ultrasonics to precondition coal prior to conventional or advanced physical beneficiation processes such that ash and pyrite separation were enhanced with improved combustible recovery. Research activities involved a series of experiments that subjected three different test coals, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Upper Freeport, ground to three different size fractions (28 mesh [times] 0, 200 mesh [times] 0, and 325 mesh [times] 0), to a fixed (20 kHz) frequency ultrasonic signal prior to processing by conventional and microbubble flotation. The samples were also processed by conventional and microbubble flotation without ultrasonic pretreatment to establish baseline conditions. Product ash, sulfur and combustible recovery data were determined for both beneficiation processes.

  1. Utilization Of Rice Husk Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Nagrale

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available India is a major rice producing country, and the husk generated during milling is mostly used as a fuel in the boilers for processing paddy, producing energy through direct combustion and / or by gasification. About 20 million tones of Rice Husk Ash (RHA is produced annually. This RHA is a great environment threat causing damage to the land and the surrounding area in which it is dumped. Lots of ways are being thought of for disposing them by making commercial use of this RHA. RHA can be used as a replacement for concrete (15 to 25%.This paper evaluates how different contents of Rice Husk Ash added to concrete may influence its physical and mechanical properties. Sample Cubes were tested with different percentage of RHA and different w/c ratio, replacing in mass the cement. Properties like Compressive strength, Water absorption and Slump retention were evaluated.

  2. The Ashes of Marci Shore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Kopeć

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses Marci Shore’s social and historical thought, as presented in her books: Caviar and Ashes: A Warsaw Generation’s Life and Death in Marxism, 1918-1968 (2006, The Taste of Ashes (2013, and her essays recently published in Polish translation. The author follows the American historian, presenting her concept of modernity, but focuses on the main theme of her research: the contribution of Jewish writers, poets, artists, and intellectuals to the creation of Marxism. The author acknowledges the great value of Marci Shore’s writings, but argues that her panorama of the 20th century would be fuller if her discussion included a reflection on the religious attitude of many Jewish thinkers to Marxism and the USSR. This topic was discussed by Nikolai Berdyaev and Polish thinkers who published in pre-war social journals.

  3. Characteristics variation of coal combustion residues in an Indian ash pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asokan, Pappu; Saxena, Mohini; Aparna, Asokan; Asolekar, Shyam R; Asoletar, Shyam R

    2004-08-01

    Coal-fired power plants all over the world are cited as one of the major sources that generate huge quantities of coal combustion residues (CCRs) as solid wastes. Most frequently CCRs are collected through electrostatic precipitators, mixed with bottom ash by hydraulic systems and deposited in ash ponds. The quality of the CCRs at different locations in one of the ash ponds in Central India was evaluated to understand the variation in characteristics with a view to effective utilization. Results revealed that the presence of fine particles (distance from the ash slurry inlet zone in the ash pond. Wide variations in the bulk density (800-980 kg m(-3)), porosity (45-57%) and water-holding capacity (57.5-75.7%) of CCRs were recorded. With increasing distance the pH of the CCRs decreased (from 9.0 to 8.2) and electrical conductivity increased (from 0.25 to 0.65 dS m(-3)). The presence of almost all the heavy metals in CCRs exhibited an increase with distance from the ash slurry discharge zone due to the increase in surface area (from 0.1038 to 2.3076 m2 g(-1)) of CCRs particles. The present paper describes the variation of characteristics of CCRs deposited in the ash pond and their potential applications.

  4. Influence of Ash Applied to Oat Crop (Avena sativa L. Grown under Organic Fertilization with Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoni Lixandru

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The power plant ash is an inorganic residue with a variable chemical buildup according to the type of charcoal used and quality. Depositing, stabilizing and eventually reintegrating the ash in the natural circuit raises a series of problems due to its disastrous effect on biodiversity. Even with these problems, at a moderate micro and macro mineral content, power plant ash could present interesting agro technical and ecological alternatives. For this reason, the controlled integration of ash could put a stop to pollution with ash by reintegrating the material in the agricultural ecosystems.For this purpose, in the field of research of Ecological and Forage Crops from Faculty of Animal Science and Biotechnologies Timisoara, research was conducted over the influence of the reintegration of 40 t of ash per ha, produced by C.E.T. Timisoara, on the biomass production of oatmeal (Avena sativa L, fertilized by levels of 25 and 50 t per ha of manure. After harvesting, the analysis of the total biomass quantity, both above and underground, revealed similar results in all trials. In conditions that include heavy metal concentrations beneath normal geological values, conclude that the application of 40t per ha may be an agro technical solution for the integration of power plant ash in the agricultural ecosystem.

  5. Rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xu; Rong, Le; Ng, Wei Cheng; Ong, Cynthia; Baeg, Gyeong Hun; Zhang, Wenlin; Lee, Si Ni; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Dai, Yanjun; Tong, Yen Wah; Neoh, Koon Gee; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    The solid residues including bottom ashes and fly ashes produced by waste gasification technology could be reused as secondary raw materials. However, the applications and utilizations of these ashes are very often restricted by their toxicity. Therefore, toxicity screening of ash is the primary condition for reusing the ash. In this manuscript, we establish a standard for rapid screening of gasification ashes on the basis of in vitro and in vivo testing, and henceforth guide the proper disposal of the ashes. We used three different test models comprising human cell lines (liver and lung cells), Drosophila melanogaster and Daphnia magna to examine the toxicity of six different types of ashes. For each ash, different leachate concentrations were used to examine the toxicity, with C0 being the original extracted leachate concentration, while C/C0 being subsequent diluted concentrations. The IC50 for each leachate was also quantified for use as an index to classify toxicity levels. The results demonstrated that the toxicity evaluation of different types of ashes using different models is consistent with each other. As the different models show consistent qualitative results, we chose one or two of the models (liver cells or lung cells models) as the standard for rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes. We may classify the gasification ashes into three categories according to the IC50, 24h value on liver cells or lung cells models, namely "toxic level I" (IC50, 24h>C/C0=0.5), "toxic level II" (C/C0=0.05types of ashes generated in gasification plants every day. Subsequently, appropriate disposal methods can be recommended for each toxicity category. PMID:26923299

  6. pH-dependent leaching of constituents of potential concern from concrete materials containing coal combustion fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosson, David S; Garrabrants, Andrew C; DeLapp, Rossane; van der Sloot, Hans A

    2014-05-01

    Current concerns about the environmental safety of coal combustion fly ash have motivated this evaluation of the impact of fly ash use as a cement replacement in concrete materials on the leaching of constituents of potential concern. The chemical effects of fly ash on leaching were determined through characterization of liquid-solid partitioning using EPA Method 1313 for four fly ash materials as well as concrete and microconcrete materials containing 0% (control materials), 25% and 45% replacement of portland cement with the fly ash source. All source materials, concrete formulations and replacement levels are representative of US concrete industry practices. Eluate concentrations as a function of pH were compared to a broader range of available testing results for international concretes and mortars for which the leaching characteristics of the component fly ashes were unknown. The chemistry of the hydrated cement fraction was found to dominate the liquid-solid partitioning resulting in reduced leaching concentrations of most trace metals compared to concentrations from fly ash materials alone. Compared to controls, eluate concentrations of Sb, As, B, Cr, Mo, Se, Tl and V from concrete products containing fly ash were essentially the same as the eluate concentrations from control materials produced without fly ash replacement indicating little to no significant impact on aqueous partitioning.

