WorldWideScience

Sample records for ash formation deposition

  1. Ash formation, deposition, corrosion, and erosion in conventional boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, S.A.; Jones, M.L. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The inorganic components (ash-forming species) associated with coals significantly affect boiler design, efficiency of operation, and lifetimes of boiler parts. During combustion in conventional pulverized fuel boilers, the inorganic components are transformed into inorganic gases, liquids, and solids. This partitioning depends upon the association of the inorganic components in the coal and combustion conditions. The inorganic components are associated as mineral grains and as organically associated elements, and these associations of inorganic components in the fuel directly influence their fate upon combustion. Combustion conditions, such as temperature and atmosphere, influence the volatility and the interaction of inorganic components during combustion and gas cooling, which influences the state and size composition distribution of the particulate and condensed ash species. The intermediate species are transported with the bulk gas flow through the combustion systems, during which time the gases and entrained ash are cooled. Deposition, corrosion, and erosion occur when the ash intermediate species are transported to the heat-transfer surface, react with the surface, accumulate, sinter, and develop strength. Research over the past decade has significantly advanced understanding of ash formation, deposition, corrosion, and erosion mechanisms. Many of the advances in understanding and predicting ash-related issues can be attributed to advanced analytical methods to determine the inorganic composition of fuels and the resulting ash materials. These new analytical techniques have been the key to elucidation of the mechanisms of ash formation and deposition. This information has been used to develop algorithms and computer models to predict the effects of ash on combustion system performance.

  2. Probe Measurements of Ash Deposit Formation Rate and Shedding in a Biomass Suspension-Fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    The aim of this study was to investigate ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake reduction and deposit removal by using advanced online ash deposition and sootblowing probes in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, utilizing wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type (straw share....... The video recordings of all deposit probe experiments revealed that deposit shedding was primarily through debonding from the surface of the tubes in the superheater region. Chemical analysis of fly ashes indicated that during suspension-firing of straw and wood, the fly ashes were rich in Si, K, Ca and Cl...

  3. Shedding of ash deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zbogar, Ana; Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2009-01-01

    Ash deposits formed during fuel thermal conversion and located on furnace walls and on convective pass tubes, may seriously inhibit the transfer of heat to the working fluid and hence reduce the overall process efficiency. Combustion of biomass causes formation of large quantities of troublesome....... Low melting temperatures make straw ashes especially troublesome, since their stickiness is higher at lower temperatures, compared to coal ashes. Increased stickiness will eventually lead to a higher collection efficiency of incoming ash particles, meaning that the deposit may grow even faster...

  4. Fundamental study of ash formation and deposition: Effect of reducing stoichiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helble, J.J.; Bool, L.E.; Kang, S.G. [and others

    1995-11-01

    This project is designed to examine the effects of combustion stoichiometry on the fundamental aspects of ash formation and ash deposit initiation. Emphasis is being placed on reducing stoichiometries associated with low-NOx combustion, although a range of oxidant/fuel ratios are being considered. Previous work has demonstrated that ash formation depends strongly upon coal mineralogy, including mineral type, size, amount, and the presence of organically associated inorganic species. Combustion temperature and the oxidation state of iron also play a significant role. As these latter items will vary with changes in stoichiometry, research to determine the net effect on deposition is required.

  5. Deposit formation in a full-scale pulverized wood-fired power plant with and without coal fly ash addition

    OpenAIRE

    Hao WU; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Sander, Bo; Glarborg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Ash transformation and deposition in a pulverized wood-fired power plant boiler of 800 MWth were studied with and without the addition of coal fly ash. The transient ash deposition behavior was investigated by using an advanced deposit probe system at two different boiler locations with flue gas temperatures of ~1300oC and ~800oC, respectively. It was found that during pulverized wood combustion, the deposit formation at the hightemperature location was characterized by a slow and continuous ...

  6. Ash Deposit Formation and Deposit Properties. A Comprehensive Summary of Research Conducted at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry L. Baxter

    2000-08-01

    This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work performed at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility over the past eight years on the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion. This work has been done under four broad categories: coal characterization, fly ash formation, ash deposition, and deposit property development. The objective was to provide sufficient understanding of these four areas to be able to predict coal behavior in current and advanced conversion systems. This work has led to new characterization techniques for fuels that provide, for the first time, systematic and species specific information regarding the inorganic material. The transformations of inorganic material during combustion can be described in terms of the net effects of the transformations of these individual species. Deposit formation mechanisms provide a framework for predicting deposition rates for abroad range of particle sizes. Predictions based on these rates many times are quite accurate although there are important exceptions. A rigorous framework for evaluating deposit has been established. Substantial data have been obtained with which to exercise this framework, but this portion of the work is less mature than is any other. Accurate prediction of deposit properties as functions of fuel properties, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions represents the single most critical area where additional research is needed.

  7. Deposit formation in a full-scale pulverized wood-fired power plant with and without coal fly ash addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2013-01-01

    temperatures of ~1300oC and ~800oC, respectively. It was found that during pulverized wood combustion, the deposit formation at the hightemperature location was characterized by a slow and continuous growth of deposits followed by the shedding of a large layer of deposits, while the deposit formation......Ash transformation and deposition in a pulverized wood-fired power plant boiler of 800 MWth were studied with and without the addition of coal fly ash. The transient ash deposition behavior was investigated by using an advanced deposit probe system at two different boiler locations with flue gas...... at the low-temperature location showed a slow initial build-up and a stable mass of deposits after approximately 1-5 h. The deposits collected during pulverized wood combustion contained a considerable amount of K2SO4, KCl, and KOH/K2CO3. With the addition of coal fly ash (~4 times of the mass flow of wood...

  8. Ash Deposit Formation and Removal in a Straw and Wood Suspension-Fired Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    by using an advanced online deposit probe in a full scale suspension-fired boiler using wood and straw pellets as fuel (Amageværket Unit 2, AMV2). The 250 MWth boiler has maximum capacity of 60t/h biomass, owned by Vattenfall, and located in Copenhagen, Denmark. The maximum operation period of boiler...... in the superheater region (1st draught, flue gas temperature, 820-865 °C) and in the tube bank region (2nd draught, flue gas temperature, 580-605 oC). The percentage of ash in the applied straw and wood was 5.9 % and 3.3 %, while the K contents were 0.81% and 0.09% respectively. During 35% straw share, the initial...

  9. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao;

    2016-01-01

    . Therefore, timely removal of ash deposits is essential for optimal boiler operation. In order to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of deposit shedding in boilers, this study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash...... deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off by an electrically controlled arm, and the corresponding adhesion strength was measured. The results reveal the effect of temperature, ash/deposit composition......, sintering duration, and steel type on the adhesion strength....

  10. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao; Bøjer, M.; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Glarborg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Ash deposition on boiler surfaces is a major problem encountered during biomass combustion. Ash deposition adversely influences the boiler efficiency, may corrode heat transfer surfaces, and may even completely block flue gas channels in severe cases, causing expensive unscheduled boiler shutdowns. Therefore, timely removal of ash deposits is essential for optimal boiler operation. In order to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of deposit shedding in boilers, this study in...

  11. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao;

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000°C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off with the help of an electrically...... controlled arm. Higher sintering temperatures resulted in greater adhesion strengths, with a sharp increase observed near the melting point of the ash. Repetition of experiments with fixed operation conditions revealed considerable variation in the obtained adhesion strengths, portraying the stochastic...

  12. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic [Institute for Biological Research ' Sinisa Stankovic,' Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Department of Ecology

    2006-05-15

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

  13. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurdjević, L; Mitrović, M; Pavlović, P; Gajić, G; Kostić, O

    2006-05-01

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges (ranging from 1-80%). Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids (38.07-185.16 microg/g of total phenolics and 4.12-27.28 microg/g of phenolic acids) in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. Ash samples contained high amounts of ferulic, vanillic, and p-coumaric acid, while the content of both p-hydroxybenzoic and syringic acid was relatively low. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits. PMID:16418890

  14. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurdjević, L; Mitrović, M; Pavlović, P; Gajić, G; Kostić, O

    2006-05-01

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges (ranging from 1-80%). Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids (38.07-185.16 microg/g of total phenolics and 4.12-27.28 microg/g of phenolic acids) in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. Ash samples contained high amounts of ferulic, vanillic, and p-coumaric acid, while the content of both p-hydroxybenzoic and syringic acid was relatively low. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

  15. Full-scale ash deposition measurements at Avedøre Power Plant unit 2 during suspension-firing of wood with and without coal ash addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    along with the fly ash and bottom ash from the plant were characterized extensively by SEM-EDS, ICP-OES/IC and XRD. Based on the results from the present work, the deposit formation and shedding mechanisms under different operational conditions were proposed and discussed. The influence of coal ash......The formation of deposits during suspension-firing of wood at Avedøre Power Plant unit 2 (AVV2) was studied by using an advanced deposit probe system. The tests were conducted both with and without coal ash addition, and at two different locations with flue gas temperatures of 1250-1300 oC and 750...... addition on deposit formation during wood suspension-firing at AVV2 was evaluated. It was revealed that the addition of coal fly ash could significantly influence the ash deposition/shedding behaviors and the deposit properties. The effect was evident at both measurement locations. At the location...

  16. Ash transformation and deposit build-up during biomass suspension and grate firing: Full-scale experimental studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    2012-01-01

    of this study was to investigate ash transformation and deposition behavior in two biomass-fired boilers, firing wheat straw and/or wood. The influence of strawfiring technology (grate and suspension) on the ash transformation, deposit formation rate and deposit characteristics has been investigated. Bulk...... elemental analysis of fly ashes revealed that fly ash from suspension firing of straw has high contents of Si, K and Ca, while fly ash from straw firing on grate was rich in the volatile elements K, Cl and S. Investigations of deposit formation ratesweremade in the superheater and convective pass regions...... of the boilers by use of an advanced online deposit probe. During straw firing on grate, the measured deposit formation ratewas close to 38 g/m2/h. Data fromstraw suspension firing showed a deposit formation rate of 41 g/m2/h. The deposit formation rates during straw suspension firing and straw grate firing were...

  17. In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernath, P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sinquefield, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Oregon State Univ., Eugene, OR (United States); Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Barfield, M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Ash Deposition Trials at Three Power Stations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming; Larsen, Ole Hede

    1998-01-01

    Six full-scale trials were conducted at three power stations in Denmark: Ensted, Funen, and Vendsyssel power stations. During these trials, pulverized coal, bottom ash, fly ash, and deposits from cooled probes were sampled and analyzed with various techniques. On the basis of SEM analyses......, the deposits can be grouped into five textural types, which all possess distinct textural and chemical characteristics. Likewise, the deposition mechanisms for these five types are characteristic and they may be used for constructing a model for the buildup and maturation of an ash deposit. The deposits...... collected on the probes were thin (maximum 2 mm after 9 h) and the influence of operational parameters and probe temperatures on the magnitude of the deposits were minor. The probe temperatures had no influence on the composition of the ash deposits for coals with low ash deposition propensities, whereas...

  19. Quantification of Ash Deposit Build-up and Removal in a Straw and Wood Suspension-Fired Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake reduction and deposit removal by using advanced online ash deposition and sootblowing probes in a 350 MWth suspension­fired boiler, utilizing wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type (straw share in...

  20. Ash formation under pressurized pulverized coal combustion conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila Latorre, Aura Cecilia

    Coal combustion is a source of inorganic particulate matter (ash), which can deposit in boilers and also be emitted into the atmosphere becoming part of ambient fine particulate matter (PM 2.5). In order to decrease coal combustion emissions per unit of power produced, higher efficiency systems have been proposed, including systems operating at elevated pressures. These new operating conditions will affect pollutant formation mechanisms, particularly those associated with the conversion of mineral matter to ash. Ash particle formation mechanisms are particularly sensitive to changes in pressure as they are related to the structure of coal char particles at early stages of combustion. To assess the importance of pressure on ash particle formation, pyrolyzed chars and ash particles from pressurized pulverized combustion of two bituminous and one subbituminous U.S. coals at operating pressures up to 30 atm were studied. Pressure changes the distribution of char particle types, changing the spatial distribution of the minerals during the combustion process and therefore affecting particle formation mechanisms. Chars were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and classified into two different types (cenospheric and solid) depending on porosity and wall thickness. A correlation for estimating the amount of these cenospheric char particles was then proposed for bituminous coals based on the operating conditions and coal maceral analysis. The ash particle size distribution of the coals combusted at different operating pressures was measured using Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM). The results of the char characterization and ash particle size distribution measurements were then incorporated into an ash particle formation algorithm that was proposed and implemented. The model predicts ash particle size and composition distributions at elevated pressures under conditions of complete char burnout. Ash predictions were calculated by first

  1. Suspension-firing of wood with coal ash addition: Probe measurements of ash deposit build-up at Avedøre Power Plant (AVV2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming;

    This report is about full-scale probe measurements of deposit build-up and removal conducted at the Avedøreværket Unit 2, a 800 MWth suspension boiler, firing wood and natural gas with the addition of coal ash. Coal ash was used as an additive to capture potassium (K) from wood-firing. Investigat......This report is about full-scale probe measurements of deposit build-up and removal conducted at the Avedøreværket Unit 2, a 800 MWth suspension boiler, firing wood and natural gas with the addition of coal ash. Coal ash was used as an additive to capture potassium (K) from wood......-firing. Investigations of deposit formation rate were made by use of an advanced online ash deposition/shedding probe. Quantification of ash deposition and shedding was made via deposit mass uptake signals obtained from the deposit probe. The influence of coal ash, flue gas temperature, probe surface temperature...... oC), deposit removal through surface melting was not identified. SEM-EDS analysis of the deposits showed significant presence of Ca, Al and Si, indicating that a significant amount of K has been captured by coal ash to form deposits rich in calcium-aluminum-silicates, and possible release of Cl...

  2. Geological behavior of wet outflow deposition fly ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周德泉; 赵明华; 刘宏利; 周毅; 严聪

    2008-01-01

    The geological behaviors of wet outflow deposition fly ash were investigated, including the feature of in-situ single and even bridge cone penetration test (CPT) curves, the change of the penetration parameters and vane strength with the increase of depth and the difference of the penetration resistance on and down the water level. Drilling, CPT and vane shear test were carried out in silty clay, fine sand, and fly ash of the ash-dam. The CPT curves of the fly ash do not show a critical depth. The cone resistance (qc) of the fly ash is smaller than that of silty clay or sand; the friction resistance is smaller than that of filling silty clay, similar to that of deposition silty clay or more than that of fine sand; the friction ratio is smaller than that of filling silty clay, or more than that of deposition silty clay or much more than that of fine sand. The specific penetration resistance (ps) is similar to that of filling silty clay, or more than that of deposition silty clay. There is a clear interface effect between the deposition fly ash and the clay. Interface effect of ps-h curve at the groundwater table is clear, and ps of the fly ash reduces significantly under the table. The vane strength of the fly ash increases as the depth increases. The deposition fly ash with wet outflow is similar to silt in the geological behavior.

  3. COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems

  4. Ash deposition impacts in the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been great strides in understanding the fundamental underpinnings of the slagging and fouling phenomena. Unfortunately as fuel quality changes due to coal pricing, mine closures, government regulations, market forces, etc., boilers and boiler operators continue to be plagued by poorer operating performance than desired. While improvements have been made, the need to address fundamental coal quality issues and how they affect deposition, emissions, handling, and combustion continues to be relevant. This paper presents the results of a study to assess how prevalent coal quality issues are to the power generation industry. A survey of selected EPRI members was made to determine the major areas where coal quality effects power generation and a reliability and availability assessment of the NERC GADS database for the years 1995 to 2004 was completed. This database was used to determine the lost generation through either forced outages, forced derates or planned outages and derates due to coal quality or slagging and fouling issues. The results clearly demonstrated that slagging, fouling, corrosion and fuel blending continue to be the leading coal quality concerns of utility personnel. Ash chemistry resulting from fuel blending and new coals being utilized continue to be the main area for needed utility support. A minimum estimated annual economic impact of over $1.2 billion was calculated for all coal- and lignite-fired boilers in the US based on coal quality and deposition occurrences. While this annual economic loss is huge, these outages and derates account for only about 1.6% of the total number of outages and derate occurrences and 2.5% of the total lost MW-hour generation. An annual evaluation of the coal quality and deposition-based outages and derates did not show a clear trend. In fact, the coal quality-based outages and derates generally increased over the ten-year period. (author)

  5. Impact of coal fly ash addition on ash transformation and deposition in a full-scale wood suspension-firing boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Bashir, Muhammad Shafique; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2013-01-01

    at the location with high flue gas temperatures was characterized by a slow and continuous growth of deposits followed by the shedding of a large layer of deposits, while at the location with low flue gas temperature the deposit formation started with a slow build-up and the amount of deposits became almost...... of the deposits. Overall, the results from this work suggest that coal fly ash can be an effective additive to minimize the possible ash deposition and corrosion problems during suspension-firing of wood. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  6. Stabilization of Fly Ash Deposits through Selected Cereal Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florica Morariu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash, a waste product from burning coal in power plants, occupies important spaces and is a major harm forenvironment: water, air, soil and associated ecosystems. New deposits do not have available nutrients for plantgrowth. The study presents a process of stimulating growth of oats in deposits of fly ash, which eliminates listed.Phytostabilization of new deposit is fast after fertilization with sewage sludge-based compost in the presence/absence of native or modified volcanic tuff with grain species, Avena sativa L., and variety Lovrin 1. Experimentalstudies have shown the species adaptability to climatic conditions and a growth rate until the maturity correlated withtype of treatment of upper layers of fly ash deposit. Fly ash with sewage sludge compost treatment 50 t/hadetermined the growth with 75% of the amount of grains vs. the amount of grains harvested from untreated fly ash.Fly ash with sewage sludge compost mixed with modified indigenous volcanic tuff 2.5 t/ha treatment determined thegrowth with 80% vs. the amount of grains harvested from untreated fly ash. If oat straw harvested from fertilizedvariant without modified indigenous volcanic tuff increases in weight are 30% and for fertilized variant in thepresence of tuff increases in weight are 39.8% vs. quantities harvested from untreated fly ash.

  7. Deposition Rate and Size Distribution of Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikida, M.

    2006-12-01

    Sakurajima Volcano has been in violent activity since 1955 and erupting large amount of volcanic ash and stones from the crater. Volcanic fallouts have caused damages to the agricaltural products in the area and denuded the mountainside of vegitation. Deposited ash and stones on the mountainside has also caused hazardrous debris flows in the rivers. Therefore, it is necessary to know the deposition rate of the fallouts in prediction of debris flow. Due to the violent volcanic activity, however, it is prohibited to enter within two kilometers of the crater, making it impossible to measure the depth of deposited fallouts in the area. Theoretical study on deposition rate of volcanic fallouts should be needed to estimate the amount of fallouts in the upstream area. At first, motion of a particle erupted from the crater into the air was computed to examine its trajectory. From the simulation of the trajectory, a particle was assumed to fall at its terminal veloctity, and theoretical equation which give the deposition rate of volcanic ash and the distribution of deposited ash were obtained. In the derivation of these equations, the probability density functions of eruption column height, the terminal velocity of the erupted particles and the wind velocity were introduced. The computed values of amount of deposited ash show good agreement with the data taken from 93 collection points around Sakurajima Volcano. The annual amount of erupted volcanic ash was estimated to be about thirteen millions tons. The sample of deposited fallouts were taken to analize the size distribution. The data was also used to check the applicability of the theory presented.

  8. Ash3d: A finite-volume, conservative numerical model for ash transport and tephra deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, Hans F.; Denlinger, Roger P.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    We develop a transient, 3-D Eulerian model (Ash3d) to predict airborne volcanic ash concentration and tephra deposition during volcanic eruptions. This model simulates downwind advection, turbulent diffusion, and settling of ash injected into the atmosphere by a volcanic eruption column. Ash advection is calculated using time-varying pre-existing wind data and a robust, high-order, finite-volume method. Our routine is mass-conservative and uses the coordinate system of the wind data, either a Cartesian system local to the volcano or a global spherical system for the Earth. Volcanic ash is specified with an arbitrary number of grain sizes, which affects the fall velocity, distribution and duration of transport. Above the source volcano, the vertical mass distribution with elevation is calculated using a Suzuki distribution for a given plume height, eruptive volume, and eruption duration. Multiple eruptions separated in time may be included in a single simulation. We test the model using analytical solutions for transport. Comparisons of the predicted and observed ash distributions for the 18 August 1992 eruption of Mt. Spurr in Alaska demonstrate to the efficacy and efficiency of the routine.

  9. Pena Blanca uranium deposits and ash-flow tuffs relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pena Blanca uranium deposits (Chihuahua, Mexico) are associated with a Tertiary sequence of ash-flow tuffs. Stratigraphic control is dominant and uranium mineralization occurs in stratiform and fracture-controlled deposits within 44 My-old units: Nopal Rhyolite and Escuadra Rhyolite. These units consist of highly vapor-phase crystallized ash-flow tuffs. They contain sanidine, quartz and granophyric phenocrysts, and minor ferromagnesian silicates. Nopal and Escuadra units are high-silica alkali-rich rhyolites that have a primary potassic character. The trace-element chemistry shows high concentrations in U-Th-Rb-Cs and low contents in Ba-Sr-Eu. These chemical properties imply a genetic relationship between deposits and host-units. The petrochemical study show that the Nopal Rhyolite and Escuadra Rhyolite are the source of U and of hydrothermal solutions

  10. Study on the structural change and heat transfer characteristics of ash deposit layers in the coal gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazuyoshi Ichikawa; Yuso Oki; Jun Inumaru [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CREIPI) (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Ash deposition is often observed in the coal gasifier. As it may interfere the operation of gasifier, in case of excessive deposition, a study is needed to evaluate the ash deposition characteristics on the gasifier wall, its ability to grow after deposition, and influence of the formation of deposition layers on the heat transfer capability in advance. CRIEPI has conducted a study of the basic gasification process and operational technology using a 2T/D air-blown pressurized entrained-flow coal gasifier (2 T/D gasifier) since 1983. In a previous work, the authors calculated the ash liquid phase ratio as an index of the ash melting characteristics in correspondence to continuous temperature change, and established the relationship with the ash deposition characteristics. We also proposed as the technique to predict ash deposition characteristics in the gasifier by construction of a model based upon the correlation and introduction into the numerical analysis code. In this report, the relationship between the sintering structure and the heat transfer characteristics of deposition layer is studied. The heat transfer mechanism in the layer was also pursued. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, L.G.; Benson, S.; Rabinovich, A.; Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Schobert H.H.

    1987-07-01

    The kinetics of ash deposition on utility boilers have been studied. A heated tube furnace system was used in the study. Areas of consideration in the deposition mechanics were: close space knowledge of chemical composition and distribution of inorganic constituents in coal, transformations and reactions of the inorganic constituents in the flame, ash transport mechanisms, initial adhesion of ash particles to heat transfer surfaces and subsequently to each other to form a deposit, and further interactions of the deposited ash to grow a strong deposit. Interactions of deposited ash that cause changes in physical and chemical properties in an aged deposit are due to processes such as sintering, chemical reactions, and melting. The degree of these changes increases as the deposit grows from the heat transfer surfaces where it forms. All of these changes during the deposit formation process are coal-specific and are strongly dependent on the boiler configuration and operating conditions. 18 refs., 55 figs., 42 tabs.

  12. Environmentally-mediated ash aggregate formation: example from Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Bernard, Benjamin; Delmelle, Pierre; Douillet, Guilhem A.; Lavallée, Yan; Mueller, Sebastian B.; Dingwell, Donald B.; Dobson, Kate J.

    2016-04-01

    deposits likely requires a combination of sufficient humidity and a pre-existing soluble salt load on aggregating ash particles. We suggest that steam pluming from the dammed Chambo river, coupled with soluble salts emplaced by gas-ash interactions between ejection and deposition, provided a unique opportunity for the formation of accretionary lapilli with sufficient mechanical strength to survive deposition, accounting for their presence in a deposit otherwise absent of such aggregates. This possibility provides an important reminder of the role played by external environmental triggers in shaping the properties volcanic ash deposits.

  13. Ash transformation and deposition behavior during co-firing biomass with sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Liang; Wu, Hao; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    In the present work, the ash transformation and deposition behavior during wheat straw and wood waste combustion were investigated by combustion experiments in an entrained flow reactor. The influence of sewage sludge addition on ash chemistry and deposition tendency was also studied. During......-Ca-silicates. The deposits formed on a well-controlled sampling probe are dominated by molten particles rich in K silicates. Over 70% of K in the fly ash is water soluble. The fine fly ash from wood waste combustion consists of mainly KCl and NaCl. Both ash clusters and molten spherical particles are found from the...... ash deposits, which mainly contain K-silicates, K-Al-silicates and K-Ca-silicates. The sewage sludge addition significantly reduced the water soluble K and Na in the fly ash from wheat straw and wood waste combustion. Compared to pure wheat straw and wood waste, the ash deposition rates were increased...

  14. Geochemical and Petrographic Characterization of Ash in the Cretaceous Eagle Ford Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronay, E.; Lee, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Eagle Ford Formation is composed of highly laminated, organic rich shales and marls interbedded with volcanic ash. Discrete ash beds are easy to identify in outcrop as recessed layers between more resistant rock. In the finely laminated shales, the ash cannot be identified visually, which fosters the questions of whether ash is present in these shales and how that can be determined. The ash is thought to come from volcanic activity in western North America during the Cenomanian and Turonian, depositing in the Western Interior Seaway in what is now South Texas. Samples of known ash-rich beds from the Eagle Ford were analyzed using micro-XRF and thin section petrography in conjunction with ICP-MS laser ablation to determine the geochemical composition of the samples. The high CaCO3 content of the marls diluted the ash in each sample so elemental data were used to separate the two components. The amount of Ca in the ash from the total measured Ca was unknown. Carbonate takes Sr but not Al, therefore the y-intercept of a Ca/Al vs. Sr/Al graph gave the concentration of Ca in the non-carbonate components. This method was used for every cation to gather a generalized overall composition of the present day ash. The ash was found to have been altered to clays, resulting in a substantial loss of Si and thereby making the original composition of the ash indeterminable. However, certain elements like Ti and Zr are not as significantly affected by weathering. Using an empirical relationship between Ti/Zr and SiO2 in magmatic rocks from the Cretaceous Peninsular Ranges batholith, the likely source of ash, our measured Ti/Zr was used to determine the original SiO2 percentage in the ash, giving a range of 60-75 wt%. This was also checked by a Ti/Al regression analysis from the same Peninsular Ranges data, which gave a range of 67-72 wt% SiO2. These results suggest that the ash came from andesitic to rhyolitic eruptions. The discrepancy in Ti/Al and Ti/Zr calculated SiO2

  15. Experimental investigation of ash deposits characteristics of co-combustion of coal and rice hull using a digital image technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigated the ash deposit characteristics during the co-firing Da Tong (DA) coal with different proportions of rice hull (0%, 5%, 10%, and 20%, based on weight) in a pilot-scale furnace. The growth of ash deposit with a four-stage mode was presented. The stable thickness values of DA coal, 5% rice hull, 10% rice hull, and 20% rice hull were 0.5, 1.4, 2.9, 5.7 cm, with stable heat flux values of 230, 200, 175, and 125 kW/m2, respectively. According to the results of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX), the amount of Si in the deposits increased with the increasing proportion of rice hull rich in SiO2. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis results indicated that most elements except Si were in the amorphous state because of the formation of eutectics. The stable thicknesses of deposits increased exponentially with the proportion of rice hull. The deposit was loose, easy removable but it reduced the heat transfer significantly. Consequently, sootblowing timely was necessary when co-firing DA coal with rice hull. - Highlights: • Digital image technique was used to monitor deposits growth process. • A type of four stages mode of ash deposit growth was presented. • The heat flux of ash deposits fit a three-stage mode. • The addition of rice hull increased the porosity of deposits

  16. Deposition and immersion-mode nucleation of ice by three distinct samples of volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    Ice nucleation of volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect atmospheric transport and global climate. Previously, it has been suggested that there is one characteristic ice nucleation efficiency for all volcanic ash, regardless of its composition, when accounting for surface area; however, this claim is derived from data from only two volcanic eruptions. In this work, we have studied the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (basaltic ash, Guatemala), Soufrière Hills (andesitic ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Oruanui eruption, rhyolitic ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. In the present study, we find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice from 225 to 235 K at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.01, comparable to the mineral dust proxy kaolinite. Since depositional ice nucleation will be more important at colder temperatures, fine volcanic ash may represent a global source of cold-cloud ice nuclei. For immersion freezing relevant to mixed-phase clouds, however, only the Oruanui ash exhibited appreciable heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  17. Formation of Humic Substances in Weathered MSWI Bottom Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixia Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at evaluating the humic substances (HSs content from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI bottom ash and its variation with time and the effect of temperature on HSs formation. The process suggested by IHSS was applied to extract HSs from two different bottom ash samples, and the extracted efficiency with NaOH and Na4P2O7 was compared. MSWI bottom ash samples were incubated at 37∘C and 50∘C for 1 year. HSs and nonhumic substances were extracted from the bottom ash sample with different incubated period by 0.1 M NaOH/Na4P2O7. Results show that the rate of humic acid formation increased originally with incubation time, reached a maximum at 12th week under 37∘C and at 18th week under 50∘C, and then decreased with time. More humic acid in MSWI bottom ash was formed under 50∘C incubated condition compared with that incubated under 37∘C. Also, the elemental compositions of HSs extracted from bottom ash are reported.

  18. Distribution, Mineralogy, Petrography, Provenance and Significance of Permian Ash-Carrying Deposits in the Paraná Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Moacyr Vianna Coutinho

    Full Text Available The study of thin sections taken from drill core samples and outcrops in southern Brazil has demonstrated the occurrenceof repeated ash fall episodes during the Permian period between 280 and 245 Ma. Scattered or concentrated altered volcanicglass shards were detected in strata of Permian sedimentary rocks of the Rio Bonito and Tatui Formations. The shardcarryingsediment is usually a silty or cherty mudstone with variable amounts of calcrete calcite. Burial and alteration ofunstable glass debris led to the development of analcite and less commonly, calcite, silica minerals, zeolites or montmorillonite.Sources of explosive Permian volcanism, responsible for ample ash falls have been sought in South Africa, in the AndeanCordillera and along the Paraná Basin margin. A swarm of rhyolitic centers described in the Cordillera Frontal and in theCentral Argentinian Provincia de La Pampa (Patagonia is here proposed as the most adequate Permian source. In that area,volcanoes must have expelled ashes that traveled thousands of kilometers before settling in deltaic or shallow marineenvironments. Twenty-three occurrences of Permian shard-carrying sediments have been plotted in a Paraná Basin map. Thenumber of ash-carrying sediments decreases northeastward. The authors envisage dense clouds originated in Patagoniatraveling NE, depositing progressively smaller quantities of ashes but reaching Australia in pre-drift Gondwana. Shardcarrying sediments must be distinguished from “tonstein”, ash fall or ash flow tuffs, also recorded in the Permian Gondwana,which would indicate closer ash source area.

  19. The 1815 Tambora ash fall: implications for transport and deposition of distal ash on land and in the deep sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandlbauer, Jessica; Carey, Steven N.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.

    2013-04-01

    Tambora volcano lies on the Sanggar Peninsula of Sumbawa Island in the Indonesian archipelago. During the great 1815 explosive eruption, the majority of the erupted pyroclastic material was dispersed and subsequently deposited into the Indian Ocean and Java Sea. This study focuses on the grain size distribution of distal 1815 Tambora ash deposited in the deep sea compared to ash fallen on land. Grain size distribution is an important factor in assessing potential risks to aviation and human health, and provides additional information about the ash transport mechanisms within volcanic umbrella clouds. Grain size analysis was performed using high precision laser diffraction for a particle range of 0.2 μm-2 mm diameter. The results indicate that the deep-sea samples provide a smooth transition to the land samples in terms of grain size distributions despite the different depositional environments. Even the very fine ash fraction (advances versus the ash component depositing once the eruption terminates. With the historical data on eruption duration (maximum 24 h) and volumetric flow rate of the umbrella cloud (˜1.5-2.5 × 1011 m3/s) as input to the improved model, and assuming a combination of 3 h Plinian phase and 21 h co-ignimbrite phase, it reduces the mean deviation of the predicted versus observed grain size distribution by more than half (˜9.4 % to ˜3.7 %) if both ash components are considered.

  20. Hail formation triggers rapid ash aggregation in volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eaton, Alexa; Mastin, Larry G.; Herzog, M.; Schwaiger, Hans F.; Schneider, David J.; Wallace, Kristi; Clarke, Amanda B

    2015-01-01

    During explosive eruptions, airborne particles collide and stick together, accelerating the fallout of volcanic ash and climate-forcing aerosols. This aggregation process remains a major source of uncertainty both in ash dispersal forecasting and interpretation of eruptions from the geological record. Here we illuminate the mechanisms and timescales of particle aggregation from a well-characterized ‘wet’ eruption. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska incorporated water from the surface (in this case, a glacier), which is a common occurrence during explosive volcanism worldwide. Observations from C-band weather radar, fall deposits, and numerical modeling demonstrate that volcanic hail formed rapidly in the eruption plume, leading to mixed-phase aggregation of ~95% of the fine ash and stripping much of the cloud out of the atmosphere within 30 minutes. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanism of hail-like aggregation that contributes to the anomalously rapid fallout of fine ash and the occurrence of concentrically-layered aggregates in volcanic deposits.

  1. Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Studies on initiation, growth and sintering in the formation of utility boiler deposits: Topical technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Austin, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    Three laboratory-scale devices were utilized to investigate the mechanisms of the initiation, growth and sintering process involved in the formation of boiler deposits. Sticking apparatus investigations were conducted to study deposit initiation by comparing the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on four types of steel-based heat exchanger materials under the conditions found in a utility boiler and an entrained slagging gasifier. In addition, the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on a reduced steel surface were investigated. All the ash drops studied in this investigation were produced from bituminous coals.

  2. Analog-experiment analysis of ash-deposition monitoring model of boiler economizers in power plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wei-liang; XIA Guo-dong; XU Shou-chen

    2005-01-01

    Ash deposition is a form of particulate fouling, and appears usually in boiler economizers. The ash deposition increases capital expenditure, energy input and maintenance costs. An analog experiment for monitoring ash deposition was performed from the analogous objective of a 410 t/h boiler economizer to verify the rationality and reliability of the ash-deposition-monitoring model presented in order to increase the security and economy in economizer running. The analog experiment platform is a tube-shell exchanger that conforms well to the conditions of a self-modeling area. The analog flue gas in the shell side is the heated air mixed with ash,and in the tube side the fluid is water heated by the flue gas. The fluid state in the water side and the flue gas side follows the second self-modeling area. A 4-factor-3 level orthogonal table was used to schedule 9 operation conditions of orthogonal experiment, with the 4 factors being heat power, flue gas velocity, ashes grain diameter and adding ashes quantity while the three levels are different values due to different position classes in every factor. The ash deposition thermal resistances is calculated by the model with the measure parameters of temperature and pressure drop. It shows that the values of the ash deposition thermal resistances gradually increase up to a stable state. And the experimental results are reliable by F testing method at α = 0. 001. Therefore, the model can be applied in online monitoring of ash deposition in a boiler economizers in power plants and provides scientific decision on ash deposition prediction and sootblowing.

  3. Transformations in oil shale ash at wet deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estonian oil shale ash contains chemically active compounds which would undergo different spontaneous transformations in the atmosphere of air. For explaining these processes the system ash-water-air was studied storing moisture samples of ash in laboratory in open-air as well as hermetic conditions. The samples of dry ash formed at pulverized combustion of oil shale at the Baltic Power Plant, and samples obtained from ash storing plateau from different depth of different boreholes were under investigation. Storing conditions as well as the properties of initial samples have a great influence upon the processes taking place at storing of ashes. The results obtained could be used to explain and control the processes taking place at storing of ashes under atmospheric (wet) conditions

  4. Deposition and immersion-mode nucleation of ice by three distinct samples of volcanic ash

    OpenAIRE

    G. P. Schill; K. Genareau; M. A. Tolbert

    2015-01-01

    Ice nucleation of volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect atmospheric transport and global climate. Previously, it has been suggested that there is one characteristic ice nucleation efficiency for all volcanic ash, regardless of its composition, when accounting for surface area; however, this claim is derived from data from only two volcanic eruptions. In this work, we have studied the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of t...

  5. The Thermal Behavior of Coal—Ash Deposits on Heat Exchangers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JamesL.S.Chen; EverettR.Ramer

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical model for predicting the thermal behavior of coal-ash deposits on heat exchangers is developed.The heat transfer modes of heat conduction,converction,and thermal radiation are considered for the system.The effective thermal conductivities and emissivities of the ash deposits are temperature dependet,Heat fluxeds and dimensionless temperatures in the three layers(loose,sintered,and fused) of the ash deposit are determined.Results are presented for the first two rows of tubes in aligned and staggered tube banks.

  6. Contribution of aluminas and aluminosilicates to the formation of PCDD/Fs on fly ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Phillip M; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M

    2016-02-01

    Chlorinated aromatics undergo surface-mediated reactions with metal oxides to form Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFRs) which can further react to produce polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Previous work using laboratory-made fly ash surrogates composed of transition metal oxides deposited on silica powder has confirmed their ability to mimic fly ash in the production of PCDD/Fs. However, little is known about the propensity of aluminas and aluminosilicates, other components of fly ash, to form PCDD/Fs. A fly ash sample containing both alumina and mullite, an aluminosilicate, was tested for PCDD/F formation ability and compared to PCDD/F yields from the thermal degradation of 2-monochlorophenol (2-MCP) precursor over γ-alumina, α-alumina, and mullite. A packed-bed flow reactor was used to investigate the thermal degradation of 2-MCP over the various catalysts at 200-600 °C. Fly ash gave similar PCDD/F yields to surrogates made with similar transition metal content. γ-alumina, which is thermodynamically unfavorable, was very catalytically active and gave low PCDD/F yields despite a high destruction of 2-MCP. Mullite and α-alumina, the thermodynamically favorable form of alumina, yielded higher concentrations of dioxins and products with a higher degree of chlorine substitution than γ-alumina. The data suggest that certain aluminas and aluminosilicates, commonly found in fly ash, are active catalytic surfaces in the formation of PCDD/Fs in the post-flame cool zones of combustion systems and should be considered as additional catalytic surfaces active in the process. PMID:26615490

  7. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 2. Effects of sintering and deposit microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    The authors report results from an experimental study that examines the influence of sintering and microstructure on ash deposit thermal conductivity. The measurements are made using a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. The technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. The initial stages of sintering and densification are accompanied by an increase in deposit thermal conductivity. Subsequent sintering continues to densify the deposit, but has little effect on deposit thermal conductivity. SEM analyses indicates that sintering creates a layered deposit structure with a relatively unsintered innermost layer. They hypothesize that this unsintered layer largely determines the overall deposit thermal conductivity. A theoretical model that treats a deposit as a two-layered material predicts the observed trends in thermal conductivity.

  8. Numerical investigation of ash deposition in straw-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen

    accumulation rates encountered during straw combustion in grate-fired boilers. The sub-models have been based on information about the combustion and deposition properties of straw gathered from the literature and combined into a single Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based analysis tool which can aid...... in the design phase of straw-fired boilers. Some of the primary model outputs include improved heat transfer rate predictions and detailed information about local deposit formation rates. This information is essential when boiler availability and efficiency is to be estimated. A stand-alone program has been...... developed to predict the combustion processes on the grate and the release rate of KCl vapor. These outputs form the boundary conditions for the CFD analysis. The bed model has been validated through comparison with experimental data obtained during batch combustion of straw. It was found that the heat...

  9. Oil shale fueled FBC power plant - ash deposits and fouling problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O. Yoffe; A. Wohlfarth; Y. Nathan; S. Cohen; T. Minster [Geological Survey of Israel, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2007-12-15

    41 MWth oil shale fired demonstration power plant was built in 1989 by PAMA in Mishor Rotem, Negev, Israel. The raw material for the plant is the local 'oil shale', which is in fact organic-rich marl. Since then, and until today, the unit is operated at high reliability and availability. At first, heavy soft fouling occurred due to the Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (CFBC) mode of operation, which caused a considerable reduction in the heat transfer coefficient of the heat exchangers. By going over to the Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) mode of operation the soft fouling phenomenon stopped at once, the heat transfer coefficient improved, and the power plant could be operated at its designed values. After five months of operation at the FBC mode the boiler had to be shut down because Hard Deposits (HD) blocked physically the passes in the boiler. These deposits could be removed only with the help of mechanical devices. During the first two years the boiler had to be stopped, at least, three times a year for deposit cleaning purposes. Research conducted at the plant and in the laboratories of the Geological Survey of Israel enabled us to understand the mechanism of formation of these deposits. The results showed that the HD are formed in two stages: (1) Deposition of very fine ash particles on the pipes of the boiler, as a result of the impact of larger particles on the pipes. The fine particles adhere to the pipes and to each other, and step by step build the deposit. The growth of the deposit on the pipe surface is always perpendicular to the particles flow direction. (2) The deposits harden due to chemical reactions. 17 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

  11. Effect of interfacial properties on mechanical stability of ash deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ontiveros-Ortega

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on the cohesion of volcanic ash particles using surface free energy determination and zeta potential analyses. This is a subject of great interest in physical volcanology, as many researches on volcanic particle aggregation are frequently reported. In this case, special attention is paid to the role of structural or hydration forces between hydrophilic surfaces, which are a consequence of the electron-donor/electron-acceptor character of the interface. From this point of view, the results are potentially interesting as they could give valuable insights into this process. The results are presented in terms of the total energy of interaction between dispersed particles, computed from the extended DLVO theory. Contributions to the total free energy of interaction were determined from the zeta potential and surface free energy of ash, measured under different experimental conditions. Two samples of basaltic volcanic ash (black and white with silica contents of 44% and 63% respectively are studied. The surface free energy and zeta potential were analysed for ashes immersed in different electrolytes (NaCl, CaCl2, FeCl3. The presence of electrolytes changes the surface properties of the solid materials. The analysis of total interaction energy between the ash particles in aqueous medium shows that soil cohesion strongly depends on ash surface properties, chemical nature, the adsorbed cation on the surface, and pH value.

  12. Deposit Formation during Coal-Straw Co-Combustion in a Utility PF-Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karin Hedebo

    1998-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis reports the research on ash deposit formation in the convective pass of a utility PF-boiler during co-combustion of coal and straw. The work was based on experimental results from a two-year full scale demonstration programme at the Studstrup Power Station, Unit 1 (MKS1), owned...... by Midtkraft Energy Company. Primarily the results from the deposition trials, but also related experimental data were used in the evaluation. In connection with the evaluation of the probe deposits collected, a visual analyses system was developed, where the physical appearence of the deposit is evaluated...... with thermodynamic equilibrium evaluations, which thus provides good indications of the over-all tendencies in a coal-straw co-combustion system. The behaviour of K and Cl from the straw is thus primarily controlled by the ash behaviour of the coal species. An evaluation of the shift from ash formation dominated...

  13. Thermochemical Formation of Polybrominated Dibenzo-p-Dioxins and Dibenzofurans Mediated by Secondary Copper Smelter Fly Ash, and Implications for Emission Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Liu, Guorui; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Zheng, Minghui; Yang, Lili; Zhao, Yuyang; Jin, Rong

    2016-07-19

    Heterogeneous reactions mediated by fly ash are important to polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/Fs) formation. However, the formation of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) through heterogeneous reactions is not yet well understood. Experiments were performed to investigate the thermochemical formation of PBDD/Fs at 150-450 °C through heterogeneous reactions on fly ash from a secondary copper smelter. The maximum PBDD/F concentration was 325 times higher than the initial PBDD/F concentration in the fly ash. The PBDD/F concentration after the experiment at 150 °C was five times higher than the initial concentration. PBDD/Fs have not previously been found to form at such a low temperature. Secondary-copper-smelter fly ash clearly promoted PBDD/F formation, and this conclusion was supported by the low activation energies that were found in Arrhenius's law calculations. Thermochemical formation of PBDD/Fs mediated by fly ash deposited in industrial facilities could explain "memory effects" that have been found for PCDD/Fs and similar compounds released from industrial facilities. Abundant polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) that were formed through fly ash-mediated reactions could be important precursors for PBDD/Fs also formed through fly ash-mediated reactions. The amounts of PBDEs that formed through fly ash-mediated reactions suggested that secondary copper smelters could be important sources of reformed PBDEs. PMID:27347728

  14. Ash deposit characterisation in a large-scale municipal waste-to-energy incineration plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of ash - combustion residues - on superheaters and heat exchanger surfaces reduce their efficiency; this phenomenon was investigated for a large-scale waste-to-energy incineration facility. Over a period of six months, ash samples were collected from the plant, which included the bottom ash and deposits from the superheater, as well as flyash from the convective heat exchanger, the economiser and fabric filters. These were analysed for particle size, unburned carbon, elemental composition and surface morphology. Element partitioning was evident in the different combustion residues, as volatile metals, such as cadmium, antimony and arsenic, were found to be depleted in the bottom ash by the high combustion temperatures (1000+oC) and concentrated/enriched in the fabric filter ash (transferred by evaporation). Non-volatile elements by contrast were distributed equally in all locations (transported by particle entrainment). The heat exchanger deposits and fabric filter ash had elevated levels of alkali metals. 82% of flyash particles from the fabric filter were in the submicron range.

  15. Deposition and immersion mode nucleation of ice by three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Ice nucleation on volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect atmospheric transport and global climate. Previously, it has been suggested that there is one characteristic ice nucleation efficiency for all volcanic ash, regardless of its composition, when accounting for surface area; however, this claim is derived from data from only two volcanic eruptions. In this work, we have studied the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman Microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (basaltic ash, Guatemala), Soufrière Hills (andesitic ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Oruanui euption, rhyolitic ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. In the present study, we find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice from 225-235 K at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.01, comparable to the mineral dust proxy kaolinite. Since depositional ice nucleation will be more important at colder temperatures, fine volcanic ash may represent a global source of cold-cloud ice nuclei. For immersion freezing relevant to mixed-phase clouds, however, only the Oruanui ash exhibited heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  16. A scanning electron microscopy study of ash, char, deposits and fuels from straw combustion and co-combustion of coal and straw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sund Soerensen, H.

    1998-07-01

    full-scale experiment of co-combustion of coal and straw, the straw-derived silica were preferentially incorporated in the fly ash relative to the bottom ash. The analyzed deposits from straw-fired CHP's have shown that in the furnace condensation of KCl is important for formation of the initial layer, whereas building of the outer loose part of the deposit is dominated by particle impaction. Additionally, particle impaction is a more prominent process in the furnace compared to what is the case in the superheater region. Potassium was observed to react with sulphur preferentially to chlorine and silicate-compounds during low-temperature (550 deg C) laboratory ashing of a mixture of wheat straw and bituminous coal from MKS3. A similar effect was, however, not observed in full scale fly ashes from MKS3 in which potassium to a high extent have reacted with alumino-silicates to form K-Al silicates. However, potassium sulphates are present in deposits formed during co-combustion at MKS1, especially in the convective pass. (au)

  17. Usability value and heavy metals accumulation in forage grasses grown on power station ash deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Aleksandar S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of five forage grasses (Lolium multiflorum, Festuca rubra, Festuca arundinacea, Arrhenatherum elatius and Dactylis glomerata was conducted on an uncontaminated cultivated land, of leached chernozem type, and on “Nikola Tesla A” (TENT A thermal power station ash deposit. The concentrations of: As, Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni, Fe i Cu in grasses grown on two media were compared. Grass samples have been collected in tillering stage, when they were in full development. During the vegetative period three replications cut was conducted at about 3-5 cm height, imitating mowing and grazing. The concentrations of As and Ni were elevated in media samples collected from TENT A ash deposit, while the level of all studied elements in soil samples collected from cultivated land were within allowed limits. The variance of certain elements amounts in plant material collected from TENT A ash deposit was less homogeneous; the concentrations of As, Fe and Ni were higher in grasses collected from ash deposit, but Pb and Cu concentrations were higher in grasses grown on cultivated land. The concentrations of Zn were approximately the same in plants collected from the sites, whereas Cd concentrations were slightly increased in grasses grown on ash deposit. In general, it can be concluded from the results of this study that the concentrations of heavy metals in plants collected from both sites do not exceed maximal tolerant levels for fodder. The use of grasses grown on ash deposit for forage production should be taken with reserve. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31016: Unapređenje tehnologije gajenja krmnih biljaka na oranicama i travnjacima

  18. In situ measurements of the spectral emittance of coal ash deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectral emittance of deposits left by bituminous and sub-bituminous coals under oxidizing conditions have been measured in situ. Pulverized coal is injected into a down-fired entrained-flow reactor. Ash accumulates on a probe in the reactor effluent and radiation emitted by the ash layer is recorded using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Values for the spectral emissive power emitted by the ash and the surface temperature of the ash are extracted from these data. These results are then used to calculate the spectral emittance of the deposit. The spectral emittances of ash deposits formed by burning Illinois no. 6 (bituminous) coal and Powder River Basin (sub-bituminous) coal were measured between 3000 and 500 wavenumbers. The spectral emittance of the deposit left by the bituminous coal has a constant value of approximately 0.46 between 3000 and 2400 wavenumbers. Between 2200 and 1200 wavenumbers, the spectral emittance of the deposit increases from approximately 0.47 to approximately 0.61. Between 1200 and 500 wavenumbers, the spectral emittance is relatively constant at 0.61. The spectral emittance of the deposit left by the sub-bituminous coal is also relatively constant between 3000 and 2400 wavenumbers at a value of 0.29. Between 2200 and 500 wavenumbers, the spectral emittance of deposits from the sub-bituminous coal increases from approximately 0.29 to 0.55. Differences between these spectral emittance measurements and those measured ex situ illustrate the importance of making in situ measurements. Band emittances were calculated using the measured spectral emittances, and band emittances of the deposits are reported as functions of temperature.

  19. INFLUENCE OF SLAG AND ASH CEPLEA VALLEY DEPOSIT ON NEIGHBORHOOD SURFACE AND UNDERGROUND WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Maria MIHUT

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we pursue the following objectives: - Definition of the main causes of raising water generated in Turceni village influence ash and slag deposit and other factors that may influence the stability of the area and the perimeter of dwellings. - Determine the possible influence of water in the ash and slag deposit Ceplea Valley on areas adjacent waters can come from: process water from power stations, surface springs, intake of aquifer influence evapotranspiration etc… - Basic data and information necessary to reduce the sources that caused the phenomenon of the rise of the water level in the village, as well as control and warning levels in piezometers.

  20. Soil Properties in Coniferous Forest Stands Along a Fly Ash Deposition Gradient in Eastern Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. KLOSE; F. MAKESCHIN

    2005-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and microbial properties of forest soils subjected to long-term fly ash depositions were analyzed in spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stands of eastern Germany on three forest sites along an emission gradient of 3 (high input), 6, and 15 km (low input) downwind of a coal-fired power plant. Past emissions resulted in an atypical high mass of mineral fly ash constituents in the organic horizons at the high input site of 128 t ha-1 compared to 58 t ha-1 at the low input site. Magnetic susceptibility measurements proved that the high mineral content of the forest floor was a result of fly ash accumulation in these forest stands. Fly ash deposition in the organic horizons at Site Ⅰ versus Ⅲsignificantly increased the pH values, effective cation exchange capacity, base saturation and, with exception of the L horizon, concentrations of mobile heavy metals Cd, Cr, and Ni, while stocks of organic C generally decreased. A principal component analysis showed that organic C content and base status mainly controlled soil microbial biomass and microbial respiration rates at these sites, while pH and mobile fractions of Cd, Cr, and Ni governed enzyme activities. Additionally,it was hypothesized that long-term fly ash emissions would eventually destabilize forest ecosystems. Therefore, the results of this study could become a useful tool for risk assessment in forest ecosystems that were subjected to past emissions from coal-fired power plants.

  1. Modeling the formation of the quench product in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkaew, Kanawut; Saffarzadeh, Amirhomayoun; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated changes in bottom ash morphology and mineralogy under lab-scale quenching conditions. The main purpose was to clarify the mechanisms behind the formation of the quench product/layer around bottom ash particles. In the experiments, the unquenched bottom ashes were heated to 300°C for 1h, and were quenched by warm water (65°C) with different simulated conditions. After having filtered and dried, the ashes were analyzed by a combination of methodologies namely, particle size distribution analysis, intact particle and thin-section observation, X-ray diffractometry, and scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicated that after quenching, the morphology and mineralogy of the bottom ash changed significantly. The freshly quenched bottom ash was dominated by a quench product that was characterized by amorphous and microcrystalline calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) phases. This product also enclosed tiny minerals, glasses, ceramics, metals, and organic materials. The dominant mineral phases produced by quenching process and detected by XRD were calcite, Friedel's salt, hydrocalumite and portlandite. The formation of quench product was controlled by the fine fraction of the bottom ash (particle size conceptual model of the ash-water reactions and formation of the quench product in the bottom ash was proposed. PMID:27079853

  2. Modelling wet deposition in simulations of volcanic ash dispersion from hypothetical eruptions of Merapi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Richard A.; Potts, Rodney J.; Wain, Alan G.

    2016-10-01

    The statistical impact of including the process of wet deposition in dispersion model predictions of the movement of volcanic ash is assessed. Based on hypothetical eruptions of Merapi, Indonesia, sets of dispersion model simulations were generated, each containing four simulations per day over a period of three years, to provide results based on a wide range of atmospheric conditions. While on average dry sedimentation removes approximately 10% of the volcanic ash from the atmosphere during the first 24 h, wet deposition removes an additional 30% during seasons with highest rainfall (December and January) but only an additional 1% during August and September. The majority of the wet removal is due to in-cloud rather than below-cloud collection of volcanic ash particles. The largest uncertainties in the amount of volcanic ash removed by the process of wet deposition result from the choice of user-defined parameters used to compute the scavenging coefficient, and from the definition of the cloud top height. Errors in the precipitation field provided by the numerical weather prediction model utilised here have relatively less impact.

