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Sample records for ash metal matrix

  1. Dry Sliding Friction and Wear Studies of Fly Ash Reinforced AA-6351 Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uthayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash particles are potentially used in metal matrix composites due to their low cost, low density, and availability in large quantities as waste by-products in thermal power plants. This study describes multifactor-based experiments that were applied to research and investigation on dry sliding wear system of stir-cast aluminum alloy 6351 with 5, 10, and 15 wt.% fly ash reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs. The effects of parameters such as load, sliding speed, and percentage of fly ash on the sliding wear, specific wear rate, and friction coefficient were analyzed using Grey relational analysis on a pin-on-disc machine. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was also employed to investigate which design parameters significantly affect the wear behavior of the composite. The results showed that the applied load exerted the greatest effect on the dry sliding wear followed by the sliding velocity.

  2. Characterization of Al-Cu alloy reinforced fly ash metal matrix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Al-4.5wt%Cu reinforced 3, 6, 9 and 12wt%fly ash composite was squeeze casted with an applied pressure of 120MPa. The results showed that hardness tensile compression and impact values were increased by increasing weight percentage of fly ash reinforcements during squeeze casting. Porosity and other casting ...

  3. Fabrication and Performance Test of Aluminium Alloy-Rice Husk Ash Hybrid Metal Matrix Composite as Industrial and Construction Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rahat Hossain

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium matrix composites (AMCs used extensively in various engineering fields due to their exceptional mechanical properties. In this present study, aluminium matrix composites (AMCs such as aluminium alloy (A356 reinforced with rice husk ash particles (RHA are made to explore the possibilities of reinforcing aluminium alloy. The stir casting method was applied to produce aluminium alloy (A356 reinforced with various amounts of (2%, 4%, and 6% rice husk ash (RHA particles. Physical treatment was carried out before the rice husk ash manufacturing process. The effect of mechanical strength of the fabricated hybrid composite was investigated. Therefore, impact test, tensile stress, compressive stress, and some other tests were carried out to analyse the mechanical properties. From the experimental results, it was found that maximum tensile, and compressive stress were found at 6% rice husk ash (RHA and aluminium matrix composites (AMCs. In future, the optimum percentages of rice husk ash (RHA to fabricate the hybrid composites will be determined. Also, simulation by finite element method (FEM will be applied for further investigation.

  4. Reduction of metal leaching in brown coal fly ash using geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankowski, P.; Zou, L.; Hodges, R.

    2004-01-01

    Current regulations classify fly ash as a prescribed waste and prohibit its disposal in regular landfill. Treatment of the fly ash can reduce the leach rate of metals, and allow it to be disposed in less prescribed landfill. A geopolymer matrix was investigated as a potential stabilisation method for brown coal fly ash. Precipitator fly ash was obtained from electrostatic precipitators and leached fly ash was collected from ash disposal ponds, and leaching tests were conducted on both types of geopolymer stabilised fly ashes. The ratio of fly ash to geopolymer was varied to determine the effects of different compositions on leaching rates. Fourteen metals and heavy metals were targeted during the leaching tests and the results indicate that a geopolymer is effective at reducing the leach rates of many metals from the fly ash, such as calcium, arsenic, selenium, strontium and barium. The major element leachate concentrations obtained from leached fly ash were in general lower than that of precipitator fly ash. Conversely, heavy metal leachate concentrations were lower in precipitator fly ash than leached pond fly ash. The maximum addition of fly ash to this geopolymer was found to be 60 wt% for fly ash obtained from the electrostatic precipitators and 70 wt% for fly ash obtained from ash disposal ponds. The formation of geopolymer in the presence of fly ash was studied using 29Si MAS-NMR and showed that a geopolymer matrix was formed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed the interaction of the fly ash with the geopolymer, which was related to the leachate data and also the maximum percentage fly ash addition

  5. Heavy metals in MSW incineration fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2003-01-01

    is characterized regarding its physical-chemical properties: pH, solubility, chemical composition, and leaching, amongst others. Results indicate a high alkalinity and the presence of large amounts of calcium, chlorides, sulfates, carbonates, sodium and potassium. Metal concentrations in fly ash are: 6,2 g....../kg for zinc, 2,4 g/kg for lead, 1,7 g/kg for iron, and 7,9 g/kg for magnesium. Copper, manganese, chromium and cadmium are also present with 546, 338, 104 and 91 mg/kg of fly ash, respectively. These results are extremely important in subsequent studies on the treatment of fly ash....

  6. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the Ph.D. work was to develop the electrodialytic remediation method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. The work was focused on two types of fly ashes: fly ashes from wood combustion and fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration.......The aim of the Ph.D. work was to develop the electrodialytic remediation method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. The work was focused on two types of fly ashes: fly ashes from wood combustion and fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration....

  7. Heavy metals in MSW incineration fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2003-01-01

    is characterized regarding its physical-chemical properties: pH, solubility, chemical composition, and leaching, amongst others. Results indicate a high alkalinity and the presence of large amounts of calcium, chlorides, sulfates, carbonates, sodium and potassium. Metal concentrations in fly ash are: 6,2 g...

  8. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from different fly ashes. Influence of heavy metal speciation in the ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2003-01-01

    -moval efficiencies were observed, especially for Pb and Zn. Cd, the sole heavy metal of environmental concern in the wood ash, was found more tightly bonded in this ash than in the two MSWI ashes. It was suggested that complex Cd-silicates are likely phases in the wood ash whereas more soluble, condensed phases......Electrodialytic Remediation has recently been suggested as a potential method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. In this work electrodialytic remediation of three different fly ashes, i.e. two municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ashes and one wood combustion fly ash was studied...... in lab scale, and the results were discussed in relation to the expected heavy metal speciation in the ashes. In initial leaching experiments the pH-dependent desorption characteristics of the heavy metals Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu were analogous in the two MSWI ashes, and thus it was expected...

  9. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from different fly ashes. Influence of heavy metal speciation in the ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2003-01-01

    Electrodialytic Remediation has recently been suggested as a potential method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. In this work electrodialytic remediation of three different fly ashes, i.e. two municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ashes and one wood combustion fly ash was studied ...

  10. Heavy metal characterization of circulating fluidized bed derived biomass ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianming; Yu, Chunjiang; Bai, Jisong; Wang, Qinhui; Luo, Zhongyang

    2012-09-30

    Although the direct combustion of biomass for energy that applies circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology is steadily expanding worldwide, only few studies have conducted an environmental assessment of biomass ash thus far. Therefore, this study aims to integrate information on the environmental effects of biomass ash. We investigated the concentration of heavy metal in biomass ash samples (bottom ash, cyclone ash, and filter ash) derived from a CFB boiler that combusted agricultural and forest residues at a biomass power plant (2×12 MW) in China. Ash samples were gathered for the digestion and leaching test. The heavy metal content in the solution and the leachate was studied via an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and a Malvern Mastersizer 2000 mercury analyzer. Measurements for the chemical composition, particle size distribution, and the surface morphology were carried out. Most of the metals in cyclone ash particles were enriched, whereas Ti and Hg were enriched in filter ash. Residence time contributed most to heavy metal enrichment. Under HJ/T 300 conditions, the heavy metals showed serious leaching characteristics. Under EN 12457-2 conditions, leaching behavior was hardly detected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessing fly ash treatment: Remediation and stabilization of heavy metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, A.T.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.

    2012-01-01

    Fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), straw (ST) and co-combustion of wood (CW) are here analyzed with the intent of reusing them. Two techniques are assessed, a remediation technique and a solidification/stabilization one. The removal of heavy metals from fly ashes through the electrodialy......Fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), straw (ST) and co-combustion of wood (CW) are here analyzed with the intent of reusing them. Two techniques are assessed, a remediation technique and a solidification/stabilization one. The removal of heavy metals from fly ashes through...... the electrodialytic process (EDR) has been tried out before. The goal of removing heavy metals has always been the reuse of fly ash, for instance in agricultural fields (BEK). The best removal rates are here summarized and some new results have been added. MSW fly ashes are still too hazardous after treatment to even...... consider application to the soil. ST ash is the only residue that gets concentrations low enough to be reused, but its fertilizing value might be questioned. An alternative reuse for the three ashes is here preliminary tested, the combination of fly ash with mortar. Fly ashes have been substituted...

  12. Metal analyses of ash derived alkalis from banana and plantain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this work was to determine the metal content of plantain and banana peels ash derived alkali and the possibility of using it as alternate and cheap source of alkali in soap industry. This was done by ashing the peels and dissolving it in de-ionised water to achieve the corresponding hydroxides with pH above ...

  13. Assessing fly ash treatment: Remediation and stabilization of heavy metals

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, A.T.

    2010-12-17

    Fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), straw (ST) and co-combustion of wood (CW) are here analyzed with the intent of reusing them. Two techniques are assessed, a remediation technique and a solidification/stabilization one. The removal of heavy metals from fly ashes through the electrodialytic process (EDR) has been tried out before. The goal of removing heavy metals has always been the reuse of fly ash, for instance in agricultural fields (BEK). The best removal rates are here summarized and some new results have been added. MSW fly ashes are still too hazardous after treatment to even consider application to the soil. ST ash is the only residue that gets concentrations low enough to be reused, but its fertilizing value might be questioned. An alternative reuse for the three ashes is here preliminary tested, the combination of fly ash with mortar. Fly ashes have been substituted by cement fraction or aggregate fraction. Surprisingly, better compressive strengths were obtained by replacing the aggregate fraction. CW ashes presented promising results for the substitution of aggregate in mortar and possibly in concrete. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Assessing fly ash treatment: remediation and stabilization of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, A T; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2012-03-01

    Fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), straw (ST) and co-combustion of wood (CW) are here analyzed with the intent of reusing them. Two techniques are assessed, a remediation technique and a solidification/stabilization one. The removal of heavy metals from fly ashes through the electrodialytic process (EDR) has been tried out before. The goal of removing heavy metals has always been the reuse of fly ash, for instance in agricultural fields (BEK). The best removal rates are here summarized and some new results have been added. MSW fly ashes are still too hazardous after treatment to even consider application to the soil. ST ash is the only residue that gets concentrations low enough to be reused, but its fertilizing value might be questioned. An alternative reuse for the three ashes is here preliminary tested, the combination of fly ash with mortar. Fly ashes have been substituted by cement fraction or aggregate fraction. Surprisingly, better compressive strengths were obtained by replacing the aggregate fraction. CW ashes presented promising results for the substitution of aggregate in mortar and possibly in concrete. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Metal Matrix Composite Solar Cell Metallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilt David M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced solar cells are moving to ever thinner formats in order to save mass and in some cases improve performance. As cells are thinned, the possibility that they may fracture or cleave due to mechanical stresses is increased. Fractures of the cell can degrade the overall device performance if the fracture propagates through the contact metallization, which frequently occurs. To address this problem, a novel semiconductor metallization system based on multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT reinforcement, termed metal matrix composite (MMC metallization is under investigation. Electro-mechanical characterization of MMC films demonstrate their ability to provide electrical conductivity over >40 micron wide cracks in the underlying semiconductor, with the carbon nanotubes bridging the gap. In addition, these materials show a “self-healing” behaviour, electrically reconnecting at ~30 microns when strained past failure. Triple junction (TJ space cells with MMC metallization demonstrated no loss in Jsc after intentional fracture, whereas TJ cells with conventional metallization suffer up to 50% Jsc loss.

  16. Suppressing Heavy Metal Leaching through Ball Milling of Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ball milling is investigated as a method of reducing the leaching concentration (often termed stablilization of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI fly ash. Three heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Pb loose much of their solubility in leachate by treating fly ash in a planetary ball mill, in which collisions between balls and fly ash drive various physical processes, as well as chemical reactions. The efficiency of stabilization is evaluated by analysing heavy metals in the leachable fraction from treated fly ash. Ball milling reduces the leaching concentration of Cu, Cr, and Pb, and water washing effectively promotes stabilization efficiency by removing soluble salts. Size distribution and morphology of particles were analysed by laser particle diameter analysis and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals significant reduction of the crystallinity of fly ash by milling. Fly ash particles can be activated through this ball milling, leading to a significant decrease in particle size, a rise in its BET-surface, and turning basic crystals therein into amorphous structures. The dissolution rate of acid buffering materials present in activated particles is enhanced, resulting in a rising pH value of the leachate, reducing the leaching out of some heavy metals.

  17. Bacterial Treatment and Metal Characterization of Biomedical Waste Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Heera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical waste ash generated due to the incineration of biomedical waste contains large amounts of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, which is disposed of in regular landfills, and results in unfavorable amounts of hazardous materials seeping into the ground and may pollute surface water and groundwater. Therefore, it is essential to remove the toxicity of ash before disposal into landfills or reutilization. Environmental characteristic analysis of BMW ash showed increased hardness (1320 mg/L and chloride (8500 mg/L content in leachate compared to World Health Organization (WHO and Environment Protection Agency (EPA guidelines for drinking water (hardness, 300 mg/L; chloride, 250 mg/L. The alkalinity and pH of the ash leachate were 400 mg/L and 8.35, respectively. In this paper, study was carried out to investigate the metal tolerance level of bacterial isolates isolated from soil. The isolate Bacillus sp. KGMDI can tolerate up to 75 mg/L of metal concentration (Mn, Mo, Cr, Fe, Cu, and Zn in enriched growth medium. This shows that the isolated culture is capable of growing in presence of high concentration of heavy metals and acts as potential biological tool to reduce the negative impact of BMW ash on the environment during landfilling.

  18. Metal distribution characteristic of MSWI bottom ash in view of metal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming; Zhang, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Bottom ash is the major by-product of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI), and is often reused as an engineering material, such as road-base aggregate. However, some metals (especially aluminum) in bottom ash can react with water and generate gas that could cause expansion and failure of products containing the ash; these metals must be removed before the ash is utilized. The size distribution and the chemical speciation of metals in the bottom ash from two Chinese MSWI plants were examined in this study, and the recovery potential of metals from the ash was evaluated. The metal concentrations in these bottom ashes were lower than that generated in other developed countries. Specifically, the contents of Al, Fe, Cu and Zn were 18.9-29.2, 25.5-32.3, 0.7-1.0 and 1.6-2.5g/kg, respectively. Moreover, 44.9-57.0wt.% of Al and 55.6-75.4wt.% of Fe were distributed in bottom ash particles smaller than 5mm. Similarly, 46.6-79.7wt.% of Cu and 42.9-74.2wt.% of Zn were concentrated in particles smaller than 3mm. The Fe in the bottom ash mainly existed as hematite, and its chemical speciation was considered to limit the recovery efficiency of magnetic separation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Mineralogical characterization of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash with an emphasis on heavy metal-bearing phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunmei; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Saffarzadeh, Amirhomayoun; Takahashi, Fumitake

    2011-03-15

    Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash contains a considerable amount of heavy metals. The occurrence and uneven distribution of these heavy metals in bottom ash can increase the complexity of such residues in terms of long-term behavior upon landfilling or recycling. Bottom ashes sampled from three stoker-type incinerators in Japan were analyzed in this paper. This study presents detailed information on the mineralogical characterization of bottom ash constituents and the weathering behavior of these constituents by means of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It was revealed that bottom ash mainly consists of assorted silicate-based glass phases (48-54 wt% of ash) and mineral phases including melilites, pseudowollastonite, spinels, and metallic inclusions (Fe-P, Fe-S, Fe-Cu, Cu-Sn, Cu-Zn, Cu-S, and Cu-Pb dominated phases), as melt products formed during the incineration process. The compounds embedded in the glass matrix, e.g. spinels and metallic inclusions, played the most important role in concentration of heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, etc.). Other phases such as refractory minerals and ceramics, frequently found in ash, were of less significance in terms of their influence on the involvement of heavy metals. Analysis of lab-scale artificially weathered and 10-year landfilled bottom ash samples revealed that secondary mineralization/alteration of the bottom ash constituents principally carbonation and glass evolution substantially decreased the potential risk of the heavy metals to the surrounding environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Coal fly ash-slag-based geopolymers: Microstructure and metal leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo, Maria; Querol, Xavier; Davidovits, Joseph; Antenucci, Diano; Nugteren, Henk; Fernandez-Pereira, Constantino

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the use of fly ash as a starting material for geopolymeric matrices. The leachable concentrations of geopolymers were compared with those of the starting fly ash to evaluate the retention of potentially harmful elements within the geopolymer matrix. Geopolymer matrices give rise to a leaching scenario characterised by a highly alkaline environment, which inhibits the leaching of heavy metals but may enhance the mobilization of certain oxyanionic species. Thus, fly ash-based geopolymers were found to immobilise a number of trace pollutants such as Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Nb, Ni, Pb, Sn, Th, U, Y, Zr and rare earth elements. However, the leachable levels of elements occurring in their oxyanionic form such as As, B, Mo, Se, V and W were increased after geopolymerization. This suggests that an optimal dosage, synthesis and curing conditions are essential in order to obtain a long-term stable final product that ensures an efficient physical encapsulation.

  1. Effects of chemical composition of fly ash on efficiency of metal separation in ash-melting of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Tomikawa, Hiroki

    2013-03-01

    In the process of metal separation by ash-melting, Fe and Cu in the incineration residue remain in the melting furnace as molten metal, whereas Pb and Zn in the residue are volatilized. This study investigated the effects of the chemical composition of incineration fly ash on the metal-separation efficiency of the ash-melting process. Incineration fly ash with different chemical compositions was melted with bottom ash in a lab-scale reactor, and the efficiency with which Pb and Zn were volatilized preventing the volatilization of Fe and Cu was evaluated. In addition, the behavior of these metals was simulated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Depending on the exhaust gas treatment system used in the incinerator, the relationships among Na, K, and Cl concentrations in the incineration fly ash differed, which affected the efficiency of the metal separation. The amounts of Fe and Cu volatilized decreased by the decrease in the molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in the ash, promoting metal separation. The thermodynamic simulation predicted that the chlorination volatilization of Fe and Cu was prevented by the decrease in the molar ratio, as mentioned before. By melting incineration fly ash with the low molar ratio in a non-oxidative atmosphere, most of the Pb and Zn in the ash were volatilized leaving behind Fe and Cu. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of heavy metals in chinese prickly ash from different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the heavy metal content of Chinese prickly ash (CPA) produced in various areas of China. Methods: CPA samples collected from different production areas in China were subjected to microwave digestion, and the contents of copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), arsenic ...

  3. Chemistry of fly ash and cyclone ash leachate from waste materials and effects of ash leachates on bacterial growth, nitrogen-transformation activity, and metal accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Mio; Kawahata, Hodaka; Gupta, Lallan P; Itouga, Misao; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Ohta, Hidekazu; Komai, Takeshi; Ono, Yoshiro

    2009-06-15

    The effects of waste ash leachates on soil microorganism were evaluated along with a chemical characterization of ash leachates. Thirty fly ash samples and cyclone ash samples obtained from the incineration of municipal solid waste, plastic waste, and construction waste were used. Twenty-one and 22 samples inhibited N transformation activity of soil microorganism and growth of Bacillus subtilis, respectively. On the other hand, 11 and 18 samples stimulated bacterial activity and growth, respectively, at low concentrations. Generally, cyclone ash contained a smaller amount of toxic metals than fly ash. Our results suggest that cyclone ash can be further studied for reuse, perhaps as a soil amendment. Pb was found to be highly accumulated in B. subtilis cells, and should be carefully monitored when waste ash is reused in the environment.

  4. Laser Additive Manufacturing of Metal Matrix Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Mertens, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Current trends in the mechanics and energy industries impose increasing demands on metallic materials, combining elevated service temperatures and severe mechanical solicitations. Metal matrix composite coatings with ceramic reinforcements are good candidates in view of fulfilling the requirements for an improved mechanical durability, and for other complex functions (e.g. self-lubrication, biocompatibility...). First of all, this paper provides an introduction to metal matrix compos...

  5. Photodegradation of phenanthrene on metal oxides and fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guesten, H.; Bozicevic, Z.; Klasinc, L.

    1984-10-01

    The photodegradation of phenanthrene adsorbed on the surface of metal oxides, sea sand and fly ashes is investigated in a rotating bed photoreactor emitting simulated solar light. Metal oxides (SiO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SnO/sub 2/, MgO), which do not absorb the simulated solar light, give rise to a very slow photodegradation of the adsorbed phenanthrene. Metal oxides (TiO/sub 2/, ZnO, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/), which exhibit semiconduction properties, induce a very rapid photodegradation. The two modifications of TiO/sub 2/, rutile and anatase, show different activities in causing the photodegradation of phenanthrene. While in the class of non-solar light absorbing metal oxides the adsorbed phenanthrene is degraded only by direct excitation to its electronic states, photons of band-gap energy in semiconducting metal oxides excite electron-hole pairs at the surface. The quantum yield of the photodegradation of phenanthrene adsorbed on a fly ash of the mullite-quartz of glass type lies between the quantum yields of the two classes of metal oxides investigated. Surprisingly, however, phenanthrene and the very photolabile anthracene are extremely resistant to photodegradation when adsorbed on a fly ash of the spinel type with pig iron content and magnetic properties.

  6. Effects of Metals Associated with Wildfire Ash on Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrato, J.; Clark, A.; Correa, N.; Ali, A.; Blake, J.; Bixby, R.

    2015-12-01

    The forests of the western United States are impacted dramatically by climate change and have suffered from large-scale increases in wildfire activity. This rise in wildfires introduces additional ash to ecosystems and can represent a serious and ongoing threat to water quality in streams and rivers from storm event runoff in burn areas. The effect of metals associated with wildfire ash (from wood collected from the Valles Caldera National Preserve, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico) on solution pH and dissolved oxygen was assessed through a series of laboratory experiments. Microscopy and spectroscopy analyses were conducted to characterize the elemental content and oxidation state of metals in unreacted and reacted ash. Certain metals (e.g., Ca, K, Al, Mg) were detected in ash from ponderosa pine, one of the dominant species in the Valles Caldera, with mean concentrations ranging from 400-1750 mg kg-1. Other metals (e.g., Na, Fe, Mn, V, Zn, Ni) were present at lower mean concentrations ranging from 12-210 mg kg-1. The initial pH after conducting batch experiments reacting ash with water started at 9.9 and the alkalinity of the water was 110 mg L-1 as CaCO3. Solution pH decreased to 8.0 after 48 hours of reaction, which is almost a delta of two pH units. Dissolved oxygen concentrations decreased by 2 mg L-1 over the course of 12 hours before the rate of reaeration surpassed the rate of consumption. This presentation will discuss how redox-active metals, such as Fe and Mn, could contribute to the increased dissolved oxygen demand and fluctuation of the oxidation/reduction potential in the system.

  7. Mosses accumulate heavy metals from the substrata of coal ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukojević Vanja

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants that are able to accumulate and tolerate extraordinarily high concentrations of heavy metals (hyperaccumulators can be used for phytoremediation (removal of contaminants from soils or phytomining (growing a crop of plants to harvest the metals. Two moss species, Bryum capillare Hedw. and Ceratodon purpureus Hedw., were tested as potential phytoremedies under in vivo conditions on a coal ash disposal site in the surroundings of Obrenovac (NW Serbia. The content of various heavy metals (iron, manganese zinc, lead, nickel, cadmium, and copper in the mosses and substrata were investigated over a period of three years. Iron and zinc were found to have the highest concentration in the mosses.

  8. Solidification/stabilization and leaching behavior of PbCl₂ in fly-ash hydrated silicate matrix and fly-ash geopolymer matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Gao, Xingbao; Wang, Qi; He, Jie; Yan, Dahai

    2015-05-01

    Fly ash (FA) for reuse as a construction material is activated using two methods, to produce hydrated silicate and geopolymer gels. We investigated the solidification/stabilization and leaching behavior of PbCl2 in a geopolymer matrix (GM) and hydrated silicate matrix (HSM), based on FA as the source material, to evaluate the environmental and health risks. The GM and HSM synthetic conditions were 60 °C, 20 % relative humidity (RH), and 12 wt% (6 mol/L) NaOH, and 20 ± 2 °C, ≥ 90 % RH, and 30 wt.%, respectively, based on their compressive strength performances. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that Pb participated in hydration and geopolymerization, and was incorporated in the structural components of the hydrated silicate and geopolymer. In leaching experiments, the solidification/stabilization effects of Pb and Cl in the HSM and GM improved with increasing curing time. After long-term curing (28 days), the immobility of Pb in the GM was better than that in the HSM. Sodalite improved the Cl-stabilizing ability of the GM compared with that of the HSM. In static monolithic leaching experiments, HSM and GM had the same Pb-leaching behaviors. Based on the changes in the location of the neutral sphere layer with decreasing acid-neutralizing capacity, Pb release was divided into alkaline-release, stagnation, and acid-release stages. The neutral sphere layer contained the highest Pb concentration during permeation toward the block center from the block edge. This behavior regulation could also apply to other amphoteric metals immobilized by GMs and HSMs.

  9. Nuclear waste storage container with metal matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sump, Kenneth R.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a storage container for high-level waste having a metal matrix for the high-level waste, thereby providing greater impact strength for the waste container and increasing heat transfer properties.

  10. Nuclear waste storage container with metal matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sump, K.R.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a storage container for high-level waste having a metal matrix for the high-level waste, thereby providing greater impact strength for the waste container and increasing heat transfer properties

  11. Utilization of fly ash for stabilization/solidification of heavy metal contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dermatas, D.; Meng, X. [Stevens Inst. of Technology, Hoboken, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Pozzolanic-based stabilization/solidification (S/S) is an effective, yet economic technological alternative to immobilize heavy metals in contaminated soils and sludges. Fly ash waste materials were used along with quicklime (CaO) to immobilize lead, trivalent and hexavalent chromium present in contaminated clayey sand soils. The degree of heavy metal immobilization was evaluated using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) as well as controlled extraction experiments. These leaching test results along with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray (SEM-EDX) analyses were also implemented to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for immobilization of the heavy metals under study. Finally, the reusability of the stabilized waste forms in construction applications was also investigated by performing unconfined compressive strength and swell tests. Results suggest that the controlling mechanism for both lead and hexavalent chromium immobilization is surface adsorption, whereas for trivalent chromium it is hydroxide precipitation. Addition of fly ash to the contaminated soils effectively reduced heavy metal leachability well below the non-hazardous regulatory limits. However, quicklime addition was necessary in order to attain satisfactory immobilization levels. Overall, fly ash addition increases the immobilization pH region for all heavy metals tested, and significantly improves the stress-strain properties of the treated solids, thus allowing their reuse as readily available construction materials. The only potential problem associated with this quicklime/fly ash treatment is the excessive formation of the pozzolanic product ettringite in the presence of sulfates. Ettringite, when brought in contact with water, may cause significant swelling and subsequent deterioration of the stabilized matrix. Addition of minimum amounts of barium hydroxide was shown to effectively eliminate ettringite formation.

  12. Amorphous metal matrix composite ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barczy, P.; Szigeti, F.

    1998-01-01

    Composite ribbons with amorphous matrix and ceramic (SiC, WC, MoB) particles were produced by modified planar melt flow casting methods. Weldability, abrasive wear and wood sanding examinations were carried out in order to find optimal material and technology for elevated wear resistance and sanding durability. The correlation between structure and composite properties is discussed. (author)

  13. Acidic extraction and precipitation of heavy metals from biomass incinerator cyclone fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kröppl M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomass incineration is increasingly used for the generation of heat and/or electricity. After incineration two ash fractions remain. Bottom ashes (the coarser ash fraction can usually be used as fertilizing agent on fields as it contains valuable elements for soils and plants and only minor concentrations of heavy metals. Fly ashes (the finer ash fraction are in most cases disposed as their heavy metal concentrations are too high for a usage as soil enhancer. In this study highly heavy metal contaminated fly ash has been cleaned through extraction with hydrochloric acid. The heavy metals were removed from the extract by precipitation with sodium hydroxide. After the cleaning procedure the ash can be pelletized and be returned to the soils.

  14. Microlevel thermal effects in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakovich, Carl T.

    1990-01-01

    A method for studying the influence of thermal effects on the inelastic response of metal matrix composites is reviewed. A micromechanics approach based upon the method of cells is shown to be quite versatile for studying a variety of materials response phenomena. Yielding and inelastic response of the composite are predicted as functions of thermal stresses, yielding of the matrix, and imperfect fiber/matrix bonding. Results are presented in the form of yield surfaces and nonlinear stress-strain curves for unidirectional and laminated boron/aluminum and silicon-carbide/titanium.

  15. Micromechanical Modeling of Woven Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extensive micromechanical modeling effort for woven metal matrix composites. The model is employed to predict the mechanical response of 8-harness (8H) satin weave carbon/copper (C/Cu) composites. Experimental mechanical results for this novel high thermal conductivity material were recently reported by Bednarcyk et al. along with preliminary model results. The micromechanics model developed herein is based on an embedded approach. A micromechanics model for the local (micro-scale) behavior of the woven composite, the original method of cells (Aboudi), is embedded in a global (macro-scale) micromechanics model (the three-dimensional generalized method of cells (GMC-3D) (Aboudi). This approach allows representation of true repeating unit cells for woven metal matrix composites via GMC-3D, and representation of local effects, such as matrix plasticity, yarn porosity, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding. In addition, the equations of GMC-3D were reformulated to significantly reduce the number of unknown quantities that characterize the deformation fields at the microlevel in order to make possible the analysis of actual microstructures of woven composites. The resulting micromechanical model (WCGMC) provides an intermediate level of geometric representation, versatility, and computational efficiency with respect to previous analytical and numerical models for woven composites, but surpasses all previous modeling work by allowing the mechanical response of a woven metal matrix composite, with an elastoplastic matrix, to be examined for the first time. WCGMC is employed to examine the effects of composite microstructure, porosity, residual stresses, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding on the predicted mechanical response of 8H satin C/Cu. The previously reported experimental results are summarized, and the model predictions are compared to monotonic and cyclic tensile and shear test data. By considering appropriate levels of porosity

  16. Electrodialytic Separation of Phosphorus and Heavy Metals from Two Types of Sewage Sludge Ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie

    2014-01-01

    During sewage sludge incineration phosphorus (P) is retained in the ash in a form not directly available to plants. As P is a sparse resource, it is important to develop techniques for recovery of P from incinerated sewage sludge ashes (ISSA). Heavy metals are concentrated in ISSA and separation....... The separation method was best suited for the Fe-rich ash, where it was possible to separate P into one processing solution, heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb) into another, keeping the ash suspended in a third solution (which though still contained P after 1 week of EDS). For the Al rich ash, the separation...

  17. Clay formation and metal fixation during weathering of coal fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zevenbergen, C.; Bradley, J.P.; Reeuwijk, L.P. Van; Shyam, A.K.; Hjelmar, O.; Comans, R.N.J.

    1999-01-01

    The enormous and worldwide production of coal fly ash cannot be durably isolated from the weathering cycle, and the weathering characteristics of fly ash must be known to understand the long-term environmental impact. The authors studied the weathering of two coal fly ashes and compared them with published data from weathered volcanic ash, it's closest natural analogue. Both types of ash contain abundant aluminosilicate glass, which alters to noncrystalline clay. However, this study reveals that the kinetics of coal fly ash weathering are more rapid than those of volcanic ash because the higher pH of fresh coal fly ash promotes rapid dissolution of the glass. After about 10 years of weathering, the noncrystalline clay content of coal fly ash is higher than that of 250-year-old volcanic ash. The observed rapid clay formation together with heavy metal fixation imply that the long-term environmental impact of coal fly ash disposal may be less severe and the benefits more pronounced than predicted from previous studies on unweathered ash. Their findings suggest that isolating coal fly ash from the weathering cycle may be counterproductive because, in the long-term under conditions of free drainage, fly ash is converted into fertile soil capable of supporting agriculture

  18. ASH1L Suppresses Matrix Metalloproteinase through Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway in Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Yin; Tianqian, Hui; Fanyuan, Yu; Haiyun, Luo; Xueyang, Liao; Jing, Yang; Chenglin, Wang; Ling, Ye

    2017-02-01

    Pulpitis is an inflammation of dental pulp produced by a response to external stimuli. The response entails substantial cellular and molecular activities. Both genetic and epigenetic regulators contribute to the occurrence of pulpitis. However, the epigenetic mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this research, we studied the role of the absent, small, or homeotic-like (ASH1L) gene in the process of pulpitis. Human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) were stimulated with proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Gene expression profiling was performed to assess the occurrence of epigenetic regulators. Pulp tissue from rat experimental pulpitis was subjected to immunofluorescence to detect the occurrence of ASH1L and trimethylation of lysine 4 histone 3 (H3K4me3). The presence of ASH1L in HDPCs that had been generated by TNF-α stimulation was analyzed by Western blot procedures and cellular immunofluorescence. Once detected, ASH1L was silenced through the use of specific small interfering RNA. The effects of ASH1L on the occurrence and operation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were then tested by analysis of quantitative polymerase chain reactions, Western blotting, and zymography. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed to detect whether ASH1L and H3K4me3 were present in the promoter regions of MMPs. We then used Western blot procedures to examine the nuclear factor kappa B and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) responses to the silencing of ASH1L. We also examined the specific pathway involved in ASH1L regulation of the MMPs. After stimulating HDPCs with TNF-α, ASH1L emerged as 1 of the most strongly induced epigenetic mediators. We found that TNF-α treatment induced the expression of ASH1L through the nuclear factor kappa B and MAPK signal pathways. ASH1L was found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. TNF-α treatment was particularly active in inducing the accumulation of ASH1L in cellular cytoplasm. As is also consistent

  19. Leaching for recovery of copper from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash: influence of ash properties and metal speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassesson, Henric; Fedje, Karin Karlfeldt; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2014-08-01

    Recovery of metals occurring in significant amounts in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, such as copper, could offer several advantages: a decreased amount of potentially mobile metal compounds going to landfill, saving of natural resources and a monetary value. A combination of leaching and solvent extraction may constitute a feasible recovery path for metals from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. However, it has been shown that the initial dissolution and leaching is a limiting step in such a recovery process. The work described in this article was focused on elucidating physical and chemical differences between two ash samples with the aim of explaining the differences in copper release from these samples in two leaching methods. The results showed that the chemical speciation is an important factor affecting the release of copper. The occurrence of copper as phosphate or silicate will hinder leaching, while sulphate and chloride will facilitate leaching. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Effect of ferrous metal presence on lead leaching in municipal waste incineration bottom ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmig, Wesley N; Roessler, Justin G; Zhang, Jianye; Townsend, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    The recovery of ferrous and non-ferrous metals from waste to energy (WTE) ash continues to advance as the sale of removed metals improves the economics of waste combustion. Published literature suggests that Fe and Fe oxides play a role in suppressing Pb leaching in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP); further removal of ferrous metals from WTE ashes may facilitate higher Pb leaching under the TCLP. Eight WTE bottom ash size-fractions, from three facilities, were evaluated to assess the effect of metallic Fe addition and ferrous metal removal on TCLP leaching. Metallic Fe addition was demonstrated to reduce Pb leaching; the removal of ferrous metals by magnet resulted in a decrease in total available Pb (mg/kg) in most ash samples, yet Pb leachability increased in 5 of 6 ash samples. The research points to two chemical mechanisms to explain these results: redox interactions between Pb and Fe and the sorption of soluble Pb onto Fe oxide surfaces, as well as the effect of the leachate pH before and after metals recovery. The findings presented here indicate that generators, processors, and regulators of ash should be aware of the impact ferrous metal removal may have on Pb leaching, as a substantial increase in leaching may have significant implications regarding the management of WTE ashes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Characterization of Fixation of Ba, Pb, and Cu in Alkali-Activated Fly Ash/Blast Furnace Slag Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Koplík

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The fixation of heavy metals (Ba, Cu, Pb in an alkali-activated matrix was investigated. The matrix consisted of fly ash and blast furnace slag (BFS. The mixture of NaOH and Na-silicate was used as alkaline activator. Three analytical techniques were used to describe the fixation of heavy metals—X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD. All heavy metals formed insoluble salts after alkaline activation. Ba was fixed as BaSO4, and only this product was crystalline. EDS mapping showed that Ba was cumulated in some regions and formed clusters. Pb was present in the form of Pb(OH2 and was dispersed throughout the matrix on the edges of BFS grains. Cu was fixed as Cu(OH2 and also was cumulated in some regions and formed clusters. Cu was present in two different chemical states; apart from Cu(OH2, a Cu–O bond was also identified.

  2. Assessing the effects of FBC ash treatments of metal-contaminated soils using life history traits and metal bioaccumulation analysis of the earthworm Eisenia andrei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumiaux, F.; Demuynck, S.; Schikorski, D.; Lemiere, S.; Lepretre, A. [Universite Lille Nord de France, Villeneuve Dascq (France)

    2010-03-15

    Earthworms (Eisenia andrei) were exposed, in controlled conditions, to metal-contaminated soils previously treated in situ with two types of fluidized bed combustion ashes. Effects on this species were determined by life history traits analysis. Metal immobilizing efficiency of ashes was indicated by metal bioaccumulation. Ashes-treated soils reduced worm mortality compared to the untreated soil. However, these ashes reduced both cocoon hatching success and hatchlings numbers compared to the untreated soil. In addition, sulfo-calcical ashes reduced or delayed worm maturity and lowered cocoon production compared to silico-alumineous ones. Metal immobilizing efficiency of ashes was demonstrated for Zn, Cu and to a lesser extent Pb. Only silico-alumineous ashes reduced Cd bioaccumulation, although Cd was still bioconcentrated. Thus, although ash additions to metal-contaminated soils may help in immobilizing metals, their use might result, depending on the chemical nature of ashes, to severe detrimental effects on earthworm reproduction with possible long term consequences to populations.

  3. Extraction of heavy metals from MSWI fly ash using hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel, Gisela; Eggenberger, Urs; Kulik, Dmitrii A; Hummel, Wolfgang; Schlumberger, Stefan; Klink, Waldemar; Fisch, Martin; Mäder, Urs K

    2018-03-17

    Fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration contains a large potential for recyclable metals such as Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd. The Swiss Waste Ordinance prescribes the treatment of fly ash and recovery of metals to be implemented by 2021. More than 60% of the fly ash in Switzerland is acid leached according to the FLUWA process, which provides the basis for metal recovery. The investigation and optimization of the FLUWA process is of increasing interest and an industrial solution for direct metal recovery within Switzerland is in development. With this work, a detailed laboratory study on different filter cakes from fly ash leaching using HCl 5% (represents the FLUWA process) and concentrated sodium chloride solution (300 g/L) is described. This two-step leaching of fly ash is an efficient combination for the mobilization of a high percentage of heavy metals from fly ash (Pb, Cd ≥ 90% and Cu, Zn 70-80%). The depletion of these metals is mainly due to a combination of redox reaction and metal-chloride-complex formation. The results indicate a way forward for an improved metal depletion and recovery from fly ash that has potential for application at industrial scale. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of heavy metal leaching from coal ash-versus conventional concrete monoliths and debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwenzi, Willis; Mupatsi, Nyarai M

    2016-03-01

    Application of coal ash in construction materials is constrained by the potential risk of heavy metal leaching. Limited information is available on the comparative heavy metal leaching from coal ash-versus conventional concrete. The current study compared total and leached heavy metal concentrations in unbound coal ash, cement and sand; and investigated the effect of initial leachant pH on heavy metal leaching from coal-ash versus conventional concrete monoliths and their debris. Total Pb, Mn and Zn in coal ash were lower than or similar to that of other materials, while Cu and Fe showed the opposite trend. Leached concentrations of Zn, Pb, Mn, Cu and Fe in unbound coal ash, its concrete and debris were comparable and in some cases even lower than that for conventional concrete. In all cases, leached concentrations accounted for just debris had highly alkaline pH indicative of high acid neutralizing and pH buffering capacity, which account for the stabilization of Zn, Pb, Mn, Cu and Fe. Based on the low risk of Zn, Pb, Mn, Cu and Fe leaching from the coal ash imply that such coal ash can be incorporated in construction materials such as concrete without adverse impacts on public and environmental health from these constituents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Wildfires and water chemistry: effect of metals associated with wood ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrato, José M; Blake, Johanna M; Hirani, Chris; Clark, Alexander L; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Peterson, Eric; Bixby, Rebecca J

    2016-08-10

    The reactivity of metals associated with ash from wood collected from the Valles Caldera National Preserve, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, was assessed through a series of laboratory experiments. Microscopy, spectroscopy, diffraction, and aqueous chemistry measurements were integrated to determine the chemical composition of wood ash and its effect on water chemistry. Climate change has caused dramatic impacts and stresses that have resulted in large-scale increases in wildfire activity in semi-arid areas of the world. Metals and other constituents associated with wildfire ash can be transported by storm event runoff and negatively affect the water quality in streams and rivers. Differences among ash from six tree species based on total concentrations of metals such as Ca, Al, Mg, Fe, and Mn were identified using non-metric multidimensional analysis. Metal-bearing carbonate and oxide phases were quantified by X-ray diffraction analyses and X-ray spectroscopy analyses. These metal-bearing carbonate phases were readily dissolved in the first 30 minutes of reaction with 18 MΩ water and 10 mM HCO3(-) in laboratory batch experiments which resulted in the release of metals and carbonates in the ash, causing water alkalinity to increase. However, metal concentrations decreased over the course of the experiment, suggesting that metals re-adsorb to ash. Our results suggest that the dissolution of metal-bearing carbonate and oxide phases in ash and metal re-adsorption to ash are relevant processes affecting water chemistry after wildfire events. These results have important implications to better understand the impact of wildfire events on water quality.

  6. Chemical properties of heavy metals in typical hospital waste incinerator ashes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lijuan; Zhang, Fu-Shen; Wang, Kaisheng; Zhu, Jianxin

    2009-03-01

    Incineration has become the main mechanism for hospital waste (HW) disposal in China after the outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in 2003. However, little information is available on the chemical properties of the resulting ashes. In the present study, 22HW ash samples, including 14 samples of bottom ash and eight samples of fly ash, were collected from four typical HW incineration plants located across China. Chemical analysis indicated that the HW ashes contained large amounts of metal salts of Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na with a concentration range of 1.8-315gkg(-1). Furthermore, the ashes contained high concentrations of heavy metals such as Ag, As, Ba, Bi, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Ti, Sb, Sn, Sr, Zn with a vast range of 1.1-121,411mgkg(-1), with higher concentrations found in the fly ash samples. Sequential extraction results showed that Ba, Cr, Ni and Sn are present in the residual fraction, while Cd existed in the exchangeable and carbonate fractions. As, Mn, Zn existed in the Fe-Mn oxide fraction, Pb was present in the Fe-Mn oxide and residual fractions, and Cu was present in the organic matter fraction. Furthermore, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results indicated that leached amounts of Cd, Cu and Pb from almost all fly ash samples exceeded the USEPA regulated levels. A comparison between the HW ashes and municipal solid waste (MSW) ash showed that both HW bottom ash and fly ash contained higher concentrations of Ag, As, Bi, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ti, and Zn. This research provides critical information for appropriate HW incineration ash management plans.

  7. Environmental, physical and structural characterisation of geopolymer matrixes synthesised from coal (co-)combustion fly ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ayuso, E; Querol, X; Plana, F; Alastuey, A; Moreno, N; Izquierdo, M; Font, O; Moreno, T; Diez, S; Vázquez, E; Barra, M

    2008-06-15

    The synthesis of geopolymer matrixes from coal (co-)combustion fly ashes as the sole source of silica and alumina has been studied in order to assess both their capacity to immobilise the potentially toxic elements contained in these coal (co-)combustion by-products and their suitability to be used as cement replacements. The geopolymerisation process has been performed using (5, 8 and 12 M) NaOH solutions as activation media and different curing time (6-48 h) and temperature (40-80 degrees C) conditions. Synthesised geopolymers have been characterised with regard to their leaching behaviour, following the DIN 38414-S4 [DIN 38414-S4, Determination of leachability by water (S4), group S: sludge and sediments. German standard methods for the examination of water, waste water and sludge. Institut für Normung, Berlin, 1984] and NEN 7375 [NEN 7375, Leaching characteristics of moulded or monolithic building and waste materials. Determination of leaching of inorganic components with the diffusion test. Netherlands Normalisation Institute, Delft, 2004] procedures, and to their structural stability by means of compressive strength measurements. In addition, geopolymer mineralogy, morphology and structure have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. It was found that synthesised geopolymer matrixes were only effective in the chemical immobilisation of a number of elements of environmental concern contained in fly ashes, reducing (especially for Ba), or maintaining their leachable contents after the geopolymerisation process, but not for those elements present as oxyanions. Physical entrapment does not seem either to contribute in an important way, in general, to the immobilisation of oxyanions. The structural stability of synthesised geopolymers was mainly dependent on the glass content of fly ashes, attaining at the optimal activation conditions (12 M NaOH, 48 h, 80

  8. Synthesis and heavy metal immobilization behaviors of fly ash based geopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunsheng Zhang; Wei Sun; Wei She; Guowei Sun [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Jiangsu Civil Engineering Materials Key Laboratory

    2009-10-15

    Two aspects of studies were carried out: 1) synthesis of geopolymer by using fly ash and metakaolin; 2) Immobilization behaviors of fly ash based geopolymer in a presence of Pb and Cu ions. As for the synthesis of fly ash based geopolymer, 4 different fly ash content (10%, 30%, 50%, 70%) and 3 types of curing regimes (standard curing, steam curing and autoclave curing) were investigated to obtain the optimum synthesis condition based on the compressive and flexural strength. The experimental results show that geopolymer, containing 30% fly ash and synthesized at steam curing (80{sup o}C for 8 h), exhibits higher mechanical strengths. The compressive and flexural strengths of fly ash based geopolymer reach 32.2 MPa and 7.15 MPa, respectively. Additionally, Infrared (IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used to characterize the microstructure of the fly ash geopolymer. IR spectra shows that the absorptive band at 1086 cm{sup -1} shifts to lower wave number around 1033 cm{sup -1}, and the 6-coordinated Al transforms into 4-coordination during the synthesis of fly ash based geopolymer. The resulting geopolymeric products were X-ray amorphous materials. As for immobilization of heavy metals, leaching tests were employed to investigate the immobilization behaviors of the fly ash based geopolymer synthesized under the above optimum condition. The leaching tests showed that fly ash based geopolymer can effectively immobilize Cu and Pb heavy metal ions, and the immobilization efficiency reached 90% greater when heavy metals were incorporated in the fly ash geopolymer in the range of 0.1% to 0.3%. The Pb exhibits better immobilization efficiency than the Cu, especially in the case of large dosages of heavy metals.

  9. Behavior of metals in ash melting and gasification-melting of municipal solid waste (MSW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, C H; Matsuto, T; Tanaka, N

    2005-01-01

    In this study, metal behavior in ash-melting and municipal solid waste (MSW) gasification-melting facilities were investigated. Eight ash-melting and three MSW gasification-melting facilities with a variety of melting processes and feedstocks were selected. From each facility, melting furnace fly ash (MFA) and molten slag were sampled, and feedstock of the ash-melting processes was also taken. For the ash melting process, the generation rate of MFA was well correlated with the ratio of incineration fly ash (IFA) in feedstock, and this was because MFA was formed mostly by mass transfer from IFA and a limited amount from bottom ash (BA). Distribution ratios of metal elements to MFA were generally determined by volatility of the metal element, but chlorine content in feedstock had a significant effect on Cu and a marginal effect on Pb. Distribution ratio of Zn to MFA was influenced by the oxidizing atmosphere in the furnace. High MFA generation and distribution ratio of non-volatile metals to MFA in gasification-melting facilities was probably caused by carry-over of fine particles to the air pollution control system due to large gas volume. Finally, dilution effect was shown to have a significant effect on metal concentration in MFA.

  10. Production of novel ceramic materials from coal fly ash and metal finishing wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, M.R.; Adell, V.; Cheeseman, C.R. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Skempton Building, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Boccaccini, A.R. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    Fly ash from coal fired power stations is a potential raw material for the production of ceramic tiles, bricks and blocks. Previous work has demonstrated that the addition of metals can significantly alter fly ash sintering. Metal finishing produces problematic waste filter cakes and sludges that are increasingly difficult to dispose of to landfill. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of selected metal finishing wastes on the properties of sintered fly ash. A 10 wt.% addition of dried metal finishing sludge obtained from the phosphate bath at a tri-cationic phosphating operation significantly reduced the sintering temperature for maximum density by approximately 75 C. The addition of the phosphate bath sludge also reduced leaching of As, to the extent that fly ash ceramics containing this waste would be classified as inert. Potential industrial applications for these novel waste-derived ceramic materials are discussed. (author)

  11. Behavior of Alkali Metals and Ash in a Low-Temperature Circulating Fluidized Bed (LTCFB) Gasifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narayan, Vikas; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2016-01-01

    , the low reactor temperature ensures that high-alkali biomass fuels canbe used without risk of bed defluidization. This paper presents the first investigation of the fate of alkali metals and ash in lowtemperaturegasifiers. Measurements on bed material and product gas dust samples were made on a 100 k......W and a 6 MW LTCFBgasifier. Of the total fuel ash entering the system, the largest fraction (40−50%) was retained in the secondary cyclone bottoms,while a lower amount (8−10%) was released as dust in the exit gas. Most of the alkali and alkaline earth metals were retained inthe solid ash, along with Si...... by the particle size and the cut size ofthe primary and secondary cyclones. A model accounting for the ash collection by the plant cyclones was shown to predict theproduct gas ash particle release reasonably well....

  12. The potential of two Salix genotypes for radionuclide/heavy metal accumulation. A case study of Rovinari ash pit (Gorj District, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernea, Cornelia; Neţoiu, Constantin; Corneanu, Gabriel; Crăciun, Constantin; Corneanu, Mihaela; Cojocaru, Luminiţa; Rovena Lăcătuşu, Anca; Popescu, Ion

    2014-05-01

    Thermo Electric Power Plants (TEPP) produce a high amount of ash, that contains heavy metals and radionuclides. Ash is usually stored in ash-pits, in mixture with water and contains U235, Th 234 and their decay products, that are released from the coal matrix, during combustion, as well as heavy metals. Warm weather dried the ash and it can be spread by the wind in surrounded area. This paper presents the results of an experiment with two Salix genotypes, cultivated on an old closed ash-pit, nearby the Rovinari TEPP, in the middle Jiu valley (Gorj District, Romania), in order to evaluate its tolerance to heavy metals and radionuclides. Ash analysis revealed the presence of natural radionuclides, beloging from ash and coal dust, as well as of Cs 137, of Chernobil provenance. Radionuclides content over the normal limits for Romania were registered for Th 234, Pb210, U235 and Ra226. The heavy metals level in ash was over the normal limits, but under the alerts limits. In order to establish the woody plants tolerance to heavy metals and radionuclides, it is important to study the seedlings behavior. In this respect Salix alba and Salix viminalis whips and cuttings culture have been establish on Rovinari ash-pit. The observations made on survival and growth rate pointed out the superiority of Salix viminalis behaviour. After a period of three years Salix viminalis registered a 96% survival rate, while in Salix alba annual decreases, reaching to 14%. These results are supported by the radionuclides content in leaves and by the electron microscopy studies. In Salix alba the leaves parenchimatic cells present a low sinthesis activity. The exogenous particles are accumulated in parenchima cells vacuola, the chloroplasts are usually agranal, with few starch grains and mitocondria presents slightly dillated crista. The ultrastructural features of the mature leaf cells, evidenced the natural adaptation of Salix viminalins for development in an environment with a big amount of

  13. Leaching behavior of heavy metals from municipal solid wastes incineration (MSWI) fly ash used in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Huisheng; Kan Lili

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash, surface leaching toxicity and successive leaching concentration of heavy metals from MSWI fly ash-cement hardened pastes were studied. And, the relationships between leaching concentrations of heavy metals and leaching time were also discussed. Experimental results showed that immobilization effect of cement on MSWI fly ash is good. Even if MSWI fly ash-cement hardened pastes were damaged, the leaching toxicity is still in a safety range. In early leaching stage, the surface leaching rate is relatively a little high, up to 10 -5 -10 -4 cm d -1 order of magnitude, in the later time of leaching, its rate rapidly declined, down to 10 -7 . Most of leached heavy metals are produced at early ages. The leaching concentration of heavy metals and leaching time has strong positive relationships. In factual utilizing circumstances, heavy metals' leaching from MSWI fly ash-cement hardened pastes is a very slow and gradually diluting process. The leaching toxicity of heavy metals is far lower than that of the National Standard of China, and minimum harmful matters can be contained and released in the environment. Reusing of MSWI fly ash as partial replacement for cement in concrete mixes is potentially feasible.

  14. Lauryl Amine as heavy metal collector of boiler ash from pulp and paper mill waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembiring, M. P.; Kaban, J.; Bangun, N.; Saputra, E.

    2018-04-01

    Theincreasing of demand of pulp and paper products, will following with the growing the pulp and paper industryand generate significant mill waste. The total waste reached 1/3 of the amount raw materials used and ash boiler is the waste with the largest percentage of 52%. For that it takes effort to manage the existing waste. The boiler ash contained the chemical elements, it can be utilized such as fertilizer, because it also contains transition metals in form of heavy metal such as Cadmium (Cd), Cobalt (Co), Chrome (Cr), Cupprum (Cu), Ferrum (Fe), Nickel (Ni), and Zinc (Zn), the use of boiler ash must follow the threshold specified by the Government. Several studies have been undertaken to reduce and extract heavy metals from ash and sand of the boiler by using carbon dioxide as its ligand. Eelectrochemical method was used to remove and recovery of heavy metals from the incenerator. This study focused on removal of heavy metals using Lauryl Amine as collector and three solvents namely Dichloromethane, Ethanol and n-Hexane. The treatmentswas able to extract the heavy metal and generally reduce the heavy metal content of ash boiler pulp and paper mill waste. The combination treatment used toreduce the heavy metal content of 5 gram Lauryl Amine collector in Dichloromethane solvent for 4 hours process time.

  15. Immobilization of krypton in a metal matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmell, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The report presents the work carried out on the immobilization of krypton in a metallic matrix by combined ion implantation and sputtering. The process has been successfully tested using 100 curies of fully active krypton in order to demonstrate that the process operates in the radiation levels which will be obtained with active gas at a reprocessing plant. A design study for a plant for fuel reprocessing has shown that the process can be simply operated, without requiring shielded cells. These results, which complete the development programme, indicate that the process is ideal for the containment of kripton arising from the processing of nuclear fuel and that the product will retain the gas under normal storage conditions and also during simulated accident conditions

  16. Fracture toughness in metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Ipiña J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations of the fracture toughness in metal matrix composites (Duralcan reinforced with 15% of Al(20(3 and SiC are presented in this work. The application of Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics is discussed and the obtained values are compared with the ones obtained by means of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics. Results show that J IC derived K JC values are higher than the corresponding values obtained by direct application of the linear elastic methodology. The effect of a heat treatment on the material fracture toughness was also evaluated in which the analyzed approaches showed, not only different toughness values, but also opposite tendencies. A second comparison of the J IC and K JC values obtained in this work with toughness values reported in the literature is presented and discussed.

  17. Multifunctional Metal Matrix Composite Filament Wound Tank Liners, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials offer tremendous potential for lightweight propellant and pressurant tankage for space applications. Thin MMC liners for COPVs...

  18. Use of hyghly reactive rice husk ash in the production of cement matrix reinforced with Green coconut fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, C.L.; Savastano, H. Jr; Paya Bernabeu, Jorge Juan; Santos, S. F.; Borrachero Rosado, María Victoria; Monzó Balbuena, José Mª; Soriano Martinez, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of partial replacement of Portland cement by rice husk ash (RHA) to enable the use of green coconut husk fiber as reinforcement for cementitious matrix. The use of highly reactive pozzolanic ash contributes for decreasing the alkaline attack on the vegetable fiber, originated from waste materials. The slurry dewatering technique was used for dispersion of the raw materials in aqueous solution, followed by vacuum drainage of water and pressing for the product...

  19. Limitations for heavy metal release during thermo-chemical treatment of sewage sludge ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Benedikt; Perutka, Libor; Aschenbrenner, Philipp; Kraus, Petra; Rechberger, Helmut; Winter, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Phosphate recycling from sewage sludge can be achieved by heavy metal removal from sewage sludge ash (SSA) producing a fertilizer product: mixing SSA with chloride and treating this mixture (eventually after granulation) in a rotary kiln at 1000 ± 100 deg. C leads to the formation of volatile heavy metal compounds that evaporate and to P-phases with high bio-availability. Due to economical and ecological reasons, it is necessary to reduce the energy consumption of this technology. Generally, fluidized bed reactors are characterized by high heat and mass transfer and thus promise the saving of energy. Therefore, a rotary reactor and a fluidized bed reactor (both laboratory-scale and operated in batch mode) are used for the treatment of granulates containing SSA and CaCl 2 . Treatment temperature, residence time and - in case of the fluidized bed reactor - superficial velocity are varied between 800 and 900 deg. C, 10 and 30 min and 3.4 and 4.6 m s -1 . Cd and Pb can be removed well (>95 %) in all experiments. Cu removal ranges from 25% to 84%, for Zn 75-90% are realized. The amount of heavy metals removed increases with increasing temperature and residence time which is most pronounced for Cu. In the pellet, three major reactions occur: formation of HCl and Cl 2 from CaCl 2 ; diffusion and reaction of these gases with heavy metal compounds; side reactions from heavy metal compounds with matrix material. Although, heat and mass transfer are higher in the fluidized bed reactor, Pb and Zn removal is slightly better in the rotary reactor. This is due the accelerated migration of formed HCl and Cl 2 out of the pellets into the reactor atmosphere. Cu is apparently limited by the diffusion of its chloride thus the removal is higher in the fluidized bed unit.

  20. Limitations for heavy metal release during thermo-chemical treatment of sewage sludge ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Benedikt; Perutka, Libor; Aschenbrenner, Philipp; Kraus, Petra; Rechberger, Helmut; Winter, Franz

    2011-06-01

    Phosphate recycling from sewage sludge can be achieved by heavy metal removal from sewage sludge ash (SSA) producing a fertilizer product: mixing SSA with chloride and treating this mixture (eventually after granulation) in a rotary kiln at 1000 ± 100°C leads to the formation of volatile heavy metal compounds that evaporate and to P-phases with high bio-availability. Due to economical and ecological reasons, it is necessary to reduce the energy consumption of this technology. Generally, fluidized bed reactors are characterized by high heat and mass transfer and thus promise the saving of energy. Therefore, a rotary reactor and a fluidized bed reactor (both laboratory-scale and operated in batch mode) are used for the treatment of granulates containing SSA and CaCl(2). Treatment temperature, residence time and - in case of the fluidized bed reactor - superficial velocity are varied between 800 and 900°C, 10 and 30 min and 3.4 and 4.6 ms(-1). Cd and Pb can be removed well (>95 %) in all experiments. Cu removal ranges from 25% to 84%, for Zn 75-90% are realized. The amount of heavy metals removed increases with increasing temperature and residence time which is most pronounced for Cu. In the pellet, three major reactions occur: formation of HCl and Cl(2) from CaCl(2); diffusion and reaction of these gases with heavy metal compounds; side reactions from heavy metal compounds with matrix material. Although, heat and mass transfer are higher in the fluidized bed reactor, Pb and Zn removal is slightly better in the rotary reactor. This is due the accelerated migration of formed HCl and Cl(2) out of the pellets into the reactor atmosphere. Cu is apparently limited by the diffusion of its chloride thus the removal is higher in the fluidized bed unit. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrodialytic treatment of sewage sludge ash for the recovery of phosphorous and separation of heavy metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbers, Benjamin; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2012-01-01

    Mobilization and extraction of both phosphorus (P) and heavy metals (HM) from sewage sludge ash through means of acidification has been studied extensively. However, separation of both P and HM after mobilization to provide reusable materials has proven to be challenging. This study presents...... a combination of acidification and electrodialytic separation (EDS) to mobilize and separate P and HM from sewage sludge ash (SSA). The EDS experimental setup consists of three compartments, separated by ion exchange membranes which are located at either side of the stirred ash suspension. Through application...... of a direct current to electrodes in the outer compartments, ionic complexes migrate and concentrate in the electrode compartments in accordance to their charge. Application of both EDS and acidification of the ash resulted in an increased release of phosphorus from the ash, but did not always result...

  2. Forensic Analysis of Cigarette Ash-Brand Determination Through Trace-metal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Anja C; Barnes, James H; Lewis, Cris; Murray, Cynthia K; Albahadily, Fakhrildeen; Jourdan, Thomas H

    2016-07-01

    The information inherent in cigarette ash in the form of trace-metal concentrations may be of use in a forensic context as it can indicate the brand from which the ash originated. This knowledge might help place suspects at crime scenes or determine how many people may have been present. To develop and test statistical models capable of classifying ash samples according to brand, commercial cigarettes procured in the U.S. and overseas were "smoked" using a peristaltic pump, mimicking the range of human smoking habits. Ash samples were digested in a mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acid applying microwave digestion and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis of the elemental data showed intrinsic differences between brands. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis demonstrated that brand classification yields good sensitivity and specificity for a number of models tested. Varying smoking parameters did not impact the classification of ash samples. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. Assessment of bioaccumulation of heavy metals by different plant species grown on fly ash dump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambhulkar, Hemlata P; Juwarkar, Asha A

    2009-05-01

    A field experiment was conducted on a 10-hectare area on fly ash dump at Khaperkheda Thermal Power Plant, Nagpur, India, where different ecologically and economically important plant species were planted using bioremediation technology. The technology involves the use of organic amendment and selection of suitable plant species along with site-specific nitrogen-fixing strains of biofertilizers. The study was conducted to find out the metal accumulation potential of different plant species. The total heavy metal contents in fly ash were determined and their relative abundance was found in the order of Fe>Mn>Zn>Cu>Ni>Cr>Pb>Cd. Fly ash samples had acidic pH, low electrical conductivity, low level of organic carbon and trace amounts of N and P. Plantation of divergent species was done on fly ash dump using the bioremediation technique. After 3 years of plantation, luxuriant growth of these species was found covering almost the entire fly ash dump. The results of the metal analysis of these species indicated that iron accumulated to the greatest extent in vegetation followed by Mn, Ni, Zn, Cu, Cr and Pb. Cassia siamea was found to accumulate all metals at higher concentrations compared to other species. The experimental study revealed that C. siamea could be used as a hyper-accumulator plant for bioremediation of fly ash dump.