  7. Steam hydration-reactivation of FBC ashes for enhanced in situ desulphurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabio Montagnaro; Marianna Nobili; Antonio Telesca; Gian Lorenz Valenti; Edward J. Anthony; Piero Salatino [Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy). Dipartimento di Chimica

    2009-06-15

    Bed and fly ashes originating from industrial-scale fluidized bed combustors (FBCs) were steam hydrated to produce sorbents suitable for further in situ desulphurization. Samples of the hydrated ash were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy and porosimetry. Bed ashes were hydrated in a pressure bomb for 30 and 60 min at 200{sup o}C and 250{sup o}C. Fly ash was hydrated in an electrically heated tubular reactor for 10 and 60 min at 200{sup o}C and 300{sup o}C. The results were interpreted by considering the hydration process and the related development of accessible porosity suitable for resulphation. The performance of the reactivated bed ash as sulphur sorbent improved with a decrease of both the hydration temperature and time. For reactivated fly ash, more favourable porosimetric features were observed at longer treatment times and lower hydration temperatures. Finally, it was shown that an ashing treatment (at 850{sup o}C for 20 min) promoted a speeding up of the hydration process and an increase in the accessible porosity. 36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Concretes and mortars with waste paper industry: Biomass ash and dregs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lage, Isabel; Velay-Lizancos, Miriam; Vázquez-Burgo, Pablo; Rivas-Fernández, Marcos; Vázquez-Herrero, Cristina; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Antonio; Martín-Cano, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    This article describes a study on the viability of using waste from the paper industry: biomass boiler ash and green liquor dregs to fabricate mortars and concretes. Both types of ash were characterized by obtaining their chemical and mineralogical composition, their organic matter content, granulometry, adsorption and other common tests for construction materials. Seven different mortars were fabricated, one for reference made up of cement, sand, and water, three in which 10, 20, or 30% of the cement was replaced by biomass ash, and three others in which 10, 20, or 30% of the cement was replaced with dregs. Test specimens were fabricated with these mortars to conduct flexural and compression tests. Flexural strength is reduced for all the mortars studied. Compressive strength increases for the mortars fabricated with biomass ash and decreases for the mortar with dregs. Finally, 5 concretes were made, one of them as a reference (neither biomass ash nor dregs added), two of them with replacements of 10 and 20% of biomass ash instead of cement and another two with replacements of 10 and 20% of dregs instead of cement. The compressive and tensile splitting strength increase when a 10% of ash is replaced and decrease in all the other cases. The modulus of elasticity always decreases.

  9. Vitrification of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash using biomass ash as additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadj-Mallah, Moussa-Mallaye; Huang, Qunxing; Cai, Xu; Chi, Yong; Yan, JianHua

    2015-01-01

    Thermal melting is an energy-costing solution for stabilizing toxic fly ash discharged from the air pollution control system in the municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant. In this paper, two different types of biomass ashes are used as additives to co-melt with the MSWI fly ash for reducing the melting temperature and energy cost. The effects of biomass ashes on the MSWI fly ash melting characteristics are investigated. A new mathematical model has been proposed to estimate the melting heat reduction based on the mass ratios of major ash components and measured melting temperature. Experimental and calculation results show that the melting temperatures for samples mixed with biomass ash are lower than those of the original MSWI fly ash and when the mass ratio of wood ash reaches 50%, the deformation temperature (DT), the softening, hemisphere temperature (HT) and fluid temperature (FT) are, respectively, reduced by 189°C, 207°C, 229°C, and 247°C. The melting heat of mixed ash samples ranges between 1650 and 2650 kJ/kg. When 50% wood ash is mixed, the melting heat is reduced by more than 700 kJ/kg for the samples studied in this paper. Therefore, for the vitrification treatment of the fly ash from MSW or other waste incineration plants, wood ash is a potential fluxing assistant.

  10. Volcanic ash infrared signature: porous non-spherical ash particle shapes compared to homogeneous spherical ash particles

    OpenAIRE

    A. Kylling; M. Kahnert; Lindqvist, H; Nousiainen, T.

    2014-01-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic ash clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements effective particle radius and mass loading may be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculated thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compared these with mass- and volume-equivalent sp...

  11. Characterizing and explaining spatio-temporal variation of water quality in a highly disturbed river by multi-statistical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Xiang; Xia, Jun; Wu, Shaofei; She, Dunxian; Zou, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the spatio-temporal variations of surface water quality is important for water environment management. In this study, surface water samples are collected from 2008 to 2015 at 17 stations in the Ying River basin in China. The two pollutants i.e. chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) are analyzed to characterize the river water quality. Cluster analysis and the seasonal Kendall test are used to detect the seasonal and inter-annual variations in the dataset, while the Moran's index is utilized to understand the spatial autocorrelation of the variables. The influence of natural factors such as hydrological regime, water temperature and etc., and anthropogenic activities with respect to land use and pollutant load are considered as driving factors to understand the water quality evolution. The results of cluster analysis present three groups according to the similarity in seasonal pattern of water quality. The trend analysis indicates an improvement in water quality during the dry seasons at most of the stations. Further, the spatial autocorrelation of water quality shows great difference between the dry and wet seasons due to sluices and dams regulation and local nonpoint source pollution. The seasonal variation in water quality is found associated with the climatic factors (hydrological and biochemical processes) and flow regulation. The analysis of land use indicates a good explanation for spatial distribution and seasonality of COD at the sub-catchment scale. Our results suggest that an integrated water quality measures including city sewage treatment, agricultural diffuse pollution control as well as joint scientific operations of river projects is needed for an effective water quality management in the Ying River basin. PMID:27512630

  12. ASH structure alignment package: Sensitivity and selectivity in domain classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toh Hiroyuki

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structure alignment methods offer the possibility of measuring distant evolutionary relationships between proteins that are not visible by sequence-based analysis. However, the question of how structural differences and similarities ought to be quantified in this regard remains open. In this study we construct a training set of sequence-unique CATH and SCOP domains, from which we develop a scoring function that can reliably identify domains with the same CATH topology and SCOP fold classification. The score is implemented in the ASH structure alignment package, for which the source code and a web service are freely available from the PDBj website http://www.pdbj.org/ASH/. Results The new ASH score shows increased selectivity and sensitivity compared with values reported for several popular programs using the same test set of 4,298,905 structure pairs, yielding an area of .96 under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. In addition, weak sequence homologies between similar domains are revealed that could not be detected by BLAST sequence alignment. Also, a subset of domain pairs is identified that exhibit high similarity, even though their CATH and SCOP classification differs. Finally, we show that the ranking of alignment programs based solely on geometric measures depends on the choice of the quality measure. Conclusion ASH shows high selectivity and sensitivity with regard to domain classification, an important step in defining distantly related protein sequence families. Moreover, the CPU cost per alignment is competitive with the fastest programs, making ASH a practical option for large-scale structure classification studies.

  13. Can vegetative ash be water repellent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodí, M. B.; Cerdà, A.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Doerr, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    In most of the literature, ash is referred to as a highly wettable material (e.g. Cerdà and Doerr, 2008; Etiegni and Campbell, 1991; Woods and Balfour 2010). However, the contrary was suggested in few articles, albeit with no further quantification (Gabet and Sternberg, 2008; Khanna et al., 1996; Stark, 1977). To clarify this question, water repellency measurements on ash using the Water Drop Penetration Times (WDPT) method were performed on ash from Mediterranean ecosystems and it was found to be water repellent (Bodí et al. 2011). Water repellency on ash from different wildfires ranged from 40 to 10 % occurrence with samples being extreme repellent (lasting more than 3600 s to penetrate). Part of the ash produced in the laboratory was also water repellent. After that, other ash samples had been found water repellent in wildfires in Colorado (unpublished results), Portugal (Gonzalez-Pelayo, 2009), or in prescribed fires in Australia (Bodí et al. 2011b; Petter Nyman, personnal communication). All the samples exhibiting water repellent properties had in common that were combusted at low temperatures, yielding in general ash with dark colour and contents of organic carbon of more than 18 % (Bodí et al. 2011a), although these properties were not exactly proportional to its water repellency occurrence or persistence. In addition, the species studied in Bodí et al. (2011) had been found to produce different levels of WR repellency, being ash from Pinus halepensis more repellent than that from Quercus coccifera and Rosmarins officinalis. Ash from Eucaliptus radiata had been found also very water repellent, as Pinus halepensis (unpublished data). The reasons of the existance of water repellent ash are that the charred residue produced by fire (an also contained in the ash) can contain aromatic compounds that have a lower free energy than water and therefore behave as hydrophobic materials with reduced solubility (Almendros et al., 1992 and Knicker, 2007

  14. Characterization of Italian honeys (Marche Region) on the basis of their mineral content and some typical quality parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Cucina Domenico; Tudino Mabel; Campanella Luigi; Stripeikis Jorge; Conti Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The characterization of three types of Marche (Italy) honeys (Acacia, Multifloral, Honeydew) was carried out on the basis of the their quality parameters (pH, sugar content, humidity) and mineral content (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, and Mn). Pattern recognition methods such as principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were performed in order to classify honey samples whose botanical origins were different, and identify the most discriminant para...