  3. Fine ash morphology and aerosol formation: A comparison of coal and biomass fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenevert, Blake Charles

    1998-12-01

    Modeling and experimental methods were used to investigate ash formation mechanisms of four industrially significant high-alkali biomass (sawdust/sanderdust) fuels. Alkali minerals tend to vaporize and recondense to form sub-micron aerosol, which poses health risks and causes special operational problems for industrial combustors. Sawdust/sanderdust was burned in a 15 kW natural gas-fired tunnel furnace. The resulting ash was collected by a water-cooled probe, and size sorted by cascade impaction and Electrical Aerosol Size Analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy techniques were used to determine morphology and composition by size cut. Three ash modes were present: (1) A residual mode composed primarily of porous calcium structures with a scale length of 8 microns and larger. This mode was likely the result of direct oxide and carbonate formation. (2) A secondary residual mode near 2 microns composed of fluxed and fragmented calcium, but also containing significant amounts of Si, Fe, Mn and Al. This mode appeared to be composed of eutectic melts separated from the parent ash particle. (3) An aerosol mode composed of Na and K with Cl anion, or sulfate anion when Cl was not present. The aerosol mode diameter was found to be a function of initial nucleate number density and coagulation time. Long coagulation time or high initial number density resulted in an aerosol mode diameter near 0.1 micron. Modeling was composed of three elements: (1) Equilibrium modeling---These calculations validated experimental evidence for alkali vaporization and condensation, predicting all alkali to enter the vapor phase as NaCl or KCl when Cl is available, or NaOH and KOH otherwise. (2) Condensation modeling---This model was used to determine the partitioning of alkali metal between homogeneous particulate matter formation (self-nucleation) and deposition on existing residual particles. It was shown that vaporized alkali can be collected on the

  4. Influence of Deposit Formation on Corrosion at a Straw Fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug; Michelsen, Hanne Philbert; Frandsen, Flemming;

    2000-01-01

    Straw-fired boilers generally experience severe problems with deposit formation and are expected to suffer from severe superheater corrosion at high steam temperatures due to the large alkali and chlorine content in straw. In this study, deposits collected (1) on air-cooled probes and (2) directly...... at the existing heat transfer surfaces of a straw-fired boiler have been examined. Deposits collected on air-cooled probes were found to consist of an inner layer of KCl and an outer layer of sintered fly ash. Ash deposits formed on the heat transfer surfaces all had a characteristic layered structure...... composition on the corrosion of the superheaters is provided. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  5. Usability value and heavy metals accumulation in forage grasses grown on power station ash deposit

    OpenAIRE

    Simić Aleksandar S.; Dželetović Željko S.; Vučković Savo M.; Sokolović Dejan R.; Delić Dušica I.; Mandić Violeta T.; Anđelković Bojan S.

    2015-01-01

    The study of five forage grasses (Lolium multiflorum, Festuca rubra, Festuca arundinacea, Arrhenatherum elatius and Dactylis glomerata) was conducted on an uncontaminated cultivated land, of leached chernozem type, and on “Nikola Tesla A” (TENT A) thermal power station ash deposit. The concentrations of: As, Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni, Fe i Cu in grasses grown on two media were compared. Grass samples have been collected in tillering stage, when they were in full devel...

  6. Ash deposition and high temperature corrosion at combustion of aggressive fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hede Larsen, O. [I/S Fynsvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Odense (Denmark); Henriksen, N. [Elsamprojekt A/S, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emission, ELSAM is investigating the possibilities of using biomass - mainly straw - for combustion in high efficiency power plants. As straw has very high contents of chlorine and potassium, a fuel with high corrosion and ash deposition propensities has been introduced. ELSAM has investigated 3 ultra supercritical boiler concepts for combustion of straw alone or together with coal: (1) PF boilers with a relatively low share of straw, (2) CFB boilers with low to high share of straw and (3) vibrating grate boilers with 100% straw. These investigations has mainly been full-scale tests with straw fed into existing boilers. Corrosion tests have been performed in these boilers using temperature regulated probes and in-plant test tubes in existing superheaters. The corrosion has been determined by detailed measurements of wall thickness reduction and light optical microscopic measurements of the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion. Corrosion mechanisms have been evaluated using SEM/EDX together with thermodynamical considerations based on measurements of the chemical environment in the flue gas. Ash deposition is problematic in CFB boilers and in straw fired boilers, especially in years with high potassium and chlorine content of the straw. This ash deposition also is related to condensation of KCl and can probably only be handled by improved cleaning devices. (EG)

  7. Formation of reactive oxygen species in rat epithelial cells upon stimulation with fly ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Voelkel; H F Krug; S Diabaté

    2003-02-01

    Fly ash was used as a model for ambient particulate matter which is under suspicion to cause adverse pulmonary health effects. The fly ash was pre-sized and contained only particles < 20 m including an ultrafine fraction (< 100 nm) that contributed 31% to the particle number. In our study, we investigated the influence of fly ash on the promotion of early inflammatory reactions like the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN). Furthermore, we determined the formation of nitric oxide (NO). The cells show a clear dose-response relationship concerning the formation of ROS with regard to the mass of particles applied. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) added as a co-stimulus did not increase the formation of ROS induced by fly ash. Furthermore, in LPS (0.1 g/ml) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; 1 ng/ml) pre-treated cells no increase in reactive oxygen species comparable to fly ash alone is observable. In presence of the metal chelator, desferrioxamine (DFO), ROS formation can be significantly reduced. Neither fly ash nor LPS induced a significant NO release in RLE-6TN cells.

  8. The characteristics of coignimbrite deposits and inferences for their formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwell, S. L.; Eychenne, J.; Wulf, S.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Coignimbrite deposits form as fine-grained ash (Ischia, 55 ka) particularly, the coignimbrite contribution is easily identified. These coignimbrite deposits are composed of glass shards, with very small lithic and expanded pumice contents. Grainsize data from these coignimbrite events show remarkably similar characteristics, typically described by a very fine-grained mode (~50 microns), and poor sorting. This fine grain size implicates aggregation as the dominant process by which this ash is deposited. Similar trends are identified in the literature, for different types and scales of eruptions indicating the grainsize of these deposits is controlled by current dynamics rather than primary eruptive conditions at the vent. The results highlight the importance of lacustrine environments for deciphering eruption dynamics, specifically those from coignimbrite forming events. In addition, the distinct difference in grainsize trends between Plinian and coignimbrite events highlights the need to model coignimbrite events and ash dispersal separately from Plinian events.

  9. Possible secondary apatite fission track age standard from altered volcanic ash beds in the middle Jurassic Carmel Formation, Southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowallis, B.J.; Christiansen, E.H.; Everett, B.H.; Crowley, K.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Miller, D.S.; Deino, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary age standards are valuable in intra- and interlaboratory calibration. At present very few such standards are available for fission track dating that is older than Tertiary. Several altered volcanic ash beds occur in the Middle Jurassic Carmel Formation in southwestern Utah. The formation was deposited in a shallow marine/sabhka environment. Near Gunlock, Utah, eight ash beds have been identified. Sanidines from one of the ash beds (GUN-F) give a single-crystal laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar age of 166.3??0.8 Ma (2??). Apatite and zircon fission track ages range from 152-185 Ma with typically 15-20 Ma errors (2??). Track densities in zircons are high and most grains are not countable. Apatites are fairly common in most of the ash beds and have reasonable track densities ranging between 1.2-1.5 ?? 106 tracks/cm2. Track length distributions in apatites are unimodal, have standard deviations <1??m, and mean track lengths of about 14-14.5 ??m. High Cl apatites (F:Cl:OH ratio of 39:33:28) are particularly abundant and large in ash GUN-F, and are fairly easy to concentrate, but the concentrates contain some siderite, most of which can be removed by sieving. GUN-F shows evidence of some reworking and detriaal contamination based on older single grain 40Ar/39Ar analyses and some rounding of grains, but the apatite population appears to be largely uncontaminated. At present BJK has approximately 12 of apatite separate from GUN-F. ?? 1993.

  10. Model calculations to formation of salt deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is a contribution from the geophysical side and its target is to explain the formation of long stretched salt deposits - salt walls - in a better manner than has been done sofar using model calculations. A few works have already been dedicated to this subject (they are treated in chapter 5). They all have the disadvantage however in not being able to represent the time sequence of the salt deposit generations. Precisely the latter is achieved in this work by including assumed initial interference. The values for the salt wall distance and its growth rate are improved upon. The Schleswig-Holstein salt deposit is taken as example. The model calculations are supported by model experiments. (orig.)

  11. Comparisons of Fly Ash and Deposition Between Air and Oxy-Fuel Combustion in Bench-Scale Fluidized Bed with Limestone Addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhimin Zheng; Hui Wang∗; Yongjun Guo; Li Yang; Shuai Guo; Shaohua Wu

    2015-01-01

    In Oxy⁃fuel circulating fluidized bed, the residual CaO particles may react with high concentration of CO2 in flue gas to form bonded deposit on heat transfer surfaces in backpass when limestone is used as a sorbent to capture SO2 .In this paper, experiments were designed on ash deposition in a bench⁃scale fluidized bed under oxy⁃fuel and air atmosphere. A novel ash deposit sampling probe was used to simulate the tubes of tail surfaces. The chemical composition of fly ash and ash deposit from both air⁃firing and oxy⁃fuel firing cases were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma⁃Atomic Emission Spectrometry ( ICP⁃AES ) and Scanning Electron Microscopy ( SEM) , respectively. The degrees of carbonation reaction of ash deposits were measured by Thermo Gravimetric Analysis. The results showed that there are distinct differences in fly ash deposition rate between oxy⁃fuel and air firing cases, and oxy⁃fuel combustion with limestone addition can affect chemical composition of fly ash and ash deposit, especially for elements of Ca, Na, K, and S. However, the carbonation reaction degree of ash deposits is found weak, which is due to the relatively low CaO content in ash deposit or not long enough of the sampling time.

  12. Trail formation based on directed pheromone deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Boissard, Emmanuel; Degond, Pierre; Motsch, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    We propose an Individual-Based Model of ant-trail formation. The ants are modeled as self-propelled particles which deposit directed pheromones and interact with them through alignment interaction. The directed pheromones intend to model pieces of trails, while the alignment interaction translates the tendency for an ant to follow a trail when it meets it. Thanks to adequate quantitative descriptors of the trail patterns, the existence of a phase transition as the ant-pheromone interaction fr...

  13. Effect of size of fly ash particle on enhancement of mullite content and glass formation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parveen Sultana; Sukhen Das; Biswajoy Bagchi; Alakananda Bhattacharya; Ruma Basu; Papiya Nandy

    2011-12-01

    Quartz is widely replaced by fly ash in traditional porcelain composite. Increased strength and stability of the fly ash-mixed composite depends on the quantity and crystallinity of the mullite phase in the fly ash. Our aim in this investigation is to increase the formation of mullite in nanocrystalline form and study the effect of temperature. Quantitative estimation of mullite and residual quartz content were done by Xray diffraction (XRD) and nanostructure and crystallization were studied using differential thermal analysis (DTA), field effect scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), XRD and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results show that fly ash sieved through 250 holes/cm2 mesh contain more mullite initially and growth of mullite as well as glass formation was faster in this sample compared to coarse fly ash. The maximum mullite in these samples was formed at 1600°C. Transformation of quartz and cristobalite phases into glassy phase was also faster for smaller particle sizes of fly ash.

  14. Residual Ash Formation during Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damø, Anne Juul; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2014-01-01

    ]. The collected particles were subjected to various analyses, including STA-analysis for determination of carbon/char burn-out level, light-scattering technique (Malvern Mastersizer) for determination of particle size distribution, bulk chemical analysis (ICP-EOS) for elemental composition, and, SEM/EDS analysis...... for investigation of particle morphology and composition. The transient release of inorganic species such as alkali metals, Cl and S from the fuel particles, was quantified by two different calculation methods. The char burn-out level of the residual ash was found to be both time dependent and highly fuel dependent...

  15. Ash transformation in suspension fired boilers co-firing coal and straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    In this literature report is provided a status for the present knowledge level on ash properties when co-firing coal and biomass. The fly ash formed in boilers using co-firing of coal and straw do have a large influence on ash deposit formation, boiler corrosion, fly ash utilization and operation...

  16. DIOXIN AND FURAN FORMATION ON FLY ASH FROM A MIXTURE OF CHLOROPHENOLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To establish the relationship between specific chlorophenol (CP) congener distributions and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) products this work investigated the formation of PCDDs/Fs from different CP mixtures passed over fly ash under selected reaction ...

  17. Dynamics of deposited fly-ash and fine grained magnetite in sandy material of different porosity (column experiments)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapicka, Ales; Kodesova, Radka; Petrovsky, Eduard; Grison, Hana

    2010-05-01

    Several studies confirm that soil magnetometry can serve as proxy of industrial immisions as well as heavy-metal contamination. The important assumption for magnetic mapping of contaminated soils is that atmospherically deposited particulate matter, including the ferrimagnetic phase, accumulates in the top soil horizons and remains there over long period. Only if this is true, large areas can be reliably mapped using soil magnetometry, and, moreover, this method can be used also for long-term monitoring. However, in soil types such as sandy soils with different porosity or soils with substantial variability of water regime, translocation of the deposited anthropogenic particles may result in biased (underestimated) values of the measured topsoil magnetic susceptibility. From the physical point of view, this process may be considered as colloid transport through porous medium. In our column experiments in laboratory we used three technical sands with different particle sizes (0,63 - 1.25mm, 0,315-0,80mm, 0,10-0,63mm). Sands in cylinders were contaminated on the surface by fly-ashes from coal-burning power plant (mean grain size 10μm) and fine grained Fe3O4 (grain size sensors were used to monitor water regime within the sand columns after controlled rain simulation and temperature distribution in sand column was measured as well. Vertical migration of ferrimagnetic particles-tracers presented in the fly-ash was measured by SM 400 Kappameter. By means of magnetic susceptibility distribution we studied two parameters: gradual shift of peak concentration of contaminants (relative to surface layer) and maximum penetration depth. Results indicated that after rain simulation (pulls infiltration of defined water volume) the positions of peak values moved downwards compared to the initial state and gradual decrease of susceptibility peak values were detected in all studied sand formations. Fly-ash migrated more or less freely in coarse sand material. In medium and fine

  18. Mass Deposition, Etching and Sputtering Effects of Low-Energy N+ Ion Irradiation on Solid Fly Ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fly ash is an industrial waste created when coal is burned to generate electrical power. In the present study, we used low-energy nitrogen ion implantation on fly ash to improve its surface properties. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) were used to study the changes of physical and chemical properties of fly ash after N+ ion implantation, and the mechanism of fly ash modified by ion implantation. In the optimal implantation with energy of 5 keV and dose of 15D0, the ion beam could effectively increase the specific surface area (approximately 150% increase) of the fly ash. Lots of scratches were generated in the surface of the fly ash after N+ ion implantation, therefore it is good for enhancing the specific surface area. Experimental results show that the ion implantation could open the chemical bonds of Si-O, Si-Al and Al-O, and deposit nitrogen ions on the surface of fly ash. (plasma technology)

  19. Ash transformation during co-firing coal and straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn;

    2007-01-01

    Co-firing straw with coal in pulverized fuel boilers can cause problems related to fly ash utilization, deposit formation, corrosion and SCR catalyst deactivation due to the high contents of Cl and K in the ash. To investigate the interaction between coal and straw ash and the effect of coal qual...

  20. Project for solving of environmental problems caused by ash emission and deposition from the thermal power plant 'Nikola Tesla' at Obrenovac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of ash emission and deposition from the Thermal Power Plant 'Nikola Tesla' (TPPNT) in Obrenovac commences with the date of their construction. Up to now, mainly, some analysis of several possible influences of ash (emitted or deposited on the ash and slug dump) was done. We believe that is time now, due to the consequences for a long time, to pose and to resolve the whole problem of ash emission and deposition from TPPNT Obrenovac. Due to the very big production capacity, an enormous amount of fly ash (particle size of 90-200 μm) is emitted to a large area near Obrenovac. Very large quantities of ash and slug (more than 2 millions tons annually) produced during coal burning were deposited on the dump very close to the river Sava. Some of the multiple consequences due to elution of heavy metals, water spilling from the dump and mixing with ground water and surface water of river Sava, weathering of fine particles of ash by wind, acid rains near to the thermal power plants, and other influences of flying and deposited ash on the environment of the whole area are always present. Due to the complexity of the posed problem, a multidisciplinary experts' team was formed to cover all aspects of negative influences of ash emission and deposition from TPPNT Obrenovac. Our project comprises a large number of subprojects covering different problem solving, diminution or removal of all negative influences according to European standards and regulations. (author)

  1. Chemical signature of two Permian volcanic ash deposits within a bentonite bed from Melo, Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calarge, Liane M; Meunier, Alain; Lanson, Bruno; Formoso, Milton L L

    2006-09-01

    A Permian bentonite deposit at Melo, Uruguay is composed of a calcite-cemented sandstone containing clay pseudomorphs of glass shards (0-0.50 m) overlying a pink massive clay deposit (0.50-2.10 m). The massive bed is composed of two layers containing quartz and smectite or pure smectite respectively. The smectite is remarkably homogeneous throughout the profile: it is a complex mixed layer composed of three layer types whose expandability with ethylene glycol (2EG 1EG or 0EG sheets in the interlayer zone which correspond to low-, medium- and high-charge layers respectively) varies with the cation saturating the interlayer zone. The smectite homogeneity through the profile is the signature of an early alteration process in a lagoonal water which was over saturated with respect to calcite. Compaction during burial has made the bentonite bed a K-depleted closed system in which diagenetic illitization was inhibited. Variations in major, REE and minor element abundances throughout the massive clay deposit suggest that it originated from two successive ash falls. The incompatible element abundances are consistent with that of a volcanic glass fractionated from a rhyolite magma formed in a subduction/collision geological context. PMID:16936941

  2. Occurrence of volcanic ash in the Quaternary alluvial deposits, lower Narmada basin, western India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rachna Raj

    2008-02-01

    This communication reports the occurrence of an ash layer intercalated within the late Quaternary alluvial succession of the Madhumati River, a tributary of the lower Narmada River. Petrographic, morphological and chemical details of glass shards and pumice fragments have formed the basis of this study. The ash has been correlated with the Youngest Toba Tuff. The finding of ash layer interbedded in Quaternary alluvial sequences of western Indian continental margin is significant, as ash being datable material, a near precise time-controlled stratigraphy can be interpreted for the Quaternary sediments of western India. The distant volcanic source of this ash requires a fresh re-assessment of ash volume and palaeoclimatic interpretations.

  3. In situ ATR-FTIR study of the early stages of fly ash geopolymer gel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Catherine A; Provis, John L; Lukey, Grant C; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2007-08-14

    The kinetics of geopolymer formation are monitored using a novel in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic technique. Reaction rates are determined from the intensity variation of the bands related to the geopolymer gel network and the unreacted fly ash particles. Comparison with deuterated geopolymer samples provides critical information regarding peak assignments. An initial induction (lag) period is observed to occur for hydroxide-activated geopolymers, followed by gel evolution according to an approximately linear reaction profile. The length of the lag period is reduced by increasing the concentration of NaOH. An increase in the rate of network formation also occurs with increasing NaOH concentration up to a maximum point, beyond which an increased NaOH concentration leads to a reduced rate of network formation. This trend is attributed to the competing effects of increased alkalinity and stronger ion pairing with an increase in NaOH concentration. In situ analysis also shows that the rate of fly ash dissolution is similar for all moderate- to high-alkali geopolymer slurries, which is attributed to the very highly water-deficient nature of these systems and is contrary to predictions from classical glass dissolution chemistry. This provides for the first time detailed kinetic information describing fly ash geopolymer formation kinetics.

  4. INHALATION STUDIES OF MT. ST. HELENS VOLCANIC ASH IN ANIMALS: RESPIRATORY MECHANICS, AIRWAY REACTIVITY AND DEPOSITION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of fine volcanic ash aerosol on pulmonary mechanical properties of awake guinea pigs were evaluated during exposure by inhalation. Ash penetration into the lungs as well as tissue response to ash were determined by transmission electron microscopy. The reactivity of airwa...

  5. Depth of the ash flow deposit in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Jürgen

    1991-08-01

    In anticipation of a drill hole, seismic refraction and gravity profiles acquired more than 20 years ago have been reinterpreted in light of new density data to determine the thickness of the ash flow deposit in the Valley of the Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The data show the ash flow is at least 170m thick and most likely welded in its lower portion. Its average density is ˜1800 kg m-3. Seismic velocities range from 0.6 to 1 km/sec for the deposit’s unwelded 30-to-50m-thick top section and 1.8 to 2.5 km/sec for the lower welded section. The data confirm the first realistic estimate of the volume of the ash flow of about 11 km³ by Curtis (1968), based on a geomorphic analysis of stream profiles.

  6. Hard Coal Fly Ash and Silica-Effect of Fine Particulate Matter Deposits on Brassica chinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ulrichs

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: One focus in recent atmospheric pollution research is on fine Particle Matter (PM, especially as result of increasing traffic and anthropogenic activity in urban areas. Here, the impact on animal and human health has been in the center of many studies. Despite the fact that PM depositions can affect plants on the long term, there are only few studies about the impact on plants conducted. Approach: Therefore we studied the impact of PM on plants, using naturally occurring silica dusts (diatomaceous earth and hard Coal Fly Ash (CFA from burning processes. Dusts were applied onto Brassica chinensis L. using a simple duster (covering upper leaf surfaces or electrostatically (covering leaf upper and -underside. Results: Main components of the tested CFA are SO42-, K, Ca and NH4+. The pH value of eluates was found to be around 9.5 in CFA and 5.7 in silica. B. chinensis was insensitive towards the high pH and showed no growth reduction when grown in silica or CFA substrate. PM deposition on leaf surfaces results through shading in a reduced photosynthetic activity. The reduction is relatively higher at higher light intensities. Photosynthesis stays reduced after removal of silica PM from leaf surfaces. We assume that stomata get cloaked by small particles and that silica absorbs lipids from the epicuticle resulting in a general stress reaction. Smaller sized silica particles resulted in a higher reduction of CO2-absorption. Next to particle size is the photosynthesis negatively correlated with exposure time for silica PM. The chlorophyll fluorescence data indicate that dust-covered leaves exhibited significantly lower quantum yield of PS II and a reduced quantum efficiency of PS II and therefore supported the gas exchange data. Conclusion: Reduced photosynthetic performance would be expected to reduce growth and productivity of B. chinensis. In contrast to silica hard coal fly ash

  7. Indirect effects of emerald ash borer-induced ash mortality and canopy gap formation on epigaeic beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Kamal J K; Smith, Annemarie; Hartzler, Diane M; Herms, Daniel A

    2014-06-01

    Exotic herbivorous insects have drastically and irreversibly altered forest structure and composition of North American forests. For example, emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) from Asia has caused wide-scale mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in eastern United States and Canada. We studied the effects of forest changes resulting from emerald ash borer invasion on epigaeic or ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) along a gradient of ash dieback and gap sizes in southeastern Michigan. Ground beetles were sampled in hydric, mesic, and xeric habitats in which black (Fraxinus nigra Marshall), green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall), and white (Fraxinus americana L.) ash were the most common species, respectively. During 2006-2007, we trapped 2,545 adult ground beetles comprising 52 species. There was a negative correlation between percent ash tree mortality in 2006 and catches of all beetles. Catches of Agonum melanarium Dejean (in 2006) and Pterostichus mutus (Say) (in 2006-2007) were negatively correlated with tree mortality and gap size, respectively. However, catches of Pterostichus corvinus Dejean were positively correlated with gap size in 2006. As ash mortality and average gap size increased from 2006 to 2007, catches of all beetles as well as P. mutus and Pterostichus stygicus (Say) increased (1.3-3.9 times), while species diversity decreased, especially in mesic and xeric stands. Cluster analysis revealed that beetle assemblages in hydric and mesic stand diverged (25 and 40%, respectively) in their composition from 2006 to 2007, and that hydric stands had the most unique beetle assemblages. Overall, epigaeic beetle assemblages were altered in ash stands impacted by emerald ash borer; however, these impacts may dissipate as canopy gaps close. PMID:24690169

  8. Melting Behavior of Volcanic Ash relevant to Aviation Ash Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash is one of the major hazards caused by volcanic eruptions. In particular, the threat to aviation from airborne volcanic ash has been widely recognized and documented. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in-flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The primary cause of engine thrust loss is that the glass in volcanic ash particles is generated at temperatures far lower than the temperatures in the combustion chamber of a jet engine ( i.e. > 1600 oC) and when the molten volcanic ash particles leave this hottest section of the engine, the resolidified molten volcanic ash particles will be accumulated on the turbine nozzle guide vanes, which reduced the effective flow of air through the engine ultimately causing failure. Thus, it is essential to investigate the melting process and subsequent deposition behavior of volcanic ash under gas turbine conditions. Although few research studies that investigated the deposition behavior of volcanic ash at the high temperature are to be found in public domain, to the best our knowledge, no work addresses the formation of molten volcanic ash. In this work, volcanic ash produced by Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala in November 8, 2012 was selected for study because of their recent activity and potential hazard to aircraft safety. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the sintering and fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by using characteristic temperatures by means of hot stage microscope (HSM), different thermal analysis (DTA) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) to

  9. Deposit Probe Measurements in Danish Grate and Pulverized Fuel Biomass Power Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Broholm; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming;

    2012-01-01

    formation rates. Suspension fired boilers generate more fly ash, while grate boilers form a fly ash with a higher fraction of melt formation (and thereby a higher sticking probability) at similar temperatures. For suspension fired units it is observed that wood with a lower ash content than straw gives rise....... Corresponding samples of fuels, ash deposits and fly ash have provided information on the transformation of inorganics in the boiler. Generally, grate fired boilers provide a fly ash containing high contents of K, Cl and S compared to the fuel ash, while suspension fired boilers fly ash has a composition nearly...... similar to the fuel ash. Inner most biomass deposits are always salt-rich, while thicker deposit layers also contain some Si and Ca. Deposit probe formation rate measurements have been performed in different ways on several boilers. Grate and suspension fired boilers seems to cause similar deposit...

  10. Prevention of the ash deposits by means of process conditions in biomass gasification; Biomassapolttoaineiden tuhkan kuonaantumiskaeyttaeytymisen estaeminen prosessiolosuhteiden avulla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moilanen, A.; Laatikainen-Luntama, J.; Nieminen, M.; Kurkela, E.; Korhonen, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    In fluidised-bed gasification, various types of deposits and agglomerates may be formed by biomass ash in the bed, in upper zones of the reactor, for instance in cyclones. These may decisively hamper the operation of the process. The aim of the project was to obtain data on the detrimental fouling behaviour of the ash of different types of biomass in fluidised-bed gasification, and on the basis of these data to determine the process conditions and ways of preventing this kind of behaviour. Different types of biomass fuel relevant to energy production such as straw, wood residue were be used as samples. The project consisted of laboratory studies and fluidised-bed reactor tests including ash behaviour studied both in the bed and freeboard. In laboratory tests, the sample material was characterised as a function of different process parameters. In fluid-bed reactors, the most harmful biomasses were tested using process variables such as temperature, bed material and the gasification agents. Bubbling fluidised-bed gasification tests with wheat straw showed that agglomerates with different sizes and structures formed in the bed depending on the temperature, the feed gas composition and bed material. Agglomerates consisted of molten ash which sintered with bed material and other solids. In all BFB tests, freeboard walls were slicked by ash agglomerates (different amounts) which, however, were easily removable. The results of this project and the earlier pilot-scale gasification experience obtained with the same feedstocks showed that useful characteristic data about ash behaviour can be obtained using laboratory tests and small scale reactors. (orig.)

  11. Characterization of high-calcium fly ash and its influence on ettringite formation in portland cement pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishmack, Jody Kathleen

    High-calcium Class C fly ashes derived from Powder River Basin coal are currently used as supplementary cementing materials in portland cement concrete. These fly ashes tend to contain significant amounts of sulfur, calcium, and aluminum, thus they are potential sources of ettringite. Characterization of six high-calcium fly ashes originating from Powder River Basin coal have been carried out. The hydration products formed in pastes made from fly ash and water were investigated. The principal phases produced at room temperature were ettringite, monosulfate, and stratlingite. The relative amounts formed varied with the specific fly ash. Removal of the soluble crystalline sulfur bearing minerals indicated that approximately a third of the sulfur is located in the fly ash glass. Pore solution analyses indicated that sulfur concentrations increased at later ages. Three fly ashes were selected for further study based on their ability to form ettringite. Portland cement-fly ash pastes made with the selected fly ashes were investigated to evaluate ettringite and monosulfate formation. Each of the fly ashes were mixed with four different types of portland cements (Type I, I/II, II, and III) as well as three different Type I cements exhibiting a range of C3A and sulfate contents. The pastes had 25% or 35% fly ash by total weight of solids and a water:cement-fly ash ratio of 0.45. The samples were placed in a curing room (R.H. = 100, 23°C) and were then analyzed at various ages by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine the principal hydration products. The hydration products identified by XRD were portlandite, ettringite (an AFt phase), monosulfate, and generally smaller amounts of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate (all AFm phases). Although the amount of ettringite formed varied with the individual cement, only a modest correlation with cement sulfate content and no correlation with cement C3A content was observed. DSC

  12. A simple semi-empirical approach to model thickness of ash-deposits for different eruption scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. González-Mellado

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of ash-fall on people, buildings, crops, water resources, and infrastructure depends on several factors such as the thickness of the deposits, grain size distribution and others. Preparedness against tephra falls over large regions around an active volcano requires an understanding of all processes controlling those factors, and a working model capable of predicting at least some of them. However, the complexity of tephra dispersion and sedimentation makes the search of an integral solution an almost unapproachable problem in the absence of highly efficient computing facilities due to the large number of equations and unknown parameters that control the process. An alternative attempt is made here to address the problem of modeling the thickness of ash deposits as a primary impact factor that can be easily communicated to the public and decision-makers. We develop a semi-empirical inversion model to estimate the thickness of non-compacted deposits produced by an explosive eruption around a volcano in the distance range 4–150 km from the eruptive source.

    The model was elaborated from the analysis of the geometric distribution of deposit thickness of 14 world-wide well-documented eruptions. The model was initially developed to depict deposits of potential eruptions of Popocatépetl and Colima volcanoes in México, but it can be applied to any volcano. It has been designed to provide planners and Civil Protection authorities of an accurate perception of the ash-fall deposit thickness that may be expected for different eruption scenarios. The model needs to be fed with a few easy-to-obtain parameters, namely, height of the eruptive column, duration of the explosive phase, and wind speed and direction, and its simplicity allows it to run in any platform, including a personal computers and even a notebook. The results may be represented as tables, two dimensional thickness-distance plots, or isopach maps using any available

  13. The potential of four woody species for the revegetation of fly ash deposits from the ‘Nikola Tesla-a’ thermoelectric plant (Obrenovac, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Olga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Four woody species, Tamarix tentandra Pallas, Populus alba L. and Robinia pseudoacacia L. (planted and Amorpha fruticosa L. (naturally colonized were studied at two fly ash deposit lagoons, weathered 3 (L1 and 11 years (L2. All species were assessed in terms of their invasive ability, photosynthetic efficiency, photosynthetic pigments and damage symptoms, while the characteristics of the habitat were assessed in terms of trace element content and the pH and EC of the ash. A reduced vitality of all populations growing on the ash was observed, except for the naturally colonized A. fruticosa. High vitality on all sites, except at L2, increased chlorophyll content and absence of damage symptoms indicates a tolerance in relation to the uptake of toxic elements from the ash. Therefore, the characteristics of naturally colonized species can be used for modeling future actions of biological restoration of fly ash deposits.

  14. Chemical signature of two Permian volcanic ash deposits within a bentonite bed from Melo, Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane M. Calarge

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A Permian bentonite deposit at Melo, Uruguay is composed of a calcite-cemented sandstone containing clay pseudomorphs of glass shards (0-0.50 m overlying a pink massive clay deposit (0.50-2.10m. The massive bed is composed of two layers containing quartz and smectite or pure smectite respectively. The smectite is remarkably homogeneous throughout the profile: it is a complex mixed layer composed of three layer types whose expandability with ethylene glycol (2EG 1EG or 0EG sheets in the interlayer zone which correspond to low-, medium- and high-charge layers respectively varies with the cation saturating the interlayer zone. The smectite homogeneity through the profile is the signature of an early alteration process in a lagoonal water which was over saturated with respect to calcite. Compaction during burial has made the bentonite bed a K-depleted closed system in which diagenetic illitization was inhibited. Variations in major, REE and minor element abundances throughout the massive clay deposit suggest that it originated from two successive ash falls. The incompatible element abundances are consistent with that of a volcanic glass fractionated from a rhyolite magma formed in a subduction/collision geological context.Um depósito Permiano de bentonita em Melo, Uruguai,é composto por um arenito com cimento calcítico contendo pseudomorfos de argila sobre detritos vítreos(0-0.50 m superpostos a um deposito maciço de argila rosado (0.50-2.10 m. A camada maciça é composta por dois níveis contendo quartzo e esmectita ou esmectita pura, respectivamente. A homogeneidade de esmectita ao longo do perfil é notável: trata-se de um interestratificado composto de três tipos de camadas, cuja expansibilidade com etileno-glicol (folhas 2EG, 1EG ou 0EG na zona interfoliar correspondentes a camadas com baixa, média e alta carga, respectivamente variam com o tipo de cátion que satura a zona interfoliar. A homogeneidade da esmectita ao longo do perfil

  15. Characteristics of slag, fly ash and deposited particles during melting of dewatered sewage sludge in a pilot plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanapiya, Premrudee; Sakano, Takeo; Kanaoka, Chikao; Mikuni, Tokuyoshi; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko; Zhang, Lian; Masui, Megumi; Masami, Furuuchi

    2006-04-01

    This study examines slag, fly ash, and deposited particles during melting of dewatered sewage sludge in a pilot plant. In addition, the chemical composition of particles in flue gas was simulated using a thermodynamics program, namely FACTSage 5.2. The results showed that the main components of slag were Al, Fe, Ca, P and Si; the minor components were Na, K, Mg, Cu, and Zn. The main chemical compound of slag was Ca4(Mg,Fe)5(PO4)6. For fly ash particles, heavy metals with the highest concentrations were in the order of Zn and As, Pb, Cu, and Cd, respectively. For non-heavy metals, Al, Fe and P were also found in significant amounts. The majority of deposited particles were composed of elements of Zn, P, S, Na, Fe, Al, Si, and Ca and such chemical compounds as Zn3(PO4)2, AlPO4, FePO4 and Fe(OH)3 while the minority consisted of elements of As, Cu, and Pb. Moreover, the compositions of deposited particles in each chamber differed due to different flue gas temperatures inside. In the secondary chamber at 760 degrees C, the amounts of Fe and Al were higher than Zn, whereas, in the other chambers (600-400 degrees C), the amount of Zn was higher. In other words, at the lower temperature the deposition of Zn was higher than the deposition of Fe and Al. In the water cooling section, volatile elements (i.e. Zn, As, Cu, Pb) were found in the highest concentrations due to a big difference in temperature between the wall surface and flue gas. From the simulation results, most of the elements in the gas phase were found to be chloride compounds, whereas those in the solid phase were in the form of oxide, sulfate, and phosphate compounds. PMID:16198048

  16. The potential of four woody species for the revegetation of fly ash deposits from the ‘Nikola Tesla-a’ thermoelectric plant (Obrenovac, Serbia)

    OpenAIRE

    Kostić Olga; Mitrović Miroslava; Knežević M.; Jarić Snežana; Gajić Gordana; Đurđević L.; Pavlović P.

    2012-01-01

    Four woody species, Tamarix tentandra Pallas, Populus alba L. and Robinia pseudoacacia L. (planted) and Amorpha fruticosa L. (naturally colonized) were studied at two fly ash deposit lagoons, weathered 3 (L1) and 11 years (L2). All species were assessed in terms of their invasive ability, photosynthetic efficiency, photosynthetic pigments and damage symptoms, while the characteristics of the habitat were assessed in terms of trace element content and the pH and EC of the ash. A reduced ...

  17. Distributions, profiles and formation mechanisms of polychlorinated naphthalenes in cement kilns co-processing municipal waste incinerator fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guorui; Zhan, Jiayu; Zhao, Yuyang; Li, Li; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Fu, Jianjie; Li, Chunping; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-07-01

    Co-processing municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash in cement kilns is challenging because the unintentional production of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) during the process is not well understood. The distributions, profiles and formation mechanisms of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) as new POPs covered under Stockholm Convention in two cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash were studied. The average concentrations of PCNs in stack gas samples were 710 ng m(-3). The PCN concentration in particle samples collected from different process stages in the cement kilns ranged from 1.1 to 84.7 ng g(-1). Three process sites including suspension pre-heater boiler, humidifier tower, and the kiln back-end bag filter were identified to be the major formation sites of PCNs in cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash. The PCN distribution patterns were similar to that of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/Fs), which indicates the possibility for simultaneous control of PCNs and PCDD/Fs in cement kilns co-processing fly ash. Chlorination was suggested to be an important formation mechanism of PCNs, and chlorination pathways of PCN congeners are proposed based on the congener profiles. Thermodynamic calculations, including relative thermal energies (ΔE) and standard free energy of formation (ΔG), and the charge densities of the carbon atoms in PCN supported the proposed chlorination mechanisms for PCN formation. The results presented in this study might provide helpful information for developing techniques and strategies to control PCN emissions during cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash.

  18. Distributions, profiles and formation mechanisms of polychlorinated naphthalenes in cement kilns co-processing municipal waste incinerator fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guorui; Zhan, Jiayu; Zhao, Yuyang; Li, Li; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Fu, Jianjie; Li, Chunping; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-07-01

    Co-processing municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash in cement kilns is challenging because the unintentional production of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) during the process is not well understood. The distributions, profiles and formation mechanisms of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) as new POPs covered under Stockholm Convention in two cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash were studied. The average concentrations of PCNs in stack gas samples were 710 ng m(-3). The PCN concentration in particle samples collected from different process stages in the cement kilns ranged from 1.1 to 84.7 ng g(-1). Three process sites including suspension pre-heater boiler, humidifier tower, and the kiln back-end bag filter were identified to be the major formation sites of PCNs in cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash. The PCN distribution patterns were similar to that of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/Fs), which indicates the possibility for simultaneous control of PCNs and PCDD/Fs in cement kilns co-processing fly ash. Chlorination was suggested to be an important formation mechanism of PCNs, and chlorination pathways of PCN congeners are proposed based on the congener profiles. Thermodynamic calculations, including relative thermal energies (ΔE) and standard free energy of formation (ΔG), and the charge densities of the carbon atoms in PCN supported the proposed chlorination mechanisms for PCN formation. The results presented in this study might provide helpful information for developing techniques and strategies to control PCN emissions during cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash. PMID:27135696

  19. Deposit Formation in a 150 MWe Utility PF-Boiler during Co-combustion of Coal and Straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karin Hedebo; Frandsen, Flemming; Hansen, P. F. B.;

    2000-01-01

    (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray analyses (SEM-EDX) and bulk chemical analyses. In the visual analysis, a significant increase in the amount and tenacity of the upstream deposits was observed as a function of increased straw share, exposure time, and boiler load. The chemical analyses...... arise when burning other coals, particularly coals with a high S or alkali metal content or a low content of ash. The behavior of K, Ca, S, and Cl was evaluated by use of thermodynamic calculations. The thermodynamically stable species agree with the observed behavior in the experiments, i.e. formation...

  20. Study of nozzle deposit formation mechanism for direct injection gasoline engines; Chokufun gasoline engine yo nozzle no deposit seisei kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, M.; Saito, A. [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan); Matsushita, S. [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan); Shibata, H. [Nippon Soken, Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Niwa, Y. [Denso Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Nozzles in fuel injectors for direct injection gasoline engines are exposed to high temperature combustion gases and soot. In such a rigorous environment, it is a fear that fuel flow rate changes in injectors by deposit formation on nozzles. Fundamental factors of nozzle deposit formation were investigated through injector bench tests and engine dynamometer tests. Deposit formation processes were observed by SEM through engine dynamometer tests. The investigation results reveal nozzle deposit formation mechanism and how to suppress the deposit. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. The Effect of Applied Organic Fertilizers on the Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Lolium Perenne, Cultivated on Fly Ash Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaranda Mâşu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to monitor the capacity of certain organic fertilizers (volcanic tuff and municipal sludge, applied as such and mixed with volcanic rocks with a high content in clinoptilolite, to determine the covering with vegetation of fly ash deposits resulted from the combustion of lignite in thermal plants. Both biosolids (20 t/ha and volcanic rock with high clinoptilolite content (5 t/ha determined the installation of a vegetative layer and diminished the soil metal bioavailability to the Lolium prerenne plant biomass. When using the organic-zeolite mixture, a synergistic effect is recorded of the two components of the treatment agent and an increase of the biomass with 448%. Moreover, the resulted biomass shows the highest reductions of metal bioaccumulations, of 38-46% for Zn and Fe, of 62% for Cu and between 82-89% for Cr, Ni and Pb.

  2. Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes Induce Calcium Mineral Formation and Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium crystals are present in the synovial fluid of 65%–100% patients with osteoarthritis (OA and 20%–39% patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. This study sought to investigate the role of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs in calcium mineral formation. We found that numerous genes classified in the biomineral formation process, including bone gamma-carboxyglutamate (gla protein/osteocalcin, runt-related transcription factor 2, ankylosis progressive homolog, and parathyroid hormone-like hormone, were differentially expressed in the OA and RA FLSs. Calcium deposits were detected in FLSs cultured in regular medium in the presence of ATP and FLSs cultured in chondrogenesis medium in the absence of ATP. More calcium minerals were deposited in the cultures of OA FLSs than in the cultures of RA FLSs. Examination of the micromass stained with nonaqueous alcoholic eosin indicated the presence of birefringent crystals. Phosphocitrate inhibited the OA FLSs-mediated calcium mineral deposition. These findings together suggest that OA FLSs are not passive bystanders but are active players in the pathological calcification process occurring in OA and that potential calcification stimuli for OA FLSs-mediated calcium deposition include ATP and certain unidentified differentiation-inducing factor(s. The OA FLSs-mediated pathological calcification process is a valid target for the development of disease-modifying drug for OA therapy.

  3. Quantifying fat, oil, and grease deposit formation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasmin, Mahbuba; Dean, Lisa O; Ducoste, Joel J

    2016-01-01

    Fat, oil, and grease (FOG) deposits formed in sanitary sewers are calcium-based saponified solids that are responsible for a significant number of nationwide sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) across United States. In the current study, the kinetics of lab-based saponified solids were determined to understand the kinetics of FOG deposit formation in sewers for two types of fat (Canola and Beef Tallow) and two types of calcium sources (calcium chloride and calcium sulfate) under three pH (7 ± 0.5, 10 ± 0.5, and ≈14) and two temperature conditions (22 ± 0.5 and 45 ± 0.5 °C). The results of this study displayed quick reactions of a fraction of fats with calcium ions to form calcium based saponified solids. Results further showed that increased palmitic fatty acid content in source fats, the magnitude of the pH, and temperature significantly affect the FOG deposit formation and saponification rates. The experimental data of the kinetics were compared with two empirical models: a) Cotte saponification model and b) Foubert crystallization model and a mass-action based mechanistic model that included alkali driven hydrolysis of triglycerides. Results showed that the mass action based mechanistic model was able to predict changes in the rate of formation of saponified solids under the different experimental conditions compared to both empirical models. The mass-action based saponification model also revealed that the hydrolysis of Beef Tallow was slower compared to liquid Canola fat resulting in smaller quantities of saponified solids. This mechanistic saponification model, with its ability to track the saponified solids chemical precursors, may provide an initial framework to predict the spatial formation of FOG deposits in municipal sewers using system wide sewer collection modeling software.

  4. Formation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls on Secondary Copper Production Fly Ash: Mechanistic Aspects and Correlation to Other Persistent Organic Pollutants

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoxu Jiang; Guorui Liu; Mei Wang; Minghui Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Emission of unintentionally formed polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from industrial thermal processes is a global issue. Because the production and use of technical PCB mixtures has been banned, industrial thermal processes have become increasingly important sources of PCBs. Among these processes, secondary copper smelting is an important PCB source in China. In the present study, the potential for fly ash-mediated formation of PCBs in the secondary copper industry, and the mechanisms involve...

  5. Characterization and quantification of deposits build up and removal in straw suspension fired boilers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arendt Jensen, Peter; Wedel, S.; Jappe Frandsen, F.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Shafique Bashir, M. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. CHEC Research Centre, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Wadenback, J.; Thaaning Pedersen, S. [Vattenfall A/S, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-07-15

    This project deals with ash deposit formation in suspension fired biomass power plant boilers. The project has been conducted in a tight collaboration between Vattenfall and the CHEC Research Centre at DTU Department of Chemical Engineering. A large part of the project has been performed by conducting advanced probe measurements at the Amagervaerkets Vattenfall owed boilers. It was the objective of the project to provide an improved understanding of ash deposit formation and removal in biomass suspension fired boilers. The project have provided a large amount of knowledge on the following issues: 1) The influence of local boiler conditions on deposit formation in suspension fired boilers using wood or co-firing straw and wood, 2) quantification of deposit removal in biomass suspension firing boilers with regards both to natural shedding and soot blower induced shedding, 3) established relations of the properties of fuel ash, fly ash and deposits, 4) use of coal ash to remedy biomass ash induced boiler deposit problems. (Author)

  6. Impairment of soil health due to fly ash-fugitive dust deposition from coal-fired thermal power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, R; Nayak, A K; Shukla, A K; Rao, K S; Gautam, Priyanka; Lal, B; Tripathi, R; Shahid, M; Panda, B B; Kumar, A; Bhattacharyya, P; Bardhan, G; Gupta, S; Patra, D K

    2015-11-01

    Thermal power stations apart from being source of energy supply are causing soil pollution leading to its degradation in fertility and contamination. Fine particle and trace element emissions from energy production in coal-fired thermal power plants are associated with significant adverse effects on human, animal, and soil health. Contamination of soil with cadmium, nickel, copper, lead, arsenic, chromium, and zinc can be a primary route of human exposure to these potentially toxic elements. The environmental evaluation of surrounding soil of thermal power plants in Odisha may serve a model study to get the insight into hazards they are causing. The study investigates the impact of fly ash-fugitive dust (FAFD) deposition from coal-fired thermal power plant emissions on soil properties including trace element concentration, pH, and soil enzymatic activities. Higher FAFD deposition was found in the close proximity of power plants, which led to high pH and greater accumulation of heavy metals. Among the three power plants, in the vicinity of NALCO, higher concentrations of soil organic carbon and nitrogen was observed whereas, higher phosphorus content was recorded in the proximity of NTPC. Multivariate statistical analysis of different variables and their association indicated that FAFD deposition and soil properties were influenced by the source of emissions and distance from source of emission. Pollution in soil profiles and high risk areas were detected and visualized using surface maps based on Kriging interpolation. The concentrations of chromium and arsenic were higher in the soil where FAFD deposition was more. Observance of relatively high concentration of heavy metals like cadmium, lead, nickel, and arsenic and a low concentration of enzymatic activity in proximity to the emission source indicated a possible link with anthropogenic emissions. PMID:26450689

  7. Inkjet printing of aqueous rivulets: Formation, deposition, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Vadim

    early-time dynamics during rivulet formation in determining the nature of subsequent particle convection and deposition. New flow and deposition phenomena have also been identified and leveraged to develop novel processes for deposition of micron-scale electrically conducting lines of silver nanoparticles. Low-temperature processing of printed silver nitrate lines with environmentally benign Ar plasma to improve electrical properties has also been investigated and will be discussed.

  8. Self-organization and nanostructure formation in chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walgraef, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    When thin films are grown on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition, the evolution of the first deposited layers may be described, on mesoscopic scales, by dynamical models of the reaction-diffusion type. For monatomic layers, such models describe the evolution of atomic coverage due to the combined effect of reaction terms representing adsorption-desorption and chemical processes and nonlinear diffusion terms that are of the Cahn-Hilliard type. This combination may lead, below a critical temperature, to the instability of uniform deposited layers. This instability triggers the formation of nanostructures corresponding to regular spatial variations of substrate coverage. Patterns wavelengths and symmetries are selected by dynamical variables and not by variational arguments. According to the balance between reaction- and diffusion-induced nonlinearities, a succession of nanostructures including hexagonal arrays of dots, stripes, and localized structures of various types may be obtained. These structures may initiate different growth mechanisms, including Volmer-Weber and Frank-Van der Merwe types of growth. The relevance of this approach to the study of deposited layers of different species is discussed.

  9. Influence of deposit architecture on intrastratal deformation, slope deposits of the Tres Pasos Formation, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchter, Neal C.; Romans, Brian W.; Hubbard, Stephen M.

    2016-07-01

    Slope sediments on passive and active margins deform and fail across a broad range of scales ranging from loading and sediment remobilization near the sediment-water interface to submarine landslides and mass movements that incorporate significant volumes of slope deposits. Deformational styles are characterized by updip extension and downdip compressional features that occur above a detachment surface. Conditions for failure and deformation include the presence of weak layer(s) that serve as a detachment surface, competency contrasts that allow for detachment and downslope movement, deformation above a detachment surface, and a triggering mechanism(s) that initiates failure. Slope failure processes and products are well documented at scales resolvable by seismic-reflection surveys and in instances of extensive downslope failure, but the processes and products associated with intermediate-scale slope deformation are poorly understood. Intrastratal deformation is defined as stratigraphically isolated zones of deformation bounded above and below by concordant and undeformed strata. In this study, outcrop examples of intrastratal deformation from the Upper Cretaceous Tres Pasos Formation are used to elucidate the influence of depositional architecture on slope deformation. The facies distribution associated with compensational stacking of lobe deposits is shown to have a first-order control on the location and style of deformation. Detachment planes that form in mudstone deposits associated with lobe fringe and interlobe deposits are spatially limited and deformation is restricted to interbedded sandstone and mudstone associated with off-axial lobe positions. Downslope translation was arrested by stratigraphic buttresses associated with more sandstone-prone axial deposits. Emplacement of a regionally extensive mass transport deposit is interpreted as the triggering mechanism for contemporaneous intrastratal deformation of > 60 m of underlying stratigraphy. A vertical

  10. Study of nickel silicide formation by physical vapor deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancharatnam, Shanti

    Metal silicides are used as contacts to the highly n-doped emitter in photovoltaic devices. Thin films of nickel silicide (NiSi) are of particular interest for Si-based solar cells, as they form at lower temperature and consume less silicon. However, interfacial oxide limits the reduction in sheet resistance. Hence, different diffusion barriers were investigated with regard to optimizing the conductivity and thermal stability. The formation of NiSi, and if it can be doped to have good contact with the n-side of a p-n junction were studied. Reduction of the interfacial oxide by the interfacial Ti layer to allow the formation of NiSi was observed. Silicon was treated in dilute hydrofluoric acid for removing the surface oxide layer. Ni and a Ti diffusion barrier were deposited on Si by physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods - electron beam evaporation and sputtering. The annealing temperature and time were varied to observe the stability of the deposited film. The films were then etched to observe the retention of the silicide. Characterization was done using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Rutherford back scattering (RBS). Sheet resistance was measured using the four-point probe technique. Annealing temperatures from 300°C showed films began to agglomerate indicating some diffusion between Ni and Si in the Ti layer, also supported by the compositional analysis in the Auger spectra. Films obtained by evaporation and sputtering were of high quality in terms of coverage over substrate area and uniformity. Thicknesses of Ni and Ti were optimized to 20 nm and 10 nm respectively. Resistivity was low at these thicknesses, and reduced by about half post annealing at 300°C for 8 hours. Thus a low resistivity contact was obtained at optimized thicknesses of the metal layers. It was also shown that some silicide formation occurs at temperatures starting from 300°C and can thus be used to make good silicide contacts.

  11. Effects Of Crystallographic Properties On The Ice Nucleation Properties Of Volcanic Ash Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Beranek, Josef; Madaan, Nitesh; Devaraj, Arun; Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Varga, Tamas

    2015-04-28

    Specific chemical and physical properties of volcanic ash particles that could affect their ability to induce ice formation are poorly understood. In this study, the ice nucleating properties of size-selected volcanic ash and mineral dust particles in relation to their surface chemistry and crystalline structure at temperatures ranging from –30 to –38 °C were investigated in deposition mode. Ice nucleation efficiency of dust particles was higher compared to ash particles at all temperature and relative humidity conditions. Particle characterization analysis shows that surface elemental composition of ash and dust particles was similar; however, the structural properties of ash samples were different.

  12. Impact of super-distal ash fallout on tropical hydrology and landscape: a case study from the YTT deposits of the Perak river, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, E.; Saidin, M.; Gibbard, P.; Oppenheimer, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Younger Toba Tuff eruption, approximately 73 ka ago, is the largest known for the Quaternary and its climate, environmental and human consequences are keenly debated (Oppenheimer, 2011).While the distribution (Rose and Chesner, 1987; Rose and Chesner, 1990; Chesner et al., 1991; Schulz et al., 2002; Von Rad et al., 2002) , geochemical properties (Shane et al., 1995; Westgate et al., 1998) and volcanic significance (Rampino and Self, 1982; Rampino and Self, 1993; Rampino and Ambrose, 2000; Oppenheimer, 2002; Mason et al., 2004)of the YTT have been widely studied, few attention has been given to the significance of the distal volcanic ash deposits within their receiving basin context. Although several studies exist on the impact of pyroclastic flows on proximal rivers and lakes (Collins and Dunne, 1986; Thompson et al., 1986; Hayes et al., 2002; Németh and Cronin, 2007), only few address the issues of the dynamic of preservation of super-distal fine ash deposits in rivers (also due to the lack of direct data on super-eruptions). It has also been demonstrated that models of the styles and timing of distal volcanoclastic re-sedimentation are more complicated than those developed for proximal settings of stratovolcanoes (Kataoka et al., 2009). We present an analysis of the taphonomy (intended as accumulation and preservation) of distal volcanic ash in fluvial and lacustrian contexts in newly discovered Toungest Toba Tuff sites in the Lenggong valley, western Peninsular Malaysia. The paper aims to characterise the nature of distal tephras in fluvial environments towards a stratigraphic distinction between primary ash and secondary ash, characterisation of the pre-ash fall receiving environment in term of fluvial dynamic and landscape morphology, and assessment of the time of recovery.