  4. Heavy Metal Contamination of Soils around a Hospital Waste Incinerator Bottom Ash Dumps Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adama, M; Esena, R; Fosu-Mensah, B; Yirenya-Tawiah, D

    2016-01-01

    Waste incineration is the main waste management strategy used in treating hospital waste in many developing countries. However, the release of dioxins, POPs, and heavy metals in fly and bottom ash poses environmental and public health concerns. To determine heavy metal (Hg, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ag) in levels in incinerator bottom ash and soils 100 m around the incinerator bottom ash dump site, ash samples and surrounding soil samples were collected at 20 m, 40 m, 60 m, 80 m, 100 m, and 1,200 m from incinerator. These were analyzed using the absorption spectrophotometer method. The geoaccumulation (I geo) and pollution load indices (PLI) were used to assess the level of heavy metal contamination of surrounding soils. The study revealed high concentrations in mg/kg for, Zn (16417.69), Pb (143.80), Cr (99.30), and Cd (7.54) in bottom ash and these were above allowable limits for disposal in landfill. The study also found soils within 60 m radius of the incinerator to be polluted with the metals. It is recommended that health care waste managers be educated on the implication of improper management of incinerator bottom ash and regulators monitor hospital waste incinerator sites.

  5. Heavy Metal Contamination of Soils around a Hospital Waste Incinerator Bottom Ash Dumps Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste incineration is the main waste management strategy used in treating hospital waste in many developing countries. However, the release of dioxins, POPs, and heavy metals in fly and bottom ash poses environmental and public health concerns. To determine heavy metal (Hg, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ag in levels in incinerator bottom ash and soils 100 m around the incinerator bottom ash dump site, ash samples and surrounding soil samples were collected at 20 m, 40 m, 60 m, 80 m, 100 m, and 1,200 m from incinerator. These were analyzed using the absorption spectrophotometer method. The geoaccumulation (Igeo and pollution load indices (PLI were used to assess the level of heavy metal contamination of surrounding soils. The study revealed high concentrations in mg/kg for, Zn (16417.69, Pb (143.80, Cr (99.30, and Cd (7.54 in bottom ash and these were above allowable limits for disposal in landfill. The study also found soils within 60 m radius of the incinerator to be polluted with the metals. It is recommended that health care waste managers be educated on the implication of improper management of incinerator bottom ash and regulators monitor hospital waste incinerator sites.

  6. Heavy Metal Contamination of Soils around a Hospital Waste Incinerator Bottom Ash Dumps Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adama, M.; Esena, R.; Fosu-Mensah, B.; Yirenya-Tawiah, D.

    2016-01-01

    Waste incineration is the main waste management strategy used in treating hospital waste in many developing countries. However, the release of dioxins, POPs, and heavy metals in fly and bottom ash poses environmental and public health concerns. To determine heavy metal (Hg, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ag) in levels in incinerator bottom ash and soils 100 m around the incinerator bottom ash dump site, ash samples and surrounding soil samples were collected at 20 m, 40 m, 60 m, 80 m, 100 m, and 1,200 m from incinerator. These were analyzed using the absorption spectrophotometer method. The geoaccumulation (I geo) and pollution load indices (PLI) were used to assess the level of heavy metal contamination of surrounding soils. The study revealed high concentrations in mg/kg for, Zn (16417.69), Pb (143.80), Cr (99.30), and Cd (7.54) in bottom ash and these were above allowable limits for disposal in landfill. The study also found soils within 60 m radius of the incinerator to be polluted with the metals. It is recommended that health care waste managers be educated on the implication of improper management of incinerator bottom ash and regulators monitor hospital waste incinerator sites. PMID:27034685

  7. Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcement from aluminum metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcements from pure Al–SiCp composite scrap by salt flux addi- tion has been theoretically predicted .... zero and the salt fluxes have only little solubility in the matrix metal, separation of the matrix ... aluminum melt with SiC at this temperature did not exceed. 30 min. In order to change the ...

  8. Chemical sequential extraction of heavy metals and sulphur in bottom ash and in fly ash from a pulp and paper mill complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmesniemi, Hannu; Pöykiö, Risto; Kuokkanen, Toivo; Rämö, Jaakko

    2008-08-01

    A five-stage sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the distribution of 11 metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Pb, Zn, As, Co, V, Ni, Ba), and sulphur (S) in bottom ash and in fly ash from a fluidized bed co-combustion (i.e. wood and peat) boiler of Stora Enso Oyj Oulu Mill at Oulu, Northern Finland, into the following fractions: (1) water-soluble fraction (H2O); (2) exchangeable fraction (CH3COOH); (3) easily reduced fraction (NH2OH-HCl); (4) oxidizable fraction (H2O2 + CH3COONH4); and (5) residual fraction (HF + HNO3 + HCl). Although metals were extractable in all fractions, the highest concentrations of most of the metals occurred in the residual fraction. From the environmental point of view, this fraction is the non-mobile fraction and is potentially the least harmful. The Ca concentrations of 29.3 g kg(-1) (dry weight) in bottom ash and of 68.5 g kg(-1) (dry weight) in fly ash were correspondingly approximately 18 and 43 times higher than the average value of 1.6 g kg(-1) (dry weight) in arable land in Central Finland. The ashes were strongly alkaline pH (approximately 12) and had a liming effects of 9.3% (bottom ash) and 13% (fly ash) expressed as Ca equivalents (dry weight). The elevated Ca concentrations indicate that the ashes are potential agents for soil remediation and for improving soil fertility. The pH and liming effect values indicate that the ashes also have a pH buffering capacity. From the environmental point of view, it is notable that the heavy metal concentrations in both types of ash were lower than the Finnish criteria for ash utilization.

  9. Heavy metal behavior in "Washing-Calcination-Changing with Bottom Ash" system for recycling of four types of fly ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fenfen; Xiong, Yiqun; Wang, Yingying; Wei, Xiang; Zhu, Xuemei; Yan, Fawei

    2018-01-30

    The Washing-Calcination-Changing with Bottom Ash (WCCB) system, effective at reducing chloride, was proposed to treat fly ash (FA) from a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) before recycling FA in cement kiln as raw material. This study analyzed the behavior of heavy metals in four types of FA during WCCB treatment via Tessier and X-ray absorption fine structure (XANES) method. One FA was from the bag filter of a typical MSWI in Beijing, China (CFA), and the other three were from Japan (RFA, CaFA, and NaFA). All the metals were reduced especially Pb, Cd, and Hg (38.4-82.4%, 21.8-34.7%, and 100%, respectively). Besides Cr almost all heavy metals were stabilized according to Tessier analysis. Cr should be given more attention in WCCB as the formation of exchangeable Cr in the final residue. XANES result indicated that PbCl 2 could be the main species of Pb in FA, while CaFA contains some PbO. The treated FAs contain PbCO 3 and PbO besides PbCl 2 . The Tessier results of Ni, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Cu showed that NaFA was better at heavy metal stabilization than the other FA, so NaHCO 3 is a more suitable neutralizer in WCCB. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimized Metal Recovery from Fly Ash from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration

    OpenAIRE

    Weibel, Gisela

    2017-01-01

    Switzerland plays a pioneering role in sustainable waste management with a long tradition of waste incineration and the prohibition to landfill unburnt municipal solid waste since 2000. In recent years, the focus has been laid on further reduction of pollutants from incineration residues because the revised Swiss Waste Ordinance prescribes the recovery of metals from fly ash starting in 2021. Fly ash collected in the heat recovery section and the electrostatic precipitator contains high conce...

  11. Metallic elements occurrences within metallic fragments in the municipal waste incineration bottom ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Piotr; Kasina, Monika; Michalik, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is composed of grainy ash material, residual components and metallic fragments (from few µm up to 3-5 cm). Its mineral and chemical composition is related to the composition of the waste stream in the incinerator operational area. Wide use of thermal techniques in management of solid waste makes important the studies on valuable components and their distribution within the material in terms of their further processing. By using various valorization or extraction techniques it is possible to extend the range of its possible further application. To investigate metallic elements distribution within metallic fragments of the MSWI BA material produced in municipal waste incineration plant in Poland were collected in 2015 and 2016. BA and its components were investigated using spectroscopic methods of chemical analysis: ICP-OES, ICP-MS, LECO and EDS (used for microanalysis during SEM observations). BA is a material rich in Si (22.5 wt%), Ca (13.4 wt%), Fe (4 wt%), Al (5.2 wt%) and Na (3.5 wt%), composed of equal part of amorphous (silicate glass dominated) and crystalline phase (rich in silicates, aluminosilicates, oxides of non- and metallic elements and sulphates). The content of metallic elements (Al, Fe, Mg, Ti, Mn, Cr, Ni, Sc, Mo, Cu, Pb, Zn, Sn) is 11.5 wt% with domination of Al (5.2 wt%) and Fe (4 wt%) and elevated values of Mg (1 wt%), Ti (0.54 wt%), Cu (0.26 wt%) and Zn (0.27 wt%) (Kowalski et al., 2016). They were mostly concentrated in the form of metallic fragments, mainly as metallic inclusions in the size of 1-20 µm and separated metallic grains in the size of 50-300 µm. Metallic fragments present in the BA are characterized by their composition heterogeneity and various oxygen content. Fragments are rarely composed of single metallic element and usually in their composition up to few main elements dominated over others. The most common were Fe-, Al- and Zn-rich fragments forming respectively

  12. Thermal and hydrometallurgical recovery methods of heavy metals from municipal solid waste fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuboňová, L; Langová, Š; Nowak, B; Winter, F

    2013-11-01

    Heavy metals in fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators are present in high concentrations. Therefore fly ash must be treated as a hazardous material. On the other hand, it may be a potential source of heavy metals. Zinc, lead, cadmium, and copper can be relatively easily removed during the thermal treatment of fly ash, e.g. in the form of chlorides. In return, wet extraction methods could provide promising results for these elements including chromium and nickel. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare thermal and hydrometallurgical treatment of municipal solid waste fly ash. Thermal treatment of fly ash was performed in a rotary reactor at temperatures between 950 and 1050°C and in a muffle oven at temperatures from 500 to 1200°C. The removal more than 90% was reached by easy volatile heavy metals such as cadmium and lead and also by copper, however at higher temperature in the muffle oven. The alkaline (sodium hydroxide) and acid (sulphuric acid) leaching of the fly ash was carried out while the influence of temperature, time, concentration, and liquid/solid ratio were investigated. The combination of alkaline-acidic leaching enhanced the removal of, namely, zinc, chromium and nickel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Geochemical investigations of metals release from submerged coal fly ash using extended elutriate tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, A J; Chappell, M A; Seiter, J M; Stanley, J K; Averett, D E; Jones, W T; Pettway, B A; Kennedy, A J; Hendrix, S H; Steevens, J A

    2010-12-01

    A storage pond dike failure occurred at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant that resulted in the release of over 3.8 million cubic meters (5 million cubic yards) of fly ash. Approximately half of this material deposited in the main channel of the Emory River, 3.5 km upstream of the confluence of the Emory and Clinch Rivers, Tennessee, USA. Remediation efforts to date have focused on targeted removal of material from the channel through hydraulic dredging, as well as mechanical excavation in some areas. The agitation of the submerged fly ash during hydraulic dredging introduces river water into the fly ash material, which could alter the redox state of metals present in the fly ash and thereby change their sorption and mobility properties. A series of extended elutriate tests were used to determine the concentration and speciation of metals released from fly ash. Results indicated that arsenic and selenium species released from the fly ash materials during elutriate preparation were redox stable over the course of 10d, with dissolved arsenic being present as arsenate, and dissolved selenium being present as selenite. Concentrations of certain metals, such as arsenic, selenium, vanadium, and barium, increased in the elutriate waters over the 10d study, whereas manganese concentrations decreased, likely due to oxidation and precipitation reactions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Chemical associations and mobilization of heavy metals in fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel, Gisela; Eggenberger, Urs; Schlumberger, Stefan; Mäder, Urs K

    2017-04-01

    This study focusses on chemical and mineralogical characterization of fly ash and leached filter cake and on the determination of parameters influencing metal mobilization by leaching. Three different leaching processes of fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plants in Switzerland comprise neutral, acidic and optimized acidic (+ oxidizing agent) fly ash leaching have been investigated. Fly ash is characterized by refractory particles (Al-foil, unburnt carbon, quartz, feldspar) and newly formed high-temperature phases (glass, gehlenite, wollastonite) surrounded by characteristic dust rims. Metals are carried along with the flue gas (Fe-oxides, brass) and are enriched in mineral aggregates (quartz, feldspar, wollastonite, glass) or vaporized and condensed as chlorides or sulphates. Parameters controlling the mobilization of neutral and acidic fly ash leaching are pH and redox conditions, liquid to solid ratio, extraction time and temperature. Almost no depletion for Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd is achieved by performing neutral leaching. Acidic fly ash leaching results in depletion factors of 40% for Zn, 53% for Cd, 8% for Pb and 6% for Cu. The extraction of Pb and Cu are mainly limited due to a cementation process and the formation of a PbCu 0 -alloy-phase and to a minor degree due to secondary precipitation (PbCl 2 ). The addition of hydrogen peroxide during acidic fly ash leaching (optimized acidic leaching) prevents this reduction through oxidation of metallic components and thus significantly higher depletion factors for Pb (57%), Cu (30%) and Cd (92%) are achieved. The elevated metal depletion using acidic leaching in combination with hydrogen peroxide justifies the extra effort not only by reduced metal loads to the environment but also by reduced deposition costs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bioaccessibility and health risk of heavy metals in ash from the incineration of different e-waste residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiao-Qing; Shen, Dong-Sheng; Shentu, Jia-Li; Long, Yu-Yang; Feng, Yi-Jian; Shen, Chen-Chao

    2015-03-01

    Ash from incinerated e-waste dismantling residues (EDR) may cause significant health risks to people through ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact exposure pathways. Ashes of four classified e-waste types generated by an incineration plant in Zhejiang, China were collected. Total contents and the bioaccessibilities of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in ashes were measured to provide crucial information to evaluate the health risks for incinerator workers and children living in vicinity. Compared to raw e-waste in mixture, ash was metal-enriched by category incinerated. However, the physiologically based extraction test (PBET) indicates the bioaccessibilities of Ni, Pb, and Zn were less than 50 %. Obviously, bioaccessibilities need to be considered in noncancer risk estimate. Total and PBET-extractable contents of metal, except for Pb, were significantly correlated with the pH of the ash. Noncancer risks of ash from different incinerator parts decreased in the order bag filter ash (BFA) > cyclone separator ash (CFA) > bottom ash (BA). The hazard quotient for exposure to ash were decreased as ingestion > dermal contact > inhalation. Pb in ingested ash dominated (>80 %) noncancer risks, and children had high chronic risks from Pb (hazard index >10). Carcinogenic risks from exposure to ash were under the acceptable level (incinerated ash are made.

  16. Adsorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution by fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I.J. Alinnora [Federal University of Technology, Owerri (Nigeria). Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry

    2007-03-15

    The removal characteristics of lead and copper ions from aqueous solution by fly ash were investigated under various conditions of contact time, pH and temperature. The influence of pH of the metal ion solutions on the uptake levels of the metal ions by fly ash were carried out between pH 4 and 12. The level of uptake of Pb{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} ions by the fly ash generally increased, but not in a progressive manner, at higher pH values. The effect of temperature on the uptake of Pb{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} ions was investigated between 30{sup o}C and 60{sup o}C, the adsorption of being enhanced at the lowest temperature. Rate constants were evaluated in terms of a first-order kinetics. The rate constant, k for uptake of Pb{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} ions were 1.77 10{sup -2}s{sup -1} and 2.11 10{sup -2}s{sup -1}, respectively. The experimental results underline the potential of coal fly ash for the recovery of metal ions from waste water. The main mechanisms involved in the removal of heavy metal ions from solution were adsorption at the surface of the fly ash and precipitation. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Accumulation of metals in vegetation established in ash constructions; Ackumulering av metaller i vegetation paa geotekniska askkonstruktioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemstroem, Kristian; Wik, Ola (SGI, Statens geotekniska institut (Sweden)); Bramryd, Torleif; Johansson, Michael (Lunds Universitet, Miljoestrategi (Sweden)); Jaegerbrand, Annika (VTI, Statens Vaeg och transportforskningsinstitut (Sweden))

    2012-07-01

    The overall aim of this study was to investigate how the use of ash in a long-term perspective affects the surrounding flora and fauna with regard to the accumulation of metals in the ecosystem through plant uptake and exposure to grazing animals. The study included a field study and a cultivation experiment. In the field study, the accumulation of metals and metalloids in leaves of trees and shrubs that had self established and grown in lysimeters with aged MSWI bottom ash and aged biofuel ash was determined. In the cultivation experiment, the accumulation of metals and metalloids from the studied materials in ryegrass was determined. Reference materials in the cultivation experiment were two conventional geotechnical materials, crushed rock and excavated soil. Leaves from trees and bushes in the vicinity of the ash lysimeters were used as reference materials in the field study. Contamination of plant samples with particles, through splashing during rain, dusting, or in connection with sampling, proved to have had a major impact on the measured metal and metalloid concentrations in several grass samples in the cultivation experiment. The results also indicate that contamination of plant samples with particles occurred in the field study. In this case, probably due to atmospheric deposition. The particle contamination complicated the evaluation of some of the results in the project since the intention was to study accumulation by roots from the studied ash materials, but, on the other hand, the particle contamination showed the importance of taking into account the spreading of contaminants through particles as an exposure route for grazing animals. In the field study, only Cd and Zn in aspen, willow and birch exhibited elevated levels in the leaves due to root uptake from MSWI bottom ash compared to the reference samples. In addition, elevated levels of As was observed in leaves from trees in the biofuel ash. The total content of As was similar in all studied

  18. Reducing Heavy Metal Element from Coal Bottom Ash by Using Citric Acid Leaching Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Ahmad Asyari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal ash is the residue that is produced during coal combustion for instance fly ash, bottom ash or boiler slag which was primarily produced from the combustion of coal. With growth in coal burning power station, huge amount of coal bottom ash (CBA considered as hazardous material which are normally disposed in an on-site disposal system without any commercialization purpose. Previous researchers have studied the extraction of silica from agricultural wastes such as palm ash and rice husk ash (RHA and CBA by using leaching treatment method. In this study, the weaker acid, citric acid solution was used to replace the strong acid in leaching treatment process. Result showed that the heavy metal content such as Copper (Cu, Zinc (Zn and Lead (Pb can be decrease. Meanwhile the silica can be extracted up to 44% from coal bottom ash using citric acid leaching treatment under the optimum reaction time of 60 minutes with solution temperature of 60°C and concentration of citric acid more than 2%.

  19. Cavitation instabilities between fibres in a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    induced by bonding to the ceramics that only show elastic deformation. In an MMC the stress state in the metal matrix is highly non-uniform, varying between regions where shear stresses are dominant and regions where hydrostatic tension is strong. An Al–SiC whisker composite with a periodic pattern......Short fibre reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are studied here to investigate the possibility that a cavitation instability can develop in the metal matrix. The high stress levels needed for a cavitation instability may occur in metal–ceramic systems due to the constraint on plastic flow...

  20. Irradiation effect on leaching behavior and form of heavy metals in fly ash of municipal solid waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► No research has been done to examine effect of electron beam irradiation on leaching behavior of heavy metals in fly ash. ► Electron beam irradiation on fly ash had significant effect on heavy metal leaching. ► Leaching potential of heavy metals in fly ash differed among metal species tested (Pb, Zn, Cu). ► Metal forms in the ash were analyzed to explain the difference. ► The difference could be explained by metal form change. - Abstract: Fly ash from a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) is commonly classified as hazardous waste. High-energy electron beam irradiation systems have gained popularity recently as a clean and promising technology to remove environmental pollutants. Irradiation effects on leaching behavior and form of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash have not been investigated in any significant detail. An electron beam accelerator was used in this research. Electron beam irradiation on fly ash significantly increased the leaching potential of heavy metals from fly ash. The amount of absorbed dose and the metal species affected leaching behavior. When electron beam irradiation intensity increased gradually up to 210 kGy, concentration of Pb and Zn in the leachate increased linearly as absorbed dose increased, while that of Cu underwent no significant change. Concentration of Pb and Zn in the leachate increased up to 15.5% (10.7 mg/kg), and 35.6% (9.6 mg/kg) respectively. However, only 4.8% (0.3 mg/kg) increase was observed in the case of Cu. The results imply that irradiation has significant effect on the leaching behavior of heavy metals in fly ash, and the effect is quite different among the metal species tested in this study. A commonly used sequential extraction analysis which can classify a metal species into five forms was conducted to examine any change in metal form in the irradiated fly ash. Notable change in metal form in fly ash was observed when fly ash was irradiated. Change in Pb form was much greater than that of

  1. Leaching behavior of heavy metals and PAHs from MSWI bottom ash in a long-term static immersing experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangsheng; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Xiaodong; Jiang, Yuping

    2008-01-01

    Bottom ash is the main solid residue (in weight) which is produced by municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) facilities. This material is composed of a mineral matrix and may be used as secondary raw material for construction purpose. However, for this specific application the leaching behavior of the environmentally relevant elements under field conditions is different from the predicted behavior based on results obtained from the standardized leaching test. Therefore, a 70-day simulative experiment has been carried out in this study to investigate the release of major heavy metals (Cu and Pb) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from several particle fractions of bottom ash under a static leaching condition, where bottom ash was immersed in water at different initial pH values. Results showed that: (1) the leaching behavior of Cu and Pb was much similar with that depicted by the standardized leaching tests, and fit well with the solubility-controlling mechanism; (2) the sorption mechanism on the neoformed phases may control the solubility of Pb, whereas the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may play an important role in the solubility of Cu; and (3) the leached PAHs were degraded during the later period of leaching process.

  2. Accumulation of metals in vegetation established in wood ash; Upptag av metaller i vegetation som etablerats i vedaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemstroem, Kristian; Fransson, Sara; Wik, Ola

    2009-04-15

    From an environmental point of view, a considerable amount of natural resources can be preserved if ashes were used in geotechnical constructions, e.g. in embankments, roads, hard surfaces, landfill coverage, and in soil stabilizations. However, when using ashes in constructions an assessment of the risks the content of contaminants in the ash might pose, must be done. Today, there is a lack of basic data to make a full risk assessment of ash material in constructions. The risk may differ depending on whether the construction is in operation or in a post operational phase. In the post operational phase, the fate and exposure routs of the contaminants in the ash might change over time. For example, a forest road out of use can with time be overgrown and become a more or less integrated part of the surrounding environment. Contaminants from the ash material might then be assimilated in the established vegetation. As primary producers, plants constitute the basis of the terrestrial food chain, and metals accumulated in plants might be transported further to plant eating animals. The accumulation of metals in vegetation may pose a risk to these herbivores especially when the metals are translocated to grazable parts, e.g. leaves and shoots. In the present study metal concentrations in different parts of vegetation established in ash material was determined and compared to concentrations in vegetation grown in a reference material. Studied materials where i) a wood ash, a waste product possible to use in geotechnical constructions, and ii) crushed stone, a non-controversial geotechnical construction material. The ash material was taken from an older lysimeter that can be seen as a snapshot picture of a geotechnical construction that was built with ash and then taken out of use 15 years ago. The aim of the study was to document and compare the accumulation and distribution of metals in vegetation that had self established in the studied materials. The results obtained in

  3. How fast will trees die? A transition matrix model of ash decline in forest stands infested by emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen S. Knight; Robert P. Long; Joanne Rebbeck; Annemarie Smith; Kamal Gandhi; Daniel A. Herms

    2008-01-01

    We recorded Fraxinus spp. tree health and other forest stand characteristics for 68 plots in 21 EAB-infested forest stands in Michigan and Ohio in 2005 and 2007. Fraxinus spp. were a dominant component of these stands, with more than 900 ash trees (including Fraxinus americana, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, Fraxinus profunda...

  4. Waste or substrate for metal hyperaccumulating plants - The potential of phytomining on waste incineration bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Theresa; Kisser, Johannes; Wenzel, Walter W; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Phytomining could represent an innovative low-cost technology for the selective recovery of valuable trace elements from secondary resources. In this context the potential of phytomining from waste incineration bottom ash was tested in a pot experiment. Fresh bottom ash was acidified, leached to reduce salinity and amended with organic material to obtain a suitable substrate for plant growth. Two hyperaccumulator species, Alyssum serpyllifolium subsp. lusitanicum and Sedum plumbizincicola as well as three metal tolerant species, Brassica napus, B. juncea and Nicotiana tabacum were tested for their phytomining potential on the pre-treated and amended bottom ashes from municipal solid waste and hazardous waste incineration. The hyperaccumulators had severe difficulties to establish on the bottom ash and to produce sufficient biomass, likely due to salinity and Cu toxicity. Nevertheless, concentrations of Ni in A. serpyllifolium and Zn in S. plumbizincicola were high, but total metal removal was limited by the low biomass production and was clearly less than on metalliferous soils. The Brassica species proved to be more tolerant to salinity and high Cu concentrations and produced considerably higher biomass, but total metal removal was limited by rather low shoot concentrations. The observed limitations of the phytomining process along with currently low market prices of Ni and Zn suggest that further optimisation of the process is required in order to make phytomining economically feasible on the tested waste incineration bottom ashes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcement from aluminum metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    . The application of metal matrix composites (MMCs) in many engineering components has increased over the last few years, particularly in the automobile industry as drive shafts, engine and brake components (Chawla and Chawla. 2006).

  6. Laser Assisted Machining of Metal Matrix Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Metal matrix composites (MMC's) are of great interest in aerospace applications where their high specific strength provides a weight saving alternative to standard...

  7. Accumulation of metals in vegetation established in ash constructions; Ackumulering av metaller i vegetation paa geotekniska askkonstruktioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemstroem, Kristian; Wik, Ola (SGI, Statens geotekniska institut (Sweden)); Bramryd, Torleif; Johansson, Michael (Lunds Universitet, Miljoestrategi (Sweden)); Jaegerbrand, Annika (VTI, Statens Vaeg och transportforskningsinstitut (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    The overall aim of this study was to investigate how the use of ash in a long-term perspective affects the surrounding flora and fauna with regard to the accumulation of metals in the ecosystem through plant uptake and exposure to grazing animals. The study included a field study and a cultivation experiment. In the field study, the accumulation of metals and metalloids in leaves of trees and shrubs that had self established and grown in lysimeters with aged MSWI bottom ash and aged biofuel ash was determined. In the cultivation experiment, the accumulation of metals and metalloids from the studied materials in ryegrass was determined. Reference materials in the cultivation experiment were two conventional geotechnical materials, crushed rock and excavated soil. Leaves from trees and bushes in the vicinity of the ash lysimeters were used as reference materials in the field study. Contamination of plant samples with particles, through splashing during rain, dusting, or in connection with sampling, proved to have had a major impact on the measured metal and metalloid concentrations in several grass samples in the cultivation experiment. The results also indicate that contamination of plant samples with particles occurred in the field study. In this case, probably due to atmospheric deposition. The particle contamination complicated the evaluation of some of the results in the project since the intention was to study accumulation by roots from the studied ash materials, but, on the other hand, the particle contamination showed the importance of taking into account the spreading of contaminants through particles as an exposure route for grazing animals. In the field study, only Cd and Zn in aspen, willow and birch exhibited elevated levels in the leaves due to root uptake from MSWI bottom ash compared to the reference samples. In addition, elevated levels of As was observed in leaves from trees in the biofuel ash. The total content of As was similar in all studied

  8. Review on preparation techniques of particle reinforced metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Bin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the investigation status of the techniques for preparation of metal matrix composites and the research outcomes achieved recently. The mechanisms, characteristics, application ranges and levels of development of these preparation techniques are analyzed. The advantages and the disadvantages of each technique are synthetically evaluated. Lastly, the future directions of research and the prospects for the preparation techniques of metal matrix composites are forecasted.

  9. Fatigue-Testing Apparatus for Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Leonard J.; Petrasek, Donald W.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical load cycling simulated in realistic fatigue tests. Efficient joining of metal matrix composite components to supporting structures is major concern facing users of these materials. Lewis Research Center designed and developed two thermal/mechancical fatigue test facilities, one to test metal matrix composite specimens and another to test compostite/metal attachment bond joints. Thermal/mechanical fatigue facility designed for testing metal matrix composites permits specimen-temperature excursions with controlled heating and loading rates. Second facility designed to test composite/metal attachment bond joints and to permit heating to maximum temperature of 1,400oC (760oC) within 10 min and cooling to 300oF (150oC) within 3 min. Facility has unique capabilities not found in other laboratories.

  10. Amelioration of soil PAH and heavy metals by combined application of fly ash and biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masto, Reginald; George, Joshy; Ansari, Md; Ram, Lal

    2016-04-01

    Generation of electricity through coal combustion produces huge quantities of fly ash. Sustainable disposal and utilization of these fly ash is a major challenge. Fly ash along with other amendments like biochar could be used for amelioration of soil. In this study, fly ash and biochar were used together for amelioration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil. Field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of fly ash and biochar on the amelioration of soil PAH, and the yield of Zea mays. The treatments were control, biochar (4 t/ha), fly ash (4 t/ha), ash + biochar ( 2 + 2 t/ha). Soil samples were collected after the harvest of maize crop and analysed for chemical and biological parameters. Thirteen PAHs were analysed in the postharvest soil samples. Soil PAHs were extracted in a microwave oven at 120 °C using hexane : acetone (1:1) mixture. The extracted solutions were concentrated, cleaned and the 13 PAHs [Acenaphthene (Ace), fluorene (Flr), phenanthrene (Phn), anthracene(Ant), pyrene(Pyr), benz(a)anthracene (BaA), chrysene (Chy), benzo(b)fluoranthene (BbF), benzo(k)fluoranthene (BkF), benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP), dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene)(Inp)] were analysed using GC-MS. The mean pH increased from 6.09 in control to 6.64 and 6.58 at biochar and fly ash treated soils, respectively. N content was not affected, whereas addition of biochar alone and in combination with fly ash, has significantly increased the soil organic carbon content. P content was almost double in combined (9.06 mg/kg) treatment as compared to control (4.32 mg/kg). The increase in K due to biochar was 118%, whereas char + ash increased soil K by 64%. Soil heavy metals were decreased: Zn (-48.4%), Ni (-41.4%), Co (-36.9%), Cu (-35.7%), Mn (-34.3%), Cd (-33.2%), and Pb (-30.4%). Soil dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased by ash and biochar treatments and the maximum activity was observed for the combined

  11. Evaluation of metals, metalloids, and ash mixture toxicity using sediment toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojak, Amber; Bonnevie, Nancy L; Jones, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    In December 2008, a release of 4.1 million m(3) of coal ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant occurred. Ash washed into the Emory River and migrated downstream into the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers. A Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment evaluated risks to ecological receptors from ash in the river system post-dredging. This article describes the approach used and results from sediment toxicity tests, discussing any causal relationships between ash, metals, and toxicity. Literature is limited in the realm of aquatic coal combustion residue (CCR) exposures and the potential magnitude of effects on benthic invertebrates. Sediment samples along a spectrum of ash content were used in a tiered toxicity testing approach and included a combination of 10 day sediment toxicity acute tests and longer-term, partial life cycle "definitive" tests with 2 species (Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dilutus). Arsenic, and to a lesser extent Se, in the ash was the most likely toxicant causing observed effects in the laboratory toxicity tests. Sites in the Emory River with the greatest statistical and biologically significant effects had As concentrations in sediments twice the probable effects concentration of 33 mg/kg. These sites contained greater than 50% ash. Sites with less than approximately 50% ash in sediments exhibited fewer significant toxic responses relative to the reference sediment in the laboratory. The results discussed here present useful evidence of only limited effects occurring from a worst-case exposure pathway. These results provided a valuable line of evidence for the overall assessment of risks to benthic invertebrates and to other ecological receptors, and were crucial to risk management and development of project remediation goals. © 2014 SETAC.

  12. Energetical fly ashes – separation and utilization of metallic valuable components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalíková Františka

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In the contribution, methods of separating metals – Fe, Al, Ge from energetic wastes – fly ashes are presented along with further possibilities of utilization of particular valuable components for industrial purposes.In the contribution, properties of energetic wastes are presented influencing the contents, separability, and utilizability of metal-bearing valuable components. From among physical properties these are grain size distribution and surface area. Chemical properties are characterized by elements contained in combusted coal whose content after combustion is increased 2 to 4 times, depending on the content of ash and combustible matters in original coal. Mineralogical properties of energetic wastes are determined by the combustion process conditions in the course of which mineral novelties are produced in concentrations suitable for separation.In the contribution, methods of separation and utilization of metals such as Fe, Al, Ge are described. From literature information on the processing of Fe component, as well as from results of experiments made at the Department of Mineral Processing and Environmental Protection, Technical University of Kosice follows that the highest concentration and mass yield of the component can be obtained from black coal fly ashes produced in smelting boilers. The content of Al in Slovak energetic wastes is lower than the 30 % Al2O3 limit that conditions an economic technological processing. Only in the case of black coal fly ash from TEKO Kosice and EVO Vojany was the Al2O3 content of 32.93 %. Therefore, in an indirect way – by separating the residues of uncombusted coal and magnetite Fe – the content of Al in fly ash was increased.For Ge, a principle of selective sizing has been utilized.A complex utilization of energetic wastes, that is the separation of metallic components, elimination of particular metals and the subsequent treatment of nonmetallic residue, should be an effective solution in various

  13. [Correlation of Persistent Free Radicals, PCDD/Fs and Metals in Waste Incineration Fly Ash].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian-jiao; Chen, Tong; Zhan, Ming-xiu; Guo, Ying; Li, Xiao-dong

    2016-03-15

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are relatively highly stable and found in the formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Recent studies have concentrated on model dioxin formation reactions and there are few studies on actual waste incineration fly ash. In order to study EPFRs and the correlation with dioxins and heavy metals in waste incineration fly ash, the spins of EPFRs, concentration of PCDD/Fs and metals in samples from 6 different waste incinerators were detected. The medical waste incineration fly ash from Tianjin, municipal solid waste incineration fly ash from Jiangxi Province, black carbon and slag from municipal solid waste incinerator in Lanxi, Zhejiang Province, all contained EPFRs. Above all the signal in Tianjin sample was the strongest. Hydroxyl radicals, carbon-center radicals and semiquinone radicals were detected. Compared with other samples, Jiangxi fly ash had the highest toxic equivalent quantity (TEQ) of dioxins, up to 7.229 4 ng · g⁻¹. However, the dioxin concentration in the Tianjin sample containing the strongest EPFR signals was only 0.092 8 ng · g⁻¹. There was perhaps little direct numeric link between EPFRs and PCDD/Fs. But the spins of EPFRs in samples presented an increasing trend as the metal contents increased, especially with Al, Fe, Zn. The signal strength of radicals was purposed to be related to the metal contents. The concentration of Zn (0.813 7% ) in the Tianjin sample was the highest and this sample contained much more spins of oxygen-center radicals. We could presume the metal Zn had a greater effect on the formation of EPFRs, and was easier to induce the formation of radicals with a longer half-life period.

  14. Dioxins, metals, and fish toxicity in ash residue from space heaters burning used motor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delistraty, Damon; Stone, Alex

    2007-06-01

    Ash residue, generated from burning used motor oil, is a complex and ubiquitous waste stream. Ash samples were collected from space heaters and analyzed for dioxins (N=10), expressed as toxic equivalents (TEQ), and heavy metals (N=9). TEQ averaged 148-164 ng kg(-1) (standard deviation [SD] 385-416 ng kg(-1)), depending on methods used for non-detects (NDs) and toxic equivalency factors (TEFs). It is notable that median TEQ (2.89-3.49 ng kg(-1)) was about 50 fold lower, reflecting the influence of several high end values on the mean. The proportion of NDs among 17 polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in each sample averaged 38.2% (range 0-94.1%). Total metals averaged 103,000 mg kg(-1) (SD 26,600 mg kg(-1)), with Zn, Cu, and Pb contributing 89.3%, 6.4%, and 3.0% of the total, respectively. Rainbow trout bioassays resulted in median mortalities of 3.2% and 42.0% (respective SD 25.3% and 43.2%) at ash concentrations of 10 and 100 mg l(-1), respectively. Nominal concentrations of several metals (e.g., Cu, Zn) in the fish bioassay exceeded their reported median lethal concentrations (LC50s) for the test species. Multiple regressions (Bonferroni Poil ash ranked on the high end of TEQ content in other environmental matrices, including wood ash, cement kiln dust, biosolids, and soils. Overall, these results suggest that suitable disposal methods are needed for ash generated from burning used motor oil.

  15. Hydrothermally modified fly ash for heavy metals and dyes removal in advanced wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visa, Maria; Chelaru, Andreea-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Fly ash resulted from coal burning is a waste that can be used in wastewater treatment for removal of dyes and heavy metals by adsorption. Class “F” fly ash (FA), collected from the Central Heat and Power (CHP) Plant Brasov (Romania), with oxides composition SiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 over 2.4 was used for obtaining a new substrate with good adsorption capacity for dyes and heavy metals from wastewater. A new material was obtained from modified fly ash with NaOH and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) a cationic surfactant. Contact time, optimum amount of substrate and the pH corresponding to 50 mL solution of pollutants were the parameters optimized for obtaining the maximum efficiency in the adsorption process. The optimized adsorption parameters were further used in thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the adsorption processes. The adsorption kinetic mechanisms, and the substrate capacities are further discussed correlated with the surface structure (XRD), composition (EDS, FTIR), and morphology (SEM, AFM). The results indicate that the novel nano-substrate composite with fly ash modified can be used as an efficient and low cost adsorbent for simultaneous removal of dyes and heavy metals, the resulted water respects the discharge regulations.

  16. Hydrothermally modified fly ash for heavy metals and dyes removal in advanced wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visa, Maria, E-mail: maria.visa@unitbv.ro; Chelaru, Andreea-Maria, E-mail: andreea.chelaru1@yahoo.com

    2014-06-01

    Fly ash resulted from coal burning is a waste that can be used in wastewater treatment for removal of dyes and heavy metals by adsorption. Class “F” fly ash (FA), collected from the Central Heat and Power (CHP) Plant Brasov (Romania), with oxides composition SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} over 2.4 was used for obtaining a new substrate with good adsorption capacity for dyes and heavy metals from wastewater. A new material was obtained from modified fly ash with NaOH and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) a cationic surfactant. Contact time, optimum amount of substrate and the pH corresponding to 50 mL solution of pollutants were the parameters optimized for obtaining the maximum efficiency in the adsorption process. The optimized adsorption parameters were further used in thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the adsorption processes. The adsorption kinetic mechanisms, and the substrate capacities are further discussed correlated with the surface structure (XRD), composition (EDS, FTIR), and morphology (SEM, AFM). The results indicate that the novel nano-substrate composite with fly ash modified can be used as an efficient and low cost adsorbent for simultaneous removal of dyes and heavy metals, the resulted water respects the discharge regulations.

  17. Relation between leaching characteristics of heavy metals and physical properties of fly ashes from typical municipal solid waste incinerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Peng; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-09-01

    Due to the alkalinity and high concentration of potentially hazardous heavy metals, fly ash from a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator is classified as hazardous waste, which should be of particular concern. Physical and chemical characterizations of the contrasted fly ashes were investigated to explore the relation between leaching characteristics of heavy metals and physical properties of fly ashes. The results showed that CaClOH, NaCl, Ca(OH) 2 , KCl and SiO 2 were primary mineral compositions in the MSWI fly ashes, and the particle size distribution of fly ash ranged between 10 μm and 300 μm. The smaller the particle size distribution of fly ash, the larger the BET-specific surface area, which was beneficial to the leaching of heavy metals. As a result of various pores, it easily accumulated heavy metals as well. The leaching tests exhibited a high leachability of heavy metals and the leaching concentration of Pb in almost all of the fly ash samples went far beyond the Standard for Pollution Control on the Landfill Site of Municipal Solid Waste. Thereupon, it is necessary to establish proper disposal systems and management strategies for environmental protection based on the characteristics of MSW incineration (MSWI) fly ash in China.

  18. Leachability Of Heavy Metals From Fly Ash, Slag Of Thermal Power Plant And Treatment Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Topal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash and slag that result from combustion of coal in thermal power plants are important environmental problems; because they contain heavy metals. Sewage sludge that is an ultimate product of wastewater treatment contains pollutants removed from wastewater and these pollutants limits its beneficial usage. The aim of this study is to determine the leachability of some heavy metals from fly ash and slag of power plant and wastewater treatment sludge by Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP and American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM methods. According to TCLP and ASTM results found that the heavy metal concentrations leached to solutions after leaching of the wastes were higher than the limits given by regulation. It was determined that important pollution can be seen as a result of the leaching of these wastes.

  19. Pulverised fly ash (PFA) and furnace bottom ash (FBA) : potential sources of critical metals?

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Richard; Wood, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Global concerns surrounding security of mineral supply have led many countries to re-assess indigenous resources, particularly of the ‘critical’ metals (so called because of their growing economic importance and high risk of supply shortage). In addition to improving knowledge of primary mineral deposits, the potential for resource recovery from waste materials is attracting considerable attention

  20. Anomalous transient leaching behavior of metals solidified/stabilized by pozzolanic fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, Lucy Mar; Munson-McGee, Stuart H.

    2006-01-01

    This study presents observations on the transient leaching behavior of chromium, cadmium, and aluminum that were solidified/stabilized by pozzolanic fly ash. These three metals were selected since they were present in a simulated waste stream generated by an evaporator during plutonium purification and also because the minimum solubility of these metals occurs at significantly different pHs. The transient pH behavior of the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachate showed a monotonic increase for all cases, but the equilibrium value was affected by process conditions. The transient leachate concentration behavior showed curves with one or two local maxima for some cases and curves with a monotonic increase for other cases. Data from the leaching experiments was compared to the solubility curves for the hydroxides of each metal since it was assumed that the highly alkaline conditions inside the fly ash waste would cause the metals to precipitate as hydroxides after initially dissolving in the acidic leaching solution. It was found that of the three metals, only cadmium followed the solubility curve for pure hydroxide solutions or for fly ash systems currently reported in the literature

  1. Stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash using silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinying; Chen, Quanyuan; Zhou, Yasu; Tyrer, Mark; Yu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash was investigated. • The addition of silica fume effectively reduced the leaching of Pb and Cd. • The relation of solid phase transformation and leaching behavior of heavy metals was discussed. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of silica fume on stabilizing heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash. In addition to compressive strength measurements, hydrated pastes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal-analyses (DTA/TG), and MAS NMR ( 27 Al and 29 Si) techniques. It was found that silica fume additions could effectively reduce the leaching of toxic heavy metals. At the addition of 20% silica fume, leaching concentrations for Cu, Pb and Zn of the hydrated paste cured for 7 days decreased from 0.32 mg/L to 0.05 mg/L, 40.99 mg/L to 4.40 mg/L, and 6.96 mg/L to 0.21 mg/L compared with the MSWI fly ash. After curing for 135 days, Cd and Pb in the leachates were not detected, while Cu and Zn concentrations decreased to 0.02 mg/L and 0.03 mg/L. The speciation of Pb and Cd by the modified version of the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) extractions showed that these metals converted into more stable state in hydrated pastes of MSWI fly ash in the presence of silica fume. Although exchangeable and weak-acid soluble fractions of Cu and Zn increased with hydration time, silica fume addition of 10% can satisfy the requirement of detoxification for heavy metals investigated in terms of the identification standard of hazardous waste of China

  2. Stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash using silica fume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinying; Chen, Quanyuan [School of Environment Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); State Environmental Protection Engineering Center for Pollution Treatment and Control in Textile Industry, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhou, Yasu [School of Environment Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Tyrer, Mark [Mineral Industry Research Organisation, Solihull B37 7HB (United Kingdom); Yu, Yang [School of Environment Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash was investigated. • The addition of silica fume effectively reduced the leaching of Pb and Cd. • The relation of solid phase transformation and leaching behavior of heavy metals was discussed. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of silica fume on stabilizing heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash. In addition to compressive strength measurements, hydrated pastes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal-analyses (DTA/TG), and MAS NMR ({sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si) techniques. It was found that silica fume additions could effectively reduce the leaching of toxic heavy metals. At the addition of 20% silica fume, leaching concentrations for Cu, Pb and Zn of the hydrated paste cured for 7 days decreased from 0.32 mg/L to 0.05 mg/L, 40.99 mg/L to 4.40 mg/L, and 6.96 mg/L to 0.21 mg/L compared with the MSWI fly ash. After curing for 135 days, Cd and Pb in the leachates were not detected, while Cu and Zn concentrations decreased to 0.02 mg/L and 0.03 mg/L. The speciation of Pb and Cd by the modified version of the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) extractions showed that these metals converted into more stable state in hydrated pastes of MSWI fly ash in the presence of silica fume. Although exchangeable and weak-acid soluble fractions of Cu and Zn increased with hydration time, silica fume addition of 10% can satisfy the requirement of detoxification for heavy metals investigated in terms of the identification standard of hazardous waste of China.

  3. Wood ash and lime. Effects on uptake of nutrients and heavy metals in bilberries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Torbjoern; Eriksson, H.M.

    1998-01-01

    Ten km north of Uppsala in eastern Sweden a field plot (2x2 m) experiment, with different ash and lime treatments, was established in June 1993 in a 70-year old mixed stand of Norway spruce and Scots pine on a sandy soil. The experiment included twelve treatments and one control, all with four replicates. The treatments were; a well-combusted loose wood ash, well-hardened ash granules, hardened and then crushed and sieved mixed ash, a mixture of hardened ash and lime, hardened wood ash and finally, lime. The normal dose was 4 tons per hectare. Two and thirteen months after treatment, bilberries were sampled. Bilberries sampled two months after treatment were analyzed for Ca, Mg, K, P, Al, Mn, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn for nine treatments. Two months after treatment, the variation in the contents of different elements was very large, especially for K, P, Mn and Zn. Bilberries in the control had, on an average, lower contents of Ca, Mg, K and Cu than bilberries from the treated plots. Contents of Zn and Cd were, on an average, highest in the control plots. However, no significant differences between treatments were found. Thirteen months after treatment, the variation in content of all the heavy metals analyzed had decreased as well as the content of Pb and Zn. However, the contents of Cd and Cu had increased somewhat. No significant differences between treatments were found. It was concluded that the different treatments had a negligible effect on the content of heavy metals in bilberries the first year after treatment 122 refs, 10 figs, 15 tabs

  4. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash using ammonium citrate as assisting agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2005-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation, an electrochemically assisted separation method, has previ-ously shown potential for removal of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ashes. In this work electrodialytic remediation of MSWI fly ash using ammonium citrate as assisting agent wa...

  5. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash using ammonium citrate as assisting agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2005-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation, an electrochemically assisted separation method, has previ-ously shown potential for removal of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ashes. In this work electrodialytic remediation of MSWI fly ash using ammonium citrate as assisting agent...

  6. Combined ultrasonic and bioleaching treatment of hospital waste incinerator bottom ash with simultaneous extraction of selected metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Fozia; Shahid, Muhammad; Bukhari, ShaziaAnwer; Potgieter, J Herman

    2014-01-01

    The mineralogy, as well as elemental composition, of the incinerated hospital waste (HW) ashes are not well known and need to be investigated for the safe handling and disposal of such ash. A study was conducted to investigate the chemical composition, mineralogy and bioleaching of selected metals from incinerated HW bottom ash using Aspergillus niger under the combined effect ofultrasonic radiation. Different techniques were utilized to determine the elemental composition (Electron Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy [EDX], atomic absorption spectrophotometry, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible light spectrophotometer) and mineralogy (X-ray Diffraction) of the raw sample, as well as the bioleached samples. Chemical leaching tests were performed to determine the effect of different organic acids on metals dissolution. Microbes were tested for acid production and leaching capabilities of selected metals from medical waste (MW) bottom ash. Wet chemical and EDX analyses showed that the ash was enriched with metallic elements like Na, K, Ca, Fe and Al with a concentration range of 22-115 (g/kg). Furthermore, the ash contained heavy metals such as Cu, Cr, Ni, Sn and Ti in the range of 0.51-21.74 (mg/kg). Citric and oxalic acids generated by fungi could be important leaching agents acting to dissolve these metals. Under ultrasonic treatment, metals dissolution by the acidic metabolites was at its maximum after just 9 d of leaching. The results showed that the dissolution of metals was much higher in citric and oxalic acid than with other acids. Extraction of metals from incinerated MW ash indicated that this ash may be a potential source of metals in the future.

  7. Removal of heavy metals from fly ash leachate using combined bioelectrochemical systems and electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hu-Chun; Lei, Tao; Shi, Gang; Sun, Xiao-Nan; Wei, Xue-Yan; Zhang, Li-Juan; Wu, Wei-Min

    2014-01-15

    Based on environmental and energetic analysis, a novel combined approach using bioelectrochemical systems (BES) followed by electrolysis reactors (ER) was tested for heavy metals removal from fly ash leachate, which contained high detectable levels of Zn, Pb and Cu according to X-ray diffraction analysis. Acetic acid was used as the fly ash leaching agent and tested under various leaching conditions. A favorable condition for the leaching process was identified to be liquid/solid ratio of 14:1 (w/w) and leaching duration 10h at initial pH 1.0. It was confirmed that the removal of heavy metals from fly ash leachate with the combination of BESs and ER is feasible. The metal removal efficiency was achieved at 98.5%, 95.4% and 98.1% for Cu(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II), respectively. Results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) indicated that Cu(II) was reduced and recovered mainly as metal Cu on cathodes related to power production, while Zn(II) and Pb(II) were not spontaneously reduced in BESs without applied voltage and basically electrolyzed in the electrolysis reactors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Simultaneous adsorption of dyes and heavy metals from multicomponent solutions using fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visa, Maria; Bogatu, Cristina; Duta, Anca

    2010-01-01

    In wastewaters originating from dye industry there are amounts of dyes (very common methyl orange, methylene blue-MB) and heavy metals (cadmium, copper, nickel mainly from the organo-metallic dyes). They tend to adsorb in a competitive process and modify the substrate. Advanced removal is usually proposed via adsorption and the use of modified fly ash as a substrate is sustainable solution. The main constituents of fly ash (silica, alumina, iron oxide and un-burned carbon), are the priority compounds which favour the heavy metal adsorption and are active sites in dyes' adsorption processes. The paper studies the effect of MB adsorbed on the fly ash surface on the removal efficiency of cadmium, copper and nickel ionic species from complex, multi-cationic dye solutions. The adsorption efficiency and kinetics are evaluated from the complex, multicomponent systems and possible influences are discussed. High efficiencies are obtained at low heavy metal concentrations (as it is the real case for the dyes industry) whereas at medium values, competitive processes lower the individual efficiencies of copper, nickel or cadmium from mixtures.

  9. Precipitation of heavy metals from coal ash leachate using biogenic hydrogen sulfide generated from FGD gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaranjan, Madawala Liyanage Duminda; Annachhatre, Ajit P

    2013-01-01

    Investigations were undertaken to utilize flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum for the treatment of leachate from the coal ash (CA) dump sites. Bench-scale investigations consisted of three main steps namely hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) production by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) using sulfate from solubilized FGD gypsum as the electron acceptor, followed by leaching of heavy metals (HMs) from coal bottom ash (CBA) and subsequent precipitation of HMs using biologically produced sulfide. Leaching tests of CBA carried out at acidic pH revealed the existence of several HMs such as Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, Mn, Cu, Ni and Zn. Molasses was used as the electron donor for the biological sulfate reduction (BSR) process which produced sulfide rich effluent with concentration up to 150 mg/L. Sulfide rich effluent from the sulfate reduction process was used to precipitate HMs as metal sulfides from CBA leachate. HM removal in the range from 40 to 100% was obtained through sulfide precipitation.

  10. Proposed framework for thermomechanical life modeling of metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saltsman, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The framework of a mechanics of materials model is proposed for thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction of unidirectional, continuous-fiber metal matrix composites (MMC's). Axially loaded MMC test samples are analyzed as structural components whose fatigue lives are governed by local stress-strain conditions resulting from combined interactions of the matrix, interfacial layer, and fiber constituents. The metallic matrix is identified as the vehicle for tracking fatigue crack initiation and propagation. The proposed framework has three major elements. First, TMF flow and failure characteristics of in situ matrix material are approximated from tests of unreinforced matrix material, and matrix TMF life prediction equations are numerically calibrated. The macrocrack initiation fatigue life of the matrix material is divided into microcrack initiation and microcrack propagation phases. Second, the influencing factors created by the presence of fibers and interfaces are analyzed, characterized, and documented in equation form. Some of the influences act on the microcrack initiation portion of the matrix fatigue life, others on the microcrack propagation life, while some affect both. Influencing factors include coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch strains, residual (mean) stresses, multiaxial stress states, off-axis fibers, internal stress concentrations, multiple initiation sites, nonuniform fiber spacing, fiber debonding, interfacial layers and cracking, fractured fibers, fiber deflections of crack fronts, fiber bridging of matrix cracks, and internal oxidation along internal interfaces. Equations exist for some, but not all, of the currently identified influencing factors. The third element is the inclusion of overriding influences such as maximum tensile strain limits of brittle fibers that could cause local fractures and ensuing catastrophic failure of surrounding matrix material. Some experimental data exist for assessing the plausibility of the proposed

  11. Usability value and heavy metals accumulation in forage grasses grown on power station ash deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Aleksandar S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of five forage grasses (Lolium multiflorum, Festuca rubra, Festuca arundinacea, Arrhenatherum elatius and Dactylis glomerata was conducted on an uncontaminated cultivated land, of leached chernozem type, and on “Nikola Tesla A” (TENT A thermal power station ash deposit. The concentrations of: As, Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni, Fe i Cu in grasses grown on two media were compared. Grass samples have been collected in tillering stage, when they were in full development. During the vegetative period three replications cut was conducted at about 3-5 cm height, imitating mowing and grazing. The concentrations of As and Ni were elevated in media samples collected from TENT A ash deposit, while the level of all studied elements in soil samples collected from cultivated land were within allowed limits. The variance of certain elements amounts in plant material collected from TENT A ash deposit was less homogeneous; the concentrations of As, Fe and Ni were higher in grasses collected from ash deposit, but Pb and Cu concentrations were higher in grasses grown on cultivated land. The concentrations of Zn were approximately the same in plants collected from the sites, whereas Cd concentrations were slightly increased in grasses grown on ash deposit. In general, it can be concluded from the results of this study that the concentrations of heavy metals in plants collected from both sites do not exceed maximal tolerant levels for fodder. The use of grasses grown on ash deposit for forage production should be taken with reserve. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31016: Unapređenje tehnologije gajenja krmnih biljaka na oranicama i travnjacima

  12. Recovery of Multi-Metallic Components from Bottom Ash by Smelting Reduction Under Plasma Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Arup Kumar; Sinha, Om Prakash

    2016-02-01

    A new concept for maintaining inert atmosphere with high temperature ~1973 K (1700 °C) inside the furnace during smelting reduction was described, in which recovery of metallic values from wastes was done in the presence of metal bath which acts as a solvent. Nitrogen plasma arc was generated by passing current and nitrogen gas through a hollow graphite electrode. In this way, the heat for reduction reactions and melting of metal and slag phases under inert atmosphere was maintained. The mixture of bottom ash and carbonaceous reducing agent was fed in the form of pellets near the plasma zone above the liquid iron bath, used for the absorption of reduced metals after reduction of oxides present in the wastes. Percent recovery of metallic values and different consumption parameters were calculated. It was observed that aluminum, iron, and silicon could be recovered effectively from the wastes.

  13. Determination of heavy metals in chinese prickly ash from different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (As), mercury (Hg), tin (Sn), and antimony (Sb) were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results: Heavy metal levels in the CPA samples followed the order: Cu (3.29-24.17 mg/kg) > Cr (0.04-. 7.33 mg/kg) > Ni (0.88-6.86 mg/kg) > Pb (0.00-3.84 mg/kg) > As (0.0011-1.08 mg/kg) > Cd ...

  14. Road soil retention of heavy metals leached from Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator bottom ash used in road construction

    OpenAIRE

    BOUVET, M

    2003-01-01

    Economic stakes of raw materials and harmful effects linked to waste landfill lead to the re-use of alternative materials like Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash in road construction . MSWI bottom ash has a high heavy metal content, which can leach and infiltrate into the underlying soil, under the effect of rainfall infiltration through the road. The assessment of MSWI bottom ash re-use eco-compatibility implies to study the solubility and the retention of heavy metals in th...

  15. The behaviour of ashes and heavy metals during the co-combustion of sewage sludges in a fluidised bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M.H.; Abelha, P.; Lapa, N.; Oliveira, J.S.; Cabrita, I.; Gulyurtlu, I. [INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2003-07-01

    Co-combustion tests of dry sewage sludges with coal were performed in a pilot bubbling FBC with the aim of characterizating the ashes and determining the behaviour of heavy metals in the process. The tests showed compliance with the regulatory levels as far as heavy metal emissions were concerned. The bottom ashes, which accounted for about 70% of the total ash production, were obtained in a granular form, with diameters ranging from 0.5 to 4 mm. The heavy metals were distributed in ashes obtained from different locations of the installation and their concentrations were found to vary depending on the location of capture. The increase in heavy metals content in bottom ashes was not found to lead to higher leachability and ecotoxicity compared to sewage sludges. Mercury suffered vaporisation inside the reactor, thus leaving bottom ashes free of contamination by it. However, there was observed a strong retention of mercury in cyclone ashes due to the presence of unburned carbon which probably acted as an adsorbent. The effluent mercury was also found to be mostly associated with the particulate fraction, being less than 20% emitted in gaseous forms. The results suggested that the combustion of the sewage sludge could successfully be carried out and the amount of unburned carbon leaving the combustor but captured in cyclone was large enough to ensure substantial retention of mercury at low temperatures, hence could contribute to an improvement of the mercury release which still remains an issue of great concern to resolve during combustion of waste materials.

  16. Metal Compression Forming of aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Porter, W.D.; Brinkman, C.R.; Sabau, A.S.; Purgert, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process.

  17. Effect of bacterial inoculants on phytomining of metals from waste incineration bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Theresa; Kidd, Petra; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2018-03-01

    Waste incineration bottom ash is considered a secondary resource for valuable trace elements (TE), which is currently neglected in most European countries. Phytomining could potentially recover valuable TE from such waste materials but is still at an exploratory stage with many challenges. The use of bioaugmentation to improve plant growth and TE accumulation of metal-tolerant high biomass plants growing on waste incineration bottom ash was evaluated. Bacterial strains that were previously isolated from rhizosphere, roots and contaminated soil were selected according to their plant growth promoting characteristics and tolerance to the bottom ash substrate. Those selected bacterial strains were tested for their beneficial effects on Nicotiana tabacum and Salix smithiana with regards to phytomining. The rhizobacterial strain Rhodococcus erythropolis P30 enhanced the shoot dry weight of N. tabacum by on average 57% compared to the control plants. Several bacterial inoculants enhanced biomass production and the nutritional status of S. smithiana. Moreover, those bacterial strains previously described to enhance biomass production of N. tabacum and members of the Salicaceae on TE-contaminated soils, also enhanced biomass production of these species on bottom ash. However, bacterial inoculants could not enhance trace element accumulation in plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristics of Matrix Metals in Which Fast Diffusion of Foreign Metallic Elements Occurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mae, Yoshiharu

    2018-04-01

    A few foreign elements are known to diffuse faster than the self-diffusion of the matrix metal. However, the characteristics of the matrix metal, which contribute to such fast diffusion remain unknown. In this study, the diffusion coefficients of various elements were plotted on a TC-YM diagram. The matrix metals that show fast diffusion are located in the low thermal conductivity range of the TC-YM diagram, while diffuser elements that undergo fast diffusion are mainly gulf elements such as Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, and Cu. The gulf elements are those that show the largest combination of thermal conductivity and Young's modulus. The great difference in the electron mobility between the matrix metal and diffuser elements generates a repulsive force between them, and the repulsive force—acting between the soft and large atoms of the matrix metal and the hard and small atoms of the diffuser elements—deforms the atoms of the matrix metal to open passageways for fast diffusion of diffuser elements.