  15. Stabilization/solidification of fly ashes and concrete production from bottom and circulating ashes produced in a power plant working under mono and co-combustion conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Rui; Lapa, Nuno; Lopes, Helena; Gulyurtlu, Ibrahim; Mendes, Benilde

    2011-01-01

    Two combustion tests were performed in a fluidized bed combustor of a thermo-electric power plant: (1) combustion of coal; (2) co-combustion of coal (68.7% w/w), sewage sludge (9.2% w/w) and meat and bone meal (MBM) (22.1% w/w). Three samples of ashes (bottom, circulating and fly ashes) were collected in each combustion test. The ashes were submitted to the following assays: (a) evaluation of the leaching behaviour; (b) stabilization/solidification of fly ashes and evaluation of the leaching behaviour of the stabilized/solidified (s/s) materials; (c) production of concrete from bottom and circulating ashes. The eluates of all materials were submitted to chemical and ecotoxicological characterizations. The crude ashes have shown similar chemical and ecotoxicological properties. The s/s materials have presented compressive strengths between 25 and 40 MPa, low emission levels of metals through leaching and were classified as non-hazardous materials. The formulations of concrete have presented compressive strengths between 12 and 24 MPa. According to the Dutch Building Materials Decree, some concrete formulations can be used in both scenarios of limited moistening and without insulation, and with permanent moistening and with insulation.

  16. Progress and gaps in understanding mechanisms of ash tree resistance to emerald ash borer, a model for wood-boring insects that kill angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villari, Caterina; Herms, Daniel A; Whitehill, Justin G A; Cipollini, Don; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    We review the literature on host resistance of ash to emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis), an invasive species that causes widespread mortality of ash. Manchurian ash (Fraxinus mandshurica), which coevolved with EAB, is more resistant than evolutionarily naïve North American and European congeners. Manchurian ash was less preferred for adult feeding and oviposition than susceptible hosts, more resistant to larval feeding, had higher constitutive concentrations of bark lignans, coumarins, proline, tyramine and defensive proteins, and was characterized by faster oxidation of phenolics. Consistent with EAB being a secondary colonizer of coevolved hosts, drought stress decreased the resistance of Manchurian ash, but had no effect on constitutive bark phenolics, suggesting that they do not contribute to increased susceptibility in response to drought stress. The induced resistance of North American species to EAB in response to the exogenous application of methyl jasmonate was associated with increased bark concentrations of verbascoside, lignin and/or trypsin inhibitors, which decreased larval survival and/or growth in bioassays. This finding suggests that these inherently susceptible species possess latent defenses that are not induced naturally by larval colonization, perhaps because they fail to recognize larval cues or respond quickly enough. Finally, we propose future research directions that would address some critical knowledge gaps. PMID:26268949

  17. Future developments in modelling and monitoring of volcanic ash clouds: outcomes from the first IAVCEI-WMO workshop on Ash Dispersal Forecast and Civil Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, Costanza; Folch, Arnau; Loughlin, Susan; Puempel, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the serious consequences of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption (Iceland) on civil aviation, 52 volcanologists, meteorologists, atmospheric dispersion modellers and space and ground-based monitoring specialists from 12 different countries (including representatives from 6 Volcanic Ash Advisory Centres and related institutions) gathered to discuss the needs of the ash dispersal modelling community, investigate new data-acquisition strategies (i.e. quantitative measurements and observations) and discuss how to improve communication between the research community and institutions with an operational mandate. Based on a dedicated benchmark exercise and on 3 days of in-depth discussion, recommendations have been made for future model improvements, new strategies of ash cloud forecasting, multidisciplinary data acquisition and more efficient communication between different communities. Issues addressed in the workshop include ash dispersal modelling, uncertainty, ensemble forecasting, combining dispersal models and observations, sensitivity analysis, model variability, data acquisition, pre-eruption forecasting, first simulation and data assimilation, research priorities and new communication strategies to improve information flow and operational routines. As a main conclusion, model developers, meteorologists, volcanologists and stakeholders need to work closely together to develop new and improved strategies for ash dispersal forecasting and, in particular, to: (1) improve the definition of the source term, (2) design models and forecasting strategies that can better characterize uncertainties, (3) explore and identify the best ensemble strategies that can be adapted to ash dispersal forecasting, (4) identify optimized strategies for the combination of models and observations and (5) implement new critical operational strategies.

  18. Effect of fly ash on autogenous shrinkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipat Termkhajornkit; Toyoharu Nawa; Masashi Nakai; Toshiki Saito [Hokkaido University, Hokkaido (Japan). Division of Structural and Geotechnical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering

    2005-03-01

    The correlation between autogenous shrinkage and degree of hydration of fly ash was determined with the selective dissolution method. Then, the relationship between the degree of hydration of fly ash and autogenous shrinkage was examined. The results showed that the degree of hydration of fly ash increased as its Blaine surface area increased. The degree of hydration of fly ash increased with time, and autogenous shrinkage increased corresponding to the increase in the degree of hydration of fly ash. Moreover, it was found that the total quantity of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in cement-fly ash samples affected autogenous shrinkage at early ages, but the long-term influence was very small.

  19. Effect of surface modification of fly ash on the mechanical, thermal, electrical and morphological properties of polyetheretherketone composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Preparation of high performance poly (ether ether ketone) (PEEK)/fly ash (FA) composites. → Characterization studies like DMTA, MDSC, FTIR and SEM have been carried out. → Addition of modified FA, decrease Tc by 58 deg. C, due to the hindrance in PEEK molecular mobility during the cooling crystallization process. → Modified fly ash filled PEEK composites exhibit higher tensile strength and modulus than the unmodified ones. - Abstract: Poly (ether ether ketone) (PEEK)/fly ash (FA) composites were prepared using melt blending technique. To improve the interfacial interaction of fly ash with the PEEK matrix, fly ash was chemically modified with calcium hydroxide, at different concentration. Various characterization studies like dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been carried out to evaluate the storage modulus, tan δ, crystallinity, and morphology in the composites. SEM micrographs showed more uniform dispersion and interaction in the modified composites than unmodified counterpart. Surface modified fly ash improved the interfacial adhesion between fly ash and PEEK which is confirmed also through improved mechanical strength. The dynamic modulus of PEEK composites exhibited over 133% increment at 100-250 deg. C, indicating improvement of elevated temperature mechanical properties. The modified fly ash reinforcements also showed improvement in glass-transition and crystallization temperature.

  20. A review of the interference of carbon containing fly ash with air entrainment in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Hougaard; Jensen, Anker Degn; Skjøth-Rasmussen, Martin Skov;

    2008-01-01

    adsorption capacity per mass of carbon. Cases reporting increased residual carbon content due to low-NO, combustion are described, together with observations from a pilot scale experiment, where increased AEA adsorption capacity of carbon appeared to relate with firing at low-NO, conditions. Post-treatment...... on the adsorption capacity of AEAs. The type of fuel used in the combustion process influences the amount and properties of the residual carbon. Fly ash derived from bituminous coal has generally higher carbon content compared with fly ash produced from subbituminous coal or lignite, but shows a lower AEA...... methods applied to improve fly ash quality are described in the review. Ozonation, thermal treatment and physical cleaning of carbon have been found to improve the fly ash performance for concrete utilization. Ultimately, recommendations for further work are outlined in the discussion....