  13. 沉积粉煤灰工程特性试验研究%Experimental study on behavior of deposition fly ash stratum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周德泉; 赵明华; 肖宏宇

    2011-01-01

    粉煤灰作为地层时的工程特性研究较少,直接影响粉煤灰场地的勘察与设计.采用钻探、静力触探和十字板剪切试验相结合的方法研究湿排沉积粉煤灰层的工程特性.结果表明:沉积粉煤灰的静力触探曲线呈锯齿状,没有临界深度;锥尖阻力比粉质粘土和细砂小;侧壁摩阻力小于填筑粉质粘土、接近沉积粉质粘土、大于细砂;摩阻比小于填筑粉质黏土、大于沉积粉质粘土和细砂;比贯入阻力接近填筑粉质粘土、大于沉积粉质粘土;粉煤灰遇水软化,触探曲线在水位上下有明显的界面效应;十字板强度随深度加大而增大,具有明显的结构性;粉煤灰地层宜用双桥静力触探进行勘察.该粉煤灰的工程特性接近于粉土.%The engineering behavior of fly ash as stratum is studied seldom,which affects directly the exploration and design of the deposition fly ash site. The behavior of deposition fly ash was studied by drilling, cone penetration test and vane shear test. The results of study show that the fly ash cone penetration is the sawtooth form, and there is no critical depth for fly ash. The cone resistance of the fly ash is smaller than silty clay and sand, the friction resistance is smaller than filling silty clay, similar to deposition silty clay and more than fine sand, the friction ratio is smaller than filling silty clay, more than deposition silty clay and much more than fine sand, the specific penetration resistance is similar to filling silty clay, more than deposition silty clay. Fly ash with water will be soften,and there is a clear interface effect of fly ash penetration curve on the groundwater level . With obvious behavior of structure, vane strength of the fly ash increases with the depth increased. Even bridge cone penetration test should be used during geological exploration . The deposition fly ash is much similar to silt in character.

  14. Eruption Source Parameters for forecasting ash dispersion and deposition from vulcanian eruptions at Tungurahua volcano: Insights from field data from the July 2013 eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, René; Bernard, Benjamin; Narváez, Diego; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Hasselle, Nathalie; Folch, Arnau

    2016-01-01

    Tungurahua volcano, located in the central area of the Ecuadorian Sierra, is erupting intermittently since 1999 alternating between periods of quiescence and explosive activity. Volcanic ash has been the most frequent and widespread hazard provoking air contamination episodes and impacts on human health, animals and crops in the surrounding area. After two months of quiescence, Tungurahua erupted violently on 14th July 2013 generating short-lived eruptive columns rising up to 9 km above the vent characterized as a vulcanian eruption. The resulting fallout deposits were sampled daily during and after the eruptions to determine grain size distributions and perform morphological and componentry analyses. Dispersion and sedimentation of ash were simulated numerically coupling the meteorological Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) with the volcanic ash dispersion FALL3D models. The combination of field and numerical studies allowed constraining the Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) for this event, which could be used to forecast ash dispersion and deposition from future vulcanian eruptions at Tungurahua. This set of pre-defined ESP was further validated using two different eruptions, as blind test, occurring on 16th December 2012 and 1st February 2014.

  15. Formation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls on Secondary Copper Production Fly Ash: Mechanistic Aspects and Correlation to Other Persistent Organic Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Guorui; Wang, Mei; Zheng, Minghui

    2015-09-01

    Emission of unintentionally formed polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from industrial thermal processes is a global issue. Because the production and use of technical PCB mixtures has been banned, industrial thermal processes have become increasingly important sources of PCBs. Among these processes, secondary copper smelting is an important PCB source in China. In the present study, the potential for fly ash-mediated formation of PCBs in the secondary copper industry, and the mechanisms involved, were studied in laboratory thermochemical experiments. The total PCB concentrations were 37-70 times higher than the initial concentrations. Thermochemical reactions on the fly ash amplified the potential toxic equivalents of PCBs. The formation of PCBs over time and the effect of temperature were investigated. Based on analyses of PCB homologue profiles with different reaction conditions, a chlorination mechanism was proposed for forming PCBs in addition to a de novo synthesis mechanism. The chlorination pathway was supported by close correlations between each pair of adjacent homologue groups. Formation of PCBs and multiple persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and polychlorinated naphthalenes, occurred during the tests, indicating that these compounds may share similar formation mechanisms.

  16. Formation and use of peat deposits in Rwanda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajunen, H. [Geological Survey of Finland, Kuopio (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The peatland area in Rwanda is estimated to cover 800 km{sup 2} and to contain about 3 Gm{sup 3} of peat in situ. The dry matter and carbon contents are estimated at 240 Mt and 120 Mt. respectively. Tectonic movements and volcanism have created basins favourable for initiation of peat formation. The oldest peat deposits originate from the last glacial period (37 000 B.P.), but most of them were formed during the Holocene period. The accumulation record based on calibrated ages is available from four deposits. The apparent accumulation rate of total dry matter has ranged from 150 - 200 g my Al and that of carbon from 80 -110 g me Al In late Holocene deposits, the accumulation reached maximum rates about 1400 - 1000 B.P. Currently, agriculture is the main economic use of peatlands. There has also been some small scale peat production since the second world war. The present production level is about 5 000 tonnes per annum. Briquetting of papyrus has been tested in a pilot plant to study the feasibility of using mires for the production of energy on a sustainable basis. (12 refs.)

  17. Depositional Environment of Permian Tak Fa Formation, Nakhonsawan, Northern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketwetsuriya, Chatchalerm; Nützel, Alexander; Kanjanapayont, Pitsanupong

    2016-04-01

    The carbonate rocks of the study area at Amphoe Tak Fa and Amphoe Takhli, Changwat Nakhon Sawan belong to the Tak Fa Formation, Saraburi Group. This formation crops out in the Khao Khwang Platform and consists of late Palaeozoic carbonate platform deposits. It reaches a thickness of 900 meters and crops out in a vast area. The exposures have been measured and samples were collected for petrographic study. The rock consists of limestones, argillaceous limestones, mudstones and dolomites with nodular and banded cherts, which comprise many invertebrate fossils such as fusulinids, ammonoid, pelecypod, gastropod, coral and bryozoa. Many of the fossils are silicified. The gastropod assemblage is currently under study and represents one of the most diverse faunas reported from SE Asia. The age of the rock is Yakhtashian or Artinskian (late Early Permian) to Midian or Capitanian (late Middle Permian). The study of carbonate facies and fauna indicates that the depositional environment was on shelf lagoon within the carbonate platform varying from shallow marine to barrier bar.

  18. The Measurement and Calculation of Temperature of the Furnace Tube with Ash Deposition%积灰炉管管壁温度的检测与计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙全胜

    2012-01-01

    通过对积灰炉管的传热过程分析建立传热模型,并确定炉管表面温度计算公式.对比计算结果与刮去灰垢后管壁温度,发现二者基本吻合,证明此计算方法可得到比较准确的管壁温度,以保证生产的安全运行.%Base on analysing the heat transfer process of furnace tube with ash deposition, established the heat transfer model and the computational formula for the temperature of tube surface. Comparing the computing resultes with the temperater of the tube surface without ash deposition, we can find that they are consistent with each other. Accurate furnace tuber temperature would be got using the computationeli for mula, in order to ensure the safe operation.

  19. Copper reduction and atomic layer deposition by oxidative decomposition of formate by hydrazine

    OpenAIRE

    Dey, Gangotri; Elliott, Simon D.

    2014-01-01

    We have used density functional theory (DFT) to study the mechanism of three step atomic layer deposition (ALD) of copper via formate and hydrazine. The technique holds promise for deposition of other transition metals.

  20. Uranium deposits of the Sierra Pena Blanca: Three examples of mechanisms of ore deposit formation in a volcanic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nopal and Escuadra Formations (welded vitroclastic tuffs) contain the uranium deposits of Sierra Pena Blanca (Chihuahua, Mexico). These Tertiary formations (between 44 and 38 million years) overlie Cretaceous limestones. With mineralogical, petrographical, geochemical and fluid inclusion studies of the non-altered rocks of the uraniferous mineralization and the associated alteration three genetic types of ore deposits have been identified. Hydrothermal ore deposits (Nopal I). These ore deposits are linked to faults or a breccia pipe. They are mainly located in the Nopal Formation. Their history is complex and begins soon after the deposition of tuff. They are considered hydrothermal, even if some supergene alteration occurs during late stages. Oxidized mineralization (uranophane) succeeds reduced ore (uranium oxides-ilmenite and pitchblende-pyrite associations). The associated kaolinite has a high temperature habitus. The montmorillonite-zeolite association is local and occurs after kaolinization. Supergene ore deposit (Puerto III). Puerto III is a stratiform-shaped deposit. The only oxidized mineralization lies in the upper part of the Nopal Formation and is located under a silicified bed interpreted as a palaeosoil. Mixed ore deposit (Las Margaritas). This uranium-molybdenum deposit is located in the Escuadra Formation. The alteration products are kaolinite with a middle temperature habitus and alunite. The intensity of this alteration is lower than in the first hydrothermal type, but the volume of altered rock is greater. Uranium mineralizations (silicates, phosphates, vanadates) are associated with molybdenum minerals (sulphides and molybdates). This deposit is considered to be the result of an interaction, in a tectonic valley, between hydrothermal volcanic fluids and underground waters. (author)

  1. Experiments on effects of coal particle ash content on ash formation during fluidized bed combustion%流化床燃烧中煤含灰量对灰渣形成特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勤辉; 徐志; 刘彦鹏; 骆仲泱; 倪明江

    2012-01-01

    为了研究煤颗粒灰质量分数对煤在流化床燃烧过程中灰渣形成特性的影响,在一台小型流化床反应炉上进行煤的灰质量分数对灰渣形成特性的实验.按煤颗粒的灰质量分数,把义马烟煤分为6个颗粒组,并选用各颗粒组的3个粒径范围的煤颗粒进行燃烧实验,研究煤颗粒的灰质量分数对底渣质量分数、底渣与飞灰中的碳量质量分数和粒径分布的影响.结果表明,随着煤颗粒灰质量分数的增加,燃烧形成的底渣质量分数增加,而煤颗粒的燃尽率和飞灰中的碳质量分数都降低.在粒径和燃烧时间相同的条件下,随着颗粒灰质量分数的增加,底渣中留在本粒径档的颗粒质量分数明显增加,而细颗粒的质量分数明显减少.而颗粒灰质量分数对飞灰的粒径分布没有明显的影响.%To investigate the influences of coal particle ash content on the ash formation behaviors during fluidized bed combustion, experiments were conducted on a bench-scale fluidized bed combustor. Yima bituminous coal samples were divided into 6 ranks with different ash content. For every rank of coal sample, 3 size ranges were used in the experiments. The results show that the mass fraction of the bottom residue increases with the ash content of the coal particles, while the burnout of coal particles and the carbon content of the fly ash decrease with the ash content of coal particles. The mass fraction of the bottom residues which have the same size range as the initial size range of the coal particles increases with the ash content. While the ash content of coal particles has no obvious influence on the size distribution of the fly ash.

  2. Measurement of natural activity in peat ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High proportions of radioactive materials in peat ashes may involve radiation hazards during handling and deposition of these waste materials. Measurements have been performed to determine the content of radioactive materials in ashes from peat burning. The activities in fly ash and ''solid'' ash in seven peat-fired power plants in Sweden are presented. The methods of analysing and measuring peat ashes for activity from different radionuclides are described. The activity levels in ash samples are given

  3. Analysis of the 2006 block-and-ash flow deposits of Merapi Volcano, Java, Indonesia, using high-spatial resolution IKONOS images and complementary ground based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouret, Jean-Claude; Gupta, Avijit; Liew, Soo Chin; Lube, Gert; Cronin, Shane J.; Surono, Dr

    2010-05-01

    On 16 June 2006 an overpass of IKONOS coincided with the emplacement of an active block-and-ash flow fed by a lava dome collapse event at Merapi Volcano (Java, Indonesia). This was the first satellite image recorded for a moving pyroclastic flow. The very high-spatial resolution data displayed the extent and impact of the pyroclastic deposits emplaced during and prior to, the day of image acquisition. This allowed a number of features associated with high-hazard block-and-ash flows emplaced in narrow, deep gorges to be mapped, interpreted and understood. The block-and-ash flow and surge deposits recognized in the Ikonos images include: (1) several channel-confined flow lobes and tongues in the box-shaped valley; (2) thin ash-cloud surge deposit and knocked-down trees in constricted areas on both slopes of the gorge; (3) fan-like over bank deposits on the Gendol-Tlogo interfluves from which flows were re-routed in the Tlogo secondary valley; (4) massive over bank lobes on the right bank from which flows devastated the village of Kaliadem 0.5 km from the main channel, a small part of this flow being re-channeled in the Opak secondary valley. The high-resolution IKONOS images also helped us to identify geomorphic obstacles that enabled flows to ramp and spill out from the sinuous channel, a process called flow avulsion. Importantly, the avulsion redirected flows to unexpected areas away from the main channel. In the case of Merapi we see that the presence of valley fill by previous deposits, bends and man-made dams influence the otherwise valley-guided course of the flows. Sadly, Sabo dams (built to ameliorate the effect of high sediment load streams) can actually cause block-and-ash flows to jump out of their containing channel and advance into sensitive areas. Very-high-spatial resolution satellite images are very useful for mapping and interpreting the distribution of freshly erupted volcanic deposits. IKONOS-type images with 1-m resolution provide opportunities to

  4. Pattern Formation in Mississippi Valley-Type Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelka, Ulrich; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Alternating, monomineralic dark and white bands are common features of ore hosting dolostones which are generally termed Zebra textures. These structures consist of coarse grained light and fine grained dark layers and accompany ore bodies of the Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT) worldwide. These deposits frequently develop in large hydrothermal systems, located in the flanks of foreland basins or in fold and thrust belts. The microstructural- and microchemical analysis in this study were performed on samples which were collected in the San Vicente mine. This large MVT deposit is hosted in Triassic/Jurassic Platform Carbonates located in an east-vergent fold and thrust belt of the Peruvian Andes. The thin sections were analyzed with petrographic- and scanning electron microscope. It is observed that one common striking feature is the high density of second-phase particles in the dark bands, whereas the coarser grained layers are virtually particle free. Furthermore, the particle distribution is found to be non-random. The highest particle densities in the samples occur on grain boundaries in the dark bands implying that grain boundaries can capture particles. Based on recent theories and the additional analytical findings, we developed a numerical simulation to study the pattern formation. The modelling is performed in 2D at the scale of a thin section, using a boundary-model coupled with a lattice-particle-code. During the simulation two processes are active, first a reaction takes place that replaces calcite with dolomite driven by a fluid that infiltrates the model, followed by a grain growth processes with an average grain size increase as a function of surface energy reduction. Fluid infiltration in the rock is modelled assuming Darcy Flow and an advection-diffusion equation coupled with a reaction which is a function of concentration. The reaction increases permeability of the solid and thus enhances infiltration. The reaction front in the model shifts particles

  5. Lithofacies and the depositional history of the Tessey Formation, Frenchman Hills, West Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneef, Mohammad; Wardlaw, B.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Tessey Formation in the Frenchman Hills, northwest Glass Mountains, represent deposition in a basinal setting. The formation consists of at least two shallowing-upward sequences of carbonate and evaporite deposition marked by two episodes of subaerial exposure, meteoric water dissolution, and collapse brecciation.

  6. FORMATION OF POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS AND DIBENZOFURANS FROM A MIXTURE OF CHLOROPHENOLS OVER FLY ASH: INFLUENCE OF WATER VAPOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    To offer a polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) parameter for plant operation control, the on-line estimation of PCDD/Fs emissions by surrogates like chlorophenols is useful. Formation of PCDD/Fs over fly ash was studied in an isothermal (310 degree...

  7. Deposit model for volcanogenic uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, George N.; Hall, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Volcanism is a major contributor to the formation of important uranium deposits both close to centers of eruption and more distal as a result of deposition of ash with leachable uranium. Hydrothermal fluids that are driven by magmatic heat proximal to some volcanic centers directly form some deposits. These fluids leach uranium from U-bearing silicic volcanic rocks and concentrate it at sites of deposition within veins, stockworks, breccias, volcaniclastic rocks, and lacustrine caldera sediments. The volcanogenic uranium deposit model presented here summarizes attributes of those deposits and follows the focus of the International Atomic Energy Agency caldera-hosted uranium deposit model. Although inferred by some to have a volcanic component to their origin, iron oxide-copper-gold deposits with economically recoverable uranium contents are not considered in this model.

  8. Experimental and modeling study of de novo formation of PCDD/PCDF on MSW fly ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-dong; ZHANG Ji; YAN Jian-hua; CEN Ke-fa; RYAN Shawn P; GULLETT Brian K; LEE Chunwai

    2007-01-01

    The effect of sulfur dioxide (SO2) on formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) has been studied in an entrained-flow reactor (EFR) under simulated waste combustion conditions. A chlorination model based on conditional probability was employed to evaluate the homologue patterns of PCDDs and PCDFs. Results revealed that the presence of SO2 did not change the formation pathway although SO2 suppressed PCDD/F formation. The model prediction of PCDF showed good agreement with the experimental data (R=0.95) while the prediction for PCDDs was not as good. This may be explained because potential chlorination pathways play a significant role in PCDF formation, while PCDDs are mainly formed through condensation reactions. Furthermore, the result indicated that the steric hindrance during formation has more effects on PCDD than on PCDF due to the symmetric molecule structures of PCDDs.

  9. An ecophysiological study of plants growing on the fly ash deposits from the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermal power station in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, Pavle; Mitrović, Miroslava; Djurdjević, Lola

    2004-05-01

    This ecophysiological research on the ash deposits from the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermal power station in Serbia covered 10 plant species (Tamarix gallica, Populus alba, Spiraea van-hauttei, Ambrosia artemisifolia, Amorpha fruticosa, Eupatorium cannabinum, Crepis setosa, Epilobium collinum, Verbascum phlomoides, and Cirsium arvense). This paper presents the results of a water regime analysis, photosynthetic efficiency and trace elements (B, Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb, and Cd) content in vegetative plant parts. Water regime parameters indicate an overall stability in plant-water relations. During the period of summer drought, photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm) was low, ranging from 0.429 to 0.620 for all the species that were analyzed. An analysis of the tissue trace elements content showed a lower trace metal concentration in the plants than in the ash, indicating that heavy metals undergo major concentration during the combustion process and some are not readily taken up by plants. The Zn and Pb concentrations in all of the examined species were normal whereas Cu and Mn concentrations were in the deficiency range. Boron concentrations in plant tissues were high, with some species even showing levels of more than 100 microg/g (Populus sp., Ambrosia sp., Amorpha sp., and Cirsium sp.). The presence of Cd was not detected. In general, it can be concluded from the results of this research that biological recultivation should take into account the existing ecological, vegetation, and floristic potential of an immediate environment that is abundant in life forms and ecological types of plant species that can overgrow the ash deposit relatively quickly. Selected species should be adapted to toxic B concentrations with moderate demands in terms of mineral elements (Cu and Mn). PMID:15503386

  10. An ecophysiological study of plants growing on the fly ash deposits from the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermal power station in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, Pavle; Mitrović, Miroslava; Djurdjević, Lola

    2004-05-01

    This ecophysiological research on the ash deposits from the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermal power station in Serbia covered 10 plant species (Tamarix gallica, Populus alba, Spiraea van-hauttei, Ambrosia artemisifolia, Amorpha fruticosa, Eupatorium cannabinum, Crepis setosa, Epilobium collinum, Verbascum phlomoides, and Cirsium arvense). This paper presents the results of a water regime analysis, photosynthetic efficiency and trace elements (B, Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb, and Cd) content in vegetative plant parts. Water regime parameters indicate an overall stability in plant-water relations. During the period of summer drought, photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm) was low, ranging from 0.429 to 0.620 for all the species that were analyzed. An analysis of the tissue trace elements content showed a lower trace metal concentration in the plants than in the ash, indicating that heavy metals undergo major concentration during the combustion process and some are not readily taken up by plants. The Zn and Pb concentrations in all of the examined species were normal whereas Cu and Mn concentrations were in the deficiency range. Boron concentrations in plant tissues were high, with some species even showing levels of more than 100 microg/g (Populus sp., Ambrosia sp., Amorpha sp., and Cirsium sp.). The presence of Cd was not detected. In general, it can be concluded from the results of this research that biological recultivation should take into account the existing ecological, vegetation, and floristic potential of an immediate environment that is abundant in life forms and ecological types of plant species that can overgrow the ash deposit relatively quickly. Selected species should be adapted to toxic B concentrations with moderate demands in terms of mineral elements (Cu and Mn).

  11. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of environmental barrier coatings for the inhibition of solid deposit formation from heated jet fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arun Ram

    Solid deposit formation from jet fuel compromises the fuel handling system of an aviation turbine engine and increases the maintenance downtime of an aircraft. The deposit formation process depends upon the composition of the fuel, the nature of metal surfaces that come in contact with the heated fuel and the operating conditions of the engine. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of substrate surfaces on the amount and nature of solid deposits in the intermediate regime where both autoxidation and pyrolysis play an important role in deposit formation. A particular focus has been directed to examining the effectiveness of barrier coatings produced by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on metal surfaces for inhibiting the solid deposit formation from jet fuel degradation. In the first part of the experimental study, a commercial Jet-A sample was stressed in a flow reactor on seven different metal surfaces: AISI316, AISI 321, AISI 304, AISI 347, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Inconel 750X and FecrAlloy. Examination of deposits by thermal and microscopic analysis shows that the solid deposit formation is influenced by the interaction of organosulfur compounds and autoxidation products with the metal surfaces. The nature of metal sulfides was predicted by Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram. Thermal stressing on uncoated surfaces produced coke deposits with varying degree of structural order. They are hydrogen-rich and structurally disordered deposits, spherulitic deposits, small carbon particles with relatively ordered structures and large platelets of ordered carbon structures formed by metal catalysis. In the second part of the study, environmental barrier coatings were deposited on tube surfaces to inhibit solid deposit formation from the heated fuel. A new CVD system was configured by the proper choice of components for mass flow, pressure and temperature control in the reactor. A bubbler was designed to deliver the precursor into the reactor

  12. Evaluation of erosion-oxidation and ash deposition in the convective section of an industrial watertube boiler retrofitted to fire coal-water fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jianyang; Walsh, P.M.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The feasibility of directly firing coal-water fuel in an oil-designed industrial watertube boiler is being determined for possible deployment at Department of Defense facilities. Erosion of carbon steel by particles and deposition of ash were measured in the convective section of the boiler while cofiring coal-water fuel and natural gas. Erosion was enhanced by directing a small jet of nitrogen, air, or oxygen toward the surface of a test coupon mounted on an air-cooled tube. The temperature and oxygen dependencies of the erosion rate were explained by a model for simultaneous erosion and oxidation. Extrapolation, using the experimentally determined coefficients for metal and oxide erosion, provided estimates of the erosion rate as functions of the gas velocity and angular position about the circumference of a heat exchanger tube in the convective section of the boiler. Under the conditions of metal temperature, oxygen concentration in the gas, particle size, and particle loading investigated, erosion of carbon steel is expected to be slower than 0.05 {mu}m/hour when the gas velocity in the convection section is less than approximately 8 m/s. A measurement in the convective section at 4 m/s gas velocity showed a pattern of ash deposits covering the circumference at positions on the tube surface where no erosion is predicted.

  13. Impact of palm biodiesel blend on injector deposit formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • 250 h Endurance test on 2 fuel samples; diesel fuel and PB20. • Visual inspection of injectors running on DF and PB20 showed deposit accumulation. • SEM and EDS analysis showed less injector deposits for DF compared to PB20 blend. • Engine oil analysis showed higher value of wear particles for PB20 compared to DF. - Abstract: During short term engine operation, renewable fuels derived from vegetable oils, are capable of providing good engine performance. In more extended operations, some of the same fuels can cause degradation of engine performance, excessive carbon and lacquer deposits and actual damage to the engine. Moreover, temperatures in the area of the injector tip due to advanced diesel injection systems may lead to particularly stubborn deposits at and around the injector tip. In this research, an endurance test was carried out for 250 h on 2 fuel samples; DF (diesel fuel) as baseline and PB20 (20% palm biodiesel and 80% DF) in a single cylinder CI engine. The effects of DF and PB20 on injector nozzle deposits, engine lubricating oil, and fuel economy and exhaust emissions were investigated. According to the results of the investigation, visual inspection showed some deposit accumulation on injectors during running on both fuels. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis showed greater carbon deposits on and around the injector tip for PB20 compared to the engine running with DF. Similarly, lubricating oil analysis presented excessive wear metal concentrations, decreased viscosity and increased density values when the engine was fuelled with PB20. Finally, fuel economy and emission results during the endurance test showed higher brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) and NOx emissions, and lower HC and CO emissions, for the PB20 blend compared to DF

  14. Experimental studies on pulp and paper mill sludge ash behavior in fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latva-Somppi, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology

    1998-11-01

    Ash formation during the fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of pulp and paper mill sludges has been experimentally studied on an industrial and bench scale. The methods included aerosol measurements, chemical and crystalline composition analyses, thermogravimetry and electron microscopy. Fly ash mass and number size distributions and elemental enrichment in submicron particles and bottom ash were measured. Fly ash, bottom ash and ash deposits were characterized and their formation mechanisms are discussed. During combustion the fine paper-making additives in sludge, clay minerals and calcite, sintered fanning porous agglomerates. The fly ash mass mean size was 7.5 - 15 lam and the supermicron particles included 93.6 - 97.3 % of the fly ash. Condensation of the volatilized inorganic species formed spherical submicron particles in the fly ash. Their mass concentration was almost negligible when co-firing paper mill sludges and wood. This suggests that the fraction of the volatilized inorganic species in the paper mill sludges was low. Results from pulp mill sludge and bark co-firing were different. A clear mass mode below 0.3 pm, presenting 2.2 - 5.0 weight-% of the fly ash was detected. The condensed species included K, Na, S and Cl. Their mass fraction was higher in the pulp mill sludge than in the paper mill sludge. Evidently this resulted in increased volatilization and formation of condensed particles. The following trace elements were enriched in the submicron ash during pulp mill sludge and wood co-firing: As, Cd, Rb and Pb. The main part of the volatile species was, however, captured in the bulk ash. Presumably, this was due to the high surface area concentration in the bulk ash. Sludge moisture was observed to reduce the inorganic species volatilization. Probably steam vaporization from the wet sludge through the burning layer decreased combustion temperatures on char surface and less char was produced. Hence, the volatilization of ash forming species was

  15. Quantifying fat, oil, and grease deposit formation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fat, oil, and grease (FOG) deposits formed in sanitary sewers are calcium-based saponified solids that are responsible for a significant number of nationwide sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) across United States. In the current study, the kinetics of lab-based saponified solids were determined to un...

  16. Investigation of the deposit formation in pipelines connecting liquefaction reactors; 1t/d PSU ni okeru ekika hanno tokan fuchakubutsu no seisei yoin ni kansuru ichikosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Y.; Nogami, Y.; Inokuchi, K. [Mitsui SRC Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Mochizuki, M.; Imada, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    The liquefaction reaction system of an NEDOL process coal liquefaction 1t/d PSU was opened and checked to investigate the cause of the rise of differential pressure between liquefaction reactors of the PSU. The liquefaction test at a coal concentration of 50 wt% using Tanito Harum coal was conducted, and it was found that the differential pressure between reactors was on the increase. By the two-phase flow pressure loss method, deposition thickness of deposit in pipelines was estimated at 4.4mm at the time of end operation, which agreed with a measuring value obtained from a {gamma} ray. The rise of differential pressure was caused by deposit formation in pipelines connecting reactors. The main component of the deposit is calcite (CaCO3 60-70%) and is the same as the usual one. It is also the same type as the deposit on the reactor wall. Ca in coal ash is concerned with this. To withdraw solid matters deposited in the reactor, there are installed pipelines for the withdrawal at the reactor bottom. The solid matters are regularly purged by reverse gas for prevention of clogging. As the frequency of purge increases, the deposit at the reactor bottom decreases, but the deposit attaches strongly to pipelines connecting reactors. It is presumed that this deposit is what Ca to be discharged out of the system as a form of deposition solid matter naturally in the Ca balance precipitated as calcite in the pipeline connecting the reactor. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Deposit Formation on Cylinder Liner Surface in medium-speed Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Buhaug, Øyvind

    2003-01-01

    The presence of deposits in the honing grooves in diesel engine cylinder liners can cause a severe increase in the consumption of lubricating oil. These deposits may appear amber in which case they may be referred to as 'liner lacquerer' or be nearly invisible in which case they are often referred to as 'transparent glaze' or 'bore glaze' in the marine sector. The formation of these deposits is believed to be influenced by engine design, engine load, fuel composition and lubricating oil compo...

  18. Refined depositional history and dating of the Tongaporutuan reference section, north Taranaki, New Zealand: new volcanic ash U-Pb zircon ages, biostratigraphy and sedimentation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, K.L.; Crundwell, Martin P.; Coble, Matthew A.; Kingsley-Smith, Peter R.; Graham, Stephan A.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents new radiometric ages from volcanic ash beds within a c. 1900 m thick, progradational, deep-water clastic slope succession of late Miocene age exposed along the north Taranaki coast of the North Island, New Zealand. The ash beds yield U–Pb zircon ages ranging from 10.63 ± 0.65 Ma to 8.97 ± 0.22 Ma. The new ages are compatible with and provide corroboration of New Zealand Tongaporutuan Stage planktic foraminiferal and bolboformid biostratigraphic events identified in the same section. The close accord between these two age datasets provides a stratigraphically consistent and coherent basis for examining margin evolution. The arrival of a prograding clastic wedge and ensuing upward shoaling is recorded by sedimentation rates c. 2000 m/Ma–1 that are an order of magnitude higher than sedimentation rates on the precursor deep basin floor. This outcrop study provides new constraints for interpreting analogous subsurface deposits in Taranaki Basin and complements the regional late Miocene biostratigraphic dating framework.

  19. In search for a compromise between biodiversity conservation and human health protection in restoration of fly ash deposits: effect of anti-dust treatments on five groups of arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropek, Robert; Cerna, Ilona; Straka, Jakub; Kocarek, Petr; Malenovsky, Igor; Tichanek, Filip; Sebek, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    Recently, fly ash deposits have been revealed as a secondary refuge of critically endangered arthropods specialised on aeolian sands in Central Europe. Simultaneously, these anthropogenic habitats are well known for their negative impact on human health and the surrounding environment. The overwhelming majority of these risks are caused by wind erosion, the substantial decreasing of which is thus necessary. But, any effects of anti-dust treatments on endangered arthropods have never been studied. We surveyed communities of five arthropod groups (wild bees and wasps, leafhoppers, spiders, hoverflies and orthopteroid insects) colonising three fly ash deposits in the western Czech Republic. We focused on two different anti-dust treatments (~70 and 100 % cover of fly ash by barren soil) and their comparison with a control of bare fly ash. Altogether, we recorded 495 species, including 132 nationally threatened species (eight of them were considered to be extinct in the country) and/or 30 species strictly specialised to drift sands. Bees and wasps and leafhoppers contained the overwhelming majority of species of the highest conservation interest; a few other important records were also in spiders and orthopteroids. Total soil cover depleted the unique environment of fly ash and thus destroyed the high conservation potential of the deposits. On the other hand, partial coverage (with ~30 % of bare fly ash) still offered habitats for many of the most threatened species, as we showed by both regression and multivariate analyses, with a decrease of wind erosion. This topic still needs much more research interest, but we consider mosaic-like preservation of smaller spots of fly ash as one of the possible compromises between biodiversity and human health. PMID:25847441

  20. In search for a compromise between biodiversity conservation and human health protection in restoration of fly ash deposits: effect of anti-dust treatments on five groups of arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropek, Robert; Cerna, Ilona; Straka, Jakub; Kocarek, Petr; Malenovsky, Igor; Tichanek, Filip; Sebek, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    Recently, fly ash deposits have been revealed as a secondary refuge of critically endangered arthropods specialised on aeolian sands in Central Europe. Simultaneously, these anthropogenic habitats are well known for their negative impact on human health and the surrounding environment. The overwhelming majority of these risks are caused by wind erosion, the substantial decreasing of which is thus necessary. But, any effects of anti-dust treatments on endangered arthropods have never been studied. We surveyed communities of five arthropod groups (wild bees and wasps, leafhoppers, spiders, hoverflies and orthopteroid insects) colonising three fly ash deposits in the western Czech Republic. We focused on two different anti-dust treatments (~70 and 100 % cover of fly ash by barren soil) and their comparison with a control of bare fly ash. Altogether, we recorded 495 species, including 132 nationally threatened species (eight of them were considered to be extinct in the country) and/or 30 species strictly specialised to drift sands. Bees and wasps and leafhoppers contained the overwhelming majority of species of the highest conservation interest; a few other important records were also in spiders and orthopteroids. Total soil cover depleted the unique environment of fly ash and thus destroyed the high conservation potential of the deposits. On the other hand, partial coverage (with ~30 % of bare fly ash) still offered habitats for many of the most threatened species, as we showed by both regression and multivariate analyses, with a decrease of wind erosion. This topic still needs much more research interest, but we consider mosaic-like preservation of smaller spots of fly ash as one of the possible compromises between biodiversity and human health.

  1. Depositional conditions of the coal-bearing Hirka Formation beneath Late Miocene explosive volcanic products in NW central Anatolia, Turkey

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Şener

    2007-04-01

    This work focuses on the relationship between the coal deposition and explosive volcanism of the Miocene basin, NW central Anatolia, Turkey. The coal-bearing Hirka Formation was deposited over the Galatian Andesitic Complex and/or massive lagoonal environments during the Miocene. The investigated lignite is a high ash (from 32 to 58%) and sulphur (from 1.43 to 3.03%) lignite which is petrographically characterised by a high humunite content. The mineral matter of the studied lignite samples is made up of mainly clay minerals (illite–smectite and kaolinite), plagioclase and quartz in Bolu coal field, clay minerals (illite–smectite, smectite and illite), quartz, calcite, plagioclase and gypsum in Seben coal field, quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase and clay minerals (kaolinite and illite) in Kıbrıscık, and dolomite, quartz, clinoptilolite, opal CT and gypsum in C¸ amlıdere coal field. The differences in these four types of lignite with specific mineralogical patterns may be due to the explosive volcanic events and depositional conditions which changed from one coal field to the others. There is a zonation from SW to SE in the studied area for zeolites such as Opal CT+smectite-clinoptilolite-analcime-K-feldspar. Carbonate minerals are commonly calcite in Seben and Kıbrıscık coal fields. In Bolu, coal samples are devoid of calcite and dolomite. These analyses show that there is an increase in the amount of Mg and a decrease in the amount of Na from the northwestern part to the southern part in the study area.

  2. Diagenesis, provenance and depositional environments of the Bunter Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Friis, Henrik;

    The Bunter Sandstone Formation in the northern North German Basin has large geothermal potential with high porosity and permeability (generally >15% and >100 mD, respectively) and with pore fluid temperatures that are adequate for geothermal energy production (c. 55–60˚C). A combined investigation...

  3. Ash production and dispersal from sustained low-intensity Mono-Inyo eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Benjamin A.; Manga, Michael; Andrews, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Recent rhyolitic volcanism has demonstrated that prolonged low-intensity ash venting may accompany effusive dome formation. We examine the possibility and some consequences of episodes of extended, weak ash venting at the rhyolitic Mono-Inyo chain in Eastern California. We describe ash-filled cracks within one of the youngest domes, Panum Crater, which provide a textural record of ash venting during dome effusion. We use synchrotron-based X-ray computed tomography to characterize the particles in these tuffisites. Particle sizes in well-sorted tuffisite layers agree well with grain size distributions observed during weak ash venting at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, and yield approximate upper and lower bounds on gas velocity and mass flux during the formation of those layers. We simulate ash dispersal with Ash3d to assess the consequences of long-lived Mono-Inyo ash venting for ash deposition and the accompanying volcanic hazards. Our results highlight the sensitivity of large-scale outcomes of volcanic eruptions to small-scale processes.

  4. Combustion Chamber Deposits and PAH Formation in SI Engines Fueled by Producer Gas from Biomass Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Schramm, Jesper;

    2003-01-01

    Investigations were made concerning the formation of combustion chamber deposits (CCD) in SI gas engines fueled by producer gas. The main objective was to determine and characterise CCD and PAH formation caused by the presence of the light tar compounds phenol and guaiacol in producer gas from...

  5. High ash fuels for diesel engines II; Korkean tuhkapitoisuuden omaavan polttoaineen kaeyttoe dieselvoimaloissa II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norrmen, E.; Vestergren, R.; Svahn, P. [Wartsila Diesel International Ltd, Vaasa (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    Heavy fuel oils containing a large amount of ash, that is used in some geographically restricted areas, can cause problems with deposit formation and hot corrosion, leading to burned exhaust gas valves in some diesel engines. The Liekki 2 programs Use of high ash fuel in diesel power plants I and II have been initiated to clarify the mechanisms of deposit formation, and start and propagation of hot corrosion. The aim is to get enough knowledge to enable the development of the Waertsilae diesel engines to be able to handle heavy fuel with a very high ash content. The chemistry, sintering, melting, and corrosiveness of deposits from different part of the diesel engine and on different exhaust valve materials, as well as the chemistry in different depths of the deposit have been investigated. Theories for the mechanisms mentioned above have been developed. Additives changing the sintering/melting point and physical properties of the formed deposits have been screened. Exhaust gas particle measurements have been performed when running on high ash fuel, both without deposit modifying fuel additive and with. The results have been used to verify the ABC (Aerosol Behaviour in Combustion) model, and the particle chemistry and morphology has been examined. Several tests, also high load endurance tests have been run in diesel engines with high ash fuels. (author)

  6. Thaumasite formation in hydraulic mortars by atmospheric SO^ deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Varela, María Teresa; Martínez-Ramírez, S.; Sabbioni, C.; Zappia, G.; Toumbakari, E. E.; Aguilera, J.; Palomo, Ángel; Riontino, C.; Van Valen, K.

    2001-01-01

    [EN]Sulphation of mortars and concretes is a function of diverse environmental factors (SO^ aerosol, temperature, etc) as well as some material characteristics. One of the phases that could be formed as consequence of the sulphation of the hydraulic binder is thaumasite. In this paper different hydraulic mortars have been exposed to laboratory exposure chambers in order to reproduce thaumasite formation due to atmospheric SO^. Under the laboratory exposure conditions, ...

  7. Study of the various factors influencing deposit formation and operation of gasoline engine injection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepien, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Generally, ethanol fuel emits less pollutants than gasoline, it is completely renewable product and has the potential to reduce greenhouse gases emission but, at the same time can present a multitude of technical challenges to engine operation conditions including creation of very adverse engine deposits. These deposits increasing fuel consumption and cause higher exhaust emissions as well as poor performance in drivability. This paper describes results of research and determination the various factors influencing injector deposits build-up of ethanol-gasoline blends operated engine. The relationship between ethanol-gasoline fuel blends composition, their treatment, engine construction as well as its operation conditions and fuel injectors deposit formation has been investigated. Simulation studies of the deposit formation endanger proper functioning of fuel injection system were carried out at dynamometer engine testing. As a result various, important factors influencing the deposit creation process and speed formation were determined. The ability to control of injector deposits by multifunctional detergent-dispersant additives package fit for ethanol-gasoline blends requirements was also investigated.

  8. Sedimentary environment analysis of Yaojia formation--the ore-hosting stratum of Qianjiadian uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qianjiadian uranium deposit is the first uranium deposit discovered in Songliao basin. In this paper, the sedimentary environment of Yaojia formation, the ore-hosting stratum of Qianjiadian uranium deposit and its relationship with uranium mineralization are studied from several aspects such as lithological combination, sedimentary structures, logging curves, thickness ratio of sandstone layer to mudstone layer, sedimentary petrology and petrological geochemistry. The sedimentary features are characterized by the average value 5.0 between thickness ratio of sandstone layer to mudstone layer of Yaojia formation, and typical tabular cross bedding and trough cross bedding. The lithology of Yaojia formation is mostly composed of intermediate to fine-grained sandstone and mudstone with less conglomerate, and the debris grains have moderate sorting and roundness. These indicate that the source area is far, and that the sediments underwent long-distance transportation before deposition. The large scale and stable extension sand body of the Yaojia formation demonstrated the sedimentary features ora large sedimentary basins. Therefore, the sedimentary environment of Yaojia formation in the study area should be far-sourced sandy braided stream in the united great Songliao basin. The uranium mineralization of Qianjiadian deposit is mainly controlled by the sand bodies of channel-bar and point-bar subfacies, and the scale of the mineralization is closely related to that of the sand bodies. (authors)

  9. Tephrostratigraphy and potassium-argon age determinations of seven volcanic ash layers in the Muddy Creek formation of southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven silicic tephra layers occur in alluvial deposits of the Muddy Creek and equivalent formations at three localities in southern Nevada. Chemical and petrographic characterization indicate the tephra were derived from seven different volcanic eruptions and do not represent any previously known tephra layers. K-Ar age determinations on minerals or glass from each layer yielded 6 to 12 m.y. ages. Discordant ages were obtained on multiple mineral phases due to incorporation of detrital contaminants. The tephra are sufficiently distinctive to constitute stratigraphic marker horizons in the Muddy Creek and equivalent formations. Derivation from the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, active 16 to 6 m.y., is highly likely for some of the tephra. The K-Ar results suggest substantial parts of the Muddy Creek Formation and equivalent basin-fill are 6 to 12 m.y., indicating basin-range faulting began prior to 12 m.y. Little tectonic deformation or physiographic change has occurrred in the past 6 m.y

  10. ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZYGARLICKE, CHRISTOPHER J; MCCOLLOR, DONALD P; KAY, JOHN P; SWANSON, MICHAEL L

    1998-09-01

    The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature. Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined. Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (Tcv ) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt. Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles. Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems. Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

  11. Impact of Macro-economic Factors on Deposit Formation by Ukrainian Population

    OpenAIRE

    Shevaldina Valentyna H.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the article is detection of interconnections between the common economic processes and formation of bank deposits by population. The article builds a correlation and regression model of complex assessment of interconnection between macro-economic factors, savings behaviour of population and level of deposits of population in banks for two hour horizons: short-term, which is characterised with deployment of crisis phenomena both in global economy and in Ukrainian economy and the me...

  12. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-03-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  13. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2016-03-02

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  14. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines. PMID:26931824

  15. Agglomeration and Deposition Behaviour of Solid Recovered Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Hjuler, Klaus;

    2016-01-01

    formation, or accumulation of impurities. The combustion of polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), wood, and SRF were studied in a rotary drum furnace. The combustion was recorded on a camera (60 frames per second), so that any agglomeration or deposition of fuel or ash...... by a careful combustion control. The ash from SRF or wood does not pose a significant risk of melting and deposits at temperatures up to 1000 °C, but the presence of glass impurities in some SRF may limit operation temperatures to 900 °C as a result of ash melting....

  16. Formation of nanoclusters on silicon from carbon deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the structure of silicon surfaces can be induced by adsorption of carbon-containing molecules followed by thermal treatments. Clean Si(111) surfaces, prepared in vacuum and exposed to different adsorbants such as methanol or carbon monoxide, change their structures with the formation of self-organised nanostructures (15-50 nm diameter) after suitable UHV annealing procedures. Evolution of the size and density per unit area over different heating periods indicates that the structures are nucleated by carbon atoms present on the surface while their growth derives from mobile surface silicon atoms during the annealing process. Methanol adsorbs dissociatively on silicon at room temperature thus leading to a high density of nucleation centres, but when the process is applied to partially oxide-masked silicon surfaces using CO as adsorbant the nanostructures form preferentially at the Si/SiO2 interface around the mask border thus offering the possibility to grow more ordered self-organised nanoscale patterns. Monte Carlo simulations of this process correlate well with STM measurements

  17. Conditions for criticality by uranium deposition in water-saturated geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on neutronic analysis to examine the criticality conditions for uranium depositions in geological formations resulting from geological disposal of damaged fuels from Fukushima Daiichi reactors. MCNP models are used to evaluate the neutron multiplication factor (keff) and critical mass for various combinations of host rock and geometries. It has been observed that the keff for the deposition become greater with (1) smaller concentrations of neutron-absorbing materials in the host rock, (2) larger porosity of the host rock, (3) heterogeneous geometry of the deposition, and (4) greater mass of uranium in the deposition. This study has revealed that the planar fracture geometry applied in the previous criticality safety assessment for geological disposal would not necessarily yield conservative results against the homogeneous uranium deposition. (author)

  18. Hydroxyapatite formation on biomedical Ti–Ta–Zr alloys by magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Ju [Department of Dental Materials, Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, and Research Center for Oral Disease Regulation of the Aged, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yong-Hoon [Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Division of Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Choe, Han-Cheol, E-mail: hcchoe@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials, Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, and Research Center for Oral Disease Regulation of the Aged, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Brantley, William A. [Division of Prosthodontics and Restorative Science, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate hydroxyapatite formation on Ti-25Ta-xZr titanium alloys resulting from radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition. Electrochemical deposition of hydroxyapatite (HA) was first carried out using a cyclic voltammetry (CV) method at 80 °C in 5 mM Ca (NO{sub 3}){sub 2} + 3 mM NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. Then a physical vapor deposition (PVD) coating was obtained by a radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique. The microstructures, phase transformations, and morphologies of the hydroxyapatite films deposited on the titanium alloys were analyzed by optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The morphologies of electrochemically deposited HA showed plate-like shapes on the titanium alloys, and the morphologies of the RF-sputtered HA coating had the appearance droplet particles on the plate-like precipitates that had formed by electrochemical deposition. For the RF-sputtered HA coatings, the Ca/P ratio was increased, compared to that for the electrochemically deposited HA surface. Moreover, the RF-sputtered HA coating, consisting of agglomerated droplet particles on the electrochemically deposited HA surface, had better wettability compared to the bulk titanium alloy surface. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite (HA) was deposited on Ti–Ta–Zr alloys by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering and a cyclic voltammetry. • The morphologies of the RF-sputtered HA coating on electrochemical deposits presented plate-like shapes with a droplet particle. • The Ca/P ratio for RF-sputtered HA coatings was greater than that for electrochemical deposited HA coatings. • The RF-sputtered and electrochemical HA coatings had superior wettability compared to the electrochemically deposited coatings.

  19. Kinetics of Hydrocarbon formation in a- C:H Film deposition plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal, E. de la; Tabares, F. L.

    1993-07-01

    The formation of C2 and Cp hydrocarbons during the PACVD of a-C:H films from admixtures of methane with H2 and He has been investigated by mass spectrometry under several deposition condition. The time evolution of the observed species indicates that the formation mechanisms of ethylene and acetylene are sensitive to the conditions of the wall during the growing of the film. Acetylene are sensitive to the conditions of the wall during the growing of the film. Acetylene formation was found to be directly related to the formation of the film on top of the carburized metal. (Author) 12 refs.

  20. Mineral-organic formations in Berezitovy deposit (the Amur region, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakh, E. A.; Vakh, A. S.; Petukhov, V. I.; Nikulina, T. V.; Tarasenko, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The article examines the structure and composition of mineral-organic formations within the hypergenesis zone of Berezitovy deposit (the Amur region). The detailed study has shown that these recent formations are represented by algae identified as Trentepohlia jolithus (Linnaeus) Wallroth. The process of macro and micro element accumulation in these formations is likely to have a complex sediment-chemogenic-organogenic nature and results from the flow of the suspended and dissolved substances formed within the hypergenesis zone of sulphide ores. It is also assumed that some elements accumulated in the formations were previously absorbed by algae from the mineralized water environment.

  1. Depositional environments of the Middle Cambrian Arctomys Formation, southern Canadian Rocky Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, R.J. (Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)); Demicco, R.V. (Brighamton Univ., NY (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The Middle Cambrian Arctomys Formation is a mixed dolomite shale formation that varies from 20 to 260 m thick in the southernmost Rocky Mountains of Alberta and British Columbia. The Arctomys Formation is the lower shaly 'half cycle' of the Arctomys-Waterfowl 'grand cycle'. It contains no fossils, has a restricted easternly extent, but exhibits mud cracks, salt casts and meter-thick cycles. The Arctomys Formation comprises four facies assemblages: thin-bedded to laminated carbonate mudstones; shale-to-carbonate breccia cycles; carbonate mudstone-to-shale cycles; and interbedded grainstones and shales. The thin-bedded to laminated carbonate mudstones facies assemblage probably records restricted peritidal to shallow lagoonal carbonate sedimentation. However, the meter-thick, upward-desiccating cycles that comprise the bulk of the Arctomys Formation (shale-to-carbonate breccia cycles and carbonate mudstone-to-shale cycles) are most likely the deposits of inland shallow lakes and coastal seepage-fed lagoons that filled and developed dry mud flat soil caps. The most landward outcrops of the Arctomys Formation consist of interbedded grainstones and shales that record sheetflood deposits on dry mud flats. The best overall modern analog for the Arctomys Formation is the extensive coastal plain of South Australia and the proposed depositional model is based on this modern passive margin setting. 56 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Use of high ash fuel in diesel power plants II; Korkean tuhkapitoisuuden omaavan polttoaineen kaeyttoe dieselvoimaloissa II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestergren, R.; Normen, E.; Hellen, G. [Wartsila Diesel International Ltd Oy, Vaasa (Finland)] [and others

    1997-10-01

    Heavy fuel oils containing a large amount of ash are used in some geographically restricted areas. The ash components can cause problems with deposit formation and hot corrosion, leading to burned exhaust gas valves in some diesel engines. The LIEKKI 2 programs Use of high ash fuel in diesel power plants, Part I and II, have been initiated to clarify the mechanisms of deposit formation, and start and propagation of hot corrosion. The aim is to get enough knowledge to enable the development of the Waertsilae diesel engines to be able to handle heavy fuels with a very high ash content. The chemistry during combustion has been studied. The chemical and physical properties of the particles in the exhaust gas, of the deposits, and of exhaust valves have been investigated. Exhaust gas particle measurements have been performed when running on high ash fuel, both with and without deposit modifying fuel additive. Theories for the mechanisms mentioned above have been developed. On the practical side two long time field tests are going on, one with an ash/deposit modifying fuel additive (vanadium chemistry alteration), one with fuel water washing (sodium removal). Seven different reports have been written. (orig.)

  3. Sedimentary evolution of Neogene continental deposits (Ñirihuau Formation) along the Ñirihuau River, North Patagonian Andes of Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, J. M.; Giacosa, R. E.; Heredia, N.

    2009-07-01

    The sedimentary evolution of the Ñirihuau Formation (late Oligocene-middle Miocene) was studied along the southern margin of the Ñirihuau River, in the North Patagonian Andes. The 1300-m-thick section includes 15 epiclastic and volcaniclastic lithofacies which are grouped into five lithofacies associations: deep lacustrine, shallow lacustrine, fluvial channels, subaerial floodplains and volcaniclastic flows (lahar). Syn-eruptive and inter-eruptive stages are recorded along the Ñirihuau River section. The former consist of highly aggradational packages several tens of meters thick of ash-fall beds and lahar deposits. During inter-eruptive periods sedimentation took place mostly in shallow and deep lacustrine environments, with four cycles of lake expansion and contraction, and a minor proportion of fluvial deposits. Sedimentary supply originated from the northeast and northwest in the lower part of the unit through low to moderate sinuosity fluvial systems, flowing into a lake with high-gradient margins, and forming Gilbert-type deltas. The younger sections were sourced from the northeast, east and southeast, indicating changes in the basin morphology. Basic and intermediate volcanic rocks similar to those of the Ventana Formation (Oligocene) are interstratified at the beginning of the sedimentation. The syn-orogenic nature of the Ñirihuau Formation is evidenced by the changes in the basin shape, but mainly by the differences in styles and intensities of deformation between the Ñirihuau River section and the overlying outcrops of La Buitrera Hill, both separated by a folded unconformity.

  4. Highly oriented polycrystalline Cu2O film formation using RF magnetron sputtering deposition for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, S.; Shima, H.; Akinaga, H.

    2014-02-01

    Room temperature sputtering deposition and re-crystallization of the deposited thin films by rapid thermal annealing have been evaluating in detail as a formation method of Cu2O active layer for solar cells, which minimize thermal budget in fabrication processes. Single phase polycrystalline Cu2O films were obtained by a magnetron rf sputtering deposition and its crystallinity and electrical characteristics were controlled by the annealing. Hall mobility was improved up to 17 cm2V-1s-1 by the annealing at 600°C for 30s. Since this value was smaller than 47 cm2V-1s-1 of the film deposited under thermal equilibrium state using pulsed laser deposition at 600°C, some contrivances were necessary to compensate the deficiency. It was understood that the sputter-deposited Cu2O films on (111)-oriented Pt films were strongly oriented to (111) face also by the self-assembly and the crystallinity was improved by the annealing preserving its orientation. The sputter-deposited film quality was expected to become equivalent to the pulsed laser deposition film from the results of X-ray diffractometry and photoluminescence.

  5. The role of microorganisms in the formation of calcitic moonmilk deposits and speleothems in Altamira Cave

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Moral, Sergio; Portillo Guisado, María del Carmen; Janices, Inés; Cuezva, Soledad; Fernández Cortés, A.; Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; González Grau, Juan Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria are able to induce carbonate precipitation although the participation of microbial or chemical processes in speleothem formation remains a matter of debate. In this study, the origin of carbonate depositions such as moonmilk, an unconsolidated microcrystalline formation with high water content, and the consolidation of carbonate precipitates into hard speleothems were analyzed. The utilized methods included measurements of the composition of stable isotopes in these precipitates, flu...