  19. Persistent free radicals, heavy metals and PAHs generated in particulate soot emissions and residue ash from controlled combustion of common types of plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Iliopoulos, Nikiforos; Gotsis, George; Fiotakis, Konstantinos

    2008-01-01

    The production and use of polymeric materials worldwide has reached levels of 150 million tonnes per year, and the majority of plastic materials are discarded in waste landfills where are burned generating toxic emissions. In the present study we conducted laboratory experiments for batch combustion/burning of commercial polymeric materials, simulating conditions of open fire combustion, with the purpose to analyze their emissions for chemical characteristics of toxicological importance. We used common types of plastic materials: poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), low and high density poly(ethylene) (LDPE, HDPE), poly(styrene) (PS), poly(propylene) (PP) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). Samples of particulate smoke (soot) collected on filters and residue solid ash produced by controlled burning conditions at 600-750 deg. C are used for analysis. Emissions of particulate matter, persistent free radicals embedded in the carbonaceous polymeric matrix, heavy metals, other elements and PAHs were determined in both types of samples. Results showed that all plastics burned easily generating charred residue solid ash and black airborne particulate smoke. Persistent carbon- and oxygen-centered radicals, known for their toxic effects in inhalable airborne particles, were detected in both particulate smoke emissions and residue solid ash. Concentrations of heavy metals and other elements (determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry, ICP, method) were measured in the airborne soot and residue ash. Toxic heavy metals, such as Pb, Zn, Cr, Ni, and Cd were relatively at were found at low concentrations. High concentrations were found for some lithophilic elements, such as Na, Ca, Mg, Si and Al in particulate soot and residue solid ash. Measurements of PAHs showed that low molecular weight PAHs were at higher concentrations in the airborne particulate soot than in the residue solid ash for all types of plastic. Higher-ringed PAHs were detected at higher

  20. Persistent free radicals, heavy metals and PAHs generated in particulate soot emissions and residue ash from controlled combustion of common types of plastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Iliopoulos, Nikiforos; Gotsis, George; Fiotakis, Konstantinos

    2008-08-15

    The production and use of polymeric materials worldwide has reached levels of 150 million tonnes per year, and the majority of plastic materials are discarded in waste landfills where are burned generating toxic emissions. In the present study we conducted laboratory experiments for batch combustion/burning of commercial polymeric materials, simulating conditions of open fire combustion, with the purpose to analyze their emissions for chemical characteristics of toxicological importance. We used common types of plastic materials: poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), low and high density poly(ethylene) (LDPE, HDPE), poly(styrene) (PS), poly(propylene) (PP) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). Samples of particulate smoke (soot) collected on filters and residue solid ash produced by controlled burning conditions at 600-750 degrees C are used for analysis. Emissions of particulate matter, persistent free radicals embedded in the carbonaceous polymeric matrix, heavy metals, other elements and PAHs were determined in both types of samples. Results showed that all plastics burned easily generating charred residue solid ash and black airborne particulate smoke. Persistent carbon- and oxygen-centered radicals, known for their toxic effects in inhalable airborne particles, were detected in both particulate smoke emissions and residue solid ash. Concentrations of heavy metals and other elements (determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry, ICP, method) were measured in the airborne soot and residue ash. Toxic heavy metals, such as Pb, Zn, Cr, Ni, and Cd were relatively at were found at low concentrations. High concentrations were found for some lithophilic elements, such as Na, Ca, Mg, Si and Al in particulate soot and residue solid ash. Measurements of PAHs showed that low molecular weight PAHs were at higher concentrations in the airborne particulate soot than in the residue solid ash for all types of plastic. Higher-ringed PAHs were detected at higher

  1. Microstructure, mechanical and fracture properties of groundnut shell ash and silicon carbide dispersion strengthened aluminium matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo Alaneme

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of aluminium hybrid composites reinforced with groundnut shell ash (GSA and silicon carbide was investigated. GSA and silicon carbide with different mix ratios (10:0, 7.5:2.5, 5.0:5.0, 2.5:7.5 and 0:10 constituted 6 and 10 wt.% of the reinforcing phase, while the matrix material was Al–Mg–Si alloy. The hybrid composites were produced via a two-step stir casting technique. Microstructural examination, hardness, tensile and fracture toughness testing were carried out to appraise the mechanical properties of the composites. The results show that with increasing GSA in the reinforcing phase, the hardness, ultimate tensile strength (UTS and specific strength of the composites decreased slightly for both 6 and 10 wt.% reinforced Al–Mg–Si based composites owing to the amount of the oxides of Al, Si, Ca, K2 and Mg present in the composition of GSA. However, the percentage elongation improved marginally and was generally invariant to increasing GSA content while the fracture toughness increased with increasing GSA content. GSA offered a favourable influence on the mechanical properties of Al–Mg–Si hybrid composites comparable to that of rice husk ash and bamboo leaf ash.

  2. Internal friction in a new kind of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Juan, J.; No, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new kind of metal matrix composites, based on powders of Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys (SMAs) surrounded by an indium matrix, specifically designed to exhibit high mechanical damping. The damping properties have been characterized by mechanical spectroscopy as a function of temperature between 150 and 400 K, frequency between 3 x 10 -3 and 3 Hz, and strain amplitude between 5 x 10 -6 and 10 -4 . The material exhibits, in some range of temperature, internal friction as high as 0.54. The extremely high damping is discussed in the light of the microstructure of the material, which has been characterized in parallel

  3. Laser cladding of wear resistant metal matrix composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovlev, A.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    2004-01-01

    A number of coatings with wear-resistant properties as well as with a low friction coefficient are produced by laser cladding. The structure of these coatings is determined by required performance and realized as metal matrix composite (MMC), where solid lubricant serves as a ductile matrix (e.g. CuSn), reinforced by appropriate ceramic phase (e.g. WC/Co). One of the engineered coating with functionally graded material (FGM) structure has a dry friction coefficient 0.12. Coatings were produced by coaxial injection of powder blend into the zone of laser beam action. Metallographic and tribological examinations were carried out confirming the advanced performance of engineered coatings

  4. Metal leachability, heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls in fly and bottom ashes of a medical waste incineration facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Iliopoulos, Nikiforos; Fiotakis, Konstantinos; Gotsis, George

    2008-06-01

    Medical waste from hospitals and other healthcare institutions has become an imperative environmental and public safety problem. Medical waste in Greece has become one of the most urgent environmental problems, because there are 14,000 tons produced annually, of which only a small proportion is incinerated. In the prefecture of Attica there is only one modern municipal medical waste incinerator (started 2004) burning selected infectious hospital waste (5-6 tons day(-1)). Fly and bottom residues (ashes) are collected and stored temporarily in barrels. High values of metal leachability prohibit the landfilling of these ashes, as imposed by EU directives. In the present study we determined quantitatively the heavy metals and other elements in the fly and bottom ashes of the medical waste incinerator, by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP) and by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Heavy metals, which are very toxic, such as Pb, Cd, Ni, Cr, Cu and Zn were found in high concentrations in both fly and bottom ashes. Metal leachability of fly and bottom ashes by water and kerosene was measured by ICP and the results showed that toxic metals in both ashes, such as Pb, Cr, Cd, Cu and Zn, have high leaching values. These values indicate that metals can become soluble and mobile if ash is deposited in landfills, thus restricting their burial according to EU regulations. Analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fly and bottom ashes showed that their concentrations were very low. This is the first known study in Greece and the results showed that incineration of medical waste can be very effective in minimizing the most hazardous and infectious health-care waste. The presence of toxic metals with high leachability values remains an important draw back of incineration of medical waste and various methods of treating these residues to diminish leaching are been considered at present to overcome this serious technical

  5. Radioactivity concentration and heavy metal content in fuel oil and oil-ashes in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, H.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Abril, J.M.; Greaves, E.D.

    2004-01-01

    as well as Fuel Oil No6. Gamma spectrometry was used for measuring 226 Ra, 214 Pb, 214 Bi, 228 Ac, 212 Pb, 212 Bi, 208 Tl and 40 K, and heavy metallic cations were determined by ICP-MS which allow also the direct determination of 238 U. In this material (oil ashes) the total activity concentration is above 300 Bq.kg-1. In fact the combustion concentrate also heavy metal cations leading to an increasing in its concentrations, as is the case of Pb, Ni, Fe, Mn, V and Zn. Finally some recommendations are included for use of oil ashes as an additive for building materials. (author)

  6. Stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash using silica fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinying; Chen, Quanyuan; Zhou, Yasu; Tyrer, Mark; Yu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of silica fume on stabilizing heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash. In addition to compressive strength measurements, hydrated pastes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal-analyses (DTA/TG), and MAS NMR ((27)Al and (29)Si) techniques. It was found that silica fume additions could effectively reduce the leaching of toxic heavy metals. At the addition of 20% silica fume, leaching concentrations for Cu, Pb and Zn of the hydrated paste cured for 7 days decreased from 0.32 mg/L to 0.05 mg/L, 40.99 mg/L to 4.40 mg/L, and 6.96 mg/L to 0.21 mg/L compared with the MSWI fly ash. After curing for 135 days, Cd and Pb in the leachates were not detected, while Cu and Zn concentrations decreased to 0.02 mg/L and 0.03 mg/L. The speciation of Pb and Cd by the modified version of the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) extractions showed that these metals converted into more stable state in hydrated pastes of MSWI fly ash in the presence of silica fume. Although exchangeable and weak-acid soluble fractions of Cu and Zn increased with hydration time, silica fume addition of 10% can satisfy the requirement of detoxification for heavy metals investigated in terms of the identification standard of hazardous waste of China. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of bagasse ash reinforcement on dry sliding wear behaviour of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigbodion, V.S.; Hassan, S.B.; Agunsoye, J.O.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → The influence of wear parameters on the wear rate of RLDPE were investigated. → The predicted wear rate of the RLDPE and it composites were found to lie close to that experimentally observed ones. → The results showed that the addition of bagasse ash as filler materials in RLDPE composites increase the wear resistance. -- Abstract: The tribological behaviour of recycled low density polyethylene (RLDPE) polymer composites with bagasse ash particles as a reinforcement was studied using a pin-on-disc wear rig under dry sliding conditions. The influence of wear parameters like, applied load, sliding speed, sliding distance and percentage of bagasse ash fillers, on the wear rate were investigated. A plan of experiments was performed to acquire data in a controlled way. Scanning electron microscope was used to analyse the worn surface of the samples. Linear regression equation and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were employed to investigate the influence of process parameters on the wear rate of the samples. The predicted wear rate of the RLDPE and it composites were found to lie close to that experimentally observed ones. The confirmation of the experiments conducted using ANOVA to verify the optimal testing parameters show that sliding speed and applied load had significant effect on the wear rate. The results showed that the addition of bagasse ash as filler materials in RLDPE composites increase the wear resistance of the composite greatly.

  8. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-01-01

    One of the key materials challenges for Generation IV reactor technology is to improve the strength and resistance to corrosion and radiation damage in the metal cladding of the fuel pins during high-temperature operation. Various candidate Gen IV designs call for increasing core temperature to improve efficiency and facilitate hydrogen production, operation with molten lead moderator to use fast neutrons. Fuel pin lifetime against swelling and fracture is a significant limit in both respects. The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite. In the context of the mission of the SBIR program, this Phase I grant has been successful. The development of a means to attain interfacial bonding between metal and ceramic has been a pacing challenge in materials science and technology for a century. It entails matching or grading of thermal expansion across the interface and attaining a graded chemical composition so that impurities do not concentrate at the boundary to create a slip layer. To date these challenges have been solved in only a modest number of pairings of compatible materials, e.g. Kovar and glass, titanium and ceramic, and aluminum and ceramic. The latter two cases have given rise to the only presently available MMC materials, developed for aerospace applications. Those materials have been possible because the matrix metal is highly reactive at elevated temperature so that graded composition and intimate bonding happens naturally at the fiber-matrix interface. For metals that are not highly reactive at processing temperature, however, successful bonding is much more difficult. Recent success has been made with copper MMCs for cooling channels in first-wall designs for fusion

  9. Microwave-assisted digestion using nitric acid for heavy metals and sulfated ash testing in active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhácek, T; Hanzal, J; Hendrych, J; Milde, D

    2016-04-01

    The monitoring of inorganic impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients plays a crucial role in the quality control of the pharmaceutical production. The heavy metals and residue on ignition/sulfated ash methods employing microwave-assisted digestion with concentrated nitric acid have been demonstrated as alternatives to inappropriate compendial methods recommended in United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.). The recoveries using the heavy metals method ranged between 89% and 122% for nearly all USP and Ph. Eur. restricted elements as well as the recoveries of sodium sulfate spikes were around 100% in all tested matrices. The proposed microwave-assisted digestion method allowed simultaneous decomposition of 15 different active pharmaceutical ingredients with sample weigh up to 1 g. The heavy metals and sulfated ash procedures were successfully applied to the determination of heavy metals and residue on ignition/sulfated ash content in mycophenolate mofetil, nicergoline and silymarin.

  10. Fundamental Study on Laser Interaction with Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to significantly advance the fundamental understanding of laser interaction with metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) and to overcome the fundamental limits of current laser processing techniques by tuning heat transfer and fluid flow using nanoparticles.Ultrasonic assisted electrocodeposition was used to prepare MMNCs samples (e.g., Ni/Al2O3) for laser melting experiments. Microstructural study showed that uniform distribution and dispersion of nanoparticles wer...

  11. Metallic-fibre-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevost, F.; Schnedecker, G.; Boncoeur, M.

    1994-01-01

    A refractory metal wire cloth is embedded in an oxide ceramic matrix, using a plasma spraying technology, in order to elaborate composite plates. When mechanically tested, the composite fails with a pseudo-ductile fracture mode whereas the ceramic alone is originally brittle. It exhibits a higher fracture strength, and remains in the form of a single piece even when straining is important. No further heat treatment is needed after the original processing to reach these characteristics. (authors). 2 figs., 2 refs

  12. Nondestructive Characterization of Two-Phase Metal-Matrix Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    to a time standard. The alloys 1100. 3003. 5052 , 6061. and 2024. Aluminium specific technique may utilise a standin,-wave pat- alloys that contain...obtained for rolled ferritic steel sheets, rolled ferritic steel plates and for extruded metal-matrix composites of the aluminium alloys Al-8091, Al-7064...and Salama Table 1. Chemical composition of aluminium alloyvs and volhme percentage of SiC reinforcement of the MNIC-specimens Alloying Elements Alloy

  13. Geopolymers with a high percentage of bottom ash for solidification/immobilization of different toxic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boca Santa, Rozineide A. Antunes; Soares, Cíntia; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M). • Solidification/immobilization (S/I) waste of heavy metals. • Activators: Sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and sodium silicate (Na 2 SiO 3 ). - Abstract: Geopolymers are produced using alkali-activated aluminosilicates, either as waste or natural material obtained from various sources. This study synthesized geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M) in a 2:1 wt ratio to test the solidification/immobilization (S/I) properties of heavy metals in geopolymer matrices, since there is very little research using BA in this type of matrices. Therefore, a decision was made to use more than 65% of BA in geopolymer synthesis with and without the addition of heavy metals. The S/I tests with metals used 10, 15 and 30 ml of a waste solution after pickling of printed circuit boards containing metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Sn, As and Ni, in different proportions. As alkali activator, the NaOH and KOH were used in the concentrations of 8 and 12 M in the composition of Na 2 SiO 3 in 1:2 vol ratios. To test S/I efficiency, tests were conducted to obtain the leached and solubilized extract. The analysis was carried out through X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and compressive strength tests. The geopolymer showed a high degree of S/I of the metals; in some samples, the results reached nearly 100%.

  14. Geopolymers with a high percentage of bottom ash for solidification/immobilization of different toxic metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boca Santa, Rozineide A. Antunes, E-mail: roosebs@gmail.com; Soares, Cíntia; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M). • Solidification/immobilization (S/I) waste of heavy metals. • Activators: Sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}). - Abstract: Geopolymers are produced using alkali-activated aluminosilicates, either as waste or natural material obtained from various sources. This study synthesized geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M) in a 2:1 wt ratio to test the solidification/immobilization (S/I) properties of heavy metals in geopolymer matrices, since there is very little research using BA in this type of matrices. Therefore, a decision was made to use more than 65% of BA in geopolymer synthesis with and without the addition of heavy metals. The S/I tests with metals used 10, 15 and 30 ml of a waste solution after pickling of printed circuit boards containing metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Sn, As and Ni, in different proportions. As alkali activator, the NaOH and KOH were used in the concentrations of 8 and 12 M in the composition of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} in 1:2 vol ratios. To test S/I efficiency, tests were conducted to obtain the leached and solubilized extract. The analysis was carried out through X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and compressive strength tests. The geopolymer showed a high degree of S/I of the metals; in some samples, the results reached nearly 100%.

  15. Leaching behavior and effectiveness of curing days (7& 28) of solidified/stabilized fly ash based geopolymer (multi-metal bearing sludge): experimental and modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Rubina; Khaleb, Divya; Badur, Smita

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the study of the immobilization of heavy metals like Pb, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn by fly ash based geopolymers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of fly ash based geopolymeric solidification/stabilization technology. For S/S of waste, geopolymer as a binding agent was mixed with waste at different ratios. For initial waste characterization, contaminants concentration and some physical waste characterization such as dry density, bulk density, specific gravity, porosity, moisture holding capacity, and moisture content were determined. Waste and geopolymer mixture were cured for 7 and 28 days to study the effect of curing days on the solidified/ stabilized product. Diffusion leaching test was performed on the geopolymers containing industrial sludge to determine the leaching mechanism of binders to entrap the waste constituents within their matrix. Movement of the elements was identified with the help of leachability index. S/S through geopolymer was found to be effective in immobilizing toxic metals present in the sludge. Zn was 100% and other metals like Pb, Fe, Mn and Cu were in the range 80-99% immobilized. The order of fixation of metals was Zn >Cu > Fe > Mn > Pb.

  16. Residual organic matter and microbial respiration in bottom ash: Effects on metal leaching and eco-toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, A; Persson, K M; Persson, M

    2015-09-01

    A common assumption regarding the residual organic matter, in bottom ash, is that it does not represent a significant pool of organic carbon and, beyond metal-ion complexation process, it is of little consequence to evolution of ash/leachate chemistry. This article evaluates the effect of residual organic matter and associated microbial respiratory processes on leaching of toxic metals (i.e. arsenic, copper, chromium, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony and zinc), eco-toxicity of ash leachates. Microbial respiration was quantified with help of a respirometric test equipment OXITOP control system. The effect of microbial respiration on metal/residual organic matter leaching and eco-toxicity was quantified with the help of batch leaching tests and an eco-toxicity assay - Daphnia magna. In general, the microbial respiration process decreased the leachate pH and eco-toxicity, indicating modification of bioavailability of metal species. Furthermore, the leaching of critical metals, such as copper and chromium, decreased after the respiration in both ash types (fresh and weathered). It was concluded that microbial respiration, if harnessed properly, could enhance the stability of fresh bottom ash and may promote its reuse. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Effects of ductile matrix failure in three dimensional analysis of metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Full three dimensional numerical cell model analyses are carried out for a metal reinforced by short fibers, to study the development of ductile matrix failure. A porous ductile material model is used to describe the effect of the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence. In each case studied...... a rounded vertex on the yield surface. The full three dimensional model is used to study effects of deviations from equal transverse tension in directions perpendicular to the fibers. (C) 1998 Acta Metallurgica Inc....

  18. Hydrothermal processing of MSWI fly ash--towards new stable minerals and fixation of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuseno, A P; Schmahl, W W; Müllejans, Th

    2009-08-15

    A hydrothermal processing strategy of MSWI fly ash is presented for obtaining stable minerals with low toxic potential. Different hydrothermal conditions were tested to obtain high yields of new stable minerals. Experimental parameters including temperature, nature and molarity of alkali reagents, and reaction time were evaluated. The chemical stability of hydrothermal products was examined by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test and subsequent XRD for the leached residue. The significant amounts of Al-substituted 11A tobermorite and katoite in addition to minor amounts of zeolites were formed under experimental conditions at 0.5M NaOH, 180 degrees C for 48 h, however KOH treatment in a similar regime resulted in smaller amounts of Al-substituted 11A tobermorite and katoite. Similarly, a product of mixed Al-substituted 11A tobermorite and katoite could be formed from the washed fly ash treated in 0.5M NaOH at 180 degrees C for 48 h. Under the acidic condition, the treated fly ash exhibited an excellent stability of the mineral assemblage and less release of heavy metals relative to the untreated parent materials.

  19. Effect of accelerated carbonation and zero valent iron on metal leaching from bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, M; Andreas, L; Lagerkvist, A

    2016-05-01

    About 85% of the ashes produced in Sweden originated from the incineration of municipal solid waste and biofuel. The rest comes from the thermal treatment of recycled wood, peat, charcoal and others. About 68% of all ashes annually produced in Sweden are used for constructions on landfills, mainly slopes, roads and embankments, and only 3% for construction of roads and working surfaces outside the landfills (SCB, 2013). Since waste bottom ash (BA) often has similar properties to crushed bedrock or gravel, it could be used for road constructions to a larger extent. However, the leaching of e.g. Cr, Cu, Mo, Pb and Zn can cause a threat to the surrounding environment if the material is used as it is. Carbonation is a commonly used pre-treatment method, yet it is not always sufficient. As leaching from aged ash is often controlled by adsorption to iron oxides, increasing the number of Fe oxide sorption sites can be a way to control the leaching of several critical elements. The importance of iron oxides as sorption sites for metals is known from both mineralogical studies of bottom ash and from the remediation of contaminated soil, where iron is used as an amendment. In this study, zero valent iron (Fe(0)) was added prior to accelerated carbonation in order to increase the number of adsorption sites for metals and thereby reduce leaching. Batch, column and pHstat leaching tests were performed and the leaching behaviour was evaluated with multivariate data analysis. It showed that leaching changed distinctly after the tested treatments, in particular after the combined treatment. Especially, the leaching of Cr and Cu clearly decreased as a result of accelerated carbonation. The combination of accelerated carbonation with Fe(0) addition reduced the leaching of Cr and Cu even further and reduced also the leaching of Mo, Zn, Pb and Cd compared to untreated BA. Compared with only accelerated carbonation, the Fe(0) addition significantly reduced the leaching of Cr, Cu and Mo

  20. Studies on the optimization of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Tim W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-01-04

    A methodology for the production of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites from hyper-eutectic copper-chromium alloys was developed. This methodology was derived from a basic study of the precipitation phenomena in these alloys encompassing evaluation of microstructural, electrical, and mechanical properties. The methodology developed produces material with a superior combination of electrical and mechanical properties compared to those presently available in commercial alloys. New and novel alloying procedures were investigated to extend the range of production methods available for these material. These studies focused on the use of High Pressure Gas Atomization and the development of new containment technologies for the liquid alloy. This allowed the production of alloys with a much more refined starting microstructure and lower contamination than available by other methods. The knowledge gained in the previous studies was used to develop two completely new families of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. These composites are based on immissible alloys with yttrium and magnesium matrices and refractory metal reinforcement. This work extends the physical property range available in deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. Additionally, it also represents new ways to apply these metals in engineering applications.

  1. Heavy metal enrichment characteristics in ash of municipal solid waste combustion in CO2/O2 atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, YuTing; Ma, XiaoQian; Yu, QuanHeng; Zhang, Can; Lai, Zhiyi; Zhang, Xiaoshen

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigated the behavior of six heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, Cr, Ni and Zn) in the bottom ashes of recycled polyvinyl chloride pellets (PVC), wood sawdust (WS) and paper mixture (PM), representing the common components of municipal solid waste (MSW), obtained during combustion in CO2/O2 atmosphere in a lab-scale electrically heated tube furnace. Replacement of N2 by CO2 did not obviously change the shape of relative enrichment factor (RE) curves and subsequent order of heavy metals, but increased enrichment of these heavy metals in bottom ashes of WS, PM and PVC. The increment of O2 concentration in CO2/O2 atmosphere further increased RE values. It was only when the temperature was higher than or equal to 700°C that the increment of the combustion temperature reduced the RE values of heavy metals. The effect of temperature on heavy metals evaporation was the most pronounced for the medium volatile metal Pb, and the least for the low volatiles Cr and Ni. The effect of temperature was more pronounced for PVC ash than for WS and PM ashes. This paper contributes to the control of heavy metals during MSW incineration and management of MSW oxy-fuel residues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring metal detoxification and accumulation potential during vermicomposting of Tea factory coal ash: sequential extraction and fluorescence probe analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Linee; Pratihar, Sanjay; Dasgupta, Suman; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Mudoi, Pronab; Bora, Jayanta; Bhattacharya, Satya Sundar; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Metal contamination from coal ashes (CAs) is widely recognized as a significant environmental concern. To learn more about metal detoxification and accumulation potential of earthworm species, metal-rich tea factory coal ashes (TFCA) were fed to Eisenia fetida and Lampito mauritii by employing a fluorescent tag detection method. Fascinatingly, on feeding fluorescence probed Zn and Cd along with cow dung to Eisenia fetida, the detection of the gut-proteins with a molecular mass higher than 100 kDa was a distinct evidence of metal binding. Significant increases were observed in the content of humified organic C [humic acid (HAC) and fulvic acid C (FAC)] and degree of humification during vermicomposting. Concurrently, considerably large amount of toxic metals (Cr, Cd, Pb, and Zn) was transformed from exchangeable to recalcitrant (organic matter and mineral bound) fractions. Moreover, total metal concentrations were reduced with high removal efficiency upon vermicomposting.

  3. Ash and heavy metals in fluidized bed-combustion; Tuhka ja raskasmetallit puuperaeisen jaetteen kerrosleijupoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaessi, T.; Aittoniemi, P. [IVO International, Vantaa (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    Combustion ashes and submicron fly ash particles were characterized in two industrial boilers (bubbling vs. circulating fluidized bed) burning paper mill deinking sludge and bark or wood as support fuel. Bulk samples from fly ash, circulating ash and bottom ash were analyzed. Fine particles in fly ash were monitored and sampled for microscopic studies. The mass size distribution of fly ash was measured and the chemical composition according to particle size was analyzed. The results showed that ash consists of large and friable clusters formed by sintering of small mineral particles originating from paper fillers. Very few ash particles were fused and they were found only among the smallest particles. No agglomerates of fused particles were found. If the residence time in furnace is long enough sintering may proceed further and ash structure grows more dense. No indication of ash vaporization was detected. These results were similar for bubbling and circulating fluidized bed boilers. (author)

  4. Comparison of sequential and single extraction in order to estimate environmental impact of metals from fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasić Aleksandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to simulate leaching of metals from fly ash in different environmental conditions using ultrasound and microwave-assisted extraction techniques. Single-agent extraction and sequential extraction procedures were used to determine the levels of different metals leaching. The concentration of metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cu, As, Be in fly ash extracts were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry. Single-agent extractions of metals were conducted during sonication times of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 min. Single-agent extraction with deionized water was also undertaken by exposing samples to microwave radiation at the temperature of 50°C. The sequential extraction was undertaken according to the BCR procedure which was modified and applied to study the partitioning of metals in coal fly ash. The microwave-assisted sequential extraction was performed at different extraction temperatures: 50, 100 and 150°C. The partitioning of metals between the individual fractions was investigated and discussed. The efficiency of the extraction process for each step was examined. In addition, the results of the microwave-assisted sequential extraction are compared to the results obtained by standard ASTM method. The mobility of most elements contained in fly ash is markedly pH sensitive. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172030, br. 176006 i br. III43009

  5. The behavior of ashes and heavy metals during the co-combustion of sewage sludges in a fluidised bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Helena M.; Abelha, P.; Cabrita, I. [INETI-DEECA, Lisboa (Portugal); Lapa, N.; Oliveira, J.S. [UNL-Ubia, Monte de Caparica (Portugal)

    2003-07-01

    Co-combustion tests of dry sewage sludges with coal were performed in a pilot bubbling FRC aiming at the characterization of ashes and determining the behaviour of heavy metals in the process. The tests showed compliance with the regulatory levels as far as heavy metal emissions were concerned. The bottom ashes, which accounted for about 70% of the total ash production, were obtained in a granular form, with diameters ranging from 0.5 to 4 mm. The heavy metals were distributed in ashes obtained from different locations of the installation and their concentrations were found to vary depending on the location of capture. The increase in heavy metals content in bottom ashes was not found to lead to higher leachability and ecotoxicity compared to sewage sludges, suggesting that there could be opportunities for their reactor further use. Mercury suffered vaporisation inside the reactor, thus leaving bottom ashes free of contamination by it. However, there was observed a strong retention of mercury in cyclone ashes due to the presence of unburned carbon which probably acted as an adsorbent. The effluent mercury was also found to be mostly associated with the particulate fraction, being less than 20% emitted in gaseous forms. The results suggested that the combustion of the sewage sludge could successfully be carried out, and the amount of unburned carbon leaving the combustor but captured in the cyclone was large enough to ensure substantial retention of mercury at low temperatures, and, hence, could contribute to an improvement of the mercury release, which still remains an issue of great concern to resolve during combustion of waste materials.

  6. The behaviour of ashes and heavy metals during the co-combustion of sewage sludges in a fluidised bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helena Lopes, M; Abelha, P; Lapa, N; Oliveira, J S; Cabrita, I; Gulyurtlu, I

    2003-01-01

    Co-combustion tests of dry sewage sludges with coal were performed in a pilot bubbling FBC aiming at the characterization of ashes and determining the behaviour of heavy metals in the process. The tests showed compliance with the regulatory levels as far as heavy metal emissions were concerned. The bottom ashes, which accounted for about 70% of the total ash production, were obtained in a granular form, with diameters ranging from 0.5 to 4 mm. The heavy metals were distributed in ashes obtained from different locations of the installation and their concentrations were found to vary depending on the location of capture. The increase in heavy metals content in bottom ashes was not found to lead to higher leachability and ecotoxicity compared to sewage sludges, suggesting that there could be opportunities for their further use. Mercury suffered vaporisation inside the reactor, thus leaving bottom ashes free of contamination by it. However, there was observed a strong retention of mercury in cyclone ashes due to the presence of unburned carbon which probably acted as an adsorbent. The effluent mercury was also found to be mostly associated with the particulate fraction, being less than 20% emitted in gaseous forms. The results suggested that the combustion of the sewage sludge could successfully be carried out and the amount of unburned carbon leaving the combustor but captured in cyclone was large enough to ensure substantial retention of mercury at low temperatures, hence could contribute to an improvement of the mercury release which still remains an issue of great concern to resolve during combustion of waste materials.

  7. The behaviour of ashes and heavy metals during the co-combustion of sewage sludges in a fluidised bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helena Lopes, M.; Abelha, P.; Lapa, N.; Oliveira, J.S.; Cabrita, I.; Gulyurtlu, I.

    2003-01-01

    Co-combustion tests of dry sewage sludges with coal were performed in a pilot bubbling FBC aiming at the characterization of ashes and determining the behaviour of heavy metals in the process. The tests showed compliance with the regulatory levels as far as heavy metal emissions were concerned. The bottom ashes, which accounted for about 70% of the total ash production, were obtained in a granular form, with diameters ranging from 0.5 to 4 mm. The heavy metals were distributed in ashes obtained from different locations of the installation and their concentrations were found to vary depending on the location of capture. The increase in heavy metals content in bottom ashes was not found to lead to higher leachability and ecotoxicity compared to sewage sludges, suggesting that there could be opportunities for their further use. Mercury suffered vaporisation inside the reactor, thus leaving bottom ashes free of contamination by it. However, there was observed a strong retention of mercury in cyclone ashes due to the presence of unburned carbon which probably acted as an adsorbent. The effluent mercury was also found to be mostly associated with the particulate fraction, being less than 20% emitted in gaseous forms. The results suggested that the combustion of the sewage sludge could successfully be carried out and the amount of unburned carbon leaving the combustor but captured in cyclone was large enough to ensure substantial retention of mercury at low temperatures, hence could contribute to an improvement of the mercury release which still remains an issue of great concern to resolve during combustion of waste materials

  8. Effect of reinforcement on the cutting forces while machining metal matrix composites–An experimental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Shoba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid metal matrix composites are of great interest for researchers in recent years, because of their attractive superior properties over traditional materials and single reinforced composites. The machinabilty of hybrid composites becomes vital for manufacturing industries. The need to study the influence of process parameters on the cutting forces in turning such hybrid composite under dry environment is essentially required. In the present study, the influence of machining parameters, e.g. cutting speed, feed and depth of cut on the cutting force components, namely feed force (Ff, cutting force (Fc, and radial force (Fd has been investigated. Investigations were performed on 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 wt% Silicon carbide (SiC and rice husk ash (RHA reinforced composite specimens. A comparison was made between the reinforced and unreinforced composites. The results proved that all the cutting force components decrease with the increase in the weight percentage of the reinforcement: this was probably due to the dislocation densities generated from the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix. Experimental evidence also showed that built-up edge (BUE is formed during machining of low percentage reinforced composites at high speed and high depth of cut. The formation of BUE was captured by SEM, therefore confirming the result. The decrease of cutting force components with lower cutting speed and higher feed and depth of cut was also highlighted. The related mechanisms are explained and presented.

  9. Studies on rheological and leaching characteristics of heavy metals through selective additive in high concentration ash slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapati, P K; Mohapatra, R; Pani, G K; Mishra, B K

    2012-08-30

    The generation and disposal level of thermal power plant ash in India is a challenging task. The conventional mode of dilute phase ash slurry (10-20% solids by weight) transport through pipelines being practiced in majority of these plants not only consumes huge amount of precious water and pumping energy but also causes serious environmental problem at the disposal site. The present study investigates the rheological and leaching characteristics of an Indian ash samples at high solids concentrations (>50% by weight) using sodium silicate as an additive. The flow behaviour of ash slurry in the concentration range of 50-60% by weight is described by a Bingham-plastic model. It was indicated that the addition of sodium silicate (0.2-0.6% of the total solids) could able to reduce both the slurry viscosity and the yield stress. The analysis of the ash samples for the presence of heavy metals such as Fe, Cd, Ni, Pb, Zn, Cu, Co, As and Hg were carried out following Hansen and Fisher procedure. The addition of sodium silicate affected the leaching characteristics of the ash samples over a period of 300 days resulting in the reduction of leaching of heavy metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Geopolymers with a high percentage of bottom ash for solidification/immobilization of different toxic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca Santa, Rozineide A Antunes; Soares, Cíntia; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2016-11-15

    Geopolymers are produced using alkali-activated aluminosilicates, either as waste or natural material obtained from various sources. This study synthesized geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M) in a 2:1wt ratio to test the solidification/immobilization (S/I) properties of heavy metals in geopolymer matrices, since there is very little research using BA in this type of matrices. Therefore, a decision was made to use more than 65% of BA in geopolymer synthesis with and without the addition of heavy metals. The S/I tests with metals used 10, 15 and 30ml of a waste solution after pickling of printed circuit boards containing metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Sn, As and Ni, in different proportions. As alkali activator, the NaOH and KOH were used in the concentrations of 8 and 12M in the composition of Na2SiO3 in 1:2vol ratios. To test S/I efficiency, tests were conducted to obtain the leached and solubilized extract. The analysis was carried out through X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and compressive strength tests. The geopolymer showed a high degree of S/I of the metals; in some samples, the results reached nearly 100%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficiencies of metal separation and recovery in ash-melting of municipal solid waste under non-oxidative atmospheres with different reducing abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Tomikawa, Hiroki

    2016-01-15

    Ash-melting of municipal solid waste produces molten metal that contains Fe and Cu, and melting furnace fly ash (MFA) that contains Pb and Zn. To recover the metal from the fly ash, Pb and Zn are extracted from the ash by water or enriched in the ash by washing out salts; this separation depends on their leachability. In this study, we investigated the effects of the reducing ability of the atmosphere on the efficiencies of metal separation during melting and metal recovery in water treatment. Different feedstocks (incineration residues) were melted under N2 or CO + N2 atmospheres. In some of the feedstock materials, volatilization of metallic Cu into MFA was promoted under the atmosphere with greater reducing ability (CO + N2). This increased volatilization inhibited the metal separation in the ash-melting process. Moreover, the higher reducing ability inhibited the formation of water-soluble lead chlorides and decreased the efficiency of metal recovery from the MFA because of the water leaching of the lead compounds. The reducing ability of the atmosphere is difficult to control uniformly in actual ash-melting plants, and we investigated appropriate melting conditions under which the effect of the reducing ability was minimized to promote metal separation and recovery. This minimization was achieved by melting incineration fly ash without additives with Cl gas treatment at 1400 °C. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Utilisation of fly ash for the management of heavy metal containing primary chemical sludge generated in a leather manufacturing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekaran, G.; Rao, B.P.; Ghanamani, A.; Rajamani, S. [Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai (India). Dept. of Environmental Technology

    2003-07-01

    The present study aims at disposal of primary chemical sludge generated in the tanning industry by solidification and stabilization process using flyash generated from thermal power plant along with binders and also on evaluating the leachability of heavy metal from the solidified product. The primary chemical sludge containing heavy metals iron and chromium were obtained from a garment leather manufacturing company at Chennai in India. The sludge was dried in open environment and it was powdered to fine size in a grinder. Binding increases stabilization of heavy metal in calcined sludge with refractory binders such as clay, fly ash, lime and ordinary Portland cement. Fly ash can be considered as the additional binder for producing stronger bricks, with high metal fixation efficiency, and minimum rate of removal of heavy metal and minimum diffusion co-efficient. 15 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Correlation between organic acid exudation and metal uptake by ectomycorrhizal fungi grown on pond ash in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Prasun; Adholeya, Alok

    2009-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of coal ash on organic acid exudation and subsequent metal uptake by ectomycorrhizal fungi. Four isolates of ectomycorrhizal fungi namely, Pisolithus tinctorius (EM-1293 and EM-1299), Scleroderma verucosum (EM-1283) and Scleroderma cepa (EM-1233) were grown on pond ash moistened with Modified Melin-Norkans medium in vitro. Exudation of formic acid, malic acid and succinic acid by these fungi were detected by HPLC. Mycelial accumulation of Al, As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb by these fungi was assayed by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Relationship between organic acid exudation and metal uptake was determined using classical multivariate linear regression model. Correlation between organic acid exudation and metal uptake could be substantiated when several metals are considered collectively. The finding supports the widespread role of low molecular weight organic acid as a function of tolerance, when exposed to metals in vitro.

  14. Metal Matrix Microencapsulated Fuel Technology for LWR Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Bell, Gary L.; Kiggans, Jim; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the metal matrix microencapsulated (M3) fuel concept for the specific LWR application has been provided. Basic fuel properties and characteristics that aim to improve operational reliability, enlarge performance envelope, and enhance safety margins under design-basis accident scenarios are summarized. Fabrication of M3 rodlets with various coated fuel particles over a temperature range of 800-1300 C is discussed. Results from preliminary irradiation testing of LWR M3 rodlets with surrogate coated fuel particles are also reported.

  15. Metallic-glass-matrix composite structures with benchmark mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Joseph P.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Demetriou, Marios D.; Johnson, William L.

    2010-12-01

    Metallic-glass-matrix composites demonstrating unusual combination of high strength, high toughness, and excellent processability are utilized to fabricate cellular structures of egg-box topology. Under compressive loading, the egg-box panels are capable of undergoing extensive plastic collapse at very high plateau stresses enabling absorption of large amounts of mechanical energy. In terms of specific mechanical energy absorbed, the present panels far outperform panels of similar topology made of aluminum or fiber-reinforced polymer composites, and even surpass steel structures of highly buckling-resistant topologies, thus emerging among the highest performance structures of any kind.

  16. Influence of carbonation under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas on the leachability of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Peng; Xiong, Zhuo; Tian, Chong; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-09-01

    Due to the high cost of pure CO 2 , carbonation of MSWI fly ash has not been fully developed. It is essential to select a kind of reaction gas with rich CO 2 instead of pure CO 2 . The CO 2 uptake and leaching toxicity of heavy metals in three typical types of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash were investigated with simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas under different reaction temperatures, which was compared with both pure CO 2 and simulated air combustion flue gas. The CO 2 uptake under simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas were similar to that of pure CO 2 . The leaching concentration of heavy metals in all MSWI fly ash samples, especially in ash from Changzhou, China (CZ), decreased after carbonation. Specifically, the leached Pb concentration of the CZ MSWI fly ash decreased 92% under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas, 95% under pure CO 2 atmosphere and 84% under the air combustion flue gas. After carbonation, the leaching concentration of Pb was below the Chinese legal limit. The leaching concentration of Zn from CZ sample decreased 69% under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas, which of Cu, As, Cr and Hg decreased 25%, 33%, 11% and 21%, respectively. In the other two samples of Xuzhou, China (XZ) and Wuhan, China (WH), the leaching characteristics of heavy metals were similar to the CZ sample. The speciation of heavy metals was largely changed from the exchangeable to carbonated fraction because of the carbonation reaction under simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas. After carbonation reaction, most of heavy metals bound in carbonates became more stable and leached less. Therefore, oxy-fuel combustion flue gas could be a low-cost source for carbonation of MSWI fly ash. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Drilling of metal matrix composites: cutting forces and chip formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Songmene, V.; Balout, B.; Masounave, J.

    2002-01-01

    Particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs) are known for their low weight and their high wear resistance, but also for the difficulties encountered during their machining. New aluminium MMCs containing with both soft lubricating graphite particles and hard particles (silicon carbide or alumina) with improved machinability were developed. This study investigates the drilling of these composites as compared to non-reinforced aluminium. The microstructure of chip, the cutting forces, the shear angles and the friction at tool-chip interface are used to compare the machinability of these composites. It was found that, during drilling of this new family of composites, the feed rate, and the nature of reinforcing particles govern the cutting forces. The mathematical models established by previous researchers for predicting the cutting forces when drilling metals were validated for these composites. The reinforcing particles within the composite help for chip segmentation, making the composite more brittle and easy to shear during the cutting process. (author)

  18. Leachability of Heavy Metals from Lightweight Aggregates Made with Sewage Sludge and Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Wei

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight aggregate (LWA production with sewage sludge and municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI fly ash is an effective approach for waste disposal. This study investigated the stability of heavy metals in LWA made from sewage sludge and MSWI fly ash. Leaching tests were conducted to find out the effects of MSWI fly ash/sewage sludge (MSWI FA/SS ratio, sintering temperature and sintering time. It was found that with the increase of MSWI FA/SS ratio, leaching rates of all heavy metals firstly decreased and then increased, indicating the optimal ratio of MSWI fly ash/sewage sludge was 2:8. With the increase of sintering temperature and sintering time, the heavy metal solidifying efficiencies were strongly enhanced by crystallization and chemical incorporations within the aluminosilicate or silicate frameworks during the sintering process. However, taking cost-savings and lower energy consumption into account, 1100 °C and 8 min were selected as the optimal parameters for LWA sample- containing sludge production. Furthermore, heavy metal leaching concentrations under these optimal LWA production parameters were found to be in the range of China’s regulatory requirements. It is concluded that heavy metals can be properly stabilized in LWA samples containing sludge and cannot be easily released into the environment again to cause secondary pollution.

  19. Leachability of heavy metals from lightweight aggregates made with sewage sludge and municipal solid waste incineration fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Na

    2015-05-07

    Lightweight aggregate (LWA) production with sewage sludge and municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash is an effective approach for waste disposal. This study investigated the stability of heavy metals in LWA made from sewage sludge and MSWI fly ash. Leaching tests were conducted to find out the effects of MSWI fly ash/sewage sludge (MSWI FA/SS) ratio, sintering temperature and sintering time. It was found that with the increase of MSWI FA/SS ratio, leaching rates of all heavy metals firstly decreased and then increased, indicating the optimal ratio of MSWI fly ash/sewage sludge was 2:8. With the increase of sintering temperature and sintering time, the heavy metal solidifying efficiencies were strongly enhanced by crystallization and chemical incorporations within the aluminosilicate or silicate frameworks during the sintering process. However, taking cost-savings and lower energy consumption into account, 1100 °C and 8 min were selected as the optimal parameters for LWA sample- containing sludge production. Furthermore, heavy metal leaching concentrations under these optimal LWA production parameters were found to be in the range of China's regulatory requirements. It is concluded that heavy metals can be properly stabilized in LWA samples containing sludge and cannot be easily released into the environment again to cause secondary pollution.

  20. Leachability of Heavy Metals from Lightweight Aggregates Made with Sewage Sludge and Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Fly Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Na

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight aggregate (LWA) production with sewage sludge and municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash is an effective approach for waste disposal. This study investigated the stability of heavy metals in LWA made from sewage sludge and MSWI fly ash. Leaching tests were conducted to find out the effects of MSWI fly ash/sewage sludge (MSWI FA/SS) ratio, sintering temperature and sintering time. It was found that with the increase of MSWI FA/SS ratio, leaching rates of all heavy metals firstly decreased and then increased, indicating the optimal ratio of MSWI fly ash/sewage sludge was 2:8. With the increase of sintering temperature and sintering time, the heavy metal solidifying efficiencies were strongly enhanced by crystallization and chemical incorporations within the aluminosilicate or silicate frameworks during the sintering process. However, taking cost-savings and lower energy consumption into account, 1100 °C and 8 min were selected as the optimal parameters for LWA sample- containing sludge production. Furthermore, heavy metal leaching concentrations under these optimal LWA production parameters were found to be in the range of China’s regulatory requirements. It is concluded that heavy metals can be properly stabilized in LWA samples containing sludge and cannot be easily released into the environment again to cause secondary pollution. PMID:25961800

  1. Influence of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    DijuSamuel, G.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    This paper focus on impact of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite. For fabrication of metal matrix composite AA6061 is used as matrix and activated carbon is used as reinforcement and it is casted using modified stir casting technique. After casting metal matrix composite has undergone various microstructure tests like SEM,EDAX and XRD. FSW is carried out in this metal matrix composite by choosing various tool pin profile like square,round,Threaded round, hexagon and taper. The quality of welded plates is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength and hardness.

  2. Oral bioavailability of arsenic, antimony and a selection of metals in ashes; Oral biotillgaenglighet av arsenik, antimon och ett urval av metaller i askor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Christel; Bendz, David; Jones, Celia

    2008-06-15

    In an earlier study, financed by Varmeforsk, 'Q4-238 Environmental guidelines for reuse of ash in civil engineering applications', the total content of arsenic and lead was shown to determine whether or not reuse of some of the ashes in construction work is feasible. The model used to calculate the guidelines uses the total concentration of metals to evaluate the health risks resulting from exposure to the ashes. The use of total concentration can lead to overly conservative risk assessments if a significant fraction of the total metal content is not bioavailable. Better precision in the risk assessment can be given by the use of the bioavailable fraction of arsenic and lead in the model. As a result, ashes which are rejected on the basis of total metal concentration may be acceptable for use in engineering construction when the assessment is based on the bioavailable fraction. The purpose of the study was to (i) compile information on the oral bioavailability of arsenic, antimony and a selection of metals in ashes and similar materials, and on in vitro methods for determination of oral bioavailability, and (ii) experimentally estimate oral bioavailability of arsenic, antimony and some metals in a selection of ashes by analysis of the gastrointestinal bioaccessibility of these elements. The investigated elements were antimony, arsenic, lead, cadmium, copper, chromium, nickel and zinc. In the literature study performed within the project a number of static and dynamic in vitro methods simulating gastrointestinal processes of contaminants were compiled. The methods include one or several segments, i.e. mouth, stomach and intestine. Among the compiled methods, the RIVM (Rijksinstituut voor volksgesundheid en milieu) in vitro method was used in the experimental part of the project. The advantages with the method was that: the method to a high degree mimicked the human gastrointestinal processes (the method included three segments mouth, stomach, and intestine

  3. Biodiversity variability and metal accumulation strategies in plants spontaneously inhibiting fly ash lagoon, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Suchita; Rana, Vivek; Kumar, Adarsh; Maiti, Subodh Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Out of 29 plant species taken into consideration for biodiversity investigations, the present study screened out Cyperus rotundus L., Calotropis procera (Aiton) W.T. Aiton, Croton bonplandianus Baill., Eclipta prostrata (L.) L., and Vernonia cinerea (L.) Less. as the most suitable metal-tolerant plant species (high relative density and frequency) which can grow on metal-laden fly ash (FA) lagoon. Total (aqua-regia), residual (HNO 3 ) and plant available (CaCl 2 ) metal concentrations were assessed for the clean-up of metal-contaminated FA disposal site using naturally colonized plants. The total metal concentration (in mg kg -1 ) in FA followed an order of Mn (229.8) > Ni (228.4) > Zn (89.4) > Cr (61.2) > Pb (56.6) > Cu (51.5) > Co (41.9) > Cd (9.7). The HNO 3 - and CaCl 2 -extracted metals were 0.57-15.68% and 0.03-7.82% of the total metal concentration, respectively. The concentration of Ni and Cr in FA in the present study was highest among the previously studied Indian and average world power plants and Cd, Ni, and Cr were above soil toxicity limit. The variation in total, residual, and plant-available metal (single extraction) concentration indicated the presence of different proportions of metals in FA lagoon which affects the metal uptake potential of the vegetation growing on it. It has been reported that plant-available metal extractant (CaCl 2 ) is the most suitable extractant for assessment of metal transfer from soil to plant. However in the present study, Spearman's correlation showed best significant correlation between total metal concentration in FA and shoot metal concentration (r = 0.840; p metal, and in calculation of BCF for moderately contaminated site. It can be stated that plant-available extractant is not always suitable for understanding the availability of metal, but total metal concentration can provide a better insight especially for moderate or low metal-contaminated sites. Principle component analysis revealed that all

  4. Stabilisation of heavy metal containing dusts by reaction with phosphoric acid: study of the reactivity of fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bournonville, Blandine; Nzihou, Ange; Sharrock, Patrick; Depelsenaire, Guy

    2004-01-01

    Water-washed fly ash was reacted with phosphoric acid in order to transform available heavy metals into insoluble metal phosphate compounds. The temperature, pH and concentration of free phosphate were monitored during the first 80 min of reaction. Phosphoric acid reacted rapidly with second order kinetics and an apparent rate constant of 0.015 l/(mol s m 2 ). Analysis of the evolution of the concentrations of other major elements of fly ash shows that the reaction follows a dissolution-precipitation type mechanism. The solubility of trace heavy metals tends to increase at low pH values. Various heat and mass transfer coefficients are derived and help understand the phosphate stabilisation procedure and design industrial reactors for this purpose. Calcium phosphates are formed which can trap heavy metals in a stable apatite mineral structure

  5. Fly ash based geopolymer thin coatings on metal substrates and its thermal evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temuujin, Jadambaa; Minjigmaa, Amgalan; Rickard, William; Lee, Melissa; Williams, Iestyn; van Riessen, Arie

    2010-08-15

    Class F fly ash based Na-geopolymer formulations have been applied as fire resistant coatings on steel. The main variables for the coating formulations were Si: Al molar and water: cement weight ratios. We have determined that the adhesive strength of the coatings strongly depend on geopolymer composition. The ease with which geopolymer can be applied onto metal surfaces and the resultant thickness depend on the water content of the formulation. Adhesive strengths of greater than 3.5 MPa have been achieved on mild steel surfaces for compositions with Si:Al of 3.5. Microstructure evolution and thermal properties of the optimised coating formulations show that they have very promising fire resistant characteristics. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Extraction of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash with organic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gerven, T; Cooreman, H; Imbrechts, K; Hindrix, K; Vandecasteele, C

    2007-02-09

    Municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash often cannot be recycled as construction material in Flanders, because leaching of Cu exceeds the limit value of 0.5mg/kg. Leaching of other components such as Mo and Sb is critical as well, but limit values for these elements are to date only informal. A treatment technique was investigated to lower pollutant leaching: extraction with solutions of organic complexants to remove Cu. Six different solutions were used, of which washing with citric acid and ammonium citrate decreases Cu leaching to below the limit value. Extraction was then performed with different concentrations of ammonium citrate. Subsequent washing of the extracted material with distilled water appears to be vital to remove all residual ammonium citrate. Extraction with a 0.2M solution of ammonium citrate followed by three washing steps decreases metal leaching to below the limit values.

  7. Comparative leaching of six toxic metals from raw and chemically stabilized MSWI fly ash using citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huawei; Fan, Xinxiu; Wang, Ya-Nan; Li, Weihua; Sun, Yingjie; Zhan, Meili; Wu, Guizhi

    2018-02-15

    The leaching behavior of six typical toxic metals (Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Cu and Ni) from raw and chemically stabilized (phosphate and chelating agent) municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash were investigated using citric acid. Leaching tests indicated that phosphate stabilization can effectively decrease the leaching of Zn, Cd and Cr; whereas chelating agent stabilization shows a strong ability to lower the release of Pb, Cd and Cu, but instead increases the solubility of Zn and Cr at low pH conditions. Sequential extraction results suggested that the leaching of Pb, Zn and Cd in both the stabilized MSWI fly ash samples led to the decrease in Fe/Mn oxide fraction and the increase in exchangeable and carbonate fractions. The leaching of Cr was due to the decrease in exchangeable, carbonate and Fe/Mn oxide fractions in phosphate-stabilized and chelating agent-stabilized MSWI fly ash. The leaching of Cu in both stabilized MSWI fly ash was greatly ascribed to the decrease in Fe/Mn oxide and oxidisable fractions. Moreover, predicted curves by geochemical model indicated that both stabilized MSWI fly ash have the risk of releasing toxic metals under strong acid environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Accumulation of heavy metals by chickpea grown in fly Ash treated soil: effect on antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Vimal Chandra; Singh, Jay Shankar [Department of Environmental Science, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar (Central) University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh (India); Kumar, Akhilesh; Tewari, D.D. [Department of Botany, Maharani Lal Kunwari Post Graduate College, Balrampur, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2010-12-15

    Chickpea grown in fly ash (FA) treated soil (25, 50, and 100% FA) was used to evaluate the effect of FA on antioxidants, metal concentration (Fe, Zn, Cu, Cr, and Cd), photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a (chl-a), chlorophyll b (chl-b), total chlorophyll (total chl), and carotenoids), growth and yield performance. All antioxidants in roots, shoots and leaves of chickpea increase with increasing FA doses to combat FA stress. The activities of antioxidants were more in the root tissues to cope with stress induced in the plants as compared to shoot and leaf. Concentration of metals was found maximum in roots than the shoots and seeds. The highest concentration of Fe and lowest level of Cd were recorded in all treatments of FA for different parts of the plant. The treated crop showed reduced level of chlorophyll but enhanced level of carotenoids and protein. However, root length, number of nodules and biomass in 25 and 50% FA treatments did not differ significantly in comparison to respective control plants. These results suggest that heavy metals of FA causes oxidative stress in this crop and the antioxidant enzymes could help a pivotal role against oxidative injury. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. MODIFICATION OF KELUD VOLCANIC ASH 2014 AS SELECTIVE ADSORBENT MATERIAL FOR COPPER(II METAL ION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susila Kristianingrum

    2017-01-01

      This research aims to prepare an adsorbent from Kelud volcanic ash for better Cu(II adsorption efficiency than Kiesel gel 60G E'Merck. Adsorbent synthesis was done by dissolving 6 grams of volcanic ash activated 700oC 4 hours and washed with HCl 0.1 M into 200 ml of 3M sodium hydroxide with stirring and heating of 100 °C for 1 hour. The filtrate sodium silicate was then neutralized using sulfuric acid. The mixture was allowed to stand for 24 hours then filtered and washed with aquaDM, then dried and crushed. The procedure is repeated for nitric acid, acetic acid and formic acid with a contact time of 24 hours. The products were then characterized using FTIR and XRD, subsequently determined acidity, moisture content, and tested for its adsorption of the ion Cu (II with AAS. The results showed that the type of acid that produced highest rendemen is AK-H2SO4-3M ie 36.93%, acidity of the adsorbent silica gel synthesized similar to Kiesel gel 60G E'Merck ie adsorbent AK-CH3COOH-3M and the water content of the silica gel adsorbent synthesized similar to Kiesel gel 60G E'Merck ie adsorbent AK-H2SO4-2 M. The character of the functional groups of silica gel synthesized all have similarities with Kiesel gel 60G E'Merck as a comparison. Qualitative analysis by XRD for all modified adsorbent showed a dominant peak of SiO2 except adsorbent AK-H2SO4 amorphous and chemical bonds with FTIR indicates that it has formed a bond of Si-O-Si and Si-OH. The optimum adsorption efficiency of the metal ions Cu(II obtained from AK-H2SO4-5M adsorbent that is equal to 93.2617% and the optimum adsorption capacity of the Cu(II metal ions was obtained from the adsorbent AK-CH3COOH-3M is equal to 2.4919 mg/ g.   Keywords: adsorbents, silica gel, adsorption, kelud volcanic ash

  10. Solidification/stabilization of ASR fly ash using Thiomer material: Optimization of compressive strength and heavy metals leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jin Woong; Choi, Angelo Earvin Sy; Park, Hung Suck

    2017-12-01

    Optimization studies of a novel and eco-friendly construction material, Thiomer, was investigated in the solidification/stabilization of automobile shredded residue (ASR) fly ash. A D-optimal mixture design was used to evaluate and optimize maximum compressive strength and heavy metals leaching by varying Thiomer (20-40wt%), ASR fly ash (30-50wt%) and sand (20-40wt%). The analysis of variance was utilized to determine the level of significance of each process parameters and interactions. The microstructure of the solidified materials was taken from a field emission-scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy that confirmed successful Thiomer solidified ASR fly ash due to reduced pores and gaps in comparison with an untreated ASR fly ash. The X-ray diffraction detected the enclosed materials on the ASR fly ash primarily contained sulfur associated crystalline complexes. Results indicated the optimal conditions of 30wt% Thiomer, 30wt% ASR fly ash and 40wt% sand reached a compressive strength of 54.9MPa. For the optimum results in heavy metals leaching, 0.0078mg/LPb, 0.0260mg/L Cr, 0.0007mg/LCd, 0.0020mg/L Cu, 0.1027mg/L Fe, 0.0046mg/L Ni and 0.0920mg/L Zn were leached out, being environmentally safe due to being substantially lower than the Korean standard leaching requirements. The results also showed that Thiomer has superiority over the commonly used Portland cement asa binding material which confirmed its potential usage as an innovative approach to simultaneously synthesize durable concrete and satisfactorily pass strict environmental regulations by heavy metals leaching. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pemanfaatan limbah abu terbang (fly ash) , abu dasar (bottom ash) batubara dan limbah padat (sludge) industri karet sebagai bahan campuran pada pembuatan batako

    OpenAIRE

    Faisal, Hendri

    2012-01-01

    Brick-making research has been conducted from a mixture of fly ash as a cement mixed with aggregate materials based bottom ash and sludge, and sand, where fly ash and cement used as an adhesive matrix. The percentage addition of fly ash is 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% of initial weight of cement. The percentage addition of bottom ash and sludge as an aggregate is 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% of initial weight of sand with the time of hardening for 28 days. Parameter tests performed include: metals...

  12. Shear testing of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1989-01-01

    This paper outlines the elements of a combined experimental/analytical methodology for accurate shear characterization of unidirectional composites in the linear and nonlinear range, with particular attention devoted to metal matrix composites. It is illustrated that consistent results can be obtained for a large class of composites from two commonly employed shear test methods currently in use by composites researchers when the influence of various factors that affect the determination of the actual shear response is properly analyzed. These factors include the effects of material anisotropy, specimen geometry, manner of load introduction, and test fixture design on the stress and deformation fields in the test section of off-axis and Iosipescu specimens. Common errors associated with the measurement of deformation fields and calculation of stress fields are discussed and quantified. Particular problems in the determination of the shear response of unidirectional boron/aluminum using the Iosipescu test are illustrated and discussed.

  13. Leveraging metal matrix composites to reduce costs in space mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Ted; Claridge, Rex; Walker, Jim

    1994-01-01

    Advanced metal matrix composites may be one of the most promising technologies for reducing cost in structural components without compromise to strength or stiffness. A microlight 12.50 N (2.81 lb), two-axis, solar array drive assembly (SADA) was made for the Advanced Materials Applications to Space Structures (AMASS) Program flight experiment. The SADA had both its inner and outer axis housings fabricated from silicon carbide particulate reinforced alumimun. Two versions of the housings were made. The first was machined from a solid billet of material. The second was plaster cast to a near net shape that required minimal finish machining. Both manufacturing methods were compared upon completion. Results showed a cost savings with the cast housing was possible for quantities greater than one and probable for quantities greater than two. For quantities approaching ten, casting resulted in a reduction factor of almost three in the cost per part.

  14. Solid State Non-powder Process for Boron Nitride Nanotube Metal Matrix Composite, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) provide potential for advanced lightweight high stiffness structures that are critical for...

  15. Metal matrix composites for sustainable lotus-effect surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosonovsky, Michael; Hejazi, Vahid; Nyong, Aniedi E; Rohatgi, Pradeep K

    2011-12-06

    The lotus effect involving roughness-induced superhydrophobicity is a way to design nonwetting, self-cleaning, omniphobic, icephobic, and antifouling surfaces. However, such surfaces require micropatterning, which is extremely vulnerable to even small wear rates. This limits the applicability of the lotus effects to situations when wear is practically absent. To design sustainable superhydrophobic surfaces, we suggest using metal matrix composites (MMCs) with hydrophobic reinforcement in the bulk of the material, rather than only at its surface. Such surfaces, if properly designed, provide roughness and heterogeneity needed for superhydrophobicity. In addition, they are sustainable, since when the surface layer is deteriorated and removed due to wear, hydrophobic reinforcement and roughness remains. We present a model and experimental data on wetting of MMCs. We also conducted selected experiments with graphite-reinforced MMCs and showed that the contact angle can be determined from the model. In order to decouple the effects of reinforcement and roughness, the experiments were conducted for initially smooth and etched matrix and composite materials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Machinability study of Al-TiC metal matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa P. N.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites have emerged as an advanced class of structural materials have a combination of different, superior properties compared to an unreinforced matrix, which can result in a number of service benefits such as increased strength, higher elastic moduli, higher service temperature, low CTE, improved wear resistance, high toughness, etc. The excellent mechanical properties of these materials together with weight saving makes them very attractive for a variety of engineering applications in aerospace, automotive, electronic industries, etc. Hence, these materials provide as alternative substitutes for conventional engineering materials when specific mechanical properties necessary for required applications. In this work an attempt is made to study the machining parameters of Al6061/TiC MMC. The composite is developed by reinforcing TiC particles in varying proportions of 3, 6, 9 and 12 % weight fractions to the Al6061 matric alloy through stir casting technique. Cutting forces were measured by varying cutting speed and feed rate with constant depth of cut for different % weight fractions. The results showed that the cutting force increases with the increase of feed rate and decreases with the increase of cutting speed for all the weight fractions. Cutting parameters were optimized using Taguchi technique.

  17. Rice Husk Ash to Stabilize Heavy Metals Contained in Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Fly Ash: First Results by Applying New Pre-treatment Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Benassi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new technology was recently developed for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI fly ash stabilization, based on the employment of all waste and byproduct materials. In particular, the proposed method is based on the use of amorphous silica contained in rice husk ash (RHA, an agricultural byproduct material (COSMOS-RICE project. The obtained final inert can be applied in several applications to produce “green composites”. In this work, for the first time, a process for pre-treatment of rice husk, before its use in the stabilization of heavy metals, based on the employment of Instant Pressure Drop technology (DIC was tested. The aim of this work is to verify the influence of the pre-treatment on the efficiency on heavy metals stabilization in the COSMOS-RICE technology. DIC technique is based on a thermomechanical effect induced by an abrupt transition from high steam pressure to a vacuum, to produce changes in the material. Two different DIC pre-treatments were selected and thermal annealing at different temperatures were performed on rice husk. The resulting RHAs were employed to obtain COSMOS-RICE samples, and the stabilization procedure was tested on the MSWI fly ash. In the frame of this work, some thermal treatments were also realized in O2-limiting conditions, to test the effect of charcoal obtained from RHA on the stabilization procedure. The results of this work show that the application of DIC technology into existing treatment cycles of some waste materials should be investigated in more details to offer the possibility to stabilize and reuse waste.