  1. Image quality assessment in digital mammography: part I. Technical characterization of the systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, N W; Monnin, P; Bosmans, H; Bochud, F O; Verdun, F R

    2011-07-21

    In many European countries, image quality for digital x-ray systems used in screening mammography is currently specified using a threshold-detail detectability method. This is a two-part study that proposes an alternative method based on calculated detectability for a model observer: the first part of the work presents a characterization of the systems. Eleven digital mammography systems were included in the study; four computed radiography (CR) systems, and a group of seven digital radiography (DR) detectors, composed of three amorphous selenium-based detectors, three caesium iodide scintillator systems and a silicon wafer-based photon counting system. The technical parameters assessed included the system response curve, detector uniformity error, pre-sampling modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Approximate quantum noise limited exposure range was examined using a separation of noise sources based upon standard deviation. Noise separation showed that electronic noise was the dominant noise at low detector air kerma for three systems; the remaining systems showed quantum noise limited behaviour between 12.5 and 380 µGy. Greater variation in detector MTF was found for the DR group compared to the CR systems; MTF at 5 mm(-1) varied from 0.08 to 0.23 for the CR detectors against a range of 0.16-0.64 for the DR units. The needle CR detector had a higher MTF, lower NNPS and higher DQE at 5 mm(-1) than the powder CR phosphors. DQE at 5 mm(-1) ranged from 0.02 to 0.20 for the CR systems, while DQE at 5 mm(-1) for the DR group ranged from 0.04 to 0.41, indicating higher DQE for the DR detectors and needle CR system than for the powder CR phosphor systems. The technical evaluation section of the study showed that the digital mammography systems were well set up and exhibiting typical performance for the detector technology employed in the respective systems.

  2. Recovery of gallium and vanadium from gasification fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Puertollano Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant (Spain) fly ash is characterized by a relatively high content of Ga and V, which occurs mainly as Ga2O3 and as Ga3+ and V3+substituting for Al3+ in the Al-Si fly ash glass matrix. Investigations focused on evaluating the potential recovery of Ga and V from these fly ashes. Several NaOH based extraction tests were performed on the IGCC fly ash, at different temperatures, NaOH/fly ash (NaOH/FA) ratios, NaOH concentrations and extraction times. The optimal Ga extraction conditions was determined as 25 deg. C, NaOH 0.7-1 M, NaOH/FA ratio of 5 L/kg and 6 h, attaining Ga extraction yields of 60-86%, equivalent to 197-275 mg of Ga/kg of fly ash. Re-circulation of leachates increased initial Ga concentrations (25-38 mg/L) to 188-215 mg/L, while reducing both content of impurities and NaOH consumption. Carbonation of concentrated Ga leachate demonstrated that 99% of the bulk Ga content in the leachate precipitates at pH 7.4. At pH 10.5 significant proportions of impurities, mainly Al (91%), co-precipitate while >98% of the bulk Ga remains in solution. A second carbonation of the remaining solution (at pH 7.5) recovers the 98.8% of the bulk Ga. Re-dissolution (at pH 0) of the precipitate increases Ga purity from 7 to 30%, this being a suitable Ga end product for further purification by electrolysis. This method produces higher recovery efficiency than currently applied for Ga on an industrial scale. In contrast, low V extraction yields (<64%) were obtained even when using extreme alkaline extraction conditions, which given the current marked price of this element, limits considerably the feasibility of V recovery from IGCC fly ash

  3. Preliminary examination of the impacts of repository site characterization activities and facility construction and operation activities on Hanford air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, C.S.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1986-04-01

    Air quality impacts that would result from site characterization activities and from the construction and operation of a high-level nuclear wste repository at Hanford are estimated using two simple atmospheric dispersion models, HANCHI and CHISHORT. Model results indicate that pollutant concentrations would not exceed ambient air quality standards at any point outside the Hanford fenceline or at any publicly accessible location within the Hanford Site. The increase in pollutant concentrations in nearby communities due to site activities would be minimal. HANCHI and CHISHORT are documented in the appendices of this document. Further study of the repository's impact on air quality will be conducted when more detailed project plans and work schedules are available.

  4. Strength of Ternary Blended Cement Sandcrete Containing Afikpo Rice Husk Ash and Saw Dust Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Ettu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the compressive strength of ternary blended cement sandcrete containing Afikpo rice husk ash (RHA and sawdust ash (SDA. 105 sandcrete cubes of 150mm x 150mm x 150mm were produced with OPC-RHA binary blended cement, 105 with OPC-SDA binary blended cement, and 105 with OPC-RHA-SDA ternary blended cement, each at percentage OPC replacement with pozzolan of 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%. Three cubes for each percentage replacement of OPC with pozzolan and the control were tested for saturated surface dry bulk density and crushed to obtain their compressive strengths at 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 50, and 90 days of curing. The 90-day strengths obtained from ternary blending of OPC with equal proportions of RHA and SDA were 11.80N/mm2for 5% replacement, 11.20N/mm2for 10% replacement, 10.60N/mm2for 15% replacement, 10.00N/mm2for 20% replacement, and 9.10N/mm2for 25% replacement, while that of the control was 10.90N/mm2. This suggests that very high sandcrete strength values could be obtained with OPCRHA-SDA ternary blended cement with richer mixes, high quality control, and longer days of hydration. Thus, OPC-RHA-SDA ternary blended cement sandcrete could be used for various civil engineering and building works, especially where early strength is not a major requirement.

  5. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao; Bøjer, M.; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Glarborg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Ash deposition on boiler surfaces is a major problem encountered during biomass combustion. Ash deposition adversely influences the boiler efficiency, may corrode heat transfer surfaces, and may even completely block flue gas channels in severe cases, causing expensive unscheduled boiler shutdowns. Therefore, timely removal of ash deposits is essential for optimal boiler operation. In order to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of deposit shedding in boilers, this study in...

  6. Cotton Fiber Quality Characterization with Vis-NIR Reflectance Spectroscopy: Toward an Optimal Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this research are to (1) assess the performance of the Vis-NIR method for predicting cotton fiber quality parameters with different calibration methods, and (2) determine useful spectral wavebands and bandwidths for predicting various fiber quality parameters. This study is direct...

  7. The Ash-1, Ash-2 and Trithorax Genes of Drosophila Melanogaster Are Functionally Related

    OpenAIRE

    Shearn, A.

    1989-01-01

    Mutations in the ash-1 and ash-2 genes of Drosophila melanogaster cause a wide variety of homeotic transformations that are similar to the transformations caused by mutations in the trithorax gene. Based on this similar variety of transformations, it was hypothesized that these genes are members of a functionally related set. Three genetic tests were employed here to evaluate that hypothesis. The first test was to examine interactions of ash-1, ash-2 and trithorax mutations with each other. D...

  8. Smartphone Air Quality and Atmospheric Aerosol Characterization for Public Health Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, S. B.; Brown, D. M.; Brown, A.

    2014-12-01

    Air quality is a major global concern. Tracking and monitoring air quality provides individuals with the knowledge to make personal decisions about their health and investigate the environment in which they live. Satellite remote sensing and ground-based observations (e.g. Environmental Protection Agency, NASA Aerosol Robotic Network) of air quality is spatially and temporarlly limited and often neglects to provide individuals with the freedom to understand their own personal environment using their personal observations. Given the ubiquitous nature of smartphones, individuals have access to powerful processing and sensing capabilities. When coupled with the appropriate sensor parameters, filters, and algorithms, smartphones can be used both for 'citizen science' air quality applications and 'professional' scientific atmospheric investigations, alike, simplifying data analysis, processing, and improving deployment efficiency. We evaluate the validity of smartphone technology for air quality investigations using standard Cimel CE 318 sun photometry and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroradiometer (FTIR) observations at specific locations.