  6. Use of ashes and ash-and-slad wastes in construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lahtinen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of ash waste saves expenses on main materials without compromising the quality of the product, while solving the problem of disposal of ash materials. The aim of this work is classification of ashes and evaluation its use in construction.Classification of ash-and-slad wastes based on type of burned coal, way of incineration, flame temperature, way of ash disposal is made. The chemical composition and behavior of shale ash, its main deposits, its advantages as a mineral concrete admixture are analysed. Fly ashes are divided into siliceous ashes and basic ashes.Various application areas of ash-and-slad wastes in construction are considered, the examples of its use are given.

  7. Laboratory Studies of Ice Nucleation on Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Ice nucleation on volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect human respiratory health, atmospheric transport, and global climate. We have performed laboratory studies of the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman Microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (Basaltic Ash, Guatemala), Soufriere Hills (Andesetic Ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Rhyolitic Ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. We find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.1. For immersion freezing, however, only the Taupo ash exhibited efficient heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  8. The role of microorganisms in the formation of calcitic moonmilk deposits and speleothems in Altamira Cave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Moral, S.; Portillo, M. C.; Janices, I.; Cuezva, S.; Fernández-Cortés, A.; Cañaveras, J. C.; Gonzalez, J. M.

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria are able to induce carbonate precipitation although the participation of microbial or chemical processes in speleothem formation remains a matter of debate. In this study, the origin of carbonate depositions such as moonmilk, an unconsolidated microcrystalline formation with high water content, and the consolidation of carbonate precipitates into hard speleothems were analyzed. The utilized methods included measurements of the composition of stable isotopes in these precipitates, fluorimetric determinations of RNA/DNA ratios and respirometric estimations in Altamira Cave. Results from isotope composition showed increases of the δ 18O and δ 13C ratios from moonmilk in the very first stages of formation toward large speleothems. Estimates of RNA/DNA ratios suggested an inactivation of microorganisms from incipient moonmilk toward consolidated deposits of calcium carbonate. Respiratory activity of microorganisms also showed a significant decrease in samples with accumulated calcite. These results suggest that bacterial activity induces the conditions required for calcium carbonate precipitation, initiating the first stages of deposition. Progressive accumulation of carbonate leads towards a less favorable environment for the development of bacteria. On consolidated speleothems, the importance of bacteria in carbonate deposition decreases and chemical processes gain importance in the deposition of carbonates.

  9. Factors controlling deposits in recovery boilers -particle formation and deposition; Soodakattilan likaantuminen ja siihen vaikuttavien tekijoeiden hallinta. Hiukkasten muodostuminen ja depositio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauppinen, E.I.; Mikkanen, P.; Tapper, U.; Ylaetalo, S.; Jaervinen, R. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Jokiniemi, J.K.; Pyykoenen, J.; Eskola, A. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    In this project the aim is to find critical factors controlling the deposit formation in the recovery boilers. Focus is on particle formation, growth and deposition. During year 1995 the aerosol particle formation was studied by an experimental study within the recovery boiler furnace and by a sensitivity study with the ABC (Aerosol Behaviour in Combustion) computer code. During year 1996 the experimental studies on the aerosol particle formation continued within the furnace and the deposition mechanisms for carry over particles were included in the ABC code and sensitivity studies of the deposition were carried out. The experimental study confirmed the fact that the particles are already formed in the recovery boiler furnace. The particle formation is initiated in the boundary layer of the burning droplet or char bed, where metals are vaporised and oxidised to form tiny seed particles

  10. Adsorption of Thiourea and Formation of Nickel-thiourea Complexes at Initial Stage of Nickel Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Guang-hui; WU Hui-huang; YANG Fang-zu; LIU Xin-yu

    2004-01-01

    The effect of thiourea(TU) on the nickel deposition process was analyzed by means of linear-sweep voltammetry. Raman spectroscopy and infrared reflectance spectroscopy were used to investigate the adsorption of TU and the formation of nickel-TU complexes on copper surface. The experimental results indicate that the nucleation and the preceding conversion step are involved in the deposition of nickel on copper electrodes. TU makes the onset nucleation potential negative due to the formation of nickel-TU complexes, which can accelerate the nickel deposition. Moreover, the S atom in the TU molecule adsorbed on copper surface facilitates the coordination of TU to Ni2+. Meanwhile, TU might be adsorbed at a flatter orientation if no Ni2+ is on the surface, while at a perpendicular orientation when Ni2+ is coadsorbed.

  11. Impact of Macro-economic Factors on Deposit Formation by Ukrainian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevaldina Valentyna H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article is detection of interconnections between the common economic processes and formation of bank deposits by population. The article builds a correlation and regression model of complex assessment of interconnection between macro-economic factors, savings behaviour of population and level of deposits of population in banks for two hour horizons: short-term, which is characterised with deployment of crisis phenomena both in global economy and in Ukrainian economy and the medium-term one. The article characterises the most significant common macro-economic factors. In the result of the study the article establishes that Ukrainian population is oriented at short-term horizon when forming savings due to the uncertainty in future. In the medium-term prospective, savings of the population are formed basically under influence of macro-economic factors, while formation of deposits by Ukrainian population is mostly influenced by socio-psychological factors.

  12. Triassic alluvial braidplain and braided river deposits of the La Ternera Formation, Atacama region, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, C. M.; Suárez, M.

    1995-01-01

    The La Ternera Formation is a thick (>2,100 m) succession of terrigenous clastic sediments, with andesitic and basaltic intercalations, exposed in the Quebrada de Paipote area of the Atacama Region, northern Chile. The strata were deposited in an active rift basin during Late Triassic to (?) Early Jurassic times. The lower 1,000 m of the studied elastic succession comprises pebbly granule paraconglomerates, unconformably overlying Upper Paleozoic sedimentary successions, volcanics, and granitoids. These sediments were derived from the east and are interpreted as braid-plain deposits. The upper 800 m of the succession comprises interbedded orthoconglomerates, sandstones and mudstones. Abundant plant fossils include trees in growth position and carbonaceous horizons. Small scale depositional cycles were the product of migrating braided-river channel systems. Larger scale successions resulted from tectonic uplift. The sediments of the La Ternera Formation were derived predominantly from a tectonically uplifted area of Upper Paleozoic acidic volcanic and plutonic rocks (Pantanoso Formation, Choiyoi Group). Active uplift on the eastern margin of the sedimentary basin probably occurred along north-south trending faults. Continued subsidence of the basin resulted in a Sinemurian to Bajocian marine transgression. Occurrences of Triassic andesitic and basaltic volcanic rocks both to the west and the east of the La Ternera formation suggest deposition in an intea-volcanic graben or half-graben.

  13. Metastable phase formation during chemical vapor deposition of niobium-germanium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regularities of different metastable phase formation during chemical vapor deposition of niobium-germanium coatings were investigated. These coatings were deposited on wire and band metal substrates by method of chemical transport reactions with the use of iodine as transporting agent. It was shown that it was possible to deposite the metastable Nb5Ge3 phase with structure of T2 type and X phase with cubic structure and hypothetical Nb2Ge composition during iodide process using Nb3Ge alloy as initial material together with phases existing at state diagram. Metastable T2 and X phases are formed only at high total pressure (more 250-500 Pa) and deposition rate less 1 μm/min. Coatings on the base of Nb3Ge with germanium content from 11 to 23 at.% were obtained

  14. Depositional facies of the Cambrian Araba Formation in the Taba region, east Sinai, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Araby, A.; Abdel-Motelib, A.

    1999-10-01

    A thick succession of Cambrian sediments is exposed in the Taba region, east Sinai, and subdivided into the Araba Formation and the overlying Naqus Formation. The vertical and lateral distribution of the Araba Formation in the Taba region provides an outstanding example of an overall retrograding sequence. Three distinctive units (I, II and III) are distinguished within this succession on the basis of depositional geometries, stratified patterns, sedimentary features and petrographic examinations. They record different depositional environments and each unit is distinguished by a particular facies association, which records processes characteristic of these environments. The lower unit (I) is dominated by five depositional facies (la-le) which belong to low sinuosity braided channels associated with floodplain fines and alluvial fans. Channel deposits are represented by tabular cross-bedded and horizontally stratified pebbly coarse-grained sandstones. The middle unit (II) reveals a relative sea level rise and is composed of fine- to coarse-grained sandstone, shale and mudstone with carbonate intercalcations. From four depositional facies (Ila-Ild), recognised facies (Ila, Ilc and Ild) are comparable to upper-lower shoreface and tidal channel environments. The fourth facies (Ilb) is carbonate-dominated with trilobite tracks, and reflects deposition in the upper-middle intertidal flat. The latter facies (llb) is subjected to intea-Cambrian karstification, which is deduced from the presence of macro- and microscopic fresh water calcite fillings, botryoidal Fe and Mn oxides and terra rossa. The uppermost unit (III) is shale-dominated from the inner shelf and is represented by two facies (Illa and Illb). Despite the general rise in sea-level in the Araba Formation, the uppermost facies (Illb) points to a progradational-upward tendency in unit (III), and this is coeval with an increase in the percentage of interbedded fine-grained sandstones.

  15. Rebound characteristics for ash particles impacting a planar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ming; Li, Sufen; Han, Jian; Xie, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The formation of ash deposition on the heat transfer tubes in a boiler reduces the heat transfer coefficient by about 25%. Because of these fouling layers, the efficiency with which energy can be absorbed from flue gases is reduced. The growth of ash deposition is strongly dependent on the interaction of the incident particle with the surface of heat transfer tubes. In this study the interaction is modeled as the outcome of collision between an incident fly ash particle and planar surface that represents a heat transfer surface. The present paper focuses on the applicability of the experimental results to indicate the rebound characteristics of fly ash particles impacting a planar surface. This is studied by impaction experiments of fly ash particles from the power plant dust, under various particle diameters and with different velocities (ranging from 0.1 to 20 m/s). The experiments are carried out in an atmospheric column, and using a digital camera system, individual impacts are recorded. Furthermore, the measured coefficient of restitution values can be predicted by a dynamic simulation model.

  16. 两段炉激冷水装置积灰原因分析及改进%Analyzing on Ash Deposition Reason and Its Improvement for Water Quenching Device of Gasifier with Two Stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹家富; 于要娟; 聂成元

    2015-01-01

    The gasifier with two stages researched and developed by the Xi'an Thermo-technical Institute was the first set unit of coal gasification tech-nology using water and steam quenching.Author has introduced the flow sheet for the coal gasification plant of the gasifier with two stages , in allusion to the ash deposition problem easy formed in the portion of water quenching device near the present two years, author has analyzed the every process parame-ter leading to the ash deposition of the gasifier, and has presented the improvement comment on decreasing the ash deposition.%西安热工院研发的两段炉是国内首套采用水和蒸汽激冷的煤气化技术。介绍了两段炉煤气化装置工艺流程,针对近两年激冷水装置处易积灰的问题,分析了导致气化炉积灰的各工艺参数,提出减缓积灰的改进意见。

  17. Formation of a Hydrothermal Kaolinite Deposit from Rhyolitic Tuff in Jiangxi, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Yuan; Guanghai Shi; Mengchu Yang; Yinuo Wu; Zhaochong Zhang; Anjie Huang; Jiajing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The Longmen kaolinite deposit is one of the largest hydrothermal clay deposits of Ganxi volcanic basin (northern Wuyi Mountain area, China). The pristine host rocks are rhyolitic crystal-vitric tuff and minor lapilli tuff from the Late Jurassic Ehuling Formation. The ore consists of kaolin-group minerals (kaolinite, dickite), pyrophyllite with minor quartz, sericite, pyrite, etc.. From the host rocks to the transition zones (altered rocks) then to the vein ores, contents of SiO2 and TFe2O3 decrease, whereas Al2O3 and LOI increase, consistent with the contents increase of kaolin minerals and pyrophyllite in the samples. The total REE abundances of the ores are much lower than that of the host and altered rocks, Rb, Nb, Nd, Zr, Ti and Y are significantly depleted. Apparent zoning features of bulk geochemistry and mineral component reflect that the kaolinite deposit occurred at the expense of the host rock by ascending hydrothermal fluids with distinct removal of SiO2, TFe2O3, Na2O, K2O. According to the mineral assemblage, the formation temperature of this deposit falls within the range of 270-350 ℃. With regard to the industrial applications, the kaolinized ores are suitable for use in ceramics and gemologic materials crafted for seal stones. Moreover, in mineralogical terms, this deposit is also proved to be an excellent example for studying channeled hydrothermal alterations of rhyolitic tuff.

  18. Coarse grain deposit feature of Guantao formation in western depression Shuyi area of Liaohe basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jian-hua; LIU Chen-sheng; ZHU Mei-heng

    2005-01-01

    The extensive distribution of coarse-grained clastic rock of Guantao formation in Shuyi area of Liaohe basin was considered as a result of fluvial deposit. According to the comprehensive analysis of seism data, well log, core observation and experimental data, this kind of clastic rock is composed of pebblestone-cobblestone, microconglomerate, sand conglomerate, medium-coarse grained sandstone and fine-sandstone. According to the clast composition, sedimentary texture, structure and rock type, 3 kinds of sediment facies can be recognized ie the mixed accumulation-conglomerate dominated debris flow, pebblestone-cobblestone dominated gradient flow and sandstone dominated braided stream. Vertically, the bottom gradient current deposit and top braided stream deposit form fining-upward sediment sequence, and the debris flow deposit distributes in them at random. The sedimentary feature of coarse grain clastic of Guantao formation in Shuyi area is accordant with proximal wet alluvial fan deposited in wet climate at foreland and this kind of alluvial fan is different from the traditional one.

  19. Singular deposit formation in PWR due to electrokinetic phenomena - application to SG clogging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillodo, M.; Muller, T.; Barale, M.; Foucault, M. [AREVA NP SAS, Technical Centre (France); Clinard, M.-H.; Brun, C.; Chahma, F. [AREVA NP SAS, Chemistry and Radiochemistry Group (France); Corredera, G.; De Bouvier, O. [Electricite de France, Centre d' Expertise de I' inspection dans les domaines de la Realisation et de l' Exploitation (France)

    2009-07-01

    The deposits which cause clogging of the 'foils' of the tube support plates (TSP) in Steam Generators (SG) of PWR present two characteristics which put forward that the mechanism at the origin of their formation is different from the mechanism that drives the formation of homogeneous deposits leading to the fouling of the free spans of SG tubes. Clogging occurs near the leading edge of the TSP and the deposits appear as diaphragms localized between both TSP and SG tubing materials, while the major part of the tube/TSP interstice presents little or no significant clogging. This type of deposit seems rather comparable to the ones which were reproduced in Lab tests to explain the flow rate instabilities observed on a French unit during hot shutdown in the 90's. The deposits which cause TSP clogging are owed to a discontinuity of the streaming currents in the vicinity of a surface singularity (orifices, scratches ...) which, in very low conductivity environment, produce local potential variations and/or current loop in the metallic pipe material due to electrokinetic effects. Deposits can be built by two mechanisms which may or not coexist: (i) accumulation of particles stabilized by an electrostatic attraction due to the local variation of electrokinetic potential, and (ii) crystalline growth of magnetite produced by the oxidation of ferrous ions on the anodic branch of a current loop. Lab investigations carried out by AREVA NP Technical Centre since the end of the 90's showed that this type of deposit occurs when the redox potential is higher than a critical value, and can be gradually dissolved when the potential becomes lower than this value which depends on the 'Material - Chemistry' couple. Special emphasis will be given in this paper to the TSP clogging of SG in PWR secondary coolant dealing particularly with the potential strong effect of electrokinetic phenomena in low conductive environment and in high temperature conditions

  20. Singular deposit formation in PWR due to electrokinetic phenomena - application to SG clogging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposits which cause clogging of the 'foils' of the tube support plates (TSP) in Steam Generators (SG) of PWR present two characteristics which put forward that the mechanism at the origin of their formation is different from the mechanism that drives the formation of homogeneous deposits leading to the fouling of the free spans of SG tubes. Clogging occurs near the leading edge of the TSP and the deposits appear as diaphragms localized between both TSP and SG tubing materials, while the major part of the tube/TSP interstice presents little or no significant clogging. This type of deposit seems rather comparable to the ones which were reproduced in Lab tests to explain the flow rate instabilities observed on a French unit during hot shutdown in the 90's. The deposits which cause TSP clogging are owed to a discontinuity of the streaming currents in the vicinity of a surface singularity (orifices, scratches ...) which, in very low conductivity environment, produce local potential variations and/or current loop in the metallic pipe material due to electrokinetic effects. Deposits can be built by two mechanisms which may or not coexist: (i) accumulation of particles stabilized by an electrostatic attraction due to the local variation of electrokinetic potential, and (ii) crystalline growth of magnetite produced by the oxidation of ferrous ions on the anodic branch of a current loop. Lab investigations carried out by AREVA NP Technical Centre since the end of the 90's showed that this type of deposit occurs when the redox potential is higher than a critical value, and can be gradually dissolved when the potential becomes lower than this value which depends on the 'Material - Chemistry' couple. Special emphasis will be given in this paper to the TSP clogging of SG in PWR secondary coolant dealing particularly with the potential strong effect of electrokinetic phenomena in low conductive environment and in high temperature conditions. (author)

  1. Formation of fine sediment deposit from a flash flood river in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifoll, Manel; Gracia, Vicenç; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; Guillén, Jorge; Espino, Manuel; Warner, John C.

    2014-01-01

    We identify the mechanisms controlling fine deposits on the inner-shelf in front of the Besòs River, in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. This river is characterized by a flash flood regime discharging large amounts of water (more than 20 times the mean water discharge) and sediment in very short periods lasting from hours to few days. Numerical model output was compared with bottom sediment observations and used to characterize the multiple spatial and temporal scales involved in offshore sediment deposit formation. A high-resolution (50 m grid size) coupled hydrodynamic-wave-sediment transport model was applied to the initial stages of the sediment dispersal after a storm-related flood event. After the flood, sediment accumulation was predominantly confined to an area near the coastline as a result of preferential deposition during the final stage of the storm. Subsequent reworking occurred due to wave-induced bottom shear stress that resuspended fine materials, with seaward flow exporting them toward the midshelf. Wave characteristics, sediment availability, and shelf circulation determined the transport after the reworking and the final sediment deposition location. One year simulations of the regional area revealed a prevalent southwestward average flow with increased intensity downstream. The circulation pattern was consistent with the observed fine deposit depocenter being shifted southward from the river mouth. At the southern edge, bathymetry controlled the fine deposition by inducing near-bottom flow convergence enhancing bottom shear stress. According to the short-term and long-term analyses, a seasonal pattern in the fine deposit formation is expected.

  2. Enhancement effect of relative humidity on the formation and regional respiratory deposition of secondary organic aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We examine the effect of humidity on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). → We found the increase of humidity could enhance the SOA mass and number. → These changes did not alter the pattern of regional respiratory deposition of SOA. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the ozonolysis of d-limonene in an environmental chamber. The mass yield and the number concentration of SOA increased seven and eight times, respectively, when the RH increased from 18% to 82%. The measured total loss rates (apparent loss rates) of the number and mass concentration of SOA in the chamber ranged from 1.70 to 1.77 h-1 and from 2.51 to 2.61 h-1, respectively, at a controlled ventilation rate of 0.72 ± 0.04 h-1. The wall-deposition-loss-rate coefficient observed (1.00 ± 0.02 h-1) was approximate to the estimated value based on Zhao and Wu's model which includes the factors of turbulence, Brownian diffusion, turbophoresis and surface roughness. According to the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) model, the inhaled SOA particles are deposited primarily in the alveoli of the lung. The integrated alveolar deposited dose of the mass (surface area) of SOA over 3 h accounted for 74.0-74.8% (74.3-74.9%) of the total deposited dose at the investigated RH. Raising the RH resulted in the growth of SOA particle sizes and increment of the deposition dose but did not cause significant changes in the ratio of regional to the total respiratory deposition of SOA.

  3. Enhancement effect of relative humidity on the formation and regional respiratory deposition of secondary organic aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Kuo-Pin, E-mail: kpyu@ym.edu.tw [Institute of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Linong Street, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chi [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, No. 700, Kaohsiung University Rd., Kaohsiung 81148, Taiwan (China); Yang, Shang-Chun [Institute of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Linong Street, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Zhao Ping [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, No. 700, Kaohsiung University Rd., Kaohsiung 81148, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the effect of humidity on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). {yields} We found the increase of humidity could enhance the SOA mass and number. {yields} These changes did not alter the pattern of regional respiratory deposition of SOA. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the ozonolysis of d-limonene in an environmental chamber. The mass yield and the number concentration of SOA increased seven and eight times, respectively, when the RH increased from 18% to 82%. The measured total loss rates (apparent loss rates) of the number and mass concentration of SOA in the chamber ranged from 1.70 to 1.77 h{sup -1} and from 2.51 to 2.61 h{sup -1}, respectively, at a controlled ventilation rate of 0.72 {+-} 0.04 h{sup -1}. The wall-deposition-loss-rate coefficient observed (1.00 {+-} 0.02 h{sup -1}) was approximate to the estimated value based on Zhao and Wu's model which includes the factors of turbulence, Brownian diffusion, turbophoresis and surface roughness. According to the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) model, the inhaled SOA particles are deposited primarily in the alveoli of the lung. The integrated alveolar deposited dose of the mass (surface area) of SOA over 3 h accounted for 74.0-74.8% (74.3-74.9%) of the total deposited dose at the investigated RH. Raising the RH resulted in the growth of SOA particle sizes and increment of the deposition dose but did not cause significant changes in the ratio of regional to the total respiratory deposition of SOA.

  4. The Cambrian Araba Formation in northeastern Egypt: Facies and depositional environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, M. A.; Soliman, H. E.; Wanas, H. A.

    2006-10-01

    The Cambrian Araba Formation exposed in Gabal El Zeit and in the Sinai Peninsula unconformably overlies Precambrian basement rocks, and is in turn overlain unconformably by the Ordovician Naqus formation. The Araba Formation has been subdivided into three informal lithologic units: lower, middle and upper, from field observations. Seven sedimentary facies assignable to three facies associations (fluvial, tidal and coastal to open marine) are recognized within the Araba Formation. The lower unit comprises two main facies: matrix-supported conglomerate (facies-A) in the south (Gabal Araba and Wadi Feiran) and interbeds of granulestone and sandstone (facies-B) in the north (Gabal Dhalal and Taba) deposited in fluvial conditions. The middle unit includes four facies: cross-bedded sandstone (facies-C), thin laminated sandstone (facies-D), burrowed-massive sandstone (facies-E) and rhythmically bedded sandstone-mudstone (facies-F) deposited mainly under tidal conditions in the coastal zone. The upper unit consists mainly of interbeds of burrowed mudstone-siltstone, with Skolithos, probably deposited in open marine environment. The sequence records the southward transgression of the Tethys Ocean over a horst and graben system developed in the late Precambrian on the northern margin of the Arabo-Nubian continent.

  5. TEMPERATURE AND CONCENTRATION EFFECTS ON THE DIOXIN AND FURAN FORMATION FROM A MIXTURE OF CHLOROPHENOLS OVER FLY ASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorophenols have been studied as precursors to PCDD/F formation but generally these experiments have been carried out with unrepresentative concentrations and potentially overlapping formation mechanisms. Research has demonstrated that the kinetics of PCDD formation from chloro...

  6. Formation of interface silicides at room temperature in pulsed laser deposited Ti thin films on Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interface characterization of pulsed laser deposited (PLD) Ti thin films on Si substrates using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity (GIXRR) reveals the growth of titanium silicides (predominantly C54-TiSi2) layers at room temperature. These silicides nucleate and grow only at higher temperatures if deposited by other physical vapor deposition techniques. The films have been subjected to isothermal and isochronal annealing under vacuum with a view to enhancing interface reaction and interdiffusion. The silicide phase formation at room temperature is due to the energetic Ti species available in PLD plume. The silicides formed in PLD have exhibited high thermal stability

  7. Formation of Ultrafine Metal Particles and Metal Oxide Precursor on Anodized Al by Electrolysis Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Nickel was deposited by ac electrolysis deposition in the pores of the porous oxide film of Al produced by anodizing in phosphoric acid. Ultrafine rod-shaped Ni particles were formed in the pores. At the same time a film of Ni oxide precursor was developed on the surface of the porous oxide film. The Ni particles and the Ni oxide precursor were examined by SEM, TEM and X-ray diffraction. The thickness of the barrier layer of the porous oxide film was thin and it attributed to the formation of the metal particles, while the formation of the oxide precursor was associated with the surface pits which were developed in the pretreatment of Al.

  8. Formation Mechanism and Stability Assessment of the Colluvial Deposit Slope in Zuoyituo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wenxing; Zhang Yihu; Yin Hongmei

    2004-01-01

    The basic features of the colluvial deposit slope in Zuoyituo such as geological conditions, dimensions, slip surfaces and groundwater conditions are described concisely in this paper. The formation mechanism of the slope is discussed. It is considered that the formation of the colluvial deposit slope in Zuoyituo has undergone accumulation, slip, load, deformation and failure. The effects of rainfall on slope stability are categorized systematically based on existing methodology, and ways to determine the effects quantitatively are presented. The remained slip force method is improved by the addition of quantitative relations to the existing formulae and programs. The parameters of the colluvial deposit slope are determined through experimentation and the method of back-analysis. The safety factors of the slope are calculated with the improved remained slip force method and the Sarma method. The results show that rainfall and water level in the Yangtze River have a significant effect on the stability of the colluvial deposit slope in Zuoyituo. The hazards caused by the instability of the slope are assessed, and prevention methods are put forward.

  9. Extracting phosphorous from incinerated sewage sludge ash rich in iron or aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Kirkelund, Gunvor M; Jensen, Pernille E

    2013-05-01

    Ashes from mono-incineration of sewage sludge (ISSA) generally contain high concentrations of phosphorous (P) and can be regarded as secondary P resources. ISSA has no direct value as fertilizer as P is not plant available. The present paper experimentally compares P extraction in acid from two different ISSAs; one rich in Al (67g/kg) and the other in Fe (58g/kg). The difference related to P precipitation at the waste water treatment facilities. Another major difference between the ashes was that flue gas purification products were mixed into the first ash and it contained about 5% activated carbon. The Al rich ash had a significantly higher buffering capacity and required more acid for extraction of P. When acid extraction of P from ISSA is the method for recovery, it is thus beneficial to go back to the waste water treatment facility and e.g. choose Fe for P precipitation rather than Al. Formation of a high amount of gypsum crystals in both ashes after extraction in H2SO4 was seen by SEM-EDX. H2SO4 is the cheapest mineral ash, but the gypsum formation must be taken into account when either finding possibility for using the remaining ash in e.g. construction materials or if the choice is deposition, as the gypsum increases the volume significantly. PMID:23490181

  10. Tracing seawater evaporation and its role in the formation of sediment-hosted stratiform copper deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Nowecki, James Philip

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the preserved fluid contents of different generations of mineralised and unmineralised vein minerals from multiple different deposits across the Zambian Copperbelt to define the fluid physicochemical characteristics of the fluids and investigate the importance of fluid processes through the basin history. An investigation into REE and trace element and sulphur isotope signatures of sulphides was conducted to investigate sulphide formation mechanisms. Re-Os dating o...

  11. Depositional, diagenetic and stratigraphic aspects of microfacies from Riachuelo Formation, Albian, Sergipe Basin, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Vinícius Gabrig Turbay

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The rocks of the Riachuelo Formation, Sergipe Basin, Brazil, represent an example of carbonate sedimentation related to the drift phase during the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. The Carapeba and Brejo quarries exhibit the best onshore outcrops of the drift carbonate section along the Brazilian continental edge. Field studies and microfacies analysis of the outcropped sedimentary section showed six sedimentary deposits related to the physiography of a carbonate shelf. Proximal mixed deposits are represented by the rich-terrigenous dolostone. Levels with alternate layers of fine grained sandstones and siltstones are here related to distal facies of submarine fans deposits. Mudstones with miliolids and textularids represent a lagoonal environment in a semi-restricted middle shelf. Packstones, grainstones and occasionally wackestones with oncoids, intraclasts and peloids represent sedimentary deposits related to the back of shallow sandy bars and environments at the interface with the lagoon. Grainstones whit ooliths, oncoids, intraclasts and bioclasts, with trough cross-bedding, represent a shallower shoreface environment over the shallow carbonate back on outer shelf. Cements and other post- depositional features suggest four different diagenetic environments: a marine phreatic diagenetic environment with active water circulation; b marine phreatic diagenetic environment with stagnant water; c freshwater phreatic diagenetic environment; d burial diagenetic environment. The sedimentary succession is formed by shallowing upward cycles overlain by a possible transgressive surface, which may indicate the passage of a lowstand to a transgressive system tract.

  12. Formation of asphaltene deposits from crude oil destabilized by addition of propane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Creek, J. [Chevron Energy Technology Co., Houston, TX (United States); Fan, T.; Buckley, J. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, NM (United States)

    2008-07-01

    As oil development moves into deeper water and deeper wells, it is increasingly important to predict the formation of asphaltene deposits. The first step toward predicting deposition is knowing the asphaltene stability as a function of temperature, pressure, and composition. Flocculated asphaltenes can segregate under the influence of gravity in low energy environments. The challenge lies in understanding the deposits that form on pipe walls in producing wells. This paper reported on a continuing study of arterial deposition from destabilized crude oils in stainless steel capillary tubing as a function of several variables, including the molecular size of the paraffinic precipitating agent. The initial studies revealed that destabilization of asphaltenes from a given crude oil with higher molecular weight precipitants produced a larger volume of asphaltene enriched deposit compared to a lower molecular weight precipitant with the same crude oil. Liquid n-paraffins precipitants from n-pentane to n-pentadecane were used in the initial studies. The data was then used to forecast precipitation with solution gas at different pressures and temperatures. In this present study, the range of paraffinic precipitants was extended to include propane for a comparative evaluation to determine the driving force for asphaltene precipitation in reservoir fluids.

  13. Fly ash quality and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B. [Inst. for Energy, Budapest (Hungary); Beer, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  14. Formation of polygonal fault systems as a result of hydrodynamical instabilities in clay-rich deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Teodolina; Antoine, Raphael; Rabinowicz, Michel; Baratoux, David; Darrozes, José; Kurita, Kei; D'Uston, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    Fine grained deposits as chalks and clays are characterised by the development of polygonal fault systems [1]. For the clay-rich deposits, two different environments are associated with their formation. First, on continents, dewatering leads to the development of polygonal desiccation cracks which have a centimetric to metric size [2]. Polygonal faults are also observed in sub-marine sedimentary deposits and here, can reach hectometric to kilometric size [3]. Since the giant polygons develop on basins with no clear evidences of tectonic stresses, the fracturing is attributed to stresses due to horizontal density variations generated during the basin subsidence. Several models have been proposed to explain the formation of the giant polygons and the two main hypotheses are the syneresis (spontaneous horizontal contraction) proposed by [4] and the low coefficient of friction of clay proposed by [5]. However, new understandings in the clay rheology and in the hydrodynamical instabilities, controlling the development of compaction in unconsolidated and consolidated clay deposits, permit us to propose an alternative hypothesis. We consider that the development of giant polygons results from the superposition of hydrodynamical instabilities leading to the formation of (i) mm-size agglomerates of clay particles while the deposit is unconsolidated [6], followed after by the consolidation of this layer, then (ii) hectometric to kilometric compaction spheres develop [7] and (iii) finally ends with the occurrence of hydrothermal and plastic convections. We show that the crucial conditions for the development of hectometric to kilometric size polygonal fault systems are: 1) the high permeability of the clay-rich deposit composed of mm-size agglomerates and 2) the dramatic increase of the strength of the clay as the deposit consolidates. [1] Dewhurst et al., (1999), Mar. Petr. Geol., 16 (8), 793-810. [2] Weinberger (1999), J. Struct. Geol., 21, 379-386. [3] Andresen and Huuse

  15. Melting and Sintering of Ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug

    1997-01-01

    in the ashes lead to increased melt fractions in the temperature range 600-750°C.b) Bottom ashes from straw combustion consist purely of silicates, with varying ratios of the quite refractory Al-silicates and quartz to the less refractory K- and Ca-silicates. Bottom ashes melt in the temperature range 800......-1300°C, and a trend of higher fusion temperatures with increasing contents of Al-silicates and quartz was found.c) Fly ashes, bottom ashes and deposits from coal/straw co-firing were all found to consist mainly of metal-alumina and alumina-silicates. These ashes all melt in the temperature range 1000......The thesis contains an experimental study of the fusion and sintering of ashes collected during straw and coal/straw co-firing.A laboratory technique for quantitative determination of ash fusion has been developed based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA). By means of this method the fraction...

  16. Depositional environment and organic geochemistry of the Upper Permian Ravenfjeld Formation source rock in East Greenland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, F.G.; Piasecki, S.; Stemmerik, L. (Geologoical Survey of Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Telnaes, N. (Norsk Hydro Research Center, Bergen (Norway))

    1993-09-01

    The Upper Permian Ravnefjeld Formation in East Greenland is composed of shales that laterally pass into carbonate buildups and platforms of the Wegener Halvo Formation. The Ravnefjeld Formation is subdivided into five units that can be traced throughout the Upper Permian depositional basin. Two of the units are laminated and organic rich and were deposited under anoxic conditions. They are considered good to excellent source rocks for liquid hydrocarbons with initial average TOC (total organic carbon) values between 4 and 5% and HI (hydrogen index) between 300 and 400. The cumulative source rocks are separated and enclosed by three units of bioturbated siltstone with a TOC of less than 0.5% and an HI of less than 100. These siltstones were deposited under relatively oxic conditions. The organic geochemistry of the source rocks is typical for marine source rocks with some features normally associated with carbonate/evaporite environments [low Pr/Ph (pristane/phytane), low CPI (carbon preference index), distribution of tricyclic and pentacyclic terpanes]. The establishment of anoxic conditions and subsequent source rock deposition was controlled by eustatic sea level changes. The subenvironment (paleogeographic setting, influx of carbonate material, water depth, salinity) has some influence on a number of bulk parameters [TOC-HI relations, TOC-TS (total sulfur) relations] and, in particular, biomarker parameters such as Pr/Ph and terpane ratios. All the basal shales or shales in the vicinity of carbonate buildups of platforms are characterized by low Pr/Ph, high C[sub 23] tricyclic terpanes, and high C[sub 35] and C[sub 33] hopanes. 52 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. New Re-Os Isotopic Constrains on the Formation of the Metalliferous Deposits of the Lower Cambrian Niutitang Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Fu; Lin Dong; Chao Li; Wenjun Qu; Haoxiang Pei; Wenlang Qiao; Bing Shen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT:The Terreneuvian Epoch (541–521 Ma)is also an important period for metallogenesis in South China, as was represented by the widespread occurrences of Ni-Mo polymetallic layers on the antecedent shallow platform margin and the V-enriched black shales in deeper slope-basin settings. In this study, we have measured Re-Os isochron ages of Ni-Mo polymetallic layers (Songlin, Niuchang, Sancha, Chuanpengwan), V-rich black shales (Bahuang), and non-metalliferous black shales (Shuidong) in the basal Niutitang Formation in Guizhou and Hunan province, South China. The Ni-Mo polymetal-lic layers and V-enriched black shales have similar Re-Os isochron ages, suggesting concurrent deposi-tion of these two types of metalliferous ores. This suggestion is consistent with the traditional strati-graphic correlation by using the nodular phosphorite bed directly underlying these metalliferous layers as a stratigraphic marker. Furthermore, the metalliferous ores and non-metalliferous black shales have similar initial 187Os/188Os ratios of 0.8–0.9, arguing for a dominant seawater origin with minor contri-bution of hydrothermal activity. Furthermore, Re-Os isotopic data also imply that Ni-Mo and V ore might have derived from the same source. We suggest that the spatial distribution of metalliferous ores can be explained by the development of non-sulfidic anoxic-suboxic wedge (NSASW) in the slope-basin and sulfidic wedge in the previous platform margin. Upwelling of deep water first transects the mildly reduced, organic rich NSASW, in which V (V) is reduced to V (IV), and is preferentially removed from seawater by organometallic complex formation. As a result, V-rich black shale deposits in the slope-basin of Yangtze Platform. Further movement of deep water into the sulfidic platform margin results in Ni-Mo polymetallic layer formation.

  18. Making the material: The formation of silt sized primary mineral particles for loess deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Ian

    In 1911 E.E. Free wrote... "it may be well to point out that there are really two problems of the loess—a problem of the origin of material and a problem of deposition". The problem of the 'origin of material' has been relatively neglected, in comparison to problems of deposition. of the formation of deposits, and latterly in comparison to studies of loess stratigraphy. If we are to understand the true nature of loess, this fascinating material, we need to be aware of all the significant events in the processing of the particles which form a deposit. A large amount of silt-sized primary mineral material has to be produced to make a loess deposit. Loess is a Quaternary phenomenon and we see the entire process being completed in Quaternary times. Some powerful Quaternary forces are able to produce very large amounts of granular material. 'Glacial grinding', vigorously supported by Smalley (1966a), provides an obvious source for some loess material, but the vast deposits of North China and Central Asia have no obvious glacial connection. However they are adjacent to 'High Asia', a region of vast tectonic activity and an enormous release of terrestrial energy in the last several million years. 'High Asia' is a large producer of loess silt, much of which finds its way south to make the Ganges delta but large amounts are moved north and east to make huge loess deposits. Africa presents a problem. Recent work (e.g. Coudé-Gaussen, 1987) suggests that there is a region of 'peri-Saharan' loess but earlier observations (e.g. Penck) indicate quite clearly that the Sahara region is free of loess. Rathjens (1928) in his study of Tripolitania indicated the presence of loess-like deposits and described their nature, but he did point out that 90% of the granular material was greater than 100 pm in diameter—which would remove it from a strict loess definition. On the Soil Taxonomy map of Africa there is a belt of soil D3 which could include considerable loess deposits; it

  19. Facies architecture and depositional environments of the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation, southern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eric M.

    2007-04-01

    The Kaiparowits Formation is an unusually thick package of Upper Cretaceous (late Campanian) strata exposed in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument of southern Utah, USA. The formation was deposited within the rapidly subsiding Cordilleran foreland basin as part of a thick clastic wedge derived from sources in the Sevier orogenic belt, thrust sheets in southeastern Nevada and southern California, and the Mogollon slope in southwestern Arizona. Channel systems in the Kaiparowits Formation shifted from northeastward to southeastward flow over time, and for a short period of time, sea level rise in the Western Interior Seaway resulted in tidally influenced rivers and/or estuarine systems. Thick floodbasin pond deposits, large suspended-load channels, and poorly developed, hydromorphic paleosols dominate the sedimentary record, and all are suggestive of a relatively wet, subhumid alluvial system. This is supported by extremely rapid sediment accumulation rates (41 cm/ka), and high diversity and abundance of aquatic vertebrate and invertebrate fossils. Facies and architectural analysis was performed on the Kaiparowits Formation, resulting in the identification of nine distinct facies associations: 1) intraformational conglomerate, 2) mollusc-shell conglomerate, 3) major tabular sandstone, 4) major lenticular sandstone, 5) minor tabular and lenticular sandstone, 6) finely laminated, calcareous siltstone, 7) inclined heterolithic sandstone and mudstone, 8) sandy mudstone, and 9) carbonaceous mudstone. These facies associations are interpreted as: 1) channel lags, 2) rare channel-hosted storm beds, 3) meandering channels, 4) anastomosing channels, 5) crevasse splays and crevasse channels, 6) lakes, 7) tidally influenced fluvial and/or estuarine channels, 8) mud-dominated floodplains, and 9) swamps and oxbow lakes. Based on this analysis, the formation is subdivided into three informal units, representative of gross changes in alluvial architecture, including facies

  20. Model of formation of gold-hematite-barite mineralization of the Prognoznoe deposit, Northeastern Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savva, N. E.; Volkov, A. V.; Ishkov, B. I.; Sidorov, A. A.

    2014-06-01

    The results of geological-structural, petrographical, and mineralogical-geochemical studies allowed the authors to offer an original model of formation of the Prognoznoe deposit. The relict shallow basin accumulated clasts of the Archean Au-bearing iron formations and metamafic rocks from the uplifted block of the Khivach inlier of the Precambrian basement of the Omolon craton terrane. As a result, the rounded and semirounded material composes a gentle volcanic sequence of the Middle-Upper Devonian Kedon tuff sandstones and gravelites (red-colored member of ferrous volcanosedimentary rocks) with dispersed clastic and supergene gold. Secondary enrichment and redistribution of gold and iron in zones of the quartz-hematite-barite-carbonate veinlets are related to the intrusion of thick Cretaceous dikes and sills. The areas without dikes and sills are free of economic gold-bearing bodies. An extremely low amount of sulfides is typical of this deposit and of the epithermal deposits of the Kedon volcanic belt in the southern part of the Omolon craton terrane.

  1. PECULIAR FEATURES PERTAINING TO SOIL DEPOSIT FORMATION IN THE MESOPOTAMIA ZONE OF IRAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al-Robai Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers geological conditions for sedimentary mantle formation. In the geological past limestone deposits and sedimentation rock mass from fragmentary materials brought by water flows were formed in the southern part of the stretched geosyncline which had been submerged by shallow sea. By lapse of time deposits were transferred into sandstone, siltstone and mudstone that represented the bottom part of rock mass. Continental conditions were established as a result of orogenic process which took place nearly 30–50 million years ago. Erosional activity of wind and flowing waters was observed on the surface for a long period of time.The top part of soil rock mass is represented by alluvial deposits of the rivers Tigris and Euphrates. During the process of sediment deposition more full-flowing Tigris caused more complicated dynamics of water channels  including meandering and changeability of inter-bedding.Engineering and geological investigations have been carried out with the purpose to study structure of soil rock mass in various regions of the country (Al-Diwaniya, Khidr, Al-Nasiriya and Khila. Specific drill columns have been selected on the basis of analysis of soil rock masses.  Theses drill columns may serve for further selection of rational types of foundations (shallow foundation, piles foundation or creation of artificial foundations (cementing, armoring etc.. 

  2. Chemical models for martian weathering profiles: Insights into formation of layered phyllosilicate and sulfate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.; Mironenko, Mikhail V.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical chemical models for water-basalt interaction have been used to constrain the formation of stratified mineralogical sequences of Noachian clay-bearing rocks exposed in the Mawrth Vallis region and in other places on cratered martian highlands. The numerical approaches are based on calculations of water-rock type chemical equilibria and models which include rates of mineral dissolution. Results show that the observed clay-bearing sequences could have formed through downward percolation and neutralization of acidic H2SO4-HCl solutions. A formation of weathering profiles by slightly acidic fluids equilibrated with current atmospheric CO2 requires large volumes of water and is inconsistent with observations. Weathering by solutions equilibrated with putative dense CO2 atmospheres leads to consumption of CO2 to abundant carbonates which are not observed in clay stratigraphies. Weathering by H2SO4-HCl solutions leads to formation of amorphous silica, Al-rich clays, ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, and minor titanium oxide and alunite at the top of weathering profiles. Mg-Fe phyllosilicates, Ca sulfates, zeolites, and minor carbonates precipitate from neutral and alkaline solutions at depth. Acidic weathering causes leaching of Na, Mg, and Ca from upper layers and accumulation of Mg-Na-Ca sulfate-chloride solutions at depth. Neutral MgSO4 type solutions dominate in middle parts of weathering profiles and could occur in deeper layers owing to incomplete alteration of Ca minerals and a limited trapping of Ca to sulfates. Although salts are not abundant in the Noachian geological formations, the results suggest the formation of Noachian salty solutions and their accumulation at depth. A partial freezing and migration of alteration solutions could have separated sulfate-rich compositions from low-temperature chloride brines and contributed to the observed diversity of salt deposits. A Hesperian remobilization and release of subsurface MgSO4 type solutions into newly

  3. Using modern ferruginous habitats to interpret Precambrian banded iron formation deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeksoy, Elif; Halama, Maximilian; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Early Earth processes are typically identified through the study of mineralogical, elemental and isotopic features in the rock record, including Precambrian banded iron formations (BIF). However, post-depositional processes often obscure the primary geochemical signals, making the use of BIF as proxies for paleo-seawater and the paleo-biosphere potentially imprecise. Thus, alternative approaches are required to complement the information gained from the rock record in order to fully understand the distinctive biogeochemical processes on ancient Earth. Simulating these conditions in the laboratory is one approach, but this approach can never fully replicate the complexity of a natural environment. Therefore, finding modern environments with a unique set of geochemical and microbiological characteristics to use as analogues for BIF depositional environments can provide invaluable information. In this review, we provide an overview of the chemical, physical and biological parameters of modern, ferruginous lakes that have been used as analogue BIF environments.

  4. Investigation of droplet formation in pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition of metals and silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siew, Wee-Ong; Lee, Wai-Keat; Wong, Hin-Yong; Tou, Teck-Yong [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yong, Thian-Khok [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yap, Seong-Shan [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Institute of Physics, Trondheim (Norway)

    2010-12-15

    In the process of pulsed laser deposition of nickel (Ni) and ruthenium (Ru) thin films, the occurrence of phase explosion in ablation was found to affect the deposition rate and enhance the optical emissions from the plasma plume. Faster thin-film growth rates coincide with the onset of phase explosion as a result of superheating and/or sub-surface boiling which also increased the particulates found on the thin-film surface. These particulates were predominantly droplets which may not be round but flattened and also debris for the case of silicon (Si) ablation. The droplets from Ni and Ru thin films were compared in terms of size distribution and number density for different laser fluences. The origins of these particulates were correlated to the bubble and ripple formations on the targets while the transfer to the thin film surface was attributed to the laser-induced ejection from the targets. (orig.)

  5. Stratigraphy, depositional environments, and carbonate petrology of the Toroweap and Kaibab Formations (lower Permian), Grand Canyon region, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. A.

    Sediments deposited in northwestern Arizona during Late Leonardian and Early Guadalupian (Permian) were controlled chiefly by an arid climate and the tectonic setting. Eastward thrusting of eugeosynclinal rocks onto miogeosynclinal deposits during Middle Devonian to Early Mississippian had a major influence on shelf sedimentation. The Toroweap and Kaibab formations represent two such platform sequences of northwestern Arizona and southern Utah deposited during this phase of sedimentation. The Toroweap Formation is subdivided into three members and represents sediments deposited during initial transgression, maximum extent of the sea, and regression (Seligman, Brady Canyon, and Woods Ranch members respectively). The Fossil Mountain Member of the Kaibab Formation documents the most extensive phase of sedimentation for all members of the Toroweap and Kaibab formations. The Harrisburg Member documents the final phase of sedimentation at the close of the Paleozoic Era.

  6. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  7. Geochemistry and Depositional Setting of Fort Munro Formation, Middle and Lower Indus Basins, Pakistan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahid Naseem; Shamim Ahmed Sheikh; Erum Bashir; Khaula Shirin

    2005-01-01

    Fort Munro Formation represents the products of the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) in the middle and lower Indus basins. The formation is exposed in the Rakhi Nala (Sulaiman Range), Bara Nala (Lakhi Range) and Naka Pabni (Southern Pab Range) areas. Major and trace elemental geochemistry and petrographic studies of the formation have been carried out to understand the facies trends in the middle and lower Indus basins. A high amount of acid-insoluble fraction, Ca/Mg and Mg vs. Ca/Sr ratio reveal that the formation was deposited in a shallow marine regressive environment. High amounts of clastic reflect abundant influx of terrigenous materials from the east (Indian craton) and west (Bibai volcanic). High Sr content indicates that aragonite was the precursor mineral, which was transformed into stable low-Mg calcite during diagenesis. Enrichment of Cu and Zn contents in the samples of the formation implies the influence of volcanic activity and that they were incorporated into the calcite lattice in the late phase.

  8. Experimental volcanic ash aggregation: Internal structuring of accretionary lapilli and the role of liquid bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sebastian B.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Jacob, Michael; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can release vast quantities of pyroclastic material into Earth's atmosphere, including volcanic ash, particles with diameters less than two millimeters. Ash particles can cluster together to form aggregates, in some cases reaching up to several centimeters in size. Aggregation alters ash transport and settling behavior compared to un-aggregated particles, influencing ash distribution and deposit stratigraphy. Accretionary lapilli, the most commonly preserved type of aggregates within the geologic record, can exhibit complex internal stratigraphy. The processes involved in the formation and preservation of these aggregates remain poorly constrained quantitatively. In this study, we simulate the variable gas-particle flow conditions which may be encountered within eruption plumes and pyroclastic density currents via laboratory experiments using the ProCell Lab System® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH. In this apparatus, solid particles are set into motion in a fluidized bed over a range of well-controlled boundary conditions (particle concentration, air flow rate, gas temperature, humidity, liquid composition). Experiments were conducted with soda-lime glass beads and natural volcanic ash particles under a range of experimental conditions. Both glass beads and volcanic ash exhibited the capacity for aggregation, but stable aggregates could only be produced when materials were coated with high but volcanically-relevant concentrations of NaCl. The growth and structure of aggregates was dependent on the initial granulometry, while the rate of aggregate formation increased exponentially with increasing relative humidity (12-45% RH), before overwetting promoted mud droplet formation. Notably, by use of a broad granulometry, we generated spherical, internally structured aggregates similar to some accretionary pellets found in volcanic deposits. Adaptation of a powder-technology model offers an explanation for the origin of natural accretionary

  9. Formation and resulfidization of a South Texas roll-type uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core samples from a roll type uranium deposit in Live Oak County, south Texas have been studied and results are reported for Se, Mo, FeS2 and organic-carbon distribution, sulfide mineral petrology, and sulfur isotopic composition of iron-disulfide phases. In addition, sulfur isotopic compositions of dissolved sulfate and sulfide from the modern ground water within the ore bearing sand have been studied. The suite of elements in the ore sand and their geometric relationships throughout the deposit are those expected for typical roll-type deposits with well-developed oxidation-reduction interfaces. However, iron-disulfide minerals are abundant in the altered tongue, demonstrating that this interval has been sulfidized after mineralization. Iron disulfide minerals in the rereduced interval differ mineralogically and isotopically from those throughout the remainder of the deposit. The resulfidized sand contains dominantly pyrite that is enriched in 34S whereas the sand beyond the altred tongue contains abundant marcasite that is enriched in the light isotope, 32S. Textural relationships between pyrite and marcasite help to establish relative timing of iron disulfide formation. Based on this evidence, the deposit formed in at least two stages: (1) a pre-ore process of host rock sulfidization which produced disseminated pyrite as the dominant iron disulfide phase; and (2) an ore-stage process which led to the development of the uranium roll with emplacement of the characteristic suite of minor and accessory elements and which produced abundant isotpically light marcasite. The host rock was modified by a post-ore stage of resulfidization which precipitated isotopically heavy pyrite. Sulfur isotopic compositions of sulfide and sulfate present in modern ground water within the host sand differ greatly form sulfur isotopic composition of iron disulfides formed during the resulfidization episode

  10. 2.8-Ma ash-flow caldera at Chegem River in the northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), contemporaneous granites, and associated ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P.W.; Bogatikov, O.A.; Tsvetkov, A.A.; Gazis, C.; Gurbanov, A.G.; Hon, K.; Koronovsky, N.V.; Kovalenko, V.I.; Marchev, P.

    1993-01-01

    Diverse latest Pliocene volcanic and plutonic rocks in the north-central Caucasus Mountains of southern Russia are newly interpreted as components of a large caldera system that erupted a compositionally zoned rhyolite-dacite ash-flow sheet at 2.83 ?? 0.02 Ma (sanidine and biotite 40Ar/39Ar). Despite its location within a cratonic collision zone, the Chegem system is structurally and petrologically similar to typical calderas of continental-margin volcanic arcs. Erosional remnants of the outflow Chegem Tuff sheet extend at least 50 km north from the source caldera in the upper Chegem River. These outflow remnants were previously interpreted by others as erupted from several local vents, but petrologic similarities indicate a common origin and correlation with thick intracaldera Chegem Tuff. The 11 ?? 15 km caldera and associated intrusions are superbly exposed over a vertical range of 2,300 m in deep canyons above treeline (elev. to 3,800 m). Densely welded intracaldera Chegem Tuff, previously described by others as a rhyolite lava plateau, forms a single cooling unit, is > 2 km thick, and contains large slide blocks from the caldera walls. Caldera subsidence was accommodated along several concentric ring fractures. No prevolcanic floor is exposed within the central core of the caldera. The caldera-filling tuff is overlain by andesitic lavas and cut by a 2.84 ?? 0.03-Ma porphyritic granodiorite intrusion that has a cooling age analytically indistinguishable from that of the tuffs. The Eldjurta Granite, a pluton exposed low in the next large canyon (Baksan River) 10 km to the northwest of the caldera, yields variable K-feldspar and biotite ages (2.8 to 1.0 Ma) through a 5-km vertical range in surface and drill-hole samples. These variable dates appear to record a prolonged complex cooling history within upper parts of another caldera-related pluton. Major W-Mo ore deposits at the Tirniauz mine are hosted in skarns and hornfels along the roof of the Eldjurta Granite

  11. Formation of porous clay ceramic using sago waste ash as a prospective additive material with controllable milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aripin H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel type of ceramic material was produced by mixing sago waste ash from the sago processing industry in Indonesia with clay. The composition was prepared by adding 50 %wt amount of sago waste into the clay, then a series of samples was milled for 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h, respectively. The samples were dry pressed and sintered at temperatures ranging from 800°C to 1200°C. The influence of the sintering temperature and the milling time on bulk density, firing shrinkage, water adsorption, and hardness was studied in detail. The results demonstrate that the low water absorption of less than 0.5% and the highest hardness of 5.82 GPa were obtained for the sample sintered at 1100°C and milled for 48 h. The investigation of the absorptive properties of such ceramics indicates that they could be recommended as a promising material for manufacturing of unglazed floor tiles.