  18. Rice Husk Ash to Stabilize Heavy Metals Contained in Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Fly Ash: First Results by Applying New Pre-treatment Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassi, Laura; Franchi, Federica; Catina, Daniele; Cioffi, Flavio; Rodella, Nicola; Borgese, Laura; Pasquali, Michela; Depero, Laura E.; Bontempi, Elza

    2015-01-01

    A new technology was recently developed for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash stabilization, based on the employment of all waste and byproduct materials. In particular, the proposed method is based on the use of amorphous silica contained in rice husk ash (RHA), an agricultural byproduct material (COSMOS-RICE project). The obtained final inert can be applied in several applications to produce “green composites”. In this work, for the first time, a process for pre-treatment of rice husk, before its use in the stabilization of heavy metals, based on the employment of Instant Pressure Drop technology (DIC) was tested. The aim of this work is to verify the influence of the pre-treatment on the efficiency on heavy metals stabilization in the COSMOS-RICE technology. DIC technique is based on a thermomechanical effect induced by an abrupt transition from high steam pressure to a vacuum, to produce changes in the material. Two different DIC pre-treatments were selected and thermal annealing at different temperatures were performed on rice husk. The resulting RHAs were employed to obtain COSMOS-RICE samples, and the stabilization procedure was tested on the MSWI fly ash. In the frame of this work, some thermal treatments were also realized in O2-limiting conditions, to test the effect of charcoal obtained from RHA on the stabilization procedure. The results of this work show that the application of DIC technology into existing treatment cycles of some waste materials should be investigated in more details to offer the possibility to stabilize and reuse waste. PMID:28793605

  19. Real-Time Investigation of Solidification of Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu

    1999-01-01

    Casting of metal matrix composites can develop imperfections either as non- uniform distributions of the reinforcement phases or as outright defects such as porosity. The solidification process itself initiates these problems. To identify or rectify the problems, one must be able to detect and to study how they form. Until, recently this was only possible by experiments that employed transparent metal model organic materials with glass beads to simulate the reinforcing phases. Recent results obtained from a Space Shuttle experiment (using transparent materials) will be used to illustrate the fundamental physics that dictates the final distribution of agglomerates in a casting. We have further extended this real time investigation to aluminum alloys using X-ray microscopy. A variety of interface-particle interactions will be discussed and how they alter the final properties of the composite. A demonstration of how a solid-liquid interface is distorted by nearby voids or particles, particle pushing or engulfment by the interface, formations of wormholes, Aggregation of particles, and particle-induced segregation of alloying elements will be presented.

  20. Production of lightweight aggregates from mining residues, heavy metal sludge, and incinerator fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, S.-C. [Department of Atomic Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, F.-C. [Research Center for Environmental Pollution Prevention and Control Technology, Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71 Chou-Shan Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: d90541003@ntu.edu.tw; Lo, S.-L. [Research Center for Environmental Pollution Prevention and Control Technology, Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71 Chou-Shan Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lee, M.-Y. [Department of Civil Engineering, National Central University, 300 Jhongda Road, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Wang, C.-F. [Department of Atomic Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, J.-D. [Department of Civil Engineering, National Central University, 300 Jhongda Road, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China)

    2007-06-01

    In this study, artificial lightweight aggregate (LWA) manufactured from recycled resources was investigated. Residues from mining, fly ash from an incinerator and heavy metal sludge from an electronic waste water plant were mixed into raw aggregate pellets and fed into a tunnel kiln to be sintered and finally cooled rapidly. Various feeding and sintering temperatures were employed to examine their impact on the extent of vitrification on the aggregate surface. Microstructural analysis and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) were also performed. The results show that the optimum condition of LWA fabrication is sintering at 1150 deg. C for 15 min with raw aggregate pellets fed at 750 deg. C. The rapidly vitrified surface envelops the gas produced with the increase in internal temperature and cooling by spraying water prevents the aggregates from binding together, thus forming LWA with specific gravity of 0.6. LWA produced by sintering in tunnel kiln shows good vitrified surface, low water absorption rate below 5%, and low cylindrical compressive strength of 4.3 MPa. In addition, only trace amounts of heavy metals were detected, making the LWA non-hazardous for construction use.

  1. Hydrogen gas generation from metal aluminum-water interaction in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithiya, Arumugam; Saffarzadeh, Amirhomayoun; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2018-03-01

    In the present research, municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash (BA) residues from three incinerators (N, K, and R) in Japan were collected for hydrogen gas generation purpose. The samples were split into four particle size fractions: (1) d≤0.6, (2) 0.6≤d≤1.0, (3) 1.0≤d≤2.0, and (4) 2.0≤d≤4.75mm for the characterization of metal aluminum, the relationship between the present metal aluminum and hydrogen gas production, and the influence of external metal aluminum on the enhancement of hydrogen gas. The batch experiments were performed for each BA fraction under agitated (200rpm) and non-agitated conditions at 40°C for 20days. The highest amount of hydrogen gas (cumulative) was collected under agitation condition that was 39.4, 10.0, and 8.4 L/kg of dry ash for N2, R2, and K2 (all fraction 2), respectively. To take the benefit of the BA high alkalinity (with initial pH over 12), 0.1 and 1g of household aluminum foil were added to the fractions 2 and 3. A Significantly larger amount of hydrogen gas was collected from each test. For 0.1g of aluminum foil, the cumulative amount of gas was in the range of 62 to 78 L/kg of dry ash and for 1g of aluminum foil the cumulative amount of hydrogen was in the range of 119-126 L/kg of dry ash. This indicated that the hydrogen gas yield was significantly a function of supplementary aluminum and the intrinsic alkaline environment of the BA residues rather than ash source or particle size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Behaviour of Stir-Cast Al-Mg-Sl Alloy Matrix Hybrid Composite Reinforced with Corn Cob Ash and Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwagbenga Babajide Fatile

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this present study, the microstructural and mechanical behaviour of Al-Mg-Si alloy matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC and Corn cob ash (An agro‑waste was investigated. This research work was aimed at assessing the suitability of developing low cost- high performance Al-Mg-Si hybrid composite. Silicon carbide (SiC particulates added with 0,1,2,3 and 4 wt% Corn cob ash (CCA were utilized to prepare 10 wt% of the reinforcing phase with Al-Mg-Si alloy as matrix using two-step stir casting method. Microstructural characterization, density measurement, estimated percent porosity, tensile testing, and micro‑hardness measurement were used to characterize the composites produced. From the results obtained, CCA has great potential to serve as a complementing reinforcement for the development of low cost‑high performance aluminum hybrid composites.

  3. Potential for leaching of heavy metals in open-burning bottom ash and soil from a non-engineered solid waste landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwenzi, Willis; Gora, Dorcas; Chaukura, Nhamo; Tauro, Tonny

    2016-03-01

    Bottom ash from open-burning of municipal waste practised in developing countries poses a risk of heavy metal leaching into groundwater. Compared to incineration ash, there is limited information on heavy metal leaching from open-burning ash and soil from non-engineered landfills. Batch and column experiments were conducted to address three specific objectives; (1) to determine aqua regia extractable concentrations of heavy metals in fresh ash, old ash and soil from beneath the landfill, (2) to determine the relationship between heavy metal leaching, initial and final pH of leaching solution, and aqua regia extractable concentrations, and (3) to determine the breakthrough curves of heavy metals in ashes and soil. Aqua regia extractable concentrations of Cd, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ni and Pb were significantly higher (p ashes than soil beneath landfill and uncontaminated soil (control). Increasing initial solution pH from 5 and 7 to 9 significantly reduced the mobility of Pb, Zn and Cu but not Cd whose mobility peaked at pH 7 and 9. Concentrations of desorbed heavy metals were not correlated with aqua regia extractable concentrations. Final pH of leachate rebounded to close to original pH of the material, suggesting a putative high buffering capacity for all materials. Both batch and column leaching showed that concentrations of leached heavy metals were disproportionately lower (ash and soil from the waste dump into groundwater was low. The high pH and the presence of Zn, Fe, Mn and Cu make ash an ideal low-cost liming material and source of micronutrients particularly on acidic soils prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrafine-grained Aluminm and Boron Carbide Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Rustin

    Cryomilling is a processing technique used to generate homogenously distributed boron carbide (B4C) particulate reinforcement within an ultrafine-grained aluminum matrix. The motivation behind characterizing a composite consisting of cryomilled aluminum B4C metal matrix composite is to design and develop a high-strength, lightweight aluminum composite for structural and high strain rate applications. Cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C powders were synthesized into bulk composite by various thermomechanical processing methods to form plate and extruded geometries. The effects of processing method on microstructure and mechanical behavior for the final consolidated composite were investigated. Cryomilling for extended periods of time in liquid nitrogen has shown to increase strength and thermal stability. The effects associated with cryomilling with stearic acid additions (as a process-control agent) on the degassing behavior of Al powders is investigated and results show that the liberation of compounds associated with stearic acid were suppressed in cryomilled Al powders. The effect of thermal expansion mismatch strain on strengthening due to geometrically necessary dislocations resulting from quenching is investigated and found not to occur in bulk cryomilled Al 5083 and B 4C composites. Previous cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C composites have exhibited ultrahigh strength associated with considerable strain-to-failure (>14 pct.) at high strain rates (>103/s) during mechanical testing, but only limited strain-to-failure (˜0.75 pct.) at quasi-static strain rates (10-3/s). The increased strain to failure at high strain rates is attributed to micro-flaw developments, including kinking, extensive axial splitting, and grain growth were observed after high strain rate deformation, and the significance of these mechanisms is considered.

  5. Metal matrix composites synthesis, wear characteristics, machinability study of MMC brake drum

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Nanjappan; Davim, J Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This book is dedicated to composite materials, presenting different synthesis processes, composite properties and their machining behaviour. The book describes also the problems on manufacturing of metal matrix composite components. Among others, it provides procedures for manufacturing of metal matrix composites and case studies.

  6. Removal of toxic and alkali/alkaline earth metals during co-thermal treatment of two types of MSWI fly ashes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Qiao, Yu; Jin, Limei; Ma, Chuan; Paterson, Nigel; Sun, Lushi

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to vaporize heavy metals and alkali/alkaline earth metals from two different types of fly ashes by thermal treatment method. Fly ash from a fluidized bed incinerator (HK fly ash) was mixed with one from a grate incinerator (HS fly ash) in various proportions and thermally treated under different temperatures. The melting of HS fly ash was avoided when treated with HK fly ash. Alkali/alkaline earth metals in HS fly ash served as Cl-donors to promote the vaporization of heavy metals during thermal treatment. With temperature increasing from 800 to 900°C, significant amounts of Cl, Na and K were vaporized. Up to 1000°C in air, less than 3% of Cl and Na and less than 5% of K were retained in ash. Under all conditions, Cd can be vaporized effectively. The vaporization of Pb was mildly improved when treated with HS fly ash, while the effect became less pronounced above 900°C. Alkali/alkaline earth metals can promote Cu vaporization by forming copper chlorides. Comparatively, Zn vaporization was low and only slightly improved by HS fly ash. The low vaporization of Zn could be caused by the formation of Zn2SiO4, ZnFe2O4 and ZnAl2O4. Under all conditions, less than 20% of Cr was vaporized. In a reductive atmosphere, the vaporization of Cd and Pb were as high as that in oxidative atmosphere. However, the vaporization of Zn was accelerated and that of Cu was hindered because the formation of Zn2SiO4, ZnFe2O4 and ZnAl2O4 and copper chloride was depressed in reductive atmosphere. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Coal Ash Aerosol in East Asian Outflow as a Source for Oceanic Deposition of Iron and Other Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. R.; Hua, X.

    2008-12-01

    While ocean deposition of East Asian dust is given significant emphasis as a source of biologically-active trace elements, iron in particular, dust events are episodic and highly seasonal. There is, however, a constant source of aerosol that is chemically similar to dust (albeit amorphous in structure rather than crystalline) in the ash particles emitted from many hundreds of coal-fired power plants that are sited along the entire coastal region of China and Korea. The emission controls on these facilities vary widely and, in even cases of state-of-the-art emission controls, the secondary release of ash can be significant. There are of course even more small industrial and household sources of coal combustion emissions, in most cases with little or no emissions controls. Ash from a modern coal-fired power facility in Korea has been examined chemically and morphologically with electron microscopic techniques. As is characteristic of all such facilities, two principal types of ash are present: (1) flyash, silicate glass spheres that are emitted with the smoke and removed by electrostatic precipitators; and (2) bottom ash, "clinkers" and noncombustible material sticking to the furnace walls that are mixed with water and ground after cooling, then removed as a slurry to a dumping area. In addition, iron sulfide (pyrite) is a common constituent of coal and provides both a source of sulfur dioxide gas and also molten iron spherical particles in the ash. The iron spheres then are rapidly oxidized upon cooling. Bottom ash is a more complex material than flyash in that it contains more iron and other trace metals, plus it contains varying amounts of uncombusted carbon. The post-combustion handling of bottom ash can lead to significant emissions despite the fact that little or none goes out the stack. The iron oxide spheres can also be emitted by this secondary method. The concentrations of ash can be very high in close proximity to power plants (PM10 of several hundred

  8. Recent history of sediment metal contamination in Lake Macquarie, Australia, and an assessment of ash handling procedure effectiveness in mitigating metal contamination from coal-fired power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Larissa, E-mail: Larissa.Schneider@canberra.edu.au [Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Maher, William [Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Potts, Jaimie [New South Wales Office of Environmental and Heritage, Lidcombe, NSW, 2141 Australia (Australia); Gruber, Bernd [Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Batley, Graeme [CSIRO Land and Water, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Taylor, Anne [Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Chariton, Anthony [CSIRO Land and Water, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Krikowa, Frank [Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Zawadzki, Atun; Heijnis, Henk [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2014-08-15

    This study assessed historical changes in metal concentrations in sediments of southern Lake Macquarie resulting from the activities of coal-fired power stations, using a multi-proxy approach which combines {sup 210}Pb, {sup 137}Cs and metal concentrations in sediment cores. Metal concentrations in the lake were on average, Zn: 67 mg/kg, Cu: 15 mg/kg, As: 8 mg/kg, Se: 2 mg/kg, Cd: 1.5 mg/kg, Pb: 8 mg/kg with a maximum of Zn: 280 mg/kg, Cu: 80 mg/kg, As: 21 mg/kg, Se: 5 mg/kg, Cd: 4 mg/kg, Pb: 48 mg/kg. The ratios of measured concentrations in sediment cores to their sediment guidelines were Cd 1.8, As 1.0, Cu 0.5, Pb 0.2 and Zn 0.2, with the highest concern being for cadmium. Of special interest was assessment of the effects of changes in ash handling procedures by the Vales Point power station on the metal concentrations in the sediments. Comparing sediment layers before and after ash handling procedures were implemented, zinc concentrations have decreased 10%, arsenic 37%, selenium 20%, cadmium 38% and lead 14%. An analysis of contaminant depth profiles showed that, after implementation of new ash handling procedures in 1995, selenium and cadmium, the main contaminants in Australian black coal had decreased significantly in this estuary. - Highlights: • The main sources of metals to Southern Lake Macquarie are coal-fired power stations. • The metal of highest concern in this estuary is cadmium. • Arsenic was mobile in sediments. • Selenium and cadmium decreased in sediments following new ash handling procedures.

  9. Cellular Mutagenicity and Heavy Metal Concentrations of Leachates Extracted from the Fly and Bottom Ash Derived from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Wen; Liu, Zhen-Shu; Wun, Min-Jie; Kuo, Tai-Chen

    2016-11-02

    Two incinerators in Taiwan have recently attempted to reuse the fly and bottom ash that they produce, but the mutagenicity of these types of ash has not yet been assessed. Therefore, we evaluated the mutagenicity of the ash with the Ames mutagenicity assay using the TA98, TA100, and TA1535 bacterial strains. We obtained three leachates from three leachants of varying pH values using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test recommended by the Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency (Taiwan EPA). We then performed the Ames assay on the harvested leachates. To evaluate the possible relationship between the presence of heavy metals and mutagenicity, the concentrations of five heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in the leachates were also determined. The concentrations of Cd and Cr in the most acidic leachate from the precipitator fly ash and the Cd concentration in the most acidic leachate from the boiler fly ash exceeded the recommended limits. Notably, none of the nine leachates extracted from the boiler, precipitator, or bottom ashes displayed mutagenic activity. This data partially affirms the safety of the fly and bottom ash produced by certain incinerators. Therefore, the biotoxicity of leachates from recycled ash should be routinely monitored before reusing the ash.

  10. Cellular Mutagenicity and Heavy Metal Concentrations of Leachates Extracted from the Fly and Bottom Ash Derived from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Wen Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Two incinerators in Taiwan have recently attempted to reuse the fly and bottom ash that they produce, but the mutagenicity of these types of ash has not yet been assessed. Therefore, we evaluated the mutagenicity of the ash with the Ames mutagenicity assay using the TA98, TA100, and TA1535 bacterial strains. We obtained three leachates from three leachants of varying pH values using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test recommended by the Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency (Taiwan EPA. We then performed the Ames assay on the harvested leachates. To evaluate the possible relationship between the presence of heavy metals and mutagenicity, the concentrations of five heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the leachates were also determined. The concentrations of Cd and Cr in the most acidic leachate from the precipitator fly ash and the Cd concentration in the most acidic leachate from the boiler fly ash exceeded the recommended limits. Notably, none of the nine leachates extracted from the boiler, precipitator, or bottom ashes displayed mutagenic activity. This data partially affirms the safety of the fly and bottom ash produced by certain incinerators. Therefore, the biotoxicity of leachates from recycled ash should be routinely monitored before reusing the ash.

  11. Cellular Mutagenicity and Heavy Metal Concentrations of Leachates Extracted from the Fly and Bottom Ash Derived from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Wen; Liu, Zhen-Shu; Wun, Min-Jie; Kuo, Tai-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Two incinerators in Taiwan have recently attempted to reuse the fly and bottom ash that they produce, but the mutagenicity of these types of ash has not yet been assessed. Therefore, we evaluated the mutagenicity of the ash with the Ames mutagenicity assay using the TA98, TA100, and TA1535 bacterial strains. We obtained three leachates from three leachants of varying pH values using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test recommended by the Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency (Taiwan EPA). We then performed the Ames assay on the harvested leachates. To evaluate the possible relationship between the presence of heavy metals and mutagenicity, the concentrations of five heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in the leachates were also determined. The concentrations of Cd and Cr in the most acidic leachate from the precipitator fly ash and the Cd concentration in the most acidic leachate from the boiler fly ash exceeded the recommended limits. Notably, none of the nine leachates extracted from the boiler, precipitator, or bottom ashes displayed mutagenic activity. This data partially affirms the safety of the fly and bottom ash produced by certain incinerators. Therefore, the biotoxicity of leachates from recycled ash should be routinely monitored before reusing the ash. PMID:27827867

  12. Trophic structure and metal bioaccumulation differences in multiple fish species exposed to coal ash-associated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otter, Ryan [Middle Tennessee State University; Bailey, Frank [Middle Tennessee State University; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    On December 22, 2008 a dike containing coal fly ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant near Kingston Tennessee USA failed and resulted in the largest coal ash spill in U.S. history. Coal ash, the by-product of coal combustion, is known to contain multiple contaminants of concern, including arsenic and selenium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioaccumulation of arsenic and selenium and to identify possible differences in trophic dynamics in feral fish at various sites in the vicinity of the Kingston coal ash spill. Elevated levels of arsenic and selenium were observed in various tissues of largemouth bass, white crappie, bluegill and redear sunfish from sites associated with the Kingston coal ash spill. Highest concentrations of selenium were found in redear sunfish with liver concentrations as high as 24.83 mg/kg dry weight and ovary concentrations up to 10.40 mg/kg dry weight at coal ash-associated sites. To help explain the elevated selenium levels observed in redear sunfish, investigations into the gut pH and trophic dynamics of redear sunfish and bluegill were conducted which demonstrated a large difference in the gut physiology between these two species. Redear sunfish stomach and intestinal pH was found to be 1.1 and 0.16 pH units higher than in bluegill, respectively. In addition, fish from coal ash-associated sites showed enrichment of 15N & 13C compared to no ash sites, indicating differences in food web dynamics between sites. These results imply the incorporation of coal ash-associated compounds into local food webs and/or a shift in diet at ash sites compared to the no ash reference sites. Based on these results, further investigation into a broader food web at ash-associated sites is warranted.

  13. Trace metal concentrations in sediments and fish in the vicinity of ash lagoon discharges from coal-combustion plants in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Benoit A; Ernst, William; Comeau, Fernand

    2011-10-01

    Metals that originate from coal-combustion residue (ash) deposited in water-filled lagoons are eventually released into the environment. This study measured metal concentrations in sediment and fish obtained in the vicinity of two coal-combustion ash-lagoon outfalls on the East River (Nova Scotia) and Grand Lake (New Brunswick), Canada. Of the 34 metals analysed, this study demonstrated that sediment in the immediate vicinity of the ash lagoon discharge in New Brunswick had statistically significant greater concentrations of thallium, arsenic, and antimony than did the sediment obtained from background areas. Tissue arsenic concentrations were increased in fish obtained near the lagoon discharge in New Brunswick but not statistically greater than that of fish obtained from background areas. Neither sediment nor fish obtained near the ash-lagoon discharge in Nova Scotia had significantly greater concentrations of any of the metals measured. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  14. Uptake of heavy metals in berries and edible fungi, and changes in the floral composition after treatment with ashes on forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruehling, Aa.

    1996-01-01

    Effects of treatment with ash on fungi and vascular plants, and on metal contents in berries and edible fungi, were studied in pine, spruce and birch forest stands in southern Sweden. Different types of ashes were studied. The changes to the vascular flora and the fungal flora that are today taking place in southern Sweden, and probably influenced by soil acidification and nitrogen deposition, are characterised by an impoverishment of mycorrhiza-forming species and thus cannot be corrected by supply of wood ashes. Instead, supply of at least raw ashes appears to hasten the process towards a nitrogen-favoured flora. It is known that raw ashes can cause nitrate-formation whereas granulated ashes have hardly increased the pH or lead to the formation of nitrate in any field experiment. The study has now been completed and has thus largely provided answers to the questions posed: Spreading of ashes does not lead to a general increase in the uptake of heavy metals in fungi and berries. The risk that berries and fungi will contain increased contents of heavy metals during the first season after spreading is small. The studies do not suggest that raw ashes can offer a short-term answer to counteracting the changes that are taking place to the composition of the fungal flora, probably as a result of soil acidification, or as a means of recreating conditions suitable for species requiring more alkaline conditions. 7 refs, 32 tabs

  15. Characterization of Toxic Metals in Tobacco, Tobacco Smoke, and Cigarette Ash from Selected Imported and Local Brands in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Ajab, Huma; Yaqub, Asim; Malik, Salman Akbar; Junaid, Muhammad; Yasmeen, Sadia; Abdullah, Mohd Azmuddin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, concentrations of Cd, Ni, Pb, and Cr were determined in tobacco, tobacco smoke-condensate, and cigarette ash for selected brands used in Pakistan. Smoking apparatus was designed for metal extraction from cigarette smoke. Samples were digested through microwave digester and then analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (FAAS). Higher concentration of Ni was detected in imported brands than the counterparts in the local brands. Pb levels were however higher in local ...

  16. Milling of Nanoparticles Reinforced Al-Based Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alokesh Pramanik

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the face milling of nanoparticles reinforced Al-based metal matrix composites (nano-MMCs using a single insert milling tool. The effects of feed and speed on machined surfaces in terms of surface roughness, surface profile, surface appearance, chip surface, chip ratio, machining forces, and force signals were analyzed. It was found that surface roughness of machined surfaces increased with the increase of feed up to the speed of 60 mm/min. However, at the higher speed (100–140 mm/min, the variation of surface roughness was minor with the increase of feed. The machined surfaces contained the marks of cutting tools, lobes of material flow in layers, pits and craters. The chip ratio increased with the increase of feed at all speeds. The top chip surfaces were full of wrinkles in all cases, though the bottom surfaces carried the evidence of friction, adhesion, and deformed material layers. The effect of feed on machining forces was evident at all speeds. The machining speed was found not to affect machining forces noticeably at a lower feed, but those decreased with the increase of speed for the high feed scenario.

  17. Comparative analysis of dry ashing and wet digestion methods for the determination of trace and heavy metals in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyele, I O; Shokunbi, O S

    2015-04-15

    This study compared the dry ashing and wet digestion methods of processing food samples for elemental analysis. The concentrations of trace elements (manganese, iron, copper and zinc) and heavy metals (chromium, cadmium, lead and nickel) were determined in varieties of samples classified as fruits, leafy and fruity vegetables, tubers, legumes and cereals, obtained from Abeokuta, South-West, Nigeria. The metal concentrations were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometer according to standard methods. The accuracy of the procedures was confirmed by spiking some samples and evaluating their recoveries. The metal levels evaluated were relatively higher in the dry-ashed samples than the wet-digested samples. However, the results showed non-significant differences in most data obtained after processing with the two methods. The dry ashing method is recommended for digestion of food items in these categories because: it involves lesser amount of chemical reagents and related hazards; it requires simple equipment and achieved better recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased bioavailability of metals in two contrasting agricultural soils treated with waste wood-derived biochar and ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchini, P; Quilliam, R S; Deluca, T H; Vamerali, T; Jones, D L

    2014-03-01

    Recycled waste wood is being increasingly used for energy production; however, organic and metal contaminants in by-products produced from the combustion/pyrolysis residue may pose a significant environmental risk if they are disposed of to land. Here we conducted a study to evaluate if highly polluted biochar (from pyrolysis) and ash (from incineration) derived from Cu-based preservative-treated wood led to different metal (e.g., Cu, As, Ni, Cd, Pb, and Zn) bioavailability and accumulation in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). In a pot experiment, biochar at a common rate of 2 % w/w, corresponding to ∼50 t ha(-1), and an equivalent pre-combustion dose of wood ash (0.2 % w/w) were added to a Eutric Cambisol (pH 6.02) and a Haplic Podzol (pH 4.95), respectively. Both amendments initially raised soil pH, although this effect was relatively short-term, with pH returning close to the unamended control within about 7 weeks. The addition of both amendments resulted in an exceedance of soil Cu statutory limit, together with a significant increase of Cu and plant nutrient (e.g., K) bioavailability. The metal-sorbing capacity of the biochar, and the temporary increase in soil pH caused by adding the ash and biochar were insufficient to offset the amount of free metal released into solution. Sunflower plants were negatively affected by the addition of metal-treated wood-derived biochar and led to elevated concentration of metals in plant tissue, and reduced above- and below-ground biomass, while sunflower did not grow at all in the Haplic Podzol. Biochar and ash derived from wood treated with Cu-based preservatives can lead to extremely high Cu concentrations in soil and negatively affect plant growth. Identifying sources of contaminated wood in waste stream feedstocks is crucial before large-scale application of biochar or wood ash to soil is considered.

  19. Surface modification by metal ion implantation forming metallic nanoparticles in an insulating matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, M.C.; Teixeira, F.S.; Sgubin, L.G.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I.G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Metal nanoparticles can be produced through metallic ion implantation in insulating substrate, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. • The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile, that can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN. • Nanocomposites, obtained by this way, can be produced in different insulator materials. More specifically we have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. • The nanocomposites were characterized by measuring the resistivity of the composite layer as function of the dose implanted, reaching the percolation threshold. • Excellent agreement was found between the experimental results and the predictions of the theory. - Abstract: There is special interest in the incorporation of metallic nanoparticles in a surrounding dielectric matrix for obtaining composites with desirable characteristics such as for surface plasmon resonance, which can be used in photonics and sensing, and controlled surface electrical conductivity. We have investigated nanocomposites produced by metal ion implantation into insulating substrates, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile (projected range), which can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN code. TRIDYN is a Monte Carlo simulation program based on the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter) code that takes into account compositional changes in the substrate due to two factors: previously implanted dopant atoms, and sputtering of the substrate surface. Our study show that the nanoparticles form a bidimentional array buried a few nanometers below the substrate surface. We have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted samples show that metallic nanoparticles form in

  20. Heavy metal content in ash of energy crops growing in sewage-contaminated natural wetlands: Potential applications in agriculture and forestry?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonanno, Giuseppe, E-mail: bonanno.giuseppe@unict.it [Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences, University of Catania, Via Longo 19, 95125, Catania (Italy); Cirelli, Giuseppe Luigi; Toscano, Attilio [Department of Agri-Food and Environmental Systems Management, University of Catania, Via Santa Sofia 100, 95123, Catania (Italy); Giudice, Rosa Lo; Pavone, Pietro [Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences, University of Catania, Via Longo 19, 95125, Catania (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    One of the greatest current challenges is to find cost-effective and eco-friendly solutions to the ever increasing needs of modern society. Some plant species are suitable for a multitude of biotechnological applications such as bioenergy production and phytoremediation. A sustainable practice is to use energy crops to clean up polluted lands or to treat wastewater in constructed wetlands without claiming further arable land for biofuel production. However, the disposal of combustion by-products may add significant costs to the whole process, especially when it deals with toxic waste. This study aimed to investigate the possibility of recycling ash from energy biomass as a fertilizer for agriculture and forestry. In particular, the concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn were analyzed in the plant tissues and corresponding ash of the grasses Phragmites australis and Arundo donax, collected in an urban stream affected by domestic sewage. Results showed that the metal concentration in ash is 1.5–3 times as high as the values in plant tissues. However, metal enriched ash showed much lower element concentrations than the legal limits for ash reutilization in agriculture and forestry. This study found that biomass ash from constructed wetlands may be considered as a potential fertilizer rather than hazardous waste. Energy from biomass can be a really sustainable and clean option not only through the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, but also through ash recycling for beneficial purposes, thus minimizing the negative impacts of disposal. - Highlights: • Metal content in ash reflects the element concentrations in Phragmites australis and Arundo donax. • Metal enriched ash of both species may be recycled as fertilizers in agriculture and forestry. • Constructed wetlands may produce a large amount of plant ash-based fertilizers from P. australis and A. donax.

  1. Heavy metal content in ash of energy crops growing in sewage-contaminated natural wetlands: Potential applications in agriculture and forestry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanno, Giuseppe; Cirelli, Giuseppe Luigi; Toscano, Attilio; Giudice, Rosa Lo; Pavone, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest current challenges is to find cost-effective and eco-friendly solutions to the ever increasing needs of modern society. Some plant species are suitable for a multitude of biotechnological applications such as bioenergy production and phytoremediation. A sustainable practice is to use energy crops to clean up polluted lands or to treat wastewater in constructed wetlands without claiming further arable land for biofuel production. However, the disposal of combustion by-products may add significant costs to the whole process, especially when it deals with toxic waste. This study aimed to investigate the possibility of recycling ash from energy biomass as a fertilizer for agriculture and forestry. In particular, the concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn were analyzed in the plant tissues and corresponding ash of the grasses Phragmites australis and Arundo donax, collected in an urban stream affected by domestic sewage. Results showed that the metal concentration in ash is 1.5–3 times as high as the values in plant tissues. However, metal enriched ash showed much lower element concentrations than the legal limits for ash reutilization in agriculture and forestry. This study found that biomass ash from constructed wetlands may be considered as a potential fertilizer rather than hazardous waste. Energy from biomass can be a really sustainable and clean option not only through the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, but also through ash recycling for beneficial purposes, thus minimizing the negative impacts of disposal. - Highlights: • Metal content in ash reflects the element concentrations in Phragmites australis and Arundo donax. • Metal enriched ash of both species may be recycled as fertilizers in agriculture and forestry. • Constructed wetlands may produce a large amount of plant ash-based fertilizers from P. australis and A. donax

  2. Mechanism on heavy metals vaporization from municipal solid waste fly ash by MgCl₂⋅6H₂O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Sun, Lushi; Ma, Chuan; Qiao, Yu; Xiang, Jun; Hu, Song; Yao, Hong

    2016-03-01

    This work aims to study the mechanism of heavy metals vaporization by MgCl2⋅6H2O. Firstly, the decomposition mechanism of MgCl2⋅6H2O was investigated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, XRD and TG. Upon heating, MgCl2⋅6H2O went through the processes of dehydration and hydrolysis simultaneously accompanied by the release of HCl between 150 and 500°C. At temperature higher than 500°C, Mg(OH)Cl gradually release part of HCl. MgCl2⋅6H2O followed the similar processes of decomposition at both oxidative and reductive atmospheres. In oxidative atmosphere, vaporization of Zn and Cu was significantly accelerated by MgCl2⋅6H2O. However, in inert atmosphere, vaporization of Cu was not promoted since copper chloride was only stable in oxidative atmosphere. Under slow heating condition, vaporization of heavy metals were close to that under fast heating condition. This may be partially attributed to that most heavy metals already reacted with HCl forming metal chlorides below 500°C, which can be vaporized at higher temperature. Moreover, the Mg(OH)Cl contributed to release HCl up to 800°C. At such high temperature, the metal chlorides continue to be formed and then vaporized. After treatment, the leaching concentration of heavy metals from treated fly ashes were much lower than that from raw fly ash and met the regulatory limit of leachate. Since a large amount of MgSiO3 were formed during thermal treatment, the fly ash treated with MgCl2⋅6H2O can be used as raw materials for glass-ceramics production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. On matrix stabilisation of d- and f-transition metal ions in unstable oxidation states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselev, Yurii M [Department of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-31

    The state-of-the-art in matrix stabilisation of d- and f-transition metal ions in unstable oxidation states is analysed. Main aspects of this problem concerning the genealogy of appropriate matrix systems are classified. Relevant examples are given and the data that contradict the scheme proposed are discussed. The thermodynamics of the matrix stabilisation effect is considered using the concept of isomorphic miscibility. The influence of defects and non-equilibrium on the matrix stabilisation effect is discussed. The problem of identification of the oxidation states in matrix systems is examined and various types of matrix systems are considered.

  4. On matrix stabilisation of d- and f-transition metal ions in unstable oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, Yurii M

    2009-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in matrix stabilisation of d- and f-transition metal ions in unstable oxidation states is analysed. Main aspects of this problem concerning the genealogy of appropriate matrix systems are classified. Relevant examples are given and the data that contradict the scheme proposed are discussed. The thermodynamics of the matrix stabilisation effect is considered using the concept of isomorphic miscibility. The influence of defects and non-equilibrium on the matrix stabilisation effect is discussed. The problem of identification of the oxidation states in matrix systems is examined and various types of matrix systems are considered.

  5. Study of the leaching of heavy metals from waste water sludge and incinerator's ash, using coupled thermostated columns and DTPA as complex agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vite T, J.; Vite T, M.; Guerrero D, J.; Carreno de Leon, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the metallic composition from waste water sludge and incinerators ashes of an incinerator located in Toluca, Mexico, the qualitative studies were made using the Activation Analysis technique, and fluorescence X-ray techniques. The quantitative analysis of heavy metals in the wastes were made using Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (Icp-Aes). For leaching the samples, we used four coupled thermostated columns, each one had a p H of 2,5, 7 and 10. The flux of the air was of 1600 cc/min. The temperature was maintain constant in 60 Centigrade using a thermostated system. For this study we used 100 g of wastes mixed with mineral acid or sodium hydroxide to reach p H 2,5,7 and 10. We added a reducing and tensoactive agents and finally DTPA as complex agent. With this method, we obtain a better leaching efficiency using a complex agent. However the high DTPA cost, make this process expansive that is why we recommend to work with another classes of complex agents, that be cheaper to leach metals of different chemistry matrix. (Author)

  6. Chemical speciation, mobility and phyto-accessibility of heavy metals in fly ash and slag from combustion of pelletized municipal sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhihua; Yuan, Xingzhong; Li, Hui; Jiang, Longbo; Leng, Lijian; Chen, Xiaohong; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Fei; Cao, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Combustion of pelletized municipal sewage sludge (MSS) can generate pestilent byproducts: fly ash and slag. Comparisons of heavy metal sequential extraction results among MSS, fly ash and slag showed that after combustion, the bioavailable heavy metal fractions (acid soluble/exchangeable, reducible and oxidizable fractions) were mostly transformed into the very stable heavy metal fractions (residual fractions). On the other hand, the results of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid and HCl extraction (phyto-accessibility assessment) demonstrated that the mobility and toxicity of heavy metals were greatly reduced. The direct and long-term bioavailability and eco-toxicity of heavy metals in fly ash and slag were relieved, which implied that combustion of pelletized MSS could be a promising and completely safe disposal technology for MSS treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of the sites of heavy metals with nanoscale carbon in a Kentucky electrostatic precipitator fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hower, James C; Graham, Uschi M; Dozier, Alan; Tseng, Michael T; Khatri, Rajesh A

    2008-11-15

    A combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HRTEM-STEM-EELS) was used to study fly ashes produced from the combustion of an eastern Kentucky coal at a southeastern-Kentucky wall-fired pulverized coal utility boiler. Fly ash was collected from individual hoppers in each row of the electrostatic precipitators (ESP) pollution-control system, with multiple hoppers sampled within each of the three rows. Temperatures within the ESP array range from about 200 degrees C at the entry to the first row to < 150 degrees C at the exit of the third row. HRTEM-STEM-EELS study demonstrated the presence of nanoscale (10 s nm) C agglomerates with typical soot-like appearance and others with graphitic fullerene-like nanocarbon structures. The minute carbon agglomerates are typically juxtaposed and intergrown with slightly larger aluminosilicate spheres and often form an ultrathin halo or deposit on the fly ash particles. The STEM-EELS analyses revealed that the nanocarbon agglomerates host even finer (< 3 nm) metal and metal oxide particles. Elemental analysis indicated an association of Hg with the nanocarbon. Arsenic, Se, Pb, Co, and traces of Ti and Ba are often associated with Fe-rich particles within the nanocarbon deposits.

  8. Experimental study on mechanical behavior of fiber/matrix interface in metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Chiang, F.P.

    1994-01-01

    The technique SIEM(Speckle Interferometry with Electron Microscopy) was employed to quantitatively measure the deformation on the fiber/matrix interface in SCS-6/Ti-6-4 composite at a microscale level. The displacement field within the fiber/matrix interphase zone was determined by in-situ observation with sensitivity of 0.003(microm). The macro-mechanical properties were compared with micro-mechanical behavior. It is shown that the strength in the interphase zone is weaker than the matrix tensile strength. The deformation process can be characterized by the uniform deformation, interface strain concentration and debond, and matrix plastic deformation

  9. Vermicomposting of Tea Factory Coal Ash: metal accumulation and metallothionein response in Eisenia fetida (Savigny) and Lampito mauritii (Kinberg).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, L; Sarkar, S; Mukherjee, S; Das, S; Barman, S; Raul, P; Bhattacharyya, P; Mandal, N C; Bhattacharya, S; Bhattacharya, S S

    2014-08-01

    Earthworms can accumulate heavy metals in their intestines to a great extent. Impact of feed materials and duration of metal exposure on natural activity of earthworms are rather unclear; this investigation therefore addresses the impact of metal rich Tea Factory Coal Ash (TFCA) on reproduction, composting and metal accumulation ability of Eisenia fetida and Lampito mauritii. Earthworm count and cocoon production increased significantly during vermicomposting. pH of the vermicomposted mixtures shifted toward neutrality, total organic C decreased substantially and total N enhanced significantly compared to composting. High heavy metal (Mn, Zn, Cu, As) accumulation was recorded in the intestine of both the earthworm species. Moreover, gradual increase in the metal-inducible metallothionein concentration indicated the causal mechanism of metal accumulation in these species. TFCA+cow dung (CD) (1:1) were most favorable feed mixture for E. fetida and TFCA+CD (1:2) were good for L. mauritii in regard to metal accumulation and compost quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A macro-micromechanics analysis of a notched metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    Macro- and micromechanics analysis were conducted to determine the matrix and fiber behaviors near the notch in a center-notched metal-matrix composite. In this approach, the macrolevel analysis models the entire notched specimen using a 3D finite element program that uses the vanishing-fiber-diameter model to simulate the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix and the elastic behavior of the fiber. The microlevel behavior is analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model containing one fiber and the surrounding matrix. The viability of this analysis is demonstrated using results for a boron/aluminum monolayer.

  11. Metal extraction from alum shale ashes under the effect of ammonium sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maremaee, E.; Taal, H.

    1991-01-01

    The present study is a part of complex research about alum shale ashes carried out in the Institute of Chemistry of the Estonian Academy of Sciences during the period 1960-1975. In this paper the results of a research into decomposition of alum shale ashes under the effect of ammonium sulphate are presented. The following parameters of decomposition process were studied: temperature, time, quantity of ammonium sulphate needed for decomposition of ashes, In addition the effect of ammonium sulphate on the process of alum shale ashes thermal decomposition was studied using thermal methods. The optimum conditions determined for decomposition of ashes with ammonium sulphate were the following: temperature - 440 degrees by Celsius, duration -30 min., weight ratio of ammonium sulphate and ashes in reaction mixture -1.75 : 1. These data are confirmed by the results of thermal analysis. The above-mentioned process conditions guarantee the extraction of Ti, Mo, V, U and Fe about 70-85%, Al - up to 50%. 7 refs., 2 figs

  12. High-Temperature Fatigue of a Hybrid Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. T.; Sanders, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    An aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) brake drum was tested in fatigue at room temperature and extreme service temperatures. At room temperature, the hybrid composite did not fail and exceeded estimated vehicle service times. At higher temperatures (62 and 73 pct of the matrix eutectic), fatigue of a hybrid particle/fiber MMC exhibited failure consistent with matrix overloading. Overaging of the A356 matrix coupled with progressive fracture of the SiC particles combined to create the matrix overload condition. No evidence of macro-fatigue crack initiation or growth was observed, and the matrix-particle interface appeared strong with no debonding, visible matrix phases, or porosity. An effective medium model was constructed to test the hypothesis that matrix overloading was the probable failure mode. The measured particle fracture rate was fit using realistic values of the SiC Weibull strength and modulus, which in turn predicted cycles to failure within the range observed in fatigue testing.

  13. Wear behaviour of Zr-based in situ bulk metallic glass matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    based bulk metallic glass (BMG) and its in situ BMG matrix composites with diameter of 3 mm were fabricated by conventional Cu-mould casting method and ... The composites showed lower friction coefficient and wear rate than the pure BMG.

  14. Metal Matrix Composites: Fatigue and Fracture Testing. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and results of testing metal matrix composites for fatigue and fracture. Methods include non-destructive testing techniques, and static and cyclic techniques for assessing compression, tensile, bending, and impact characteristics.

  15. The Effect of Nodular Cast Iron Metal Matrix on the Wear Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    G. Gumienny

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies on the effect of the nodular cast iron metal matrix composition on the abrasive and adhesive wear resistance. Nodular cast iron with different metal matrix obtained in the rough state and ADI were tested. To research of abrasive and adhesive wear the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides and without this component were chosen. The influence of the carbides amount for cast iron wear resistance was examined. It was found, that the highest abrasive ...

  16. Hardfacing of aluminium alloys by means of metal matrix composites produced by laser surface alloying

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pityana, SL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available consisted of the hard particles uniformly distributed in the host metal matrix. A strong bond between the particles and matrix was formed in the modified layer. A Rofin Nd: YAG laser was used for injecting the ceramic powder into the substrate...

  17. Low temperature setting iron phosphate ceramics as a stabilization and solidification agent for incinerator ash contaminated with transuranic and RCRA metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, P.G.; Hansen, M.; Wood, E.L.; Frank, S.M.; Sidwell, R.W.; Giglio, J.J.; Johnson, S.G.; Macheret, J.

    1997-01-01

    Incineration of combustible Mixed Transuranic Waste yields an ash residue that contains oxides of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and transuranic metals. In order to dispose of this ash safely, it has to be solidified and stabilized to satisfy appropriate requirements for repository disposal. This paper describes a new method for solidification of incinerator ash, using room temperature setting iron phosphate ceramics, and includes fabrication procedures for these waste forms as well as results of the MCC-1 static leach test, XRD analysis, scanning electron microscopy studies and density measurements of the solidified waste form produced

  18. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J.K. Jr.; Gensse, C.

    1993-09-14

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials. 8 figures.

  19. Sewage sludge ash to phosphate fertilizer by chlorination and thermal treatment: residence time requirements for heavy metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Benedikt; Wegerer, Harald; Aschenbrenner, Philipp; Rechberger, Helmut; Winter, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metal removal from sewage sludge ash can be performed by mixing the ash with environmentally compatible chlorides (e.g. CaCl2 or MgCl2) and water, pelletizing the mixture and treating the pellets in a rotary reactor at about 1000 degrees C. Thermogravimetry-mass spectroscopy, muffle oven tests (500-1150 degrees C) and investigations in a laboratory-scale rotary reactor (950-1050 degrees C, residence time 1-25 min) were carried out. In the rotary reactor, up to 97% of Cu, 95% Pb and 95% Zn can be removed at 1050 degrees C. As Cl release starts from 400 degrees C (obtained from thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry experiments), heavy metals are already removed partially within the heating period. This heavy metal removal can be described as being similar to a first-order rate law. To meet the limit values specified in the Austrian and German fertilizer ordinances, residence times of the order of minutes are sufficient at 950 degrees C.

  20. Characterization of toxic metals in tobacco, tobacco smoke, and cigarette ash from selected imported and local brands in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajab, Huma; Yaqub, Asim; Malik, Salman Akbar; Junaid, Muhammad; Yasmeen, Sadia; Abdullah, Mohd Azmuddin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, concentrations of Cd, Ni, Pb, and Cr were determined in tobacco, tobacco smoke-condensate, and cigarette ash for selected brands used in Pakistan. Smoking apparatus was designed for metal extraction from cigarette smoke. Samples were digested through microwave digester and then analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (FAAS). Higher concentration of Ni was detected in imported brands than the counterparts in the local brands. Pb levels were however higher in local brands while significant concentration of Cd was observed in both brands. For Cr, the level in tobacco of local brands was higher than their emitted smoke, whereas imported brands showed higher level in smoke than in tobacco. The cigarette ash retained 65 to 75% of the metal and about 25 to 30% went into the body. While this study revealed the serious requirement to standardize the manufacturing of tobacco products, more importantly is the urgent need for stronger enforcements to put in place to alert the general population about the hazardous effects of cigarettes and the health risks associated with these toxic metals.

  1. Characterization of Toxic Metals in Tobacco, Tobacco Smoke, and Cigarette Ash from Selected Imported and Local Brands in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Ajab

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, concentrations of Cd, Ni, Pb, and Cr were determined in tobacco, tobacco smoke-condensate, and cigarette ash for selected brands used in Pakistan. Smoking apparatus was designed for metal extraction from cigarette smoke. Samples were digested through microwave digester and then analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (FAAS. Higher concentration of Ni was detected in imported brands than the counterparts in the local brands. Pb levels were however higher in local brands while significant concentration of Cd was observed in both brands. For Cr, the level in tobacco of local brands was higher than their emitted smoke, whereas imported brands showed higher level in smoke than in tobacco. The cigarette ash retained 65 to 75% of the metal and about 25 to 30% went into the body. While this study revealed the serious requirement to standardize the manufacturing of tobacco products, more importantly is the urgent need for stronger enforcements to put in place to alert the general population about the hazardous effects of cigarettes and the health risks associated with these toxic metals.

  2. Microstructure characterization of laser-deposited titanium carbide and zirconium-based titanium metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ochonogor, OF

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available . In this work, the technique is used to fabricate metal matrix composites (MMCs) by using an elementally blended feedstock combining metal and ceramic powders in the melt pool, which melt and solidify to create the required morphology. Ti6Al4V + TiC MMCs were...

  3. Weld microstructure in cast AlSi9/SiC(p metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wysocki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Welded joint in cast AlSi9/SiC/20(p metal matrix composite by manual TIG arc welding using AlMg5 filler metal has been described inhis paper. Cooling curves have been stated, and the influence in distribution of reinforced particles on crystallization and weldmicrostructure. Welded joint mechanical properties have been determined: hardness and tensile.

  4. The tensile failure modes of metal-matrix composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M. A.; Wills, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The strengths of individual boron fibers extracted from various as-received and thermally fatigued aluminum alloy matrix materials were measured. The results are described in terms of a Weibull distribution, and strengths of composites fabricated from these fibers are calculated in terms of lower and upper bounds. Tests conducted on composite specimens indicated that strengths approaching the upper bounds can be achieved in composites fabricated by normal diffusion bonding techniques. Cyclic temperature changes effectively reduced the strength values toward the lower bounds. It was concluded that this effect resulted from the degradation of the strength of the fiber-matrix bond.

  5. Study of the rice husk ash utilization as filler polypropylene matrix and ionization radiation effect on this composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro, Eduardo de Faria

    2010-01-01

    In the first step of this work, it was evaluated the possibility of using rice husk ash as a filler in polypropylene (PP) making a comparison with talc which is the most used mineral filler in polymers. This comparison was made by using polypropylene with 20% rice husk ash as well as polypropylene with 20% talc measuring their properties. Despite the properties of the PP with 20% rice husk ash decreased compared with the composite of polypropylene with 20% talc it can be said that the rice husk ash can be used as filler for or other utilization less noble of PP . This way it is being given a destination for this residue that it is disposable in the environment contributing to its preservation, moreover reducing the product cost. This work had also as an aim to study the ionizing radiation effect in the properties of these composites. It was used the coupling agent, maleic anhydride , to verify a best sample homogenization. According to the results it can be said that PP is a semicrystalline polymer, and so it has its morphology modified when exposed to the irradiation process. This fact is due to the scission mechanisms of the polymeric chains which it is in compliance to the literature. (author)

  6. Characterization of Al-Cu alloy reinforced fly ash metal matrix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The liquid metallurgy squeeze casting technique has characteristics such as fine microstructure as a result of rapid cooling, low porosity and good bonding between the particles and base alloy. In this study, the effect of hardness, tensile, compression and impact properties as well as density have been investigated.

  7. Immobilization of heavy metals in polluted soils by the addition of zeolitic material synthesized from coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Moreno, N.; Alvarez-Ayuso, E.; Garcia-Sanchez, A.; Cama, J.; Ayora, C.; Simon, M. [CSIC, Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-01-01

    The use of zeolitic material synthesized from coal fly ash for the immobilization of pollutants in contaminated soils was investigated in experimental plots in the Guadiamar Valley (SW Spain). This area was affected by a pyrite slurry spill in April 1998. Although reclamation activities were completed in a few months, residual pyrite slurry mixed with soil accounted for relatively high leachable levels of trace elements such as Zn, Pb, As, Cu, Sb, Co, Tl and Cd. Phytoremediation strategies were adopted for the final recovery of the polluted soils. The immobilization of metals had previously been undertaken to avoid leaching processes and the consequent groundwater pollution. To this end, 1100 kg of high NaPl (Na{sub 6}(AlO{sub 2}){sub 6}(SiO{sub 2}){sub 10}{center_dot} 15H{sub 2}O) zeolitic material was synthesized using fly ash from the Teruel power plant (NE Spain), in a 10 m{sup 3} reactor. This zeolitic material was manually applied using different doses (10000-25000 kg per hectare), into the 25 cm topsoil. Another plot (control) was maintained without zeolite. Sampling was carried out 1 and 2 years after the zeolite addition. The results show that the zeolitic material considerably decreases the leaching of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, and Zn. The sorption of metals in soil clay minerals (illite) proved to be the main cause contributing to the immobilization of these pollutants. This sorption could be a consequence of the rise in pH from 3.3 to 7.6 owing to the alkalinity of the zeolitic material added (caused by traces of free lime in the fly ash, or residual NaOH from synthesis).

  8. Carbon speciation in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash in relation to facilitated metal leaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomeren, van A.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2009-01-01

    The release of inorganic and organic contaminants from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash is controlled to a large extent by the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and in particular by the reactive humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) subfractions of DOC. The properties of

  9. Carbon speciation in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash in relation to facilitated metal leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomeren, André van; Comans, Rob N J

    2009-07-01

    The release of inorganic and organic contaminants from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash is controlled to a large extent by the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and in particular by the reactive humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) subfractions of DOC. The properties of organic matter contributing to the release of DOC, HA and FA are, therefore, important for environmental risk assessment. In this study we have quantitatively measured the carbon speciation, and its relation with the leaching of Cu, in three fresh and carbonated MSWI bottom ash samples. Results show that up to only 25% of loss on ignition (LOI) consists of organic carbon (OC), while about 17% of OC in the three samples consists of HA and FA. Up to 50% of DOC in MSWI bottom ash leachates was identified as fulvic acid (FA). This value is substantially higher than previously estimated for these MSWI bottom ash samples and is consistent with the higher recovery of the new method that was applied. The results of this study imply that methods focusing on specific carbon fractions are more appropriate for assessment of environmentally relevant organic carbon species than the measurement of LOI.

  10. The Effect of Applied Organic Fertilizers on the Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Lolium Perenne, Cultivated on Fly Ash Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaranda Mâşu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to monitor the capacity of certain organic fertilizers (volcanic tuff and municipal sludge, applied as such and mixed with volcanic rocks with a high content in clinoptilolite, to determine the covering with vegetation of fly ash deposits resulted from the combustion of lignite in thermal plants. Both biosolids (20 t/ha and volcanic rock with high clinoptilolite content (5 t/ha determined the installation of a vegetative layer and diminished the soil metal bioavailability to the Lolium prerenne plant biomass. When using the organic-zeolite mixture, a synergistic effect is recorded of the two components of the treatment agent and an increase of the biomass with 448%. Moreover, the resulted biomass shows the highest reductions of metal bioaccumulations, of 38-46% for Zn and Fe, of 62% for Cu and between 82-89% for Cr, Ni and Pb.

  11. Effect of salinity on the precipitation of dissolved metals in the wastewater that produced during fly ash disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lina; Yang, Yanling; Tian, Junguo; Li, Yaojian; Li, Jun; Yan, Shengjun

    2018-02-01

    In this study, a salinity wastewater was produced during the fly ash treatment in the waste incineration plant. Chemical precipitation method was applied for heavy metals removal in the salinity wastewater. The effect of salinity on the removal of dissolved heavy metal ions (Zn2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, Ni2+ and Cd2+) was studied, especially on the removal of Pb2+ and Cd2+. Because of the formation of [PbCl3]- and [PbCl4]2- complexes, the residual concentration of dissolved Pb2+ increased from 0.02 mg/L to 4.08 mg/L, as the NaCl concentration increased from 0 % to 10 %. And the residual concentration of dissolved Cd2+ increased from 0.02 mg/L to 1.39 mg/L, due to the formation of [CdCl3]-, [CdCl4]2- and [CdCl6]4- complexes.

  12. Corrosion Characterization Of ZA-27 Red Mud Metal Matrix Composites In Sodium Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakash

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aims to evaluate the corrosion characteristics of red mud metal in sodium chloride solution. Metal matrix composites MMC are heterogeneous systems containing matrix and reinforcement. Matrix may be alloy or metal or polymer. Reinforcement may be particulate or fiber or whisker. Their physical and mechanical properties can be tailored according to requirement. They are used in automobile aircraft and marine industries because of their increased corrosion resistance. In this study weight loss corrosion tests and Potestiodynamic polarization studies by using potestiostat are conducted on ZA-27 Red Mud metal matrix composites in different concentrated sodium chloride solutions. Both matrix and reinforcements are commercially available. Composites are prepared by liquid melt metallurgy technique using vortex method. Composites containing 2 4 and 6 percent of preheated but uncoated red mud are prepared. Cylindrical specimens and rectangular specimens are machined. Studies are carried out in 0.035 0.352 and 3.5 solutions of sodium chloride. In all the tests the composites were less prone to corrosion than the matrix. Hence the composites can be used in the marine environment.

  13. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  14. Investigations on LM6 Metal Matrix Composite with borosilicate Glass Reinforcement for Aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnaraj, J. David; Sathish, S.

    2017-10-01

    The recycling of glass wastes from the industries and society holds a threat to the environment and leads to the need for new applications. While producing a metal matrix composite production cost is an important factor which decides the suitable application. So, while developing a new material with this low - cost has great importance in this competitive world. In this study, an metal-matrix composite fabricated from an aluminum alloy (LM6) and Borosilicate glass powder particles with % addition of 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10% were produced by liquid Processing (stir casting) technique. The variations in the mechanical properties like toughness, compressive strength, hardness, and tensile were examined. The microstructures of the fabricated metal matrix composite have been obtained by using Metallographic microscope. The addition of the borosilicate glass indicated an improved behavior in the hardness and toughness properties. The Rockwell hardness value of fabricated metal matrix composite increases with the increase in % of reinforcement. The compressive and tensile strength of the fabricated MMC increases until reinforcement reaches a maximum of 7.5%. The microstructure of the fabricated MMC shows that the reinforcements were homogeneously distributed in the fabricated metal matrix composite.

  15. The effect of palm kernel shell ash on the mechanical properties of as-cast aluminium alloy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isiaka Oluwole OLADELE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the effect of palm kernel shell ash (PKSA as reinforcement on the mechanical properties of As-cast aluminium alloy. Recycled aluminium alloy from cylinder of an automotive engine block was degreased by using premium motor spirit (PMS also known as petrol, washed thoroughly with soap and water and sun dried for 5 days. The palm kernel shell was screened of dirt and other unwanted foreign materials before being roasted in furnace. The ash was further pulverized by laboratory ball mill machine followed by sieving to obtain particle sizes of 106 µm and divided into two parts. One portion was treated with NaOH solution while the other part was left as untreated before they are used to reinforced molten aluminium alloy in predetermined proportions. The newly developed composites were characterized with respect to their mechanical properties in response to the tests that were carried out on them. The results indicate that palm kernel shell ash can be used as potential reinforcing material for automobile applications.

  16. Mass-balance estimation of heavy metals and selected anions at a landfill receiving MSWI bottom ash and mixed construction wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oygard, Joar Karsten; Gjengedal, Elin; Måge, Amund

    2005-08-31

    An estimation of the heavy metal and anion mass-balance was made for municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash deposited at a construction and industrial waste landfill. The mass-balance was found by comparing the content of metals and anions in the landfill leachate to the metal and anion content in the deposited bottom ash. The discharge of heavy metals ranged from 0.001% for Pb to 0.55% for Cr, which is approximately at the same level as in regular municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. Landfilled organic material and silicates from construction waste might have contributed to the retention of metals. Chloride, and to a lesser extent sulphate, appeared to be readily released from the landfill. It was estimated that a mass corresponding to 80% of the Cl- and 18% of the SO(4)2- in the bottom ash was discharged annually. Low retention, especially of chloride, may lead to a rapid decline in the discharge of this ion in the future when the landfilling of bottom ash is discontinued.

  17. A planar model study of creep in metal matrix composites with misaligned short fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, N.J.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of fibre misalignment on the creep behaviour of metal matrix composites is modelled, including hardening behaviour (stage 1), dynamic recovery and steady state creep (stage 2) of the matrix material, using an internal variable constitutive model for the creep behaviour of the metal...... matrix. Numerical plane strain results in terms of average properties and detailed local deformation behaviour up to large strains are needed to show effects of fibre misalignment on the development of inelastic strains and the resulting over-all creep resistance of the material. The creep resistance...... for the composite is markedly reduced by the fibre misalignment and the time needed to reach an approximate steady state is elongated due to the strain induced rotation of the short fibres in the matrix....

  18. A Novel Route for Development of Bulk Al/SiC Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payodhar Padhi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of nano particles, even in quantities as small as 2 weight percent can enhance the hardness or yield strength by a factor as high as 2. There are several methods for the production of metal matrix nanocomposites including mechanical alloying, vertex process, and spray deposition and so forth. However, the above processes are expensive. Solidification processing is a relatively cheaper route. During solidification processing, nano particulates tend to agglomerate as a result of van der Waals forces and thus proper dispersion of the nano particulate in metal matrix is a challenge. In the present study a noncontact method, where the ultrasonic probe is not in direct contact with the liquid metal, was attempted to disperse nanosized SiC particulates in aluminum matrix. In this method, the mold was subjected to ultrasonic vibration. Hardness measurements and microstructural studies using HRTEM were carried out on samples taken from different locations of the nanocomposite ingot cast by this method.

  19. THERMOPLASTIC MATRIX SELECTION FOR FIBRE METAL LAMINATE USING FUZZY VIKOR AND ENTROPY MEASURE FOR OBJECTIVE WEIGHTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. ISHAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to define the suitable thermoplastic matrix for fibre metal laminate for automotive front hood utilisation. To achieve the accurate and reliable results, the decision making process involved subjective and objective weighting where the combination of Fuzzy VIKOR and entropy method have been applied. Fuzzy VIKOR is used for ranking purpose and entropy method is used to determine the objective weighting. The result shows that polypropylene is the best thermoplastic matrix for fibre metal laminate by satisfying two compromise solutions with validation using least VIKOR index value scored 0.00, compared to low density polyethylene, high density polyethylene and polystyrene. Through a combination of Fuzzy VIKOR and entropy, it is proved that this method gives a higher degree of confidence to the decision maker especially for fibre metal laminate thermoplastic matrix selection due to its systematic and scientific selection method involving MCDM.

  20. Leaching Behavior of Selected Trace and Toxic Metals in Coal Fly Ash Samples Collected from Two Thermal Power Plants, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, P; Sahu, S K; Kothai, P; Pandit, G G

    2016-09-01

    Studies on leaching behavior of metals associated with coal fly ash (FA) are of great concern because of possible contamination of the aquatic environment. In the present study, leaching behavior of metals (As, Se, Cr, Pb, V, Zn, etc.) in two different FA samples (FA1 and FA2) was investigated at various pH (2-12), temperatures of leachate solution and using TCLP. At pH 2, the highest leaching was observed for Fe (21.6 and 32.8 µg/g), whereas at pH 12, Arsenic was found to have the highest leaching (1.5 and 2.4 µg/g) in FA1 and FA2. Leachate solution temperature showed a positive effect on the metal's leachability. In TCLP, most of the metal's leachability was observed to be higher than that of batch leaching tests. The present study suggests that, leaching of As and Se from FA samples can moderately affect ground/surface water quality at the study locations.