  9. Hazards Associated With Recent Popocatepetl Ash Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, A.; Martin, A.; Espinasa-Pereña, R.; Ferres, D.

    2013-05-01

    Popocatepetl has been producing ash from small eruptions since 1994. Until 2012 about 650 small ash emissions have been recorded at the monitoring system of Popocatépetl Volcano. Ash consists mainly of glassy lithic clasts from the recent crater domes, plagioclase and pyroxene crystals, and in major eruptions, olivine and/or hornblende. Dome forming eruptions produced a fine white ash which covers the coarser ash. This fine ash consists of plagioclase, glass and cristobalite particles mostly under15 microns. During the recent crisis at Popocatépetl, April and May2012 ash fell on villages to the east and west of the volcano, reaching Mexico City (more than 20 million people) and Puebla (2 million people). In 14 cases the plumes had heights over 2 km, the largest on May 2 and 11 (3 and 4 km in height, respectively). Heavier ash fall occurred on April 13, 14, 20, and 23 and May 2, 3, 5, 11, 14, 23, 24 and 25. A database for ash fall was constructed from April 13 with field observations, reports emitted by the Centro Nacional de Comunicaciones (CENACOM), ash fall advisories received at CENAPRED and alerts from the Servicios a la Navegación en el Espacio Aéreo Mexicano (SENEAM). This aim of this database is to calculate areas affected by the ash and estimate the ash fall volume emitted by Popocatépetl in each of these events. Heavy ash fall from the May 8 to May 11 combined with reduced visibility due to fog forced to closure of the Puebla airport during various periods of time, for up to 13 hours. Domestic and international flights were cancelled. Ash eruptions have caused respiratory conditions in the state of Puebla, to the east of the volcano, since 1994 (Rojas et al, 2001), but because of the changing wind conditions in the summer mainly, some of these ash plumes go westward to towns in the State of Mexico and even Mexico City. Preliminary analyses of these eruptions indicate that some ash emissions produced increased respiratory noninfectious problems

  10. Characteristics of Wood ASH/OPC Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullahi, M

    2006-01-01

    The study presents the behaviour of wood ash / OPC concrete. Chemical analysis of wood ash, bulk density, sieve analysis and specific gravity of wood ash and aggregates, consistency, setting time and slump test of the fresh paste were conducted to determine the suitability of the materials for concrete making. Mix ratio of 1:2:4 and percentage replacement level of 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 percents of cement by wood ash were used. 150mm´150mm cubes were cast, cured and crushed at 28 and 60 days to...

  11. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao;

    2016-01-01

    . Therefore, timely removal of ash deposits is essential for optimal boiler operation. In order to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of deposit shedding in boilers, this study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash...... deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off by an electrically controlled arm, and the corresponding adhesion strength was measured. The results reveal the effect of temperature, ash/deposit composition......, sintering duration, and steel type on the adhesion strength....

  12. Electrodialytic treatment for metal removal from sewage sludge ash from fluidized bed combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazos, Marta; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2010-01-01

    to treat sewage sludge. By its use, the high amount of sludge is reduced to a small quantity of ash and thermal destruction of toxic organic constituents is obtained. Conversely, heavy metals are retained in the ash. In this work the possibility for electrodialytic metal removal for sewage sludge ash from......Sewage sludge contains several potentially hazardous compounds such as heavy metals, PCBs, PAHs, etc. However, elements with high agricultural value (P, K or Ca) are also present. During the last years, the fluidized bed sludge combustor (FBSC) is considered an effective and novel alternative...... FBSC was studied. A detailed characterization of the sewage sludge ash was done initially, determining that, with the exception of Cd, the other heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn) were under the limiting levels of Danish legislation for the use of sewage sludge as fertilizer. After 14 days...

  13. Wildfires and water chemistry: effect of metals associated with wood ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrato, José M; Blake, Johanna M; Hirani, Chris; Clark, Alexander L; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Peterson, Eric; Bixby, Rebecca J

    2016-08-10

    The reactivity of metals associated with ash from wood collected from the Valles Caldera National Preserve, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, was assessed through a series of laboratory experiments. Microscopy, spectroscopy, diffraction, and aqueous chemistry measurements were integrated to determine the chemical composition of wood ash and its effect on water chemistry. Climate change has caused dramatic impacts and stresses that have resulted in large-scale increases in wildfire activity in semi-arid areas of the world. Metals and other constituents associated with wildfire ash can be transported by storm event runoff and negatively affect the water quality in streams and rivers. Differences among ash from six tree species based on total concentrations of metals such as Ca, Al, Mg, Fe, and Mn were identified using non-metric multidimensional analysis. Metal-bearing carbonate and oxide phases were quantified by X-ray diffraction analyses and X-ray spectroscopy analyses. These metal-bearing carbonate phases were readily dissolved in the first 30 minutes of reaction with 18 MΩ water and 10 mM HCO3(-) in laboratory batch experiments which resulted in the release of metals and carbonates in the ash, causing water alkalinity to increase. However, metal concentrations decreased over the course of the experiment, suggesting that metals re-adsorb to ash. Our results suggest that the dissolution of metal-bearing carbonate and oxide phases in ash and metal re-adsorption to ash are relevant processes affecting water chemistry after wildfire events. These results have important implications to better understand the impact of wildfire events on water quality. PMID:27457586

  14. Wildfires and water chemistry: effect of metals associated with wood ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrato, José M; Blake, Johanna M; Hirani, Chris; Clark, Alexander L; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Peterson, Eric; Bixby, Rebecca J

    2016-08-10

    The reactivity of metals associated with ash from wood collected from the Valles Caldera National Preserve, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, was assessed through a series of laboratory experiments. Microscopy, spectroscopy, diffraction, and aqueous chemistry measurements were integrated to determine the chemical composition of wood ash and its effect on water chemistry. Climate change has caused dramatic impacts and stresses that have resulted in large-scale increases in wildfire activity in semi-arid areas of the world. Metals and other constituents associated with wildfire ash can be transported by storm event runoff and negatively affect the water quality in streams and rivers. Differences among ash from six tree species based on total concentrations of metals such as Ca, Al, Mg, Fe, and Mn were identified using non-metric multidimensional analysis. Metal-bearing carbonate and oxide phases were quantified by X-ray diffraction analyses and X-ray spectroscopy analyses. These metal-bearing carbonate phases were readily dissolved in the first 30 minutes of reaction with 18 MΩ water and 10 mM HCO3(-) in laboratory batch experiments which resulted in the release of metals and carbonates in the ash, causing water alkalinity to increase. However, metal concentrations decreased over the course of the experiment, suggesting that metals re-adsorb to ash. Our results suggest that the dissolution of metal-bearing carbonate and oxide phases in ash and metal re-adsorption to ash are relevant processes affecting water chemistry after wildfire events. These results have important implications to better understand the impact of wildfire events on water quality.

  15. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabbe, R.R.

    1995-03-02

    The objective of this Quality Assurance Plan is to provide quality assurance (QA) guidance, implementation of regulatory QA requirements, and quality control (QC) specifications for analytical service. This document follows the Department of Energy (DOE)-issued Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP) and additional federal [10 US Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 830.120] QA requirements that HASQAP does not cover. This document describes how the laboratory implements QA requirements to meet the federal or state requirements, provides what are the default QC specifications, and/or identifies the procedural information that governs how the laboratory operates. In addition, this document meets the objectives of the Quality Assurance Program provided in the WHC-CM-4-2, Section 2.1. This document also covers QA elements that are required in the Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Program Plans (QAPPs), (QAMS-004), and Interim Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Product Plans (QAMS-005) from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A QA Index is provided in the Appendix A.