  12. Influence of Coal nature and Structure on Ash Size Formation Characteristic and Related pollutant Emissions During CFB Combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MinQIAN; YongjieNA; 等

    2000-01-01

    The size distribution of coal particles in a Circulating Fluidized Bed(CFB) boiler plays a crucial role in the complicated combustion,heat exchange and pollutant emissions in such a plant.Therefore,it is fundamental to study the different factors having influence on the size distribution of coal particles.Above all,the coal itself and in particular,the coal comminution phenomenon is a very influent factor.In the frame of this work,the coal nature (eleentary compostion) and coal internal structure (mineral componeents) are studied in detail.At this intermediary stage,experients on three typical Chinese coals on a 1.5 MWt CFBC pilot plant have been made.Some primary fragmentation test hae also been made in a small lab scale fluidized bed reactor.The resutls from the hot pilot test show i)the variation of coal ash distributions and other CFB performance data due to the cyclone and the coal characteristics and ii) the variation of desulfurization efficiency with limestone.Whereas the bench scale primary fragmentation test,likely linked to the caking propriety of a coal,does not seem to change considerable the char size distribution.

  13. Dimer and String Formation during Low Temperature Silicon Deposition on Si(100)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, A. P.; Jonsson, Hannes

    1996-01-01

    We present theoretical results based on density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of silicon deposition and address observations made in recently reported low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy studies. A mechanism is presented which explains dimer formation on top...... of the substrate's dimer rows at 160 K and up to room temperature, while between-row dimers and longer strings of adatoms (''diluted dimer rows'') form at higher temperature. A crossover occurs at around room temperature between two different mechanisms for adatom diffusion in our model....

  14. Depositional environments of Laborcita Formation (Wolfcampian), northern Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fly, S.H. III

    1986-03-01

    Depositional environments that change dramatically over short lateral distances are represented by exposures of the Laborcita Formation. A siliclastic source area lay to the east and southeast, in the Pedernal Mountains. To the west, a shallow marine sea filled the orogrande basin. Alternating cycles of marine and nonmarine sedimentation resulted from fan-delta lobe shifting and eustatic sea level movements. In clear-water areas not affected by fan-deltaic sedimentation, deposits become increasingly calcareous. Various carbonate facies resulted from organisms adapting to changing environmental conditions. Mud-cracked algal mats, digitate algal stromatolites, and small phylloid red algal mounds and rhodoliths indicate deposition in shallow-water subtidal to supratidal settings. Large buildups (20 m thick) of phylloid green algae associated with abundant submarine cement occurred in a position near the edge of the narrow shelf. Widespread skeletal detritus beds overlie and extend hundreds of meters away from the massive buildups. Influx of terrigenous mud and silt in advance of a prograding fan-delta system terminated growth of the buildups. The next transgression is represented by a carbonate grainstone exhibiting characteristics of shallow-water marine, storm-dominated shelf bars. The shelf bars migrated in a northwest-southeast direction.

  15. Evidence for deep-water evaporite deposition in the Miocene Kareem Formation, Gemsa basin, eastern Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, J.A.; Stonecipher, S.A.; Steinmetz, J.C. (Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States)); Dyess, J.N. (Marathon Petroleum Egypt, Maadi (Egypt))

    1991-03-01

    The correct interpretation of intercalated Miocene siliciclastics and evaporites of Gemsa basin is crucial for understanding early rift tectonics of the Gulf of Suez, pinpointing the timing of isolation of the Gulf from the Mediterranean, and developing exploration plays. Evaporites of the Kareem Formation comprise celestites and massive, 'chicken-wire,' and laminated anhydrites. Although previously interpreted as sabkha deposits; sedimentologic, petrographic, and paleontologic analyses indicate these evaporites more likely formed in a submarine setting. Marls that encase the evaporites contain a diverse and abundant assemblage of nannoplankton, planktonic foraminifera, diatoms, pteropods, and fish scales indicative of basinal deposition. Associated turbidites also denote deep-water sedimentation. The paucity of benthic diatoms and foraminifera, plus the presence of unburrowed shales, phosphate nodules, early ferroan carbonate cements, and authigenic pyrite, suggest periodic anoxic, or at least disaerobic, bottom waters. These sequences probably represent partial isolation of the Gulf of Suez by middle Miocene, producing periodic basin restriction and evaporative drawdown. Episodes of increasing salinity likely caused the progressive decreases in foram abundance and diversity in marls beneath the anhydrites, culminating in subaqueous evaporite formation. Diverse, indigenous nannoplankton assemblages from shale seams within the anhydrites suggest Gemsa basin was stratified; shallow open-marine conditions coexisted with anhydrite crystallization from deeper hypersaline waters.

  16. Early Cambrian wave-formed shoreline deposits: the Hardeberga Formation, Bornholm, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmensen, Lars B.; Glad, Aslaug C.; Pedersen, Gunver K.

    2016-09-01

    During the early Cambrian, the Danish island Bornholm was situated on the northern edge of the continent Baltica with palaeolatitudes of about 35°S. An early Cambrian (Terreneuvian) transgression inundated large areas of Baltica including Bornholm creating shallow marine and coastline environments. During this period, wave-formed shoreline sediments (the Vik Member, Hardeberga Formation) were deposited on Bornholm and are presently exposed at Strøby quarry. The sediments consist of fine- and medium-grained quartz-cemented arenites in association with a few silt-rich mudstones. The presence of well-preserved subaqueous dunes and wave ripples indicates deposition in a wave-dominated upper shoreface (littoral zone) environment, and the presence of interference ripples indicates that the littoral zone environment experienced water level fluctuations due to tides and/or changing meteorological conditions. Discoidal structures (medusoids) are present in the quarry, but due to the relative poor preservation of their fine-scale structures it is difficult to determine if the discoids represent true medusae imprints or inorganic structures. The preservation of the shallow-water bedforms as well as the possible medusae imprints is related to either the formation of thin mud layers, formed during a period of calm water when winds blew offshore for a longer period, or to the growth of bacterial mats. The orientation of the wave-formed bedforms indicates a local palaeoshoreline trending NE-SW and facing a large ocean to the north.

  17. Simulation of geochemical processes responsible for the formation of the Zhezqazghan deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhenko, B. N.; Cherkasova, E. V.

    2014-05-01

    Physicochemical computer simulation of water-rock systems at a temperature of 25-150°C and under a pressure of up to 600 bar has been carried out for quantitative description of the mineralization formation conditions at sandstone- and shale-hosted copper deposits. The simulation is based on geological and geochemical information concerning the Zhezqazghan deposit and considers (i) a source of ore matter, (ii) composition of the fluid that transfers ore matter to the ore formation zone, and (iii) factors of ore concentration. It has been shown that extraction of copper from minerals of rocks and its accumulation in aqueous solution are optimal at a high mass ratio of rock to water (R/W > 10), Eh of +200 to -100 mV, and an obligatory content of chloride ions in the aqueous phase. The averaged ore-bearing fluid Cl95SO44//Ca50(Na + K)30Mg19 (eq %), pH ˜ 4, mineralization of up to 400 g/L, is formed by the interaction of red sandstone beds with a sedimentogenic brine (a product of metamorphism of seawater in carbonate rocks enriched in organic matter). The ore concentration proceeds in the course of cooling from 150 to 50°C during filtration of ore-bearing fluid through red sandstone beds in the rock-water system thermodynamically opened with respect to the reductive components.

  18. Task 3.0 - Advanced power systems. Subtask 3.18 - Ash behavior in power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature. Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined. Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (Tcv ) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt. Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles. Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems. Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems

  19. Characterization of ashes from biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, F.J.; Hansen, L.A. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. Dept. of Chemical Engineering (Denmark); Soerensen, H.S. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (Denmark); Hjuler, K. [dk-TEKNIK. Energy and Environment (Denmark)

    1998-02-01

    One motivation for initiating the present project was that the international standard method of estimating the deposit propensity of solid fuels, of which a number of variants exist (e.g. ISO, ASTM, SD, DIN), has shown to be unsuitable for biomass ashes. This goal was addressed by the development of two new methods for the detection of ash fusibility behaviour based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA) and High Temperature Light Microscopy (HTLM), respectively. The methods were developed specifically for ashes from biofuels, but are suitable for coal ashes as well. They have been tested using simple salt mixtures, geological standards and samples from straw CHP and coal-straw PF combustion plants. All samples were run in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C/min. In comparison with the standard method, the new methods are objective and have superior repeatability and sensitivity. Furthermore, the two methods enable the melting behavior to be characterized by a continuous measurement of melt fraction versus temperature. Due to this two-dimensional resolution of the results, the STA and HTLM methods provide more information than the standard method. The study of bottom ash and fly ash as well as deposit samples from straw test firings at the Haslev and Slagelse Combined Heat and Power plants resulted in a better understanding of mineral behaviour during straw grate firing. In these tests a number of straws were fired which had been carefully selected for having different qualities with respect to sort and potassium and chlorine contents. By studying bottom ashes from Slagelse it was found that the melting behaviour correlated with the deposition rate on a probe situated at the outlet part of the combustion zone. (EG)

  20. Deposit formation in spiral-wound reverse-osmosis and nanofiltration elements and ways of preventing it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, S. L.

    2014-06-01

    Mechanisms governing scale formation on membrane surfaces and the main ways of preventing them for spiral wound reverse-osmosis and nanofiltration elements are considered. The effectiveness of ultrafiltration as a comprehensive water pretreatment method for reducing the risks of deposit formation in the nanofiltration and reverse osmosis processes is demonstrated.

  1. EDU 626 ASH

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 40 course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com     Product Description EDU 626 Week 1 Research Topic (Ash) EDU 626 Week 2 Annotated Bibliography (Ash) EDU 626 Week 2 Critical Thinking Questions (Ash) EDU 626 Week 3 Procedures or Methods (Ash) EDU 626 Week 4 Critical Thinking Questions (Ash) EDU 626 Week 5 Critical Thinking Questions (Ash) EDU 626 Week 6 Final Paper (Ash)  

  2. Probing ore deposits formation: New insights and challenges from synchrotron and neutron studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, Joel, E-mail: joel.brugger@adelaide.edu.a [Division of Mineral, South Australian Museum, Adelaide (Australia); School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Pring, Allan [Division of Mineral, South Australian Museum, Adelaide (Australia); School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Reith, Frank [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Ryan, Chris; Etschmann, Barbara; Liu, Weihua [CSIRO Exploration and Mining, Melbourne (Australia); O' Neill, Brian; Ngothai, Yung [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    The understanding of the physico-chemical processes leading to the formation and weathering of ore deposits plays an increasingly important role in mineral exploration. Synchrotron, neutron, and nuclear radiation are contributing to this endeavour in many ways, including (i) support the modelling of ore transport and deposition, by providing molecular-level understanding of solvent-solute interaction and thermodynamic properties for the important metal complexes in brines, vapours, and supercritical fluids over the range of conditions relevant for the formation of ore deposits (i.e., temperature 25-600 deg. C; pressure 1-10{sup 9} Pa; and fluid compositions varying from hypersaline (e.g., >50 wt% NaCl) to volatile-rich (e.g., CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}S)); (ii) track the fluids that travelled through rocks and predict their ore-forming potential by analysing hydrothermal minerals and remnants of those fluids trapped in these minerals as 'fluid inclusions'; (iii) characterize the biochemical controls on metal mobility in soils to predict the geochemical footprint of a buried mineral deposit. X-ray fluorescence (XRF), particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are the most common techniques used in support of mineral exploration. Analytical challenges are related to (i) the complexity of heterogeneous natural samples, which often contain only low concentrations of the elements of interest; (ii) beam sensitivity, especially for redox-sensitive elements in aqueous fluids or biological samples; (iii) extreme sample environments, e.g., in-situ study of fluids at high pressure and temperature. Thus, critical improvements need to be made on a number of fronts to: (i) develop more efficient detectors, able to map large areas in heterogeneous samples (e.g., 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} pixels per map), and also to collect a maximum number of photons to limit sample exposure and beam damage; (ii) integrate techniques (e.g., XRF

  3. Paleotectonic controls on deposition of upper Upper Jurassic La Casita Formation, east-central Chihuahua, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, D.C.

    1989-03-01

    Surface mapping of the basal Mesozoic La Casita Formation (upper Upper Jurassic) in east-central Chihuahua, Mexico, indicates initial Mesozoic sedimentation occurred in a segmented, interconnected subbasin of the Chihuahua trough. La Casite Formation (1200 m thick) is a tectonostratigraphic unit resting with angular unconformity on the Lower Permian Plomosas Formation. It consists primarily of siliciclastic material with sporadic interbedded limestones. The dominant lithofacies, approximately 1000 m thick, consists of turbiditic sandstone units (10-20 m) alternating with thicker, monotonous shale sequences. In the mapped area (approximately 30 km/sup 2/), flute cast measurements indicate flows from both the northeast (N20/degree/E) and southwest (S58/degree/W). Turbiditic sandstone units appear to pinch out and/or interfinger as they extend from the north and south into the central portion of the area. The initial opening of the Chihuahua trough is often associated with Late Jurassic block faulting, related to development of the ancestral Gulf of Mexico. Synrift depositional sequences of a similar age have been described in southern Coahuila, northern Zacatecas, and western Chiapas, Mexico. The subbasin (graben ) examined here may be ascribed a paleoposition near the western edge of the early Chihuahua trough. The western boundary of the early trough may have comprised a series of these subbasins, forming a cuspate or serrated coastline. Late Jurassic ammonites recovered from this and other localities along the length of the Chihuahua trough suggest that the subbasins were interconnected by means of an eastern continuous seaway.

  4. Ice Formation via Deposition Mode Nucleation on Bare and Alcohol-covered Graphite Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Xiangrui; Thomson, Erik S; Pettersson, Jan B C

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of water on aerosol particles contributes to ice cloud formation in the atmosphere with implications for the water cycle and climate on Earth. The heterogeneous ice nucleation process is influenced by physico-chemical properties of the substrate, but the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here, we report on ice formation on bare and alcohol-covered graphite at temperatures from 175 to 213 K, probed by elastic helium and light scattering. Water has a low wettability on bare and butanol-covered graphite resulting in the growth of rough ice surfaces. In contrast, pre-adsorbed methanol provides hydrophilic surface sites and results in the formation of smooth crystalline ice; an effect that is pronounced also for sub-monolayer methanol coverages. The alcohols primarily reside at the ice surface and at the ice-graphite interface with a minor fraction being incorporated into the growing ice structures. Methanol has no observable effect on gas/solid water vapor exchange whereas butanol acts as a tr...

  5. The influence of source periodicity on formation of large scale spottiness of the total deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrynyk, O.; Chernysh, R.; Hrytsyuk, Y.

    2010-09-01

    In this work we have studied the formation of a large-scale spot-like structure of the cumulative deposition pattern at the regional scale (linear size of 105-106 m or larger) due to a powerful elevated source. Only one possible cause of spottiness at the regional scale, namely the diurnal cycle of the vertical turbulent mixing intensity in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), has been taken into account in this study. Based on numerical and analytical solutions of model diffusion problems (using the K-theory approximation) we have studied how the nonstationarity/periodicity of a source acting for a limited time interval, tk, affects the formation of spottiness. The source periodicity was specified in the form of a simple harmonic function (cosine) for source strength, Q=f(t). The main focus of our study was on the case when the source lifetime is longer than the characteristic time of the periodic change of the ABL structure, i.e. tk >T (in this case the spottiness does not appear when the source is stationary, Q=const). The results of our modeling demonstrate that under the condition Q=f(t) there may exist a resonant mode, which can cause spottiness when tk >T. The resonant mode (strengthening of the periodic action of the spottiness formation mechanism) exists when the periods of the source strength and the vertical turbulent mixing intensity are approximately equal, while the phases of their oscillations are opposite.

  6. Factors controlling alkali salt deposition in recovery boilers - particle formation and deposition; Soodakattilan likaantuminen ja siihen vaikuttavien tekijoeiden hallinta - hiukkasten muodostuminen ja depositio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauppinen, E.I.; Mikkanen, P.; Ylaetalo, S. [VTT Chemistry, Espoo (Finland); Jokiniemi, J.K.; Lyyraenen, J.; Pyykoenen, J.; Saastamoinen, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    In this project, the aim was to find out those critical factors that control the deposit formation in the recovery boilers. We focus on the particle formation, growth and deposition as well as the single black liquor particle combustion behaviour. The final goal is the development of the predictive model to be used to describe deposit growth and subsequent behaviour as well as the dependence of deposition on black liquor characteristics and boiler operation conditions. During year 1995 an experimental study on the aerosol particle formation within the recovery boiler furnace and a sensitivity study with the Aerosol Behaviour in Combustion (ABC) code were carried out. The experimental study confirmed the fact that the particles are already formed in the recovery boiler furnace. The particle formation is initiated in the boundary layer of the burning droplet or smelt bed, where metals are vaporised and oxidised to form tiny seed particles. Trace amounts of metals were measured in all particle sizes and the sensitivity study with the ABC model gave further evidence of the seed formation was necessary primary step in the particle formation. At the furnace outlet the sintration ratio and the sulfation ratio of the particles were dependent on the furnace temperature and the residence time in the furnace. At ESP inlet three types of particles were observed (1) fine particles with the major mass mode at about 1-2 {mu}m, (2) large agglomerates in sizes larger than 8 {mu}m, and (3) spherical particles about 2-4 {mu}m in size. The fine particles were formed from vapours and the large agglomerates were formed from fine particles agglomerated on heat exchanger surfaces and re-entrained back to flue gas flow. The large agglomerates also contain vapours that have directly condensed to surfaces. The large spherical particles contain silicon and pass the process almost unchanged. (Abstract Truncated)

  7. Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitin Padture

    2011-12-31

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

  8. Depositional environments and paleoecology of the Oil Creek Formation (Middle Ordovician), Arbuckle Mountains and Criner Hills, Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The Oil Creek Formation (Whiterockian) is the second oldest of the five formations which make up the Simpson Group. Although widespread in the subsurface, it is exposed only in the study area and possibly in West Texas. The formation was deposited in a linear basin known as the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen during a phase of apparent episodic subsidence. Deposition occurred in supratidal to shallow marine environments which were subjected to occasional tropical storms. Six depositional facies within the shaly upper member of the formation, previously known as the Oil Creek shale are defined. These facies are based on the lithology and fossil content of the quartzarenite and limestone beds because the alternating shale beds are monotonous and essentially lack skeletal fossils. This facies tract shows that, as in other formations of the Simpson Group, deposition apparently took place in one major cycle of transgression and regression. The transgressive phase of deposition is represented by the vertical sequence consisting of the Basal Sandstone Unit, Upper Offshore Facies, Transition Zone 1, and Lower Offshore Facies. The regressive phase includes Transition Zone 2, the Shoal Facies, Lagoon Facies, and Tidal Flat Facies. The Shoal Facies has relatively thick limestone beds composed of skeletal debris, quartz sand, and goethitic ooids, while the Lagoon Facies is dominated by terrigenous shale. The species composition and number in the different communities seem to have been largely determined by the nature of the substrate.

  9. Uptake of heavy metals in berries and edible fungi, and changes in the floral composition after treatment with ashes on forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of treatment with ash on fungi and vascular plants, and on metal contents in berries and edible fungi, were studied in pine, spruce and birch forest stands in southern Sweden. Different types of ashes were studied. The changes to the vascular flora and the fungal flora that are today taking place in southern Sweden, and probably influenced by soil acidification and nitrogen deposition, are characterised by an impoverishment of mycorrhiza-forming species and thus cannot be corrected by supply of wood ashes. Instead, supply of at least raw ashes appears to hasten the process towards a nitrogen-favoured flora. It is known that raw ashes can cause nitrate-formation whereas granulated ashes have hardly increased the pH or lead to the formation of nitrate in any field experiment. The study has now been completed and has thus largely provided answers to the questions posed: Spreading of ashes does not lead to a general increase in the uptake of heavy metals in fungi and berries. The risk that berries and fungi will contain increased contents of heavy metals during the first season after spreading is small. The studies do not suggest that raw ashes can offer a short-term answer to counteracting the changes that are taking place to the composition of the fungal flora, probably as a result of soil acidification, or as a means of recreating conditions suitable for species requiring more alkaline conditions. 7 refs, 32 tabs

  10. Ordovician ash geochemistry and the establishment of land plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parnell John

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The colonization of the terrestrial environment by land plants transformed the planetary surface and its biota, and shifted the balance of Earth’s biomass from the subsurface towards the surface. However there was a long delay between the formation of palaeosols (soils on the land surface and the key stage of plant colonization. The record of palaeosols, and their colonization by fungi and lichens extends well back into the Precambrian. While these early soils provided a potential substrate, they were generally leached of nutrients as part of the weathering process. In contrast, volcanic ash falls provide a geochemically favourable substrate that is both nutrient-rich and has high water retention, making them good hosts to land plants. An anomalously extensive system of volcanic arcs generated unprecedented volumes of lava and volcanic ash (tuff during the Ordovician. The earliest, mid-Ordovician, records of plant spores coincide with these widespread volcanic deposits, suggesting the possibility of a genetic relationship. The ash constituted a global environment of nutrient-laden, water-saturated soil that could be exploited to maximum advantage by the evolving anchoring systems of land plants. The rapid and pervasive inoculation of modern volcanic ash by plant spores, and symbiotic nitrogen-fixing fungi, suggests that the Ordovician ash must have received a substantial load of the earliest spores and their chemistry favoured plant development. In particular, high phosphorus levels in ash were favourable to plant growth. This may have allowed photosynthesizers to diversify and enlarge, and transform the surface of the planet.

  11. The layered subsurface - periglacial slope deposits as crucial elements for soil formation and variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völkel, Jörg; Huber, Juliane

    2014-05-01

    Still most concepts of soil formation, weathering production rates and weathering front ideas are dealing with a monolayered near-surface underground and subsoil. At best a line is given on so-called moved regolith. In fact the subsurface is often characterized by stratified and multilayered slope deposits with thicknesses exceeding 1 m. These stratified slope sediments play a significant role in the nature of the physical and chemical properties as well as on soil forming processes. Examples are given for sediment sourced chemical elements and common clay minerals, and the significance of slope sediments as both barriers and pathways for interflow that moves through the stratified sediments. The stratified subsurface is often datable by numeric age techniques (OSL) showing up how sediment features contradict weathering effects and meaning e.g. for soil genesis. In the mid latitudes, geomorphic and sedimentologic evidence supports a periglacial origin, involving solifluction, for the origin of these slope deposits. The study areas are situated within the Colorado Front Range, U.S. and the Bavarian Forest, Germany. The projects are currently financed and supported by the German Science Foundation DFG. Literature: Völkel, J., Huber, J. & Leopold, M. (2011): Significance of slope sediments layering on physical characteristics and interflow within the Critical Zone… - Applied Geochemistry 26: 143-145.

  12. Influence of relative humidity during coating on polymer deposition and film formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Elena; Felton, Linda A

    2016-08-20

    The influence of relative humidity in the pan during coating on polymer deposition and film formation was investigated. Four tablet substrates, differing in hydrophobicity, porosity, and surface roughness, were prepared and coated with Eudragit(®) RS/RL 30 D (8:2 ratio). The spray rate and atomization air pressure were varied to create two distinct micro-environmental conditions in the coating pan. PyroButton data logging devices placed directly in the pan were found to more accurately reflect the relative humidity to which tablets were exposed in comparison to measurements taken at the exhaust. Polymer deposition was shown to be influenced by the properties of the substrate, rather than the processing conditions used during coating, with higher polymer weight gains observed for the more porous tablets. Differences in the film-tablet interface and in the release performance of the coated products, however, were attributed to both the relative humidity in the pan and tablet porosity. Overall, this study demonstrated that a more humid coating process (86% vs 67%) promoted surface dissolution and physical mixing of the tablet ingredients with the forming film and the extent of this phenomenon was dependent on the tablet porosity. PMID:27282533

  13. Evidence for microbial activity in the formation of carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucha, H.; Raith, J.

    2009-04-01

    *Kucha H **Raith J *University of Mining and Metallurgy, Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, Mickiewicza 30, PL-30-059 Krakow, Poland. ** University of Leoben, Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics, A-8700 Leoben, Peter Tunner Str. 5, Austria Evidence for microbial activity in the formation of carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits To date evaluation of bacterial processes in the formation of carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits is largely based on sulphur isotope evidence. However, during a past few years, textural criteria, have been established, which support the bacterial origin of many of these deposits. This has received a strong support from micro-, and nano-textures of naturally growing bacterial films in a flooded tunnel within carbonates that host the Piquette Zn-Pb deposit (Druschel et al., 2002). Bacterial textures, micro- and nano textures found in carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits are: i)wavy bacterial films up to a few mm thick to up to a few cm long composed of peloids, ii)semimassive agglomeration of peloids in the carbonate matrix, and iii)solitary peloids dispersed in the carbonate matrix. Peloids are usually composed of a distinct 50-90um core most often made up of Zn-bearing calcite surrounded by 30-60um thick dentate rim composed of ZnS. Etching of Zn-carbonate cores reveals 1 - 2um ZnS filaments, and numerous 15 to 90nm large ZnS nano-spheres (Kucha et al., 2005). In massive ore composite Zn-calcite - sphalerite peloids are entirely replaced by zinc sulphide, and form peloids ghosts within banded sulphide layers. Bacterially derived micro- and nano-textures have been observed in the following carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits: 1)Irish-type Zn-Pb deposits. In the Navan deposit the basic sulphur is isotopically light bacteriogenic S (Fallick at al., 2001). This is corroborated by semimassive agglomerations of composite peloids (Zn-calcite-ZnS corona or ZnS core-melnikovite corona). Etching of Zn-calcite core reveals globular

  14. Inhibition of C: H Co-deposit Formation by Ammonia Injection in Remote Areas of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Since its proposal in 2002 the scavenger technique for the inhibition of tritium rich co-deposit formation in hidden areas of carbon-based Fusion Reactor has been tested in several tokamak devices, divertor simulators and laboratory cold plasmas. For nitrogen injection, however, the concern about a possible enhancement of carbon erosion by the injected scavenger species at the divertor plasma still exists, so that alternative injection schemes must be developed. In the experiments here reported, ammonia has been tested as a possible candidate for the use of the scavenger concept in a non-perturbative way i.e., injected away from the plasma-wall interaction area. In Pilot-PSI, injection of nitrogen and ammonia in an H2/methane plasmas (2.0 and 0.16 slm respectively, total pressure of 4 Pa) was performed at two different locations with respect to the deposition monitor, located ∼ 15 cm downstream the target and screened from the plasma column. In order to enhance the transport of the plasma-borne carbon radicals, a hot liner (300 deg. C) was installed coaxially to the plasma column. In the absence of scavenger, a carbon deposit, whose thickness was monitored in situ by laser interferometry, was created at a rate of 4 nm/min. Two locations of the gas inlet were tested, feeding the scavenger species either directly into the plasma column or a few centimetres in front of the deposition monitor, in the plasma-free area. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to record the impact of the seeded gas into the plasma. Although inhibition factors > 80% were achieved for both species, it was found that ammonia not only works more efficiently as carbon film scavenger than nitrogen does but, also, its efficiency as scavenger is basically independent of the location respect to the plasma where it is seeded. Furthermore, Inductively Coupled RF plasmas in ammonia/methane were used to test the scavenging effect of ammonia in the absence of ionic species. The

  15. Formation of magnesite and siderite deposits in the Southern Urals—evidence of inclusion fluid chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, W.; Krupenin, M.

    2013-02-01

    World-class deposits of magnesite and siderite occur in Riphean strata of the Southern Urals, Russia. Field evidence, inclusion fluid chemistry, and stable isotope data presented in this study clearly proof that the replacement and precipitation processes leading to the formation of the epigenetic dolomite, magnesite and hydrothermal siderite were genetically related to evaporitic fluids affecting already lithified rocks. There is, however, a systematic succession of events leading to the formation of magnesite in a first stage. After burial and diagenesis the same brines were modified to hot and reducing hydrothermal fluids and were the source for the formation of hydrothermal siderite. The magnesites of the Satka Formation as well as the magnesites and the siderites of the Bakal Formation exhibit low Na/Br (106 to 222) and Cl/Br (162 to 280) ratios plotting on the seawater evaporation trend, indicating that the fluids acquired their salinity by evaporation processes of seawater. Temperature calculations based on cation exchange thermometers indicate a formation temperature of the magnesites of ~ 130 °C. Considering the fractionation at this temperature stable isotope evidence shows that the magnesite forming brines had δ18OSMOW values of ~ +1 ‰ thus indicating a seawater origin of the original fluid. Furthermore it proves that these fluids were not yet affected by appreciable fluid-rock interaction, which again implies magnesite formation in relatively high crustal levels. In contrast to the magnesites, the siderite mineralization was caused by hydrothermal fluids that underwent more intense reactions with their host rocks in deeper crustal levels compared to the magnesite. The values of 87Sr /86Sr in the siderites are substantially higher compared to the host rock slates. They also exceed the 87Sr /86Sr ratios of the magnesites and the host rock limestones indicating these slates as the source of iron as a consequence of water-rock interaction. The siderites

  16. The formation of calcium phosphate coatings by pulse laser deposition on the surface of polymeric ferroelectric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolbasov, E.N. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Lapin, I.N.; Svetlichnyi, V.A. [Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Lenivtseva, Y.D. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Malashicheva, A. [Federal Almazov Medical Research Centre, 2 Akkuratova St., St. Petersburg 197341 (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg State University, 7/9 Universitetskaya nab., St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); ITMO University, Institute of translational Medicine, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Malashichev, Y. [St. Petersburg State University, 7/9 Universitetskaya nab., St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Golovkin, A.S. [Federal Almazov Medical Research Centre, 2 Akkuratova St., St. Petersburg 197341 (Russian Federation); Anissimov, Y.G. [Griffith University, School of Natural Sciences, Engineering Dr., Southport, QLD 4222 (Australia); Tverdokhlebov, S.I., E-mail: tverd@tpu.ru [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Calcium phosphate coatings were obtained on ferroelectric polymer materials surface by using PLD method. • Obtained coatings have well-developed surface. • Depending on sputtering target composition it is possible to obtain crystalline or amorphous coating. • Formation of coating does not change the crystal structure of the ferroelectric polymer material. - Abstract: This work analyses the properties of calcium phosphate coatings obtained by pulsed laser deposition on the surface of the ferroelectric polymer material. Atomic force and scanning electron microscopy studies demonstrate that, regardless of the type of sputtering target, the calcium phosphate coatings have a multiscale rough surface that is potentially capable of promoting the attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts. This developed surface of the coatings is due to its formation mainly from a liquid phase. The chemical and crystalline composition of the coatings depends on the type of sputtering target used. It was shown that, regardless of the type of sputtering target, the crystalline structure of the ferroelectric polymer material does not change. Cell viability and adhesion studies of mesenchymal stromal cells on the coatings were conducted using flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. These studies indicated that the produced coatings are non-toxic.

  17. The formation of calcium phosphate coatings by pulse laser deposition on the surface of polymeric ferroelectric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Calcium phosphate coatings were obtained on ferroelectric polymer materials surface by using PLD method. • Obtained coatings have well-developed surface. • Depending on sputtering target composition it is possible to obtain crystalline or amorphous coating. • Formation of coating does not change the crystal structure of the ferroelectric polymer material. - Abstract: This work analyses the properties of calcium phosphate coatings obtained by pulsed laser deposition on the surface of the ferroelectric polymer material. Atomic force and scanning electron microscopy studies demonstrate that, regardless of the type of sputtering target, the calcium phosphate coatings have a multiscale rough surface that is potentially capable of promoting the attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts. This developed surface of the coatings is due to its formation mainly from a liquid phase. The chemical and crystalline composition of the coatings depends on the type of sputtering target used. It was shown that, regardless of the type of sputtering target, the crystalline structure of the ferroelectric polymer material does not change. Cell viability and adhesion studies of mesenchymal stromal cells on the coatings were conducted using flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. These studies indicated that the produced coatings are non-toxic

  18. Deposition of 1.88-billion-year-old iron formations as a consequence of rapid crustal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Birger; Fletcher, Ian R; Bekker, Andrey; Muhling, Janet R; Gregory, Courtney J; Thorne, Alan M

    2012-04-26

    Iron formations are chemical sedimentary rocks comprising layers of iron-rich and silica-rich minerals whose deposition requires anoxic and iron-rich (ferruginous) sea water. Their demise after the rise in atmospheric oxygen by 2.32 billion years (Gyr) ago has been attributed to the removal of dissolved iron through progressive oxidation or sulphidation of the deep ocean. Therefore, a sudden return of voluminous iron formations nearly 500 million years later poses an apparent conundrum. Most late Palaeoproterozoic iron formations are about 1.88 Gyr old and occur in the Superior region of North America. Major iron formations are also preserved in Australia, but these were apparently deposited after the transition to a sulphidic ocean at 1.84 Gyr ago that should have terminated iron formation deposition, implying that they reflect local marine conditions. Here we date zircons in tuff layers to show that iron formations in the Frere Formation of Western Australia are about 1.88 Gyr old, indicating that the deposition of iron formations from two disparate cratons was coeval and probably reflects global ocean chemistry. The sudden reappearance of major iron formations at 1.88 Gyr ago--contemporaneous with peaks in global mafic-ultramafic magmatism, juvenile continental and oceanic crust formation, mantle depletion and volcanogenic massive sulphide formation--suggests deposition of iron formations as a consequence of major mantle activity and rapid crustal growth. Our findings support the idea that enhanced submarine volcanism and hydrothermal activity linked to a peak in mantle melting released large volumes of ferrous iron and other reductants that overwhelmed the sulphate and oxygen reservoirs of the ocean, decoupling atmospheric and seawater redox states, and causing the return of widespread ferruginous conditions. Iron formations formed on clastic-starved coastal shelves where dissolved iron upwelled and mixed with oxygenated surface water. The

  19. Formation of TiO2 Thin Films using NH3 as Catalyst by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Hoon; Kang, Sang-Won

    2001-05-01

    We have studied metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of TiO2 thin films using titanium tetra-isopropoxide [TTIP, Ti(O--C3H7)4] and NH3 as a catalyst at deposition temperatures ranging from 250 to 365°C. At deposition temperatures above 330°C, pyrolytic self-decomposition of TTIP is dominant regardless of the use of NH3, and the activation energy for TiO2 film formation is 152 kJ/mol. At deposition temperatures below 330°C, the films can be formed with the help of the catalytic activity of NH3, and the activation energy is reduced to 55 kJ/mol. TiO2 films deposited through the pyrolytic self-decomposition of TTIP have an anatase structure before and after performing post-deposition annealing in oxygen ambient for 30 min at 750°C. On the other hand, the as-deposited films formed through the catalytic reaction of TTIP with NH3 incorporate nitrogen impurities and have microcrystallites of the rutile structure within the amorphous matrix. However, the post-deposition annealing, the nitrogen impurities are completely removed from the films, and the films are converted into polycrystalline TiO2 films with the rutile structure, which have a high dielectric constant of 82 and a low leakage current.

  20. Experimental techniques to determine salt formation and deposition in supercritical water oxidation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J.P.C.; LaJeunesse, C.A.; Rice, S.F.

    1994-08-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for destroying aqueous organic waste. Feed material, containing organic waste at concentrations typically less than 10 wt % in water, is pressurized and heated to conditions above water`s critical point where the ability of water to dissolve hydrocarbons and other organic chemicals is greatly enhanced. An oxidizer, is then added to the feed. Given adequate residence time and reaction temperature, the SCWO process rapidly produces innocuous combustion products. Organic carbon and nitrogen in the feed emerge as CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}; metals, heteroatoms, and halides appear in the effluent as inorganic salts and acids. The oxidation of organic material containing heteroatoms, such as sulfur or phosphorous, forms acid anions. In the presence of metal ions, salts are formed and precipitate out of the supercritical fluid. In a tubular configured reactor, these salts agglomerate, adhere to the reactor wall, and eventually interfere by causing a flow restriction in the reactor leading to an increase in pressure. This rapid precipitation is due to an extreme drop in salt solubility that occurs as the feed stream becomes supercritical. To design a system that can accommodate the formation of these salts, it is important to understand the deposition process quantitatively. A phenomenological model is developed in this paper to predict the time that reactor pressure begins to rise as a function of the fluid axial temperature profile and effective solubility curve. The experimental techniques used to generate effective solubility curves for one salt of interest, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, are described, and data is generated for comparison. Good correlation between the model and experiment is shown. An operational technique is also discussed that allows the deposited salt to be redissolved in a single phase and removed from the affected portion of the reactor. This technique is demonstrated experimentally.

  1. Preliminary protein corona formation stabilizes gold nanoparticles and improves deposition efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luby, Alexandra O.; Breitner, Emily K.; Comfort, Kristen K.

    2016-08-01

    Due to their advantageous characteristics, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are being increasingly utilized in a vast array of biomedical applications. However, the efficacy of these procedures are highly dependent upon strong interactions between AuNPs and the surrounding environment. While the field of nanotechnology has grown exponentially, there is still much to be discovered with regards to the complex interactions between NPs and biological systems. One area of particular interest is the generation of a protein corona, which instantaneously forms when NPs encounter a protein-rich environment. Currently, the corona is viewed as an obstacle and has been identified as the cause for loss of application efficiency in physiological systems. To date, however, no study has explored if the protein corona could be designed and advantageously utilized to improve both NP behavior and application efficacy. Therefore, we sought to identify if the formation of a preliminary protein corona could modify both AuNP characteristics and association with the HaCaT cell model. In this study, a corona comprised solely of epidermal growth factor (EGF) was successfully formed around 10-nm AuNPs. These EGF-AuNPs demonstrated augmented particle stability, a modified corona composition, and increased deposition over stock AuNPs, while remaining biocompatible. Analysis of AuNP dosimetry was repeated under dynamic conditions, with lateral flow significantly disrupting deposition and the nano-cellular interface. Taken together, this study demonstrated the plausibility and potential of utilizing the protein corona as a means to influence NP behavior; however, fluid dynamics remains a major challenge to progressing NP dosimetry.

  2. Growth of Larval Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and Fitness of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in Blue Ash (Fraxinus quadrangulata) and Green Ash (F. pennsylvanica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Donnie L; Duan, Jian J; Yaninek, J S; Ginzel, Matthew D; Sadof, Clifford S

    2015-12-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an invasive primary pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. Blue ash (F. quadrangulata) is less susceptible to emerald ash borer infestations in the forest than other species of North American ash. Whereas other studies have examined adult host preferences, we compared the capacity of emerald ash borer larvae reared from emerald ash borer eggs in the field and in the laboratory to survive and grow in blue ash and the more susceptible green ash (F. pennsylvanica). Emerald ash borer larval survivorship was the same on both ash species. Mortality due to wound periderm formation was only observed in living field grown trees, but was low (emerald ash borer. Larvae reared from eggs on blue ash were smaller than on green ash growing in the field and also in bolts that were infested under laboratory conditions. In a laboratory study, parasitism rates of confined Tetrastichus planipennisi were similar on emerald ash borer larvae reared in blue and green ash bolts, as were fitness measures of the parasitoid including brood size, sex ratio, and adult female size. Thus, we postulate that emerald ash borer larvae infesting blue ash could support populations of T. planipennisi and serve as a potential reservoir for this introduced natural enemy after most of the other native ash trees have been killed. PMID:26314024

  3. Fly Ash Disposal in Ash Ponds: A Threat to Ground Water Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. K.; Gupta, N. C.; Guha, B. K.

    2016-07-01

    Ground water contamination due to deposition of fly ash in ash ponds was assessed by simulating the disposal site conditions using batch leaching test with fly ash samples from three thermal power plants. The periodic analysis of leachates was performed for selected elements, Fe, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb and Cd in three different extraction solutions to determine the maximum amount that can be leached from fly ash. It was observed that at low pH value, maximum metals are released from the surface of the ash into leachate. The average concentration of these elements found in ground water samples from the nearby area of ash ponds shows that almost all the metals except `Cr' are crossing the prescribed limits of drinking water. The concentration of these elements at this level can endanger public health and environment.

  4. Fly Ash Disposal in Ash Ponds: A Threat to Ground Water Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. K.; Gupta, N. C.; Guha, B. K.

    2016-09-01

    Ground water contamination due to deposition of fly ash in ash ponds was assessed by simulating the disposal site conditions using batch leaching test with fly ash samples from three thermal power plants. The periodic analysis of leachates was performed for selected elements, Fe, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb and Cd in three different extraction solutions to determine the maximum amount that can be leached from fly ash. It was observed that at low pH value, maximum metals are released from the surface of the ash into leachate. The average concentration of these elements found in ground water samples from the nearby area of ash ponds shows that almost all the metals except `Cr' are crossing the prescribed limits of drinking water. The concentration of these elements at this level can endanger public health and environment.

  5. Subduction of the Nazca Ridge and the Inca Plateau: Insights into the formation of ore deposits in Peru [rapid communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Gideon; Giles, David; Saxon, Mark; Betts, Peter G.; Weinberg, Roberto F.; Duboz, Cecile

    2005-10-01

    A large number of ore deposits that formed in the Peruvian Andes during the Miocene (15-5 Ma) are related to the subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South American plate. Here we show that the spatial and temporal distribution of these deposits correspond with the arrival of relatively buoyant topographic anomalies, namely the Nazca Ridge in central Peru and the now-consumed Inca Plateau in northern Peru, at the subduction zone. Plate reconstruction shows a rapid metallogenic response to the arrival of the topographic anomalies at the subduction trench. This is indicated by clusters of ore deposits situated within the proximity of the laterally migrating zones of ridge subduction. It is accordingly suggested that tectonic changes associated with impingement of the aseismic ridge into the subduction zone may trigger the formation of ore deposits in metallogenically fertile suprasubduction environments.

  6. Synergy of hydromechanical and hydrochemical parameters in formation of solid deposits in geothermal and other waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Ljiljana N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with synchronised influences of hydromechanical and hidrochemical parameters on the formation of solid deposits in geothermal and other waters which compose complex heterogeneous and micro-heterogeneous system of liquid-solid. Constituents of these waters in ionic, colloidal and micro-heterogeneous suspended state of liquid-solid are responsible for the creation of the carbonates, sulphates and other solid matters. In these processes one cannot eliminate the influence of hydromechanical parameters with flow velocity and water flow criteria (laminar or turbulent flow as vital factors. Experiments were conducted on the laboratory pilot installation with glass pipes diameter of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 mm respectively, and the flow was monitored by means of digital peristaltic pump with the flow rate of 2 ml/min to 5000 ml/min. The paper gives the results of the investigation of the impact of the linear flow velocity on the relative decrease of the initial water hardness in geothermal waters of Sijarinska Banja spa, Niška Banja spa and the estuary water of Medijana, Niš. From the obtained dependences, according to the linear regression model, for each diameter critical values for linear velocities as an important parameter for the understanding of the synergism of the hydromechanical and hydrochemical parameters were determined. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 33046

  7. Formation and Transport of Atomic Hydrogen in Hot-Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we focus on diamond film hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactors where the only reactant ishydrogen so as to study the formation and transport of hydrogen atoms. Analysis of dimensionless numbers forheat and mass transfer reveals that thermal conduction and diffusion are the dominant mechanisms for gas-phaseheat and mass transfer, respectively. A simplified model has been established to simulate gas-phase temperature andH concentration distributions between the filament and the substrate. Examination of the relative importance ofhomogeneous and heterogeneous production of H atoms indicates that filament-surface decomposition of molecularhydrogen is the dominant source of H and gas-phase reaction plays a negligible role. The filament-surface dissociationrates of H2 for various filament temperatures were calculated to match H-atom concentrations observed in the liter-ature or derived from power consumption by filaments. Arrhenius plots of the filament-surface hydrogen dissociationrates suggest that dissociation of H2 at refractory filament surface is a catalytic process, which has a rather lowereffective activation energy than homogeneous thermal dissociation. Atomic hydrogen, acting as an important heattransfer medium to heat the substrate, can freely diffuse from the filament to the substrate without recombination.

  8. Fouling propensity of high-phosphorus solid fuels: Predictive criteria and ash deposits characterisation of sunflower hulls with P/Ca-additives in a drop tube furnace

    OpenAIRE

    De Fusco, Lucio; Boucquey, A.; Blondeau, J.; Jeanmart, Hervé; Contino, F

    2016-01-01

    Fouling from the processing of residual biomass fuels in combustion applications is a major concern. This paper discusses the fouling behaviour of sunflower hulls with a high phosphorus (P) content by means of a broad fuel characterisation strategy including advanced predictive indices, the fuel selective leaching, multiple deposition tests in a Drop Tube Furnace (DTF) and deposits analysis with scanning electron microscopy–energy dispersive X-rays spectroscopy (SEM–EDS). First, we summarise ...

  9. Ichnofabrics and Their Environmental Interpretation from the Fluvial Deposits of the Middle Triassic Youfangzhuang Formation in Western Henan, Central China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Yongan Qi; Da Li; Mingyue Dai; Yuguang Chang

    2014-01-01

    Fluvial deposits from the Middle Triassic Youfangzhuang Formation in Henan Province, China contain a low-diversity trace fossils. Vertical dwelling burrows of opportunists dominate in active channel, whereas horizontal deposit-feeding, grazing, and vertical dwelling burrows occur in overbank deposits. Seven recurrent ichnofabrics were distingushed. The Palaeophycus tubularis ichnofabric pre-serves below scour interface between two fluvial cycles. The Skolithos linearis ichnofabric forms in middle to high-energy, soft substrates in the middle and upper parts of active channel deposits under semi-arid climate. The Skolithos linearis-Planolites montanus ichnofabric occurs in the sediments just a little above the Skolithos linearis ichnofabric and is formed in middle-energy, soft substrates in the up-per part of active channel deposits. The Planolites montanus ichnofabric is mostly preserved in associa-tion with medium- to thick-bedded brown-red silty mudstones or siltstones in low-energy, perennial muddy bottom ponds in overbank settings. The Taenidium barretti ichnofabric is interpreted as peri-odically exposed ephemeral ponds or low-energy distal floodplain. The Skolithos isp. ichnofabric com-monly occurs in middle to high-energy firm ground of proximal foodplain or crevasse-splay deposits. The root trace ichnofabric occurs in the crevasse splay deposits. The presence of thin palaeosols and the abundance of calcretization in mudstones indicate a seasonal climate ranging from humid to semi-arid, with high temperature, rainfall, and well-defined dry and wet seasons.

  10. Direct Deposition of Gas Phase Generated Aerosol Gold Nanoparticles into Biological Fluids - Corona Formation and Particle Size Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Christian R.; Messing, Maria E.; Lundqvist, Martin; Schollin, Alexander; Deppert, Knut; Pagels, Joakim H.; Rissler, Jenny; Cedervall, Tommy

    2013-01-01

    An ongoing discussion whether traditional toxicological methods are sufficient to evaluate the risks associated with nanoparticle inhalation has led to the emergence of Air-Liquid interface toxicology. As a step in this process, this study explores the evolution of particle characteristics as they move from the airborne state into physiological solution. Airborne gold nanoparticles (AuNP) are generated using an evaporation-condensation technique. Spherical and agglomerate AuNPs are deposited into physiological solutions of increasing biological complexity. The AuNP size is characterized in air as mobility diameter and in liquid as hydrodynamic diameter. AuNP:Protein aggregation in physiological solutions is determined using dynamic light scattering, particle tracking analysis, and UV absorption spectroscopy. AuNPs deposited into homocysteine buffer form large gold-aggregates. Spherical AuNPs deposited in solutions of albumin were trapped at the Air-Liquid interface but was readily suspended in the solutions with a size close to that of the airborne particles, indicating that AuNP:Protein complex formation is promoted. Deposition into serum and lung fluid resulted in larger complexes, reflecting the formation of a more complex protein corona. UV absorption spectroscopy indicated no further aggregation of the AuNPs after deposition in solution. The corona of the deposited AuNPs shows differences compared to AuNPs generated in suspension. Deposition of AuNPs from the aerosol phase into biological fluids offers a method to study the protein corona formed, upon inhalation and deposition in the lungs in a more realistic way compared to particle liquid suspensions. This is important since the protein corona together with key particle properties (e.g. size, shape and surface reactivity) to a large extent may determine the nanoparticle effects and possible translocation to other organs. PMID:24086363

  11. The conjunction of factors that lead to formation of giant gold provinces and deposits in non-arc settings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David I. Groves; Richard J. Goldfarb; M. Santosh

    2016-01-01

    -flux systems relative to orogenic gold deposits, and those few giants are essentially preservational exceptions. Many Carlin-type deposits are giants due to the exceptional conjunction of both structural and lithological parameters that caused reactive and permeable rocks, enriched in syngenetic gold, to be located below an impermeable cap along antiformal “trends”. Hy-drocarbons probably played an important role in concentrating metal. The supergiant Post-Betze deposit has additional ore zones in strain heterogeneities surrounding the pre-gold Goldstrike stock. All un-equivocal IOCG deposits are giant or near-giant deposits in terms of gold-equivalent resources, partly due to economic factors for this relatively poorly understood, low Cu-Au grade deposit type. The supergiant Olympic Dam deposit, the most shallowly formed deposit among the larger IOCGs, probably owes its origin to eruption of volatile-rich hybrid magma at surface, with formation of a large maar and intense and widespread brecciation, alteration and Cu-Au-U deposition in a huge rock volume.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of the formation of sp3 hybridized bonds in hydrogenated diamondlike carbon deposition processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yasuo; Horiguchi, Seishi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2010-04-01

    The formation process of sp3 hybridized carbon networks (i.e., diamondlike structures) in hydrogenated diamondlike carbon (DLC) films has been studied with the use of molecular-dynamics simulations. The processes simulated in this study are injections of hydrocarbon (CH3 and CH) beams into amorphous carbon (a-C) substrates. It has been shown that diamondlike sp3 structures are formed predominantly at a subsurface level when the beam energy is relatively high, as in the "subplantation" process for hydrogen-free DLC deposition. However, for hydrogenated DLC deposition, the presence of abundant hydrogen at subsurface levels, together with thermal spikes caused by energetic ion injections, substantially enhances the formation of carbon-to-carbon sp3 bonds. Therefore, the sp3 bond formation process for hydrogenated DLC films essentially differs from that for hydrogen-free DLC films.

  13. Characterization and quantification of deposits build up and removal in straw suspension fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Arendt; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Wedel, Stig;

    This project deals with ash deposit formation in suspension fired biomass power plant boilers. The project has been conducted in a tight collaboration between Vattenfall and the CHEC Research Centre at DTU Department of Chemical Engineering. A large part of the project has been performed...... by conducting advanced probe measurements at the Amagerværkets Vattenfall owed boilers. It was the objective of the project to provide an improved understanding of ash deposit formation and removal in biomass suspension fired boilers. The project have provided a large amount of knowledge on the following issues......: 1) The influence of local boiler conditions on deposit formation in suspension fired boilers using wood or co-firing straw and wood, 2) quantification of deposit removal in biomass suspension firing boilers with regards both to natural shedding and soot blower induced shedding, 3) established...

  14. Formation of fouling deposits on a carbon steel surface from Colombian heavy crude oil under preheating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Pinto, D. A.; Cuervo Camargo, S. M.; Orozco Parra, M.; Laverde, D.; García Vergara, S.; Blanco Pinzon, C.

    2016-02-01

    Fouling in heat exchangers is produced by the deposition of undesired materials on metal surfaces. As fouling progresses, pressure drop and heat transfer resistance is observed and therefore the overall thermal efficiency of the equipment diminishes. Fouling is mainly caused by the deposition of suspended particles, such as those from chemical reactions, crystallization of certain salts, and some corrosion processes. In order to understand the formation of fouling deposits from Colombian heavy oil (API≈12.3) on carbon steel SA 516 Gr 70, a batch stirred tank reactor was used. The reactor was operated at a constant pressure of 340psi while varying the temperature and reaction times. To evaluate the formation of deposits on the metal surfaces, the steel samples were characterized by gravimetric analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). On the exposed surfaces, the results revealed an increase in the total mass derived from the deposition of salt compounds, iron oxides and alkaline metals. In general, fouling was modulated by both the temperature and the reaction time, but under the experimental conditions, the temperature seems to be the predominant variable that controls and accelerates fouling.

  15. The causes of milk deposit formation on the walls of the heat exchangers during the heat treatment of milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Matijević

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of research on finding the causes and preventing the formation of milk deposit are described in this paper.During the heat treatment of milk, an unwanted phenomenon occurs; the formation of milk deposit on heating surfaces of heat exchangers. This phenomenon causes the decrease of heat transfer coefficient as well as the pressure drop, it restricts the flow of milk, and causes additional production costs and increases production loss.The formation of milk deposit is a result of complex processes caused by thermal treatment of proteins and mineral substances in milk. Factors which cause milk deposit are: pH - value, the amount of proteins and mineral substances in milk, dissolved gases in milk, characteristics of heating surface, the difference in temperatures of milk and heating surfaces, and the regime of milk circulation. The chemical composition of milk can not be influenced, but the standards of heat treatment in order to minimise this phenomenon can, and that is precisely the topic of the latest researches.

  16. Agglomeration and Deposition Behaviour of Solid Recovered Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Nielsen, Mads;

    2015-01-01

    contains significant quantities of common plastics such as polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Fluidized bed experiments to examine the pyrolysis of polymers have shown that bed agglomeration can result from melting plastics or sticky char residues in the case...... of PET [11,12]. The main objective of this study was to characterize the combustion of SRF and especially the deposition propensity of SRF and the main constituents of SRF. This relates both to the low temperature deposits formed during plastic pyrolysis and the high temperature deposits formed by ash...... materials such as plastic and paper than mixed MSW [2]. The inhomogeneous nature of SRF [3] makes it difficult to combust and many problems may arise concerning e.g. combustion control, feeding of fuel [2,4], deposit formation [5], or accumulation of impurities [3]. Laboratory ash fusion tests typically...