  1. Metals accumulations during thermal processing of sewage sludge - characterization of bottom ash and air pollution control (APC) residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasina, Monika; Kowalski, Piotr R.; Michalik, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Due to increasing mass of sewage sludge, problems in its management have appeared. Over years sewage sludge was landfilled, however due to EU directives concerning environmental issues this option is no longer possible. This type of material is considered hazardous due to highly concentrated metals and harmful elements, toxic organic substances and biological components (e.g. parasites, microbes). Currently in Europe, incineration is considered to be the most reasonable method for sewage sludge treatment. As a result of sludge incineration significant amount of energy is recovered due to high calorific value of sewage sludge but bottom ash and APC residues are being produced. In this study we show the preliminary results of chemical and mineral analyses of both bottom ash and APC residues produced in fluidized bed boiler in sewage sludge incineration plant in Poland, with a special emphasis on metals which, as a part of incombustible fraction can accumulate in the residual materials after thermal processing. The bottom ash was a SiO2-P2O5-Fe2O3-CaO-Al2O3 dominated material. Main mineral phases identified in X-ray diffraction patterns were: quartz, feldspar, hematite, and phosphates (apatite and scholzite). The bottom ash was characterized by high content of Zn - 4472 mg kg-1, Cu - 665.5 mg kg-1, Pb - 138 mg kg-1, Ni - 119.5 mg kg-1, and interestingly high content of Au - 0.858 mg kg-1 The APC residues composition was dominated by soluble phases which represent more than 90% of the material. The XRD patterns indicated thenardite, halite, anhydrite, calcite and apatite as main mineral phases. The removal of soluble phases by dissolution in deionised water caused a significant mass reduction (ca. 3% of material remained on the filters). Calcite, apatite and quartz were main identified phases. The content of metals in insoluble material is relatively high: Zn - 6326 mg kg-1, Pb - 514.3 mg kg-1, Cu - 476.6 mg kg-1, Ni - 43.3 mg kg-1. The content of Cd, As, Se and Hg was

  2. Mechanochemical process to recover heavy metals from industrial ash; Procedimenti meccanochimici per l'estrazione di metalli pesanti da ceneri industriali

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Barbera, A.; Bimbi, C.; De Francesco, M.; Padella, F. [ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Ranaldi, E. [ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1999-07-01

    An innovative mechanochemical process has been conceived to recover heavy metals from industrial ashes. The low environmental impact process is based on the transformation of heavy metals oxides into soluble salts. In particular high energy ball milling has been successfully applied on real samples from iron electrometallurgy. Heavy metals extractions higher than the ones resulting from the typical acid attack were obtained. [Italian] A partire da simulazioni termidinamiche, e' stato ideato un innovativo processo meccanochimico a basso impatto ambientale per il recupero di metalli pesanti da ceneri pericolose di origine industriale. Il processo, che prevede la conversione in fasi solubili di metalli pesanti presenti nelle ceneri sotto forma di ossidi misti insolubili, e' stato sperimentato con successo sia su campioni di laboratorio che su campioni reali. In particolare la macinazione ad alta energia e' stata applicata a campioni di cenere provenienti da elettrometallurgia del ferro, con un elevato contenuto di zinco, ottenendo risultati migliori di quelli ottenibili da un tradizionale attacco acido.

  3. Seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures and process for their manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A metallic outer sleeve is provided which is capable of enveloping a hollow metallic inner member having continuous reinforcing fibers attached to the distal end thereof. The inner member is then introduced into outer sleeve until inner member is completely enveloped by outer sleeve. A liquid matrix member is then injected into space between inner member and outer sleeve. A pressurized heat transfer medium is flowed through the inside of inner member, thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. The novelty of this invention resides in the development of a efficient method of producing seamless metal clad fiber reinforced organic matrix composite structures.

  4. On low cycle fatigue in metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Ø; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    A numerical cell model analysis is used to study the development of fatigue damage in aluminium reinforced by aligned, short SiC fibres. The material is subjected to cyclic loading with either stress control or strain control, and the matrix material is represented by a cyclic plasticity model......, in which continuum damage mechanics is incorporated to model fatigue damage evolution. This material model uses a superposition of kinematic and isotropic hardening, and is able to account for the Bauschinger effect as well as ratchetting, mean stress relaxation, and cyclic hardening or softening. The cell...... model represents a material with transversely staggered fibres. With focus on low cyclic fatigue, the effect of different fibre aspect ratios, different triaxial stress states, and balanced as well as unbalanced cyclic loading is studied....

  5. Study of the Analytical Conditions for the Determination of Cadmium in Coal Fly Ashes by GFAAS with evaluation of several matrix modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucandio, M.I.; Petit, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    A new method for the determination of cadmium in coal fly ash samples by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (GFAAS) has been developed. Analytical conditions and different instrumental parameters have been optimized. In a first step, several types of matrix modifiers have been tested and a mixture of 2% NH 4 H 2 PO 4 with 0.4%Mg(NO 3 ) 2 in 0.5N HNO 3 has been selected, since it provides the highest sensitivity. In a second step, an optimization of several conditions, using the selected modifier, has been carried out, such as ashing and atomization temperatures, heating rate, etc. The influence of the use of a L' vov platform on the analytical and background signals has been studied, showing a significative decrease on the background signal, being the net absorbance similar to those obtained in absence of the platform. Using the optimal conditions, the direct method with standard samples provides cadmium concentration consistent with those obtained using the standard addition method. (Author) 18 refs

  6. Synthesis and characterization of copper–alumina metal matrix composite by conventional and spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, K.; Ray, B.C.; Chaira, D.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The evolution of microstructure, density and hardness of Cu–Al 2 O 3 metal matrix composites with different techniques of sintering has been demonstrated here. The effect of sintering atmosphere has also been discussed. Synthesis of microcomposites was carried out by reinforcing 5, 10 and 15 vol.% of alumina powder particle (average size ∼5.71 μm) in copper matrix via conventional sintering using H 2 and N 2 atmospheres. Nanocomposites of 1, 5, 7 vol.% alumina (average size 2 O 3 metal matrix microcomposites and nanocomposites via conventional route and spark plasma sintering routes are studied and compared. Maximum Vickers hardness of 60 and 80 are obtained when the Cu–15 vol.% Al 2 O 3 is conventionally sintered in N 2 and H 2 atmosphere respectively. However, maximum hardness value of 125 is achieved for the Cu–5 vol.% Al 2 O 3 nanocomposite prepared by spark plasma sintering. It has been observed that Cu–Al 2 O 3 metal matrix composite (MMC) shows poor mechanical properties when it is conventionally sintered in N 2 atmosphere than H 2 atmosphere. Highlights: ► Better matrix–reinforcement interfacial bonding and compatibility in hydrogen atmosphere than nitrogen atmosphere. ► An improvement in density and hardness under hydrogen atmosphere than in nitrogen atmosphere is manifested. ► Spark plasma sintering method results in higher density and hardness values than conventional sintering. - Abstract: The evolution of microstructure, density and hardness of Cu–Al 2 O 3 metal matrix composites with different techniques of sintering have been demonstrated here. The effect of sintering atmosphere on the interfacial compatibility of matrix and reinforcement has also been discussed. Synthesis of microcomposites was carried out by reinforcing 5, 10 and 15 vol.% of alumina powder particles (average size ∼5.71 μm) in copper matrix via conventional sintering using N 2, H 2 and Ar atmospheres. Nanocomposites of 1, 5, 7 vol

  7. Review of metal-matrix encapsulation of solidified radioactive high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L.J.; Steindler, M.J.

    1978-05-01

    Literature describing previous and current work on the encapsulation of solidified high-level waste forms in a metal matrix was reviewed. Encapsulation of either stabilized calcine pellets or glass beads in alloys by casting techniques was concluded to be the most developed and direct approach to fabricating solid metal-matrix waste forms. Further characterizations of the physical and chemical properties of metal-matrix waste forms are still needed to assess the net attributes of metal-encapsulation alternatives. Steady-state heat transfer properties of waste canisters in air and water environments were calculated for four reference waste forms: (1) calcine, (2) glass monoliths, (3) metal-encapsulated calcine, and (4) metal-encapsulated glass beads. A set of criteria for the maximum allowable canister centerline and surface temperatures and heat generation rates per canister at the time of shipment to a Federal repository was assumed, and comparisons were made between canisters of these reference waste forms of the shortest time after reactor discharge that canisters could be filled and the subsequent ''interim'' storage times prior to shipment to a Federal repository for various canister diameters and waste ages. A reference conceptual flowsheet based on existing or developing technology for encapsulation of stabilized calcine pellets is discussed. Conclusions and recommendations are presented

  8. Review of metal-matrix encapsulation of solidified radioactive high-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L J; Steindler, M J

    1978-05-01

    Literature describing previous and current work on the encapsulation of solidified high-level waste forms in a metal matrix was reviewed. Encapsulation of either stabilized calcine pellets or glass beads in alloys by casting techniques was concluded to be the most developed and direct approach to fabricating solid metal-matrix waste forms. Further characterizations of the physical and chemical properties of metal-matrix waste forms are still needed to assess the net attributes of metal-encapsulation alternatives. Steady-state heat transfer properties of waste canisters in air and water environments were calculated for four reference waste forms: (1) calcine, (2) glass monoliths, (3) metal-encapsulated calcine, and (4) metal-encapsulated glass beads. A set of criteria for the maximum allowable canister centerline and surface temperatures and heat generation rates per canister at the time of shipment to a Federal repository was assumed, and comparisons were made between canisters of these reference waste forms of the shortest time after reactor discharge that canisters could be filled and the subsequent ''interim'' storage times prior to shipment to a Federal repository for various canister diameters and waste ages. A reference conceptual flowsheet based on existing or developing technology for encapsulation of stabilized calcine pellets is discussed. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  9. Graphitization of diamond with a metallic coating on ferritic matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Stenio Cavalier; Oliveira, Hellen Cristine Prata de; Filgueira, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    Iron is a strong catalyst of graphitization of diamonds. This graphitization occurs mainly during the processing of composites - conventional sintering or hot pressing, and during cutting operations. Aiming to avoid or minimize this deleterious effect, there is increasing use of diamond coated with metallic materials in the production of diamond tools processed via powder metallurgy. This work studies the influence of Fe on diamond graphitization diamond-coated Ti after mixing of Fe-diamonds, hot pressing parameters were performed with 3 minutes/35MPa/900 deg C - this is the condition of pressing hot used in industry for production of diamond tools. Microstructural features were observed by SEM, diffusion of Fe in diamond was studied by EDS. Graphitization was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that Fe not activate graphitization on the diamond under the conditions of hot pressing. (author)

  10. REMOVAL OF SO2 AND NO OVER RICE HUSK ASH (RHA/CaO-SUPPORTED METAL OXIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRVAN DAHLAN

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The activity of rice husk ash (RHA/CaO-based sorbent supported with various metal oxides for the removal of SO2 and NO from simulated flue gas of combustion process has been studied. In this study, RHA/CaO-based sorbents were impregnated with an appropriate metal nitrates solution followed by drying and calcinations, which resulted in the sorbent having the following active phases; MgO, MnO, CoO, ZnO, Al2O3, Fe2O3, and CeO2. The sorbent-catalysts were tested in a fixed bed reactor by passing mixture gas consisting of SO2 (2000 ppm, NO (500 ppm, O2 (10 %, water vapor (50% and N2 as a balance at a total flow rate of 150 mL/min and reaction temperature of 87C. The results showed that RHA/CaO sorbents impregnated with CeO2 displayed the highest sorption capacity among other impregnated metal oxides for the simultaneous removal of SO2 and NO. Infrared spectroscopic results indicate the formation of both sulfate (SO42- and nitrate (NO3- species due to a catalytic role played by CeO2.

  11. Non-self-similar cracking in unidirectional metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, G.; Dharani, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental investigations on the fracture behavior of unidirectional Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) show the presence of extensive matrix damage and non-self-similar cracking of fibers near the notch tip. These failures are primarily observed in the interior layers of an MMC, presenting experimental difficulties in studying them. Hence an investigation of the matrix damage and fiber fracture near the notch tip is necessary to determine the stress concentration at the notch tip. The classical shear lag (CLSL) assumption has been used in the present study to investigate longitudinal matrix damage and nonself-similar cracking of fibers at the notch tip of an MMC. It is seen that non-self-similar cracking of fibers reduces the stress concentration at the notch tip considerably and the effect of matrix damage is negligible after a large number of fibers have broken beyond the notch tip in a non-self-similar manner. Finally, an effort has been made to include non-self-similar fiber fracture and matrix damage to model the fracture behavior of a unidirectional boron/aluminum composite for two different matrices viz. a 6061-0 fully annealed aluminum matrix and a heat treated 6061-T6 aluminum matrix. Results have been drawn for several characteristics pertaining to the shear stiffnesses and the shear yield stresses of the two matrices and compared with the available experimental results

  12. Finite element implementation and numerical issues of strain gradient plasticity with application to metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksson, Per; Gudmundson, Peter; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2009-01-01

    of quadrilateral type are examined and a few numerical issues are addressed related to these elements as well as to strain gradient plasticity theories in general. Numerical results are presented for an idealized cell model of a metal matrix composite under shear loading. It is shown that strengthening due...

  13. ratio on the deformation behaviour of Fe–Al2O3 metal matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005,. India. MS received 17 March 2015; accepted 21 March 2016. Abstract. The present paper reports the effect of height to diameter (h/d) ratio on the deformation behaviour of Fe–Al2O3 metal matrix ...

  14. Thermomechanically induced residual strains in Al/SiCp metal-matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, T.; Clarke, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Residual lattice strains in the aluminium and SiC phases of F3S.20S extruded A359 20% SiC metal-matrix composite were measured by using neutron diffi action at room and elevated temperatures to monitor the effects of in situ uniaxial plastic deformations. The results are interpreted with referenc...

  15. Sliding wear resistance of metal matrix composite layers prepared by high power laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, Vaclav; Matthews, D; de Hosson, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Two laser surface engineering techniques, Laser Cladding and Laser Melt Injection (LMI), were used to prepare three different metal matrix composite layers with a thickness of about 1 mm and approximately 25-30% volume fraction of ceramic particles. SiC/Al-8Si, WC/Ti-6Al-4V and TiB2/Ti-6Al-4V layers

  16. Wear behaviour of Zr-based in situ bulk metallic glass matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) and its in situ BMG matrix composites with diameter of 3 mm were fabricated by conventional .... with no evidence of any crystalline Bragg peaks, indicating that the as-cast sample is fully ..... Acknowledgements. Funding by education fund item of Liaoning Province under grant no.

  17. Static and Fatigue behavior of Pin-Loaded Metal Matrix Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    NO. NO. NO. NO, 11. TITLE (Include Security Clasification ) Static and Fatigue 62201F 2401 01 79 Rphavinr of Metal Matrix Joints (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR...Specimen Steel Pin I (1/4" Dia.) Steel Plate (1/4" thick) Steel Shims Hydraulic Grip Figure 3 Pin-Bearing Test Assemblage (Note: Not to scale) 26 200 B

  18. Spectra of matrix isolated metal atoms and clusters. [In rare gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, B.

    1977-09-30

    The matrix isolation spectra of all of the 40 presently known atomic metal species show strong matrix effects. The transition energies are increased, and the bands are broad and exhibit splitting of sublevels which are degenerate in the gas phase. Several models have been proposed for splitting of levels, but basic effects are not yet understood, and spectra cannot be predicted, yet it is possible to correlate gas phase and matrix in many of the systems. Selective production of diatomics and clusters via thermal and optical annealing of atomic species can be monitored by optical spectra, but yields spectroscopically complex systems which, however, especially in the case of transition metals, can be used as precursors in novel chemical reactions. A combination of absorption, emission, ir, Raman, ESR, and other methods is now quickly yielding data which will help correlate the increasing wealth of existing data. 55 references, 6 figures.

  19. Analysis of metal-matrix composite structures. I - Micromechanics constitutive theory. II - Laminate analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenburg, R. T.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    The micromechanical constitutive theory is used to examine the nonlinear behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite structures. Effective lamina constitutive relations based on the Abouli micromechanics theory are presented. The inelastic matrix behavior is modeled by the unified viscoplasticity theory of Bodner and Partom. The laminate constitutive relations are incorporated into a first-order deformation plate theory. The resulting boundary value problem is solved by utilizing the finite element method. Attention is also given to computational aspects of the numerical solution, including the temporal integration of the inelastic strains and the spatial integration of bending moments. Numerical results the nonlinear response of metal matrix composites subjected to extensional and bending loads are presented.

  20. Effect of flyash particles with aluminium melt on the wear of aluminium metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin K. Sharma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the fabrication and tribological testing of an aluminium flyash composite. The metal matrix selected was aluminium and flyash contents in different percentages were reinforced in it to fabricate the required metal matrix composite (MMC. Stir casting method was used to fabricate the MMC with 2–4–6% weight of flyash contents in aluminium. Tribological analysis of the tribo pairs formed between the smooth surfaces of cast iron disc and smooth MMC pin has been considered and friction force and wear of the MMC were investigated by using a Pin-on-disc setup. It was observed that the MMC with 6% weight of flyash content in aluminium matrix results in less wear (0.32 g and 4% weight of flyash content gives the low coefficient of friction (0.12 between the tribopairs of cast iron surface and MMC surface.

  1. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  2. Microstructural evolution in WC-Co cermet reinforced - A17075 metal matrix composites by stir casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal Krishna, U. B.; Ranganatha, P.; Auradi, V.; Mahendra Kumar, S.; Vasudeva, B.

    2016-09-01

    Aluminium metal matrix composites (AMMCs) are preferred because of their enhanced properties like high strength to weight ratio, stiffness and wear resistance. In the present work, an attempt is made to develop cermet (WC-Co) reinforced with Al7075 metal matrix composite by stir casting technique. WC-Co cermet is reduced to an average size of 10μm through ball milling using Alumina as grinding media. Ball milled WC-Co Cermet in an amount of 6 wt. % is used as reinforcement in Al7075 matrix. Microstructural characterization of the prepared composites is carried out using SEM/EDX and XRD studies. X-ray diffraction studies have revealed the peaks corresponding to α-Al, WC, Co and minor Al5W phases. SEM/EDX characterization revealed the uniform distribution of cermet in Al matrix. Further studies also revealed that, addition of WC-Co cermet to Al7075 matrix has resulted in improvement in hardness and Densities of Al7075 matrix.

  3. Ash Properties of Alternative Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capablo, Joaquin; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Pedersen, Kim Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    analysis into three main groups depending upon their ash content of silica, alkali metal, and calcium and magnesium. To further detail the biomass classification, the relative molar ratio of Cl, S, and P to alkali were included. The study has led to knowledge on biomass fuel ash composition influence...... on ash transformation, ash deposit flux, and deposit chlorine content when biomass fuels are applied for suspension combustion....

  4. Procedure for Matrix Effect Reduction in Metal Analysis Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Eshaikh, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    A procedure for matrix effect reduction is proposed to enhance the precision of quantitative analysis of metal alloys using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). This procedure is based on a number of successive steps in order to correct the signal fluctuations caused by plasma interaction and the matrix effect. The first step is the selection of optimum parameter settings of the detection system, such as laser power, delay time, and focal distance. The second step is the estimation of the absolute or relative values of impurities on the basis of the internal standard calibration. The third step is the analysis of the metal basis of the alloy used as an internal standard, which requires spectrum averaging, whole integral spectrum normalization, and self-absorption correction. Three sets of metal-based alloys (aluminum, steel, and copper) are used in this investigation as reference standards for calibration and validation. Successive improvements of the quality of calibration curves are observed during the proposed procedure.

  5. In-process assembly of micro metal inserts in a polymer matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2006-01-01

    , have to be established in order to be able to develop new and more integrated micro products. In this paper a method for testing the bonding between micro thickened metal inserts and the polymer matrix they are moulded in is presented. A specific demonstrator has been manufactured by means of a hot...... embossing-like process which allows fast developing time and the possibility of batch process. Different levels of surface roughness and metal insert thickness were applied in a systematic design of experiments. The results show a strong influence of surface texture on bonding strength. The testing......New functionalities and smaller dimensions of micro products can be achieved by means of a higher degree of integration of both materials and components. Smart micro assembly techniques (such as on-the-machine assembly) together with hybrid structures (as metal inserts in polymer matrix...

  6. Numerical Modeling of Fiber-Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite Processing by the Liquid Route: Literature Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Eric; Arvieu, Corinne; Mantaux, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    One of the technologies used to produce metal matrix composites (MMCs) is liquid route processing. One solution is to inject a liquid metal under pressure or at constant rate through a fibrous preform. This foundry technique overcomes the problem of the wettability of ceramic fibers by liquid metal. The liquid route can also be used to produce semiproducts by coating a filament with a molten metal. These processes involve physical phenomena combined with mass and heat transfer and phase change. The phase change phenomena related to solidification and also to the melting of the metal during the process notably result in modifications to the permeability of porous media, in gaps in impregnation, in the appearance of defects (porosities), and in segregation in the final product. In this article, we provide a state-of-the-art review of numerical models and simulation developed to study these physical phenomena involved in MMC processing by the liquid route.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Fiber-Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite Processing by the Liquid Route: Literature Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Eric; Arvieu, Corinne; Mantaux, Olivier

    2018-04-01

    One of the technologies used to produce metal matrix composites (MMCs) is liquid route processing. One solution is to inject a liquid metal under pressure or at constant rate through a fibrous preform. This foundry technique overcomes the problem of the wettability of ceramic fibers by liquid metal. The liquid route can also be used to produce semiproducts by coating a filament with a molten metal. These processes involve physical phenomena combined with mass and heat transfer and phase change. The phase change phenomena related to solidification and also to the melting of the metal during the process notably result in modifications to the permeability of porous media, in gaps in impregnation, in the appearance of defects (porosities), and in segregation in the final product. In this article, we provide a state-of-the-art review of numerical models and simulation developed to study these physical phenomena involved in MMC processing by the liquid route.

  8. Critique of Macro Flow/Damage Surface Representations for Metal Matrix Composites Using Micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidance for the formulation of robust, multiaxial, constitutive models for advanced materials is provided by addressing theoretical and experimental issues using micromechanics. The multiaxial response of metal matrix composites, depicted in terms of macro flow/damage surfaces, is predicted at room and elevated temperatures using an analytical micromechanical model that includes viscoplastic matrix response as well as fiber-matrix debonding. Macro flow/damage surfaces (i.e., debonding envelopes, matrix threshold surfaces, macro 'yield' surfaces, surfaces of constant inelastic strain rate, and surfaces of constant dissipation rate) are determined for silicon carbide/titanium in three stress spaces. Residual stresses are shown to offset the centers of the flow/damage surfaces from the origin and their shape is significantly altered by debonding. The results indicate which type of flow/damage surfaces should be characterized and what loadings applied to provide the most meaningful experimental data for guiding theoretical model development and verification.

  9. Mechanical and corrosion behaviors of developed copper-based metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manvandra Kumar; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Prakash, Rajiv; Ji, Gopal

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates mechanical properties and corrosion resistances of cast copper-tungsten carbide (WC) metal matrix composites (MMCs). Copper matrix composites have been developed by stir casting technique. Different sizes of micro and nano particles of WC particles are utilized as reinforcement to prepare two copper-based composites, however, nano size of WC particles are prepared by high-energy ball milling. XRD (X-rays diffraction) characterize the materials for involvement of different phases. The mechanical behavior of composites has been studied by Vickers hardness test and compression test; while the corrosion behavior of developed composites is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. The results show that hardness, compressive strength and corrosion resistance of copper matrix composites are very high in comparison to that of copper matrix, which attributed to the microstructural changes occurred during composite formation. SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) reveals the morphology of the corroded surfaces.

  10. Bioaccumulations of heavy metals in Ipomoea aquatica grown in bottom ash recycling wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milla, Odette Varela; Rivera, Eva B; Huang, Wu-Jang

    2014-05-01

    A plant bioassay using hydroponically grown Ipomoea aquatica (water spinach) was applied to assess the phytotoxicity of untreated and treated wastewaters from a municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash recycling facility. The 50%-diluted, untreated wastewater exhibited acute toxicity (plants died within 24 hours). Highly diluted doses (3 and 6%) of both wastewater types displayed no significant differences when compared with the control. Treating the wastewater through sequential physical filtration and chemical precipitation processes decreased not only the dissolved solids content but also the pH and salt content. In addition, significant accumulations of Sr, Cr, and Sn were observed in the hydroponically grown I. aquatica plant tissues; in particular, the bioaccumulation of Sr in the leaves and roots was unexpectedly high.

  11. Variation and distribution of metals and metalloids in soil/ash mixtures from Agbogbloshie e-waste recycling site in Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, Takaaki; Otsuka, Masanari; Asante, Kwadwo Ansong; Muto, Mamoru; Opoku-Ankomah, Yaw; Ansa-Asare, Osmund Duodu; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-02-01

    Illegal import and improper recycling of electronic waste (e-waste) are an environmental issue in developing countries around the world. African countries are no exception to this problem and the Agbogbloshie market in Accra, Ghana is a well-known e-waste recycling site. We have studied the levels of metal(loid)s in the mixtures of residual ash, formed by the burning of e-waste, and the cover soil, obtained using a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (P-XRF) coupled with determination of the 1M HCl-extractable fraction by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The accuracy and precision of the P-XRF measurements were evaluated by measuring 18 standard reference materials; this indicated the acceptable but limited quality of this method as a screening tool. The HCl-extractable levels of Al, Co, Cu, Zn, Cd, In, Sb, Ba, and Pb in 10 soil/ash mixtures varied by more than one order of magnitude. The levels of these metal(loid)s were found to be correlated with the color (i.e., soil/ash ratio), suggesting that they are being released from disposed e-waste via open burning. The source of rare elements could be constrained using correlation to the predominant metals. Human hazard quotient values based on ingestion of soil/ash mixtures exceeded unity for Pb, As, Sb, and Cu in a high-exposure scenario. This study showed that along with common metals, rare metal(loid)s are also enriched in the e-waste burning site. We suggest that risk assessment considering exposure to multiple metal(loid)s should be addressed in studies of e-waste recycling sites. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Wood ash and lime. Effects on uptake of nutrients and heavy metals in bilberries; Vedaska och kalk. Effekter paa upptag av naeringsaemnen och tungmetaller i blaabaer. Ramprogram Askaaterfoering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Torbjoern; Eriksson, H.M. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Soils

    1998-09-01

    Ten km north of Uppsala in eastern Sweden a field plot (2x2 m) experiment, with different ash and lime treatments, was established in June 1993 in a 70-year old mixed stand of Norway spruce and Scots pine on a sandy soil. The experiment included twelve treatments and one control, all with four replicates. The treatments were; a well-combusted loose wood ash, well-hardened ash granules, hardened and then crushed and sieved mixed ash, a mixture of hardened ash and lime, hardened wood ash and finally, lime. The normal dose was 4 tons per hectare. Two and thirteen months after treatment, bilberries were sampled. Bilberries sampled two months after treatment were analyzed for Ca, Mg, K, P, Al, Mn, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn for nine treatments. Two months after treatment, the variation in the contents of different elements was very large, especially for K, P, Mn and Zn. Bilberries in the control had, on an average, lower contents of Ca, Mg, K and Cu than bilberries from the treated plots. Contents of Zn and Cd were, on an average, highest in the control plots. However, no significant differences between treatments were found. Thirteen months after treatment, the variation in content of all the heavy metals analyzed had decreased as well as the content of Pb and Zn. However, the contents of Cd and Cu had increased somewhat. No significant differences between treatments were found. It was concluded that the different treatments had a negligible effect on the content of heavy metals in bilberries the first year after treatment 122 refs, 10 figs, 15 tabs

  13. Metal Cluster Models for Heterogeneous Catalysis: A Matrix-Isolation Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Olaf; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2018-02-19

    Metal cluster models are of high relevance for establishing new mechanistic concepts for heterogeneous catalysis. The high reactivity and particular selectivity of metal clusters is caused by the wealth of low-lying electronically excited states that are often thermally populated. Thereby the metal clusters are flexible with regard to their electronic structure and can adjust their states to be appropriate for the reaction with a particular substrate. The matrix isolation technique is ideally suited for studying excited state reactivity. The low matrix temperatures (generally 4-40 K) of the noble gas matrix host guarantee that all clusters are in their electronic ground-state (with only a very few exceptions). Electronically excited states can then be selectively populated and their reactivity probed. Unfortunately, a systematic research in this direction has not been made up to date. The purpose of this review is to provide the grounds for a directed approach to understand cluster reactivity through matrix-isolation studies combined with quantum chemical calculations. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Programmed gradient descent biosorption of strontium ions by Saccaromyces cerevisiae and ashing analysis: A decrement solution for nuclide and heavy metal disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Xiaoqin; Sun, Shiyong; Wei, Hongfu; Luo, Lang; Xiang, Sha; Zhang, Gege

    2016-08-15

    One of the waste disposal principles is decrement. The programmed gradient descent biosorption of strontium ions by Saccaromyces cerevisiae regarding bioremoval and ashing process for decrement were studied in present research. The results indicated that S. cerevisiae cells showed valid biosorption for strontium ions with greater than 90% bioremoval efficiency for high concentration strontium ions under batch culture conditions. The S. cerevisiae cells bioaccumulated approximately 10% of strontium ions in the cytoplasm besides adsorbing 90% strontium ions on cell wall. The programmed gradient descent biosorption presented good performance with a nearly 100% bioremoval ratio for low concentration strontium ions after 3 cycles. The ashing process resulted in a huge volume and weight reduction ratio as well as enrichment for strontium in the ash. XRD results showed that SrSO4 existed in ash. Simulated experiments proved that sulfate could adjust the precipitation of strontium ions. Finally, we proposed a technological flow process that combined the programmed gradient descent biosorption and ashing, which could yield great decrement and allow the supernatant to meet discharge standard. This technological flow process may be beneficial for nuclides and heavy metal disposal treatment in many fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Leaching of valuable metals from orimulsion burning ash with hydrogen peroxide; Kasanka suiso ni yoru orimulsion nenshobai kara no yuka kinzoku no shinshutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokukawa, N. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-12-25

    Discussions were given on leaching of such valuable metals as vanadium and nickel from orimulsion burning ash with hydrogen peroxide. Orimulsion is an emulsion in which Orinoco tar existing in the north basin of Orinoco River in Venezuela is added with water and a surfactant. Orimulsion burning ash is expected as a resource of vanadium and nickel. The test sample is ash discharged from electric dust collectors for boilers exclusively burning orimulsion at thermal power plants. The ash contains more vanadium and nickel (originated from Orinoco tar) and magnesium (originated from additives to stabilize and prevent corrosion in emulsion) than heavy oil burning ash. Leaching rate for vanadium, nickel and magnesium was 98% or higher in any of these elements, when they are leached at 25 degC for 60 minutes using 2% aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution of pH 2. Acids used to adjust pH of the leaching solution, such as sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid and nitric acid, showed nearly the same extraction trend. Because of sulfuric acid ions dissolving into the leaching solution, sulfuric acid would be most effective in pH adjustment of the leaching solution if post treatment is taken into consideration. 6 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. An Analysis of the Retention of a Diamond Particle in a Metallic Matrix after Hot Pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borowiecka-Jamrozek J.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with computer modelling of the retention of a synthetic diamond particle in a metallic matrix produced by powder metallurgy. The analyzed sintered powders can be used as matrices for diamond impregnated tools. First, the behaviour of sintered cobalt powder was analyzed. The model of a diamond particle embedded in a metallic matrix was created using Abaqus software. The preliminary analysis was performed to determine the mechanical parameters that are independent of the shape of the crystal. The calculation results were compared with the experimental data. Next, sintered specimens obtained from two commercially available powder mixtures were studied. The aim of the investigations was to determine the influence of the mechanical and thermal parameters of the matrix materials on their retentive properties. The analysis indicated the mechanical parameters that are responsible for the retention of diamond particles in a matrix. These mechanical variables have been: the elastic energy of particle, the elastic energy of matrix and the radius of plastic zone around particle.

  17. Matrix elimination method for the determination of precious metals in ores using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Bekir; Celikbiçak, Omür; Döker, Serhat; Doğan, Mehmet

    2007-03-28

    Poly(N-(hydroxymethyl)methacrylamide)-1-allyl-2-thiourea) hydrogels, poly(NHMMA-ATU), were synthesized by gamma radiation using (60)Co gamma source in the ternary mixture of NHMMA-ATU-H(2)O. These hydrogels were used for the specific gold, silver, platinum and palladium recovery, pre-concentration and matrix elimination from the solutions containing trace amounts of precious metal ions. Elimination of inorganic matrices such as different transition and heavy metal ions, and anions was performed by adjusting the solution pH to 0.5 that was the selective adsorption pH of the precious metal ions. Desorption of the precious metal ions was performed by using 0.8 M thiourea in 3M HCl as the most efficient desorbing agent with recovery values more than 95%. In the desorption medium, thiourea effect on the atomic signal was eliminated by selecting proper pyrolysis and atomization temperatures for all precious metal ions. Precision and the accuracy of the results were improved in the graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) measurements by applying the developed matrix elimination method performing the adsorption at pH 0.5. Pre-concentration factors of the studied precious metal ions were found to be at least 1000-fold. Detection limits of the precious metal ions were found to be less than 10 ng L(-1) of the all studied precious metal ions by using the proposed pre-concentration method. Determination of trace levels of the precious metals in the sea-water, anode slime, geological samples and photographic fixer solutions were performed using GFAAS clearly after applying the adsorption-desorption cycle onto the poly(NHMMA-UTU) hydrogels.

  18. A possibility of using mechanical alloying for developing metal matrix composites with light-weight reinforcements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, Vladimir A.; Zhizhin, Konstantin Yu.; Malinina, Elena A.; Ketsko, Valery A.; Kuznetsov, Nikolay T.

    2007-01-01

    A new type of metal matrix composite (MMC) with light-weight reinforcements from 10 types of boron-hydrogen compounds was prepared using the method of mechanical alloying. The boron-hydrogen compounds had a decomposition temperature higher than 500 o C and a density of 1.3-2.5 g/cm 3 . The initial size of particles was 50-500 μm. Aluminum and copper were used as the matrix materials. The reinforcements were 20-40 vol. % of the MMC. Mechanical alloying followed by compaction can yield a good-quality bulk material of reduced density

  19. Characterization and environmental risk assessment of heavy metals found in fly ashes from waste filter bags obtained from a Chinese steel plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun; Ning, Xun-an; Liao, Xikai; Lin, Meiqing; Liu, Jingyong; Wang, Jianghui

    2013-09-01

    The environmental risk of exposure to six heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Ni, and Cd) found in fly ashes from waste filter bags obtained from a steel plant was estimated based on the mineralogical compositions, total concentrations and speciation of the metals in the fly ashes. The results indicated that the fly ashes mainly consisted of hematite, magnetite, cyanite, spinel, coesite and amorphous materials. The concentrations of Zn and Pb were much higher than that of other materials. After Zn and Pb, Ni was present in the highest concentration, followed by Cu, Cr and Cd. Each heavy metal was distributed differently in fly ashes. The levels of Zn, Cd and Pb in the active fraction were very high, and ranged from 64.83 to 81.96%, 34.48 to 82.4% and 6.92 to 79.65% respectively, while Cu, Cr and Ni were mainly present in the residual fraction. The risk assessment code (RAC) values of fly ashes showed that the Zn and Cd present in the H3 sample presented a very high risk, with RAC values greater than 50%. The Cu present in the H3 sample, Cd in the H2 sample and Zn in the H4 and H5 samples presented a high risk. The Pb present in the H2 sample, Cd in the H4 sample, Ni in the H1 and H5 samples, and Zn in the H1 sample presented a medium risk. A low risk was presented by the Cu present in the H1, H2, H4 and H5 samples, the Pb in the H1, H3 and H5 samples, the Cd in the H1 and H5 samples, and the Ni in the H2 sample. No risk was presented by Cr in any sample. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Aslam, Muhammad, E-mail: klaira73@gmail.com; Altaf, Khurram, E-mail: khurram.altaf@petronas.com.my; Shirazi, Irfan, E-mail: irfanshirazi@hotmail.com [Mechanical Engineering Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  1. Removal of metallic Al and Al/Zn alloys in MSWI bottom ash by alkaline treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Dongxing; Poon, Chi Sun

    2018-02-15

    In order to reduce the leaching of pollutants and remove the Al and Zn/Al alloy from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWIBA), an optimized alkaline pre-treatment procedure was developed in this study. The influences of alkaline conditions on the removal rate of Al and Zn/Al alloy were investigated, including [OH] - concentration, temperature, particle size, liquid/solid ratio and treatment duration. The experimental results showed that the optimized alkaline pre-treatment conditions to efficiently remove the Al and Zn/Al alloy was by using a minimum of 1.0mol/l [OH] - , at 55°C and with a minimal liquid/solid ratio of 5. The removal rate of Al and Zn/Al alloy followed an S-shape curve, in which the slow beginning stage was attributed to the protection of the oxidation layer and the quenched product around the Al and Al/Zn alloy. After 3h of the optimized alkaline pre-treatment, the leaching of Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn of the treated MSWIBA was reduced by more than 90% of that of the original MSWIBA. The alkali-silica reaction test further indicated that the expansion of concrete prepared with the pre-treated MSWIBA was significantly reduced and there was no macro-crack or spalling damage on the surface of the tested specimens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrodialytic treatment for metal removal from sewage sludge ash from fluidized bed combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazos, Marta; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Sewage sludge contains several potentially hazardous compounds such as heavy metals, PCBs, PAHs, etc. However, elements with high agricultural value (P, K or Ca) are also present. During the last years, the fluidized bed sludge combustor (FBSC) is considered an effective and novel alternative...... of electrodialytic treatment, the Cd concentration was reduced to values below the limiting concentration. In all experiments the concentrations of other metals were under limiting values of the Danish legislation. It can be concluded that the electrodialytic treatment is an adequate alternative to reduce the Cd...

  3. Development, characterization and machining of Al and SiCp nano particles metal matrix nano composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Pradyut Kumar; Sahool, Ashok Kumar; Das, Ratnakar; Padhi, Payodhar

    2018-02-01

    The present study has been developed to ensure proper mixing of SiCp nano particle with powder of aluminum metal matrix. Different wt fraction of SiCp 1, 1.5 and 2% samples were prepared for characterization of nano composite material. The paper deals with the influence of different machining parameters at different wt fraction of SiCp in aluminum metal matrix. It was also observed that the cutting forces are affected by dry turning machining operation. As result, high cutting forces were required for machining of high percentage of SiCp nano particles. The study also deals with the dispersion of nano particle and segregation of the particles near the grain boundaries due to grain growth.

  4. Evaluation of mechanical properties of aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijaya Ramnath, B.; Elanchezhian, C.; Jaivignesh, M.; Rajesh, S.; Parswajinan, C.; Siddique Ahmed Ghias, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of MMC with aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide is done. • Different proportions of reinforcements are added. • The effects of varying proportions are studied. • Investigation on mechanical properties above composites is performed. • Failure morphology analysis is done using SEM. - Abstract: This paper deals with the fabrication and mechanical investigation of aluminium alloy, alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) and boron carbide metal matrix composites. Aluminium is the matrix metal having properties like light weight, high strength and ease of machinability. Alumina which has better wear resistance, high strength, hardness and boron carbide which has excellent hardness and fracture toughness are added as reinforcements. Here, the fabrication is done by stir casting which involves mixing the required quantities of additives into stirred molten aluminium. After solidification, the samples are prepared and tested to find the various mechanical properties like tensile, flexural, impact and hardness. The internal structure of the composite is observed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

  5. Comparison of two different electrodialytic cells for separation of phosphorus and heavy metals from sewage sludge ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbers, Benjamin; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2015-01-01

    utilizing a three compartment cell setup where the anode, cathode and stirred suspension are separated by ion exchange membranes are reported. Simplifying this experimental setup by removing the anion exchange membrane brings the anode in direct contact with the stirred ash suspension. Through...... in the ash was dissolved after 7. d. Using the three compartment setup and initially suspending the ash in distilled water, resulted in 53% dissolution of the total recovered phosphorus after 7. d....

  6. Influence of cold rolling and fatigue on the residual stress state of a metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanus, E.; Ericsson, T.; Lu, J.; Decomps, F.

    1993-01-01

    The large difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the matrix alloy and the particle in a metal matrix composite gives rise to residual stresses in the material. In the present work the effect of cold rolling and four-point bending fatigue on the residual stress state of a silicon carbide particle reinforced aluminium alloy (AA 2014) has been investigated. The three dimensional stress state measured in both phases: matrix and reinforcement, has been determined by using an X-ray diffraction technique. It was found that cold rolling induces surface compressive macrostresses of about -250 MPa, with a penetration depth around 2 mm. The absolute values of the pseudomacrostresses in both phases are significantly reduced due to the single track rolling. Stress relaxation occurs during four-point bending fatigue. (orig.)

  7. Interfacial reaction in cast WC particulate reinforced titanium metal matrix composites coating produced by laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dejian; Hu, Peipei; Min, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    Laser injection of ceramic particle was conducted to produce particulate reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Cast WC particle (WCp) was used as injection reinforcement to avoid excessive release of carbon atoms into the melt pool. The interfaces and boundaries between WC and Ti matrix were investigated by electron microscopy study. Compared with single crystal WCp, cast WCp was an appropriate solution to control the reaction products (TiC) in the matrix and the total amount of reaction products was significantly reduced. Irregular-shape reaction layers were formed around cast WCp. The reaction layers consist of a W2C layer and a mixed layer of W and TiC. Such reaction layers are effective in load transfer under an external load.

  8. Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic and metal matrix composites for NASA's HITEMP and enabling propulsion materials programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1992-01-01

    In a preliminary study, ultrasonic, x-ray opaque, and fluorescent dye penetrants techniques were used to evaluate and characterize ceramic and metal matrix composites. Techniques are highlighted for identifying porosity, fiber alignment, fiber uniformity, matrix cracks, fiber fractures, unbonds or disbonds between laminae, and fiber-to-matrix bond variations. The nondestructive evaluations (NDE) were performed during processing and after thermomechanical testing. Specific examples are given for Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber), FeCrAlY/Al2O3 fibers, Ti-15-3/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) materials, and Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) actively cooled panel components. Results of this study indicate that the choice of the NDE tools to be used can be optimized to yield a faithful and accurate evaluation of advanced composites.

  9. Production of Decorative Cast Metal Matrix Composites with a Complex Relief and Nonmetal Reinforcement Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Spasova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is relevant to the research of possibilities for the production of decorative complex relief metal matrix composites (MMCs of the “invitro” type, with unformed and unchanging reinforcement (strengthening phase in the process of creating a composite. The research on the methods of metal matrix composites development in this paper has been brought to the application of different space vacuum schemes for composite synthesisof vacuuming the space for composites synthesis by using the notion of the “capillary forming”. In this method the metal matrix (copper alloy melt was infiltrated in the space between the pellets of reinforcement phase (quartz particles – SiO2, whereas the classical method adopted for the obtaining MMCs “in vitro”, uses a mechanism of forced insertion of the reinforcement phase into the ready for use melt, followed by homogenization of the composite structure. In the particular case, because the obtained composite will have a complex relief three-dimensional surface, the conditions for compacting the building phases in the three directions x, y, z should be virtually equalized. In order to accomplish the task set, a laboratory system is developed. The experiments were conducted with laboratory equipment elaborated on the base of another equipment for "capillary forming" with extra vacuum. The structures of the obtained MMCs were tested by metallographic analysis.

  10. Changes in soil microbial community functionality and structure in a metal-polluted site: The effect of digestate and fly ash applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sánchez, M; Garcia-Romera, I; Cajthaml, T; Tlustoš, P; Száková, J

    2015-10-01

    Soil from Trhové Dušníky (Příbram, Czech Republic) is characterized by its high polymetallic accumulations in Pb-Ag-Zn due to mining and smelting activities. In previous studies performed in our research group, we have evaluated the potential use of amendments that would reduce the mobility and availability of metals such as Hg. We have observed that the application of digestate and fly ash in metal-polluted soil has an impact in immobilizing these metals. However, until now we have lacked information about the effect of these amendments on soil microbial functionality and communities. The multi-contaminated soil was used to grow wheat in a pot experiment to evaluate the impact of digestate and fly ash application in soil microbial communities. Soil samples were collected after 30 and 60 days of treatment. The digestate application improved chemical attributes such as the content in total organic carbon (TOC), water soluble carbon (WSOC), total soluble carbon (C), total soluble nitrogen (N), and inorganic N forms (NO3(-)) as consequence of high content in C and N which is contained in digestate. Likewise, microbial activity was greatly enhanced by digestate application, as was physiological diversity. Bacterial and fungal communities were increased, and the microbial biomass was highly enhanced. These effects were evident after 30 and 60 days of treatment. In contrast, fly ash did not have a remarkable effect when compared to digestate, but soil microbial biomass was positively affected as a consequence of macro- and micro-nutrient sources applied by the addition of fly ash. This study indicates that digestate can be used successfully in the remediation of metal-contaminated soil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Variation and distribution of metals and metalloids in soil/ash mixtures from Agbogbloshie e-waste recycling site in Accra, Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itai, Takaaki, E-mail: itai@sci.ehime-u.ac.jp [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Otsuka, Masanari [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Asante, Kwadwo Ansong [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); CSIR Water Research Institute, P. O. Box AH 38, Achimota, Accra (Ghana); Muto, Mamoru [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Opoku-Ankomah, Yaw; Ansa-Asare, Osmund Duodu [CSIR Water Research Institute, P. O. Box AH 38, Achimota, Accra (Ghana); Tanabe, Shinsuke [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan)

    2014-02-01

    Illegal import and improper recycling of electronic waste (e-waste) are an environmental issue in developing countries around the world. African countries are no exception to this problem and the Agbogbloshie market in Accra, Ghana is a well-known e-waste recycling site. We have studied the levels of metal(loid)s in the mixtures of residual ash, formed by the burning of e-waste, and the cover soil, obtained using a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (P-XRF) coupled with determination of the 1 M HCl-extractable fraction by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The accuracy and precision of the P-XRF measurements were evaluated by measuring 18 standard reference materials; this indicated the acceptable but limited quality of this method as a screening tool. The HCl-extractable levels of Al, Co, Cu, Zn, Cd, In, Sb, Ba, and Pb in 10 soil/ash mixtures varied by more than one order of magnitude. The levels of these metal(loid)s were found to be correlated with the color (i.e., soil/ash ratio), suggesting that they are being released from disposed e-waste via open burning. The source of rare elements could be constrained using correlation to the predominant metals. Human hazard quotient values based on ingestion of soil/ash mixtures exceeded unity for Pb, As, Sb, and Cu in a high-exposure scenario. This study showed that along with common metals, rare metal(loid)s are also enriched in the e-waste burning site. We suggest that risk assessment considering exposure to multiple metal(loid)s should be addressed in studies of e-waste recycling sites. - Highlights: • Contamination on the largest e-waste recycling site in Africa was investigated. • Portable X-ray Fluorescence analyzer useful for first screening • High levels of Cu, Zn, Pb, and Al in soil/ash mixtures • Hazards for workers are significant.

  12. Development and fabrication of high strength alloy fibers for use in metal-metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G. W.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Metal fiber reinforced superalloys are being considered for construction of critical components in turbine engines that operate at high temperature. The problems involved in fabricating refractory metal alloys into wire form in such a manner as to maximize their strength properties without developing excessive structural defects are described. The fundamental principles underlying the development of such alloy fibers are also briefly discussed. The progress made to date in developing tungsten, tantalum and columbium base alloys for fiber reinforcement is reported and future prospects for alloy fiber development considered.

  13. Effect of Metallic Additives to Polymer Matrix on Properties of Composite Adhesives Dedicated for Light Metal Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamala A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The most recent and promising trends in development of renewable sources of energy are Combined Heat and Power (CHP systems. The newest solutions from this field are hybrid compact solar panels. The correct operation of both systems, i.e. the photovoltaic panel and the heat exchanger requires an effective connection between the two. The adhesives utilized to interconnect above elements should provide a stable and hermetic joint able to withstand mechanical and thermal impacts of the surrounding environment factors. The paper presents the research results over the impact of the type and the amount of reinforcing phase on the physical and mechanical properties of epoxy resin matrix composites reinforced with particles of non-ferrous metals (Ag, Cu, W, Al, dedicated as adhesives for connections between photovoltaic panels and heat exchangers. Based on the experimental findings the usefulness of classical analytic models for valuation of polymer-metal composites properties was validated.

  14. Incorporation of tungsten metal fibers in a metal and ceramic matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Vokáč, M.; Kolísko, J.; Pokorný, P.; Kubatík, Tomáš František

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, 1-2 (2017), s. 79-82 ISSN 0543-5846 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tungsten wires * tungsten fibers * plasma spraying * metallic coatings * ceramic coatings Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics http://hrcak.srce.hr/168890

  15. Influence of metal(loid) bioaccumulation and maternal transfer on embryo-larval development in fish exposed to a major coal ash spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Mark S; Adams, S Marshall; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Mary K

    2016-04-01

    In December 2008, an earthen retaining wall at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Fuel Plant failed and released 4.1 millionm(3) of coal ash to rivers flowing into Watts Bar Reservoir in east Tennessee, United States (U.S.). As part of a comprehensive effort to evaluate the risks to aquatic resources from this spill - the largest in U.S. history - we compared bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of selenium (Se), arsenic (As), and mercury (Hg) in adult redear sunfish (Lepomis macrolophus), collected two years after the spill from both coal-ash exposed and non-exposed areas of the Emory and Clinch Rivers, with the success of embryo-larval development in their offspring. Whole body and ovary concentrations of Se in female sunfish at three study sites downstream of the spill were significantly elevated (site means=4.9-5.3 and 6.7-9.0mg/kg d.w. whole body and ovary concentrations, respectively) compared with concentrations in fish from reference sites upstream of the spill site (2.2-3.2mg/kg d.w. for whole bodies and 3.6-4.8mg/kg d.w. for ovaries). However, Se concentrations in coal ash-exposed areas remain below proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) criteria for the protection of aquatic life. Site-to-site variation in fish concentrations of As and Hg were not well-correlated with ash-exposure, reflecting the multiple sources of these metal(loid)s in the affected watersheds. In 7-day laboratory tests of embryos and larvae derived from in vitro crosses of eggs and sperm from these field-collected sunfish, fertilization success, hatching success, embryo-larval survival, and incidences of developmental abnormalities did not differ significantly between ash-exposed and non-exposed fish. Furthermore, these developmental endpoints were not correlated with whole body or ovary concentrations of Se, As, or Hg in the maternal fish, or with fish size, ovary weight, or gonadal-somatic indices. Results from this and related studies associated

  16. A new method for soldering particle-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jinbin; Mu, Yunchao [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Luo, Xiangwei [Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Niu, Jitai, E-mail: niujitai@163.com [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soldering of 55% SiCp/Al composite and Kovar is first achieved in the world. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nickel plating is required on the surface of the composites before soldering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low welding temperature is set to avoid overheating of the matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical and metallurgical bonding of composites and Kovar is carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High tension strength of 225 MPa in soldering seam has been obtained. - Abstract: Soldering of aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-SiC) to other structural materials, or even to themselves, has proved unsuccessful mainly due to the poor wetting of these composites by conventional soldering alloys. This paper reports a new approach, which improves the wetting properties of these composites by molting solder alloys to promote stronger bonds. The new approach relies on nickel-plating of the composite's faying surface prior to application of a solder alloy. Based on this approach, an aluminum metal matrix composite containing 55 vol.% SiC particles is successfully soldered to a Fe-Ni-Co alloy (commercially known as Kovar 4J29). The solder material is a zinc-based alloy (Zn-Cd-Ag-Cu) with a melting point of about 400 Degree-Sign C. Microscopic examinations of the aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs)-Kovar interfaces show that the nickel-plating, prior to soldering, could noticeably enhance the reaction between the molten solder and composites. The fractography of the shear-tested samples revealed that fracture occurs within the composite (i.e. cohesive failure), indicating a good adhesion between the solder alloy and the Al-SiC composite.

  17. A new method for soldering particle-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jinbin; Mu, Yunchao; Luo, Xiangwei; Niu, Jitai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Soldering of 55% SiCp/Al composite and Kovar is first achieved in the world. ► The nickel plating is required on the surface of the composites before soldering. ► Low welding temperature is set to avoid overheating of the matrix. ► Chemical and metallurgical bonding of composites and Kovar is carried out. ► High tension strength of 225 MPa in soldering seam has been obtained. - Abstract: Soldering of aluminum metal matrix composites (Al–SiC) to other structural materials, or even to themselves, has proved unsuccessful mainly due to the poor wetting of these composites by conventional soldering alloys. This paper reports a new approach, which improves the wetting properties of these composites by molting solder alloys to promote stronger bonds. The new approach relies on nickel-plating of the composite's faying surface prior to application of a solder alloy. Based on this approach, an aluminum metal matrix composite containing 55 vol.% SiC particles is successfully soldered to a Fe–Ni–Co alloy (commercially known as Kovar 4J29). The solder material is a zinc-based alloy (Zn–Cd–Ag–Cu) with a melting point of about 400 °C. Microscopic examinations of the aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs)–Kovar interfaces show that the nickel-plating, prior to soldering, could noticeably enhance the reaction between the molten solder and composites. The fractography of the shear-tested samples revealed that fracture occurs within the composite (i.e. cohesive failure), indicating a good adhesion between the solder alloy and the Al–SiC composite.

  18. Solidification/stabilization of fly and bottom ash from medical waste incineration facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadou, Kalliopi; Christopoulos, Konstantinos; Mousios, Epameinontas; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2012-03-15

    In the present work, the stabilization/solidification of fly and bottom ash generated from incinerated hospital waste was studied. The objectives of the solidification/stabilization treatment were therefore to reduce the leachability of the heavy metals present in these materials so as to permit their disposal in a sanitary landfill requiring only a lower degree of environmental protection. Another objective of the applied treatment was to increase the mechanical characteristics of the bottom ash using different amounts of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) as a binder. The solidified matrix showed that the cement is able to immobilize the heavy metals found in fly and bottom ash. The TCLP leachates of the untreated fly ash contain high concentrations of Zn (13.2 mg/l) and Pb (5.21 mg/l), and lesser amounts of Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Cd and Ba. Cement-based solidification exhibited a compressive strength of 0.55-16.12 MPa. The strength decreased as the percentage of cement loading was reduced; the compressive strength was 2.52-12.7 MPa for 60% cement mixed with 40% fly ash and 6.62-16.12 MPa for a mixture of 60% cement and 40% bottom ash. The compressive strength reduced to 0.55-1.30 MPa when 30% cement was mixed with 70% fly ash, and to 0.90-7.95 MPa when 30% cement was mixed with 70% bottom ash, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A review of metal recovery from spent petroleum catalysts and ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcil, Ata; Vegliò, Francesco; Ferella, Francesco; Okudan, Mediha Demet; Tuncuk, Aysenur

    2015-11-01

    With the increase in environmental awareness, the disposal of any form of hazardous waste has become a great concern for the industrial sector. Spent catalysts contribute to a significant amount of the solid waste generated by the petrochemical and petroleum refining industry. Hydro-cracking and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts are extensively used in the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries. The catalysts used in the refining processes lose their effectiveness over time. When the activity of catalysts decline below the acceptable level, they are usually regenerated and reused but regeneration is not possible every time. Recycling of some industrial waste containing base metals (such as V, Ni, Co, Mo) is estimated as an economical opportunity in the exploitation of these wastes. Alkali roasted catalysts can be leached in water to get the Mo and V in solution (in which temperature plays an important role during leaching). Several techniques are possible to separate the different metals, among those selective precipitation and solvent extraction are the most used. Pyrometallurgical treatment and bio-hydrometallurgical leaching were also proposed in the scientific literature but up to now they did not have any industrial application. An overview on patented and commercial processes was also presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metal immobilization and phosphorus leaching after stabilization of pyrite ash contaminated soil by phosphate amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupančič, Marija; Lavrič, Simona; Bukovec, Peter

    2012-02-01

    In this study we would like to show the importance of a holistic approach to evaluation of chemical stabilization using phosphate amendments. An extensive evaluation of metal stabilization in contaminated soil and an evaluation of the leaching of phosphorus induced after treatment were performed. The soil was highly contaminated with Cu (2894 mg kg(-1)), Zn (3884 mg kg(-1)), As (247 mg kg(-1)), Cd (12.6 mg kg(-1)) and Pb (3154 mg kg(-1)). To immobilize the metals, mixtures of soil with phosphate (from H(3)PO(4) and hydroxyapatite (HA) with varying ratios) were prepared with a constant Pb : P molar ratio of 1: 10. The acetic acid extractable concentration of Pb in the mixture with the highest amount of added phosphoric acid (n(H(3)PO(4)) : n(HA) = 3 : 1) was reduced to 1.9% (0.62 mg L(-1)) of the extractable Pb concentration in the untreated soil, but the content of water extractable phosphorus in the samples increased from 0.04 mg L(-1) in the untreated soil sample up to 14.3 mg L(-1) in the same n(H(3)PO(4)) : n(HA) = 3 : 1 mixture. The high increase in arsenic mobility was also observed after phosphate addition. The PBET test showed phosphate induced reduction in Pb bioavailability. In attempting to stabilize Pb in the soil with the minimum treatment-induced leaching of phosphorus, it was found that a mixture of soil with phosphate addition in the molar ratio of H(3)PO(4) : HA of 0.75 : 1 showed the most promising results, with an acetic acid extractable Pb concentration of 1.35 mg L(-1) and a water extractable phosphorus concentration of 1.76 mg L(-1). The time-dependent leaching characteristics of metals and phosphorus for this mixture were evaluated by a column experiment, where irrigation of the soil mixture with the average annual amount of precipitation in Slovenia (1000 mm) was simulated. The phosphorus concentration in the leachates decreased from 2.60 mg L(-1) at the beginning of irrigation to 1.00 mg L(-1) at the end.

  1. A Unified Model for the Prediction of Yield Strength in Particulate-Reinforced Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Mirza

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lightweighting in the transportation industry is today recognized as one of the most important strategies to improve fuel efficiency and reduce anthropogenic climate-changing, environment-damaging, and human death-causing emissions. However, the structural applications of lightweight alloys are often limited by some inherent deficiencies such as low stiffness, high wear rate and inferior strength. These properties could be effectively enhanced by the addition of stronger and stiffer reinforcements, especially nano-sized particles, into metal matrix to form composites. In most cases three common strengthening mechanisms (load-bearing effect, mismatch of coefficients of thermal expansion, and Orowan strengthening have been considered to predict the yield strength of metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs. This study was aimed at developing a unified model by taking into account the matrix grain size and porosity (which is unavoidable in the materials processing such as casting and powder metallurgy in the prediction of the yield strength of MMNCs. The Zener pinning effect of grain boundaries by the nano-sized particles has also been integrated. The model was validated using the experimental data of magnesium- and titanium-based nanocomposites containing different types of nano-sized particles (namely, Al2O3, Y2O3, and carbon nanotubes. The predicted results were observed to be in good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature.

  2. Microstructural characterisation of electrodeposited coatings of metal matrix composite with alumina nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indyka, P; Beltowska-Lehman, E; Bigos, A

    2012-01-01

    In the present work a nanocrystalline Ni-W metallic matrix was used to fabricate Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 composite coatings. The MMC (metal matrix composite) coatings with inert α-Al 2 O 3 particles (30 - 90 nm) were electrodeposited from aqueous electrolytes under direct current (DC) and controlled hydrodynamic conditions in a system with a rotating disk electrode (RDE). The chemical composition and microstructure of electrodeposited composites mainly control their functional properties; however, the particles must be uniformly dispersed to exhibit the dispersion-hardening effect. In order to increase the alumina particles incorporation as well as to promote the uniform distribution of the ceramic phase in a matrix, outer ultrasonic field was applied during electrodeposition. The influence of embedded alumina nanoparticles on structural characteristics (morphology, phase composition, residual stresses) of the resulting Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 coatings was investigated in order to obtain a nanocomposite with high hardness and relatively low residual stresses. Surface and cross-section morphology and the chemical composition of deposits was examined in the scanning electron microscope, the EDS technique was used. Microstructure and phase composition were determined by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Based on microstructural and micromechanical properties of the coatings, the optimum conditions for obtaining crack-free homogeneous Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 composite coatings have been determined.

  3. Method and apparatus for fabricating a composite structure consisting of a filamentary material in a metal matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, J.G.; Anderson, R.C.

    1975-10-21

    A method and apparatus are provided for preparing a composite structure consisting of filamentary material within a metal matrix. The method is practiced by the steps of confining the metal for forming the matrix in a first chamber, heating the confined metal to a temperature adequate to effect melting thereof, introducing a stream of inert gas into the chamber for pressurizing the atmosphere in the chamber to a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure, confining the filamentary material in a second chamber, heating the confined filamentary material to a temperature less than the melting temperature of the metal, evacuating the second chamber to provide an atmosphere therein at a pressure, placing the second chamber in registry with the first chamber to provide for the forced flow of the molten metal into the second chamber to effect infiltration of the filamentary material with the molten metal, and thereafter cooling the metal infiltrated-filamentary material to form said composite structure.

  4. Experimental research on the penetration of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullet into steel target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. W.; Chen, G.

    2012-08-01

    In the present paper, the penetration experiments of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullets into 45# steel targets are conducted by employing H25 artillery. In which, an experimental technique of sub-caliber penetration is constructed. The quasi static and dynamic behaviours of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are also experimental investigated. The self-sharpening phenomenon of composite material is observed. Integrated with metallographic analysis, the failure modes of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are identified systemically and compared with the quasi-static and dynamic material tests. It includes four failure modes, i.e., shear fracture of tungsten fiber, brittle fracture of tungsten fiber and shear fracture of metallic glass matrix as well as melting of tungsten fiber and metallic glass matrix. Comparatively, three failure mechanisms of tungsten fiber in the bullet nose are also identified, i.e., shear fracture, splitting fracture and bending or/and buckling. Finally, the mechanism of self-sharpening behaviour of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material is discussed.