  16. Micro-analytical studies on sugar cane bagasse ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Jagadesh; A Ramachandramurthy; R Murugesan; K Sarayu

    2015-08-01

    The worldwide production of sugar generates large volumes of bagasse wastes, which are burnt in uncontrolled manner for heating boiler, which are deposited in landfills, which create negative effects in the environment. The ash obtained by burning bagasse is generally used as Supplementary Cementing Material (SCM) in concrete production without proper knowledge of pozzolanic material characterization. This paper summarizes the results obtained from the various techniques to determine pozzolanic mineral profiles in sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA). Techniques employed in the present study include X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) spectrometer, Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Thermal Analysis [Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Derivative Thermo-Gravimetric (DTG)] in order to understand the type, form, nature, morphology, concentration, etc. of pozzolanic minerals.

  17. Leachate and radon production from fly ash autoclaved cellular concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latona, M.C.; Neufeld, R.D.; Vallejo, L.E.; Brandon, D.; Hu, W.; Kelly, C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1997-08-01

    Environmental consequences and potential liabilities of autoclaved cellular concrete (ACC) use were assessed by aqueous leaching of crushed samples for metals and organic solvent extractions of solid ACC for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Also, whole ACC blocks were tested for radon exhalation potential. Results show leachate concentrations were typically 10 times below, and always 100 times below the regulatory threshold of applicable drinking water standards. A Microtox bioassay procedure showed no toxic effects due to leached metals. Organic analysis of solvent extracts indicated no release of hazardous PAHs attributable to the fly ash ingredient of ACC. Measured rates of radon exhalation were too low to cause potentially dangerous buildups in confined air spaces. Fly ash ACC may be characterized as an environmentally green construction material based on these findings.

  18. Emergency protection approved for two Ash Meadows fishes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A large residential and agricultural development near Ash Meadows, Nevada poses an imminent threat to the survival of the Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish and the Ash...

  19. Forest fuel, ashes and ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale use of bioenergy is an essential measure if several of the major environmental problems are to be solved. However, it is important to utilize the possibilities available to produce biofuel without creating new environmental problems. Whole-tree removal gives a considerable reduction in the nitrogen lead which, in combination with the return of ashes, counteracts the nutrient imbalance and acidification in southern Sweden. Forestry of that kind should lead to lower total leaching of nitrogen in comparison with conventional forestry. In situations where there is high deposition of atmospheric sulphur and nitrogen, fuel removal with return of a moderate dose of slowly dissolvable ashes should be a good soil management measure. The humus status and flora/fauna always require some kind of consideration. With compensation measures and retained nutrient status there should be no problems with the humus status on most soils. However, on poor and dry soils, it is suitable to avoid whole-tree removal on account of the humus status. Consideration to nature includes, for example, increasing the number of broad-leaf trees, old trees and dead wood (preferably the trunks). These measures concern all types of forestry and are not linked directly with fuel removal. Removal of felling residues and return of ashes are of minor importance in comparison with this and fit well into forestry adapted to natural values. With correct planning and accomplishment of the removal of forest fuel the natural values of the forest can be retained or even improved. Forestry where fuel is also produced can be designed whereby negative effects are avoided at the same time as positive environmental effects are obtained. 68 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  20. Amelioration of soil PAH and heavy metals by combined application of fly ash and biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masto, Reginald; George, Joshy; Ansari, Md; Ram, Lal

    2016-04-01

    combined treatment. Peroxidase, phenol oxidase, and catalase activities were not affected by these treatments. Acid phosphatase activity decreased, whereas alkaline phosphatase activity increased due to biochar and fly ash treatment. Microbial biomass carbon increased significantly (P < 0.05) with biochar (+27.9%), fly ash (19.8%), and char + ash (+27.9%) applications. Maize grain yield was increased by biochar (+11.4%) and char + ash (+28.1%) treatments. The total PAH concentration decreased from 4191 μg/kg in control to 1930 μg/kg in fly ash; 1509 μg/kg in biochar and 1011 μg/kg in ash + char treatments. Among the different PAHs the concentration was higher for BkF, which decreased from 713 μg/kg in control to 139 - 315 μg/kg under different treatments. Overall, combined application of fly ash and biochar was found to be effective in amelioration of soil quality parameters and improving crop yield.

  1. 10 Risk to Ash from Emerald Ash Borer: Can Biological Control Prevent the Loss of Ash Stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash trees were once relatively free of serious, major diseases and insect pests in North America until the arrival of EAB, which was first detected in North America in Michigan in 2002. As of February 2014, EAB had been detected in 22 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces, killing millions of ash ...

  2. Changes of the ash structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Václav; Friedel, Pavel; Janša, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the article is to appraisal of the changes in the structure of the ash due to the addition of compounds capable of the eutectics composition change. For the transformation were used limestone and dolomite dosed in amounts of 2, 5 and 10 wt.% with pellets of spruce wood, willow wood and refused derived fuel. Combustion temperatures of the mixtures were adjusted according to the temperatures reached during the using of fuels in power plants, i.e. 900, 1000, 1100 and 1200 °C.

  3. Characterization of imperfect bonding qualities of layered substrate using generalized leaky lamb waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generalized Lamb waves that exist on layered substrates have been adopted as a tool for the bonding quality evaluation. A dispersion simulation by introducing an effective interface layer shows that all the dispersion curves for imperfect interfaces are in a form of concave curves and vary with the stiffness constants that can quantitatively represent the bonding quality. The characteristics of dispersion curves of TiN coating specimens with different wear conditions was experimentally determined by use of an ultrasonic backward radiation measurement technique. Results showed that the lowest velocity mode (Rayleigh-like) of the generalized Lamb waves are sensitively affected by the bonding quality and could be applied in the quantitative evaluation of imperfect bonding quality.

  4. Traffic Engineering and Quality of Experience in MPLS Network by Fuzzy Logic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Prakash Rout,

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a load balancing algorithm using fuzzy logic so that maximum Quality of Experience can be achieved. Avoidance of congestion is one of the major performance objectives of traffic engineering in MPLS networks. Load balancing can prevent the congestion caused due to inefficient allocation of network resources. Another aspect of the network performance is Quality of Experience (QoE. QoE in telecommunications terminology, it is a measurement used to determine how well that network is satisfying the end user's requirements. The Mean Opinion Score (MOS is an important factor in determining the QoE. MOS is a measurement of the quality delivered by the network based on human perception at the destination end. Specifically we can tell mean opinion score (MOS provides a numerical indication of the perceived quality of received media after compression and/or transmission.

  5. MANUAL. Fly ash in civil engineering, Gravel roads; HANDBOK. Flygaska i mark- och vaegbyggnad, Grusvaegar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munde, Hanna; Svedberg, Bo; Macsik, Josef; Maijala, Aino; Lahtinen, Pentti; Ekdahl, Peter; Neren, Jens [Vattenfall AB, Stockholm (Sweden). Vaerme Norden

    2006-01-15

    Fly ash based on biofuels or coal has been used as construction material for a long time in roads and other civil engineering applications. Some example, where it has been used in roadbase and subbase of gravel roads, are in the counties of Uppsala, Soedermanland, Vaestmanland and in Finland. The use of fly ash has contributed to good function for example as bearing capacity, thaw and frost capacity and good durability. This has also reduced costs for maintenance. The objective of this project was to develop a manual to provide a base for contemporary use of fly ash in road constructions. In the manual experience from studies, field tests and regulations has been compiled. The manual handles fly ash as base for products to be used in base and subbase in gravel roads. Future user of the guidelines are mainly consultant engineers and contractors. However the aim of the manual is to also support road administrators, environmental authorities and industry. The project has been carried out parallel to another ongoing national project titled 'Guidelines, Use of alternative materials in civil engineering'. The objective of that project is to establish a base for handling of alternative materials in Sweden. Fly ash in gravel roads are mainly used in two typical applications, one without any additive in a single layer and one with fly ash mixed with gravel. The use of flyash provides functional properties such as increased stiffness, stability and enhanced frost and thaw capacity for the road construction in total. Furthermore the products based on fly ash will have low permeability and good frost and thaw durability. These properties are for example related to fly ash quality, design and construction and are in general expected to be better than for traditional constructions using, for example, sand or gravel. The properties can be enhanced further by using binders such as cement and Merit. Fly ash should always be used above the ground water table with

  6. Traffic Engineering and Quality of Experience in MPLS Network by Fuzzy Logic characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Satya Prakash Rout; Palash Ghosal

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a load balancing algorithm using fuzzy logic so that maximum Quality of Experience can be achieved. Avoidance of congestion is one of the major performance objectives of traffic engineering in MPLS networks. Load balancing can prevent the congestion caused due to inefficient allocation of network resources. Another aspect of the network performance is Quality of Experience (QoE). QoE in telecommunications terminology, it is a measurement used to determine how w...