  17. Stratigraphic variations of lacustrine sediment gravity flow deposits and their recurrence intervals in the Middle Pleistocene Miyajima Formation, northeastern Japan: an implication for paleoenvironmental analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hana; Onishi, Yuri; Ishihara, Yoshiro

    2016-04-01

    Lacustrine sediment gravity flow deposits have been proposed as archives for flood and earthquake events. Holocene lacustrine deposits are especially valuable because they can be correlated with historical records and other detailed paleoenvironmental indices. When sediment gravity flow deposits are intercalated in varved deposits, they can potentially be used for high resolution reconstruction of recurrence intervals of events in addition to environmental changes. The Shiobara Group in the Shiobara Basin, Tochigi Prefecture, northeastern Japan, consists of the upper Miyajima Formation and the lower Kamishiobara Formation. The Miyajima Formation includes varved deposits distributed at the center of the basin. These units are interpreted as lake floor deposits of the Paleo-Shiobara Caldera Lake. The varved deposits of the Miyajima Formation consist of cyclic repetitions of light-colored seasonal sub-layers mainly composed of diatoms (Stephanodiscus niagarae) and dark-colored seasonal sub-layers mainly composed of river inflow deposits. For this study, we measured lacustrine deposits of the Miyajima Formation and analyzed stratigraphic variation of varved deposits. Stratigraphic units of approximately 4 m in total thickness were studied, which included 416 events of sediment -gravity flow deposition over ca. 700 years. Sedimentary facies of the lacustrine sediment gravity flow deposits: The sediment gravity flow deposits can be classified by their erosional and internal features: whether they have an erosional base, whether they are graded, and whether they have rip-up clasts. Because high density currents were suggested from above features, most of the deposits are interpreted as the result of hyperpycnal flow. Also, the features suggest that the sediment gravity flow deposits originated from rivers around the lake. Stratigraphic variation of varved deposits: Average thicknesses of varves decrease from the lower and middle portions of the section to the upper part

  18. Fouling in heat exchangers : a study of the mechanisms of formation of kaolin deposits

    OpenAIRE

    L. F. Melo; Pinheiro, J. D. R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Fouling caused by a water-kaolin suspension in an annular heat exchanger was studied. Deposition seemed to be controlled by ma!!s transfer for lower Reynolds numbers and by adhesion for higher Re. The data was satisfactorily described by the generalized model of Pinheiro. The relative cohesion of the deposits was measured using a concentric cylinders apparatus, which also helped in confirming the existence of a loose and a hard layer in the kaolin deposits.

  19. Characterization and formation mechanism of nano-structured hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by the liquid precursor plasma spraying process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano-structured hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings were deposited on the Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrate by the liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS) process. The thermal behavior of the HA liquid precursor was analyzed to interpret the phase change and structure transformation during the formation process of the nano-structured HA coatings. The phase composition, structure and morphology of the nano-structured HA coatings were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The XRD spectra showed that the coatings deposited by the LPPS process mainly consisted of the HA phase and the crystallite size was measured to be 56 nm. The SEM observation showed that the as-deposited LPPS coatings had small splat size, and nano-scale HA particles were found in certain regions of the coating surface. The FTIR spectroscopy showed the strong presence of the OH- group in the as-deposited LPPS coatings, indicating a superior structural integrity. In addition, the coatings deposited by the LPPS process were also carbonated HA coatings. The results indicate that the LPPS process is a promising plasma spraying technique for depositing nano-structured HA coatings with unique microstructural features that are desirable for improving the biological performance of the HA coatings.

  20. Characterization and formation mechanism of nano-structured hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by the liquid precursor plasma spraying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yi; Song Lei; Huang Tao; Liu Xiaoguang; Xiao Yanfeng; Wu Yao; Wu Fang; Gu Zhongwei, E-mail: fangwu0808@yahoo.co [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2010-10-01

    Nano-structured hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings were deposited on the Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrate by the liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS) process. The thermal behavior of the HA liquid precursor was analyzed to interpret the phase change and structure transformation during the formation process of the nano-structured HA coatings. The phase composition, structure and morphology of the nano-structured HA coatings were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The XRD spectra showed that the coatings deposited by the LPPS process mainly consisted of the HA phase and the crystallite size was measured to be 56 nm. The SEM observation showed that the as-deposited LPPS coatings had small splat size, and nano-scale HA particles were found in certain regions of the coating surface. The FTIR spectroscopy showed the strong presence of the OH{sup -} group in the as-deposited LPPS coatings, indicating a superior structural integrity. In addition, the coatings deposited by the LPPS process were also carbonated HA coatings. The results indicate that the LPPS process is a promising plasma spraying technique for depositing nano-structured HA coatings with unique microstructural features that are desirable for improving the biological performance of the HA coatings.

  1. Ash and heavy metals in fluidized-bed combustion of wood wastes; Tuhka ja raskasmetallit puuperaeisen jaetteen kerrosleijupoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaessi, T.; Aittoniemi, P. [IVO Power Engineering, Vantaa (Finland); Kauppinen, E.; Latva-Somppi, J.; Kurkela, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Partanen, J. [IVO Technology Centre, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Ash formation and deposition mechanisms during co-combustion of pulp mill sludge and bark in industrial bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) combustor have been studied. Similar fuels were used in a bench-scale BFB for co-combustion of sludge and bark pellets and comparative studies with separate combustion of these fuels. Results indicated that in industrial scale unit significant fraction of ash had vaporization. About 14 mass-% of the total fly ash was found in the particle size below 0.2 {mu}m. The vaporized species consisted of potassium (K), sulfur (S), chlorine (Cl) and also of minor quantities of sodium (Na). In the benchscale similar vaporization fractions during co-combustion were measured, about 11 mass-%. During the combustion of bark this ratio, about 20 mass-%, was higher than during sludge combustion. The vaporized ash fraction was in the case of dried sludge combustion about 7 mass-%, but with wet sludge the vaporization rate was remarkably lower, about 1-2 mass-%. An increase in the bed temperature increased also ash vaporization. Test run period without combustion at elevated temperatures produced very low quantities of vaporized ash. The vaporized species in bench-scale test during bark pellet combustion were K, S and Cl, for sludge combustion also Na was clearly detected. No condensation of the vaporized species in bed area or furnace walls was observed. Bed defluidization was studied in the bench-scale unit. During bark pellet combustion the bed-agglomeration proceeded via small ash particle, below 2 {mu}m, coating on sand particle surface and consequent bonding between the ash layers. In the case of sludge combustion the accumulation of large ash particles and sintering of these porous agglomerates was observed to cause bed coarsening and defluidization. (orig.)

  2. Triple oxygen and sulfur isotope analyses of sulfate extracted from voluminous volcanic ashes in the Oligocene John Day Formation: insight into dry climate conditions and ozone contribution to supereruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, J.; Bindeman, I. N.; Martin, E.; Retallack, G.; Palandri, J. L.; Weldon, N.

    2014-12-01

    Large volume pyroclastic silicic eruptions emit hundreds of megatons of SO2 into the troposphere and stratosphere that is oxidized into sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by a variety of reactions with mass independent oxygen signatures (MIF), Δ17O>0. Sulfuric acid is then preserved as gypsum in parental volcanic deposits. Diagenic effects are mass dependent and can dilute, but otherwise do not affect MIF ratios. Pleistocene Yellowstone and Bishop tuffs and modern volcanic eruptions preserved under arid climate conditions in North American playa lakes, preserve small amounts of volcanic sulfate as gypsum. This gypsum's Δ17O>0, in combination with isotopic variations of δ18O, δ33S and δ34S is distinct from sedimentary sulfate and reveals its original MIF sulfate isotopic signal and the effect of super eruptions on the atmosphere, and ozone consumption in particular. We use linear algebraic equations to resolve volcanic versus sedimentary (MIF=0) sources. We have found that many large volume ignimbrites have very high initial Δ17O in volcanic sulfate that can only be acquired from reaction with stratospheric ozone. We here investigate nine thick (>2 m) ash beds ranging in age from ~33-23 Ma in the John Day Formation of central Oregon, including massive 28.6 Ma Picture Gorge tuff of newly identified Crooked River supercaldera. The 28.6 Ma Picture Gorge tuff (PGT) has the highest measured Δ17O of 3.5‰, and other tuffs (Tin Roof, Biotite, Deep Creek) have +1.3 to 3.4‰ Δ17O excesses. Sulfate from modern smaller tropospheric eruptions studied for comparison have a resolvable 0.4‰ range consistent with liquid-phase based H2O2 oxidation. The PGT is coeval with the ignimbrite flare-up in western N. America, the 28-29 Ma eruption of the 5000 km3 Fish Canyon tuff and the 28 Ma Never Summer Field eruption in Nebraska-Colorado that have the highest measured Δ17O of 6‰ (Bao et al. 2003). We speculate on the climatic/atmospheric effects of these multiple ~28 Ma supereruptions

  3. Ice nucleation properties of volcanic ash from Eyjafjallajökull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hoyle

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation ability of volcanic ash particles collected close to the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull during its eruptions in April and May 2010 is investigated experimentally, in the immersion and deposition modes, and applied to atmospheric conditions by comparison with airborne measurements and microphysical model calculations. The number of ash particles which are active as ice nuclei (IN is strongly temperature dependent, with a very small minority being active in the immersion mode at temperatures of 250–263 K. Average ash particles show only a moderate effect on ice nucleation, by inducing freezing at temperatures between 236 K and 240 K (i.e. approximately 3–4 K higher than temperatures required for homogeneous ice nucleation, measured with the same instrument. By scaling the results to aircraft and lidar measurements of the conditions in the ash plume days down wind of the eruption and by applying a simple microphysical model, it was found that the IN active in the immersion mode in the range 250–263 K generally occurred in atmospheric number densities at the lower end of those required to have an impact on ice cloud formation. However, 3–4 K above the homogeneous freezing point, immersion mode IN number densities a few days down wind of the eruption were sufficiently high to have a moderate influence on ice cloud formation. The efficiency of IN in the deposition mode was found to be poor except at very cold conditions (< 238 K, when they reach an efficiency similar to that of mineral dust with the onset of freezing at 10 % supersaturation with respect to ice, and with the frozen fraction nearing its maximum value at a supersaturation 20 %. In summary, these investigations suggest volcanic ash particles to have only moderate effects on atmospheric ice formation.

  4. Magmatic and tectonic processes related to the formation of hydrothermal mineral deposits in the Rocky Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, T.B. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Earth Resources)

    1993-04-01

    Hydrothermal mineral deposits along the Rocky Mountain trend from Montana to New Mexico occur along distinct northeasterly linear trends, reflecting first order structural control on localization of the deposits. The Great Falls Tectonic Zone, Colorado Mineral Belt, and Jemez Zones have localized hydrothermal mineral deposits from Late Cretaceous to the late Tertiary. The deposits range from porphyry-related Climax-and Leadville-types of deposits to epithermal vein and breccia system that have some magmatic component. Local skarn development is important in some districts, typically exhibiting retrograde effects. Less common north and northwest trends localized mineral deposits. Notably, the Wyoming Archean terrane was less favorable than the Proterozoic basement terrane elsewhere along the Rocky Mountains. Magmas associated with the hydrothermal mineral deposits range from subduction-related calc-alkaline systems to back-arc alkaline systems. The two magma types are temporally-separated but spatially associated. The alkaline systems developed with the inception of extensional tectonics. Areas with thin (<40 km) continental crust were important in localizing the alkaline magmas and associated mineral deposits. The limited Nd- and Sr-isotopic data indicate that Late Cretaceous to Tertiary intrusive-volcanic systems exhibit increased [epsilon][sub Nd] and initial Sr values with decreasing age, interpreted to reflect increasing crustal contamination. S, O, H, and Pb isotopic- and fluid inclusion-data from many of the Rocky Mountain ore systems exhibit a wide range of sources, but reflect the importance of igneous activity in the ore-forming process.

  5. Formation conditions of paleovalley uranium deposits hosted in upper Eocene-lower Oligocene rocks of Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokurov, S. F.; Strelkova, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The uranium deposits of Bulgaria related to the Late Alpine tectonomagmatic reactivation are subdivided into two groups: exogenic-epigenetic paleovalley deposits related to the basins filled with upper Eocene-lower Oligocene volcanic-sedimentary rocks and the hydrothermal deposits hosted in the coeval depressions. The geological and lithofacies conditions of their localization, the epigenetic alteration of rocks, mineralogy and geochemistry of uranium ore are exemplified in thoroughly studied paleovalley deposits of the Maritsa ore district. Argumentation of the genetic concepts providing insights into both sedimentation-diagenetic and exogenic-epigenetic mineralization with development of stratal oxidation zones is discussed. A new exfiltration model has been proposed to explain the origin of the aforementioned deposits on the basis of additional analysis with consideration of archival factual data and possible causes of specific ningyoite uranium ore composition.

  6. Geomorphology of crater and basin deposits - Emplacement of the Fra Mauro formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R. H.; Oberbeck, V. R.

    1975-01-01

    Characteristics of continuous deposits near lunar craters larger than about 1 km wide are considered, and it is concluded that (1) concentric dunes, radial ridges, and braided lineations result from deposition of the collision products of ejecta from adjacent pairs of similarly oriented secondary-crater chains and are, therefore, concentrations of secondary-crater ejecta; (2) intracrater ridges are produced within preexisting craters surrounding a fresh primary crater by ricocheting and focusing of secondary-crater ejecta from the preexisting craters' walls; and (3) secondary cratering has produced many of the structures of the continuous deposits of relatively small lunar craters and is the dominant process for emplacement of most of the radial facies of the continuous deposits of large lunar craters and basins. The percentages of Imbrium ejecta in deposits and the nature of Imbrium sculpturing are investigated.

  7. Formation of Jarosite in the Marwrth Vallis Region of Mars by Weathering Within Paleo-Ice Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, J. R.; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Here we report new detections of jarosite in the Mawrth Vallis region of Mars. These newly recognized deposits expand the known occurrences of sulfates [1-2] in the region and further expand the already considerable geologic-mineralogic diversity of the Mawrth Vallis area [3-6]. The occurrence of sulfates such as jarosite in geologic contact with thick deposits of phyllosilicates in the Mawrth Vallis area is a relatively rare case on Mars where the enigmatic transition from an early phyllosilicateforming era to a younger sulfate-forming era [7] can be explored. We propose an ice-weathering model which can potentially explain the formation of jarosite-silicakaolinite within acidic ice deposits.

  8. Altered callose deposition during embryo sac formation of multi-pistil mutant (mp1) in Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H C; Jin, L; Li, J; Wang, X J

    2016-01-01

    Whether callose deposition is the cause or result of ovule sterility in Medicago sativa remains controversial, because it is unclear when and where changes in callose deposition and dissolution occur during fertile and sterile embryo sac formation. Here, alfalfa spontaneous multi-pistil mutant (mp1) and wild-type plants were used to compare the dynamics of callose deposition during embryo sac formation using microscopy. The results showed that both mutant and wild-type plants experienced megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis, and there was no significant difference during megasporogenesis. In contrast to the wild-type plants, in which the mature embryo sac was observed after three continuous cycles of mitosis, functional megaspores of mutant plants developed abnormally after the second round of mitosis, leading to degeneration of synergid, central, and antipodal cells. Callose deposition in both mutant and wild-type plants was first observed in the walls of megasporocytes, and then in the megaspore tetrad walls. After meiosis, the callose wall began to degrade as the functional megaspore underwent mitosis, and almost no callose was observed in the mature embryo sac in wild-type plants. However, callose deposition was observed in mp1 plants around the synergid, and increased with the development of the embryo sac, and was mainly deposited at the micropylar end. Our results indicate that synergid, central, and antipodal cells, which are surrounded by callose, may degrade owing to lack of nutrition. Callose accumulation around the synergid and at the micropylar end may hinder signals required for the pollen tube to enter the embryo sac, leading to abortion. PMID:27323128

  9. Renal Light Chain Deposition Associated with the Formation of Intracellular Crystalline Inclusion Bodies in Podocytes: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-da; Dong, Zhe-yi; Zhang, Xue-guang; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Zhong; Qiu, Qiang; Chen, Xiang-mei

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of an elderly woman with bone pain and proteinuria as the main clinical manifestations. The patient was diagnosed with the IgG κ type of multiple myeloma. Her renal pathology consisted of widespread κ light chain protein deposition associated with the formation of large quantities of rod-like crystals in podocytes. This phenomenon is very rare. We explored the significance of this crystal formation via a detailed and descriptive analysis and also performed a literature review, thus providing data to increase the available information about this type of disease.

  10. Geochemical evidence of paleogeography and paleoclimate during deposition of the 2nd Member of Kongdian Formation in Kongnan area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The 2nd Member of Kongdian Formation has been made up of a large number of oil shale and mudstone in the Kongnan aera of Huanghua depression around the Bohai Bay. In the Kongnan area, the lake basins were very large and deep during the deposition of the 2nd Member of Kongdian Formation. During that period,the lakes were sealed, uncommunieated with the sea water and the paleoclimate was very warm and wet in Kongnan area. Analyzing the content of the trace element and the rare earth element, carbon and oxygen isotope in the disquisition, The authors prove the two views correct.

  11. Examination of the petroporphyrins found in oil shale from the Julia Creek deposit of the Toolebuc formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekstrom, A.; Loeh, H.; Dale, L.

    1983-01-01

    The oil shale of the Toolebuc formation in Queensland, Australia has been shown to contain relatively high concentrations of vanadium and nickel porphyrin compounds. Two aspects of the porphyrin compounds in this deposit are described. First, the variations in the concentrations of the chloroform extractable metal porphyrin compounds through well-characterized drill cores was determined. Second, the ature of the vanadium porphyrins was examined using absorption spectrophotometry and insertion probe, fast atom bombardment and field desorption mass spectrometry techniques. (JMT)

  12. 循环流化床锅炉生物质与煤混烧积灰腐蚀试验%Experimental study on ash deposition and corrosion in a CFB boiler co-firing biomass with coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志; 雷秀坚; 汪佩宁; 胡康涛; 杨海瑞

    2015-01-01

    During ash decomposition and corrosion tests in a 75 t/h circulating fluidized bed (CFB)boiler burning coal and biomass,the corrosion probe equipped with three kinds of metal samples was placed in front of the superheater,and the superheater tube wall temperature was simulated with a system of air cooling.Three kinds of metal deposition samples were obtained in operating mode (duration time of 24 hours)with three mixing ratios of coal and biomass.The physicochemical property of the samples was ana-lyzed by SEM-EDX.The results show that,under the testing conditions,no deposition was found at the wind side,and the deposition formed at the lee side was different for different metallic materials.No materi-al loss or significant corrosion was detected.It is proved in this study that depositions at the lee side of the superheater were probably more serious than that at the wind side,and the co-combustion of coal and bio-mass containing low levels of alkali metal will not cause serious deposition or corrosion and can be applied in industrial production.%将3种不同金属管材样品环的气冷腐蚀探头置于某生物质与煤混烧的75 t/h 循环流化床(CFB)锅炉尾部烟道低温过热器前,通过空气冷却模拟过热器的管壁温度,获得3种混烧比例工况下(持续时间24 h)3种管材的积灰样品。利用扫描电子显微镜分析积灰的理化特性,探讨混烧比例和材料种类对积灰腐蚀的影响规律。结果表明:在测试工况下,样品环迎风面不存在明显积灰现象,而背风面积灰明显,且随着材料的不同而有所不同,但未发现明显腐蚀或金属磨损,表明碱金属含量相对较低的生物质与煤混烧并不会造成严重积灰及腐蚀。

  13. Glomerular C3c localization indicates ongoing immune deposit formation and complement activation in experimental glomerulonephritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schulze, M.; Pruchno, C. J.; Burns, M.; Baker, P. J.; R. J. Johnson; Couser, W G

    1993-01-01

    In antibody-mediated glomerular disease, deposits of C3 (C3b) are common and are degraded by factor I to C3c and C3d. However, the kinetics of C3b degradation in glomerulonephritis have not been defined. To do this, we studied three models of complement-dependent glomerulonephritis with established C3 deposits (passive Heymann nephritis, cationized immunoglobulin G membranous nephropathy, and concanavalin A-anticoncanavalin A glomerulonephritis). C3b deposition was halted by administration of...

  14. Stratigraphy, age, and depositional setting of the Miocene Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill, central Mojave Desert, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Shannon R.; Miller, David M.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2010-01-01

    New detailed geologic mapping and geochronology of the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill, 30 km east of Barstow, CA, help to constrain Miocene paleogeography and tectonics of the central Mojave Desert. A northern strand of the Quaternary ENE-striking, sinistral Manix fault divides the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill into two distinct lithologic assemblages. Strata north of the fault consist of: a green rhyolitic tuff, informally named the Shamrock tuff; lacustrine sandstone; partially silicified thin-bedded to massive limestone; and alluvial sandstone to pebble conglomerate. Strata south of the fault consist of: lacustrine siltstone and sandstone; a rhyolitic tuff dated at 19.1 Ma (U-Pb); rock-avalanche breccia deposits; partially silicified well-bedded to massive limestone; and alluvial sandstone and conglomerate. Our U-Pb zircon dating of the Shamrock tuff by SHRIMP-RG yields a peak probability age of 18.7 ± 0.1 Ma. Distinctive outcrop characteristics, mineralogy, remanent magnetization, and zircon geochemistry (Th/U) suggest that the Shamrock tuff represents a lacustrine facies of the regionally extensive Peach Spring Tuff (PST). Here we compare zircon age and geochemical analyses from the Shamrock tuff with those of the PST at Stoddard Wash and provide new insight into the age of zircon crystallization in the PST rhyolite. Results of our field studies show that Miocene strata at Harvard Hill mostly accumulated in a lacustrine environment, although depositional environments varied from a relatively deep lake to a very shallow lake or even onshore setting. Rock-avalanche breccias and alluvial deposits near the base of the exposed section indicate proximity to a steep basin margin and detrital studies suggest a southern source for coarse-grained deposits; therefore, we may infer a southern basin-margin setting at Harvard Hill during the early Miocene. Our geochronology demonstrates that deposition of the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill extended from before

  15. Lithofacies, depositional environments, regional biostratigraphy and age of the Chitarwata Formation in the Bugti Hills, Balochistan, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métais, Grégoire; Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Baqri, S. R. Hassan; Crochet, Jean-Yves; De Franceschi, Dario; Marivaux, Laurent; Welcomme, Jean-Loup

    2009-02-01

    The Oligocene-early Miocene Chitarwata Formation records a critical interval of terrestrial sedimentation that predates the Siwalik deposits on the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan. This Oligocene-early Miocene time interval has long been considered as lacking in the entire Indo-Pakistan region. The Chitarwata Formation is widely exposed in the Sulaiman Range, but has never been described in detail in the Sulaiman Lobe, where the famous fossiliferous strata called 'Bugti Bone Beds' have been known for over a century and half. The Chitarwata Formation represents coastal-delta at the base, and plain and fluvial environments at the top. Lithofacies and sedimentary structures of the Chitarwata Formation in the Bugti area are described in detail, and show a clearly distinct lithologic pattern, different from that reported from the Zinda Pir area. The Chitarwata Formation also records an important transition in the evolution of the drainage systems in the area during the late Paleogene and early Neogene. This transition from the west-flowing paleo-Indus fluvial system to the development of the ancestral Indus drainage system may explain the numerous hiatuses that characterize the Chitarwata Formation. The abundance of fossil mammals from the Chitarwata and overlying Vihowa formation in the Bugti Hills provides critical biochronologic information that sheds new light on biostratigraphic correlation with the Zinda Pir area and for the entire Sulaiman Range.

  16. [Ash Meadows Purchase Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A proposal sent to the Richard King Mellon Foundation for a loan to fund the purchase of Ash Meadows by the Nature Conservancy. Ash Meadows, set outside of Las...

  17. Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-11-14

    Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T(B)(max) is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T(B)(max) for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot. PMID:25399173

  18. Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria, E-mail: Valeria.Molinero@utah.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Utah, 315 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

  19. Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servranckx, R.; Stunder, B.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDM) have been used operationally since the mid 1990's by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) designated Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) to provide ash forecast guidance. Over the years, significant improvements in the detection and prediction of airborne volcanic ash have been realized thanks to improved models, increases in computing power, 24-hr real time monitoring by VAACs / Meteorological Watch Offices and close coordination with Volcano Observatories around the world. Yet, predicting accurately the spatial and temporal structures of airborne volcanic ash and the deposition at the earth's surface remains a difficult and challenging problem. The forecasting problem is influenced by 3 main components. The first one (ERUPTION SOURCE PARAMETERS) comprises all non-meteorological parameters that characterize a specific eruption or volcanic ash cloud. For example, the volume / mass of ash released in the atmosphere, the duration of the eruption, the altitude and distribution of the ash cloud, the particle size distribution, etc. The second component (METEOROLOGY) includes all meteorological parameters (wind, moisture, stability, etc.) that are calculated by Numerical Weather Prediction models and that serve as input to the VATDM. The third component (TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION) combines input from the other 2 components through the use of VATDM to transport and disperse airborne volcanic ash in the atmosphere as well as depositing it at the surface though various removal mechanisms. Any weakness in one of the components may adversely affect the accuracy of the forecast. In a real-time, operational response context such as exists at the VAACs, the rapid delivery of the modeling results puts some constraints on model resolution and computing time. Efforts are ongoing to evaluate the reliability of VATDM forecasts though the use of various methods, including ensemble techniques. Remote sensing data

  20. Uplift and submarine formation of some Melanesian porphyry copper deposits: Stable isotope evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivas, A.R.; O'Neil, J.R.; Katchan, G.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope analyses of sericites and kaolinites from four young porphyry copper deposits (Ok Tedi (1.2 Ma) and Yandera (6.5 Ma), Papua New Guinea; Koloula (1.5 Ma), Solomon Islands; and Waisoi (ocean water. For Ok Tedi, the non-magmatic component was a meteoric water with an isotopic composition different from that of the present meteoric water in the region. The isotopic signature of the former meteoric water is consistent with a surface elevation of 200 m a.s.l. or less at the time of mineralization. The deposit was later exposed and supergene kaolinitization commenced at approximately 1200 m a.s.l. Uplift and erosion has continued to the present at which time the elevation of the exposed deposit is 1800 m a.s.l. This rate of uplift is consistent with that known from other geological evidence. If the rate of uplift were approximately constant during the last 1.2 Ma, the age of supergene enrichment can be dated at approximately 0.4 Ma B.P. Similarly, influx of meteoric water at Yandera occurred when the ground surface above the deposit was at an elevation of approximately 600 m a.s.l. The deposit's present elevation is 1600 m a.s.l. In this case a total uplift of approximately 2.2 km is indicated, with removal of 1.2 km of overburden by erosion. ?? 1984.

  1. Structure, formation and geochronology of the late Pleistocene and Holocene cover deposits in South-Eastern Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrūnas, Valentinas; Karmaza, Bronislavas; Molodkov, Anatoly; Šinkūnas, Petras; Švedas, Kęstutis; Zinkutė, Rimantė

    2010-11-01

    The available data of earlier investigations ( Basalykas, 1965; Basalykas et al., 1976a,b; Kudaba, 1983) show that deposits of various origin and age are widespread in Ašmena Upland and Lyda Plateau (South-Eastern Lithuania). They overlie a polygenetic dislodged marginal formations of the penultimate Medininkai (Warthe) glaciation. Pleistocene deposits in this area are often deformed by solifluction and fluvial erosion and penetrated by cryogenic ice-wedge pseudomorphs. Granulometric, geochemical and petrographic investigations of the deposits have demonstrated that they are characterized by different sources of sedimentary material supply as well as different degrees of physical and chemical weathering. The alternate deposits preserved in the study area imply palaeoenvironmental changes associated with the different palaeoclimatic events. The Ca/Zr ratios in cover deposits testify that the upper beds usually experienced stronger chemical weathering that is associated with warmer climate. The cases of weaker weathering can be explained by different sources of material, i.e. deposit origin, which can be indicated by Zr/Ti ratio. According to the scarce geochronological data available at least 4 clusters of IR-OSL dates can be distinguished in the late Pleistocene environmental history of Ašmena Upland and Lyda Plateau: about 100 ka (marine isotope stage (MIS) 5c, Merkinė interglacial), 89-71 ka (MIS 5a, Merkinė interglacial), about 40 ka (MIS 3, Rokai interstadial) and 21-12 ka (late Nemunas). One cluster of IR-OSL dates (9.7-5.3 ka) is obtained in the first half of Holocene.

  2. Depositional conditions for the Kuna Formation, Red Dog Zn-PB-Ag-Barite District, Alaska, inferred from isotopic and chemical proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig A.; Dumoulin, Julie A.; Burruss, Robert A.; Slack, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Water column redox conditions, degree of restriction of the depositional basin, and other paleoenvironmental parameters have been determined for the Mississippian Kuna Formation of northwestern Alaska from stratigraphic profiles of Mo, Fe/Al, and S isotopes in pyrite, C isotopes in organic matter, and N isotopes in bulk rock. This unit is important because it hosts the Red Dog and Anarraaq Zn-Pb-Ag ± barite deposits, which together constitute one of the largest zinc resources in the world. The isotopic and chemical proxies record a deep basin environment that became isolated from the open ocean, became increasingly reducing, and ultimately became euxinic. The basin was ventilated briefly and then became isolated again just prior to its demise as a discrete depocenter with the transition to the overlying Siksikpuk Formation. Ventilation corresponded approximately to the initiation of bedded barite deposition in the district, whereas the demise of the basin corresponded approximately to the formation of the massive sulfide deposits. The changes in basin circulation during deposition of the upper Kuna Formation may have had multiple immediate causes, but the underlying driver was probably extensional tectonic activity that also facilitated fluid flow beneath the basin floor. Although the formation of sediment-hosted sulfide deposits is generally favored by highly reducing conditions, the Zn-Pb deposits of the Red Dog district are not found in the major euxinic facies of the Kuna basin, nor did they form during the main period of euxinia. Rather, the deposits occur where strata were permeable to migrating fluids and where excess H2S was available beyond what was produced in situ by decomposition of local sedimentary organic matter. The known deposits formed mainly by replacement of calcareous strata that gained H2S from nearby highly carbonaceous beds (Anarraaq deposit) or by fracturing and vein formation in strata that produced excess H2S by reductive dissolution of

  3. Rising from the ashes: Coal ash in recycling and construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naquin, D.

    1998-02-01

    Beneficial Ash Management (BAM, Clearfield, Pa.) has won an environmental award for its use of ash and other waste to fight acid mine drainage. The company`s workers take various waste materials, mainly fly ash from coal-burning plants, to make a cement-like material or grouting, says Ernest Roselli, BAM president. The grouting covers the soil, which helps prevent water from contacting materials. This, in turn, helps control chemical reactions, reducing or eliminating formation of acid mine drainage. The company is restoring the 1,400-acre Bark Camp coal mine site near Penfield in Clearfield County, Pa. Under a no-cost contract with the state of Pennsylvania, BAM is using boiler slag, causticizing byproducts (lime) and nonreclaimable clarifier sludge from International Paper Co. (Erie, Pa.). The mine reclamation techniques developed and monitored at the site include using man-made wetlands to treat acid mine drainage and testing anhydrous ammonia as a similar treatment agent. BAM researches and tests fly ash mixed with lime-based activators as fill material for land reclamation, and develops and uses artificial soil material from paper mill and tannery biosolids.

  4. Ichnological constraints on the depositional environment of the Sawahlunto Formation, Kandi, northwest Ombilin Basin, west Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonneveld, J.-P.; Zaim, Y.; Rizal, Y.; Ciochon, R. L.; Bettis, E. A.; Aswan; Gunnell, G. F.

    2012-02-01

    A low diversity trace fossil assemblage is described from the Oligocene Sawahlunto Formation near Kandi, in the northwestern part of the Ombilin Basin in western Sumatra, Indonesia. This trace fossil assemblage includes six ichnogenera attributed to invertebrate infaunal and epifaunal activities ( Arenicolites, Diplocraterion, Planolites, Monocraterion/ Skolithos and Coenobichnus) and two ichnotaxa attributed to vertebrate activity (avian footprints: two species of Aquatilavipes). Arenicolites, Diplocraterion and Monocraterion/ Skolithos record the suspension feeding activities of either arthropods (most likely amphipods) or vermiform organisms. Planolites reflects the presence of an infaunal deposit feeder. Coenobichnus records the walking activities of hermit crabs. Both the Coenobichnus and the avian footprints record the surficial detritus scavenging of epifaunal organisms within a subaerial setting. These traces occur within a fine-grained sandstone succession characterized by planar laminae and low-relief, asymmetrical, commonly mud-draped (locally bidirectional) ripples. The presence of traces attributable to suspension feeders implies deposition in a subaqueous setting. Their occurrence (particularly the presence of Arenicolites and Diplocraterion) in a sandstone bed characterized by mud-draped and bidirectional ripples implies emplacement in a tidally-influenced marine to marginal marine setting. Co-occurrence of these traces with well-preserved avian footprints ( Aquatilavipes) further implies periodic subaerial exposure. Thus, it is most likely that the Sawahlunto Formation near Kandi records deposition within an intertidal flat setting. Definitive evidence of marine influences in the Oligocene interval of the Ombilin Basin implies a more complex tectono-stratigraphic history than has previously been implied.

  5. EFFECT OF RESIDUAL STRESS ON THE MARTENSITIC TRANS- FORMATION OF SPUTTER-DEPOSITED SMA THIN FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. Wang; D. Xu; B.C. Cai

    2002-01-01

    TiNi thin films were sputter-deposited on circular single-crystal silicon substrates un-der various sputtering parameters. The crystal structure and residual stress of the as-deposited films were determined by X-ray diffraction and substrate-curvature method.The phenomenon of stress-suppressed martensitic transformation was observed. It isconsidered that the residual stresses in SMA thin films based on circular substratesact as balanced biaxial tensile stresses. The status of equilibrant delays the align-ment of self-accommodated variants and the volume shrinkage during the martensitictransformation.

  6. Formation of complex bis(β-mercaptobenzothiazole)-zinc(II) films by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kejie; Yarmolenko, M. A.; Rogachev, A. A.; Zhou, Bing; Jiang, Xiaohong; Shen, Ruiqi; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2013-05-01

    Bis(β-mercaptobenzothiazole)-zinc (Zn(MBT)2) films were successfully deposited onto silicon substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method using Zn(MBT)2 powder as the raw material. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were used to characterize the as-prepared product. The obtained results indicate the structure and composition of Zn(MBT)2 are preserved during the mild PLD process. The approach provides new possibility to produce special metal complex film material.

  7. CONCENTRIC TUBE-FOULING RIG FOR INVESTIGATION OF FOULING DEPOSIT FORMATION FROM PASTEURISER OF VISCOUS FOOD LIQUID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. KHALID

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the work on developing concentric tube-fouling rig, a new fouling deposit monitoring device. This device can detect and quantify the level of fouling deposit formation. It can also functioning as sampler for fouling deposit study, which can be attached at any food processing equipment. The design is initiated with conceptual design. The rig is designed with inner diameter of 7 cm and with tube length of 37 cm. A spiral insert with 34.5 cm length and with 5.4 cm diameter is fitted inside the tube to ensure the fluid flows around the tube. In this work, the rig is attached to the lab-scale concentric tube-pasteurizer to test its effectiveness and to collect a fouling sample after pasteurization of pink guava puree. Temperature changes are recorded during the pasteurization and the data is used to plot the heat transfer profile. Thickness of the fouling deposit is also measured. The trends for thickness, heat resistance profile and heat transfer profile for concentric tube-fouling rig matched the trends obtained from lab-scale concentric tube-pasteurizer very well. The findings from this work have shown a good potential of this rig however there is a limitation with spiral insert, which is discussed in this paper.

  8. ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS - ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS. INCLUDES THE SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 01, 1998 - JUNE 30, 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature; Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined; Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (T{sub cv}) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt; Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles; Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems; and Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

  9. Lithofacies, depositional environments, and regional stratigraphy of the lower Eocene Ghazij Formation, Balochistan, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Edward A.; Warwick, P.D.; Roberts, S.B.; Khan, I.H.

    1999-01-01

    A regional stratigraphic investigation of one of the most important coal-bearing lithostratigraphic units in Pakistan, the report includes sedimentologic observations taken from outcrops and measured sections, information derived from petrographic and paleontologic analyses, depositional interpretations, and descriptions of regional trends.

  10. ASH MELTING TEMPERATURE PREDICTION FROM CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF BIOMASS ASH

    OpenAIRE

    Holubcik, Michal; Jandacka, Jozef; Malcho, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Solid fuels, including biomass, consist of combustible, ash and water. Ash in fuel is result of reaction of minerals presented in the biomass. Minerals and other different substances which form ash got into biomass during growth. Ash is solid residue resulted from the perfect laboratory combustion of fuel. It is composed of minerals that are present in the fuel. Some species of biomass ash have low ash melting temperature and can cause various problems in combustion boilers. Ash slags and sin...

  11. The Cement Solidification of Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Fly Ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Haobo; HE Xinghua; ZHU Shujing; ZHANG Dajie

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition, the content and the leachability of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration ( MSWI) fly ash were tested and analyzed. It is shown that the leachability of Pb and Cr exceeds the leaching toxicity standard, and so the MSWI fly ash is considered as hazardous waste and must be solidifled. The effect of solidifying the MSWI fly ash by cement was studied, and it is indicated that the heavy metals can be well immobilized if the mass fraction of the fly ash is appropriate. The heavy metals were immobilized within cement hydration products through either physical fixation, substitution, deposition or adsorption mechanisms.

  12. Formation of the Martian Polar Layered Terrains: Quantifying Polar Water Ice and Dust Surface Deposition During Current and Past Orbital Epochs with the NASA Ames GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, J. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The NASA Ames GCM will be used to quantify net annual polar deposition rates of water ice and dust on Mars during current and past orbital epochs to investigate the formation history, structure, and stratigraphy of the polar layered terrains.

  13. MODELING AND SIMULATION TO PREDICT PARTIAL DEPOSITION OF AMMONIA AND SPECIFIC GROWTH RATE OF BACTERIAL IN HOMOGENEOUS FORMATION IN OBIO/AKPOR, RIVERS STATE OF NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    solomon Ndubuisi Eluozo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Specific growth rate of bacteria has been expressed through characteristics influence deposition at various stratums to aquiferous zone. The growth rates of bacteria are under the influence of the substrate utilization that contaminates groundwater aquifers in various formations. Derived mathematical equations generated theoretical values that expressed the rate of exponential phase of ammonia deposition and bacteria growth rate in homogenous formation. Slight fluctuations were experienced in between the aquiferous zones under the influence of variation from degree of porosity and permeability of the stratum. Experimental values were compared with the theoretical values; both parameters produced a best fit. These expressed the application of the derived model that determines partial deposition of ammonia and bacteria growth rate in homogenous formation. The study is imperative because the model expressed partial depositions of ammonia that determine the growth rate of bacteria at various formations to groundwater aquifers in the study area.

  14. Simultaneous coastal measurements of ozone deposition fluxes and iodine-mediated particle emission fluxes with subsequent CCN formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Whitehead

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first observations of simultaneous ozone deposition fluxes and ultrafine particle emission fluxes over an extensive infra-littoral zone. Fluxes were measured by the eddy covariance technique at the Station Biologique de Roscoff, on the coast of Brittany, north-west France. This site overlooks a very wide (3 km littoral zone controlled by very deep tides (9.6 m exposing extensive macroalgae beds available for significant iodine mediated photochemical production of ultrafine particles. The aspect at the Station Biologique de Roscoff provides an extensive and relatively flat, uniform fetch within which micrometeorological techniques may be utilized to study links between ozone deposition to macroalgae (and sea water and ultrafine particle production.

    Ozone deposition to seawater at high tide was significantly slower (vd[O3]=0.302±0.095 mm s−1 than low tidal deposition. A statistically significant difference in the deposition velocities to macroalgae at low tide was observed between night time (vd[O3]=1.00±0.10 mm s−1 and daytime (vd[O3]=2.05±0.16 mm s−1 when ultrafine particle formation results in apparent particle emission. Very high emission fluxes of ultrafine particles were observed during daytime periods at low tides ranging from 50 000 particles cm−2 s−1 to greater than 200 000 particles cm−2 s−1 during some of the lowest tides. These emission fluxes exhibited a significant relationship with particle number concentrations comparable with previous observations at another location. Apparent particle growth rates were estimated to be in the range 17–150 nm h−1 for particles in the size range 3–10 nm. Under certain conditions, particle growth may be inferred to continue to greater than 120 nm over tens

  15. Simultaneous coastal measurements of ozone deposition fluxes and iodine-mediated particle emission fluxes with subsequent CCN formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Whitehead

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first observations of simultaneous ozone deposition fluxes and ultrafine particle emission fluxes over an extensive infra-littoral zone. Fluxes were measured by the eddy covariance technique at the Station Biologique de Roscoff, on the coast of Brittany, north-west France. This site overlooks a very wide (3 km littoral zone controlled by very deep tides (9.6 m exposing extensive macroalgae beds available for significant iodine mediated photochemical production of ultrafine particles. The aspect at the Station Biologique de Roscoff provides an extensive and relatively flat, uniform fetch within which micrometeorological techniques may be utilized to study links between ozone deposition to macroalgae (and sea water and ultrafine particle production.

    Ozone deposition to seawater at high tide was significantly slower (vd[O3]=0.302±0.095 mm s−1 than low tidal deposition. A statistically significant difference in the deposition velocities to macroalgae at low tide was observed between night time (vd[O3]=1.00±0.10 mm s−1 and daytime (vd[O3]=2.05±0.16s−1 when ultrafine particle formation results in apparent particle emission. Very high emission fluxes of ultrafine particles were observed during daytime periods at low tides ranging from 50 000 particles cm−2 s−1 to greater than 200 000 particles cm−2 s−1 during some of the lowest tides. These emission fluxes exhibited a significant relationship with particle number concentrations comparable with previous observations at another location. Apparent particle growth rates were estimated to be in the range 17–150 nm h−1 for particles in the size range 3–10 nm. Under certain conditions, particle growth may be inferred to continue to greater than 120 nm over tens of hours; sizes at which

  16. The role of phase separation for self-organized surface pattern formation by ion beam erosion and metal atom co-deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsaess, H.; Zhang, K.; Pape, A.; Bobes, O.; Broetzmann, M. [Georg-August University Goettingen, II. Institute of Physics, Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    We investigate the ripple pattern formation on Si surfaces at room temperature during normal incidence ion beam erosion under simultaneous deposition of different metallic co-deposited surfactant atoms. The co-deposition of small amounts of metallic atoms, in particular Fe and Mo, is known to have a tremendous impact on the evolution of nanoscale surface patterns on Si. In previous work on ion erosion of Si during co-deposition of Fe atoms, we proposed that chemical interactions between Fe and Si atoms of the steady-state mixed Fe{sub x} Si surface layer formed during ion beam erosion is a dominant driving force for self-organized pattern formation. In particular, we provided experimental evidence for the formation of amorphous iron disilicide. To confirm and generalize such chemical effects on the pattern formation, in particular the tendency for phase separation, we have now irradiated Si surfaces with normal incidence 5 keV Xe ions under simultaneous gracing incidence co-deposition of Fe, Ni, Cu, Mo, W, Pt, and Au surfactant atoms. The selected metals in the two groups (Fe, Ni, Cu) and (W, Pt, Au) are very similar regarding their collision cascade behavior, but strongly differ regarding their tendency to silicide formation. We find pronounced ripple pattern formation only for those co deposited metals (Fe, Mo, Ni, W, and Pt), which are prone to the formation of mono and disilicides. In contrast, for Cu and Au co-deposition the surface remains very flat, even after irradiation at high ion fluence. Because of the very different behavior of Cu compared to Fe, Ni and Au compared to W, Pt, phase separation toward amorphous metal silicide phases is seen as the relevant process for the pattern formation on Si in the case of Fe, Mo, Ni, W, and Pt co-deposition. (orig.)

  17. MODELING AND SIMULATION TO PREDICT PARTIAL DEPOSITION OF AMMONIA AND SPECIFIC GROWTH RATE OF BACTERIAL IN HOMOGENEOUS FORMATION IN OBIO/AKPOR, RIVERS STATE OF NIGERIA

    OpenAIRE

    solomon Ndubuisi Eluozo

    2013-01-01

    Specific growth rate of bacteria has been expressed through characteristics influence deposition at various stratums to aquiferous zone. The growth rates of bacteria are under the influence of the substrate utilization that contaminates groundwater aquifers in various formations. Derived mathematical equations generated theoretical values that expressed the rate of exponential phase of ammonia deposition and bacteria growth rate in homogenous formation. Slight fluctuations were experienced in...

  18. Study on gold mineralization in the El Callao Mining District, Venezuela. Implication of "invisible" gold remobilization for the deposit formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Velásquez, German

    2012-01-01

    The Colombia Mine is localized in the El Callao Mining District Venezuela. It has Au reserves of 23 million ounces (= 740 t Au), which make it the largest gold mine in Guayana Craton, and grant it the label of giant gold deposit (i.e. > 500 t Au). The mineralization is hosted by the Paleoproterozoic El Callao formation, which is constituted by Fe-rich tholeiitic basalts that were formed in a plateau oceanic setting. Exploitation in the mine is focused on three "vein systems", known as América...

  19. Direct evidence for fluid mixing processes during formation of post-Variscan, unconformity-related hydrothermal vein deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Fußwinkel, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Post-Variscan hydrothermal vein deposits are widespread in central Europe and are associated with enrichments in Pb-Zn-Cu-(Ag), Mn-Fe or Co-Ni-Bi. Their formation is commonly explained by fluid mixing processes. However, direct evidence for the occurrence of such processes on the scale of individual ore veins is rare, and as a result their efficiency on these scales is still disputed. Using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), multi-element analyses of indiv...

  20. Towards a CFD-based mechanistic deposit formation model for straw-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Baxter, L.L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of FLUENTe in the analysis of grate-fired biomass boilers. A short description of the concept used to model fuel conversion on the grate and the coupling to the CFD code is offered. The development and implementation of a CFD-based deposition model is presented...... in the reminder of the paper. The growth of deposits on furnace walls and super heater tubes is treated including the impact on heat transfer rates determined by the CFD code. Based on the commercial CFD code FLUENTe, the overall model is fully implemented through the User Defined Functions. The model...... resistance changes. The model is applied to the straw-fired Masnedø boiler. Results are in good qualitative agreement with both measurements and observations at the plants. q 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. Formation of high T/sub c/ superconducting films by organometallic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first growth of superconducting YBaCuO films by organometallic chemical vapor deposition is described. Metal β-diketonates were decomposed thermally on MgO substrates in an oxygen-rich atmosphere to produce amorphous brown films. Subsequent annealing in oxygen yielded dull gray films whose thickness corresponded to deposition rates of approximately 8 nm min-1. These films showed semiconductor-like behavior at higher temperatures, followed by a broad resistive transition from 80 to 36 K with the resistance becoming zero at ∼20 K. Analysis of x-ray data indicated the presence of the orthorhombic superconducting phase and various other metal oxides. Profilometer measurements yielded film thicknesses up to 950 nm, and scanning electron microscopy revealed faceted grains from 0.5 to 1.0 μm in size

  2. Sodium vapour aerosol formation and sodium deposition current work within the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significance to reactor operation of sodium transport through the cover gas of a sodium-cooled fast reactor and its subsequent deposition on cooled reactor surfaces is fully appreciated in the UK. A programme of work is therefore underway designed to understand the mechanism of sodium transport under these conditions. This paper described the work which has so far been completed, discussed the work presently in progress, and outlines future plans. (author)

  3. Depositional environments of the coal-bearing Mist Mountain formation, Eagle Mountain, southeastern Canadian Rocky mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlop, R.L.; Bustin, R.M. (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Department of Geological Sciences)

    1987-12-01

    Fifteen major coal seams have been identified at the Mist Mountain formation at Eagle Mountain in southeastern British Columbia. In this paper a detailed three-dimensional analysis of the sedimentology of the Mist Mountain formation is undertaken, with particular reference to factors controlling lateral and vertical distribution of major coal seams and coal quality. Data was based on examination of 200 drill hole samples. 32 refs., 20 figs.

  4. The Formation of Nanocrystalline Diamond Coating on WC Deposited by Microwave Assisted Plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toff, M. R. M.; Hamzah, E.; Purniawan, A.

    2010-03-01

    Diamond is one form of carbon structure. The extreme hardness and high chemical resistant of diamond coatings determined that many works on this area relate to coated materials for tribological applications in biomedicine, as mechanical seals or cutting tools for hard machining operations. In the work, nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coated tungsten carbide (WC) have been deposited by microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition (MAPCVD) from CH4/H2 mixtures. Morphology of NCD was investigated by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The quality of NCD is defined as ratio between diamond and non diamond and also full width at half maximum (FWHM) was determined using Raman spectra. The result found that the NCD structure can be deposited on WC surface using CH4/H2 gas mixture with grain size ˜20 nm to 100 nm. Increase %CH4 concentration due to increase the nucleation of NCD whereas decrease the quality of diamond. Based on Raman spectra, the quality of NCD is in the range ˜98.82-99.01% and 99.56-99.75% for NCD and microcrystalline (MCD), respectively. In addition, FWHM of NCD is high than MCD in the range of 8.664-62.24 cm-1 and 4.24-5.05 cm-1 for NCD and MCD respectively that indicate the crystallineity of NCD is smaller than MCD.

  5. Growth, intermixing, and surface phase formation for zinc tin oxide nanolaminates produced by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad and expanding range of materials can be produced by atomic layer deposition at relatively low temperatures, including both oxides and metals. For many applications of interest, however, it is desirable to grow more tailored and complex materials such as semiconductors with a certain doping, mixed oxides, and metallic alloys. How well such mixed materials can be accomplished with atomic layer deposition requires knowledge of the conditions under which the resulting films will be mixed, solid solutions, or laminated. The growth and lamination of zinc oxide and tin oxide is studied here by means of the extremely surface sensitive technique of low energy ion scattering, combined with bulk composition and thickness determination, and x-ray diffraction. At the low temperatures used for deposition (150 °C), there is little evidence for atomic scale mixing even with the smallest possible bilayer period, and instead a morphology with small ZnO inclusions in a SnOx matrix is deduced. Postannealing of such laminates above 400 °C however produces a stable surface phase with a 30% increased density. From the surface stoichiometry, this is likely the inverted spinel of zinc stannate, Zn2SnO4. Annealing to 800 °C results in films containing crystalline Zn2SnO4, or multilayered films of crystalline ZnO, Zn2SnO4, and SnO2 phases, depending on the bilayer period

  6. Saharan dust deposition in the Carpathian Basin and its possible effects on interglacial soil formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, György; Cserháti, Csaba; Kovács, János; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    Several hundred tons of windblown dust material are lifted into the atmosphere and are transported every year from Saharan dust source areas towards Europe having an important climatic and other environmental effect also on distant areas. According to the systematic observations of modern Saharan dust events, it can be stated that dust deflated from North African source areas is a significant constituent of the atmosphere of the Carpathian Basin and Saharan dust deposition events are identifiable several times in a year. Dust episodes are connected to distinct meteorological situations, which are also the determining factors of the different kinds of depositional mechanisms. By using the adjusted values of dust deposition simulations of numerical models, the annual Saharan dust flux can be set into the range of 3.2-5.4 g/m2/y. Based on the results of past mass accumulation rates calculated from stratigraphic and sedimentary data of loess-paleosol sequences, the relative contribution of Saharan dust to interglacial paleosol material was quantified. According to these calculations, North African exotic dust material can represent 20-30% of clay and fine silt-sized soil components of interglacial paleosols in the Carpathian Basin. The syngenetic contribution of external aeolian dust material is capable to modify physicochemical properties of soils and hereby the paleoclimatic interpretation of these pedogene stratigraphic units.

  7. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  8. The Eocene Rusayl Formation, Oman, carbonaceous rocks in calcareous shelf sediments: Environment of deposition, alteration and hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dill, H.G.; Wehner, H.; Kus, J. [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, P.O. Box 510163, D-30631 Hannover (Germany); Botz, R. [University Kiel, Geological-Paleontological Department, Olshausenstrasse 40-60, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Berner, Z.; Stueben, D. [Technical University Karlsruhe, Institute for Mineralogy and Geochemistry, Fritz-Haber-Weg 2, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Al-Sayigh, A. [Sultan Qaboos University, Geological Dept. PO Box 36, Al-Khod (Oman)

    2007-10-01

    Paralic carbonaceous series intercalated among calcareous shelf sediments have seldom been investigated. During the early Eocene, calcareous and siliciclastic sediments were deposited on a wide shelf in front of low-reliefed hinterland in the Al Khawd region in NE Oman. The siliciclastic-calcareous sediments originated from strongly reworked debris of the Arabic Shield. The underlying Semail Ophiolite did not act as a direct source of debris but provided some heat to increase the maturity of carbonaceous rocks and modify the isotope signal of the calcareous minerals in the Rusayl Formation. A multidisciplinary approach involving sedimentology, mineralogy, chemistry, coal petrography and paleontology resulted in the establishment of nine stratigraphic lithofacies units and provides the reader with a full picture from deposition of the mixed carbonaceous-calcareous-siliciclastic rocks to the most recent stages of post-depositional alteration of the Paleogene formations. The calcareous Jafnayn Formation (lithofacies unit I) developed in a subtidal to intertidal regime, influenced episodically by storms. Deepening of the calcareous shelf towards younger series was ground to a halt by paleosols developing on a disconformity (lithofacies unit II) and heralding the onset of the Rusayl Formation. The stratigraphic lithofacies units III and IV reflect mangrove swamps which from time to time were flooded through washover fans from the open sea. The presence of Spinozonocolpites and the taxon Avicennia, which today belong to a coastal marsh vegetational community, furnish palynological evidence to the idea of extensive mangrove swamps in the Rusayl Formation [El Beialy, S.Y., 1998. Stratigraphic and palaeonenvironmental significance of Eocene palynomorphs from the Rusayl Shale Formation, Al Khawd, northern Oman. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 102, 249-258]. During the upper Rusayl Formation (lithofacies units V through VII) algal mats episodically flooded by marine

  9. Volcanic ash as fertiliser for the surface ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Langmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron is a key limiting micro-nutrient for marine primary productivity. It can be supplied to the ocean by atmospheric dust deposition. Volcanic ash deposition into the ocean represents another external and so far largely neglected source of iron. This study demonstrates strong evidence for natural fertilisation in the iron-limited oceanic area of the NE Pacific, induced by volcanic ash from the eruption of Kasatochi volcano in August 2008. Atmospheric and oceanic conditions were favourable to generate a massive phytoplankton bloom in the NE Pacific Ocean which for the first time strongly suggests a connection between oceanic iron-fertilisation and volcanic ash supply.