  5. Experimental research on the penetration of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullet into steel target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen X.W.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the penetration experiments of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullets into 45# steel targets are conducted by employing H25 artillery. In which, an experimental technique of sub-caliber penetration is constructed. The quasi static and dynamic behaviours of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are also experimental investigated. The self-sharpening phenomenon of composite material is observed. Integrated with metallographic analysis, the failure modes of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are identified systemically and compared with the quasi-static and dynamic material tests. It includes four failure modes, i.e., shear fracture of tungsten fiber, brittle fracture of tungsten fiber and shear fracture of metallic glass matrix as well as melting of tungsten fiber and metallic glass matrix. Comparatively, three failure mechanisms of tungsten fiber in the bullet nose are also identified, i.e., shear fracture, splitting fracture and bending or/and buckling. Finally, the mechanism of self-sharpening behaviour of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material is discussed.

  6. Conditioning processes for incinerator ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouan, A.; Ouvrier, N.; Teulon, F.

    1990-01-01

    Three conditioning processes for alpha-bearing solid waste incineration ashes were investigated and compared according to technical and economic criteria: isostatic pressing, cold-crucible direct-induction melting and cement-resin matrix embedding

  7. The Characteristic and Activation of Mixed Andisol Soil/Bayat Clays/Rice Husk Ash as Adsorbent of Heavy Metal Chromium (Cr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranoto; Sajidan; Suprapto, A.

    2017-02-01

    Chromium (Cr) concentration in water can be reduced by adsorption. This study aimed to determine the effect of Andisol soil composition/Bayat clay/husk ash, activation temperature and contact time of the adsorption capacity of Cr in the model solution; the optimum adsorption conditions and the effectiveness of ceramic filters and purifiers to reduce contaminant of Cr in the water. The mixture of Andisol soil, Bayat clay, and husk ash is used as adsorbent of metal ion of Cr(III) using batch method. The identification and characterisation of adsorbent was done with NaF test, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD). Cr metal concentrations were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Sorption isotherms determined by Freundlich equation and Langmuir. The optimum conditions of sorption were achieved at 150°C activation temperature, contact time of 30 minutes and a composition Andisol soil / Bayat clay / husk ash by comparison 80/10/10. The results show a ceramic filter effectively reduces total dissolved solids (TDS) and Chromium in the water with the percentage decrease respectively by 75.91% and 9.44%.

  8. Separation and characterization of magnetic fractions from waste-to-energy bottom ash with an emphasis on the leachability of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunmei; Mei, Xiaoxia; Shi, Dezhi; Liu, Guotao; Li, Li; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic fractions were extracted from pulverized waste-to-energy (WTE) bottom ashes using a combined wet-dry extraction method. The resulting magnetic and non-magnetic fractions were subjected to compositional, mineralogical, and redox state analyses by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The distribution and leaching toxicity of heavy metals were assessed to evaluate potential effects on the environment. Compositional analyses revealed that Fe accounted for 35% of the magnetic fraction of pulverized ashes, which was approximately seven times that of the raw ash. In addition to Fe, elemental Ni, Mn, and Cr were also significantly enriched in the magnetic fractions. The mineralogical analysis determined that Fe was primarily present as hematite and magnetite, and metallic iron was also identified in the magnetic fraction samples. The XPS analysis further proved the existence of zero-valence Fe. However, a significant amount of Fe remained in the non-magnetic fractions, which could partially be ascribed to the intergrowth structure of the various minerals. The elevated concentrations of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP)-extracted Mn, Ni, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn were primarily ascribed to the lower buffering capability of the magnetic fractions, with the enrichment of Mn, Ni, and Cr in the magnetic fractions also contributing to this elevation.

  9. Process for the manufacture of seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing seamless metal-clad composite structures includes providing a hollow, metallic inner member and an outer sleeve to surround the inner member and define an inner space therebetween. A plurality of continuous reinforcing fibers is attached to the distal end of the outside diameter of the inner member, and the inner member is then introduced, distal end first, into one end of the outer sleeve. The inner member is then moved, distal end first, into the outer sleeve until the inner member is completely enveloped by the outer sleeve. A liquid matrix material is then injected into the space containing the reinforcing fibers between the inner member and the outer sleeve. Next a pressurized heat transfer medium is passed through the inner member to cure the liquid matrix material. Finally, the wall thickness of both the inner member and the outer sleeve are reduced to desired dimensions by chemical etching, which adjusts the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to a desired value.

  10. A traveling wave ultrasonic motor with a metal/polymer-matrix material compound stator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinbang; Liu, Shuo; Zhou, Ningning; Yu, Aibing; Cui, Yuguo; Chen, Pengfei

    2018-01-01

    This study proposes a traveling wave ultrasonic motor with a metal/polymer-matrix material compound stator. The stator is composed of a metal ring and polymer-matrix teeth. The resonance frequency of the stator with different structural dimensions was analyzed by the finite element method. From the results, the structure parameters of the metal ring were obtained. The effects of the density and elastic modulus of the tooth material on the resonance frequency were also investigated. A viscoelastic contact model was built to explore the contact state between the compound stator and rotor. Considering the density, elastic modulus and tribological properties, the tooth material was prepared by a molding process. The load-torque and efficiency-torque characteristics of the motor with different tooth thicknesses were measured under different preloads using a preload controlled ultrasonic motor test device. The maximum no-load speed of the motor was about 85 r min-1 with a tooth thickness of 3 mm and a preload of 100 N, the maximum stall torque of the motor was about 0.5 N · m with a tooth thickness of 4 mm and a preload of 125 N, and a maximum efficiency of about 5.5% occurred with a tooth thickness of 4 mm, a preload of 100 N and a torque of 0.3 N · m. The main merits of the proposed ultrasonic motor are low cost, light weight, high processing efficiency and long life.

  11. Effect of metal tolerant plant growth promoting bacteria on growth and metal accumulation in Zea mays plants grown in fly ash amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kalpna V; Patra, D D

    2013-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of the application of fly ash (FA) into Garden soil (GS), with and without inoculation of plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), on the growth and metal uptake by Zea mays plants. Three FA tolerant PGPB strains, Pseudomonas sp. PS5, PS14, and Bacillus sp. BC29 were isolated from FA contaminated soils and assessed for their plant growth promoting features on the Z. mays plants. All three strains were also examined for their ability to solubilize phosphate and to produce Indole Acetic Acid (IAA), siderophores, and hydrogencynide acid (HCN) production. Although inoculation of all strains significantly enhanced the growth of plants at both the concentration of FA but maximum growth was observed in plants inoculated with BC29 and PS14 at low level (25%) of FA concentration. The experimental results explored the plant growth promoting features of selected strains which not only enhanced growth and biomass of plants but also protected them from toxicity of FA.

  12. Ash and heavy metals in fluidized-bed combustion of wood wastes; Tuhka ja raskasmetallit puuperaeisen jaetteen kerrosleijupoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaessi, T.; Aittoniemi, P. [IVO Power Engineering, Vantaa (Finland); Kauppinen, E.; Latva-Somppi, J.; Kurkela, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Partanen, J. [IVO Technology Centre, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Ash formation and deposition mechanisms during co-combustion of pulp mill sludge and bark in industrial bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) combustor have been studied. Similar fuels were used in a bench-scale BFB for co-combustion of sludge and bark pellets and comparative studies with separate combustion of these fuels. Results indicated that in industrial scale unit significant fraction of ash had vaporization. About 14 mass-% of the total fly ash was found in the particle size below 0.2 {mu}m. The vaporized species consisted of potassium (K), sulfur (S), chlorine (Cl) and also of minor quantities of sodium (Na). In the benchscale similar vaporization fractions during co-combustion were measured, about 11 mass-%. During the combustion of bark this ratio, about 20 mass-%, was higher than during sludge combustion. The vaporized ash fraction was in the case of dried sludge combustion about 7 mass-%, but with wet sludge the vaporization rate was remarkably lower, about 1-2 mass-%. An increase in the bed temperature increased also ash vaporization. Test run period without combustion at elevated temperatures produced very low quantities of vaporized ash. The vaporized species in bench-scale test during bark pellet combustion were K, S and Cl, for sludge combustion also Na was clearly detected. No condensation of the vaporized species in bed area or furnace walls was observed. Bed defluidization was studied in the bench-scale unit. During bark pellet combustion the bed-agglomeration proceeded via small ash particle, below 2 {mu}m, coating on sand particle surface and consequent bonding between the ash layers. In the case of sludge combustion the accumulation of large ash particles and sintering of these porous agglomerates was observed to cause bed coarsening and defluidization. (orig.)

  13. Heavy metal leaching from aerobic and anaerobic landfill bioreactors of co-disposed municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash and shredded low-organic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanc, Bulent; Inoue, Yuzo; Yamada, Masato; Ono, Yusaku; Nagamori, Masanao

    2007-03-22

    In this study, heavy metal leaching from aerobic and anaerobic landfill bioreactor test cells for co-disposed municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash and shredded low-organic residues has been investigated. Test cells were operated for 1 year. Heavy metals which were comparatively higher in leachate of aerobic cell were copper (Cu), lead (Pb), boron (B), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe), and those apparently lower were aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), molybdenum (Mo), and vanadium (V). However, no significant release of heavy metals under aerobic conditions was observed compared to anaerobic and control cells. Furthermore, there was no meaningful correlation between oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and heavy metal concentrations in the leachates although some researchers speculate that aeration may result in excessive heavy metal leaching. No meaningful correlation between dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and leaching of Cu and Pb was another interesting observation. The only heavy metal that exceeded the state discharge limits (10mg/l, to be enforced after April 2005) in the aerobic cell leachate samples was boron and there was no correlation between boron leaching and ORP. Higher B levels in aerobic cell should be due to comparatively lower pH values in this cell. However, it is anticipated that this slightly increased concentrations of B (maximum 25mg/l) will not create a risk for bioreactor operation; rather it should be beneficial for long-term stability of the landfill through faster washout. It was concluded that aerobization of landfills of heavy metal rich MSWI bottom ash and shredded residues is possible with no dramatic increase in heavy metals in the leachate.

  14. An Overview of Key Challenges in the Fabrication of Metal Matrix Nanocomposites Reinforced by Graphene Nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Saboori

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of research efforts with an emphasis on the fabrication of metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs reinforced by graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs. Particular attention is devoted to finding the challenges in the production of MMNCs through the powder metallurgy techniques. The main technical challenges can be listed as: (I reinforcement selection; (II dispersion of reinforcement within the matrix; (III reactivity between the reinforcement and matrix; (IV interfacial bonding; (V preferred orientation of reinforcement. It is found that some of these difficulties can be attributed to the nature of the materials involved, while the others are related to the preparation routes. It is reported that the challenges related to the process can often be addressed by changing the production process or by using post-processing techniques. More challenging issues instead are related to the composition of the matrix and reinforcement, their reactivity and the dispersion of reinforcement. These topics still bring significant challenges to the materials scientists, and it would be worth mentioning that the fabrication of MMNCs with a uniform dispersion of reinforcement, strong interfacial bonding, without detrimental reactions and improved isotropic properties is still a puzzling issue.

  15. Matrix isolation studies and DFT calculations on molecular alkali metal bromates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, J Steven; Graham, John T; Joy, Jon T; Ferrante, Francesco

    2009-01-28

    DFT and MP2 calculations have been carried out on a series of molecular alkali metal bromates MBrO3 (M = Na, K, Rb, Cs), and the results compared with matrix isolation IR studies on the vaporisation of the solid salts. For M = Na, K or Rb, no ternary molecular species were detected in the low temperature matrix, but vaporisation of solid caesium bromate at 730 K resulted in the formation of molecular CsBrO3, which was identified as having a C3v structure involving tridentate coordination. Additionally, the DFT and MP2 calculations provide estimates of the molecular parameters for all four MBrO3 species, and for the related MXO3 species CsClO3 and CsIO3. The proven stability of MBrO3 molecules may have a bearing on the atmospheric chemistry of bromine oxo-species.

  16. Incorporation of tungsten metal fibers in a metal and ceramic matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Brozek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibers have high tensile strength but a poor oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Using this first characteristic and to prevent oxidation of tungsten coated composite materials in which the primary requirement: reinforcement against destruction or deformation, was studied on tungsten fibers and tungsten wires which were coated by applying the metal and ceramic powders via plasma spraying device in plasma generator WSP®. Deposition took place in an atmosphere of Ar + 7 % H2, sufficient to reduce the oxidized trace amounts of tungsten.

  17. Damage and failure behavior of metal matrix composites under biaxial loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Steven Wayne

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are being considered for increased use in structures that require the ductility and damage tolerance of the metal matrix and the enhanced strength and creep resistance at elevated temperatures of high performance fibers. Particularly promising for advanced aerospace engines and airframes are SiC fiber/titanium matrix composites (TMCs). A large program was undertaken in the Air Force to characterize the deformation and failure behaviors of TMCs and to develop computational models that can be used for component design. The effort reported here focused on a SiC SCS-6/Timetal 21S composite under biaxial loading conditions. Biaxial loading conditions are important because multiaxial stresses have been shown to influence the strength and ductility of engineering materials and, in general, structural components are subjected to multiaxial loads. The TMC material response, including stress-strain curves and failure surfaces, was measured using a combination of off-axis uniaxial tension and compression tests and biaxial cruciform tests. The off-axis tests produce combinations of in-plane tension, compression, and shear stresses, the mix of which are controlled by the relative angle between the fiber and specimen axes. The biaxial cruciform tests allowed independent control over the tensile or compressive loads in the fiber and transverse directions. The results of these characterization tests were used to develop a microstructural constitutive model and failure criteria. The basis of the micromechanical constitutive model is a representative unit volume of the MMC with a periodic array of fibers. The representative unit volume is divided into a fiber and three matrix cells for which the microstructural equilibrium and compatibility equations can be analyzed. The resulting constitutive model and associated failure criteria can be used to predict the material behavior under general loading conditions.

  18. Characterisation and treatment of roads covered with zinc ashes, muffle furnace fragments and lead slags from former non-ferrous metal industries in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecasteele, C; Van den Broeck, K; Van Gerven, T; Dutré, V; Seuntjens, P; Berghmans, P; Cornelis, C; Nouwen, J

    2002-08-01

    Zinc ashes, muffle furnace fragments and lead slags from non-ferrous industries were applied to pave roads in the North of Belgium. From an inventory it appeared that there are at least 490 km of such roads. In our survey the materials on these roads were characterised. The total metal concentration, the availability and the leaching as a function of time were determined. It appeared that these materials contain high concentrations of heavy metals, some of which are readily available. The high leaching of some metals makes them as such unsuitable as secondary construction material. Methods for the application of these materials for road construction were examined where the materials replaced part of the sand and gravel fraction in lean concrete and in bituminous mixtures, or where they replaced the sand in sand-cement mixtures, all these to be used for road foundations, cycle tracks, etc. When lead slags were applied in lean concrete, a material was obtained complying with the standards for secondary construction materials and with sufficient compressive strength for road foundations. When zinc ashes or muffle fragments were used to replace sand in sand-cement mixtures, again a suitable construction material was obtained. The other combinations tried out were rather unsuccessful, because of high metal leaching and/or poor compressive strength.

  19. Comparative study of ageing, heat treatment and accelerated carbonation for stabilization of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash in view of reducing regulated heavy metal/metalloid leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rafael M; Mertens, Gilles; Salman, Muhammad; Cizer, Özlem; Van Gerven, Tom

    2013-10-15

    This study compared the performance of four different approaches for stabilization of regulated heavy metal and metalloid leaching from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI-BA): (i) short term (three months) heap ageing, (ii) heat treatment, (iii) accelerated moist carbonation, and (iv) accelerated pressurized slurry carbonation. Two distinct types of MSWI-BA were tested in this study: one originating from a moving-grate furnace incineration operation treating exclusively household refuse (sample B), and another originating from a fluid-bed furnace incineration operation that treats a mixture of household and light industrial wastes (sample F). The most abundant elements in the ashes were Si (20-27 wt.%) and Ca (16-19 wt.%), followed by significant quantities of Fe, Al, Na, S, K, Mg, Ti, and Cl. The main crystalline substances present in the fresh ashes were Quartz, Calcite, Apatite, Anhydrite and Gehlenite, while the amorphous fraction ranged from 56 to 73 wt.%. The leaching values of all samples were compared to the Flemish (NEN 7343) and the Walloon (DIN 38414) regulations from Belgium. Batch leaching of the fresh ashes at natural pH showed that seven elements exceeded at least one regulatory limit (Ba, Cr, Cu, Mo, Pb, Se and Zn), and that both ashes had excess basicity (pH > 12). Accelerated carbonation achieved significant reduction in ash basicity (9.3-9.9); lower than ageing (10.5-12.2) and heat treatment (11.1-12.1). For sample B, there was little distinction between the leaching results of ageing and accelerated carbonation with respect to regulatory limits; however carbonation achieved comparatively lower leaching levels. Heat treatment was especially detrimental to the leaching of Cr. For sample F, ageing was ineffective and heat treatment had marginally better results, while accelerated carbonation delivered the most effective performance, with slurry carbonation meeting all DIN limits. Slurry carbonation was deemed the most

  20. MSW fly ash stabilized with coal ash for geotechnical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamon, M; Katsumi, T; Sano, Y

    2000-09-15

    The solidification and stabilization of municipal solid waste (MSW) fly ash for the purpose of minimizing the geo-environmental impact caused by toxic heavy metals as well as ensuring engineering safety (strength and soaking durability) are experimentally evaluated. The mixtures of MSW fly ash stabilized with cement and fluidized bed combustion coal fly ash (FCA) were used for unconfined compressive strength tests, leachate tests, and soaking tests. The behavior of soluble salts contained in the MSW fly ash significantly affects strength development, soaking durability, and the hardening reaction of the stabilized MSW fly ash mixtures. The cement stabilization of the MSW fly ash does not have enough effect on strength development and soaking durability. The addition of cement only contributes to the containment of heavy metals due to the high level of alkalinity. When using FCA as a stabilizing agent for MSW fly ash, the mixture exhibits high strength and durability. However, the Cd leachate cannot be prevented in the early stages of curing. Using a combination of cement and FCA as a MSW fly ash stabilizer can attain high strength, high soaking durability, and the containment of heavy metals. The stabilized MSW fly ash with cement and FCA can be practically applied to embankments.

  1. Evolution of the internal friction in SIC particle reinforced 8090 Al-Li metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez-Urrutia, I.; Gallego, I.; No, M. L.; San Juan, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The present study has been undertaken to investigate the mechanisms of thermal stress relief at the range of temperatures below room temperature for the metal matrix composite Al-Li 8090/SiC. For this aim the experimental technique of internal friction has been used which has been showed up very effective. Several thermal cycles from 453 K to 100 K were used in order to measures the internal friction as well as the elastic modules of the material concluding that thermal stresses are relaxed by microplastic deformation around the reinforcements. It has been also related the variation in the elastic modules with the different levels of precipitation. (Author) 18 refs

  2. Metal-insulator transition in disordered systems from the one-body density matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Resta, Raffaele; Souza, Ivo

    2017-01-01

    systems. In particular, for noninteracting systems the geometrical marker can be obtained from the configurational average of the norm-squared one-body density matrix, which can be calculated within open as well as periodic boundary conditions. This is in sharp contrast to a classification based......The insulating state of matter can be probed by means of a ground state geometrical marker, which is closely related to the modern theory of polarization (based on a Berry phase). In the present work we show that this marker can be applied to determine the metal-insulator transition in disordered...

  3. Micro structural analysis of nanocomposite of metallic matrix of aluminum reinforced by 2% of NTC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Fabio Saldanha; LavaredaCarlos Romulo; Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Queiroz, Jennyson Luz

    2016-01-01

    The study of based on aluminum materials has a high importance level, mainly when is intense wanted in automobile and aerospace industry to transform in light and high perform parts. Aluminum has low specific weight and easiness to join with other materials and these qualities can supply excellent properties and lots of technological applications. Components based on aluminum represents good examples to develop optimized micro structures during the fabrication process that can be basic on properties mechanical performance. As a result this work analyses the micro structure's composites with metallic matrix reinforced by 2% of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes manufactured by aluminum splinters mixed to CNT (author)

  4. Machining parameters optimization during machining of Al/5 wt% alumina metal matrix composite by fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Arindam; Patil, Pravin

    2017-06-01

    This experimental work presents the study of machining parameters of Ytterbium fiber laser during machining of 5 mm thick Aluminium/5wt%Alumina-MMC (Metal Matrix Composite). Response surface methodology (RSM) is used to achieve the optimization i.e. minimize hole tapering and maximize Material Removal Rate (MRR). A mathematical model has been developed and ANOVA has been done for correlating the interactive and higher-order influences of Ytterbium fiber laser machining parameters (laser power, modulation frequency, gas pressure, wait time, pulse width) on Material Removal Rate (MRR) and hole tapering during machining process.

  5. Investigation of metal-matrix composite containing liquid-phase dispersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strunz, Pavel; Mukherji, D.; Gilles, R.; Geue, T.; Rösler, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 340, 012098 (2012), s. 1-15 ISSN 1742-6588. [5th European Conference on Neutron Scattering. Praha, 17.07.2011-21.07.2011] R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/378 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) RII3-CT-2003-505925 Program:FP6 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : metal-matrix composite * liquid- phase dispersion * strengthening * neutron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/340/1/012098

  6. Electrodialytic treatment of fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie

    Heavy metals are removed from the fly ashes by an electrodialytic treatment with the aim of up-grading the ashes for reuse in stead of disposal in landfill.A great potential for upgrading of bio- and waste incineration ashes by electrodialytic treatment exists. In the future, the applicability...... of the treated products for reuse in construction or farming sectors should be explored further, as should the possibility of recycling of valuable, extracted elements in the metallurgical industry....

  7. Toxicity to Eisenia andrei and Folsomia candida of a metal mixture applied to soil directly or via an organic matrix.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natal da Luz, T.; Ojeda, G.; Pratas, J.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Sousa, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory limits for chemicals and ecological risk assessment are usually based on the effects of single compounds, not taking into account mixture effects. The ecotoxicity of metal-contaminated sludge may, however, not only be due to its metal content. Both the sludge matrix and the presence of

  8. An approximate method for calculating electron-phonon matrix element of a disordered transition metal and relevant comments on superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.

    1981-08-01

    A method based on the tight-binding approximation is developed to calculate the electron-phonon matrix element for the disordered transition metals. With the method as a basis the experimental Tsub(c) data of the amorphous transition metal superconductors are re-analysed. Some comments on the superconductivity of the disordered materials are given

  9. Machinability of Al-SiC metal matrix composites using WC, PCD and MCD inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beristain, J.; Gonzalo, O.; Sanda, A.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this work is the study of the machinability of aluminium-silicon carbide Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) in turning operations. The cutting tools used were hard metal (WC) with and without coating, different grades and geometries of Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD) and Mono-Crystalline Diamond (MCD). The work piece material was AMC225xe, composed of aluminium-copper alloy AA 2124 and 25% wt of SiC, being the size of the SiC particles around 3 {mu}m. Experiments were conducted at various cutting speeds and cutting parameters in facing finishing operations, measuring the surface roughness, cutting forces and tool wear. The worn surface of the cutting tool was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). It was observed that the Built Up Edge (BUE) and stuck material is higher in the MCD tools than in the PCD tools. The BUE acts as a protective layer against abrasive wear of the tool. (Author)

  10. Machinability of Al-SiC metal matrix composites using WC, PCD and MCD inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beristain, J.; Gonzalo, O.; Sanda, A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is the study of the machinability of aluminium-silicon carbide Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) in turning operations. The cutting tools used were hard metal (WC) with and without coating, different grades and geometries of Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD) and Mono-Crystalline Diamond (MCD). The work piece material was AMC225xe, composed of aluminium-copper alloy AA 2124 and 25% wt of SiC, being the size of the SiC particles around 3 μm. Experiments were conducted at various cutting speeds and cutting parameters in facing finishing operations, measuring the surface roughness, cutting forces and tool wear. The worn surface of the cutting tool was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). It was observed that the Built Up Edge (BUE) and stuck material is higher in the MCD tools than in the PCD tools. The BUE acts as a protective layer against abrasive wear of the tool. (Author)

  11. In situ ceramic layer growth on coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrani, K. A.; Silva, C. M.; Kiggans, J. O.; Cai, Z.; Shin, D.; Snead, L. L.

    2013-06-01

    The extent and nature of the chemical interaction between the outermost coating layer of coated fuel particles embedded in zirconium metal during fabrication of metal matrix microencapsulated fuels were examined. Various particles with outermost coating layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, and ZrC have been investigated in this study. ZrC-Zr interaction was the least substantial, while the PyC-Zr reaction can be exploited to produce a ZrC layer at the interface in an in situ manner. The thickness of the ZrC layer in the latter case can be controlled by adjusting the time and temperature during processing. The kinetics of ZrC layer growth is significantly faster from what is predicted using literature carbon diffusivity data in ZrC. SiC-Zr interaction is more complex and results in formation of various chemical phases in a layered aggregate morphology at the interface.

  12. Preparation of Al-based metal matrix composites reinforced by Cu coated SiC particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hailong; Zhang Rui; Xu Hongliang; Lu Hongxia; Guan Shaokang [Coll. of Materials Engineering, Zhengzhou Univ., HEN (China)

    2005-07-01

    In order to improve the interfacial behavior between SiC and Al, a surface layer of Cu was coated on SiC particles. The influence of pH value on the coating process was analyzed. A powder metallurgy method was used to prepare the Al-based metal matrix composites (MMCs). SEM, XRD techniques were used to characterize the sintered compacts. It was found that the optimized pH value during the coating process was 1{proportional_to}2. The specimen showed the maximum density when sintered at 750 C. Inter-metallic compound of Al{sub 3.21}Si{sub 0.47} was detected which contributed to the enhancement at the interface between SiC and Al. The hardness of the composites is improved to 90 MPa. (orig.)

  13. Blackberry wines mineral and heavy metal content determination after dry ashing: multivariate data analysis as a tool for fruit wine quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidžić Klarić, Daniela; Klarić, Ilija; Mornar, Ana; Velić, Darko; Velić, Natalija

    2015-08-01

    This study brings out the data on the content of 21 mineral and heavy metal in 15 blackberry wines made of conventionally and organically grown blackberries. The objective of this study was to classify the blackberry wine samples based on their mineral composition and the applied cultivation method of the starting raw material by using chemometric analysis. The metal content of Croatian blackberry wine samples was determined by AAS after dry ashing. The comparison between an organic and conventional group of investigated blackberry wines showed statistically significant difference in concentrations of Si and Li, where the organic group contained higher concentrations of these compounds. According to multivariate data analysis, the model based on the original metal content data set finally included seven original variables (K, Fe, Mn, Cu, Ba, Cd and Cr) and gave a satisfactory separation of two applied cultivation methods of the starting raw material.

  14. Classification of Structure Defects of Metal Matrix Castings with Saturated Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawdzińska K.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Definition of a composite [1] describes an ideal composite material with perfect structure. In real composite materials, structure is usually imperfect - composites contain various types of defects [2, 3-5], especially as the casted composites are of concern. The reason for this is a specific structure of castings, related to course of the manufacturing process. In case of metal matrix composite castings, especially regarding these manufactured by saturation, there is no classification of these defects [2, 4]. Classification of defects in castings of classic materials (cast iron, cast steel, non-ferrous alloys is insufficient and requires completion of specific defects of mentioned materials. This problem (noted during manufacturing metal matrix composite castings with saturated reinforcement in Institute of Basic Technical Sciences of Maritime University Szczecin has become a reason of starting work aimed at creating such classification. As a result, this paper was prepared. It can contribute to improvement of quality of studied materials and, as a consequence, improve the environment protection level.

  15. Classification of Structure Defects of Metal Matrix Castings with Saturated Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gawdzińska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Definition of a composite [1] describes an ideal composite material with perfect structure. In real composite materials, structure isusually imperfect – composites contain various types of defects [2, 3–5], especially as the casted composites are of concern. The reason for this is a specific structure of castings, related to course of the manufacturing process. In case of metal matrix composite castings, especially regarding these manufactured by saturation, there is no classification of these defects [2, 4]. Classification of defects in castings of classic materials (cast iron, cast steel, non-ferrous alloys is insufficient and requires completion of specific defects of mentioned materials. This problem (noted during manufacturing metal matrix composite castings with saturated reinforcement in Institute of Basic Technical Sciences of Maritime University Szczecin has become a reason of starting work aimed at creating such classification. As a result, this paper was prepared. It can contribute to improvement of quality of studied materials and, as a consequence, improve the environment protection level.

  16. Corrosion and Erosion-Corrosion Processes of Metal-Matrix Composites in Slurry Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. F.; Neville, A.; Kapur, N.; Gnanavelu, A.

    2012-03-01

    The corrosion and erosion-corrosion (EC) processes of four metal-matrix composites (MMCs) in a simulated cooling water environment have been assessed in this article. The MMCs consisted of two Ni-base and two Fe-base matrices alloyed with different concentrations of chromium, molybdenum, boron, silicon, and carbon; the matrices were reinforced with tungsten carbide (WC) particles. The corrosion behavior has been investigated using a combination of potentiostatic polarization and post-tests surface analysis. The EC processes were studied by in situ electrochemical techniques measuring the current density and corrosion potential response at different slurry temperatures and sand content. At static conditions it was found that as the temperature increased, there was a transition from a homogeneous corrosion of the matrix to an interfacial corrosion mechanism. The Ni-base MMCs showed a better corrosion resistance and interestingly a highly alloyed matrix did not significantly improved MMC's corrosion resistance. In the in situ EC tests, the Fe-base MMCs showed a constant increase in the current density at all sand contents. Whereas, significant changes were not observed in the Ni-base MMCs below 0.5 g/L. Although sand content had an effect on the monitored current density (the current increased as the sand content increased) this effect was less pronounced above 3 g/L.

  17. Macro-mechanical material model for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    CERN Document Server

    Banks-Sills, L

    1999-01-01

    The stress-strain behavior of a metal matrix composite reinforced with unidirectional, continuous and periodic fibers is investigated. Three-dimensional micro-mechanical analyses of a unit cell by means of the finite element method $9 and homogenization-localization are carried out. These calculations allow the determination of material behavior of the in-plane, as well as the fiber directions. The fibers are assumed to be elastic and the matrix elasto-plastic. $9 The matrix material is governed by a von Mises yield surface, isotropic hardening and an associated flow rule. With the aid of these analyses, the foundation to a macro-mechanical material model is presented which is employed to $9 consider an elementary problem. The model includes an anisotropic yield surface with isotropic hardening and an associated flow rule. A beam in bending containing square fibers under plane strain conditions is analyzed by means of $9 the model. Two cases are considered: one in which the fibers are symmetric with respect t...

  18. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travelli, A.

    1985-10-25

    A flat or curved plate structure, to be used as fuel in a nuclear reactor, comprises elongated fissionable wires or strips embedded in a metallic continuous non-fissionable matrix plate. The wires or strips are made predominantly of a malleable uranium alloy, such as uranium silicide, uranium gallide or uranium germanide. The matrix plate is made predominantly of aluminum or an aluminum alloy. The wires or strips are located in a single row at the midsurface of the plate, parallel with one another and with the length dimension of the plate. The wires or strips are separated from each other, and from the surface of the plate, by sufficient thicknesses of matrix material, to provide structural integrity and effective fission product retention, under neutron irradiation. This construction makes it safely feasible to provide a high uranium density, so that the uranium enrichment with uranium 235 may be reduced below about 20%, to deter the reprocessing of the uranium for use in nuclear weapons.

  19. Artificial neural network modeling of mechanical alloying process for synthesizing of metal matrix nanocomposite powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashtbayazi, M.R.; Shokuhfar, A.; Simchi, A.

    2007-01-01

    An artificial neural network model was developed for modeling of the effects of mechanical alloying parameters including milling time, milling speed and ball to powder weight ratio on the characteristics of Al-8 vol%SiC nanocomposite powders. The crystallite size and lattice strain of the aluminum matrix were considered for modeling. This nanostructured nanocomposite powder was synthesized by utilizing planetary high energy ball mill and the required data for training were collected from the experimental results. The characteristics of the particles were determined by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Two types of neural network architecture, i.e. multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF), were used. The steepest descent along with variable learning rate back-propagation algorithm known as a heuristic technique was utilized for training the MLP network. It was found that MLP network yields better results compared to RBF network, giving an acceptable mapping between the network responses and the target data with a high correlation coefficients. The response surfaces between the response variables, i.e. crystallite size, lattice strain of the aluminum matrix and the processing parameters are presented. The procedure modeling can be used for optimization of the MA process for synthesizing of nanostructured metal matrix nanocomposites

  20. An Assessment of Mechanical and Tribological Property of Hybrid Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Santosh Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials has huge requirement in the area of automobile, aerospace, and wear resistant applications. This study presents the synthesis of composite reinforced with SiC and Al2O3 using gravity stir casting. Stir casting is the manufacturing process that is incorporated to produce the composite material because of its extreme bonding capacity with base material. The composition of reinforcement with 6061 aluminium matrix is SiC-7.5% and Al2O3 -2.5% respectively. The average size of reinforcement particle is 30-40 microns. The synthesised composite casting is machined using EDM to prepare specimens for various tests. Microstructure study was carried and the microstructure images prove the existence and dispersion of reinforcement particles in the metal matrix. There is no visible porosity is observed. The hardness of the specimen is tested using Vickers hardness tester and found considerable increase when compare with parent alloy Al 6061. Also mechanical and tribological properties of hybrid Aluminium metal matrix composite were employed. The fortifying material, Silicon Carbide is composed of tetrahedral of carbon and silicon atoms with strong bonds in crystal lattice along with its excellent wear resistance property and alumina have high strength and wear resistance. To avoid enormous material wastage and to achieve absolute accuracy, wire-cut EDM process is capitalised to engrave the specimen as per required dimensions. Three Tensile test specimens were prepared, in order to achieve reliability in results as per ASTM- E8 standard, and the values were tabulated. Impact test was carried out and the readings were tabulated. Wear test was carried out using pin on disc wear test apparatus and the results show considerable increase in wear resistant property when compare with parent alloy Al6061.The above work proves the successful fabrication of composite and evaluation of properties.

  1. Synthesis of new metal-matrix Al-Al2O3-graphene composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshina, L. A.; Muradymov, R. V.; Kvashnichev, A. G.; Vichuzhanin, D. I.; Molchanova, N. G.; Pankratov, A. A.

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism of formation of ceramic microparticles (alumina) and graphene in a molten aluminum matrix is studied as a function of the morphology and type of precursor particles, the temperature, and the gas atmosphere. The influence of the composition of an aluminum composite material (as a function of the concentration and size of reinforcing particles) on its mechanical and corrosion properties, melting temperature, and thermal conductivity is investigated. Hybrid metallic Al-Al2O3-graphene composite materials with up to 10 wt % alumina microparticles and 0.2 wt % graphene films, which are uniformly distributed over the metal volume and are fully wetted with aluminum, are synthesized during the chemical interaction of a salt solution containing yttria and boron carbide with molten aluminum in air. Simultaneous introduction of alumina and graphene into an aluminum matrix makes it possible to produce hybrid metallic composite materials having a unique combination of the following properties: their thermal conductivity is higher than that of aluminum, their hardness and strength are increased by two times, their relative elongation during tension is increased threefold, and their corrosion resistance is higher than that of initial aluminum by a factor of 2.5-4. We are the first to synthesize an in situ hybrid Al-Al2O3-graphene composite material having a unique combination of some characteristics. This material can be recommended as a promising material for a wide circle of electrical applications, including ultrathin wires, and as a structural material for the aerospace industry, the car industry, and the shipbuilding industry.

  2. FLY ASH: AN ALTERNATIVE TO POWDERED ACTIVATED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    fly ash were measured through N2 adsorption at 77 K using a TRISTAR-3000 surface area and porosity analyzer (Micromeritics). Surface morphology of fly ash was characterized by a SM-. 6700F field emission scanning electron microscope. Table 2. Chemical composition of fly ash. Oxide of metal. Percentage composition.

  3. Method of reversibly immobilizing sulfate ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1984-01-01

    A sulphate ash at least 20% by weight of which consists of sulphates of transuranic elements is immobilised by heating to melting a mixture of the ash, a metal, and a fluxing agent; the metal used is Al, Ce, Sm, Eu or mixtures thereof and it is used in an amount sufficient to reduce the transuranic sulphates in the ash to metal and form an alloy with the metal so produced; sufficient of the fluxing agent is used to reduce the percentage of transuranic sulphates in the mix to form 1% to 10% of the mix and the molten mixture is cooled and the alloy containing the immobilised ash separated. (author)

  4. The effects of alkaline dosage and Si/Al ratio on the immobilization of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash-based geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Wang, Wei; Shi, Yunchun

    2010-04-01

    The present research explored the application of geopolymerization for the immobilization and solidification of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash. The influence of alkaline activator dosage and Si/Al molar ratio on the compressive strength and microstructure of MSWI fly ash-based geopolymer was investigated. A geopolymer with the highest strength was identified to occur at an intermediate alkaline activator dosage and Si/Al ratio, and the optimal Na/MSWI fly ash and Si/Al molar ratio was close to 2.8 mol kg(-1) and 2.0, respectively. IR spectra showed that higher alkaline activator dosage enhanced the structural disruption of the original aluminosilicate phases and a higher degree of polymerization of the geopolymer networks. At low Si/Al ratio, there was an increasing number of tetrahedral Al incorporating into the silicate backbone. As the Na/MSWI fly ash ratio increased, the microstructure changed from containing large macropores to more mesopores and micropores, indicating that more geopolymers are formed. Furthermore, the pore volume distribution of geopolymers was observed to shift to larger pores as the Si/Al ratio increased, which suggests that the soluble silicon content serves to reduce the amount of geopolymers. Heavy metal leaching was successfully elucidated using the first-order reaction/reaction-diffusion model. Combining the results from the microstructure of samples with the kinetic analysis, the immobilization mechanism of Cr, Cu, and Zn was inferred in this study. The methodologies described could provide a powerful set of tools for the systematic evaluation of element release from geopolymers. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Trivalent metal ions based on inorganic compounds with in vitro inhibitory activity of matrix metalloproteinase 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hanyu; Qin, Yuan; Zhong, Weilong; Li, Cong; Liu, Xiang; Shen, Yehua

    2016-10-01

    Collagenase-3 (MMP-13) inhibitors have attracted considerable attention in recent years and have been developed as a therapeutic target for a variety of diseases, including cancer. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) can be inhibited by a multitude of compounds, including hydroxamic acids. Studies have shown that materials and compounds containing trivalent metal ions, particularly potassium hexacyanoferrate (III) (K3[Fe(CN)6]), exhibit cdMMP-13 inhibitory potential with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.3μM. The target protein was obtained by refolding the recombinant histidine-tagged cdMMP-13 using size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The secondary structures of the refolded cdMMP-13 with or without metal ions were further analyzed via circular dichroism and the results indicate that upon binding with metal ions, an altered structure with increased domain stability was obtained. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments demonstrated that K3[Fe(CN)6]is able to bind to MMP-13 and endothelial cell tube formation tests provide further evidence for this interaction to exhibit anti-angiogenesis potential. To the best of our knowledge, no previous report of an inorganic compound featuring a MMP-13 inhibitory activity has ever been reported in the literature. Our results demonstrate that K3[Fe(CN)6] is useful as a new effective and specific inhibitor for cdMMP-13 which may be of great potential for future drug screening applications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Mercury and toxic metals in ash from combustion and incineration processes; Mercurio y metales toxicos en cenizas provenientes de procesos de combustion e incineracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugica, V.; Amador, M.A.; Torres, M.; Figueroa, J. de J. [Universidad Autonomo-Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Reynosa (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In Mexico, most of the ashes from combustion and incineration process were not appropriately disposed, they are either left on industrial yards and cliffs or thrown away in open spaces and then carried by the wind to places where they can harm population, affect aquatic environment or soils. For prevention and control, the knowledge on the concentration of trace elements in waste ashes is necessary. In this study, several oxidation methods for digestion of ashes followed by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry were evaluated. Hg, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and V were determined in ashes from coal and fuel oil combustion, as well as in ashes from the incineration of municipal, water treatment sludge, and medical wastes. Results showed important concentrations of different trace elements in the ashes. This suggests that adequate disposal of these wastes should be mandatory. On the other hand, concentration of trace elements in the leachates indicated that these wastes are not toxic and they could be disposed in sanitary landfill. 23 refs.

  7. Internal damping due to dislocation movements induced by thermal expansion mismatch between matrix and particles in metal matrix composites. [Al/SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girand, C.; Lormand, G.; Fougeres, R.; Vincent, A. (GEMPPM, Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-05-01

    In metal matrix composites (MMCs), the mechanical 1 of the reinforcement-matrix interface is an important parameter because it governs the load transfer from matrix to particles, from which the mechanical properties of these materials are derived. Therefore, it would be useful to set out an experimental method able to characterize the interface and the adjacent matrix behaviors. Thus, a study has been undertaken by means of internal damping (I.D.) measurements, which are well known to be very sensitive for studying irreversible displacements at the atomic scale. More especially, this investigation is based on the fact that, during cooling of MMC's, stress concentrations originating from differences in coefficients of thermal expansion (C.T.E.) of matrix and particles should induce dislocation movements in the matrix surrounding the reinforcement; that is, local microplastic strains occur. Therefore, during I.D. measurements vs temperature these movements should contribute to MMCs I.D. in a process similar to those involved around first order phase transitions in solids. The aim of this paper is to present, in the case of Al/SiC particulate composites, new developments of this approach that has previously led to promising results in the case of Al-Si alloys.

  8. Ash Management Review—Applications of Biomass Bottom Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpuneet S. Ghuman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In industrialized countries, it is expected that the future generation of bioenergy will be from the direct combustion of residues and wastes obtained from biomass. Bioenergy production using woody biomass is a fast developing application since this fuel source is considered to be carbon neutral. The harnessing of bioenergy from these sources produces residue in the form of ash. As the demand for bioenergy production increases, ash and residue volumes will increase. Major challenges will arise relating to the efficient management of these byproducts. The primary concerns for ash are its storage, disposal, use and the presence of unburned carbon. The continual increase in ash volume will result in decreased ash storage facilities (in cases of limited room for landfill expansion, as well as increased handling, transporting and spreading costs. The utilization of ash has been the focus of many studies, hence this review investigates the likely environmental and technological challenges that increased ash generation may cause. The presence of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, chlorine, sulphur and silicon influences the reactivity and leaching to the inorganic phases which may have significant impacts on soils and the recycling of soil nutrient. Discussed are some of the existing technologies for the processing of ash. Unburned carbon present in ash allows for the exploration of using ash as a fuel. The paper proposes sieve fractionation as a suitable method for the separation of unburnt carbon present in bottom ash obtained from a fixed-bed combustion system, followed by the application of the gasification technology to particle sizes of energy importance. It is hoped that this process will significantly reduce the volume of ash disposed at landfills.

  9. Creep-fatigue behaviour of aluminum alloy-based metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbera, Daniele; Chen, Haofeng; Liu, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) represents a valuable option as structural material for different type of structures and components. Despite this they struggle to become widely adopted due to expensive manufacturing process and complex microstructural behaviour. When subjected to cyclic load conditions the structural response of MMC is not trivial, and becomes even more difficult when high temperature load is involved. Different failure mechanisms would happen and they are originated by the different material properties between the fibre and surrounding matrix. Among all, the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficient is recognized to be the dominant one. The significantly differing coefficients of thermal expansion between ceramic and metal give rise to micro thermal stresses, which enhance the initiation of matrix micro cracks. Their performance under varying load and high temperature is complex, and hence it is difficult to have a clear understanding of the structural responses, especially when fatigue and creep damages become the main failures of MMCs. To improve current understanding of the relationship between creep fatigue interaction of MMCs, the history of thermal and mechanical loading, and the creep dwell period, a highly accurate but robust direct simulation technique on the basis of the Linear Matching Method (LMM) framework has been proposed in this paper, and been applied to model the fatigue and creep behaviour of MMCs. A homogenised FE model is considered in all analyses, which consist of continuous silicon carbide fibres embedded in a square 2024T3 aluminium alloy matrix array. Various factors that affect creep and fatigue behaviours of composites are analysed and discussed, including effects of the applied load level, dwell period and temperature on the MMC's performance. The effects of reversed plasticity on stress relaxation and creep deformation of MMC are investigated, and the behaviours of cyclically enhanced creep and elastic follow-up are

  10. Production of ceramic nanoparticles through self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) and their introduction into a metallic matrix to form metal matrix composites (MMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuechterlein, Jacob

    Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) is a self-sustaining combustion reaction of reactant powders typically in the form of compacted pellets to form a desired product species. The reactants are ignited in one or more locations by several different techniques. After ignition the reaction travels as a wave through the pellet exothermically converting the reactants into products as it propagates. In this case the products are formed as discrete ceramic particles of TiC, Al2O3 and SiC. The goal of this research was to reduce the size of the particles formed by this technique from a diameter of 1-5μm to less than 100nm with the goal of then incorporating these nanoparticles as reinforcements in Al metal matrix composites. To accomplish this, many different SHS principles were studied and their associated variables were changed to reduce the combustion temperature of each reacting system. Several of these systems were investigated and discarded for a number of reasons such as: low ignition or high combustion temperatures, dangerous reaction conditions, or undesirable product densities and morphologies. The systems chosen exhibited low material costs, low combustion temperatures, and a wide range of stabilities when lowering the reaction temperature. The reacting systems pursued were based around the aluminothermic reduction of TiO2 in the presence of carbon to form TiC and Al2O 3. The combustion temperature of this reaction was reduced from 2053ºC to less than 1100ºC, which had a corresponding effect on the particle size of the products, reducing the average diameter of the particles to less than 100nm. This was accomplished by providing high heating rates, controlling the green density and adding diluents to the reaction such as Al, TiC, SiC or Al2O3. Cooling experiments were also investigated, but the cooling rate was found to have no effect on the particle size.

  11. A novel matrix derivatized from hydrophilic gigaporous polystyrene-based microspheres for high-speed immobilized-metal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jian-Bo; Huang, Yong-Dong; Jing, Guang-Lun; Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhou, Wei-Qing; Zhu, Hu; Lu, Jian-Ren

    2011-05-01

    Agarose coated gigaporous polystyrene microspheres were evaluated as a novel matrix for immobilized-metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). With four steps, nickel ions were successfully immobilized on the microspheres. The gigaporous structure and chromatographic properties of IMAC medium were characterized. A column packed with the matrix showed low column backpressure and high column efficiency at high flow velocity. Furthermore, this matrix was used for purifying superoxide dismutase (SOD), which was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) in submerged fermentation, on an Äkta purifier 100 system under different flow velocities. The purity of the SOD from this one-step purification was 79% and the recovery yield was about 89.6% under the superficial flow velocity of 3251 cm/h. In conclusion, all the results suggested that the gigaporous matrix has considerable advantages for high-speed immobilized-metal affinity chromatography. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Machinability and Tribological Properties of Stir Cast LM6/SiC/GR Hybrid Metal Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahat Montasser S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis on machining characteristics in turning of LM6/SiC/Gr hybrid metal matrix composites is made of (Al-11.8%Si/SiC/Gr hybrid metal matrix composites. The process performances such as porosity, wear rate of the composites, tool wear, tool life, specific modulus, surface roughness and material removal rate with equal weight fraction of SiC and Gr particulates of 3%, 7%, 10% and 13% reinforcement are investigated. This experimental analysis and test results on the machinability of Al/SiCMMC will provide essential guidelines to the manufacturers. Hybird metal matrix composites reinforced with graphite particles posses better machinability and tribological properties.

  13. Matrix Sputtering Method: A Novel Physical Approach for Photoluminescent Noble Metal Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yohei; Corpuz, Ryan D; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2017-12-19

    Noble metal nanoclusters are believed to be the transition between single metal atoms, which show distinct optical properties, and metal nanoparticles, which show characteristic plasmon absorbance. The interesting properties of these materials emerge when the particle size is well below 2 nm, such as photoluminescence, which has potential application particularly in biomedical fields. These photoluminescent ultrasmall nanoclusters are typically produced by chemical reduction, which limits their practical application because of the inherent toxicity of the reagents used in this method. Thus, alternative strategies are sought, particularly in terms of physical approaches, which are known as "greener alternatives," to produce high-purity materials at high yields. Thus, a new approach using the sputtering technique was developed. This method was initially used to produce thin films using solid substrates; now it can be applied even with liquid substrates such as ionic liquids or polyethylene glycol as long as these liquids have a low vapor pressure. This revolutionary development has opened up new areas of research, particularly for the synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles with dimensions below 10 nm. We are among the first to apply the sputtering technique to the physical synthesis of photoluminescent noble metal nanoclusters. Although typical sputtering systems have relied on the effect of surface composition and viscosity of the liquid matrix on controlling particle diameters, which only resulted in diameters ca. 3-10 nm, that were all plasmonic, our new approach introduced thiol molecules as stabilizers inspired from chemical methods. In the chemical syntheses of metal nanoparticles, controlling the concentration ratio between metal ions and stabilizing reagents is a possible means of systematic size control. However, it was not clear whether this would be applicable in a sputtering system. Our latest results showed that we were able to generically produce a

  14. Effect of nano size 3% wt TaC particles dispersion in two different metallic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, U.U.; Oliveira, L.A.; Souza, C.P.; Menezes, R.C.; Furukava, M.; Torres, Y.

    2009-01-01

    This work studies the characteristics of two different metallic matrixes composites, ferritic and austenitic steels, reinforced with 3% wt nano size tantalum carbide by powder metallurgy. The starting powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of the nano sized carbide dispersion on the matrix microstructures and its consequences on the mechanical properties were identified. The preliminary results showed that the sintering were influenced by morphology and the distribution of carbide and the alloys. (author)

  15. Magnetic response from a composite of metal-dielectric particles in the visible range: T-matrix simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zhuromskyy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The optical response of a particle composed of a dielectric core surrounded by a densely packed shell of small metal spheres is simulated with the superposition Tmatrix method for realistic material parameters. In order to compute the electric and magnetic particle polarizabilities a single expansion T-matrix is derived from a particle centered T-matrix. Finally the permeability of a medium comprising such particles is found to deviate considerable from unity resulting in a noticeable optical response.

  16. The Process of Nanostructuring of Metal (Iron Matrix in Composite Materials for Directional Control of the Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zemtsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We justified theoretical and experimental bases of synthesis of new class of highly nanostructured composite nanomaterials based on metal matrix with titanium carbide nanowires as dispersed phase. A new combined method for obtaining of metal iron-based composite materials comprising the powder metallurgy processes and the surface design of the dispersed phase is considered. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1 preparation of porous metal matrix; (2 surface structuring of the porous metal matrix by TiC nanowires; (3 pressing and sintering to give solid metal composite nanostructured materials based on iron with TiC nanostructures with size 1–50 nm. This material can be represented as the material type “frame in the frame” that represents iron metal frame reinforcing the frame of different chemical compositions based on TiC. Study of material functional properties showed that the mechanical properties of composite materials based on iron with TiC dispersed phase despite the presence of residual porosity are comparable to the properties of the best grades of steel containing expensive dopants and obtained by molding. This will solve the problem of developing a new generation of nanostructured metal (iron-based materials with improved mechanical properties for the different areas of technology.

  17. Energy recovery of metallic aluminium in MSWI bottom ash : Different approaches to hydrogen production from MSWI bottom ash: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Most of the wastes in Sweden end up in incinerator plants. These trashes are full of metals, especially aluminium, which will not oxidize, they can’t always be recycled and they will instead oxidize in water and leak hydrogen gas to its surrounding. Estimations calculate it could be an average potential of around 40-50 kWh/ton of burnt trash. Ignoring the imported trash, the national recovery potential of Sweden’s 4,3 million tonnes of trash would then be equal to 170-220 GWh/year due to non-...

  18. Influence of fly ash aided phytostabilisation of Pb, Cd and Zn highly contaminated soils on Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens metal transfer and physiological stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopareva-Pohu, Alena; Verdin, Anthony; Garcon, Guillaume; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Pourrut, Bertrand; Debiane, Djouher; Waterlot, Christophe; Laruelle, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    Due to anthropogenic activities, large extends of soils are highly contaminated by Metal Trace Element (MTE). Aided phytostabilisation aims to establish a vegetation cover in order to promote in situ immobilisation of trace elements by combining the use of metal-tolerant plants and inexpensive mineral or organic soil amendments. Eight years after Coal Fly Ash (CFA) soil amendment, MTE bioavailability and uptake by two plants, Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens, were evaluated, as some biological markers reflecting physiological stress. Results showed that the two plant species under study were suitable to reduce the mobility and the availability of these elements. Moreover, the plant growth was better on CFA amended MTE-contaminated soils, and the plant sensitivity to MTE-induced physiological stress, as studied through photosynthetic pigment contents and oxidative damage was lower or similar. In conclusion, these results supported the usefulness of aided phytostabilisation of MTE-highly contaminated soils. - Highlights: → Aided phytostabilisation aims to establish a vegetation cover in order to promote immobilisation of MTE. → 8 years after the soil amendments, a pot culture study was carried out in greenhouse conditions. → MTE bioavailability and uptake by the two plants was drastically decreased with amendments. → Our results support the usefulness of aided phytostabilisation of MTE-highly contaminated soils. → CFA addition contributed to the reduction of the MTE mobility and availability for the plants. - Efficiency of Coal Fly Ash amendment for phytostabilisation of Pb, Cd and Zn in MTE-highly contaminated soils.

  19. Modeling of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Under Compression: Microstructure Effect on Shear Band Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Qiu, Kun; Sun, Longgang; Wu, Qingqing

    2018-01-01

    The relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical performance is the most important for metallic glass matrix composites (MGCs). Numerical modeling was performed on the shear banding in MGCs, and the impacts of particle concentration, morphology, agglomerate, size, and thermal residual stress were revealed. Based on the shear damage criterion, the equivalent plastic strain acted as an internal state variable to depict the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of shear bands. The element deletion technique was employed to describe the process of transformation from shear band to micro-crack. The impedance effect of particle morphology on the propagation of shear bands was discussed, whereby the toughening mechanism was clearly interpreted. The present work contributes to the subsequent strengthening and toughening design of MGCs.

  20. On the homogenization of metal matrix composites using strain gradient plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2014-01-01

    The homogenized response of metal matrix composites (MMC) is studied using strain gradient plasticity. The material model employed is a rate independent formulation of energetic strain gradient plasticity at the micro scale and conventional rate independent plasticity at the macro scale. Free...... condition. Micro-macro homogenization is performed observing the Hill-Mandel energy condition, and overall loading is considered such that the homogenized higher order terms vanish. The results highlight the intrinsic size-effects as well as the effect of fiber volume fraction on the overall response curves...... energy inside the micro structure is included due to the elastic strains and plastic strain gradients. A unit cell containing a circular elastic fiber is analyzed under macroscopic simple shear in addition to transverse and longitudinal loading. The analyses are carried out under generalized plane strain...

  1. Design, analysis, and testing of a metal matrix composite web/flange intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, S. B.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Moran, S. G.; Olliffe, R.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and analytical program to study the local design details of a typical T-shaped web/flange intersection made from a metal matrix composite is described. Loads creating flange bending were applied to specimens having different designs and boundary conditions. Finite element analyses were conducted on models of the test specimens to predict the structural response. The analyses correctly predict failure load, mode, and location in the fillet material in the intersection region of the web and the flange when specimen quality is good. The test program shows the importance of fabrication quality in the intersection region. The full-scale test program that led to the investigation of this local detail is also described.

  2. Wear Behavior of Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Prepared from Industrial Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, L Francis; Suresh, Paramasivam

    2016-01-01

    With an increase in the population and industrialization, a lot of valuable natural resources are depleted to prepare and manufacture products. However industrialization on the other hand has waste disposal issues, causing dust and environmental pollution. In this work, Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite is prepared by reinforcing 10 wt% and 20 wt% of wet grinder stone dust particles an industrial waste obtained during processing of quarry rocks which are available in nature. In the composite materials design wear is a very important criterion requiring consideration which ensures the materials reliability in applications where they come in contact with the environment and other surfaces. Dry sliding wear test was carried out using pin-on-disc apparatus on the prepared composites. The results reveal that increasing the reinforcement content from 10 wt% to 20 wt% increases the resistance to wear rate.

  3. Development of new metal matrix composite electrodes for electrical discharge machining through powder metallurgy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mathalai Sundaram

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical discharge machining (EDM is one of the widely used nontraditional machining methods to produce die cavities by the erosive effect of electrical discharges. This method is popular due to the fact that a relatively soft electrically conductive tool electrode can machine hard work piece. Copper electrode is normally used for machining process. Electrode wear rate is the major drawback for EDM researchers. This research focus on fabrication of metal matrix composite (MMC electrode by mixing copper powder with titanium carbide (TiC and Tungsten carbide (WC powder through powder metallurgy process, Copper powder is the major amount of mixing proportion with TiC and WC. However, this paper focus on the early stage of the project where powder metallurgy route was used to determine suitable mixing time, compaction pressure and sintering and compacting process in producing EDM electrode. The newly prepared composite electrodes in different composition are tested in EDM for OHNS steel.

  4. Comparison of various tool wear prediction methods during end milling of metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiciak, Martyna; Twardowski, Paweł; Wojciechowski, Szymon

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the problem of tool wear prediction during milling of hard-to-cut metal matrix composite Duralcan™ was presented. The conducted research involved the measurements of acceleration of vibrations during milling with constant cutting conditions, and evaluation of the flank wear. Subsequently, the analysis of vibrations in time and frequency domain, as well as the correlation of the obtained measures with the tool wear values were conducted. The validation of tool wear diagnosis in relation to selected diagnostic measures was carried out with the use of one variable and two variables regression models, as well as with the application of artificial neural networks (ANN). The comparative analysis of the obtained results enable.

  5. Wear Behavior of Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Prepared from Industrial Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Francis Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With an increase in the population and industrialization, a lot of valuable natural resources are depleted to prepare and manufacture products. However industrialization on the other hand has waste disposal issues, causing dust and environmental pollution. In this work, Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite is prepared by reinforcing 10 wt% and 20 wt% of wet grinder stone dust particles an industrial waste obtained during processing of quarry rocks which are available in nature. In the composite materials design wear is a very important criterion requiring consideration which ensures the materials reliability in applications where they come in contact with the environment and other surfaces. Dry sliding wear test was carried out using pin-on-disc apparatus on the prepared composites. The results reveal that increasing the reinforcement content from 10 wt% to 20 wt% increases the resistance to wear rate.

  6. Investigation of Selective Laser Melting Surface Alloyed Aluminium Metal Matrix Dispersive Reinforced Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburov, V. V.; Dimitrova, R. B.; Kandeva, M. K.; Sofronov, Y. P.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the improvement of mechanical properties and in particular wear resistance of laser surface alloyed dispersive reinforced thin layers produced by selective laser melting (SLM) technology. The wear resistance investigation of aluminium matrix composite layers in the conditions of dry friction surface with abrasive particles and nanoindentation tests were carried out. The process parameters (as scan speed) and their impact on the wear resistant layers have been evaluated. The alloyed layers containing metalized SiC particles were studied by Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). The obtained experimental results of the laser alloyed thin layers show significant development of their wear resistance and nanohardness due to the incorporated reinforced phase of electroless nickel coated SiC particles.

  7. Investigation of the microcrack evolution in a Ti-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The initiation and evolution behavior of the shear-bands and microcracks in a Ti-based metallic-glass–matrix composite (MGMC were investigated by using an in-situ tensile test under transmission electron microscopy (TEM. It was found that the plastic deformation of the Ti-based MGMC related with the generation of the plastic deformation zone in crystalline and shear deformation zone in glass phase near the crack tip. The dendrites can suppress the propagation of the shear band effectively. Before the rapid propagation of cracks, the extending of plastic deformation zone and shear deformation zone ahead of crack tip is the main pattern in the composite.

  8. Micromechanical modeling of tungsten-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hao [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Li Ke [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, TAMU 3123, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)]. E-mail: keli@tamu.edu; Subhash, Ghatu [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Kecskes, Laszlo J. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Dowding, Robert J. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Micromechanics models are developed for tungsten (W)-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) matrix composites employing the Voronoi tessellation technique and the finite element (FE) method. The simulation results indicate that the computed elastic moduli are close to those measured in the experiments. The predicted stress-strain curves agree well with their experimentally obtained counterparts in the early stage of the plastic deformation. An increase in the W volume fraction leads to a decrease in the yield stress and an increase in the Young's modulus of the composite. In addition, contours of equivalent plastic strain for increasing applied strains provide an explanation why shear bands were observed in the glassy phase, along the W/BMG interface, and in the W phase of failed W/BMG composite specimens.

  9. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J.-H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: j.h.you@ipp.mpg.de

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated.

  10. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, J.-H.

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated

  11. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  12. Influence of fly ash aided phytostabilisation of Pb, Cd and Zn highly contaminated soils on Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens metal transfer and physiological stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopareva-Pohu, A.; Verdin, A.; Garcon, G.; Sahraoui, A.L.H.; Pourrut, B.; Debiane, D.; Waterlot, C.; Laruelle, F.; Bidar, G.; Douay, F.; Shirali, P. [University of Lille Nord France, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    Due to anthropogenic activities, large extends of soils are highly contaminated by Metal Trace Element (MTE). Aided phytostabilisation aims to establish a vegetation cover in order to promote in situ immobilisation of trace elements by combining the use of metal-tolerant plants and inexpensive mineral or organic soil amendments. Eight years after Coal Fly Ash (CFA) soil amendment, MTE bioavailability and uptake by two plants, Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens, were evaluated, as some biological markers reflecting physiological stress. Results showed that the two plant species under study were suitable to reduce the mobility and the availability of these elements. Moreover, the plant growth was better on CFA amended MTE-contaminated soils, and the plant sensitivity to MTE-induced physiological stress, as studied through photosynthetic pigment contents and oxidative damage was lower or similar. In conclusion, these results supported the usefulness of aided phytostabilisation of MTE-highly contaminated soils.