  7. Characterization of hot spots for natural chloroform formation: Relevance for groundwater quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Ole S.; Albers, Christian N.; Laier, Troels

    2015-04-01

    Chloroform soil hot spot may deteriorate groundwater quality and may even result in chloroform concentration exceeding the Danish maximum limit of 1 µg/L in groundwater for potable use. In order to characterize the soil properties important for the chloroform production, various ecosystems were examined with respect to soil air chloroform and soil organic matter type and content. Coniferous forest areas, responsible for highest chloroform concentrations, were examined on widely different scales from km to cm scale. Furthermore, regular soil gas measurements including chloroform were performed during 4 seasons at various depths, together with various meteorological measurements and soil temperature recordings. Laboratory incubation experiments were also performed on undisturbed soil samples in order to examine the role of various microbiota, fungi and bacteria. To identify hot spots responsible for the natural contamination we have measured the production of chloroform in the upper soil from different terrestrial systems. Field measurements of chloroform in top soil air were used as production indicators. The production was however not evenly distributed at any scale. The ecosystems seem to have quite different net-productions of chloroform from very low in grassland to very high in some coniferous forests. Within the forest ecosystem we found large variation in chloroform concentrations depending on vegetation. In beech forest we found the lowest values, somewhat higher in an open pine forest, but the highest concentrations were detected in spruce forest without any vegetation beneath. Within this ecotype, it appeared that the variation was also large; hot spots with 2-4 decades higher production than the surrounding area. These hot spots were not in any way visually different from the surroundings and were of variable size from 3 to 20 meters in diameter. Besides this, measurements within a seemingly homogenous hot spot showed that there was still high

  8. Co-composting of biowaste and wood ash, influence on a microbially driven-process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Delgado Juárez, Marina; Prähauser, Barbara; Walter, Andreas; Insam, Heribert; Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H

    2015-12-01

    A trial at semi-industrial scale was conducted to evaluate the effect of wood ash amendment on communal biowaste in a composting process and on the final composts produced. For this purpose, three treatments including an unamended control (C0) and composts with additions of 6% (C6), and 12% (C12) of wood ash (w/w) were studied, and physico-chemical parameters as well as microbial activity and community composition were investigated. At the end of the process, composts were tested for toxicity and quality, and microbial physiological activity. The influence of ash addition on compost temperature, pH, microbial activity and composition was stronger during the early composting stages and diminished with time, whereby composts became more similar. Using the COMPOCHIP microarray, a reduction in the pathogenic genera Listeria and Clostridium was observed, which together with the temperature increases of the composting process helped in the hygienisation of composts. Lactobacillus species were also affected, such that reduced hybridisation signals were observed with increased ash addition, due to the increased pH values in amended composts. Organic matter mineralisation was also increased through ash addition, and no negative effects on the composting process were observed. The nutrient content of the final products was increased through the addition of ash, and no toxic effects were observed. Nonetheless, greater concentrations of heavy metals were found in composts amended with more ash, which resulted in a downgrading of the compost quality according to the Austrian Compost Ordinance. Thus, regulation of both input materials and end-product quality is essential in optimising composting processes. PMID:26394680

  9. Investigations of ash fouling with cattle wastes as reburn fuel in a small-scale boiler burner under transient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyukjin; Annamalai, Kalyan; Sweeten, John M

    2008-04-01

    Fouling behavior under reburn conditions was investigated with cattle wastes (termed as feedlot biomass [FB]) and coal as reburn fuels under a transient condition and short-time operation. A small-scale (30 kW or 100,000 Btu/hr) boiler burner research facility was used for the reburn experiments. The fuels considered for these experiments were natural gas (NG) for the ashless case, pure coal, pure FB, and blends of coal and FB. Two parameters that were used to characterize the ash "fouling" were (1) the overall heat-transfer coefficient (OHTC) when burning NG and solid fuels as reburn fuels, and (2) the combustible loss through ash deposited on the surfaces of heat exchanger tubes and the bottom ash in the ash port. A new methodology is presented for determining ash-fouling behavior under transient conditions. Results on the OHTCs for solid reburn fuels are compared with the OHTCs for NG. It was found that the growth of the layer of ash depositions over longer periods typically lowers OHTC, and the increased concentration of ash in gas phase promotes radiation in high-temperature zones during initial periods while decreasing the heat transfer in low-temperature zones. The ash analyses indicated that the bottom ash in the ash port contained a smaller percentage of combustibles with a higher FB percentage in the fuels, indicating better performance compared with coal because small particles in FB burn faster and the FB has higher volatile matter on a dry ash-free basis promoting more burn out.

  10. Characterization of chestnut (Castanea sativa, mill) starch for industrial utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Demiate Ivo Mottin; Oetterer Marília; Wosiacki Gilvan

    2001-01-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize the chestnut and its starch. Chemical composition of the chestnuts showed high level of starch. Moisture level in the raw nuts was around 50g/100g in wet basis and starch content, around 80g/100g in dry basis; other nut flour components were protein (5.58 g/100g), lipid (5.39 g/100g), crude fiber (2.34 g/100g) and ash (2.14 g/100g). Starch fraction was chemically characterized in order to identify the granule quality as compared with those of cassava and...

  11. Insights into explosion dynamics at Stromboli in 2009 from ash samples collected in real-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, J.; Lautze, N.; Andronico, D.; D'Auria, L.; Niemeijer, A.; Houghton, B.; Scarlato, P.

    2012-04-01

    Rapid characterization of tephra during explosive eruptions can provide valuable insights into eruptive mechanisms, also integrating other monitoring systems. Here we reveal a perspective on Stromboli's conduit processes by linking ash textures to geophysical estimates of eruption parameters of observed explosions. A three day campaign at Stromboli was undertaken by Italy's Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) in October 2009. At this time activity was moderately intense, with an average 4 to 5, both ash-rich and ash-poor, explosions per hour at each the SW and NE vents. A total of fifteen ash samples were collected in real time. We used binocular and scanning electron microscopes to analyze the components, grain size and morphology distributions, and surface chemistry of ash particles within eight selected samples. In addition, the INGV monitoring network provided visual, thermal, and seismic information on the explosions that generated the sampled ash. In each sample, the proportion of fluidal, glassy sideromelane (as opposed to blocky, microcrystalline tachylite plus lithics), the degree of "chemical freshness" (as opposed to chemical alteration), and the average size of particles appear to correlate directly with the maximum height and the seismic amplitude of the corresponding explosion, and inversely correlate with the amount of ash erupted, as estimated by monitoring videos. These observations suggest that more violent explosions (i.e., those driven by the release of larger and more pressurized gas volumes) produce ash via the fragmentation of hotter, more fluid magma, while weaker ones mostly erupt ash-sized particles derived by the fragmentation of colder magma and incorporation of conduit wall debris. The formation of fluidal ash particles (up to Pele's hairs) requires aerodynamic deformation of a relatively low-viscosity magma, in agreement with the strong acceleration imposed upon fragmented magma clots by the rapid expansion of