  10. Volcanic ash as fertiliser for the surface ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Langmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is a key limiting micro-nutrient for marine primary productivity. It can be supplied to the ocean by atmospheric dust deposition. Volcanic ash deposition into the ocean represents another external and so far largely neglected source of iron. This study demonstrates strong evidence for natural fertilisation in the iron-limited oceanic area of the NE Pacific, induced by volcanic ash from the eruption of Kasatochi volcano in August 2008. Atmospheric and oceanic conditions were favourable to generate a massive phytoplankton bloom in the NE Pacific Ocean which for the first time establishes a causal connection between oceanic iron-fertilisation and volcanic ash supply.

  11. A study on the genetic relations between Permian Longtan Formation coal series strata and Carlin-type gold deposits, southwestern Guizhou Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Aiguo; MEI Shiquan; GUAN Daiyun; WU Pan; ZHANG Zhuru

    2008-01-01

    A large number of the Carlin-type gold deposits occur in the Longtan Formation in southwestern Guizhou Province. The Longtan Formation contains abundant basalt, tuff and siliceous rocks. All rocks of the Longtan Formation are enriched in gold, which were deposited in a limited platform environment in the transition zone from marine to continental. The process of sedimentation was accompanied by the eruption of Emeishan basalt and hydrothermal deposition controlled by co-sedimentary submarine deep faults in the west, which led to the formation of a peculiar gold-bearing formation with coal series strata. This formation controlled the occurrence of the Carlin-type gold deposits in southwestern Guizhou Province. In response to the remobilization of the Emei mantle plume during the Yanshanian period, As, Au and other ore-forming materials were continuously extracted by deeply circulating waters from the Emeishan basalt and coal seams, thereafter forming ore-forming hydrothermal solutions.When these elements were transported in the coal seams, large amounts of As, Au and other elements were enriched in pyrite within the coal seams, thus forming high-As coal and Carlin-type gold deposits in the Longtan Formation coal series strata.

  12. Facies characteristics of the basal part of the Talchir Formation, Talchir Basin, India – depositional history revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabir Dasgupta; Rishiraj Sahoo

    2007-02-01

    The lowest unit of the Talchir Formation of Talchir Basin, Orissa, was described by pioneer workers as the 'basal oulder bed'. In an attempt to explain the co-existence of gravel and clay, materials of contrasting hydraulic properties, a probable situation resembling the effects of the action of ground-ice enabled boulders to be carried down by sluggish currents resulting in an intermixture of large boulders and fine mud was conceived. Misinterpretation of this conclusion led to a general tendency to describe the 'basal boulder bed' as 'glacial tillite'. However, the unit described as 'basal boulder bed is actually represented by a matrix rich conglomerate with pockets of normally graded silty clay. The present study reveals that the depositional imprints preserved in this part of the sedimentary succession indicate emplacement of successive debris flows generated through remobilization of pre-existing unconsolidated sediments. Small pockets of fine-grained turbidites presumably deposited from the entrained turbidity currents associated with the debris flows suggest the composite character of the debris flow deposit.

  13. Growth, intermixing, and surface phase formation for zinc tin oxide nanolaminates produced by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hägglund, Carl, E-mail: carl.hagglund@angstrom.uu.se [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Engineering Sciences, Division of Solid State Electronics, Uppsala University, 75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Grehl, Thomas; Brongersma, Hidde H. [ION-TOF GmbH, Heisenbergstraße 15, 48149 Münster (Germany); Tanskanen, Jukka T.; Mullings, Marja N.; Mackus, Adriaan J. M.; MacIsaac, Callisto; Bent, Stacey Francine, E-mail: sbent@stanford.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yee, Ye Sheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Clemens, Bruce M. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A broad and expanding range of materials can be produced by atomic layer deposition at relatively low temperatures, including both oxides and metals. For many applications of interest, however, it is desirable to grow more tailored and complex materials such as semiconductors with a certain doping, mixed oxides, and metallic alloys. How well such mixed materials can be accomplished with atomic layer deposition requires knowledge of the conditions under which the resulting films will be mixed, solid solutions, or laminated. The growth and lamination of zinc oxide and tin oxide is studied here by means of the extremely surface sensitive technique of low energy ion scattering, combined with bulk composition and thickness determination, and x-ray diffraction. At the low temperatures used for deposition (150 °C), there is little evidence for atomic scale mixing even with the smallest possible bilayer period, and instead a morphology with small ZnO inclusions in a SnO{sub x} matrix is deduced. Postannealing of such laminates above 400 °C however produces a stable surface phase with a 30% increased density. From the surface stoichiometry, this is likely the inverted spinel of zinc stannate, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}. Annealing to 800 °C results in films containing crystalline Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, or multilayered films of crystalline ZnO, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, and SnO{sub 2} phases, depending on the bilayer period.

  14. Magmatic-vapor expansion and the formation of high-sulfidation gold deposits: Chemical controls on alteration and mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, R.W.; Berger, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Large bulk-tonnage high-sulfidation gold deposits, such as Yanacocha, Peru, are the surface expression of structurally-controlled lode gold deposits, such as El Indio, Chile. Both formed in active andesite-dacite volcanic terranes. Fluid inclusion, stable isotope and geologic data show that lode deposits formed within 1500. m of the paleo-surface as a consequence of the expansion of low-salinity, low-density magmatic vapor with very limited, if any, groundwater mixing. They are characterized by an initial 'Sulfate' Stage of advanced argillic wallrock alteration ?? alunite commonly with intense silicification followed by a 'Sulfide' Stage - a succession of discrete sulfide-sulfosalt veins that may be ore grade in gold and silver. Fluid inclusions in quartz formed during wallrock alteration have homogenization temperatures between 100 and over 500 ??C and preserve a record of a vapor-rich environment. Recent data for El Indio and similar deposits show that at the commencement of the Sulfide Stage, 'condensation' of Cu-As-S sulfosalt melts with trace concentrations of Sb, Te, Bi, Ag and Au occurred at > 600 ??C following pyrite deposition. Euhedral quartz crystals were simultaneously deposited from the vapor phase during crystallization of the vapor-saturated melt occurs to Fe-tennantite with progressive non-equilibrium fractionation of heavy metals between melt-vapor and solid. Vugs containing a range of sulfides, sulfosalts and gold record the changing composition of the vapor. Published fluid inclusion and mineralogical data are reviewed in the context of geological relationships to establish boundary conditions through which to trace the expansion of magmatic vapor from source to surface and consequent alteration and mineralization. Initially heat loss from the vapor is high resulting in the formation of acid condensate permeating through the wallrock. This Sulfate Stage alteration effectively isolates the expansion of magmatic vapor in subsurface fracture arrays

  15. Heavy metals in MSW incineration fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2003-01-01

    related to the combustion of MSW and the formation of fly ash, especially in what concerns heavy metals. Treatment of the flue gas in air pollution control equipment plays an important role and the basic processes to accomplish this are explained. Fly ash from a semi-dry flue gas treatment system......Incineration is a common solution for dealing with the increasing amount of municipal solid waste (MSW). During the process, the heavy metals initially present in the waste go through several transformations, ending up in combustion products, such as fly ash. This article deals with some issues...... is characterized regarding its physical-chemical properties: pH, solubility, chemical composition, and leaching, amongst others. Results indicate a high alkalinity and the presence of large amounts of calcium, chlorides, sulfates, carbonates, sodium and potassium. Metal concentrations in fly ash are: 6,2 g...

  16. Formation of rubrene nanocrystals by laser ablation in liquids utilizing MAPLE deposited thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Sean M.; Amin, Mitesh; Borchert, James; Jimenez, Richard; Steiner, Matt; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Bubb, Daniel M.

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of the organic semiconductor rubrene were formed utilizing the laser ablation in liquids (LAL) method. Thin-films deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) served as the ablation targets. We note in the case of amorphous films targets, the absorbed energy is below the threshold value needed for ablation; though polycrystalline films irradiated under the same LAL conditions result in ejecta. It is suggested this stems from an increase in the effective absorption through light trapping within crystalline domains. An observed red-shift in the absorption edge is attributed to the polar aqueous environment and to the crystalline phase.

  17. An Investigation on the Formation of Carbon Nanotubes by Two-Stage Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shamsudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has been synthesized from agricultural hydrocarbon: camphor oil using a one-hour synthesis time and a titanium dioxide sol gel catalyst. The pyrolysis temperature is studied in the range of 700–900°C at increments of 50°C. The synthesis process is done using a custom-made two-stage catalytic chemical vapor deposition apparatus. The CNT characteristics are investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that structural properties of CNT are highly dependent on pyrolysis temperature changes.

  18. Formation and physical properties of YBCO thick films grown by using the electrophoretic deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thick films of the YBa2Cu3Oγ-δ (YBCO) superconductor were prepared by using the electrophoretic deposition technique and a flexible wire as the substrate. The transition temperature of the wires was 91 K, the intragranular magnetic critical current density Jcgmag was about 105 A/cm2 at 77 K in a weak field, and the transport Jctrans was about 365 A/cm2 at 77 K. We calculated the intergranular magnetic critical current JcJmag and the activation energy from the AC-susceptibility measurements, and their values were about 444 A/cm2 at 77 K and 2.02 eV, respectively

  19. Deposition of acrylonitrile cluster ions on solid substrates: thin film formation by intracluster polymerization products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Sato, Naoki

    2006-03-01

    Cluster anions of acrylonitrile (AN), known to give intracluster anionic polymerization products, were deposited on solid substrates. The obtained films were examined by using infrared absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography with the aid of quantum chemical calculations. The acquired spectroscopic data are similar to those of polyacrylonitrile (PAN), while the normal polymerization of AN or reactions related to PAN seemed not to occur noticeably. On the contrary, the product analysis shows that most of the constituent molecules of the films are formed via cyclohexane-1,3,5-tricarbonitrile (CHTCN), a dominant product of the intracluster polymerization of AN, accompanied by fragmentation and dimerization. PMID:16509718

  20. The classical and alternative pathways of complement activation play distinct roles in spontaneous C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2004-01-01

    The contributions of the classical (CP) and alternative (AP) pathways of complement activation to the spontaneous deposition of C3 fragments and the formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC) on human B lymphocytes, were assessed by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with autologous......, however, in the nature of the fragments deposited as a result of CP and AP activation: C3b fragments deposited via the CP were extensively ( approximately 90%) converted to the terminal degradation product, C3dg, whereas about 50% of those deposited by the AP persisted as C3b/iC3b fragments. The extent of...

  1. Deposit formation by 5 % FAME blends in premix burner systems; Ablagerungsbildung durch 5 % FAME Blends in Vormischbrennersystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rheinberg, Oliver van; Dirks, Helma; Lucka, Klaus; Koehne, Heinrich [Oel-Waerme-Institut gGmbH (OWI), Aachen-Herzogenrath (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Modern burnersystems for Domestic Heating Oil (DHO), with low emissions use an extensive mixing preparation, which is an important criterion for the quality of the combustion. Changes on the fuel may lead to higher emissions and deposit formation and can furthermore affect the storage stability. Analogous to the fuel sector, a further development of DHO concerning the admixture or substitution by alternative fuels is pursued at the moment. The DIN V 51603-6 ''alternative Domestic Heating Oil'' defines the requirements of blends of mineral oil based low sulphur Domestic Heating Oil with biogenic and other alternative compounds such as Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME), Vegetable Oil (VO) or Gas to Liquid (GtL) and Biomass to Liquid (BtL). The utilization of burners which are available in the market right now with minor technical modifications is desired. The project aim was to research the practical usage of DHO with an admixture of 5 % (V/V) FAME and 5 % (V/V) VO in oil heating systems. The project was divided into three parts: first the deposit formation and the emissions of stationary oil firing systems were determined in the lab. This was conducted on three different types of burners (blue burner, yellow burner, and rotation evaporator), that are supposedly relevant for today's stock. Secondly, the effect of the fuel matrix on the deposit forming of idealized droplet evaporation in a crucible furnace was qualified and quantified, to make temperature ranges and layout criterions for burner components available. Thirdly, a practical storage of the blends used was conducted which was attended by suitable fuel analysis. Besides the documentation of the ageing state and the correlation to the experiments, the validation of a measuring method for the determination of the oxidation stability as emphasized. (orig.)

  2. Formation of pure Cu nanocrystals upon post-growth annealing of Cu–C material obtained from focused electron beam induced deposition: comparison of different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Rodrigues Vaz, Alfredo; Zhang, Yucheng; Rudkowski, Andrzej; Kapusta, Czesław; Erni, Rolf; Moshkalev, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this paper we study in detail the post-growth annealing of a copper-containing material deposited with focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). The organometallic precursor Cu(II)(hfac)2 was used for deposition and the results were compared to that of compared to earlier experiments with (hfac)Cu(I)(VTMS) and (hfac)Cu(I)(DMB). Transmission electron microscopy revealed the deposition of amorphous material from Cu(II)(hfac)2. In contrast, as-deposited material from (hfac)Cu(I)(VTMS) and (hfac)Cu(I)(DMB) was nano-composite with Cu nanocrystals dispersed in a carbonaceous matrix. After annealing at around 150–200 °C all deposits showed the formation of pure Cu nanocrystals at the outer surface of the initial deposit due to the migration of Cu atoms from the carbonaceous matrix containing the elements carbon, oxygen, and fluorine. Post-irradiation of deposits with 200 keV electrons in a transmission electron microscope favored the formation of Cu nanocrystals within the carbonaceous matrix of freestanding rods and suppressed the formation on their surface. Electrical four-point measurements on FEBID lines from Cu(hfac)2 showed five orders of magnitude improvement in conductivity when being annealed conventionally and by laser-induced heating in the scanning electron microscope chamber. PMID:26425404

  3. The effects of colloidal SiO2 and inhibitor on the solid deposit formation in geothermal water of low hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Novica J.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Low solubility of SiO2 and its occurrence in geothermal waters in the form of ionic, colloidal and suspended state are the main cause of the solid deposit occurrence. Certain chemical types of silica, under the influence of Fe2+, Al3+, F−, OH- ions and other micro-constituents, and due to significantly decreased solubility of SiO2, stimulate nucleation, particle growth and solid deposit formation. The aim of this paper is to inhibit the process of nucleation and solid deposit formation by adding originally designed inhibitor in the form of an emulsion, when the total concentration of the present and added colloidal SiO2 is beyond the solubility limit (120 mg/dm3. By turbidimetric, SEM, EDS and XRD analysis, the processes of solid deposit formation were investigated in Vranjska Banja (Serbia spa geothermal water source (water hardness of 4ºdH, and theoretical and practical conclusions were made.

  4. A Study on Reactive Spray Deposition Technology Processing Parameters in the Context of Pt Nanoparticle Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Justin M.; Maric, Radenka

    2015-12-01

    Catalytic materials are complex systems in which achieving the desired properties (i.e., activity, selectivity and stability) depends on exploiting the many degrees of freedom in surface and bulk composition, geometry, and defects. Flame aerosol synthesis is a process for producing nanoparticles with ample processing parameter space to tune the desired properties. Flame dynamics inside the reactor are determined by the input process variables such as solubility of precursor in the fuel; solvent boiling point; reactant flow rate and concentration; flow rates of air, fuel and the carrier gas; and the burner geometry. In this study, the processing parameters for reactive spray deposition technology, a flame-based synthesis method, are systematically evaluated to understand the residence times, reactant mixing, and temperature profiles of flames used in the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles. This provides a framework for further study and modeling. The flame temperature and length are also studied as a function of O2 and fuel flow rates.

  5. The classical and alternative pathways of complement activation play distinct roles in spontaneous C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2004-01-01

    The contributions of the classical (CP) and alternative (AP) pathways of complement activation to the spontaneous deposition of C3 fragments and the formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC) on human B lymphocytes, were assessed by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with autologous...... serum in the absence and presence of selective inhibitors of the AP and CP, respectively. While the total amount of C3 fragments deposited was relatively unaffected by blocking either pathway individually, deposition was virtually abrogated by their combined blockade. A marked difference was observed......, however, in the nature of the fragments deposited as a result of CP and AP activation: C3b fragments deposited via the CP were extensively ( approximately 90%) converted to the terminal degradation product, C3dg, whereas about 50% of those deposited by the AP persisted as C3b/iC3b fragments. The extent of...

  6. Thaumasite formation in hydraulic mortars by atmospheric SO2 deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Varela, M. T.; Aguilera, J.; Martínez Ramires, S.; Palomo, A.; Sabbioni, C.; Riotinto, C.; Zappia, C.; Van Valen, K.; Toumbakari, E. E.

    2001-01-01

    Sulphation of mortars and concretes is a function of diverse environmental factors (SO2 aerosol, temperature, etc) as well as some material characteristics. One of the phases that could be formed as consequence of the sulphation of the hydraulic binder is thaumasite. In this paper different hydraulic mortars have been exposed to laboratory exposure chambers in order to reproduce thaumasite formation due to atmospheric SO2. Under the laboratory exp...

  7. The influence of deposition parameters and gaseous detonation equipment design on the coating formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper devoted to the problems of development of the problem-oriented dialogue program complex for direct computational experiment in the chain detonation gun -gas-powder feeding-high-temperature high-velocity jet- coating. The formation of structure and properties of coatings are determining by large quantity of factors. At the first approaching the conditions of coatings formation are determined by shape, sizes, velocity and temperature of particles, their texture and aggregative state, spatio-temporal distribution of powder particles into impulse heterogeneous jet, microrelief, texture and temperature gradient of substrate surface layer, rate of fire, etc. More detailed consideration is demanding taking into account a number of other factors as used gas mixture, spatio- temporal characteristics of fresh charge into barrel, kinematics of spraying process, design philosophy of sprayed component, main material, etc. However, the starting point in this complicated process of coating obtaining is the formation of start elements of coating in the form of individual particles sprayed onto substrate. The systems of mathematical models and information interchange in the time of optimization of engineering procedures of detonation spraying of coatings are examined. The base of an expert system to assist detonation spray coating process is a dialogue modeling complex. It represent a stationary developed complex of methodical, algorithmic, software and information environment, which assure the essential promotion of effectiveness of development work, investigations and training. (author)

  8. Facies analysis and depositional environments of the OligoceneeMiocene Asmari Formation, Zagros Basin, Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Sahraeyan; Mohammad Bahrami; Solmaz Arzaghi

    2014-01-01

    The Asmari Formation (a giant hydrocarbon reservoir) is a thick carbonate sequence of the Oligocenee Miocene in the Zagros Basin, southwest of Iran. This formation is exposed at Tang-e-Lendeh in the Fars interior zone with a thickness of 190 m comprising medium and thick to massive bedded carbonates. The age of the Asmari Formation in the study area is the late Oligocene (Chattian)eearly Miocene (Burdigalian). Ten microfacies are defined, characterizing a gradual shallowing upward trend;the related environments are as follows:open marine (MF 8e10), restricted lagoon (MF 6e7), shoal (MF 3e5), lagoon (MF 2), and tidal flat (MF 1). Based on the environmental interpretations, a homoclinal ramp consisting of inner and middle parts prevails. MF 3e7 are characterized by the occurrence of large and small porcelaneous benthic foraminifera representing a shallow-water setting of an inner ramp, influenced by wave and tidal pro-cesses. MF 8e10, with large particles of coral and algae, represent a deeper fair weather wave base of a middle ramp setting.

  9. Modeling volcanic ash resuspension – application to the 14–18 October 2011 outbreak episode in Central Patagonia, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Folch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic fallout deposits from the June 2011 Cordón Caulle eruption in Central Patagonia were remobilized in several occasions months after their emplacement. In particular, during 14–18 October 2011, an intense outbreak episode generated huge volcanic clouds that were dispersed across Argentina, causing multiple impacts in the environment, affecting the air quality and disrupting airports. Fine ash particles in volcanic fallout deposits can be resuspended under favourable meteorological conditions, particularly during strong wind episodes in arid environments having low soil moisture and poor vegetation coverage. In opposition to eruption-formed ash clouds, modeling of resuspension-formed ash clouds has received little attention. In consequence, there are no emission schemes specially developed and calibrated for volcanic ash, and no operational product exists to model and forecast the formation and dispersal of resuspension ash clouds. Here we implement three dust emission schemes of increasing complexity in the FALL3D tephra dispersal model and use the 14–18 October 2011 outbreak episode as a model test case. We calibrate the emission schemes and validate the results of the coupled WRF-ARW/FALL3D modeling system using satellite imagery and measurements of visibility (a quantity related to total suspended particle concentration at surface and particulate matter (PM10 concentration at several meteorological and air quality stations sparse across Argentina and Uruguay. Our final goal is to test the capability of the modeling system to become, in the near future, an operational forecast product for volcanic ash resuspension events.

  10. The behavior of ash species in suspension fired biomass boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Arendt

    formation in suspension fired boilers. The presentation provides an overview of the knowledge obtained with respect to ash species behavior insuspension fired biomass boilers. A mechanistic understanding of the fly ash formation process in biomass fired PF boilers isobtained today. A high fraction of alkali...... salt species are released to the gas phase during the initial fuel combustion process. The salt species are present in gas phase in the boil chamberand upon cooling in the convective pass aerosols are formed. Recent studies indicates that a large fraction of the residual condensed phase ash fragments...... to generate ash particles typically in the size range of 50 to 200 μm on biomass suspension fired power plant boilers. A fragmentation rate of fuel particles of 3 have been used to describe both the residual ash formation process in laboratory entrained flow reactors and in full scale boilers.A range...

  11. Regular Recycling of Wood Ash to Prevent Waste Production (RecAsh). Technical Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Lars E-mail: lars.t.andersson@skogsstyreslen.se

    2007-03-15

    At present, the extraction of harvest residues is predicted to increase in Sweden and Finland. As an effect of the intensified harvesting, the export of nutrients and acid buffering substances from the growth site is also increased. Wood ash could be used to compensate forest soils for such losses. Most wood fuel ash is today often deposited in landfills. If the wood ash is recycled, wood energy is produced without any significant waste production. Ash recycling would therefore contribute to decreasing the production of waste, and to maintaining the chemical quality of forest waters and biological productivity of forest soils in the long term. The project has developed, analysed and demonstrated two regular ash-recycling systems. It has also distributed knowledge gathered about motives for ash recycling as well as technical and administrative solutions through a range of media (handbooks, workshops, field demonstrations, reports, web page and information videos). Hopefully, the project will contribute to decreasing waste problems related to bio-energy production in the EU at large. The project has been organised as a separate structure at the beneficiary and divided in four geographically defined subprojects, one in Finland and three in Sweden (Central Sweden, Northern Sweden, and South-western Sweden). The work in each subproject has been lead by a subproject leader. Each subproject has organised a regional reference group. A project steering committee has been established consisting of senior officials from all concerned partners. The project had nine main tasks with the following main expected deliverables and output: 1. Development of two complete full-scale ash-recycling systems; 2. Production of handbooks of the ash recycling system; 3. Ash classification study to support national actions for recommendations; 4. Organise regional demonstrations of various technical options for ash treatment and spreading; 5. Organise national seminars and demonstrations of

  12. Depositional Settings of the basal López de Bertodano Formation, Maastrichtian, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.B. Olivero

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In Snow Hill and Seymour islands the lower Maastrichtian, basal part of the L ópez de Bertodano Formation, rests on a high relief, erosive surface elaborated in the underlying Snow Hill Island Formation. Mudstone-dominated beds with inclined heterolithic stratification dominate the basal strata of the López de Bertodano Formation. They consist of rhythmical alternations of friable sandy- and clayeymudstone couplets, with ripple cross lamination, mud drapes, and flaser bedding. They are characterized by a marked lenticular geometry, reflecting the filling of tide-influenced channels of various scales and paleogeographic positions within a tide-dominated embayment or estuary. Major, sand-rich channel fills, up to 50-m thick, bounded by erosive surfaces probably represent inlets, located on a more central position in the estuary. Minor channel fills, 1- to 3-m thick, associated with offlapping packages with inclined heterolithic stratification probably represent the lateral accretion of point bars adjacent to migrating tidal channels in the upper estuary. Both types of channel fills bear relatively abundant marine fauna, are intensively bioturbated, and are interpreted as a network of subtidal channels. In southwestern Snow Hill Island, the minor offlapping packages have scarce marine fossils and bear aligned depressions interpreted as poor preserved dinosaur footprints. They represent the lateral accretion of point bars adjacent to intertidal creeks, probably located on the fringes of a mud-dominated estuary or embayment. The basal unconformity was produced by subaerial erosion; hence the inferred estuarine settings are consistent with the beginning of a new transgressive sedimentary cycle.

  13. Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bryers, R.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Oden, L.L. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

  14. Formation of Hierarchical CuO Nanostructures on Copper Foil by Chemical Bath Deposition for Applications in Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felizco Jenichi Clairvaux

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical CuO nanostructures (urchin-like and grassy island structure were successfully synthesized by a simple chemical bath deposition method at low temperature of 70°C in a short reaction time of 1h. XRD analysis revealed the presence of pure crystalline monoclinic CuO. Morphological analysis revealed the formation of spherical structures composed of numerous hair-like structures. The pH of the solution was also investigated to have a great effect on the morphology of the CuO nanostructures. At lower pH, the structures tend to form urchin-like structures; while at higher pH, the structures tend to form grass-like islands. A growth mechanism was also proposed in this paper. Lastly, wettability test proved the stable superhydrophobic property of the CuO nanostructured thin film surface.

  15. A generic model of pattern formation in Mississippi Valley-Type deposits based on analytical findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelka, Ulrich; Veveakis, Manolis; Beaudoin, Nicolas; Poulet, Thomas; Koehn, Daniel; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Chung, Peter; Berndt, Jasper

    2016-04-01

    Rhythmically banded dolomites (zebra dolomite) are found worldwide, and are frequently associated with mineralization of the Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT). These rocks consist of dark fine grained and impurity-rich layers alternating with light coarse grained and virtually impurity-free layers. The texture of the light layers is similar to the one of tectonic syntaxial veins where crystals grow towards a median line. We present petrographic and chemical analysis of zebra dolomite samples from the San Vicente mine, Central Peru. The applied methods are petrographic microscopy, SEM, EBSD, EMP and LA-ICP-MS. The findings influence the development of a generic model of pattern formation. We found the density and the distribution of second-phase material to be one striking feature. The impurities are accumulated in the dark layers, which show an even higher density of second-phase material than the surrounding impurity-rich dolomite. With CL, it was possible to detect a luminescent structure in the center of the light bands which seems to be present independent of the thickness and spacing of the respective layers. This structure was analysed in more detail with EMP. We further found that the dolomite crystals in the dark and light layers are chemically similar but show a variation in some trace elements. Based on the analytical findings, we put forward a mathematical model of zebra dolomite formation based on Cnoidal waves. We believe that the light coarse grained layers represent hydromechanical instabilities arising during the diagenetic compaction of a fluid saturated, impurity-rich dolomite. Our approach is based on the extension of the classical compaction bands theory to a viscose, non-linear rheology. In the model, the spacing between two light coarse grained layers is linked to the compaction length during the pattern formation. With the formulation of a 1D steady-state solution we can relate the genesis of the structure to physical parameter, such as

  16. An examination of the petroporphyrins found in oil shale from the Julia Creek Deposit of the toolebuc formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekstrom, A.; Dale, L.; Loeh, H.

    1983-02-01

    The nature of the petroporphyrins found in a variety of crude oils, oil shales, ancient and recent sediments have been a subject of continual interest since these compounds were first isolated from such materials by Treibs et al. some fifty years ago. It is now generally agreed that the petroporphyrins represent the degradation products of chlorophyll and that they consist predominantly of homologous series of deoxophylloerythroetioporphyrin (DPEP) and etio porphyrins. However, as yet unidentified porphyrin compounds which do not belong to either of these two classes have been observed in some samples and the proposition that all petroporphyrins are derived from chlorophyll has also been questioned. The oil shale of the Toolebuc formation in Queensland, Australia has been shown to contain relatively high concentrations of vanadium and nickel porphyrin compounds. Saxby et al. have suggested that these porphyrins are largely of the DPEP and etio-type and also observed significant variations in their concentrations in samples taken from various sites in the deposit. In this paper we describe two further aspects of the porphyrin compounds in this deposit. First, the variations in the concentrations of the chloroform extractable metal porphyrin compounds through well-characterized drill cores was determined, and second, the nature of the vanadium porphyrins was examined using absorption spectrophotometry and insertion probe, fast atom bombardment (FAB) and field desorption (FD) mass spectrometry techniques.

  17. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2016-02-01

    Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W2CoB2 with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600-730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  18. Geochemical correlation and 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Kern River ash bed and related tephra layers: Implications for the stratigraphy of petroleum-bearing formations in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, D.; Negrini, R.M.; Golob, E.M.; Miller, D.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A.; Fleck, R.J.; Hacker, B.; Erendi, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Kern River ash (KRA) bed is a prominent tephra layer separating the K and G sands in the upper part of the Kern River Formation, a major petroleum-bearing formation in the southern San Joaquin Valley (SSJV) of California. The minimum age of the Kern River Formation was based on the tentative major-element correlation with the Bishop Tuff, a 0.759??0.002 Ma volcanic tephra layer erupted from the Long Valley Caldera. We report a 6.12??0.05 Ma 40Ar/39Ar date for the KRA, updated major-element correlations, trace-element correlations of the KRA and geochemically similar tephra, and a 6.0??0.2 Ma 40Ar/39Ar age for a tephra layer from the Volcano Hills/Silver Peak eruptive center in Nevada. Both major and trace-element correlations show that despite the similarity to the Bishop Tuff, the KRA correlates most closely with tephra from the Volcano Hills/Silver Peak eruptive center. This geochemical correlation is supported by the radiometric dates which are consistent with a correlation of the KRA to the Volcano Hills/Silver Peak center but not to the Bishop Tuff. The 6.12??0.05 Ma age for the KRA and the 6.0??0.2 Ma age for the tephra layer from the Volcano Hills/Silver Peak eruptive center suggest that the upper age of the Kern River Formation is over 5 Ma older than previously thought. Re-interpreted stratigraphy of the SSJV based on the new, significantly older age for the Kern River Formation opens up new opportunities for petroleum exploration in the SSJV and places better constraints on the tectonostratigraphic development of the SSJV. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  19. Geology and formation of titaniferous placer deposits in Upper Jogaz Valley area, Fanuj, Sistan and Baluchestan province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Javad Moghaddasi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Fanuj titaniferous placer deposits are located 35 km northwest of the Fanuj, Sistan and Baluchestan province (1 . The studied area comprises a (2 small part of the late Cretaceous Fanuj-Maskutan (Rameshk ophiolite complex (Arshadi and Mahdavi, 1987. Reconnaissance and comprehensive exploration programs in the Fanuj district (East of the 1:100000 Fanuj quadrangle map,Yazdi, 2010 revealed that the Upper Jogaz Valley area has the highest concentration of titaniferous placer deposits. In this study, geology and formation of the titaniferous placer deposits in Upper Jogaz Valley area are discussed. Materials and Methods (3 Forty samples were collected from surface and drainage sediments to evaluate the potential for titaniferous placers. Mineralogical studies indicated the high Ti (ilmenite bearing areas, which led to detailed exploration by 29 shallow drill holes and 9 trenches. A total of 61 sub-surface samples were collected for heavy mineral studies and ore grade determination. The exploration studies suggest that the the Upper Jogaz Valley area in the Fanuj district has a high potential for titaniferous placer deposits. Extensive exposures of black sands in the sreambeds of this area suggested detailed sampling, so that 12 holes were drilled (2-3 m depthfrom which 26 samples were collected, and five trenches were excavated to 2-4 m depth (4. The distribution of drill holes and trenches were plotted with “Logplot” software for further interpretation. Twenty-two samples from these drill holes were analyzed for TiO2. Results The reconnaissance and comprehensive exploration in Fanuj district shows that the Upper Jogaz Valley area has the highest concentration of titaniferous placer deposits. The general geology of the region and petrology and mineralogy of collected samples suggest that the source rock of the Upper Jogaz Valley titaniferous placers is the hornblende- and olivine-gabbro unit of the Fanuj-Ramesh ophiolites. The Ti

  20. Ash storms: impacts of wind-remobilised volcanic ash on rural communities and agriculture following the 1991 Hudson eruption, southern Patagonia, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. M.; Cole, J. W.; Stewart, C.; Cronin, S. J.; Johnston, D. M.

    2011-04-01

    Tephra fall from the August 1991 eruption of Volcán Hudson affected some 100,000 km2 of Patagonia and was almost immediately reworked by strong winds, creating billowing clouds of remobilised ash, or `ash storms'. The immediate impacts on agriculture and rural communities were severe, but were then greatly exacerbated by continuing ash storms. This paper describes the findings of a 3-week study tour of the diverse environments of southern Patagonia affected by ash storms, with an emphasis on determining the impacts of repeated ash storms on agriculture and local practices that were developed in an attempt to mitigate these impacts. Ash storms produce similar effects to initial tephra eruptions, prolonged for considerable periods. These have included the burial of farmland under dune deposits, abrasion of vegetation and contamination of feed supplies with fine ash. These impacts can then cause problems for grazing animals such as starvation, severe tooth abrasion, gastrointestinal problems, corneal abrasion and blindness, and exhaustion if sheep fleeces become laden with ash. In addition, ash storms have led to exacerbated soil erosion, human health impacts, increased cleanup requirements, sedimentation in irrigation canals, and disruption of aviation and land transport. Ash deposits were naturally stabilised most rapidly in areas with high rainfall (>1,500 mm/year) through compaction and enhanced vegetation growth. Stabilisation was slowest in windy, semi-arid regions. Destruction of vegetation and suppression of regrowth by heavy tephra fall (>100 mm) hindered the stabilisation of deposits for years, and reduced the surface friction which increased wind erosivity. Stabilisation of tephra deposits was improved by intensive tillage, use of windbreaks and where there was dense and taller vegetative cover. Long-term drought and the impracticality of mixing ash deposits with soil by tillage on large farms was a barrier to stabilising deposits and, in turn

  1. Ash chemistry and sintering, verification of the mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Skrifvars, B.J. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    In this project four sintering mechanisms have been studied, i.e., partial melting with a viscous liquid, partial melting with a non-viscous liquid, chemical reaction sintering and solid state sintering. The work has aimed at improving the understanding of ash sintering mechanisms and quantifying their role in combustion and gasification. The work has been oriented in particular on the understanding of biomass ash behavior. The work has not directly focused on any specific technical application. However, results can also be applied on other fuels such as brown coal, petroleum coke, black liquor and different types of wastes (PDF, RDF, MSW). In one part of study the melting behavior was calculated for ten biomass ashes and compared with lab measurements of sintering tendencies. The comparison showed that the T{sub 15} temperatures, i.e. those temperatures at which the ashes contained 15 % molten phase, correlated fairly well with the temperature at which the sintering measurements detected sintering. This suggests that partial melting can be predicted fairly accurate for some ashes already with the today existing thermodynamic calculation routines. In some cases, however the melting calculations did not correlate with the detected sintering temperatures. In a second part detailed measurements on ash behavior was conducted both in a semi full scale CFB and a lab scale FBC. Ashes and deposits were collected and analyzed in several different ways. These analyses show that the ash chemistry shifts radically when the fuel is shifted. Fuels with silicate based ashes behaved totally different than those with an oxide or salt based ash. The chemistry was also affected by fuel blending. The ultimate goal has been to be able to predict the ash thermal behavior during biomass thermal conversion, using the fuel and ash elemental analyses and a few operational key parameters as the only input data. This goal has not yet today been achieved. (author)

  2. Thaumasite formation in hydraulic mortars by atmospheric SO2 deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco-Varela, M. T.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulphation of mortars and concretes is a function of diverse environmental factors (SO2 aerosol, temperature, etc as well as some material characteristics. One of the phases that could be formed as consequence of the sulphation of the hydraulic binder is thaumasite. In this paper different hydraulic mortars have been exposed to laboratory exposure chambers in order to reproduce thaumasite formation due to atmospheric SO2. Under the laboratory exposure conditions, thaumasite was formed in hydraulic lime mortars, and mortars elaborated with ordinary Portland cement as well as mineralized white portland cement. However, thaumasite was not formed in mortars made of lime and pozzolan. The first product formed as a result of the SO2-mortar interaction was gypsum. Gypsum reacted with calcite and C-S-H gel, present in the samples, giving place to thaumasite. Low temperature promotes thaumasite formation.

    La sulfatación de morteros y hormigones depende de las condiciones ambientales (SO2 aerosol, temperatura, etc., así como de las características del material. Una de las fases que se puede formar como consecuencia de la sulfatación de los ligantes hidráulicos es la taumasita. En este trabajo se han expuesto diferentes morteros hidráulicos en cámaras de laboratorio con el fin de reproducir la formación de taumasita por efecto del SO2 atmosférico. Bajo las condiciones de laboratorio se formó taumasita en los morteros de cal hidráulica y en los morteros fabricados con cemento portland y cemento blanco mineralizado. Sin embargo, cuando el ligante utilizado en los morteros fue cal y puzolana, no se formó taumasita. El yeso fue el primer producto formado en la interacción entre los morteros y el SO2. A continuación, este yeso reaccionó con la calcita y el gel C-S-H dando lugar a la formación de taumasita. Las bajas temperaturas favorecieron la formación de taumasita.

  3. Numerical simulation of zirconia splat formation and cooling during plasma spray deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, YeMeng; Zheng, YunZhai; Zheng, ZhengHuan; Li, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    The adhesion/cohesion of plasma-sprayed coatings depends strongly on the flattening and solidification of individual splat, taking place in a few microseconds. Such a short time makes it difficult to thoroughly study the splat formation. A three-dimensional numerical model incorporating the substrate melting and solidification was developed using CFD method to simulate the flattening and cooling of zirconia splat involving the influence of interface thermal contact resistance. On smooth substrate where the thermal contact resistance is zero, the splat has a cooling rate of 1.7 × 108 K/s, resulting in substrate melting, and a disk-like splat is formed with a spread factor of approximately 3.5. While on substrate with thermal contact resistance of 10-7 m2 K/W, corresponding cooling rate is 3.17 × 108 K/s and a central splat surrounded by satellite droplets is formed due to the rapid solidification of the splat edges.

  4. Petrological-Geochemical Characteristics of Volcanic Ash Sediments in Yanchang Formation in Ordos Basin%鄂尔多斯盆地延长组火山灰沉积物岩石地球化学特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱欣卫; 刘池洋; 毛光周; 吴柏林

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic ash sediment is widely distributed in Yanchang Formation in ()rdos basin, in order to study lithogeochemistry characteristics and formational mechanism of volcanic ashes sediment, the paper use many analysis methods, such as observe the cores, microscope. XRF, ICP-MS, SEM et al.. The results indicate volcanic ash sediment containing much crystal and shard fragments, including tuff and bentonite, the illite and andreattite can be seen under the SEM; Si()2 content between 50. 29%-79. 82%, rich potassium, K2O+Na2O at 3. 20%-7. 88%, the negative correlation present in relationship of SiO2with Al2O3, TFe2O3 and MgO3; ∑REE=99. 82× 10-6 ~550. 15× 10-6, and rich in IREE, deplete in HREE, the curve rightward incline, Eu negative abnormity and the δEu between 0. 147-0. 837, there is no evidently Ce abnormity, and K, Rb, Ba,Th are of positive abnormity. In the illustration of Nb/Y-Zr/TiO2, the data dots are mainly located at the zone of andesite-rhyolite, which suggest that the volcanic ash is primary from middle-acid rocks. Lithogeochemistry and sedimentology illustrate the formational mechanisms of volcanic ash include: falling down from air and carried by water. Through the diagram of tectonic setting, the volcanic ash is primary from volcanic arc and calc-alkalic lavas, which is intimately related the evolution of Qinling orogenic belt.%鄂尔多斯盆地延长组火山灰沉积物分布广泛,为研究其岩石地球化学特征和形成机制,通过详细的岩心观察、薄片鉴定、X荧光光谱分析(XRF)、ICP-MS分析、扫描电镜(SEM)分析等手段,对延长组火山灰层进行了细致的岩石地球化学分析.结果表明火山灰沉积物富含晶屑、玻屑等火山物质,整体蚀变强烈,可分为凝灰岩和斑脱岩,以伊利石、伊蒙混层等粘土矿物为主;主量元素SiO_2含量为50.29%~79.82%富钾,K_2O+Na_2O在3.20%~7.88%之间,SiO_2与Al_2O_3、TFe_2O_3 、MgO之间存在着

  5. Cluster size and substrate temperature affecting thin film formation during copper cluster deposition on a Si (001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Heng-Feng; Lü Wei; Wang Lu-Min; Li Gong-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The soft deposition of Cu clusters on a Si (001) surface was studied by molecular dynamics simulations.The embedded atom method,the Stillinger-Weber and the Lennar Jones potentials were used to describe the interactions between the cluster atoms,between the substrate atoms,and between the cluster and the substrate atoms,respectively.The Cu13,Cu55,and Cu147 clusters were investigated at different substrate temperatures.We found that the substrate temperature had a significant effect on the Cu147 cluster.For smaller Cu13 and Cu55 clusters,the substrate temperature in the range of study appeared to have little effect on the mean center-of-mass height.The clusters showed better degrees of epitaxy at 800 K.With the same substrate temperature,the Cu55 cluster demonstrated the highest degree of epitaxy,followed by Cu147 and then Cu13 clusters.In addition,the Cu55 cluster showed the lowest mean center-of-mass height.These results suggested that the Cu55 cluster is a better choice for the thin-film formation among the clusters considered.Our studies may provide insight into the formation of desired Cu thin films on a Si substrate.

  6. What Controls the Sizes and Shapes of Volcanic Ash? Integrating Morphological, Textural and Geochemical Ash Properties to Decipher Eruptive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, E. J.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash particles encompass a diverse spectrum of shapes as a consequence of differences in the magma properties and the magma ascent and eruption conditions. We show how the quantitative analysis of ash particle shapes can be a valuable tool for deciphering magma fragmentation and transport processes. Importantly, integrating morphological data with ash texture (e.g. bubble and crystal sizes) and dissolved volatile data provides valuable insights into the physical and chemical controls on the resulting ash deposit. To explore the influence of magma-water interaction (MWI) on fine ash generation, we apply this multi-component characterisation to tephra from the 2500BC Hverfjall Fires, Iceland. Here, coeval fissure vents spanned sub-aerial to shallow lacustrine environments. Differences in the size and morphology of pyroclasts thus reflect fragmentation mechanisms under different near-surface conditions. Using shape parameters sensitive to both particle roughness and internal vesicularity, we quantify the relative proportions of dense fragments, bubble shards, and vesicular grains from 2-D SEM images. We show that componentry (and particle morphology) varies as a function of grain size, and that this variation can be related back to the bubble size distribution. Although both magmatic and hydromagmatic deposits exhibit similar component assemblages, they differ in how these assemblages change with grain size. These results highlight the benefits of characterising ash deposits over a wide range of grain sizes, and caution against inferring fragmentation mechanism from a narrow grain size range. Elevated matrix glass S concentrations in hydromagmatic ash (600-1500 ppm) compared to those in magmatic ash and scoria lapilli (200-500 ppm) indicate interrupted vesiculation. In contrast to the subaerial 'dry' deposits, fragmentation during MWI likely occurred over a greater range of depths with quench rates sufficient to prevent post-fragmentation degassing. High

  7. A transgression-regression event during the deposition of the Upper Cambrian Honey Creek formation in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElmoyl, C.; Donovan, R.N. (Texas Christian Univ., Ft. Worth, TX (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    The transgression that inundated the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the upper Cambrian enveloped a landscape that consisted of hills of rhyolite up to 350 m in high. Initial deposits on this topography have been interpreted as alluvium. These, together with succeeding tidally-influenced marine siliciclastics form the Reagan Formation. The siliciclastics grains are made up of fragments of local origin (i.e., rhyolite), quartz (derived from a distal source) and authigenic glauconite. The upward passage from the Reagan to the Honeycreek Formation is defined by the addition to the siliciclastics of carbonate detritus in the form of tidally-influenced grainstones, mostly composed of pelmatozoan fragments. The passage from the Honeycreek to the overlying Fort Sill Formation of the Arbuckle Group is marked by the incoming of beds of lime mudstone and the gradual disappearance of grainstones and siliciclastics. Evidence of the existence of rhyolite topography (i.e., an archipelago) can be detected to within 50 m of the top of the Fort Sill. While the overall facies pattern undoubtedly records a widespread transgression, a newly-discovered slightly angular unconformity within the lower part of the Honeycreek is best interpreted as a record of a temporary regression. Three distinctive lithologies are involved in this relationship: the lowest beds are light grey cross-bedded pelmatozoan grainstones with minor amounts of quartz and rhyolite grains. Syntaxial cements at the base of this unit are homogenous under cathode luminescence, while cements near the top display up to 27 zones of reflectance, interpreted as a fluctuating marine-meteoric groundwater imprint. The overlying bed is a red-brown mud-supported limestone that contains abundant angular rhyolite pebbles and a rich trilobite fauna. Some of the pebbles are coated by pelmatozoans.

  8. ACC 305 ASH

    OpenAIRE

    admn

    2015-01-01

    ACC 305 ASH Check this A+ tutorial guideline at   http://www.assignmentcloud.com/ACC-305-ASH/ACC-305-ASH-Complete-Class ACC 305 Week 1 Assignments E 3-18, E 3-20, J Case 3-5 ACC 305 Week 1 DQ 1 FASB and Ethics ACC 305 Week 1 DQ 2 Cash versus Accrual & Financial Disclosures ACC 305 Week 2 DQ 1 Earnings Management Case 4-3 ACC 305 Week 2 DQ 2 Revenue Recognition Case 5-2 ACC 305 Week 2 Problem E4-16 Bluebonnet Bakers ACC 305 Week 2 Problem E4-19 ...

  9. HIS 204 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    JOHN

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HIS 204 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) HIS 204 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) HIS 204 Week 3 Assignment Women Right, Sacrifices & Independence (Ash) HIS 204 Week 3 DQ 1 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 3 DQ 2 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 4 DQ 1 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 4 DQ 2 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 4 Quiz (Ash) HIS 204 Week 5 DQ 1 (Ash) ...

  10. High resolution stratigraphy and gravity flow deposits in the Los Molles Formation (Cuyo Group - Jurassic at La Jardinera region, Neuquén basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo S.G. Paim

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pliensbachian to Early Callovian Cuyo Group in the Arroyo La Jardinera area reflects a shelf-slope-basin plain physiography. A major unconformity defines the onset of a thick turbidite succession and represents a 2nd order sequence boundary. The older 2nd order depositional sequence comprises the base of Los Molles Formation and includes a transgressive-regressive cycle ascribed to basin plain and slope rise strata. The younger one, which includes the rest of the Cuyo Group, consists of a regressive succession punctuated by several abrupt shifts of physiographic elements (3rd order sequence boundaries. The 3rd order depositional sequences include Aalenian slope rise and slope deposits in the Los Molles Formation, Early Bajocian shelfal facies at the transition of the Los Molles and Lajas formations, and Middle to Late Bajocian inner shelf to nearshore strata in the Lajas Formation that are overlain by Bathonian alluvial deposits of the Challacó Formation. Higher frequency cycles punctuate the succession and have controlled the origin, deposition and abandonment of the architectural elements. Facies and architectural elements analyses indicate that gravity flow deposits in the Los Molles Formation fit in a submarine ramp model. The three identified gravity flow (GF types have been related to 4th order relative sea-level falls. The GF1 was ascribed to hyperpycnal flows produced during 4th order early lowstand, coeval to fluvial incision on the shelf, which were ignited in the slope and produced depletive depositional pulses with a fluvial compositional signature. The GF1 system includes relatively small channels in the slope, well-developed lobes in the slope rise and proximal basin plain, and lobe fringes in the basin plain. The GF2 strata were ascribed to hyperpycnal flows influenced by an oscillatory component and related to the 4th order late lowstand systems tract that also includes the incised channels fill. They are characterized in

  11. Fossil-bearing deposits from the Bukpyeong Formation (Miocene) in the Bukpyeong Basin at Donghae city, Gangwon-do, South Korea: occurrences, taphonomy and paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Jeong, Eun Kyoung; Uemura, Kazuhiko; Kim, Kyungsik; Paik, In Sung

    2016-04-01

    Abundant and diverse plant fossils such as land plants and subaqueous plants, freshwater mollusc fossils and invertebrate trace fossils are found in the Miocene Bukpyeong Formation at Donghae city, Gangwon-do, South Korea. Occurrences and taphofacies of the fossil-bearing deposits from the Bukpyeong Formation are described and their taphonomy and paleoenvironmental implications are interpreted. Based on fossil occurrences, lithofacies and sedimentary features of the fossil-bearing deposits, eight taphofacies are classified as the following: (1) Taphofacies 1: Gastropod fossils in massive silty mudstone; (2) Taphofacies 2: Bivalve fossils in massive silty mudstone; (3) Taphofacies 3: Plant fossils (leaf fossils) in massive silty mudstone; (4) Taphofacies 4: Gastropod and plant fossils in massive silty mudstone; (5) Taphofacies 5: Plant fossils in weakly fissile silty mudstone; (6) Taphofacies 6: Plant fossils (leaf fossils) in thin-bedded and graded silty mudstone to mudstone (claystone); (7) Taphofacies 7: Plant fragment fossils in thin-bedded and graded silty mudstone to mudstone (claystone); (8) Taphofacies 8: Plant debris in planar- to cross-laminated fine-grained sandstone. Taphonomy of taphofacies 1, 2, and 4 including freshwater mollusc fossils is interpreted to have been reworked or transported by turbidity currents after death and deposited in shallow lake to open lake. Taphonomy of taphofacies 3, 5, 6, and 7 including plant fossils is interpreted to have been transported by input of episodic flooding in the land and deposited by settling down in open lake. Taphofacies 8 including plant debris has been deposited in shallow lake by input of intensive episodic flooding from the land. The occurrences and taphofacies of the fossil-bearing deposits indicate that most of the fossils were transported by turbidity current induced by input of episodic flooding in the land and deposited in shallow lake to open lake. Moreover, plant fossils from the Bukpyeong

  12. Santa Bárbara Formation (Caçapava do Sul, southern Brazil): depositional sequences and evolution of an Early Paleozoic postcollisional basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Borba, André Weissheimer; Pimentel Mizusaki, Ana Maria

    2003-10-01

    The Santa Bárbara Formation, located in southernmost Brazil, comprises red-colored conglomerates, sandstones, and siltstones. It was deposited in the Early Paleozoic under continental conditions in a restricted, strike-slip basin (Santa Bárbara basin) in response to the postcollisional stresses of the Brasiliano/Pan-African cycle (900-500 Ma). Five facies associations are recognized: alluvial fans, fan-delta front, lacustrine, sandy braided, and gravel bed braided river deposits. The application of sequence stratigraphy enables the recognition of three depositional sequences. The two basal sequences (I and II) represent a coherent depositional pattern, with axial fluvial and fan-delta systems that deposit northeastward and lateral contribution from alluvial fans. Such coarse deposits are composed mainly of metamorphic clasts derived from the erosion of 'Caçapava high', the eastern steep margin of the Santa Bárbara basin. Sequence III lies unconformably over the basal subunits and reflects the inversion of the axial systems, in that the paleocurrents of the gravel bed deposits systematically point south/southwestward. The alluvial fan deposits of Sequence III also suggest a tectonic rearrangement of the basin, with partial erosion of the basal sequences and the presence of granitoid fragments, which reflects a deeper denudation stage for the Caçapava high and possibly a significant hiatus at the base of Sequence III.

  13. Re-burning of ash in grate boilers; Omfoerbraenning av askor i rosterpannor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergqvist, Kristina; Myringer, Aase; Nordgren, Daniel; Rydberg, Stina [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2005-03-01

    High contents of unburnt carbon in ashes that are dumped or recycled, is questionable from both an economical and an environmental point of view. The content of unburnt carbon in bottom and fly ash from grate boilers varies greatly between different plants but can sometimes exceed 50 %. Re-burning of ash that is separated before a final dust separation, is a relatively cheep and simple method for reducing the content of unburnt carbon in ash, which both reduces the fuel cost and the deposit cost, i.e. the cost of landfilling or recycling. As from 2005 it is prohibited to deposit ash with a too high content of unburnt organic material; the content is limited to 18 weight % of unburnt carbon. The study was carried out in two phases. The aim of the first phase was to map the different techniques used for re-burning ash that are used in grate boilers today. The mapping was done through telephone interviews and comprises technical descriptions of the systems, gathering of operational know-how, installations costs and the effect of the systems on the amount of ash generated at the plants and the content of unburnt carbon in the ash. In order to accomplish a deeper technical and economical evaluation of ash re-burning systems, the second phase involved field studies at two plants. In addition screening tests were done to investigate the connection between the content of unburnt carbon and particle size. The potential of reducing the amount of circulated inorganic material by sieving the ash before bringing it back to the furnace could thereby be determined. 13 plants that utilize re-burning of ash were identified, of which two plants re-burn the bottom ash that floats up to the surface in the wet ash removal system. The remaining 11 plants re-burn fly ash. At three plants the fly ash is first separated in a mesh sieve or similar equipment and only the coarser fly ash is re-burnt. As the amount of bottom ash that surfaces in the wet ash-removal is relatively small

  14. Forest fuel, ashes and ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale use of bioenergy is an essential measure if several of the major environmental problems are to be solved. However, it is important to utilize the possibilities available to produce biofuel without creating new environmental problems. Whole-tree removal gives a considerable reduction in the nitrogen lead which, in combination with the return of ashes, counteracts the nutrient imbalance and acidification in southern Sweden. Forestry of that kind should lead to lower total leaching of nitrogen in comparison with conventional forestry. In situations where there is high deposition of atmospheric sulphur and nitrogen, fuel removal with return of a moderate dose of slowly dissolvable ashes should be a good soil management measure. The humus status and flora/fauna always require some kind of consideration. With compensation measures and retained nutrient status there should be no problems with the humus status on most soils. However, on poor and dry soils, it is suitable to avoid whole-tree removal on account of the humus status. Consideration to nature includes, for example, increasing the number of broad-leaf trees, old trees and dead wood (preferably the trunks). These measures concern all types of forestry and are not linked directly with fuel removal. Removal of felling residues and return of ashes are of minor importance in comparison with this and fit well into forestry adapted to natural values. With correct planning and accomplishment of the removal of forest fuel the natural values of the forest can be retained or even improved. Forestry where fuel is also produced can be designed whereby negative effects are avoided at the same time as positive environmental effects are obtained. 68 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  15. FORMATION OF GOLD-BEARING HYDROFRACTURING BRECCIA BODIES IN TECTONIC LENSES: A CASE STUDY ON SHUANGWANG GOLD DEPOSIT, SHAANXI, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Macro-microscopic tectonic analysis and lithologic features show that the gold-bearing breccia bodies in the Shuangwang gold deposit, for hydrofracturing of the deep-sourced and alkali-rich fluids in the Devonian sodic rock series, are identified as hydrofracturing breccia bodies. Since the Indosinian,intracontinental collisional orogenesis results in multiple fracturings and magmatic emplacements in the Qinling area. Deep-sourced fluids resulting from deep fractures and granitoid magmatic intrusion are of a supercritical nature. Joint action between the fluid-rock system and structures leads to hydroffacturing and ore formation of the gold deposit.Firstly, the progressive coaxial compression caused the competent sodic rock series and the incompetent pelitic rock series to be deformed and partitioned. Lens-like weak-strain domains are hence formed and distributed at the approximate equidistance zones and the linear strong-strain zones,respectively. Subsequently, the progressive non-coaxial shearing and right-lateral and high-angle oblique thrusting lead to the most developed fracture system in the core of the weak-strain domain to turn from compression to extension and to link up with the deep fracture systems. The periodical huge pressure decline in the pumping center causes the deep-sourced confined fluids to develop periodic tectonic pumping, hydrofracturing and precipitation-healing in the sodic rock series. The gold-bearing hydrofracturing breccia bodies are hence ultimately formed at near-equidistance tectonic lenses. On the basis of the above model, the predicted concealed gold-bearing hydrofracturing breccia bodies have been preliminarily validated by latest drillings.