  13. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the quantitative analysis of metals in sediments using natural zeolite matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austria, E. S.; Fuentes, E. M.; Nuesca, G. M.; Lamorena, R. B.

    2017-10-01

    The dependence of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the matrix of the sample remains an important consideration in performing quantitative analysis. In this study, a new matrix was introduced in the preparation of solid powder calibration curves. Heat-treated natural zeolite and KBr were mixed separately into high purity metal powders to generate calibration curves using a univariate approach. A LIBS technique was used in the detection and quantitative analysis of Cr, Cu and Pb in river sediment samples. The relative percent difference (RPD) was calculated to describe the variability measurements made using ICP/OES and LIBS as well as to evaluate the accuracy of the method. Calculated limits of detection in the matrices prepared were comparable with literature values and ranged from 0.41 to 6.1 ppm. The resulting metal concentrations indicate that the natural zeolite matrix were closer to the reference values compared to the KBr matrix. By employing principal component analysis (PCA), heat treated zeolite was shown as a potential diluent or binder for generating calibration curves and could provide matrix-matched standards in identification of target metals from unknown sediment samples. The natural zeolite appeared to closely simulate the ablation behavior and property of the samples, and it is found to be a potential suitable matrix for the quantitative LIBS analysis of sediments.

  14. Fabrication and Tribological Behavior of Stir Cast Mg/B4C Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amandeep; Bala, Niraj

    2017-10-01

    Magnesium-based metal matrix composites (MMMCs) have emerged as good alternative material to conventional materials due to their promising advanced properties. In the present work, magnesium-based metal matrix composites (MMMCs) reinforced with B4C particles were successfully fabricated by cost-effective conventional stir casting technique. MMMCs with an average particle size of 63 µm and different weight percent (wt pct) of B4C between 3 and 12 were fabricated. Wear tests were carried out using a pin-on-disk against a steel disk under dry sliding condition at loads that varied between 1 and 5 kg at fixed sliding velocity of 1 m/s. The wear data clearly showed that wear resistance of cast composites is better than that of unreinforced magnesium, which is attributed to dispersion hardening caused by carbide particles. An increase in wt pct of B4C showed the wear resistance and hardness to increase significantly. The wear rate and coefficient of friction increased with an increase in applied load. The SEM and EDS analysis of the worn surfaces delineated the dominant wear mechanisms to be abrasion, adhesion, and oxidation under the different sliding conditions. At lower loads, the wear mechanism transformed from severe abrasive wear in pure magnesium (Mg) to mild abrasion, slight delamination, and oxidation in the Mg/12 wt pct B4C fabricated composite. At higher loads, severe abrasion, adhesion, delamination, and oxidation were found to be the major wear mechanisms in pure Mg, whereas in the Mg/12 wt pct B4C fabricated composites the corresponding mechanisms were mild abrasion, mild adhesion, slight delamination, and oxidation.

  15. Fabrication process optimization for improved mechanical properties of Al 7075/SiCp metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti Kanta Das

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Two sets of nine different silicon carbide particulate (SiCp reinforced Al 7075 Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs were fabricated using liquid metallurgy stir casting process. Mean particle size and weight percentage of the reinforcement were varied according to Taguchi L9 Design of Experiments (DOE. One set of the cast composites were then heat treated to T6 condition. Optical micrographs of the MMCs reveal consistent dispersion of reinforcements in the matrix phase. Mechanical properties were determined for both as-cast and heat treated MMCs for comparison of the experimental results. Linear regression models were developed for mechanical properties of the heat treated MMCs using list square method of regression analysis. The fabrication process parameters were then optimized using Taguchi based grey relational analysis for the multiple mechanical properties of the heat treated MMCs. The largest value of mean grey relational grade was obtained for the composite with mean particle size 6.18 µm and 25 weight % of reinforcement. The optimal combination of process parameters were then verified through confirmation experiments, which resulted 42% of improvement in the grey relational grade. Finally, the percentage of contribution of each process parameter on the multiple performance characteristics was calculated through Analysis of Variance (ANOVA.

  16. Twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) and work hardening in Ti-based metallic glass matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J; Qiao, J W; Wang, Z H; Rao, W; Kang, G Z

    2017-05-12

    The present study demonstrates that Ti-based metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a normal composition of Ti 43 Zr 32 Ni 6 Ta 5 Be 14 containing ductile dendrites dispersed in the glass matrix has been developed, and deformation mechanisms about the tensile property have been investigated by focusing on twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) effect. The Ti-based MGMC has excellent tensile properties and pronounced tensile work-hardening capacity, with a yield strength of 1100 MPa and homogeneous elongation of 4%. The distinguished strain hardening is ascribed to the formation of deformation twinning within the dendrites. Twinning generated in the dendrites works as an obstacle for the rapid propagation of shear bands, and then, the localized necking is avoided, which ensures the ductility of such kinds of composites. Besides, a finite-element model (FEM) has been established to explain the TWIP effect which brings out a work-hardening behavior in the present MGMC instead of a localized strain concentration. According to the plasticity theory of traditional crystal materials and some new alloys, TWIP effect is mainly controlled by stacking fault energy (SFE), which has been analyzed intensively in the present MGMC.

  17. Metal Matrix Superconductor Composites for Flight-Weight Microwave Lightcraft Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, Dan A.; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2008-01-01

    Flight-weight superconducting magnets are designed for a 20-m diameter MicroWave LightCraft (MWLC). The twin coil unit with storage capacity of 900 MJ, is made of structural carbon fiber filaments with a superconducting MgCNi 3 high current density film surface layer, imbedded in a beryllium stabilizer matrix of high electrical and thermal conductivity. These 'bucking' magnets run circumferentially about the lightcraft rim, and provide a 2-Tesla magnetic field necessary for the craft's hypersonic MHD slipstream accelerator. Each magnet is comprised of a single 22 cm diameter, hollow cylindrical cable made from metal matrix composites for superconductors (MMC lowbar Sc) with integral coolant passageways for circulating liquid-helium coolant to prevent the magnets from warming above the superconductive transition temperature. Each is suspended inside a 30-cm diameter toroidal vacuum tube, braced by a radial mesh of high-strength insulating fibers loaded in tension. For a coil separation distance of 1.4 m, each coil has a calculated mass of 1365 kg which is within 2x of the ultimate objective

  18. Cu-TiB metal matrix composites prepared by powder metallurgy route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Z.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium boride (TiB is characterized by good conductivity, high strength and high melting point. In this work, TiB was used to make Cu-TiB metal matrix composites (MMCs. Amounts of TiB added into Cu matrix were 2wt.%, 5wt.%, 10 wt.% and 15 wt.%. The samples were pressed at pressures of 500MPa, 600MPa, 700MPa and 800MPa and sintered at 820o and 920o, respectively. The properties of the sintered composites such as hardness and impact toughness were studied. Hardness and impact toughness of samples increased with increasing pressures and decreased with increasing contents of TiB. Composite with good mechanical properties and high conductivity was obtained from the sample containing 2wt.%TiB compacted at 800MPa and sintered at 920o. It was shown that 2wt.% TiB is a suitable content to make Cu-TiB MMCs with good mechanical properties and excellent conductivity.

  19. Dry Sliding Wear behaviour of Aluminium-Red mud- Tungsten Carbide Hybrid metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi Chinta, Neelima; Selvaraj, N.; Mahesh, V.

    2016-09-01

    Red mud is an industrial waste obtained during the processing of alumina by Bayer's process. An attempt has been made to utilize the solid waste by using it as the reinforcement material in metal matrix composites. Red mud received from NALCO has been subjected for sieve analysis and milled to 42 nanometers using high energy ball mill. Red mud is used as a reinforcement material in Pure Aluminium matrix composite at 2%, 4%, and 6% weight at 100 microns level as well as 42 nano meters along with 4%Tungsten carbide by weight. Micro and Nano structured red mud powders, Tungsten carbide powder and Aluminium is mixed in a V-Blender, compacted at a pressure of 40 bar and samples are prepared by conventional sintering with vacuum as medium. In this current work, dry sliding wear characteristics at normal and heat treatment conditions are investigated with optimal combination of Aluminium, Tungsten carbide and different weight fractions of micro and nano structured red mud powder.

  20. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide - cobalt chromium, chromium carbide - nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the MMC aligns with the improved dispersion of reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix.

  1. Improved Mechanical and Tribological Properties of Metal-Matrix Composites Dispersion-Strengthened by Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii Levashov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Co- and Fe-based alloys produced by powder technology are being widely used as a matrix for diamond-containing composites in cutting, drilling, grinding pplications, etc. The severe service conditions demand that the mechanical and tribological properties of these alloys be improved. Development of metal-matrix composites (MMCs and alloys reinforced with nanoparticles is a promising way to resolve this problem. In this work, we have investigated the effect of nano-sized WC, ZrO2, Al2O3, and Si3N4 additives on the properties of sintered dispersion-strengthened Co- and Fe-based MMCs. The results show an increase in the hardness (up to 10 HRB, bending strength (up to 50%, wear resistance (by a factor of 2–10 and a decrease in the friction coefficient (up to 4-fold of the dispersion-strengthened materials. The use of designed alloys as a binder of cutting diamond tools gave a 4-fold increment in the service life, without reduction in their cutting speed.

  2. Microstructure Analysis of Neutron Absorber Al/B4C Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of Al/B4C metal matrix composites (MMCs used as neutron absorbers in both dry storage casks and wet storage pools of spent nuclear fuel was analyzed by SEM and TEM. A polishing method of a focused Ga+ ion beam was used to obtain an ideal sample surface with very low roughness, which was used to statistically analyze the distribution characteristics and size factor of B4C particles in the aluminum matrix. The area of B4C particles mainly ranged from 0 to 0.5 μm2, which was the proportion of 64.29%, 86.99% and 76.86% of total statistical results for the Al-15%B4C, Al-25%B4C and Al-30%B4C MMCs, respectively. The average area of B4C particles in the Al-15%B4C, Al-25%B4C and Al-30%B4C MMCs were about 1.396, 0.528 and 1.183 μm2, respectively. The nanoscale precipitates were analyzed by the element mappings in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM mode and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS mode, which included elliptic alloy precipitates with elemental Cu, Cr, Fe and Si, except for Al, and B4C nanoparticles with polygonal shape. The interface characteristics showed that the (021 crystal plane of B4C particle and (111 crystal plane of aluminum matrix grew together. The lattice misfit was about 1.68% for (111Al//(021B4C. The corrosion properties and corresponding mechanism of Al/B4C MMCs were investigated in an aqueous solution with 5000 ppm boric acid at 100 °C and atmospheric pressure, which showed that the mass increment rate was first decreased with increasing corrosion time and then increased.

  3. A study of the diffusional behavior of a two-phase metal matrix composite exposed to a high temperature environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The progress of diffusion-controlled filament-matrix interaction in a metal matrix composite where the filaments and matrix comprise a two-phase binary alloy system was studied by mathematically modeling compositional changes resulting from prolonged elevated temperature exposure. The analysis treats a finite, diffusion-controlled, two-phase moving-interface problem by means of a variable-grid finite-difference technique. The Ni-W system was selected as an example system. Modeling was carried out for the 1000 to 1200 C temperature range for unidirectional composites containing from 6 to 40 volume percent tungsten filaments in a Ni matrix. The results are displayed to show both the change in filament diameter and matrix composition as a function of exposure time. Compositional profiles produced between first and second nearest neighbor filaments were calculated by superposition of finite-difference solutions of the diffusion equations.

  4. Study of the leaching of heavy metals from waste water sludge and incinerator's ash, using coupled thermostated columns and DTPA as complex agent; Estudio de la extraccion de metales pesados de lodos y cenizas de aguas residuales usando columnas termostatizadas acopladas y DTPA como agente complejante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vite T, J.; Vite T, M.; Guerrero D, J.; Carreno de Leon, M.C. [Departamento de Estudios del Ambiente, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    We studied the metallic composition from waste water sludge and incinerators ashes of an incinerator located in Toluca, Mexico, the qualitative studies were made using the Activation Analysis technique, and fluorescence X-ray techniques. The quantitative analysis of heavy metals in the wastes were made using Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (Icp-Aes). For leaching the samples, we used four coupled thermostated columns, each one had a p H of 2,5, 7 and 10. The flux of the air was of 1600 cc/min. The temperature was maintain constant in 60 Centigrade using a thermostated system. For this study we used 100 g of wastes mixed with mineral acid or sodium hydroxide to reach p H 2,5,7 and 10. We added a reducing and tensoactive agents and finally DTPA as complex agent. With this method, we obtain a better leaching efficiency using a complex agent. However the high DTPA cost, make this process expansive that is why we recommend to work with another classes of complex agents, that be cheaper to leach metals of different chemistry matrix. (Author)

  5. Polymer-Derived In- Situ Metal Matrix Composites Created by Direct Injection of a Liquid Polymer into Molten Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarshan; Terauds, Kalvis; Anilchandra, A. R.; Raj, Rishi

    2014-02-01

    We show that a liquid organic precursor can be injected directly into molten magnesium to produce nanoscale ceramic dispersions within the melt. The castings made in this way possess good resistance to tensile deformation at 673 K (400 °C), confirming the non-coarsening nature of these dispersions. Direct liquid injection into molten metals is a significant step toward inserting different chemistries of liquid precursors to generate a variety of polymer-derived metal matrix composites.

  6. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxley, Chett [Park City, UT

    2012-05-15

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  7. Extraction of toxic and valuable metals from wastewater sludge and ash arising from RECICLAGUA, a treatment plant for residual waters applying the leaching technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero D, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Presently work, the technique is applied of having leached using coupled thermostatted columns, the X-ray diffraction for the identification of the atomic and molecular structure of the metals toxic that are present in the residual muds of a treatment plant of water located in the municipality of the Estado de Mexico, RECICLAGUA, likewise the techniques is used of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence analysis for the qualitative analysis. We took samples of residual sludge and incinerated ash of a treatment plant waste water from the industrial corridor Toluca-Lerma RECICLAGUA, located in Lerma, Estado de Mexico. For this study 100 g. of residual of sludge mixed with a solution to 10% of mineral acid or sodium hydroxide according to the case, to adjust the one p H at 2, 5, 7 and 10, bisulfite was added, of 0.3-1.5 g of dodecyl sulfate of sodium and 3.93 g of DTPA (triple V). Diethylene triamine penta acetate. These sludges and ashes were extracted from toxic and valuable metals by means of the leaching technique using coupled thermostated columns that which were designed by Dr. Jaime Vite Torres, it is necessary to make mention that so much the process as the apparatus with those that one worked was patented by him same. With the extraction of these metals, benefits are obtained, mainly of economic type, achieving the decrease of the volume of those wastes that have been generated; as well as the so much use of those residuals, once the metals have been eliminated, as of those residuals, once the metals have been eliminated, as of those liquors, the heavy metals were extracted. It was carried out a quantitative analysis using Icp mass spectroscopy, this way to be able to know the one content of the present metals in the samples before and after of leaching them, these results reported a great quantity of elements. Another of the techniques employees was the analysis by X-ray diffraction that provides an elementary content of the

  8. DETERMINATION OF METAL CONTENT AND AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL USE OF WASTE CASHEW NUT ASH (CNSA) AS SOURCE FOR POTASH PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Bosede Ogundiran; Joshua Olajiire Babayemi; Chima Gregory Nzeribe

    2011-01-01

    The potential use of waste cashew nut shell (CNS) ash as a source for potash production was investigated in this study. Managing waste ash generated from cashew nut processing is a major challenge, as land filling and open dumping of the waste ashes have been the main options in management of the ash in Nigeria. Economically viable ways of using waste ash rather than having to dispose of it have to be investigated. The CNS was air-dried for 4 weeks and combusted to ashes; the resulting ash wa...

  9. EVALUATION & COMPARISION OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ALUMINIUM ALLOY 5052 REINFORCED WITH SILICONCARBIDE, GRAPHITE AND FLY ASH HYBRID METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    ANKUSH SACHDEVA; RAM NARAYAN; R.D.GUPTA

    2013-01-01

    The engineering fraternity has always been looking forward to develop an outstanding and wonder-materials which would fit the ever-changing demands of the world. In order to fullfill the demands various newdiscoveries have been made by scientists, engineers and resrearchers. In todays competitive world many, materials have been tried for various unexplored conditions , but the never ending demand of the world encourages the researchers to develop the new material. Now the researchers are prep...

  10. Determination of macro, essential trace elements, toxic heavy metal concentrations, crude oil extracts and ash composition from Saudi Arabian fruits and vegetables having medicinal values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana R. Alzahrani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of essential elements (Mg, Ca, Na, K, Fe, Zn, Se, Al, Ni, and Cu and toxic heavy metals (Pb, As, Cr, Cd, and Cr from Saudi Arabian fruits and vegetables were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrophotometry (ICP/OES. Two types of butters, Caralluma munbayana and Caralluma hesperidum, Vigna (Vigna unguiculata, common fig (Ficus carica, Annona seeds (Annonaceae seeds, Annona fruits (Annonaceae fruits, Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare, and Fennel flowers (Nigella sativa were investigated, because they are used by indigenous groups as traditional medicines with Soxhlet-extraction and dry-ashing protocol. The estimated daily dietary element intake in food samples was further calculated in order to evaluate the element dietary intake and fruit and vegetable consumption pattern of the indigenes of Saudi Arabia. The crude oil and ash compositions varied widely, but suggested that most of the foods were good sources of oils and minerals. The figures-of-merit of the ICP-OES calibration curves were excellent with good linearity (R2 > 0.9921. The use of ICP-OES in this study allowed the accurate analysis and the detection of the elements at low levels. Essential elements (K, Ca, Na, and Mg had the highest concentrations while toxic heavy metals (As, Pb, and Cd had the lowest in the foods. Essential element pairs (Mg-Na, Mg-Ca, Fe-Al were highly correlated, suggesting that these foods are sources of multiple nutrients. Toxic element pairs (Pb-Cd, Pb-As, and Cd-As, however, were poorly correlated in the foods, suggesting that these elements do not have a common source in these foods. Average consumption of these foods should provide the recommended daily allowances of essential elements, but will not expose consumers to toxic heavy metals. The ICP-OES method was validated by determining method detection limits and percent recoveries of laboratory-fortified blanks, which were generally 90–100%.

  11. Wear resistance of WCp/Duplex Stainless Steel metal matrix composite layers prepared by laser melt injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do Nascimento, A. M.; Ocelik, V.; Ierardi, M. C. F.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Melt Injection (LMI) was used to prepare metal matrix composite layers with a thickness of about 0.7 mm and approximately 10% volume fraction of WC particles in three kinds of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels (CDSSs). WC particles were injected into the molten surface layer using Nd:YAG high power

  12. Engineering Behavior and Characteristics of Wood Ash and Sugarcane Bagasse Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Grau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomasses are organic materials that are derived from any living or recently-living structure. Plenty of biomasses are produced nationwide. Biomasses are mostly combusted and usually discarded or disposed of without treatment as biomass ashes, which include wood and sugarcane bagasse ashes. Thus, recycling or treatment of biomass ashes leads to utilizing the natural materials as an economical and environmental alternative. This study is intended to provide an environmental solution for uncontrolled disposal of biomass ashes by way of recycling the biomass ash and replacing the soils in geotechnical engineering projects. Therefore, in this study, characteristic tests of wood and sugarcane bagasse ashes that are considered the most common biomass ashes are conducted. The test of chemical compositions of biomass ashes is conducted using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, and heavy metal analysis is also conducted. Engineering behaviors including hydraulic conductivity, constrained modulus and shear modulus are examined. Also, coal fly ash Class C is used in this study for comparison with biomass ashes, and Ottawa 20/30 sands containing biomass ashes are examined to identify the soil replacement effect of biomass ashes. The results show that the particle sizes of biomass ashes are halfway between coal fly ash Class C and Ottawa 20/30 sand, and biomass ashes consist of a heterogeneous mixture of different particle sizes and shapes. Also, all heavy metal concentrations were found to be below the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA maximum limit. Hydraulic conductivity values of Ottawa 20/30 sand decrease significantly when replacing them with only 1%–2% of biomass ashes. While both the constrained modulus and shear modulus of biomass ashes are lower than Ottawa 20/30 sand, those of mixtures containing up to 10% biomass ashes are little affected by replacing the soils with biomass ashes.

  13. Leaching characteristics of residual lateritic soils stabilised with fly ash and lime for geotechnical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, R K; Mahanta, C

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of residual lateritic soils as fill material for various construction activities is often limited by the difficulty in handling them. Attempt to improve their workability with fly ash and lime has shown promising results, although accompanied by risk of release of heavy metal leachates to the groundwater. In the present work, the leaching properties from residual lateritic soils from a part of Northeast India stabilised with fly ash and lime (CaO) was investigated with the help of single batch leaching test and column leaching test for different soil-fly ash-lime mixes. Test results show that the high pH induced by lime treatment of the mixes helps in keeping most of the metals within the stabilised soil matrix. Although the heavy metal concentrations in the leachates were generally within permissible limits, the release response for different metals was different suggesting implications for permeate solutions having metal pre-concentrations, such as those emanating from hazardous landfill sites. The observed characteristics provide insights towards the potential and realistic estimates of leaching of metals and its variation due to change in fly ash and lime content in the stabilised mix. Many of these constituents found in the stabilised soil had a first-flush phenomenon. But, as they occur only for short duration (about 5 pore volumes over 5 days) and at low concentration, dilution effect may eliminate them. The effect of continuous permeation on the flow parameters and the leaching pattern of the mixes have also been highlighted.

  14. Current Methods to Detoxify Fly Ash from Waste Incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallgren, Christine; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    vitrification, electric arc and melting in a secondary combustion chamber by adding coke as a heating source (coke bed melting furnaces) or residual carbon in the fly ash (Rotary surface melting furnace) are the most common methods. In general, vitrification processes require a high-energy input and are therefore relatively cost intensive. Locking the hazardous components into the matrix by a stabilization/solidification with cement is a common alternative to decontamination. Mixing the fly ash with cement or asphalt is widely used for the reuse of fly ash from coal incineration, but it requires careful attention to any leaching of heavy metals if applied to fly ash from waste incineration. Studies by mixing fly ash with cement at concentrations from 5 to 70 % showed, that in most cases an additional pretreatment step, e.g. washing in HNO{sub 3} solution, is necessary to receive acceptable leaching behaviour and required properties as building material. Related European regulations are currently pending. On the other hand, the use of fly ash as filler for asphalt does not require any pretreatment and is already commonly applied in some countries such as the Netherlands as a well-established method. Solvent extraction methods such as acidic extraction (3R-process) or combined basic and acidic extraction (MR-process) are also designed to remove the contaminants. The effectiveness of these methods is only moderate and a further thermal treatment is required to destroy the dioxins. These methods require relatively high amounts of chemicals and wastewater management. However, they are supposed to be relatively cost effective. Other treatment options that are being tested at laboratory scale such as microbiological treatment and supercritical extraction are optimistic but have no realistic practical relevance at this state.

  15. Characteristics and metal leachability of incinerated sewage sludge ash and air pollution control residues from Hong Kong evaluated by different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-Shan; Xue, Qiang; Fang, Le; Poon, Chi Sun

    2017-06-01

    The improper disposal of incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA) and air pollution control residues (APCR) from sewage sludge incinerators has become an environmental concern. The physicochemical, morphological and mineralogical characteristics of ISSA and APCR from Hong Kong, and the leachability and risk of heavy metals, are presented in this paper. The results showed that a low hydraulic and pozzolanic potential was associated with the ISSA and APCR due to the presence of low contents of SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and CaO and high contents of P, S and Cl (especially for APCR). Although high concentrations of Zn and Cu (especially for ISSA) followed by Ni, Pb and As, Se were detected, a low leaching rate of these metals (especially at neutral and alkaline pH) rendered them classifiable as non-hazardous according to the U.S. EPA and Chinese national regulatory limits. The leached metals concentrations from ISSA and APCR were mainly pH dependent, and metals solubilization occurred mainly at low pH. Different leaching tests should be adopted based on the simulated different environmental conditions and exposure scenarios for assessing the leachability as contrasting results could be obtained due to the differences in complexing abilities and final pH of the leaching solutions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muchova, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm),

  17. Effects of Wood Ash on Soil Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz Paredes, Carla

    Reutilizing biomass ash on soil has been proposed to counteract soil acidity and to save fertilizer inputs by recycling valuable nutrients contained in biomass ash such as calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P). However, the heavy metal content of biomass ashes, such as cadmium (Cd...... in agricultural and forest soils focusing on soil microbial communities’ composition and function, particularly mycorrhizal fungi. Two study sites were used for this study, one in an agricultural field where different biomass ashes were evaluated as replacements for P fertilizers in barley, and a second one...... of wood ash with factorial additions of lime and Cd to disentangle the pH and Cd effects of wood ash amendments using community trait distributions. Barley yield, P content, and Cd content were not affected by biomass ashes. Some arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal species were reduced when biomass ashes...

  18. Obtainment, machining and wear of metal matrix composites processed by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Edilson Rosa Barbosa de.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was the obtainment of metal matrix composites (MMC) by the route of powder metallurgy, and the valuation of these materials with relation to their machining and wear characteristics. Firstly, were obtained pure commercial aluminium matrix composites materials, with 5, 10 and 15% volumetric fraction of silicon carbide particles. Was also obtained a material without reinforcement particles in order to verify by comparison, the influence of addition of reinforcement particles. The obtained materials were characterized physics (hydrostatic density), mechanics (hardness and tensile tests) and microstructurally (optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). The results showed a homogeneous distribution of reinforcement particles in the composite, and improvement in the mechanical properties, mainly tensile strength (UTS) in comparison to the unreinforced material. After, tests were made to verify the materials behavior during machining and to check the performance of several tool materials (cemented carbide, ceramics and polycrystalline diamond). In these tests, values of the cutting force were measured by instrumented tool-holders. Phenomena such as tool wear, built-up edge formation and mechanism of chip formation were also observed and evaluated. The results from the cemented carbide tool tests, were utilised for the machinability index determination of each material. These results were applied to the Taylor equation and the equation constants for each material and test conditions were determined. The results showed that the inclusion of silicon carbide particles made extremely difficult the machining of the composites, and only with diamond tool, satisfactory results were obtained. At last, wear tests were performed to verify the influence of the reinforcement particles in the characteristics of wear resistance of the materials. The results obtained were utilized in the wear coefficient determination for each material. The

  19. H-binding of size- and polarity-fractionated soil and lignite humic acids after removal of metal and ash components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosos, Marios; Leenheer, Jerry A.; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2014-01-01

    A fractionation technique, combining dialysis removal of metal and ash components with hydrofluoric acid and pH 10 citrate buffer followed by chromatography of dialysis permeate on XAD-8 resin at decreasing pH values, has been applied to lignite humic acid (lignite-HA) and soil humic acid (soil-HA). H-binding data and non ideal competitive adsorption-Donnan model parameters were obtained for the HA fractions by theoretical analysis of H-binding data which reveal a significant increase of the carboxyl and the phenolic charge for the lignite-HA fractions vs. the parental lignite humic acid (LParentalHA). The fractionated lignite-HA material consisted mainly of permeate fractions, some of which were fulvic acid-like. The fractionated soil-HA material consisted mainly of large macromolecular structures that did not permeate the dialysis membrane during deashing. Chargeable groups had comparable concentrations in soil-HA fractions and parental soil humic acid (SParentalHA), indicating minimal interference of ash components with carboxyl and phenolic (and/or enolic) groups. Fractionation of HA, combined with theoretical analysis of H-binding, can distinguish the supramolecular vs. macromolecular nature of fractions within the same parental HA.

  20. Evaluation of metal matrix composite to replace spheroidal graphite iron for a critical component, steering knuckle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayarangan, S.; Rajamanickam, N.; Sivananth, V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A FE model is developed to study the suitability of MMC for steering knuckle. ► Structural analysis of steering knuckle is carried out for 12 load cases. ► The cross section of the critical region is optimized using genetic algorithm. ► The life of the MMC (Al-10 wt.% TiC) knuckle is compared before and after optimization. ► MMC material could replace SG iron for automotive steering knuckle. -- Abstract: Steering knuckle is considered as one of the critical component in automotive suspension system. It is subjected to time varying loads during its service life, leading to fatigue failure. Therefore, its design is an important aspect in the product development cycle. Currently, spheroidal graphite (SG) iron is widely used to manufacture steering knuckle in the commercial automobile sector. It has been observed from the knuckle manufacturers that advanced materials and weight reduction are the real need for the current automobile industry. Due to their high strength to weight ratio, Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have the potential to meet the demanded design requirements of the automotive industry, compared to conventional materials. In this work, an aluminum alloy reinforced with titanium carbide particulate is suggested as an alternate material in place of existing SG iron. Structural analysis of steering knuckle made of alternate material Al-10 wt.% TiC was performed using commercial code ANSYS. The results of steering knuckle made of MMC (Al-10 wt.% TiC) were compared with that of aluminum alloy and SG iron steering knuckles for its performance based on real time load cases. It is found from this analysis, the knuckle strut region has maximum stress and deflection during its life time. The critical strut region cross section area of knuckle was analyzed and geometrically optimized for minimum bending stress and deflection using genetic algorithm available in MatLab. Since, the knuckle experiences time varying loads, fatigue analysis also

  1. Fabrication of metal matrix composite by semi-solid powder processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yufeng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Various metal matrix composites (MMCs) are widely used in the automotive, aerospace and electrical industries due to their capability and flexibility in improving the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of a component. However, current manufacturing technologies may suffer from insufficient process stability and reliability and inadequate economic efficiency and may not be able to satisfy the increasing demands placed on MMCs. Semi-solid powder processing (SPP), a technology that combines traditional powder metallurgy and semi-solid forming methods, has potential to produce MMCs with low cost and high efficiency. In this work, the analytical study and experimental investigation of SPP on the fabrication of MMCs were explored. An analytical model was developed to understand the deformation mechanism of the powder compact in the semi-solid state. The densification behavior of the Al6061 and SiC powder mixtures was investigated with different liquid fractions and SiC volume fractions. The limits of SPP were analyzed in terms of reinforcement phase loading and its impact on the composite microstructure. To explore adoption of new materials, carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated as a reinforcing material in aluminum matrix using SPP. The process was successfully modeled for the mono-phase powder (Al6061) compaction and the density and density distribution were predicted. The deformation mechanism at low and high liquid fractions was discussed. In addition, the compaction behavior of the ceramic-metal powder mixture was understood, and the SiC loading limit was identified by parametric study. For the fabrication of CNT reinforced Al6061 composite, the mechanical alloying of Al6061-CNT powders was first investigated. A mathematical model was developed to predict the CNT length change during the mechanical alloying process. The effects of mechanical alloying time and processing temperature during SPP were studied on the mechanical, microstructural and

  2. Improvement of Tribological Properties of Metal Matrix Composites by Means of Slide Burnishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr BEDNARSKI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Burnishing of metal surfaces can affect positively tribological and mechanical properties such as fatigue strength, wear resistance, contact stiffness and bearing capacity. Burnishing affects the entire surface topography, including surface roughness, radii of curvature of peaks and valleys, slope angles and more. We have studied A1Mg1SiCu (6xxx series aluminum matrix composites with a reinforcing phase of Al2O3 which exhibits good workability but poor machinability. The second series studied was based on an AlSi alloy (A-390 reinforced with SiC – this one characterized by poor workability but good machinability. Materials have been prepared by mixing metal powders with the reinforcement, cold pressing, sintering, hot extrusion and heat treatment. We have determined surface roughness with a Hommel tester; the arithmetical mean for A1Mg1SiCu (A6061 + Al2O3 was ~1 µm before burnishing and ~0.15 mm after burnishing. We have also determined the bearing capacity at 50 % with the same tester: before burnishing 2.30 µm and 0.47 µm afterwards for A6061 + Al2O3; before 2.30 µm, afterwards 0.37 µm for A390 + SiC. Vickers microhardness at the surface with respect to the core increases 30 % for the Al2O3 containing composite and 50 % for the SiC containing composite.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.4.2404

  3. Ash in the Soil System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, P.

    2012-04-01

    Ash is the organic and inorganic residue produced by combustion, under laboratory and field conditions. This definition is far away to be accepted. Some researchers consider ash only as the inorganic part, others include also the material not completely combusted as charcoal or biochar. There is a need to have a convergence about this question and define clear "what means ash". After the fire and after spread ash onto soil surface, soil properties can be substantially changed depending on ash properties, that can be different according to the burned residue (e.g wood, coal, solid waste, peppermill, animal residues), material treatment before burning, time of exposition and storage conditions. Ash produced in boilers is different from the produced in fires because of the material diferent propertie and burning conditions. In addition, the ash produced in boilers is frequently treated (e.g pelletization, granulation, self curing) previously to application, to reduce the negative effects on soil (e.g rapid increase of pH, mycorrhiza, fine roots of trees and microfauna). These treatments normally reduce the rate of nutrients dissolution. In fires this does not happen. Thus the implications on soil properties are logically different. Depending on the combustion temperature and/or severity, ash could have different physical (e.g texture, wettability) and chemical properties (e.g amount and type of total and leached nutrients) and this will have implications on soil. Ash can increase and decrease soil aggregation, wettablity and water retention, bulk density, runoff and water infiltration. Normally, ash increases soil pH, Electrical Conductivity, and the amount of some basic nutrients as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. However it is also a potential source of heavy metals, especially if ash pH is low. However the effect of ash on soil in space and time depends especially of the ash amount and characteristics, fire temperature, severity, topography, aspect

  4. Effect of fly ash from a fuel oil power station on heavy metal content of wild plants at Tenerife island, the Canarian archipelago, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, C.E.; Fernandez, M.; Iglesias, E.; Perez, N.; Snelling, R.

    1993-01-01

    Heavy metal analysis have been carried out in wild plants around a Power Station located at the southeastern area of Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain). The concentrations of Fe, Ni, and V in the leaves and terminal stems of three wild plants (Euphorbia obtusifolia, Kleinia neriifolia, and Plocama pendula) which were collected during the spring of 1988 are reported from four different allotments. These sampling sites were located at distances of 0.4, 1, 1, 25, and 34 km from the Electric Generating Facility, and at elevations of 60, 120, 180 and 60 m, respectively. Results show a potential contamination of vanadium in E. obtusifolia and P. pendula plants located close to the Power Station, probably due to dry deposition on fly ash in the surrounding area. The levels of iron and nickel concentrations in the same type of plants did not show any geographical relationship with respect to the location of the Power Station. 19 refs., 4 figs

  5. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  6. Investigation, evaluation and analysis of SiCp nano particle metal matrix nano composite using a hybrid process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Pradyut Kumar; Sahool, Ashok Kumar; Das, Ratnakar; Padhi, Payodhar

    2018-02-01

    The present study was performed on mixing of fine powder of aluminum and silicon carbide nano particles 25nm size each. In this process, aluminum works as matrix and silicon carbide works as reinforcement with volume fraction of 1, 1.5 and 2%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microscopy techniques were used for crystal structure and micro structural characterization of the nano composite material. The objective of study was to achieve uniform distribution of SiCp nano particles in the aluminum matrix. The effect of reinforcement of Silicon carbide nano particle size and its volume fraction with aluminum encouraged investigation of stress strain response, elastic modulus and yield strength of nano composite metal matrix. Nano indentation and compression test were performed to characterize the nano composite material. Yield strength, compressive strength and elastic modulus were obtained from the compression test. Whereas, nano indentation results gave the yield strength, maximum shear stress and elastic modulus. The tensile test was conducted to find out the ultimate tensile strength. FESEM and EDAX techniques were also used to evaluate the different elements and their properties of Aluminum and SiCp nano particle metal matrix nano composite. The study reveals that in the liquid metal nano particle were uniformly dispersed and the segregation of the particles near the grain boundaries is due to pushing of the nano particle during growth of grain.

  7. Analysis of semi-solid processing for metal matrix composite synthesis using factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kratus Ranieri

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal in this work is to conduct a quantitative analysis of the mechanical stir casting process for obtaining particulate metal matrix composites. A combined route of stirring at semi-solid state followed by stirring at liquid state is proposed. A fractional factorial design was developed to investigate the influence and interactions of factors as: time, rotation, initial fraction and particle size, on the incorporated fraction. The best incorporations were obtained with all factors at high levels, as well as that very long stirring periods have no strong influence being particle size and rotation the most important factors on the incorporated fraction. Particle wetting occurs during stirring at semi-solid state, highlighting the importance of the interactions between particles and the alloy globularized phase. The role of the alloying element Mg as a wettability-promoting agent is discussed. The shear forces resulting from the stirring system is emphasized and understood as the effect of rotation itself added to the propeller blade geometry.

  8. Investigation of abrasion in Al–MgO metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muharr em Pul; Çalin, Recep; Gül, Ferhat

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of reinforcement volume fractions on abrasive wear behavior were examined in Al–MgO reinforced metal matrix composites of 5%, 10% and 15% reinforcement – volume ratios produced by melt-stirring. Abrasive wear tests were carried out by 60, 80 and 100 mesh sized Al 2 O 3 abrasive papers and pin-on-disc wear test apparatus under 10, 20 and 30 N loads at 0.2 m/s sliding speed. The mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture strength were determined. Subsequent to the wear tests, the microstructures of worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscope analyses. While increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite resulted increased hardness, fracture strength was determined to decrease. Additionally, it was found that increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite was accompanied with increased wear loss and porosity as well as reinforcement – volume ratio was identified to be significant determinants of abrasive wear behavior

  9. On the homogenization of metal matrix composites using strain gradient plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Reza; Niordson, Christian F.; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2014-04-01

    The homogenized response of metal matrix composites (MMC) is studied using strain gradient plasticity. The material model employed is a rate independent formulation of energetic strain gradient plasticity at the micro scale and conventional rate independent plasticity at the macro scale. Free energy inside the micro structure is included due to the elastic strains and plastic strain gradients. A unit cell containing a circular elastic fiber is analyzed under macroscopic simple shear in addition to transverse and longitudinal loading. The analyses are carried out under generalized plane strain condition. Micro-macro homogenization is performed observing the Hill-Mandel energy condition, and overall loading is considered such that the homogenized higher order terms vanish. The results highlight the intrinsic size-effects as well as the effect of fiber volume fraction on the overall response curves, plastic strain distributions and homogenized yield surfaces under different loading conditions. It is concluded that composites with smaller reinforcement size have larger initial yield surfaces and furthermore, they exhibit more kinematic hardening. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. MOORA-Based Tribological Studies on Red Mud Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of an experimental investigation on the effects of applied load, sliding velocity, wt.% of reinforcement and hardness of the counterface material in dry sliding wear studies performed on red mud-based aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC. The specific wear rate and the coefficient of friction are considered as the output quality characteristics. Taguchi-based L9 orthogonal array has been used to accomplish the objective of the experimental study. Analysis of variance (ANOVA is employed to find the optimal setting and the effect of each parameter on the output performance characteristics. It has been observed that optimal factor setting for each output performance is different. In order to minimize the two responses simultaneously, multiobjective optimization based on ratio analysis (MOORA is adopted. MOORA revealed that the optimal combination of the dry sliding wear parameters for the multiperformance characteristics of the red mud based aluminium is the set normal load at 20 N, sliding velocity 3 m/s, % of reinforcement 20%, and counterface hardness of the material 58 HRC.

  11. Investigation of Product Performance of Al-Metal Matrix Composites Brake Disc using Finite Element Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatchurrohman, N; Marini, C D; Suraya, S; Iqbal, AKM Asif

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand of fuel efficiency and light weight components in automobile sectors have led to the development of advanced material parts with improved performance. A specific class of MMCs which has gained a lot of attention due to its potential is aluminium metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs). Product performance investigation of Al- MMCs is presented in this article, where an Al-MMCs brake disc is analyzed using finite element analysis. The objective is to identify the potentiality of replacing the conventional iron brake disc with Al-MMCs brake disc. The simulation results suggested that the MMCs brake disc provided better thermal and mechanical performance as compared to the conventional cast iron brake disc. Although, the Al-MMCs brake disc dissipated higher maximum temperature compared to cast iron brake disc's maximum temperature. The Al-MMCs brake disc showed a well distributed temperature than the cast iron brake disc. The high temperature developed at the ring of the disc and heat was dissipated in circumferential direction. Moreover, better thermal dissipation and conduction at brake disc rotor surface played a major influence on the stress. As a comparison, the maximum stress and strain of Al-MMCs brake disc was lower than that induced on the cast iron brake disc. (paper)

  12. Micro-strain Evolution and Toughening Mechanisms in a Trimodal Al-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzheng; Topping, Troy D.; Yang, Hanry; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Schoenung, Julie M.; Nutt, Steven R.

    2015-03-01

    A trimodal metal matrix composite (MMC) based on AA (Al alloy) 5083 (Al-4.4Mg-0.7Mn-0.15Cr wt pct) was synthesized by cryomilling powders followed by compaction of blended powders and ceramic particles using two successive dual mode dynamic forgings. The microstructure consisted of 66.5 vol pct ultrafine grain (UFG) region, 30 vol pct coarse grain (CG) region and 3.5 vol pct reinforcing boron carbide particles. The microstructure imparted high-tensile yield strength (581 MPa) compared to a conventional AA 5083 (242 MPa) and enhanced ductility compared to 100 pct UFG Al MMC. The deformation behavior of the heterogeneous structure and the effects of CG regions on crack propagation were investigated using in situ scanning electron microscopy micro-tensile tests. The micro-strain evolution measured using digital image correlation showed early plastic strain localization in CG regions. Micro-voids due to the strain mismatch at CG/UFG interfaces were responsible for crack initiation. CG region toughening was realized by plasticity-induced crack closure and zone shielding of disconnected micro-cracks. However, these toughening mechanisms did not effectively suppress its brittle behavior. Further optimization of the CG distribution (spacing and morphology) is required to achieve toughness levels required for structural applications.

  13. Investigation on Leaching Behaviour of Fly Ash and Bottom Ash Replacement in Self-Compacting Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    Fly ash and bottom ash are some of the waste generated by coal-fired power plants, which contains large quantities of toxic and heavy metals. In recent years, many researchers have been interested in studying on the properties of self-compacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash but there was very limited research from the combination of fly ash and bottom ash towards the environmental needs. Therefore, this research was focused on investigating the leachability of heavy metals of SCC incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash by using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure and Static Leaching Test. The samples obtained from the coal-fired power plant located at Peninsula, Malaysia. In this study, the potential heavy metals leached out from SCC that is produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a substitute for sand with the ratios from 10% to 30% respectively were designated and cast. There are eight heavy metals of concern such as As, Cr, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mn and Fe. The results indicated that most of the heavy metals leached below the permissible limits from the United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization limit for drinking water. As a conclusion, the minimum leaching of the heavy metals from the incorporation of fly ash and bottom ash in self-compacting concrete was found in 20% of fly ash and 20% of bottom ash replacement. The results also indicate that this incorporation could minimize the potential of environmental problems.

  14. Machinability of Al-SiC metal matrix composites using WC, PCD and MCD inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beristain, Jokin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is the study of the machinability of aluminium-silicon carbide Metal Matrix Composites (MMC in turning operations. The cutting tools used were hard metal (WC with and without coating, different grades and geometries of Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD and Mono-Crystalline Diamond (MCD. The work piece material was AMC225xe, composed of aluminium-copper alloy AA 2124 and 25% wt of SiC, being the size of the SiC particles around 3 μm. Experiments were conducted at various cutting speeds and cutting parameters in facing finishing operations, measuring the surface roughness, cutting forces and tool wear. The worn surface of the cutting tool was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. It was observed that the Built Up Edge (BUE and stuck material is higher in the MCD tools than in the PCD tools. The BUE acts as a protective layer against abrasive wear of the tool.El objetivo de este trabajo es el estudio de la maquinabilidad del material compuesto de matriz metálica aluminio-carburo de silicio en operaciones de torneado. Las herramientas de corte utilizadas han sido de metal duro con y sin recubrimiento, diferentes grados de diamante policristalino (PCD y diamante monocristalino (MCD. El material mecanizado ha sido AMC225xe, compuesto de la aleación de aluminio AA 2124 con un 25% en peso de partículas de SiC con un tamaño medio de 3 μm. Los experimentos se han realizado con diferentes velocidades de corte en una operación de refrentado, midiendo la rugosidad superficial, las fuerzas y el desgaste de la herramienta. La superficie desgastada de la herramienta ha sido examinada en el microscopio electrónico (SEM. Se ha observado que el filo recrecido y el material adherido son mayores en el caso de las herramientas de MCD que en las de PCD. El filo recrecido actúa como una capa protectora contra la abrasión.

  15. Durability and Damage Tolerance of High Temperature Advanced Titanium Metal Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghonem, H

    2000-01-01

    The bridging fatigue crack growth damage mechanisms in a unidirectional SiC/Ti MMC include matrix cracking, fiber/matrix interface debonding and sliding along bridging fibers and fracture of these fibers...

  16. Anti-oxidative and inflammatory responses induced by fly ash particles and carbon black in lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diabate, Silvia; Plaumann, Diana; Uebel, Caroline; Weiss, Carsten [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bergfeldt, Britta [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Technical Chemistry, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Combustion-derived nanoparticles as constituents of ambient particulate matter have been shown to induce adverse health effects due to inhalation. However, the components inducing these effects as well as the biological mechanisms are still not fully understood. The fine fraction of fly ash particles collected from the electrostatic precipitator of a municipal solid waste incinerator was taken as an example for real particles with complex composition released into the atmosphere to study the mechanism of early biological responses of BEAS-2B human lung epithelial cells. The studies include the effects of the water-soluble and -insoluble fractions of the fly ash and the well-studied carbon black nanoparticles were used as a reference. Fly ash induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased the total cellular glutathione (tGSH) content. Carbon black also induced ROS generation; however, in contrast to the fly ash, it decreased the intracellular tGSH. The fly ash-induced oxidative stress was correlated with induction of the anti-oxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 and increase of the redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2. Carbon black was not able to induce HO-1. ROS generation, tGSH increase and HO-1 induction were only induced by the insoluble fraction of the fly ash, not by the water-soluble fraction. ROS generation and HO-1 induction were markedly inhibited by pre-incubation of the cells with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine which confirmed the involvement of oxidative stress. Both effects were also reduced by the metal chelator deferoxamine indicating a contribution of bioavailable transition metals. In summary, both fly ash and carbon black induce ROS but only fly ash induced an increase of intracellular tGSH and HO-1 production. Bioavailable transition metals in the solid water-insoluble matrix of the fly ash mostly contribute to the effects. (orig.)

  17. Distribution and leaching characteristics of trace elements in ashes as a function of different waste fuels and incineration technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqib, Naeem; Bäckström, Mattias

    2015-10-01

    Impact of waste fuels (virgin/waste wood, mixed biofuel (peat, bark, wood chips) industrial, household, mixed waste fuel) and incineration technologies on partitioning and leaching behavior of trace elements has been investigated. Study included 4 grate fired and 9 fluidized boilers. Results showed that mixed waste incineration mostly caused increased transfer of trace elements to fly ash; particularly Pb/Zn. Waste wood incineration showed higher transfer of Cr, As and Zn to fly ash as compared to virgin wood. The possible reasons could be high input of trace element in waste fuel/change in volatilization behavior due to addition of certain waste fractions. The concentration of Cd and Zn increased in fly ash with incineration temperature. Total concentration in ashes decreased in order of Zn>Cu>Pb>Cr>Sb>As>Mo. The concentration levels of trace elements were mostly higher in fluidized boilers fly ashes as compared to grate boilers (especially for biofuel incineration). It might be attributed to high combustion efficiency due to pre-treatment of waste in fluidized boilers. Leaching results indicated that water soluble forms of elements in ashes were low with few exceptions. Concentration levels in ash and ash matrix properties (association of elements on ash particles) are crucial parameters affecting leaching. Leached amounts of Pb, Zn and Cr in >50% of fly ashes exceeded regulatory limit for disposal. 87% of chlorine in fly ashes washed out with water at the liquid to solid ratio 10 indicating excessive presence of alkali metal chlorides/alkaline earths. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Fresh Bottom Ash Characteristics Dependence on Fractional Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgita Seniūnaitė; Saulius Vasarevičius

    2017-01-01

    Waste incineration process generates two main by-products streams: fly ash and bottom ash. Bottom ash is composed of a variety of oxides, heavy metals and salts. Chemical materials distributed unevenly in different fractions of bottom ash. This study investigates the heavy metals (Pb, Cd) content dependence of bottom ash and fraction composition. Studies were performed with five different fractions (0–2 mm; 2–5.6 mm; 5.6–11.2 mm; 11.2–22,4 mm; 22.4–40 mm) of fresh bottom ash. After a one-step...

  19. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peat, Tom, E-mail: tompeat12@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose Street, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios [Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose Street, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); McNutt, Philip [TWI Ltd., Granta Park, Cambridge CB21 6AL (United Kingdom); Iqbal, Naveed [TWI Technology Centre, Wallis Way, Catcliff, Rotherham, S60 5TZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • WC-CoCr, Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings were cold spray deposited on AA5083 and friction stir processed. • The SprayStirred WC-CoCr demonstrated a hardness increase of 100% over the cold sprayed coating. • As-deposited and SprayStirred coatings were examined under slurry erosion test conditions. • Mass and volume loss was measured following 20-min exposure to the slurry. • The WC-CoCr and Al2O3 demonstrated a reduction in volume loss of approx. 40% over the cold sprayed coating. - Abstract: This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide – cobalt chromium, chromium carbide – nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the

  20. Metal-organic frameworks in mixed-matrix membranes for gas separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanh Jeazet, Harold B; Staudt, Claudia; Janiak, Christoph

    2012-12-14

    Mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs) with metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as additives (fillers) exhibit enhanced gas permeabilities and possibly also selectivities when compared to the pure polymer. Polyimides (Matrimid®) and polysulfones are popular polymer matrices for MOF fillers. Presently investigated MOFs for MMMs include [Cu(SiF(6))(4,4'-BIPY)(2)], [Cu(3)(BTC)(2)(H(2)O)(3)] (HKUST-1, Cu-BTC), [Cu(BDC)(DMF)], [Zn(4)O(BDC)(3)] (MOF-5), [Zn(2-methylimidazolate)(2)] (ZIF-8), [Zn(purinate)(2)] (ZIF-20), [Zn(2-carboxyaldehyde imidazolate)(2)] (ZIF-90), Mn(HCOO)(2), [Al(BDC)(μ-OH)] (MIL-53(Al)), [Al(NH(2)-BDC)(μ-OH)] (NH(2)-MIL-53(Al)) and [Cr(3)O(BDC)(3)(F,OH)(H(2)O)(2)] (MIL-101) (4,4'-BIPY = 4,4'-bipyridine, BTC = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate, BDC = benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate, terephthalate). MOF particle adhesion to polyimide and polysulfone organic polymers does not represent a problem. MOF-polymer MMMs are investigated for the permeability of the single gases H(2), N(2), O(2), CH(4), CO(2) and of the gas mixtures O(2)/N(2), H(2)/CH(4), CO(2)/CH(4), H(2)/CO(2), CH(4)/N(2) and CO(2)/N(2) (preferentially permeating gas named first). Permeability increases can be traced to the MOF porosity. Since the porosity of MOFs can be tuned very precisely, which is not possible with polymeric material, MMMs offer the opportunity of significantly increasing the selectivity compared to the pure polymeric matrix. Additionally in most of the cases the permeability is increased for MMM membranes compared to the pure polymer. Addition of MOFs to polymers in MMMs easily yields performances similar to the best polymer membranes and gives higher selectivities than those reported to date for any pure MOF membrane for the same gas separation. MOF-polymer MMMs allow for easier synthesis and handability compared to pure MOF membranes.

  1. Neutron diffraction measurements and modeling of residual strains in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G. G.; Hubbard, C. R.; Misture, S. T.; Wang, X. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements at room temperature are used to characterize the residual strains in tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix, tungsten fiber-reinforced Kanthal matrix, and diamond particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites. Results of finite element modeling are compared with the neutron diffraction data. In tungsten/Kanthal composites, the fibers are in compression, the matrix is in tension, and the thermal residual strains are a strong function of the volume fraction of fibers. In copper matrix composites, the matrix is in tension and the stresses are independent of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers or diamond particles and the assumed stress free temperature because of the low yield strength of the matrix phase.

  2. Alkaline Treatment of Oil Palm Frond Fibers by Using Extract of Oil Palm EFB Ash for Better Adhesion toward Polymeric Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warman Fatra

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia, 187 million tons of biomass were produced from 8.11 million ha of oil palm plantation in 2009. This massive amount of biomass mainly consists of oil palm fronds (OPF and oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB, which are normally categorized as waste. The properties of OPF fibers compared to those of synthetic fibers, such as low density, low cost, less abrasion of equipment, and safer production, makes them an attractive reinforcement for composite materials. In this work, the utilization of oil palm empty fruit bunch ash for OPF fiber-polyester resin composite and the effect of process conditions were studied. Water absorption, tensile and flexural strength were used to characterize the effects of alkaline treatment on modified OPF fibers in polyester resin. The investigation focused on the effect of alkaline treatment time. Treatment temperature and liquid to solid ratio were analyzed using Response Surface Method-Central Composite Design (RSM-CCD. The highest tensile strength (44.87 MPa was achieved at 12 hours soaking time, at 40°C treatment temperature and 5:1 water to ash ratio. The highest flexural strength (120.50 MPa was obtained at 1.3 hours soaking time, 4 dissolving ratio and 35°C treatment temperature. The lowest water absorption of composite (3.00% was achieved at the longest soaking time (14.7 hours, 4 dissolving ratio and 35°C treatment temperature. Variance of soaking time, dissolving ratio and temperature in the alkaline treatment process using extract of oil palm empty fruit bunch ash significantly affected the mechanical and physical properties of the oil palm frond fibers reinforced composite.

  3. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods.

  4. Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites for use in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramics and have a very high strength to weight ratio, a property which makes them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Since FSW occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This work characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length of joint) on the wear process. Based on the results of these experiments, a phenomenological model of the wear process was constructed based on the rotating plug model for FSW. The effectiveness of harder tool materials (such as Tungsten Carbide, high speed steel, and tools with diamond coatings) to combat abrasive wear is explored. In-process force, torque, and

  5. Investigations on thermal properties, stress and deformation of Al/SiC metal matrix composite based on finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Ramesh Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AlSiC is a metal matrix composite which comprises of aluminium matrix with silicon carbide particles. It is characterized by high thermal conductivity (180-200 W/m K, and its thermal expansion are attuned to match other important materials that finds enormous demand in industrial sectors. Although its application is very common, the physics behind the Al-SiC formation, functionality and behaviors are intricate owing to the temperature gradient of hundreds of degrees, over the volume, occurring on a time scale of a few seconds, involving multiple phases. In this study, various physical, metallurgical and numerical aspects such as equation of continuum for thermal, stress and deformation using finite element (FE matrix formulation, temperature dependent material properties, are analyzed. Modelling and simulation studies of Al/SiC composites are a preliminary attempt to view this research work from computational point of view.

  6. Al6061 Hybrid Metal Matrix Composite Reinforced with Alumina and Molybdenum Disulphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pitchayyapillai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum Hybrid Reinforcement Technology is a response to the dynamic ever-increasing service requirement of industries such as transportation, aerospace, automobile, and marine, due to its attractive properties like high ductility, highly conductivity, light weight, and high strength to weight ratio. In this evolution, an attempt has been made to investigate the wear rate of Al6061 hybrid metal matrix composite reinforced with the hard ceramic alumina (4, 8, and 12 wt.% of Al2O3 and soft solid lubricant of molybdenum disulphide (2, 4, and 6 wt.% of MoS2 is fabricated by using stir casting method. The unlubricated pins on disc wear tests were conducted to examine the wear behaviour of Al6061/12 wt.% of Al2O3/MoS2 composites. The sliding wear tests were carried out at various loads of 15, 30, and 45 N, sliding velocity (1.25, 2.50, and 3.25 m/sec, and different MoS2 wt.% (2, 4, and 6 wt.%. In addition, the CNC turning experiments were conducted on Al6061/12 wt.% Al2O3/6 wt.% MoS2 using CNMG 120408 uncoated carbide cutting tool under cutting of 100, 150, and 200 m/min, feed of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mm/rev, and depth of cut of 1, 1.5, and 2 mm.

  7. The T-Matrix method in electron energy loss and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy calculations for metallic nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyssek, Christian; Schmidt, Vladimir; Hergert, Wolfram; Wriedt, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present the application of the T-Matrix method (TMM) for the calculation of Electron Energy Loss Spectra (EELS), cathodoluminescence spectra (CLS) and far-field patterns produced by metallic nano-particles. Being frequently used in electromagnetic scattering calculations, the TMM provides an efficient tool for EELS calculations as well and can be employed, e.g. for the investigation of nano-antennas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of residual stresses in metal matrix composite materials, by the means of neutron and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceretti, M.; Braham, C.

    1996-01-01

    Thermally- as well as mechanically-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites have been analyzed by the means of two complementary techniques: X-ray diffraction for surface analysis, and neutron diffraction for volume analysis. The residual stress relaxation is examined through in-situ measurements with neutron diffraction. Results from both techniques are well correlated, on condition that the same basic assumptions are used

  9. Metal removal efficiency, operational life and secondary environmental impacts of a stormwater filter developed from iron-oxide-amended bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Aamir; Muthanna, Tone M

    2017-12-06

    The aim of this paper was to conduct pilot-scale column tests on an alternative treatment filter designed for the treatment of highway stormwater in cold climates. The study evaluated adsorption performance of the filter with regard to the four most commonly found metals (Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in highway stormwater. An alternative method was used to estimate the operational life of the filter from the adsorption test data without a breakthrough under high hydraulic loads. The potential environmental impact of the filter was assessed by comparing desorption test data with four different environmental quality standards. The proposed filter achieved high adsorption (over 90%) of the target metals. The comparisons of desorption and leaching data with the environmental standards indicated that iron-oxide/bottom ash was non-hazardous, reusable and without serious environmental risks. The operational life and filter dimensions were highly dependent on rainfall depth, which indicated that the filter design would have to be adapted to suit the climate. To fully appreciate the performance and environmental aspects, the filter unit should be tested in the field and the testing should explicitly include ecotoxicological and life cycle impacts.

  10. Properties and Leachability of Self-Compacting Concrete Incorporated with Fly Ash and Bottom Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Jamaluddin, Norwati; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    The process of combustion in coal-fired power plant generates ashes, namely fly ash and bottom ash. Besides, coal ash produced from coal combustion contains heavy metals within their compositions. These metals are toxic to the environment as well as to human health. Fortunately, treatment methods are available for these ashes, and the use of fly ash and bottom ash in the concrete mix is one of the few. Therefore, an experimental program was carried out to study the properties and determine the leachability of selfcompacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash. For experimental study, self-compacting concrete was produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a replacement for sand with the ratios of 10%, 20%, and 30% respectively. The fresh properties tests conducted were slump flow, t500, sieve segregation and J-ring. Meanwhile for the hardened properties, density, compressive strength and water absorption test were performed. The samples were then crushed to be extracted using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and heavy metals content within the samples were identified accordingly using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The results demonstrated that both fresh and hardened properties were qualified to categorize as self-compacting concrete. Improvements in compressive strength were observed, and densities for all the samples were identified as a normal weight concrete with ranges between 2000 kg/m3 to 2600 kg/m3. Other than that, it was found that incorporation up to 30% of the ashes was safe as the leached heavy metals concentration did not exceed the regulatory levels, except for arsenic. In conclusion, this study will serve as a reference which suggests that fly ash and bottom ash are widely applicable in concrete technology, and its incorporation in self-compacting concrete constitutes a potential means of adding value to appropriate mix and design.

  11. Effect of COSMOS technologies in detoxifying municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinelli, Elsa; Lasagni, Marina; Collina, Elena; Bonaiti, Stefania; Bontempi, Elza

    2017-05-01

    This study investigates the effect of technologies for heavy metal stabilization on the concentration of PolyChlorinatedDibenzo-p-Dioxins (PCDD) and PolyChlorinatedDibenzoFurans (PCDF), abbreviated PCDD/F, in Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) fly ash. We determined the variation of the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and PCDD/F concentration between raw and stabilized material. The technologies, that already proved to be very promising for heavy metal entrapment, showed encouraging results also for PCDD/F detoxification. This result could be very impacting on the management of MSWI fly ash: at the best of our knowledge, there are no methods, in literature, that can provide good results in stabilization of heavy metals, and abatement of chlorinated organic pollutants contained in the same matrix.

  12. Chemometrics and theoretical approaches for evaluation of matrix effect in laser ablation and ionization of metal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shudi; Zhang, Bochao [Department of Chemistry, The MOE Key Lab of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University (China); Hang, Wei, E-mail: weihang@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, The MOE Key Lab of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University (China); Huang, Benli [Department of Chemistry, The MOE Key Lab of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University (China)

    2015-05-01

    Matrix effect is one of the shortcomings of direct solid analysis which makes the quantitative analysis a great challenge. All of the physical properties of solid and laser parameters could make contributions to the matrix effect. For better understanding and controlling laser ablation process, it is of great importance to investigate how and to what extent these factors would affect matrix effect, through simulation and chemometrics works. In this study, twenty-three solid standards of six types of metal matrices were analyzed, including aluminum, copper, iron, nickel, tungsten and zinc. The influence of laser pulse duration was investigated by applying nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) lasers to a buffer-gas-assisted ionization source coupled with an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. After relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) of each element in different matrices were calculated, they were combined with the physical property values of the matrices to form a dataset which was analyzed by the chemometrics tool of orthogonal partial least-squares (OPLSs). The S-plot result reveals that thermal properties of solid play vital roles in the matrix effect induced by ns-laser ablation, while fs-laser could significantly reduce the thermal effect. Additionally, a theoretical model was figured out to simulate the RSCs by combining the laser–solid interaction process and plasma expansion process. The model prediction shows a relatively close agreement with experimental result, revealing that the model could reasonably explain the process of matrix effect. - Highlights: • Matrix effect is one of the obstacles in direct solid analysis. • RSCs combined with physical properties were analyzed by chemometrics tool. • S-plot reveals thermal property playing vital role in matrix effect in ns-laser ablation. • Theoretical model was built to simulate RSCs. • Model prediction of RSCs shows a relatively close agreement with experimental result.