  12. Characterization of chromophoric dissolved organic matter and relationships among PARAFAC components and water quality parameters in Heilongjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongyang; Shi, Jianhong; Qiu, Linlin; Zhao, Yue; Wei, Zimin; Wang, Xinglei; Jia, Liming; Li, Jiming

    2016-05-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is an important optically active substance that can transports nutrients and pollutants from terrestrial to aquatic systems. Additionally, it is used as a measure of water quality. To investigate the source and composition of CDOM, we used chemical and fluorescent analyses to characterize CDOM in Heilongjiang. The composition of CDOM can be investigated by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). PARAFAC identified four individual components that were attributed to microbial humic-like (C1) and terrestrial humic-like (C2-4) in water samples collected from the Heilongjiang River. The relationships between the maximum fluorescence intensities of the four PARAFAC components and the water quality parameters indicate that the dynamic of the four components is related to nutrients in the Heilongjiang River. The relationships between the fluorescence component C3 and the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) indicates that component C3 makes a great contribution to BOD5 and it can be used as a carbon source for microbes in the Heilongjiang River. Furthermore, the relationships between component C3, the particulate organic carbon (POC), and the chemical oxygen demand (CODMn) show that component C3 and POC make great contributions to BOD5 and CODMn. The use of these indexes along with PARAFAC results would be of help to characterize the co-variation between the CDOM and water quality parameters in the Heilongjiang River. PMID:26865492

  13. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the Ph.D. work was to develop the electrodialytic remediation method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. The work was focused on two types of fly ashes: fly ashes from wood combustion and fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration.......The aim of the Ph.D. work was to develop the electrodialytic remediation method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. The work was focused on two types of fly ashes: fly ashes from wood combustion and fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration....

  14. Surface Modification of Fly Ash for Active Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Deepti Jain; Renu Hada; Ashu Rani

    2013-01-01

    Fly ash based effective solid base catalyst (KF/Al2O3/fly ash473, KF/Al2O3/fly ash673, and KF/Al2O3/fly ash873) was synthesized by loading KF over chemically and thermally activated fly ash. The chemical activation was done by treating fly ash with aluminum nitrate via precipitation method followed by thermal activation at 650°C to increase the alumina content in fly ash. The increased alumina content was confirmed by SEM-EDX analysis. The alumina enriched fly ash was then loaded with KF (10...

  15. ENG 328 ASH Course Tutorial / eng328dotcom

    OpenAIRE

    anil3

    2015-01-01

    ENG 328 Entire Course (Ash) For more course tutorials visit www.eng328.com ENG 328 Week 1 DQ 1 What is Technical Writing (Ash) ENG 328 Week 1 DQ 2 Target Audience (Ash) ENG 328 Week 2 DQ 1 Collaborative Writing Process (Ash) ENG 328 Week 2 DQ 2 Design and Graphics (Ash) ENG 328 Week 3 DQ 1 Web Design and Readability (Ash) ENG 328 Week 3 DQ 2 Online Technical Documents (Ash) ENG 328 Week 4 DQ 1 Writing Instructions (Ash) ENG 328 Week 4 DQ 2 Writing Propo...

  16. ENG 328 ASH Material-eng328dotcom

    OpenAIRE

    Sandywilliam

    2015-01-01

    ENG 328 Entire Course (Ash) For more course tutorials visit www.eng328.com ENG 328 Week 1 DQ 1 What is Technical Writing (Ash) ENG 328 Week 1 DQ 2 Target Audience (Ash) ENG 328 Week 2 DQ 1 Collaborative Writing Process (Ash) ENG 328 Week 2 DQ 2 Design and Graphics (Ash) ENG 328 Week 3 DQ 1 Web Design and Readability (Ash) ENG 328 Week 3 DQ 2 Online Technical Documents (Ash) ENG 328 Week 4 DQ 1 Writing Instructions (Ash) ENG 328 Week 4 DQ 2 Writing Propo...

  17. Ash basin reclamation with forest trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, J.H.; McMinn, J.W.

    1977-09-01

    An ash basin at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina is growing trees as well as, and with some species better than, a local soil. The basin contains ashes from a stoker-fed boiler and was last used about 12 years before the trees were planted. The concentrations of 24 chemical elements were measured in ashes, soil and trees. The concentrations of most of the chemical elements were higher in ashes than in soil; however, with a few exceptions, these elements were less available to the trees on ashes than to the trees on soil. The trees do not show any toxicity or deficiency symptoms, but the concentration of manganese in sycamore growing on ashes indicates a possible deficiency. No concentration of an element in trees appears to be high enough to be toxic to the trees. A longer period of study will be required to determine whether the ashes can produce commercial timber, but trees can be used to stabilize ash basins and improve their appearance.

  18. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muchova, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm),

  19. Density currents in the Chicago River: Characterization, effects on water quality, and potential sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Garcia, Carlos M.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Johnson, Kevin K.; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2008-01-01

    Bidirectional flows in a river system can occur under stratified flow conditions and in addition to creating significant errors in discharge estimates, the upstream propagating currents are capable of transporting contaminants and affecting water quality. Detailed field observations of bidirectional flows were made in the Chicago River in Chicago, Illinois in the winter of 2005-06. Using multiple acoustic Doppler current profilers simultaneously with a water-quality profiler, the formation of upstream propagating density currents within the Chicago River both as an underflow and an overflow was observed on three occasions. Density differences driving the flow primarily arise from salinity differences between intersecting branches of the Chicago River, whereas water temperature is secondary in the creation of these currents. Deicing salts appear to be the primary source of salinity in the North Branch of the Chicago River, entering the waterway through direct runoff and effluent from a wastewater-treatment plant in a large metropolitan area primarily served by combined sewers. Water-quality assessments of the Chicago River may underestimate (or overestimate) the impairment of the river because standard water-quality monitoring practices do not account for density-driven underflows (or overflows). Chloride concentrations near the riverbed can significantly exceed concentrations at the river surface during underflows indicating that full-depth parameter profiles are necessary for accurate water-quality assessments in urban environments where application of deicing salt is common.

  20. Obtenção e caracterização de cinza de ossos bovinos visando à fabricação de porcelana de ossos - bone china Preparation and characterization of bovine bone ash for the fabrication of bone china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Y. Miyahara

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A porcelana de ossos - bone china - é uma cerâmica de corpo especial de grande dureza e translucidez exclusivamente fabricada na Inglaterra e em outras poucas partes do mundo, mas não no Brasil. Suas matérias-primas são compostas por aproximadamente metade de cinza de ossos, além de caulim e feldspato. O trabalho apresenta a obtenção e caracterização de cinza de ossos a partir de ossos bovinos com o objetivo da fabricação de porcelanas. No processo de preparação da cinza de ossos envolve o uso de autoclave, descarnagem manual, calcinação e moagem dos ossos. As condições de preparação foram estudadas em função das condições de calcinação, moagem e lavagem do osso. A calcinação foi estudada através de análises térmicas e difração de raios X de diferentes partes do animal. O pó obtido foi caracterizado por análises químicas, medida de granulometria por difração de laser, e microscopia eletrônica de varredura. Os resultados mostraram que a matéria-prima obtida neste trabalho possui propriedades similares das originalmente utilizadas nas indústrias inglesas com baixo teor de ferro e partículas coloidais e que podem ser calcinadas a temperaturas inferiores a 1000 °C.Bone china is a special kind of porcelain, very hard and translucent, nowadays manufactured almost exclusively in England and in few other parts of the world, but not in Brazil. Its raw-materials comprise about fifty percent of bone ash, together with kaolin and a feldspar mineral. This paper presents the preparation and the characterization of bone ash obtained from bovine bones, with the objective of obtaining bone china. The preparation of the bone ash involves the use of an autoclave, manual removal of the meat, firing, and milling the bones. The preparation conditions were studied as a function of the firing conditions, milling, and washing the powder bones. The firing step was studied by thermal analyses TG-DTA and X-ray diffraction, whereas