  13. Thermal Shock Resistance of Stabilized Zirconia/Metal Coat on Polymer Matrix Composites by Thermal Spraying Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Huang, Wenzhi; Cheng, Haifeng; Cao, Xueqiang

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized zirconia/metal coating systems were deposited on the polymer matrix composites by a combined thermal spray process. Effects of the thicknesses of metal layers and ceramic layer on thermal shock resistance of the coating systems were investigated. According to the results of thermal shock lifetime, the coating system consisting of 20 μm Zn and 125 μm 8YSZ exhibited the best thermal shock resistance. Based on microstructure evolution, failure modes and failure mechanism of the coating systems were proposed. The main failure modes were the formation of vertical cracks and delamination in the outlayer of substrate, and the appearance of coating spallation. The residual stress, thermal stress and oxidation of substrate near the substrate/metal layer interface were responsible for coating failure, while the oxidation of substrate near the substrate/coating interface was the dominant one.

  14. A metal ion charged mixed matrix membrane for selective adsorption of hemoglobin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetala, K.K.R.; Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Levisson, M.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we developed a mixed matrix membrane by incorporating 20–40 μm size iminodiacetic acid modified immobeads within porous Ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVAL) polymer matrix. The MMM were charged with copper ions for selective adsorption of bovine hemoglobin in presence of bovine serum albumin.

  15. Toxicity to Eisenia andrei and Folsomia candida of a metal mixture applied to soil directly or via an organic matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natal-da-Luz, T; Ojeda, G; Pratas, J; Van Gestel, C A M; Sousa, J P

    2011-09-01

    Regulatory limits for chemicals and ecological risk assessment are usually based on the effects of single compounds, not taking into account mixture effects. The ecotoxicity of metal-contaminated sludge may, however, not only be due to its metal content. Both the sludge matrix and the presence of other toxicants may mitigate or promote metal toxicity. To test this assumption, the toxicity of soils recently amended with an industrial sludge predominantly contaminated with chromium, copper, nickel, and zinc and soils freshly spiked with the same mixture of metals was evaluated through earthworm (Eisenia andrei) and collembolan (Folsomia candida) reproduction tests. The sludge was less toxic than the spiked metal mixture for E. andrei but more toxic for F. candida. Results obtained for the earthworms suggest a decrease in metal bioavailability promoted by the high organic matter content of the sludge. The higher toxicity of the sludge for F. candida was probably due to the additive toxic effect of other pollutants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Heavy metal removal from MSWI fly ash by electrokinetic remediation coupled with a permeable activated charcoal reactive barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Li, Dongwei; Kexiang, Liu; Zhang, Yuewei

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the investigations into the feasibility of the application of a remediation system that couples electrokinetic remediation (EKR) with the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) concept for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash with activated charcoal as the PRB material. The experimental results of this study showed that the proposed combined method can effectively improve the remediation efficiency and that the addition of the oxalic acid to the PRB media before the coupled system can further enhance the remediation process. In the optimization tests, the maximum removals of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd were achieved under different experimental conditions. The voltage gradient and processing time were shown to have significant effects on the removal of Cu and Cd, whereas the addition of the oxalic acid had a more significant influence on the removal of Pb. Generally, the processing time is the most significant factor in changing the removal rates of HMs in the enhanced coupled system. In terms of the leaching toxicity, the specimen remediated by ENEKR + PRB showed the lowest leaching value for each HM in the S2 and S3 regions.

  17. Characterisation of wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto

    The combustion of wood chips and wood pellets for the production of renewable energy in Denmark increased from 5.7 PJ to 16 PJ during the period 2000-2015, and further increases are expected to occur within the coming years. In 2012, about 22,300 tonnes of wood ashes were generated in Denmark....... Currently, these ashes are mainly landfilled, despite Danish legislation allowing their application onto forest and agricultural soils for fertilising and/or liming purposes. During this PhD work, 16 wood ash samples generated at ten different Danish combustion plants were collected and characterised...... for their composition and leaching properties. Despite the relatively large variations in the contents of nutrients and trace metals, the overall levels were comparable to typical ranges reported in the literature for other wood combustion ashes, as well as with regards to leaching. In general, the composition...

  18. Residual Stress Induced Mechanical Property Enhancement in Steel Encapsulated Light Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudger, Sean James

    Macro hybridized systems consisting of steel encapsulated light metal matrix composites (MMCs) were produced with the goal of creating a low cost/light weight composite system with enhanced mechanical properties. MMCs are frequently incorporated into advanced material systems due to their tailorable material properties. However, they often have insufficient ductility for many structural applications. The macro hybridized systems take advantage of the high strength, modulus, and damage tolerance of steels and high specific stiffness and low density of MMCs while mitigating the high density of steels and the poor ductility of MMCs. Furthermore, a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch induced residual compressive stress method is utilized as a means of improving the ductility of the MMCs and overall efficiency of the macro hybridized systems. Systems consisting of an A36, 304 stainless steel, or NitronicRTM 50 stainless steel shell filled with an Al-SiC, Al-Al2O3, or Mg-B4C MMC are evaluated in this work. Upon cooling from processing temperatures, residual strains are generated due to a CTE mismatch between each of the phases. The resulting systems offer higher specific properties and a more structurally efficient system can be attained. Mechanical testing was performed and improvements in yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, and ductility were observed. However, the combination of these dissimilar materials often results in the formation of intermetallic compounds. In certain loading situations, these typically brittle intermetallic layers can result in degraded performance. X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), and Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) are utilized to characterize the intermetallic layer formation at the interface between the steel and MMC. As the residual stress condition in each phase has a large impact on the mechanical property improvement, accurate quantification of these strains/stresses is

  19. Manufacturing Challenges Associated with the Use of Metal Matrix Composites in Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramic particles or fibers. These materials possess a very high strength to weight ratio, good resistance to impact and wear, and a number of other properties which make them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as NASA's Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and Space Launch System. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials, such as MMCs, which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Since Friction Stir Welding occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This chapter summarizes the challenges encountered when joining MMCs to themselves or to other materials in structures. Specific attention is paid to the influence of process variables in Friction Stir Welding on the wear process characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length

  20. Cellular Mutagenicity and Heavy Metal Concentrations of Leachates Extracted from the Fly and Bottom Ash Derived from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Po-Wen; Liu, Zhen-Shu; Wun, Min-Jie; Kuo, Tai-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Two incinerators in Taiwan have recently attempted to reuse the fly and bottom ash that they produce, but the mutagenicity of these types of ash has not yet been assessed. Therefore, we evaluated the mutagenicity of the ash with the Ames mutagenicity assay using the TA98, TA100, and TA1535 bacterial strains. We obtained three leachates from three leachants of varying pH values using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test recommended by the Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency (...

  1. The influence of reinforcement size on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of a nanostructured aluminum-based metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, Nathan Adam

    With increased availability and growing commercial applications, aluminum-based metal matrix composites show promise as high specific strength structural materials. Before they can be implemented however, they require thorough characterization and testing. A novel nanostructured aluminum-based metal matrix composite (MMC) was characterized through a combination of microstructural analysis and mechanical testing. Two composites were studied, an aluminum MMC reinforced with 50 nm boron carbide, (B4C) and an aluminum MMC reinforced with 500 nm boron carbide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed an ultra-fine grained matrix with grains on the order of 100--300 nm. The quasi-static and dynamic response of the composites was compared with the behavior of the unreinforced aluminum alloy, and it was found that the reinforcement resulted in a 30% improvement in strength. The decrease in the reinforcement size from 500 to 50 nm activated an additional strengthening mechanism, which further improved the strength of the MMC reinforced with the 50 nm B4C. Dynamic compression tests were performed at elevated temperatures up 400°C on the composites, and it was found that they exhibited impressive strengths considering the thermal softening prevalent in aluminum. The reinforcement size was found to play an important role in the strain softening exhibited at elevated temperature, fracture mechanism, and composite strength. Models to describe the composite behavior are presented.

  2. Effects of interface formation kinetics on the microstructural properties of wear-resistant metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilo, S.; Just, Ch.; Badisch, E.; Wosik, J.; Danninger, H.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: The dissolution reaction kinetics and the formation of intermediate layers of tungsten carbides in Ni-(Cr)-B-Si matrices were studied in liquid-phase sintering with well-defined temperature/time relationship. → The internal intermediate layer formation, close to the original primary tungsten carbide showed diffusion-controlled kinetic (∼t 0.5 ), whereas the outside layer thickness formation, proportional to the processing time (∼t), was formed by the subsequent eutectic reaction of the Ni-(Cr)-B-Si matrix with the WC/W 2 C component. → Cr-addition in the matrix highly influences the inner layer thickness caused probably by increasing the C-diffusion rate, whereas the outer layer thickness was not dependent on the initial Cr-content in the matrix. Generally, the Cr-addition in the Ni-based matrix increased the hardness and elastic modulus of the intermediate phases along the carbide/matrix interface. → The different microstructure gradients are depended mainly on the interface growth kinetics. → The intermediate layers are hard phases (carbides, borides or carbo-borides). → The hardness of the carbide/matrix interface area is significantly lower as the hardness of the original primary tungsten carbides. - Abstract: Hard-particle metal-matrix composites (MMC) are generally used to increase the lifetime of machinery equipment exposed to severe wear conditions. Depending on the manufacturing technology, dissolution reactions of hard phases undergo different temperature/time profiles during processing affecting the microstructure and mechanical properties of the MMCs. Therefore, quantification of the carbide dissolution effects on the microstructure and micro-mechanical properties is the key to success in the development and optimisation of MMCs. Dissolution kinetics of WC/W 2 C in Ni-based matrices were determined in the liquid-sintering with a well-defined temperature/time profile. Microscopic evaluation of the samples showed two

  3. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Metal- and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical analysis of the fracture toughness enhancement of carbon nanotube- (CNT- reinforced hard matrix composites is carried out on the basis of shear-lag theory and facture mechanics. It is found that stronger CNT/matrix interfaces cannot definitely lead to the better fracture toughness of these composites, and the optimal interfacial chemical bond density is that making the failure mode just in the transition from CNT pull-out to CNT break. For hard matrix composites, the fracture toughness of composites with weak interfaces can be improved effectively by increasing the CNT length. However, for soft matrix composite, the fracture toughness improvement due to the reinforcing CNTs quickly becomes saturated with an increase in CNT length. The proposed theoretical model is also applicable to short fiber-reinforced composites.

  4. Enhancing Hydrogen Diffusion in Silica Matrix by Using Metal Ion Implantation to Improve the Emission Properties of Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bornacelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient silicon-based light emitters continue to be a challenge. A great effort has been made in photonics to modify silicon in order to enhance its light emission properties. In this aspect silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs have become the main building block of silicon photonic (modulators, waveguide, source, and detectors. In this work, we present an approach based on implantation of Ag (or Au ions and a proper thermal annealing in order to improve the photoluminescence (PL emission of Si-NCs embedded in SiO2. The Si-NCs are obtained by ion implantation at MeV energy and nucleated at high depth into the silica matrix (1-2 μm under surface. Once Si-NCs are formed inside the SiO2 we implant metal ions at energies that do not damage the Si-NCs. We have observed by, PL and time-resolved PL, that ion metal implantation and a subsequent thermal annealing in a hydrogen-containing atmosphere could significantly increase the emission properties of Si-NCs. Elastic Recoil Detection measurements show that the samples with an enhanced luminescence emission present a higher hydrogen concentration. This suggests that ion metal implantation enhances the hydrogen diffusion into silica matrix allowing a better passivation of surface defects on Si NCs.

  5. Avaliação do uso de poli(tereftalato de etileno (PET como matriz de imobilização de cinzas de incineradores Assessment of the use of polyethylene terephthalate (PET as matrix for immobilization of incinerator ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Gonçalves Pacheco

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial hazardous wastes must receive appropriate treatment to ensure a safe disposal to humans and environment. One of the techniques adopted for this purpose is the stabilization/solidification in polymer matrices. This paper evaluated the use of recycled polyethylene terephthalate as an incorporation matrix of incinerator ash. The polymer and the ash were submitted to an extrusion process in different percentages. The final product was evaluated through thermal and leaching tests and the leachate extracts constituents were determinated by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The results showed a reduction in the release of substances up to 99% by mass for the conditions used.

  6. Flash pyrolysis of heavy metal contaminated hardwoods from phytoremediation: Characterisation of biomass, pyrolysis oil and char/ash fraction

    OpenAIRE

    STALS, Mark; CARLEER, Robert; REGGERS, Guy; Schreurs, Sonja; YPERMAN, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Flash pyrolysis of heavy metal contaminated hardwoods originating from phytoremediation is studied. Different kinds of hardwoods, i.e. Salix fragilis (crack willow), Salix jorunn ("Jorunn" willow) and Populus grimminge (Grimminge poplar) are compared in a preliminary phase. Salix fragilis scores the best on both remediation capabilities and pyrolysis characteristics. Therefore, this cultivar is chosen for in-depth research. S. fragilis stems, leaves and stems mixed with leaves are pyrolysed. ...

  7. Metal ion attachment to the matrix meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin, related matrices and analytes: an experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kampen, Jeroen J A; Luider, Theo M; Ruttink, Paul J A; Burgers, Peter C

    2009-11-01

    In a previous study [van Kampen et al. Analytical Chemistry 2006; 78: 5403], we found that meso-tetrakis (pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (F20TPP), in combination with lithium salts, provides an efficient matrix to cationize small molecules by Li+ attachment and that this combination can be successfully applied to the quantitative analysis of drugs, such as antiretroviral compounds using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization in conjunction with a time-of-flight analyzer (MALDI-TOF). In the present study, we further explore the mechanism of metal ion attachment to F20TPP and analytes by MALDI-FTMS(/MS). To this end, we have studied the interaction of F20TPP and analytes with various mono-, di- and trivalent metal ions (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, Co2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+, Fe3+ and Ga3+). For the alkali cations, we find that F20TPP forms complexes only with Li+ and Na+; in addition, model analyte molecules such as poly(ethyleneglycol)s, mixed with F20TPP and the alkali cations, also only form Li+ and Na+ adducts. This contrasts sharply with the commonly used matrix 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, where analytes are most efficiently cationized by Na+ or K+. Reasons for this difference are delineated. Ab initio calculations on porphyrin itself reveal that even the smallest alkali cation, Li+, does not fit in the porphyrin cavity, but lies on top of it, pushing the 21H and 23 H hydrogen atoms out of and below the plane with concomitant bending of the porphyrin skeleton in the opposite direction, i.e. toward the cation. Thus, the Li+ ion is not effectively sequestered and is in fact exposed and thus accessible for donation to analyte molecules. Interaction of F20TPP with di- and trivalent metal ions leads to protoporphyrin-metal ions, where the metal ion is captured within the protoporphyrin dianion cavity. The most intense signal is obtained when F20TPP is reacted with CuCl2 and then subjected to laser ablation. This method presents an easy general route to study the metal

  8. Sediment matrix characterization as a tool for evaluating the environmental impact of heavy metals in metal mining, smelting, and ore processing areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ružičková, Silvia; Remeteiová, Dagmar; Mičková, Vladislava; Dirner, Vojtech

    2018-02-21

    In this work, the matrix characterization (mineralogy, total and local chemical composition, and total organic (TOC) and inorganic carbon (TIC) contents) of different types of sediments from mining- and metallurgy-influenced areas and the assessment of the impact of the matrix on the association of potentially hazardous metals with the mineral phases of these samples, which affect their mobility in the environment, are presented. For these purposes, sediment samples with different origins and from different locations in the environment were analyzed. Anthropogenic sediments from metal-rich post-flotation tailings (Lintich, Slovakia) represent waste from ore processing, natural river sediments from the Hornád River (Košice, Slovakia) represent areas influenced predominantly by the metallurgical industry, and lake sediments from a water reservoir Ružín (inflow from the Hornád and Hnilec Rivers, Slovakia) represent the impact of the metallurgical and/or mining industries. The total metal contents were determined by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis, the local chemical and morphological microanalysis by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), and the TOC and TIC contents by infrared (IR) spectrometry. The mobility/bioavailability of Cu, Pb, and Zn in/from sediments at the studied areas was assessed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and acetic acid (AA) extraction and is discussed in the context of the matrix composition. The contents of selected potentially hazardous elements in the extracts were determined by the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS).

  9. In-situ deformation studies of an aluminum metal-matrix composite in a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Tensile specimens made of a metal-matrix composite (cast and extruded aluminum alloy-based matrix reinforced with Al2O3 particulate) were tested in situ in a scanning electron microscope equipped with a deformation stage, to directly monitor the crack propagation phenomenon. The in situ SEM observations revealed the presence of microcracks both ahead of and near the crack-tip region. The microcracks were primarily associated with cracks in the alumina particles. The results suggest that a region of intense deformation exists ahead of the crack and corresponds to the region of microcracking. As the crack progresses, a region of plastically deformed material and associated microcracks remains in the wake of the crack.

  10. Lipid peroxidation and oxidative status compared in workers at a bottom ash recovery plant and fly ash treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hung-Hsin; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Chen, I-Ju; Chen, Hsiu-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Fly ash and ambient emissions of municipal solid waste incinerators contain polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), other organic compounds, metals, and gases. Hazardous substances such as PCDD/Fs, mercury vapors and other silicates, and the components of bottom ash and fly ash elevate the oxidative damage. We compared oxidative damage in workers exposed to hazardous substances at a bottom ash recovery plant and 3 fly ash treatment plants in Taiwan by measuring their levels of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and urine 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG). Significantly higher MDA levels were found in fly ash treatment plant workers (3.20 microM) than in bottom ash plant workers (0.58 microM). There was a significant association between MDA levels in workers and their working environment, especially in the fly ash treatment plants. Levels of 8-OH-dG varied more widely in bottom ash workers than in fly ash workers. The association between occupational exposure and 8-OH-dG levels may be affected by the life style of the workers. Because more dioxins and metals may leach from fly ash than from bottom ash, fly ash treatment plant workers should, as much as possible, avoid exposing themselves to fly ash.

  11. The erosion performance of particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings produced by co-deposition cold gas dynamic spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This work reports on the erosion performance of three particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings, co-deposited with an aluminium binder via cold-gas dynamic spraying. The deposition of ceramic particles is difficult to achieve with typical cold spray techniques due to the absence of particle deformation. This issue has been overcome in the present study by simultaneously spraying the reinforcing particles with a ductile metallic binder which has led to an increased level of ceramic/cermet particles deposited on the substrate with thick (>400 μm) coatings produced. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the erosion performance of the co-deposited coatings within a slurry environment. The study also incorporated standard metallographic characterisation techniques to evaluate the distribution of reinforcing particles within the aluminium matrix. All coatings exhibited poorer erosion performance than the uncoated material, both in terms of volume loss and mass loss. The Al2O3 reinforced coating sustained the greatest amount of damage following exposure to the slurry and recorded the greatest volume loss (approx. 2.8 mm3) out of all of the examined coatings. Despite the poor erosion performance, the WC-CoCr reinforced coating demonstrated a considerable hardness increase over the as-received AA5083 (approx. 400%) and also exhibited the smallest free space length between adjacent particles. The findings of this study reveal that the removal of the AA5083 matrix by the impinging silicon carbide particles acts as the primary wear mechanism leading to the degradation of the coating. Analysis of the wear scar has demonstrated that the damage to the soft matrix alloy takes the form of ploughing and scoring which subsequently exposes carbide/oxide particles to the impinging slurry.

  12. Crack and wear behavior of SiC particulate reinforced aluminium based metal matrix composite fabricated by direct metal laser sintering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Partha

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, crack density and wear performance of SiC particulate (SiCp) reinforced Al-based metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) fabricated by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process have been studied. Mainly, size and volume fraction of SiCp have been varied to analyze the crack and wear behavior of the composite. The study has suggested that crack density increases significantly after 15 volume percentage (vol.%) of SiCp. The paper has also suggested that when size (mesh) of reinforcement increases, wear resistance of the composite drops. Three hundred mesh of SiCp offers better wear resistance; above 300 mesh the specific wear rate increases significantly. Similarly, there has been no improvement of wear resistance after 20 vol.% of reinforcement. The scanning electron micrographs of the worn surfaces have revealed that during the wear test SiCp fragments into small pieces which act as abrasives to result in abrasive wear in the specimen.

  13. Data characterizing compressive properties of Al/Al2O3 syntactic foam core metal matrix sandwich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Yaseer Omar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microstructural observations and compressive property datasets of metal matrix syntactic foam core sandwich composite at quasi-static and high strain rate (HSR conditions (525–845 s−1 are provided. The data supplied in this article includes sample preparation procedure prior to scanning electron and optical microscopy as well as the micrographs. The data used to construct the stress–strain curves and the derived compressive properties of all specimens in both quasi-static and HSR regions are included. Videos of quasi-static compressive failure and that obtained by a high speed image acquisition system during deformation and failure of HSR specimen are also included.

  14. Wear and Friction Behavior of Stir Cast Al-TiB2 Metal Matrix Composites with Various Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Al- TiB2 metal matrix composites are fabricated using stir cast method and its tribological characterization is done using three different lubricants. Tribological studies are performed in a multi-tribotester using block-on-roller configuration under 25-75 N loads and 400-600 rpm rotational speeds. Four different weight percentages of TiB2 are considered in this study. Comparison between dry condition and lubricated conditions is gleaned to differentiate wear and friction characteristics and SEM images are taken to fortify them. Lubricated conditions yield large reduction in wear and friction compared to dry condition.

  15. Optimization of the manufacturing process of a titanium aluminide metal matrix composite using a viscoplastic constitutive theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, J.A.; Quimby, H.M. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-04-01

    The thermomechanical behavior of a titanium aluminide metal matrix composite reinforced with silicon carbide fibers is computationally investigated to determine an optimum manufacturing process. The investigations are completed using the Ramaswamy-Stouffer constitutive model and the finite element method. Hold times at a given temperature were used in an effort to allow the residual stresses to relax. However, the subsequent temperature changes erased the benefit of such holds. Thermomechanical cycling was determined to be the optimum method for reducing the residual stress field after cooldown from consolidation.

  16. Magnesium Matrix Composite Foams—Density, Mechanical Properties, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Cho

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Potential of widespread industrial applications of magnesium has been realized in recent years. A variety of magnesium alloy matrix composites are now being studied for mechanical properties. Since magnesium is the lightest structural metal, it can replace aluminum in existing applications for further weight savings. This review presents an overview of hollow particle filled magnesium matrix syntactic composite foams. Fly ash cenospheres are the most commonly used hollow particles for such applications. Fly ash cenospheres primarily have alumino-silicate composition and contain a large number of trace elements, which makes it challenging to study the interfacial reactions and microstructure in these composites. Microstructures of commonly studied AZ and ZC series magnesium alloys and their syntactic foams are discussed. Although only a few studies are available on these materials because of the nascent stage of this field, a comparison with similar aluminum matrix syntactic foams has provided insight into the properties and weight saving potential of magnesium matrix composites. Analysis shows that the magnesium matrix syntactic foams have higher yield strength at the same level of density compared to most other metal matrix syntactic foams. The comparison can guide future work and set goals that need to be achieved through materials selection and processing method development.

  17. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals and chloride from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash and air pollution control residue in suspension - test of a new two compartment experimental cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Magro, Cátia; Guedes, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues such as fly ash and air pollution control (APC) residues are classified as hazardous waste and disposed of, although they contain potential resources. The most problematic elements in MSWI residues are leachable heavy metals and salts. For reuse...... of MSWI residues in for instance concrete, the aim of remediation should be reduction of the heavy metal leaching, while at the same time keeping the alkaline pH, so the residue can replace cement. In this study a MSWI residues were subjected to electrodialytic remediation under various experimental...

  18. Metal recovery from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWIBA): state of the art, potential and environmental benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Holtze, Maria S.; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    Incineration has a central role in the waste management system in Denmark (e.g. 52% of the household waste) resulting in approximately 726000t of solid residues each year. However, the targets imposed by the Danish Waste Strategy and the increasing discussions about resource in waste raise an issue...... on resource losses through waste incineration. In this framework, this study provides actual data on the state of the art of the recovery of resource in MSWIBA in Denmark (i.e. metals), on the potential for further recovery and on the environmental benefits or burdens assessed through the Life Cycle...

  19. Expansion control for cementation of incinerated ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, T.; Suzuki, S.; Hanada, K.; Tomioka, O.; Sato, J.; Irisawa, K.; Kato, J.; Kawato, Y.; Meguro, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A method, in which incinerated ash is solidified with a cement material, has been developed to dispose of radioactive incinerated ash waste. A small amount of metallic Al, which was not oxidized in the incineration, existed in the ash. When such ash was mixed with a cement material and water, alkaline components in the ash and the cement were dissolved in the mixing water and then metallic Al reaction with the alkaline compounds resulted in generation of H 2 . Because the H 2 generation began immediately just after the mixing, H 2 bubbles pushed up the mixed grout material and an expanded solidified form was obtained. The expansion leads to lowering the strength of the solidified form and making harmful void. In this study, we tried to control H 2 generation from the reaction of metallic Al in the cementation by means of following two methods, one was a method to let metallic Al react prior to the cementation and the other was a method to add an expansion inhibitor that made an oxide film on the surface of metallic Al. In the pre-treatment, the ash was soaked in water in order to let metallic Al react with it, and then the ash with the immersion solution was dried at 105 Celsius degrees. The pre-treated ash was mixed with an ordinary portland cement and water. The inhibitor of lithium nitrite, sodium nitrite, phosphoric acid, or potassium dihydrogen phosphate was added at the mixing process. The solidified forms prepared using the pre-treated ash and lithium nitrite were not expanded. Phosphoric acid and sodium nitrite were effective for expansion control, but potassium dihydrogen phosphate did not work. (authors)

  20. Metal matrix-metal nanoparticle composites with tunable melting temperature and high thermal conductivity for phase-change thermal storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wu, Hsinwei; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-02-24

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) are of broad interest for thermal storage and management applications. For energy-dense storage with fast thermal charging/discharging rates, a PCM should have a suitable melting temperature, large enthalpy of fusion, and high thermal conductivity. To simultaneously accomplish these traits, we custom design nanocomposites consisting of phase-change Bi nanoparticles embedded in an Ag matrix. We precisely control nanoparticle size, shape, and volume fraction in the composite by separating the nanoparticle synthesis and nanocomposite formation steps. We demonstrate a 50-100% thermal energy density improvement relative to common organic PCMs with equivalent volume fraction. We also tune the melting temperature from 236-252 °C by varying nanoparticle diameter from 8.1-14.9 nm. Importantly, the silver matrix successfully prevents nanoparticle coalescence, and no melting changes are observed during 100 melt-freeze cycles. The nanocomposite's Ag matrix also leads to very high thermal conductivities. For example, the thermal conductivity of a composite with a 10% volume fraction of 13 nm Bi nanoparticles is 128 ± 23 W/m-K, which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical thermal storage materials. We complement these measurements with calculations using a modified effective medium approximation for nanoscale thermal transport. These calculations predict that the thermal conductivity of composites with 13 nm Bi nanoparticles varies from 142 to 47 W/m-K as the nanoparticle volume fraction changes from 10 to 35%. Larger nanoparticle diameters and/or smaller nanoparticle volume fractions lead to larger thermal conductivities.

  1. Depth of Cure of Proximal Composite Restorations using a New Perforated Metal Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    DoD  or  the  USUHS.   Chair /Department  Head  Approval**   Name  (Last,  First,  Middle  Initial)    Motyka, Nancy, C...FORCE POSTGRADUATE DENTAL SCHOOL 2450 Pepperrell Street Lackland AFB Texas, 78236-5345 http://www.usuhs.mll "The author hereby certifies that the...buccal and lingual light curing, or a transparent (Composi-Tight 3D Clear matrix, Garrison Dental Solutions, Spring Lake, MI) sectional matrix system

  2. Analysis of four toxic metals in a single rice seed by matrix solid phase dispersion -inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiufen; Chen, Lixia; Chen, Xin; Yu, Huamei; Peng, Lixu; Han, Bingjun

    2016-12-01

    Toxic metals in rice pose great risks to human health. Metal bioaccumulation in rice grains is a criterion of breeding. Rice breeding requires a sensitive method to determine metal content in single rice grains to assist the variety selection. In the present study, four toxic metals of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in a single rice grain were determined by a simple and rapid method. The developed method is based on matrix solid phase dispersion using multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as dispersing agent and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The experimental parameters were systematically investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) were 5.0, 0.6, 10 and 2.1 ng g-1 for As, Cd, Cr, and Pb, respectively, with relative standard deviations (n = 6) of rice samples analyzed by this method agreed well with those obtained by the standard microwave digestion. The amount of sample required was reduced approximately 100 fold in comparison with the microwave digestion. The method has a high application potential for other sample matrices and elements with high sensitivity and sample throughput.

  3. Evaluation of Pollutant Leaching Potential of Coal Ashes for Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D.; Woo, N. C.; Kim, H.; Yoon, H.; Chung, D.

    2011-12-01

    By 2009, coal ashes produced from coal-based power plants in Korea have been reused as cement supplement materials; however, the rest is mostly disposed in landfills inside the plant properties. Continuous production of coal ashes and limited landfill sites require more recycles of coal ashes as base materials, specifically in constructions of roads and of huge industrial complex. Previous researches showed that coal ashes could contain various metals such as arsenic(As), chromium(Cr), lead(Pb), nickel(Ni), selenium(Se), etc. In this study, we collected four types of bottom ashes and two of fly ashes from four coal-based power plants. These ash samples were tested with distilled water through the column leaching process in oxidized conditions. The column test results were compared with those of total digestion, sequential extraction processes and TCLP. Concentrations of metals in outflows from columns are generally greater in fly ashes than in bottom ashes, specifically for As, Se, B, Sr and SO4. Only one fly ash (J2-F) shows high concentrations of arsenic and selenium in leachate. Sequential extraction results indicate that these metals are in readily soluble forms, such as adsorbed, carbonated, and reducible forms. Results of TCLP analysis indicate no potential contaminants leached from the ashes. In conclusion, recycling of coal combustion ashes could be encouraged with proper tests such as sequential and leaching experiments.

  4. Wear behaviour of Zr-based in situ bulk metallic glass matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... wear debris, which exhibited the characteristic of a mild abrasive wear. The improvement of the wear resistance of the composite with the proper amount of β -Zr crystalline phase is attributed to the fact that the β -Zr crystalline phase distributed in the amorphous matrix has some effective load bearing, plastic deformation ...

  5. Wear of semi-solid rheocast SiCp/Al metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curle, UA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available compared with the 50% SiC MMC wear rate due to wear of the aluminum matrix. This trend is reversed on diamond abrasives due to pull-out of the irregular shaped composite particles. The 50% SiC MMC suffers from composite particle fracture porosity after high...

  6. Metal particles constraint in glass matrix composites and its impact on fracture toughness enhancement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotoul, M.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    387-389 (2004), s. 404-408 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/02/0683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : brittle matrix composites * crack bridging * crack trapping Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  7. Debonding of short fibres among particulates in a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2003-01-01

    A numerical analysis is carried out for the development of damage by fibre-matrix debonding in aluminium reinforced by aligned, short SiC fibres. A unit cell-model that has earlier been applied to study materials with arrays of transversely staggered fibres is here extended to contain a number...

  8. Effect of leachate solutions from fly ash bottom ash on groundwater quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopsick, D.A.; Angino, E.E.

    1981-12-01

    Leaching experiments on fly ash and bottom ash for Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu and Pb indicated a potential for contamination of ground- and surface-water supplies. Due to the variability in chemical composition of coals, it is difficult to make generalizations concerning the chemistry of leachate solutions from the ashes of the coals. A decrease in concentration with time of leaching was observed for all elements, except for Ca which was released at a constant rate. Fly ash from a Missouri coal generated a leachate enriched in Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn and Cd, reflective of the high Pb-Zn mineralization present in the surrounding area. With a pH of 3.0 this ash has the greatest potential for groundwater contamination. Conversely, leachates from Wyoming fly and bottom ashes exhibited low trace-metal concentrations. These same solutions were high in K, Na, Ca and Mg, and also showed strong pozzolanic behaviour, which will reduce the leachability of these ashes. In most instances, fly and bottom ash from Kentucky and Illinois coals yielded leachates intermediate in elemental composition to leachates of Missouri and Wyoming coal ashes. Leaching experiments indicate that it is not valid to predict the chemistry of leachates from fly and bottom ash based solely on the chemical composition of the ash. (16 refs.)

  9. Development of scalable methods for the utilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennerberg, Danny Curtis

    traditional fiber-reinforced composites. The latter part of this thesis work explores a new method of producing BP comprised of oriented nanotubes through the use of a modified Taylor-Couette setup capable of simultaneously shearing and filtering an aqueous MWCNT dispersion. BP produced with this setup exhibited anisotropic electrical and mechanical properties as a result of the nanotube alignment. Finally, a new technique for producing MWCNT metal matrix composites was developed using the nanotubes as the heating element and carbon source in a microwave-assisted carbothermic reduction of copper oxide. The extremely rapid heating of MWCNTs upon microwave irradiation allowed Cu-MWCNT composites to be produced in times on the order of a minute. Because this approach requires none of the specialized equipment generally used in metal matrix composite processing, it has promise as a scalable fabrication technique.

  10. Organic luminophor metal complex in inorganic glass matrix-A new hybrid material

    Science.gov (United States)

    I. Avetisov, Roman; Petrova, Olga; Khomyakov, Andrew; Mushkalo, Oksana; Akkuzina, Alina; Cherednichenko, Alexander; Avetissov, Igor

    2014-09-01

    Hybrid materials were synthesized on the base of borate glass matrix and the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum, gallium and indium (Mq3=Alq3, Gaq3, and Inq3) organic complexes, which are used as phosphors in OLED devices. The luminescence properties of hybrid materials containing 0.02-0.1 wt% of Mq3 in B2O3 glass matrix were studied. It was found that the luminescence peaks of hybrid materials were significantly shifted to shorter wavelengths. The measured luminescence lifetimes of Mq3 based hybrid materials fitted by two exponents were found to be several times less for the shorter components and nearly the same for the long components when compared with pure Mq3.

  11. Numerical Simulations of As-Extruded Mg Matrix Composites Interpenetrated by Metal Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Wang, H.; Wang, S. R.; Yang, X. F.; Li, P.

    2017-12-01

    The interpenetrating magnesium composites reinforced by three-dimensional braided stainless steel wire reinforcement were fabricated and investigated. The extrusion processes of the composites in different conditions were carried out and simulated by finite element method using the DEFORM-3D software. The results show that the matrix and reinforcement of the composites form a good interfacial bonding and the grains were refined by extrusion and the influence of reinforcement, which are in accordance with the enhanced strength and degraded plasticity. The combined quality between the matrix and reinforcement can be strengthened in extrusion chamber where occurred large strain and suffered intense stress, and the effective stress of the material increases continuously with the increase in extrusion ratio and the decrease in extrusion speed until it reaches a stable value.

  12. Non-local plasticity effects on the tensile properties of a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2001-01-01

    For a metal reinforced by aligned short fibres the effect of a material length scale characterising the inelastic deformations of the metal is studied. The elastic-plastic constitutive relations used here to represent the nonlocal effects are formulated so that the instantaneous hardening moduli...... depend on the gradient of the effective plastic strain. Numerical cell-model analyses are used to obtain a parametric understanding of the influence of different combinations of the main material parameters. The analyses show a strong dependence on the fibre diameter for given values of all other...

  13. Screening the possibility for removing cadmium and other heavy metals from wastewater sludge and bio-ashes by an electrodialytic method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Hansen, Henrik K.

    2007-01-01

    in wastewater sludge and bio-ashes (straw and wood) using an electrodialytic method. The waste products were treated as stirred suspensions. During the remediation the suspension was acidified from water splitting at the anion exchange membrane and the acidification mobilized Cd that was removed......Both wastewater sludge and fly ash from combustion of biomass (bio-ash) have traditionally been applied to agricultural land in Denmark. However, Cd concentrations often exceed limiting values. The present study is a preliminary investigation of the possibility for reducing the Cd concentration...... to the electrode compartments. Even though the matrices were very different the remediation was successful in all cases. After treatment the Cd concentration in the ashes allowed for spreading at agricultural land and the limiting concentration of 0.8mgCd/kg for the wastewater sludge was almost reached (0.84 and 0...

  14. The Oxidation of Sulfur-Containing Compounds Using Heterogeneous Catalysts of Transition Metal Oxides Deposited on the Polymeric Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh Vu, Ngo; Dinh Bui, Nhi; Thi Minh, Thao; Thi Thanh Dam, Huong; Thi Tran, Hang

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the activity of heterogeneous catalysts of transition metal oxides deposited on the polymeric matrix in the oxidation of sulfur-containing compounds. It is shown that MnO2-10/CuO-10 has the highest catalytic activity. The physicomechanical properties of polymeric heterogeneous catalysts of transition-metal oxides, including the specific surface area, elongation at break and breaking strength, specific electrical resistance, and volume resistivity were studied by using an Inspekt mini 3 kN universal tensile machine in accordance with TCVN 4509:2006 at a temperature of 20 ± 2°C. Results show that heterogeneous polymeric catalysts were stable under severe reaction conditions. Scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive analysis are used to study the surfaces of the catalysts. Microstructural characterization of the catalysts is performed by using x-ray computed tomography. We demonstrate the potential application of polymeric heterogeneous catalysts of transition-metal oxides in industrial wastewater treatment.

  15. Factors influencing creep resistance in discontinuously reinforced magnesium metal matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenička, Václav; Kuchařová, Květa; Kvapilová, Marie; Svoboda, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2015), s. 221-229 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : magnesium alloys * composites * creep properties testing * structure * fibres * interfaces Subject RIV: JG - Metal lurgy Impact factor: 0.365, year: 2015

  16. Machinability evaluation of Al–4% Cu–7.5% SiC metal matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) result shows that thedepth of cut is the influential parameter that contributes toward output responses. A metaheuristic evolutionary algorithm nondominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) is applied to optimize the machining parameters for minimizing wear and maximizing metal removal.

  17. Near-net-shape manufacturing: Spray-formed metal matrix composites and tooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchugh, Kevin M.

    1994-01-01

    Spray forming is a materials processing technology in which a bulk liquid metal is converted to a spray of fine droplets and deposited onto a substrate or pattern to form a near-net-shape solid. The technology offers unique opportunities for simplifying materials processing without sacrificing, and oftentimes substantially improving, product quality. Spray forming can be performed with a wide range of metals and nonmetals, and offers property improvements resulting from rapid solidification (e.g. refined microstructures, extended solid solubilities and reduced segregation). Economic benefits result from process simplification and the elimination of unit operations. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is developing a unique spray-forming method, the Controlled Aspiration Process (CAP), to produce near-net-shape solids and coatings of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Results from two spray-accompanying technical and economic benefits. These programs involved spray forming aluminum strip reinforced with SiC particulate, and the production of tooling, such as injection molds and dies, using low-melting-point metals.

  18. Electrical properties of composites of hard metal carbides in a polymer matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilčáková, J.; Sáha, P.; Hausnerová, B.; Quadrat, Otakar

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 5 (2002), s. 942-946 ISSN 0272-8397 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/97/0308 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : polymer composites * hard metal carbides * electric conductivity Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.746, year: 2002

  19. Monitoring exposure to heavy metals among children in Lake Victoria, Kenya: Environmental and fish matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okoth, E.O.; Admiraal, W.; Osano, O.; Ngure, V.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Omutange, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    This study used hair and nails to biomonitor heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr and Cu) from geological source and exposure through regular fish consumption among children in Lake Victoria, Kenya. Concentration of Pb and Cu in water reflected anthropogenic pathways, while Cd and Cr reflected accumulation from

  20. Growth, Metabolism and Yield of Rice Cultivated in Soils Amended with Fly Ash and Cyanobacteria and Metal Loads in Plant Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra N. Padhy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil amendment with fly ash (FA and combined supplementation with N2-fixing cyanobacteria masses as biofertilizer were done in field experiments with rice. Amendments with FA levels, 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0 and 10.0 kg/m2, caused increase in growth and yield of rice up to 8.0 kg/m2, monitored with several parameters. Pigment contents and enzyme activities of leaves were enhanced by FA, with the maximum level of FA at 10.0 kg/m2. Protein content of rice seeds was the highest in plants grown at FA level 4.0 kg/m2. Basic soil properties, pH value, percentage of silt, percentage of clay, water-holding capacity, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, and organic carbon content increased due to the FA amendment. Parallel supplementation of FA amended plots with 1.0 kg/m2 N2-fixing cyanobacteria mass caused further significant increments of the most soil properties, and rice growth and yield parameters. 1000-grain weight of rice plants grown at FA level 4.0 kg/m2 along with cyanobacteria supplementation was the maximum. Cyanobacteria supplementation caused increase of important basic properties of soil including the total N-content. Estimations of elemental content in soils and plant parts (root and seed were done by the atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Accumulations of K, P, Fe and several plant micronutrients (Mn, Ni, Co, Zn and Cu and toxic elements (Pb, Cr and Cd increased in soils and plant parts as a function of the FA gradation, but Na content remained almost unchanged in soils and seeds. Supplementation of cyanobacteria had ameliorating effect on toxic metal contents of soils and plant parts. The FA level 4.0 kg/m2, with 1.0 kg/m2 cyanobacteria mass supplementation, could be taken ideal, since there would be recharging of the soil with essential micronutrients as well as toxic chemicals in comparative lesser proportions, and cyanobacteria mass would cause lessening toxic metal loads with usual N2-fixation.

  1. Breakage and debonding of short brittle fibres among particulates in a metal matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2004-01-01

    The competition of failure by fibre cracking or decohesion of the fibre-matrix interface is analysed for aluminium reinforced by aligned, short SiC fibres. An axisymmetric unit-cell model containing a number of differently shaped fibres or particulates is used here to represent failure by debonding...... or fracture of a relatively long discontinuous fibre among particulates that do not fail. A cohesive zone model that accounts for normal separation as well as tangential separation is used to represent debonding, while fibre fracture is represented by a critical value of the average tensile stress on a cross...

  2. In situ SEM thermal fatigue of Al/graphite metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, G. S.; Rabenberg, L.; Marcus, H. L.

    1990-01-01

    Several thermal fatigue-induced failure mechanisms are deduced for unidirectional graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMCs subjected to in situ thermal cycling. These thermal cycling conditions are representative of MMC service cycles in aerospace environments, where thermal fatigue is primarily associated with changes in the stress states near the interfaces due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between fiber and matrix. This in situ SEM thermal-cycling study clarified such factors affecting MMCs' thermal fatigue as local fiber content and distribution, void volume, fiber stiffness, thermal excursion magnitude, and number of thermal cycles. MMC microfailure modes in thermal fatigue have been deduced.

  3. Biotoxicity evaluation of fly ash and bottom ash from different municipal solid waste incinerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Jing-Dong; Wey, Ming-Yen; Liang, Hsiu-Hao; Chang, Shih-Hsien

    2009-08-30

    Different types of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly and bottom ash were extracted by TCLP and PBET procedures. The biotoxicity of the leachate of fly ash and bottom ash was evaluated by Vibrio fischeri light inhibition test. The results indicate the following: (1) The optimal solid/liquid ratio was 1:100 for PBET extraction because it had the highest Pb and Cu extractable mass from MSWI fly ash. (2) The extractable metal mass from both fly ash and bottom ash by PBET procedure was significantly higher than that by TCLP procedure. (3) The metal concentrations of fly ash leachate from a fluidized bed incinerator was lower than that from mass-burning and mass-burning combined with rotary kiln incinerator. (4) The TCLP and PBET leachate from all MSWI fly ash samples showed biotoxicity. Even though bottom ash is regarded as a non-hazardous material, its TCLP and PBET leachate also showed biotoxicity. The pH significantly influenced the biotoxicity of leachate.

  4. Screening effects in metal sculptured thin films studied with terahertz Mueller matrix ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, T.; Knight, S.; Sekora, D.; Schmidt, D.; Herzinger, C. M.; Woollam, J. A.; Schubert, E.; Schubert, M.

    2017-11-01

    The anisotropic optical dielectric functions of a metal (cobalt) slanted columnar thin film deposited by electron-beam glancing angle deposition are reported for the terahertz (THz) frequency domain before and after the slanted columnar thin film was passivated by a conformal alumina coating. A simple effective medium dielectric function homogenization approach which describes isolated, electrically conductive columns rendering the thin film biaxial (orthorhombic) is used to model the observed optical responses. Upon passivating the slanted columnar thin film with a 3 nm thick alumina film an increase of both the real and the imaginary part of the dielectric function for all major polarizability directions is found and attributed to screening effects within the spatially coherent metal nanocolumns.

  5. Enhanced Contacts for Inverted Metamorphic Multi-Junction Solar Cells Using Carbon Nanotube Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-18

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2017-0125 TR-2017-0125 ENHANCED CONTACTS FOR INVERTED METAMORPHIC MULTI-JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS USING CARBON NANOTUBE METAL...Rochester, NY 14604-5603 18 Jan 2018 Final Report APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION IS UNLIMITED. AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY Space...ACCORDANCE WITH ASSIGNED DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. DAVID WILT PAUL HAUSGEN, Ph.D. Program Manager Technical Advisor, Spacecraft Component Technology

  6. Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Metal-Matrix Composites Reinforced with Silicon Carbide Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia E. Ares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is focused on the study of the effect of directional heat extraction on the silicon-carbide (SiC distribution in zinc-aluminum matrix composites (MMCs and on the columnar-to-equiaxed (CET position in directionally solidified samples. To this end, a ZA-27 alloy matrix was reinforced with ceramic particles of SiC and vertically directionally solidified. The cooling rates, temperature gradients, and interphase velocities were then measured, and their influence on the solidification microstructure of the MMCs was analyzed. The recalescence detected and measured during the equiaxed transition was of the order of 3.5°C to 1.1°C. The values of the temperature gradients reached a minimum during the CET and were even negative in most cases (between −3.89 K and 0.06 K. The interphase velocities varied between 0.07 mm/s and 0.44 mm/s at the transition. Also, the presence of ceramic particles in ZA-27 alloys affected the thermodynamic local conditions and the kinetics of nucleation, producing a finer microstructure.

  7. Surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Dharmalingam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fly ash, an inorganic alumino silicate has been used as filler in epoxy matrix, but it reduces the mechanical properties due to its poor dispersion and interfacial bonding with the epoxy matrix. To improve its interfacial bonding with epoxy matrix, surface treatment of fly ash was done using surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate and silane coupling agent glycidoxy propyl trimethoxy silane. An attempt is also made to reduce the particle size of fly ash using high pressure pulverizer. To improve fly ash dispersion in epoxy matrix, the epoxy was modified by mixing with amine containing liquid silicone rubber (ACS. The effect of surface treated fly ash with varying filler loadings from 10 to 40% weight on the mechanical, morphological and thermal properties of modified epoxy composites was investigated. The surface treated fly ash was characterized by particle size analyzer and FTIR spectra. Morphological studies of surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites indicate good dispersion of fillers in the modified epoxy matrix and improves its mechanical properties. Impact strength of the surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites show more improvement than unmodified composites.

  8. Pengaruh Milling Time Terhadap Pembentukan Intermetalik ɣ-TiAl Sebagai Reinforced Dalam Metal Matrix Composite (MMCs Hasil Mechanical Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Badrus Soleh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Paduan TiAl mempunyai berbagai keunggulan dalam sifat mekanik serta sifat termal. Senyawa intermetalik γ-TiAl mempunyai sifat mekanik dan sifat termal yang sangat baik sehingga sesuai apabila diaplikasikan sebagai penguat pada metal matrix composite (MMCs. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mensintesis paduan TiAl sehingga terbentuk  fasa intermetalik γ-TiAl yang homogen. Sintesa dilakukan dengan metode mechanical alloying menggunakan modification horizontal ball mill dengan komposisi paduan Ti-36%wt Al dan variasi milling time 0,10,20 jam dengan kecepatan tetap 350rpm. Hasil milling dikompaksi dan di-annealing pada temperatur 9000C selama 30menit.  Fasa intermetalik γ-TiAl terbentuk setelah proses mechanical alloying 20 jam. Hasil pengujian difraksi sinar X menunjukkan ukuran kristal sebesar 198.92Å pada fasa γ-TiAl, memiliki kekerasan 678,1HV.

  9. A new macroscopically anisotropic pressure dependent yield function for metal matrix composite based on strain gradient plasticity for the microstructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza; Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2013-01-01

    in addition to the elastic strain. Hill's classical anisotropic yield criterion is extended to cover the composite such that hydrostatic pressure dependency, Bauschinger stress and size-effects are considered. It is found that depending on the fiber volume fraction, the anisotropic yield surface......Metal matrix composites with long aligned elastic fibers are studied using an energetic rate independent strain gradient plasticity theory with an isotropic pressure independent yield function at the microscale. The material response is homogenized to obtain a conventional macroscopic model...... that exhibits anisotropic yield properties with a pressure dependence. At the microscale free energy includes both elastic strains and plastic strain gradients, and the theory demands higher order boundary conditions in terms of plastic strain or work conjugate higher order tractions. The mechanical response...

  10. Fly Ash Amendments Catalyze Soil Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amonette, James E.; Kim, Jungbae; Russell, Colleen K.; Palumbo, A. V.; Daniels, William L.

    2003-09-15

    We tested the effects of four alkaline fly ashes {Class C (sub-bituminous), Class F (bituminous), Class F [bituminous with flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) products], and Class F (lignitic)} on a reaction that simulates the enzyme-mediated formation of humic materials in soils. The presence of FGD products completely halted the reaction, and the bituminous ash showed no benefit over an ash-free control. The sub-bituminous and lignitic fly ashes, however, increased the amount of polymer formed by several-fold. The strong synergetic effect of these ashes when enzyme is present apparently arises from the combined effects of metal oxide co-oxidation (Fe and Mn oxides), alkaline pH, and physical stabilization of the enzyme (porous silica cenospheres).

  11. Tribological Behavior of TiAl Metal Matrix Composite Brake Disk with TiC Reinforcement Under Dry Sliding Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaquat, Hassan; Shi, Xiaoliang; Yang, Kang; Huang, Yuchun; Liu, Xiyao; Wang, Zhihai

    2017-07-01

    In this investigation, the effect of TiC particulate reinforcement and sintering parameters on tribological behavior of TiAl metal matrix composite (TMMC) has been studied and compared with commercially conventional gray cast iron to evaluate the use of TMMC as brake disk material in an automobile. Three sample disks of TMMC containing TiC particulate reinforcement (D1-5 wt.%, D2 and D3-10 wt.%) were produced by the spark plasma sintering process. D3 compared with D2 was sintered at a higher temperature to evaluate the effect of SPS parameters on the wear characteristics of TMMC. All experiments were performed on pin-on-disk tribotester under a dry sliding condition with different loads (10-11.5 N) and sliding velocities (0.2-0.9 m/s). It is found that higher content of TiC increased TMMC hardness and density. XRD technique has been used to analyze the phase composition. Owing to the high sintering temperature, α-2 Ti3Al phase was formed which further enhanced the matrix anti-wear capability. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to capture the wear track and observe wear mechanism. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) has been used to analyze the tribofilm and wear debris. The results showed that the tribofilm for TMMC was mainly composed of metal oxides. Oxidation of Al and Ti due to frictional heat provides wear-resistant protective layer. Under almost all sliding conditions, TMMC, especially disk D3, exhibited minimum wear rate and stable friction coefficient, whereas gray cast iron exhibited lower and unstable friction coefficient as well as higher wear rate. TMMC has shown superior tribological characteristics over gray cast iron in terms of low wear rate along with stable and adequate friction coefficient which is necessary for braking operation and life of brake disk. However, further investigation on full-scale automobile conditions is needed for its practical application.

  12. Hot Extrusion of A356 Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite with Carbon Nanotube/Al2O3 Hybrid Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. H.; Babu, J. S. S.; Kang, C. G.

    2014-05-01

    Over the years, the attention of material scientists and engineers has shifted from conventional composite materials to nanocomposite materials for the development of light weight and high-performance devices. Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), many researchers have tried to fabricate metal matrix composites (MMCs) with CNT reinforcements. However, CNTs exhibit low dispersibility in metal melts owing to their poor wettability and large surface-to-volume ratio. The use of an array of short fibers or hybrid reinforcements in a preform could overcome this problem and enhance the dispersion of CNTs in the matrix. In this study, multi-walled CNT/Al2O3 preform-based aluminum hybrid composites were fabricated using the infiltration method. Then, the composites were extruded to evaluate changes in its mechanical properties. In addition, the dispersion of reinforcements was investigated using a hardness test. The required extrusion pressure of hybrid MMCs increased as the Al2O3/CNT fraction increased. The deformation resistance of hybrid material was over two times that of the original A356 aluminum alloy material due to strengthening by the Al2O3/CNTs reinforcements. In addition, an unusual trend was detected; primary transition was induced by the hybrid reinforcements, as can be observed in the pressure-displacement curve. Increasing temperature of the material can help increase formability. In particular, temperatures under 623 K (350 °C) and over-incorporating reinforcements (Al2O3 20 pct, CNTs 3 pct) are not recommended owing to a significant increase in the brittleness of the hybrid material.

  13. An analytical/numerical correlation study of the multiple concentric cylinder model for the thermoplastic response of metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.; Williams, Todd O.

    1993-01-01

    The utility of a recently developed analytical micromechanics model for the response of metal matrix composites under thermal loading is illustrated by comparison with the results generated using the finite-element approach. The model is based on the concentric cylinder assemblage consisting of an arbitrary number of elastic or elastoplastic sublayers with isotropic or orthotropic, temperature-dependent properties. The elastoplastic boundary-value problem of an arbitrarily layered concentric cylinder is solved using the local/global stiffness matrix formulation (originally developed for elastic layered media) and Mendelson's iterative technique of successive elastic solutions. These features of the model facilitate efficient investigation of the effects of various microstructural details, such as functionally graded architectures of interfacial layers, on the evolution of residual stresses during cool down. The available closed-form expressions for the field variables can readily be incorporated into an optimization algorithm in order to efficiently identify optimal configurations of graded interfaces for given applications. Comparison of residual stress distributions after cool down generated using finite-element analysis and the present micromechanics model for four composite systems with substantially different temperature-dependent elastic, plastic, and thermal properties illustrates the efficacy of the developed analytical scheme.

  14. The effect of abrasive particle size on the wear behaviour of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Y.; Ozdin, K.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of abrasive particle size on the wear behavior of the SiC particle-reinforced aluminium composites produced by liquid metallurgy was investigated under different sizes of SiC grits at a fixed speed. The results show that the wear loss of composite was considerably lower than that of aluminium alloy. The wear loss increased linearly with sliding distance for both materials, but indicating a considerable difference. It increased with increasing SiC abrasive particles. Moreover, SEM examination indicates that abrasive wear observed for the matrix alloy. The depth of wear grooves decreased with decreasing the abrasive particle size and load. For the composites, wear surfaces were found to be a quite smooth indicating that no abrasive grooves appeared

  15. Mechanical properties of aluminium based metal matrix composites reinforced with graphite nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Syed Nasimul, E-mail: syedn@nitrkl.ac.in; Kumar, Lailesh

    2016-06-14

    In this work Al-matrix composites reinforced by exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) is fabricated by powder metallurgy route and their microstructure, mechanical properties and sliding wear behaviour were investigated. Here, xGnP has been synthesized from the thermally exfoliated graphite produced from a graphite intercalation compound (GIC) through rapid evaporation of the intercalant at an elevated temperature. The xGnP synthesized was characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (DSC/TGA), Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The Al and xGnP powder mixtures were consolidated under a load of 565 MPa followed by sintering at 550 °C for 2 h in an inert atmosphere. Al-1, 2, 3 and 5 wt% xGnP nanocomposites were developed. Results of the wear test show that there was a significant improvement in the wear resistance of the composites up to the addition of 3 wt% of xGnP in the Al matrix. The hardness of the various Al-xGnP composites also shows improvement upto the addition of 1 wt% xGnP beyond which there was a decrease in the hardness of the composites. The tensile strength of the Al-xGnP composites continuously reduced with the addition of xGnP due to the formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} particles at the interface of the Al and xGnP in the composite.

  16. Diurnal and seasonal trends and source apportionment of redox-active metals in Los Angeles using a novel online metal monitor and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Amirhosein; Sowlat, Mohammad H.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, we identified the sources of four redox-active metals, including Iron (Fe), Chromium (Cr), Cupper (Cu), and Manganese (Mn) and quantified the contribution of these sources to PM2.5 concentrations in central Los Angeles, California, by employing time-resolved measurements (i.e., a time resolution of 2 h) with a recently developed online metal monitor and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). Size distribution of ambient PM (14 nm-10 μm) was measured using the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and Optical Particle Sizer (OPS). Auxiliary variables were also collected, including elemental (EC) and organic carbon (OC), gaseous pollutants (NO2 and O3), meteorological parameters (including relative humidity (RH) and temperature), and traffic data (for heavy- (HDVs) and light-duty vehicles (LDVs)). A 4-factor solution was found to be optimum for the chemically-speciated dataset, whereas a 5-factor solution appeared to be most plausible for the size distribution data. The factors included fresh traffic, soil/road dust, urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and nucleation (only resolved for the size distribution data). Fresh traffic was the major contributor to Fe and Cu concentrations, whereas Cr was mostly found in the urban background aerosol (reflecting a mixture of small local sources as well as aged traffic emissions), and Mn mostly came from both soil/road dust and was to a lesser degree found in urban background aerosol. Secondary aerosol did not contribute to the concentrations of any of these metals, but was associated with very high loading of OC, as expected. Even though the urban background aerosol and secondary aerosol appeared to be characterized by "aged" particles and have a rather homogeneous spatial distribution, the reactions and processes involved in their formation are entirely different. Our results provide insights into the sources of redox-active metals in central Los Angeles. They also underscore the benefits of

  17. Corrosion behaviour of groundnut shell ash and silicon carbide hybrid reinforced Al-Mg-Si alloy matrix composites in 3.5% NaCl and 0.3M H2SO4 solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo ALANEME

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of Al-Mg-Si alloy based composites reinforced with groundnut shell ash (GSA and silicon carbide (SiC was investigated. The aim is to assess the corrosion properties of Al-Mg-Si alloy based hybrid reinforced composites developed using different mix ratios of GSA (a cheaply processed agro waste derivative which served as partial replacement for SiC and SiC as reinforcing materials. GSA and SiC mixed in weight ratios 0:1, 1:3, 1:1, 3:1, and 1:0 were utilized to prepare 6 and 10 wt% of the reinforcing phase with Al‐Mg‐Si alloy as matrix using two‐step stir casting method. Mass loss and corrosion rate measurement was used to study the corrosion behaviour of the produced composites in 3.5% NaCl and 0.3M H2SO4 solutions. The results show that the Al-Mg-Si alloy based composites containing 6 and 10 wt% GSA and SiC in varied weight ratios were resistant to corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution. The composites were however more susceptible to corrosion in 0.3M H2SO4 solution (in comparison with the 3.5% NaCl solution. It was noted that the Al-Mg-Si/6 wt% GSA-SiC hybrid composite grades containing GSA and SiC in weight ratio 1:3 and 3:1 respectively exhibited superior corrosion resistance in the 0.3M H2SO4 solution compared to other composites produced for this series. In the case of the Al-Mg-Si/10 wt% GSA-SiC hybrid composite grades, the corrosion resistance was relatively superior for the composites containing a greater weight ratio of GSA (75% and 100% in 0.3M H2SO4 solution.

  18. Method of fabricating metal- and ceramic- matrix composites and functionalized textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, James L [Jemez Springs, NM; Chavez, Craig A [Los Alamos, NM; Black, Marcie R [Lincoln, MA

    2012-04-17

    A method of manufacturing an article comprises providing a first sheet, wetting the first sheet with a liquid precursor to provide a first wet sheet, and irradiating the first wet sheet in a pattern corresponding to a first cross section of the article such that the liquid precursor is at least partially converted to a solid in the first cross section. A second sheet is disposed adjacent to the first sheet. The method further comprises wetting the second sheet with the liquid precursor to provide a second wet sheet, and irradiating the second wet sheet in a pattern corresponding to a second cross section of the article such that the liquid precursor is at least partially converted to a solid in the second cross section. In particular the liquid precursor may be converted to a metal, ceramic, semiconductor, semimetal, or a combination of these materials.

  19. Fusibility and sintering characteristics of ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ots, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    The temperature characteristics of ash fusibility are studied for a wide range of bituminous and brown coals, lignites, and shales with ratios R B/A of their alkaline and acid components between 0.03 and 4. Acritical value of R B/A is found at which the fusion temperatures are minimal. The sintering properties of the ashes are determined by measuring the force required to fracture a cylindrical sample. It is found that the strength of the samples increases sharply at certain temperatures. The alkali metal content of the ashes has a strong effect on their sintering characteristics.

  20. High-energy high-rate processing of high-temperature metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persad, C.; Raghunathan, S.; Lee, B.H.; Bourell, D.L.; Eliezer, Z.; Marcus, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    Advances in kinetic energy storage devices have opened up a new approach to powder processing of high temperature composites. The processing consists of internal heating of a customized powder blend by a fast electrical discharge of homopolar generator. The high-energy high rate IMJ in 1s pulse permits rapid heating of a conducting powder in a cold wall die. This short time at temperature approach offers the opportunity to control phase transformations and the degree of microstructural coarsening not readily possible using standard powder processing approaches. This paper describes the consolidation results of two high temperature composite materials, (W-Ni-Fe)B 4 C and (Ti 3 Al + Nb)/SiC. The focus of this study was the identification of the reaction products formed at the matrix/reinforcement interface as a function of input energy and applied stress. Input energies beyond a threshold value for each system were required to produce detectable reaction products. In the (W-Ni