  16. Behaviour of Onobrychis Viciifolia Growing on Fly Ash Experimental Parcels

    OpenAIRE

    Florica Morariu; Smaranda Mâsu; Dumitru Popescu

    2011-01-01

    Studies were conducted to identify a treatment method for upper layers of fly ash to cover them with vegetation. Fixing plant layer acts against erosion/washes of fly ash deposits. Studies emphasized the need of use of an organic fertilizer mixed with inorganic materials such as volcanic tuff and, also, the need of selecting a plant species compatible with the treated culture medium. The use of an amended variant of compost and modified volcanic tuff of fly ash layers shows that the selected ...

  17. Sulphation characteristics of paper sludge ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, S.A. [Environmental Systems Research Center, Korea Inst. of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.D. [Environmental Systems Research Center, Korea Inst. of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

    2007-04-15

    Landfills are no longer a viable solution for the disposal of sludge produced from waste water treatment plants because of the decrease in available space, rising fees and growing environmental concerns. However, thermal utilization of this waste may be an economic and sustainable disposal solution. Co-combustion of low heating value sludge with fossil fuels has a positive effect for sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions due to the low sulphur content of biomass fuels and increased sulphur retention in the ash. The sulphur retention is attributed to the formation of sulphates, such as CaSO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The amount of fuel-ash-related sulphur sorption increases during co-combustion. Therefore, sorbents for sulphur reduction may not be required if proper control of the biomass feed is maintained. This paper presented a study in which the sulphation characteristics of calcium-rich paper sludge ash were determined for the use of co-combustion of biomass and coal. The calcium in the paper sludge ash came from the limestone filler used in the manufacturing process to increase the density and whiteness of the paper at 2 paper mills in Korea. A thermobalance reactor along with XRD and SEM-EDX were used for the analysis of sulphated ash to determine the effects of sulphation temperature, particle size and SO{sub 2} concentration on sulphation conversion. The activation energy and pre-exponential factor of sulphation reaction of sludge ash were determined based on the uniform-reaction model. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that most of the sulphation compounds were CaSO{sub 4}. The sulphation occurred uniformly throughout the ash and the CaSO{sub 4} did not block the outer pore of the sludge ash. The uniform distributions of CaO and other inert minerals in the ash resulted in uniform sulphation with good penetration of SO{sub 2} into pores of the sludge ash without pore blocking during sulphation of CaO. 13 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  18. Characterizing and Exploring the Formation Mechanism of Salt Deposition by Reusing Advanced-softened, Silica-rich, Oilfield-produced Water (ASOW) in Superheated Steam Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bin; Xu, Ying; Lin, Senmin; Dai, Xiaohu

    2015-11-01

    To dispose of large volumes of oilfield-produced water, an environmentally friendly method that reuses advanced-softened, silica-rich, oilfield-produced water (ASOW) as feedwater was implemented via a 10-month pilot-scale test in oilfield. However, salt deposition detrimental to the efficiency and security of steam injection system was generated in superheated steam pipeline. To evaluate the method, the characteristics and formation mechanism of the deposition were explored. The silicon content and total hardness of the ASOW were 272.20 mg/L and 0.018 mg/L, respectively. Morphology and composition of the deposition were determined by scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Na2Si2O5, Na2CO3 and trace silanes were identified in the deposition. In addition, the solubility of the deposition was about 99%, suggesting that it is very different from traditional scaling. The results of a simulation experiment and thermal analysis system (TGA and TG-FTIR) proved that Na2CO3 and Si(OH)4 (gas) are involved in the formation of Na2Si2O5, which is ascribed mainly to the temperature difference between the superheated steam and the pipe wall. These findings provide an important reference for improving the reuse of ASOW and reducing its deposition.

  19. Investigation of additives for preventing ash fouling and sintering during barley straw combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation of potassium chloride reduces ash sintering temperature and causes fouling deposits in biomass combustion applications. In the present work, the capacity of two mineral additives zeolite 24A and kaolin to capture KCl were investigated. A series of thermogravimetric experiments were carried out to measure fractions of KCl retained in the two additives as function of reaction temperature and heating time. The residues from additive-KCl mixtures after heating treatment were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). When heated at 900 °C for 1 h, the overall KCl capturing efficiencies of the two additives were 60% and 45% for zeolite 24A and kaolin respectively, which slightly decreased to 50% and 43% as the heating time increased to 12 h. At 1000 °C, the fractions of KCl captured by zeolite 24A and kaolin significantly decreased from 50% and 40% to 26% and 17%, as the KCl-additive mixtures were heated for 1 and 12 h, respectively. The decrease in of the overall KCl capturing efficiencies is mainly attributed to reduction of surface areas and chemically active compounds of the two additives with increasing temperature and heating time. The XRD analysis results showed that both zeolite 24A and kaolin can react with KCl to form different potassium aluminium silicates. It indicates that chemical reactions play an important role in the overall capturing process. The effects of zeolite 24A and kaolin on sintering behaviors of the barley straw ash were also investigated. The residues from sintering tests were analyzed by a combination of X-Ray diffractometry (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-Ray analysis (SEM-EDX). The barley straw ash melted intensively at elevated temperatures. Together with XRD analysis, the SEM-EDX analysis results revealed that severe melting of the barley straw ash was due to formation and fusion of low temperature melting potassium silicates. Addition of kaolin and zeolite 24A significantly

  20. Micro- and nanobands in late Archean and Palaeoproterozoic banded-iron formations as possible mineral records of annual and diurnal depositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Liang

    2014-04-01

    The microbands in Precambrian banded-iron formations (BIFs) have been conjectured to record annual or even diurnal depositions. However, these bands have rarely been observed in high resolution at their true (micro) scale. Here, I suggest that nanobands of fine-grained hematite represent possible diurnal depositions and that microbands of chert/jasper represent possible annual depositions in three sets of BIFs: 2460-Myr BIFs from the Kuruman Iron Formation, Transvaal Supergroup of South Africa; 2480-Myr BIFs from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, Western Australia; and 2728-Myr BIFs from the Hunter Mine Group, Abitibi Greenstone Belt, Canada. Observations made using scanning electron microscopy indicate that hematite and chert were syngenetic, and that there was a hiatus between their precipitation and the genesis of the remainder of the minerals containing structural Fe(II). Spindle-like grains of hematite, monocrystals of magnetite, and ferro-dolomite formed microbands of ∼30-70 μm in thickness, which appear cyclically in the matrix of the chert. Neither the band-bound magnetite and dolomite nor the linear formations of the hematite spindles represent annual depositions due to their diagenetic features. The thinnest microbands (∼3-∼12 μm) were observed in the chert and jasper, and indicate depositional rates of 6.6-22.2 m/Myr in the BIFs. These rates are consistent with the integrated deposition rates calculated by geochronologic methods for the BIFs, if annual deposition is assumed. The ∼26-nm nanobands observed only in hematite grains reflect an annual deposition of ∼18.6 μm, or ∼18.6 m/Myr, which is also consistent with the depositional rate calculated by geochronologic methods. It is tentatively suggested that these ∼26-nm nanobands were formed from the diurnal precipitation of Fe(III) resulting from the circadian metabolism of Fe(II)-oxidizing or oxygen-evolving photosynthetic microorganisms, which slowed down the rise

  1. Design and capabilities of an experimental setup based on magnetron sputtering for formation and deposition of size-selected metal clusters on ultra-clean surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Hannes; Popok, Vladimir; Barke, Ingo;

    2012-01-01

    The design and performance of an experimental setup utilizing a magnetron sputtering source for production of beams of ionized size-selected clusters for deposition in ultra-high vacuum is described. For the case of copper cluster formation the influence of different source parameters is studied...

  2. Isotopically heavy carbon in C21 to C25 regular isoprenoids in halite-rich deposits from the Sdm Formation, Dead Sea, Israel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Grice, K.; Schouten, S.; Nissenbaum, A.; Charrach, J.

    1998-01-01

    A series of Miocene/Pliocene halite deposits (with extremely low organic carbon contents) from the Sdom Formation (Dead Sea Basin, Israel) have been studied. Distributions and contents of biomarkers have been determined using GC MS and irm-GCMS analyses, respectively. The hydrocarbon fractions cons

  3. Physicochemical Conditions of the Formation of Beryl and Aquamarin in Mufushan Granopegmatite Deposit,Hunan Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兆麟; 牛贺才; 等

    1994-01-01

    The formation of the Mufushan granopegmatite was closely related to the Late Yenshanian multiphase and multistage magmatic activities,More than one generation of beryl and aquamarine occur in different types of pegmatite in the granites.The presence of melt and melt-fluid inclusions strongly indicates a melt-solution character of the pegmatitic magma.Forming temperatures of the different generations of beryl in a Na+-K+,Ca2+-CO32--Cl--SO42- solution ranges from 990℃to 200℃.Aquamarine was formed at 720-180℃.The contents of alkali metals(Na++K+)in th ore-formming solution of aquamarine are lower than those in the beryl,but the contents of alkali earths(Ca) and salinity are higher,The granite was generated by remelting of the basement formation(meta-sedimentary rocks of the Lengjiaxi Group)which also served as the source of ore-forming material.Beryllium in the pegmatite was transported mainly in the form of Na[Be(CO3)2],with part of it being complexed with Cl- and SO42-.During the generation and evolution of the pegmatite,equilibrium might have been reached in the solid-melt-fluid or solid-fluid system.The intergranular solutions may have reacted with the early crystallized minerals,resulting in potash-feldsparization,albitization and muscovitization during which the ore-forming elements were mobilized and transported in favour of ore deposition.

  4. Formation of hydrothermal deposits at Kings Triple Junction, northern Lau back-arc basin, SW Pacific: The geochemical perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paropkari, Anil L.; Ray, Durbar; Balaram, V.; Surya Prakash, L.; Mirza, Imran H.; Satyanarayana, M.; Gnaneshwar Rao, T.; Kaisary, Sujata

    2010-04-01

    An inactive hydrothermal field was discovered near Kings Triple Junction (KTJ) in northern Lau back-arc basin during 19th cruise of R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in 1990. The field consisted of a large elongated basal platform 'the pedestal' with several 'small' chimneys on its periphery and one 'main mound' superposed over it. The surrounding region is carpeted with lava pillows having ferromanganese 'precipitate' as infillings. The adjoining second field consisted of small chimney like growths termed as 'Christmas Tree' Field. The basal pedestal, the peripheral chimneys and small 'Christmas Tree' like growths (samples collected by MIR submersibles), though parts of the same hydrothermal field, differ significantly in their mineralogy and elemental composition indicating different history of formation. The pedestal slab consisting of chalcopyrite and pyrite as major minerals and rich in Cu is likely to have formed at higher temperatures than sphalerite dominated peripheral chimney. Extremely low concentration of high field strength elements (e.g. Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta) and enrichment of light REE in these sulfides indicate prominent influence of aqueous arc-magma, rich in subduction components. The oxide growths in the 'Christmas Tree' Field have two distinct layers, Fe rich orange-red basal part which seems to have formed at very low temperature as precipitates from diffused hydrothermal flows from the seafloor whereas Mn rich black surface coating is formed from hydrothermal fluids emanated from the seafloor during another episode of hydrothermal activity. Perhaps this is for the first time such unique hydrothermal oxide growths are being reported in association with hydrothermal system. Here, we discuss the possible processes responsible for the formation of these different hydrothermal deposits based on their mineralogy and geochemistry.

  5. Experimental evidence for de novo synthesis of PBDD/PBDF and PXDD/PXDF as well as dioxins in the thermal processes of ash samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamoto, K.; Ishikawa, N. [National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Fly ash in gasification-melting plants and conventional incineration plants can form dioxins through a process known as de novo synthesis. This paper investigated the de novo synthesis of dioxins formed as a result of fly ash catalysis activities. Thermal experiments using fly ash were performed using a flow-through reactor to investigate the formation of brominated and chlorinated-brominated dibenzodioxins (PBDD/F) and dibenzofurans (PXDD/F). Ash samples were collected at conventional stoker incineration and gasification-melting plants. Samples included ash from a bag filter (Ash A); ash from a fluidized gasification and melting furnace plant (Ash C); boiler ash (Ash B); and ash containing tetrabromobisphenol (Ash D). Samples were subjected to a thermal treatment at 300 degrees C. Results showed that dioxin levels were very high for Ash A, which suggested that temperature had a significant influence on de novo synthesis. Dioxin concentrations for Ash C had a relatively low carbon content. Considerable concentrations of PXDD/PXDF were determined for Ash A. High PBDD, PBDF, PXDD and PXDF were observed for Ash D and Ash B. The total amount of dioxins in Ash A were relatively slow to change before and after the thermal treatment of the sample. The homologue distribution patterns of PCDD and PCDF in Ash A showed significant alterations after treatment. It was concluded that de novo dioxin synthesis occurred during the experimental procedure. Results suggested that carbon content plays an important role in the production of dioxins. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  6. Formation of the Wiesloch Mississippi Valley-type Zn-Pb-Ag deposit in the extensional setting of the Upper Rhinegraben, SW Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Katharina; Hildebrandt, Ludwig H.; Leach, David L.; Jacob, Dorrit E.; Markl, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    The Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) Zn-Pb-Ag deposit in the Wiesloch area, Southwest Germany, is controlled by graben-related faults of the Upper Rhinegraben. Mineralization occurs as vein fillings and irregular replacement ore bodies consisting of sphalerite, banded sphalerite, galena, pyrite, sulfosalts (jordanite and geocronite), barite, and calcite in the Middle Triassic carbonate host rock. Combining paragenetic information, fluid inclusion investigations, stable isotope and mineral chemistry with thermodynamic modeling, we have derived a model for the formation of the Wiesloch deposit. This model involves fluid mixing between ascending hot brines (originating in the crystalline basement) with sedimentary formation waters. The ascending brines originally had a near-neutral pH (around 6) and intermediate oxidation state, reflecting equilibrium with granites and gneisses in the basement. During fluid ascent and cooling, the pH of the brine shifted towards more acidic (around 4) and the oxidation state increased to conditions above the hematite-magnetite buffer. These chemical characteristics contrast strongly with those of the pore and fracture fluid residing in the limestone aquifer, which had a pH between 8 and 9 in equilibrium with calcite and was rather reduced due to the presence of organic matter in the limestone. Mixing between these two fluids resulted in a strong decrease in the solubility of silver-bearing sphalerite and galena, and calcite. Besides Wiesloch, several Pb-Zn deposits are known along the Upper Rhinegraben, including hydrothermal vein-type deposits like Badenweiler and the Michael mine near Lahr. They all share the same fluid origin and formation process and only differ in details of their host rock and fluid cooling paths. The mechanism of fluid mixing also seems to be responsible for the formation of other MVT deposits in Europe (e.g., Reocin, Northern Spain; Treves, Southern France; and Cracow-Silesia, Poland), which show notable

  7. Submicrometer Hollow Bioglass Cones Deposited by Radio Frequency Magnetron Sputtering: Formation Mechanism, Properties, and Prospective Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, A C; Stan, G E; Besleaga, C; Ion, L; Maraloiu, V A; Tulyaganov, D U; Ferreira, J M F

    2016-02-01

    This work reports on the unprecedented magnetron sputtering deposition of submicrometric hollow cones of bioactive glass at low temperature in the absence of any template or catalyst. The influence of sputtering conditions on the formation and development of bioglass cones was studied. It was shown that larger populations of well-developed cones could be achieved by increasing the argon sputtering pressure. A mechanism describing the growth of bioglass hollow cones is presented, offering the links for process control and reproducibility of the cone features. The composition, structure, and morphology of the as-synthesized hollow cones were investigated by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), grazing incidence geometry X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The in vitro biological performance, assessed by degradation tests (ISO 10993-14) and cytocompatibility assays (ISO 10993-5) in endothelial cell cultures, was excellent. This allied with resorbability and the unique morphological features make the submicrometer hollow cones interesting candidate material devices for focal transitory permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier in the treatment of carcinoma and neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Submicrometer Hollow Bioglass Cones Deposited by Radio Frequency Magnetron Sputtering: Formation Mechanism, Properties, and Prospective Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, A C; Stan, G E; Besleaga, C; Ion, L; Maraloiu, V A; Tulyaganov, D U; Ferreira, J M F

    2016-02-01

    This work reports on the unprecedented magnetron sputtering deposition of submicrometric hollow cones of bioactive glass at low temperature in the absence of any template or catalyst. The influence of sputtering conditions on the formation and development of bioglass cones was studied. It was shown that larger populations of well-developed cones could be achieved by increasing the argon sputtering pressure. A mechanism describing the growth of bioglass hollow cones is presented, offering the links for process control and reproducibility of the cone features. The composition, structure, and morphology of the as-synthesized hollow cones were investigated by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), grazing incidence geometry X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The in vitro biological performance, assessed by degradation tests (ISO 10993-14) and cytocompatibility assays (ISO 10993-5) in endothelial cell cultures, was excellent. This allied with resorbability and the unique morphological features make the submicrometer hollow cones interesting candidate material devices for focal transitory permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier in the treatment of carcinoma and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26836256

  9. Hot-Gas Filter Ash Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dockter, B.A.; Hurley, J.P.; Watne, T.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; O`Keefe, C.A. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Minerals Research Center

    1996-12-31

    Large-scale hot-gas testing over the past several years has revealed numerous cases of cake buildup on filter elements that have been difficult, if not impossible to remove. At times, the cake can bridge between candle filters, leading to high filter failure rates. Physical factors, including particle-size distribution, particle shape, the aerodynamics of deposition, and system temperature contribute to difficulty in removing the cake. It is speculated that chemical as well as physical effects are playing a role in leading the ash to bond to the filter or to itself. The Energy and Environmental research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota is working with Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and a consortium of companies in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform the research necessary to determine the factors that cause hot-gas cleanup filters to be blinded by ash or to develop deposits that can bridge the filters and cause them to fail. The objectives of this overall project are threefold: first, to determine the mechanisms by which difficult-to-clean ash is formed; second, to develop a method to determine the rate of blinding/bridging based on fuel and sorbent properties and operating conditions; finally, to provide suggestions fro ways to prevent filter blinding by the troublesome ash. The projects consists of four tasks: field sampling and archive sample analyses, laboratory-scale testing, bench-scale testing, and model and database development testing. This paper present preliminary data from Task 2 on determining the tensile strengths of coal ash particles at elevated temperatures and simulated combustor gas conditions.

  10. Fusion characterization of biomass ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Teng; Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang;

    2016-01-01

    The ash fusion characteristics are important parameters for thermochemical utilization of biomass. In this research, a method for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash by Thermo-mechanical Analyzer, TMA, is described. The typical TMA shrinking ratio curve can be divided into two...... stages, which are closely related to ash melting behaviors. Several characteristics temperatures based on the TMA curves are used to assess the ash fusion characteristics. A new characteristics temperature, Tm, is proposed to represent the severe melting temperature of biomass ash. The fusion...... characteristics of six types of biomass ash have been measured by TMA. Compared with standard ash fusibility temperatures (AFT) test, TMA is more suitable for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. The glassy molten areas of the ash samples are sticky and mainly consist of K-Ca-silicates....

  11. Delineation of a volcanic ash body using electrical resistivity profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four lines of electrical resistivity profiling (ERP) were performed to define the extent of a shallow Quaternary volcanic ash deposit being mined in the United States. Inversion results of ERP proved suitable for defining the thickness and lateral extent of the volcanic ash deposit at this testing site. These interpretations were confirmed by shallow borehole drilling. The model sensitivity information indicates that inverted models possess sufficient resolving power down to a depth of 7 m and are fairly consistent in terms of horizontal resolution along the four ERP lines. The bottom of most of the volcanic ash deposit in the study area is less than 7 m in depth. Based on synthesis of the ERP and drill information, the limits of the mineable ash bed resources were clearly defined. Moreover, by integrating the ERP results with a minimal number of optimally placed borings, the volume of the volcanic ash deposit was established at a lesser cost, and with greater accuracy than would be possible with a traditionally designed grid drilling programme

  12. Ash dispersal dynamics: state of the art and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, R.

    2013-05-01

    Volcanic ash, during dispersal and deposition, is among the major hazards from explosive eruptions. Volcanic ash fallout can disrupt communities downwind, interrupt surface transportation networks and lead to closure of airports. Airborne ash seriously threatens modern jet aircraft in flight. In several documented cases, encounters between aircraft and volcanic clouds have resulted in engine flameout and near crashes, so there is a need to accurately predict the trajectory of volcanic ash clouds in order to improve aviation safety and reduce economic losses. The ash clouds affect aviation even in distal regions, as demonstrated by several eruptions with far-range dispersal. Recent examples include Crater Peak 1992, Tungurahua 1999-2001, Mount Cleveland 2001, Chaitén 2008, Eyjafjallajökull 2010, Grimsvötn 2011, and Cordón-Caulle 2011. Amongst these, the April-May 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland provoked the largest civil aviation breakdown. Accumulation of tephra can produce roof collapse, interruption of lifelines (roads, railways, etc.), disruption to airport operations, and damage to communications and electrical power lines. Deposition of ash decreases soil permeability, increases surface runoff, and promotes floods. Ash leaching can result in the pollution of water resources, damage to agriculture, pastures, and livestock, impinge on aquatic ecosystems, and alteration of the geochemical environment on the seafloor. Despite the potential big impact, the dispersal dynamics of volcanic ash is still an unsolved problem for volcanologists, which claims for fiture high level research. Here, a critical overview about models (field, experimental and numerical) for inversion of field data to gain insights on physics of dispersal of volcanic ash is proposed. A special focus is devoted to some physical parameters that are far from a satisfactory inversion (e.g. reconstruction of total grain size distribution), and clues for future research are suggested.

  13. Basin-Scale Sand Deposition in the Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation of the Sichuan Basin, Southwest China: Sedimentary Framework and Conceptual Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiucheng Tan; Qingsong Xia; Jingshan Chen; Ling Li; Hong Liu; Bing Luo; Jiwen Xia; Jiajing Yang

    2013-01-01

    The Upper Triassic Xujiahe(须家河) Formation in the Sichuan (四川) Basin,Southwes China is distinctive for the basin-scale sand deposition.This relatively rare sedimentary phenomenon has not been well interpreted.Here we addressed this issue by discussing sedimentary framework and conceptual model.Analysis of sedimentary setting implied that the basin received transgression during the deposition.It had multiple provenance supplies and river networks,as being surrounded by oldlands in multiple directions including the north,east and south.Thus,the basin was generally characterized by coastal and widely open and shallow lacustrine deposition during the Late Triassic Xujiahe period.This is similar to the modern well-known Poyang(鄱阳) Lake.Therefore,we investigated the framework and conceptual model of the Sichuan Basin during the Xujiahe period with an analogue to the Poyang Lake.Results show that the conceptual model of the deposition can be divided into transgressive and regressive stages.The first,third and fifth members of the formation are in transgressive stage and the deposits are dominated by shore and shallow lacustrine mud.In contrast,the deposition is mainly of braided river channel sand deposits during the regressive stage,mainly including the second,fourth and sixth members of the formation.The sand deposited in almost the entire basin because of the lateral migration and forward moving of the cross networks of the braided rivers.The multiple alternations of short and rapid transgression and relatively long regression are beneficial to the basin-scale sand deposition.Thus,the main channel of the braided river and its extensional areas are favorable for the development of hydrocarbon reservoir.This provides practical significance to the reservoir evaluation and exploration.In addition,the results also justify the relatively distinctive sedimentary phenomenon in the study area and may also have implications for understanding the large

  14. Ash dust co-centration in the vicinity of the ash disposal site depending on the size of the pond (“Water Mirror”)

    OpenAIRE

    Zoran Gršić; Predrag Milutinović; Borivoj Rajković; Dragan Dramlić; Zoran Veliki; Stefan Dramlić

    2010-01-01

    Thermal power plants Nikola Tesla “A” and “B” are large sources of ash from their ashes/slag deposit sites. Total sizes of ashes/slag depots are 600ha and 382ha, with active cassettes having dimensions ∼200 ha and ∼130 ha. The active cassettes of the disposal sites are covered by rather large waste ponds, the sizes of vary depending on the working condition of a sluice system and on meteorological conditions. Modeling of ash lifting was attempted using results from the dust lifting research. ...

  15. Advanced development of a pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized-bed coal gasification system: Topical report, Process analysis, FY 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1987-07-31

    KRW Energy Systems, Inc., is engaged in the continuing development of a pressurized, fluidized-bed gasification process at its Waltz Mill Site in Madison, Pennsylvania. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate the viability of the KRW process for the environmentally-acceptable production of low- and medium-Btu fuel gas from a variety of fossilized carbonaceous feedstocks and industrial fuels. This report presents process analysis of the 24 ton-per-day Process Development Unit (PDU) operations and is a continuation of the process analysis work performed in 1980 and 1981. Included is work performed on PDU process data; gasification; char-ash separation; ash agglomeration; fines carryover, recycle, and consumption; deposit formation; materials; and environmental, health, and safety issues. 63 figs., 43 tabs.

  16. The effect of Etna volcanic ash clouds on the Maltese Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Azzopardi, F.; Physics Department, University of Malta, Msida MSD 2080, Malta; Raymond, E.; Physics Department, University of Malta, Msida MSD 2080, Malta; Prestifilippo, M.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia; Scollo, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia; Coltelli, M.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied in depth the effect of Etna volcanic ash clouds on the Maltese Islands. Research was carried out to gather information about Etna's eruptions that impacted the Maltese Islands, starting with historical eruptions dating back to the 14th century continuing to present day. A statistical approach was utilized to provide tephra deposit load and ash concentration using PUFF — a model which simulates the transport, dispersion and sedimentation of volcanic ash. Three...

  17. Sedimentation of the basal Kombolgie Formation (Upper Precambrian-Carpentarian) Northern Territory, Australia: possible significance in the genesis of the underlying Alligator Rivers unconformity-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1400 to 1500 My old Kombolgie Formation of the MacArthur Basin of the Northern Territory overlies or has overlain unconformity-type uranium deposits including Jabiluka, Ranger, Koongarra, Nabarlek and the small deposits of the South Alligator River Valley. A brief study of the basal portion of the formation showed it to consist entirely of mature conglomerates and quartzose sandstones. Analysis of the bedding types (planar cross beds, trough cross beds and parallel beds) and other sedimentary structures (mainly ripple marks and parting lineation) fit a braided alluvial plain model. A paleocurrent study utilizing about 400 measurements from nine localities located along the westward-facing 250 kilometer-long erosional escarpment of the Arnhem Land Plateau showed the dominant paleocurrent trend to be from west and northwest towards the east and southeast, with local divergence. The data and interpretation presented are relevant to the supergene model of uranium deposition at the unconformity, for they add to the suggestion that additional uranium deposits similar to Jabiluka Two may underlie the Kombolgie Formation eastward from the present escarpment

  18. Role of low-energy ion irradiation in the formation of an aluminum germanate layer on a germanium substrate by radical-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Yukio, E-mail: y-fukuda@rs.suwa.tus.ac.jp; Yamada, Daichi; Yokohira, Tomoya; Yanachi, Kosei [Tokyo University of Science, Suwa, 5000-1 Toyohira, Chino, Nagano 391-0292 (Japan); Yamamoto, Chiaya; Yoo, Byeonghak; Sato, Tetsuya [University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan); Yamanaka, Junji [University of Yamanashi, 7-32 Miyamae, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan); Takamatsu, Toshiyuki [SST Inc., 989-6 Shimadadai, Yachiyo, Chiba 276-0004 (Japan); Okamoto, Hiroshi [Hirosaki University, 3 Bunkyo, Hirosaki 036-8561 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Radical-enhanced atomic layer deposition uses oxygen radicals generated by a remote microwave-induced plasma as an oxidant to change the surface reactions of the alternately supplied trimethylaluminum precursor and oxygen radicals on a Ge substrate, which leads to the spontaneous formation of an aluminum germanate layer. In this paper, the effects that low-energy ions, supplied from a remote microwave plasma to the substrate along with the oxygen radicals, have on the surface reactions were studied. From a comparative study of aluminum oxide deposition under controlled ion flux irradiation on the deposition surface, it was found that the ions enhance the formation of the aluminum germanate layer. The plasma potential measured at the substrate position by the Langmuir probe method was 5.4 V. Assuming that the kinetic energy of ions arriving at the substrate surface is comparable to that gained by this plasma potential, such ions have sufficient energy to induce exchange reactions of surface-adsorbed Al atoms with the underlying Ge atoms without causing significant damage to the substrate. This ion-induced exchange reaction between Al and Ge atoms is inferred to be the background kinetics of the aluminum germanate formation by radical-enhanced atomic layer deposition.

  19. Braid-Delta Deposits from a Broad Shallow-Marine Setting:the Middle Member of the Kalpingtag Formation in the Central Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yiming; ZHANG Jinliang

    2008-01-01

    During the early Silurian, a transgressive and vast shallow sea with flat sea-floor covered the central Tarim Basin (the Tazhong area). The depositional environment of the middle member of the Kalpingtag Formation is controversial. In order to provide a basis for the prediction of reservoir sand, the sedimentary facies are recognized according to abundant core observations and de-scriptions combined with well-log analysis, isograms, seismic interpretations and regional sedimentary background. The middle member of the Kalpingtag Formation, which shows a retrograding sequence, is interpreted as braid-delta deposits influenced by mi-nor tidal reworking. The sources of clasts are from the southern uplift. The subaqueous braid-delta deposits in the study area have some characteristics quite different from the common deltas that generally deposit in marginal seas. Four facies grouped to a delta front association are recognized, ranging from distributary-channel (Facies A), front bar (Facies B), sand sheet (Facies C) and inter-distributary bay (Facies D). The distributary channels construct the sandbody framework of the delta front. Front bar deposits, which are fine-grained with low depositionai dips, display a near-continuous sand strip around the entire periphery of the delta. Sand sheet deposits are mainly found in front of Facies B, gradationally contacting with the prodelta. The interdistributary bay is essentially the uppermost unit capping the channel sequence and generally made up of laminated and massive mudstones. The delta front deposits display extensive sheet-like bodies contrasting with the characteristic wedge shapes of common subaqueous delta bodies. The bi-modal cross-stratification and mud drapes in the fine-to medium-grained sandstone in the distal area are inferred to reflect high-energy tidal processes.

  20. Direct synthesis of carbon nanofibers from South African coal fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintsho, Nomso; Shaikjee, Ahmed; Masenda, Hilary; Naidoo, Deena; Billing, Dave; Franklyn, Paul; Durbach, Shane

    2014-08-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs), cylindrical nanostructures containing graphene, were synthesized directly from South African fly ash (a waste product formed during the combustion of coal). The CNFs (as well as other carbonaceous materials like carbon nanotubes (CNTs)) were produced by the catalytic chemical vapour deposition method (CCVD) in the presence of acetylene gas at temperatures ranging from 400°C to 700°C. The fly ash and its carbonaceous products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), laser Raman spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements. It was observed that as-received fly ash was capable of producing CNFs in high yield by CCVD, starting at a relatively low temperature of 400°C. Laser Raman spectra and TGA thermograms showed that the carbonaceous products which formed were mostly disordered. Small bundles of CNTs and CNFs observed by TEM and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the catalyst most likely responsible for CNF formation was iron in the form of cementite; X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed these findings.

  1. Isotopic and fluid-inclusion constraints on the formation of polymetallic vein deposits in the central Argentinian Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejonghe, Léon; Darras, Benoît; Hughes, Guillermo; Muchez, Philippe; Scoates, James S.; Weis, Dominique

    2002-03-01

    The lead isotope compositions of galena and the fluid-inclusion systematics of nine barite-bearing polymetallic (Au, Ag, Pb, Zn) deposits of the central Argentinian Patagonia (Chubut and Rio Negro provinces) have been investigated to constrain the compositions and sources of the mineralizing fluids. Most of the deposits occur as veins, with less common wall-rock disseminations and/or stockworks, and are low-sulfidation epithermal deposits hosted in Jurassic volcanic rocks. Fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures (Th) from quartz and sphalerite from the deposits fall within the range of 100-300 °C, with the highest measured average temperatures for the most eastern deposits (Mina Angela - 298 °C; Cañadón Bagual - 343 °C). The salinities of the hydrothermal fluids at all deposits were low to moderate (≤10.4 equiv. wt% NaCl). Three groups of ore deposits can be defined on the basis of 206Pb/204Pb ratios for galena and these show a general decrease from west to east (from 18.506 to 18.000). The central Argentinian Patagonia deposits have distinctly less radiogenic lead isotope compositions than similar deposits from Peru and Chile, except for the porphyry copper deposits of central and southern Peru. Galena from the Mina Angela deposit is characterized by very low radiogenic lead isotope compositions (18.000Precambrian basement. The geographic trend in lead isotope compositions of both galena and whole rocks indicates a crustal contribution which increases eastwards, also reflected in the strontium-neodymium isotope systematics of the host lavas. Finally, due to the lack of precise age determinations for the central Patagonian polymetallic deposits, a potential link with Andean porphyry copper systems remains an open question.

  2. MAT 126 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    stylia

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MAT 126 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Written Assignment (Arithmetic and geometric sequence) (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Assignment Is It Fat Free (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Assignment Quadratic Equations (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126...

  3. A study of fly ash-lime granule unfired brick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Chindaprasirt; K. Pimraksa [Khon Kaen University (Thailand). Department of Civil Engineering

    2008-02-15

    In this paper, the properties of fly ash-lime granule unfired bricks are studied. Granules were prepared from mixtures of fly ash and lime at fly ash to hydrated lime ratios of 100:0 (Ca/Si = 0.2), 95:5 (Ca/Si = 0.35) and 90:10 (Ca/Si = 0.5). After a period of moist curing, the microstructure and mineralogy of the granules were studied. Microstructure examination reveals that new phases in the form of needle-like particles are formed at the surface of granule. The granules were used to make unfired bricks using hydrothermal treatment at temperature of 130 {+-} 5{sup o}C and pressure of 0.14 MPa. The microstructures, mineralogical compositions, mechanical properties and environmental impact of bricks were determined. The results reveal that the strengths of unfired bricks are dependent on the fineness of fly ash. The strength is higher with an increase in fly ash fineness. The strengths of the fly ash-lime granule unfired brick are excellent at 47.0-62.5 MPa. The high strength is due to the formation of new products consisting mainly of hibschite and Al-substituted 11 {angstrom} tobermorite. The main advantage of utilization of granule is the ability to increase the pozzolanic reaction of fly ash through moisture retained in the granule. In addition, the heavy elements, in particular Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn are efficiently retained in the fly ash-lime granule unfired brick.

  4. Porphyry-Cu-Mo Stockwork Formation by Dynamic, Transient Hydrothermal Pulses: Mineralogic Insights From the Deposit at Butte, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, C. N.; Reed, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    The temperature profile in magmatic-hydrothermal systems directly affects the chemical behavior and pressure regime of hydrothermal fluids and the resulting diversity of mineralization. We combine textural observations of igneous and hydrothermal minerals using SEM-CL and -BSE images with three independent mineral thermobarometers to better understand the thermal profile at the porphyry-Cu-Mo deposit in Butte, Montana. We apply the two most recent (and controversial) forms of the Ti-in-quartz thermobarometer from Thomas et al. (2010) and Huang and Audétat (2011), the Zr-in-rutile thermobarometer of Tomkins et al. (2007), and the XMg-Ti-in-biotite thermometer of Henry et al. (2005) to estimate the formation temperatures of these magmatic and hydrothermal minerals. In a comparison of isobaric temperature distributions from Ti-in-quartz (Thomas et al., 2010) and Zr-in-rutile we find that the Thomas et al. calibration consistently yields temperatures that are 50 to 200°C lower than those from Zr-in-rutile. These quartz temperatures are unreasonably low for quartz phenocrysts and are considerably lower than previous estimates for vein quartz. Temperature estimates from the Zr-in-rutile and XMg-Ti-in-biotite thermobarometers agree well with each other and with previous temperature estimates. We conclude that application of the Ti-in-quartz thermobarometer of Thomas et al. is not appropriate for this natural system. Quartz temperatures calculated using the calibration of Huang and Audétat (2011) are closer to those from rutile and biotite. Application of the Ti-in-quartz thermobarometer of Huang and Audétat to hydrothermal samples yields maximum temperature estimates, however, and requires evaluation of trace element abundances (e.g., Ti, Al) and other crystal lattice impurities (e.g., fluid inclusions) in growth zones as a means to determine whether growth zones represent slow or fast-growing quartz. Using thermobarometry from rutile, biotite, and quartz (Huang and

  5. Formation of Micro- and Nanostructures on the Nanotitanium Surface by Chemical Etching and Deposition of Titania Films by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis V. Nazarov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an integrated approach was used for the preparation of a nanotitanium-based bioactive material. The integrated approach included three methods: severe plastic deformation (SPD, chemical etching and atomic layer deposition (ALD. For the first time, it was experimentally shown that the nature of the etching medium (acidic or basic Piranha solutions and the etching time have a significant qualitative impact on the nanotitanium surface structure both at the nano- and microscale. The etched samples were coated with crystalline biocompatible TiO2 films with a thickness of 20 nm by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD. Comparative study of the adhesive and spreading properties of human osteoblasts MG-63 has demonstrated that presence of nano- and microscale structures and crystalline titanium oxide on the surface of nanotitanium improve bioactive properties of the material.

  6. Formation and evolution stages of gold rich Barika massive sulfide deposit, east of Sardasht, northern Sanandaj-Sirjan zone: based on structural, textural and fluid inclusion studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ali Tajeddin

    2010-05-01

    mineralization is recrystallization of the framboidal pyrite and migration of submicroscopic gold to the crystal boundary to form electrum under low to moderate strain. Highly strain and deformation (D2 on the deposit caused the remobilization of gold and accompanied َAs, Sb, Ag, and Pb minerals and continued to form coarse-grained electrum (up to 3 mm in open space fractures. The formation of barren silica veins (D3 and high angle normal faults (D4 are the results of retrograde metamorphism.

  7. Lithofacies, age, depositional setting, and geochemistry of the Otuk Formation in the Red Dog District, northwestern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Julie A.; Burruss, Robert A.; Blome, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    Complete penetration of the Otuk Formation in a continuous drill core (diamond-drill hole, DDH 927) from the Red Dog District illuminates the facies, age, depositional environment, source rock potential, and isotope stratigraphy of this unit in northwestern Alaska. The section, in the Wolverine Creek plate of the Endicott Mountains Allochthon (EMA), is ~82 meters (m) thick and appears structurally uncomplicated. Bedding dips are generally low and thicknesses recorded are close to true thicknesses. Preliminary synthesis of sedimentologic, paleontologic, and isotopic data suggests that the Otuk succession in DDH 927 is a largely complete, albeit condensed, marine Triassic section in conformable contact with marine Permian and Jurassic strata. The Otuk Formation in DDH 927 gradationally overlies gray siliceous mudstone of the Siksikpuk Formation (Permian, based on regional correlations) and underlies black organic-rich mudstone of the Kingak(?) Shale (Jurassic?, based on regional correlations). The informal shale, chert, and limestone members of the Otuk are recognized in DDH 927, but the Jurassic Blankenship Member is absent. The lower (shale) member consists of 28 m of black to light gray, silty shale with as much as 6.9 weight percent total organic carbon (TOC). Thin limy layers near the base of this member contain bivalve fragments (Claraia sp.?) consistent with an Early Triassic (Griesbachian-early Smithian) age. Gray radiolarian chert dominates the middle member (25 m thick) and yields radiolarians of Middle Triassic (Anisian and Ladinian) and Late Triassic (Carnian-late middle Norian) ages. Black to light gray silty shale, like that in the lower member, forms interbeds that range from a few millimeters to 7 centimeters in thickness through much of the middle member. A distinctive, 2.4-m-thick interval of black shale and calcareous radiolarite ~17 m above the base of the member has as much as 9.8 weight percent TOC, and a 1.9-m-thick interval of limy to cherty

  8. Ore formation at the Kupol epithermal gold-silver deposit in northeastern Russia deduced from fluid inclusion study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, A. V.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.; Savva, N. E.; Sidorov, A. A.; Bayankin, M. A.; Uyutnov, K. V.; Kolova, E. E.

    2012-07-01

    The Kupol epithermal gold-silver deposit-the largest of this type of mineralization in northeastern Russia-is situated in the outer zone of the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanic belt. The results of thermobarogeochemical study of fluid inclusions in quartz from ore veins at the Kupol deposit are compared with the data on the Dvoinoi and Arykvaam deposits. The study of aqueous extracts from fluid inclusions revealed that the chemical compositions of ore-forming fluids at the Dvoinoi and Kupol deposits are similar in most elements. The only substantial difference is that fluids from the Kupol deposit are considerably enriched in sulfate, as is characteristic of the alunite-subtype of epithermal high-sulfidation mineralization. The salinity of aqueous solutions filling inclusions in amethyst and quartz from ore veins at the Kupol and Dvoinoi deposits is two-three times higher than the salinity of fluid inclusions from the barren veins at the Arykvaam occurrence. The data obtained support the hypothesis put forward earlier that fumaroles and solfataras played a part in ore deposition at the Kupol deposit.

  9. The conjunction of factors that lead to formation of giant gold provinces and deposits in non-arc settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, David I.; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Santosh, M.

    2016-01-01

    It is quite evident that it is not anomalous metal transport, nor unique depositional conditions, nor any single factor at the deposit scale, that dictates whether a mineral deposit becomes a giant or not. A hierarchical approach thus is required to progressively examine controlling parameters at successively decreasing scales in the total mineral system to understand the location of giant gold deposits in non-arc environments. For giant orogenic, intrusion-related gold systems (IRGS) and Carlin-type gold deposits and iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits, there are common factors among all of these at the lithospheric to crustal scale. All are sited in giant gold provinces controlled by complex fundamental fault or shear zones that follow craton margins or, in the case of most Phanerozoic orogenic giants, define the primary suture zones between tectonic terranes. Giant provinces of IRGS, IOCG, and Carlin-type deposits require melting of metasomatized lithosphere beneath craton margins with ascent of hybrid lamprophyric to granitic magmas and associated heat flux to generate the giant province. The IRGS and IOCG deposits require direct exsolution of volatile-rich magmatic-hydrothermal fluids, whereas the association of such melts with Carlin-type ores is more indirect and enigmatic. Giant orogenic gold provinces show no direct relationship to such magmatism, forming from metamorphic fluids, but show an indirect relationship to lamprophyres that reflect the mantle connectivity of controlling first-order structures.

  10. Electrodialytic treatment of fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie;

    Heavy metals are removed from the fly ashes by an electrodialytic treatment with the aim of up-grading the ashes for reuse in stead of disposal in landfill.A great potential for upgrading of bio- and waste incineration ashes by electrodialytic treatment exists. In the future, the applicability...

  11. Ash properties of some dominant Greek forest species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elemental and chemical wood ash compositions of six dominant Greek fuels was investigated using a variety of techniques, including thermal gravimetric analysis (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, the alkalinity of wood ash was determined by titration. The ash was prepared by combustion at low (600 deg. C), middle (800 deg. C) and high temperatures (1000 deg. C). The ash composition is very important because thousands of hectares of wildlands are burned annually in Greece. The resulting deposits affect soil properties (i.e., pH) and provide a source of inorganic constituents (i.e., Ca, K, Na, Mg, etc.), while the most soluble compounds (i.e., sodium and potassium hydroxides and carbonates) do not persist through the wet season. The samples selected were: Pinus halepensis (Aleppo pine), Pinus brutia (Calabrian pine), Olea europaea (Olive), Cupressus sempervirens (Italian cypress), Pistacia lentiscus (Mastic tree), Quercus coccifera (Holly oak)

  12. Ash and sludge covering of mine waste. Benefits and/or risks using ash and sludge for covering of mine waste; Askor och roetslam som taeckskikt foer gruvavfall. Foerdelar och/eller risker med att anvaenda aska och slam som taeckskikt foer gruvavfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckstroem, Mattias; Johansson, Inger [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden). Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre

    2004-01-01

    One of the main sources for metal pollution in Sweden is mine waste. One way to decrease the leaching of metals from mine waste areas is covering which decreases the formation of acid drainage. There is a shortage of appropriate materials to use for covering, and excavation of till and clay from the environment might cause damages on the landscape. Previous studies have demonstrated that sludge and ashes are suitable materials for covering of waste deposits. When covering mine waste with ash and sludge various positive effects would arise, since the production of drainage water decreases as well as the pH increases due to the high buffer-capacity of the ash. In Ervalla outside Oerebro an area with mine waste has been covered with ash and sludge. This area gives a unique possibility to study benefits and/or risks with the covering of mine waste with ash and sludge. This report is a summary of the first phase of the project and the focus has been on characterisation of the material that has been used for covering. Also a monitoring program for the area has started. Preliminary findings indicate that that the covering decreases the leaching of some metals whereas the leaching of some metals increases. A decrease in the concentration of iron, nickel, cobalt and lead was observed and an increase was observed for arsenic, barium, chromium and copper.

  13. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) International Airways Volcano Watch. This plan defines agency responsibilities, provides a comprehensive description of an interagency standard for volcanic ash products and their formats, describes the agency backup procedures for operational products, and outlines the actions to be taken by each agency following an occurrence of a volcanic eruption that subsequently affects and impacts aviation services. Since our most recent International Conference on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety, volcanic ash-related product and service activities have grown considerably along with partnerships and alliances throughout the aviation community. In January 2005, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environment Prediction began running the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model in place of the Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport and Dispersion (VAFTAD) model, upgrading support to the volcanic ash advisory community. Today, improvements to the HYSPLIT model are ongoing based on recommendations by the OFCM-sponsored Joint Action Group for the Selection and Evaluation of Atmospheric Transport and Diffusion Models and the Joint Action Group for Atmospheric Transport and Diffusion Modeling (Research and Development Plan). Two international workshops on volcanic ash have already taken place, noticeable improvements and innovations in education, training, and outreach have been made, and federal and public education and training programs on volcanic ash-related products, services, and procedures iv continue to evolve. For example, in partnership with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and other academic institutions, volcanic ash hazard and mitigation training has been incorporated into aviation meteorology courses. As an essential next step, our volcanic ash-related efforts in the near term will be centered on the development of an interagency implementation plan to

  14. Electrochemical formation of Mg-Li-Y alloys by co-deposition of magnesium,lithium and yttrium ions in molten chlorides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Yun; YAN Yongde; ZHANG Milin; HAN Wei; ZHANG Zhijian

    2012-01-01

    An electrochemical approach for the preparation of Mg-Li-Y alloys via co-reduction of Mg,Li,and Y on a molybdenum electrode in LiCl-KCl-MgCl2-YCl3 melts at 943 K was investigated.Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) illuminated that the underpotential deposition (UPD) of yttrium on pre-deposited magnesium led to the formation of a liquid Mg-Y alloy,and the succeeding underpotential deposition of lithium on pre-deposited Mg-Y led to the formation of a liquid Mg-Li-Y alloy.Chronopotentiometry measurements indicated that the order of electrode reactions was as follows:discharge of Mg(Ⅱ) to Mg-metal,electroreduction of Y on the surface of Mg with formation of ε-Mg24+xY5 and after that the discharge of Li+ with the deposition of Mg-Li-Y alloys.X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that Mg-Li-Y alloys with different phases were formed via galvanostatic electrolysis.The microstructure of different phases of Mg-Li-Y alloys was characterized by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).The analysis results of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) showed that the chemical compositions of Mg-Li-Y alloys corresponded with the phase structures of the XRD patterns,and the lithium and yttrium contents of Mg-Li-Y alloys depended on the concentrations of MgCl2 and YCl3.

  15. Agglomeration in Stripper Ash Coolers and Its Possible Remedial Solutions: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravi Inder

    2016-04-01

    The bottom ash of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler contains large amounts of physical heat. When low quality coals are used in these types of boilers, the ash content is normally more than 40 % and the physical heat loss is approximately 3 % if the bottom ash is discharged without cooling. Bottom ash cooler (BAC) is often used to treat the high temperature bottom ash to reclaim heat, and to facilitate the easily handling and transportation of ash. The CFB boiler at BLA Power, Newari, MP (India) is facing problems of clinker formation in strip ash coolers of plant since the installation of unit. These clinkers are basically agglomerates, which leads to defluidization of stripper ash cooler (BAC) units. There are two strip ash coolers in unit. Each strip ash cooler is capable of working independently. The proper functioning of both strip coolers is very important as it is going to increase the combustion efficiency of boiler by stripping of fine unburnt coal particles from ash, which are injected into the furnace. In this paper causes, characterization of agglomerates, thermo gravimetric analysis of fuel used, particular size distribution of coal and sand and possible remedial solution to overcome these agglomerates in strip ash coolers has also been presented. High temperature in compact separators, non uniform supply of coal and not removing small agglomerates from stripper ash cooler are among main causes of agglomeration in stripper ash cooler. Control of compact separator temperature, replacing 10-12 % of bed material and cleaning stripper ash cooler periodically will decrease agglomeration in stripper ash cooler of unit.

  16. Progression in sulfur isotopic compositions from coal to fly ash: Examples from single-source combustion in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaofa, Jiang; Elswick, E.R.; Mastalerz, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur occurs in multiple mineral forms in coals, and its fate in coal combustion is still not well understood. The sulfur isotopic composition of coal from two coal mines in Indiana and fly ash from two power plants that use these coals were studied using geological and geochemical methods. The two coal beds are Middle Pennsylvanian in age; one seam is the low-sulfur ( 5%) Springfield Coal Member of the Petersburg Formation. Both seams have ash contents of approximately 11%. Fly-ash samples were collected at various points in the ash-collection system in the two plants. The results show notable difference in ??34S for sulfur species within and between the low-sulfur and high-sulfur coal. The ??34S values for all sulfur species are exclusively positive in the low-sulfur Danville coal, whereas the ??34S values for sulfate, pyritic, and organic sulfur are both positive and negative in the high-sulfur Springfield coal. Each coal exhibits a distinct pattern of stratigraphic variation in sulfur isotopic composition. Overall, the ??34S for sulfur species values increase up the section in the low-sulfur Danville coal, whereas they show a decrease up the vertical section in the high-sulfur Springfield coal. Based on the evolution of ??34S for sulfur species, it is suggested that there was influence of seawater on peat swamp, with two marine incursions occurring during peat accumulation of the high-sulfur Springfield coal. Therefore, bacterial sulfate reduction played a key role in converting sulfate into hydrogen sulfide, sulfide minerals, and elemental sulfur. The differences in ??34S between sulfate sulfur and pyritic sulfur is very small between individual benches of both coals, implying that some oxidation occurred during deposition or postdeposition. The ??34S values for fly ash from the high-sulfur Springfield coal (averaging 9.7???) are greatly enriched in 34S relative to those in the parent coal (averaging 2.2???). This indicates a fractionation of sulfur isotopes

  17. Ectomycorrhizal community structure and function in relation to forest residue harvesting and wood ash applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi form symbiotic associations with tree roots and assist in nutrient-uptake and -cycling in forest ecosystems, thereby constituting a most significant part of the microbial community. The aims of the studies described in this thesis were to evaluate the potential of DNA-based molecular methods in below-ground ectomycorrhizal community studies and to investigate changes in ectomycorrhizal communities on spruce roots in sites with different N deposition, and in sites subjected to harvesting of forest residues or application of wood ash. The ability of selected ectomycorrhizal fungi to mobilise nutrients from wood ash and to colonise root systems in the presence and absence of ash was also studied. In total 39 ectomycorrhizal species were detected in the experimental forests located in southern Sweden. At each site five to six species colonised around 60% of the root tips. The dominant species, common to the sites, were Tylospora fibrillosa, Thelephora terrestris and Cenococcum geophilum. Differences between two sites with differing levels of N deposition suggested that community structure may be influenced by N deposition, although site history, location and degree of isolation may also influence species composition. Repeated harvesting of forest residues reduced numbers of mycorrhizal roots in the humus layer to approximately 50% of that in control plots but no shift in the ectomycorrhizal community could be detected. At another site, application of granulated wood ash induced a shift in ectomycorrhizal community structure and three ectomycorrhizal fungi ('ash fungi') were found to colonise ash granules. Two 'ash fungi' showed a superior ability to solubilise stabilised wood ash in laboratory experiments compared to other ectomycorrhizal isolates from the same site. In laboratory microcosms containing intact mycorrhizal mycelia, colonisation of wood ash patches by one 'ash fungus' was good whereas colonisation by Piloderma croceum was poor. In a

  18. Composition and diagenetic processes of sandstone and tuff deposits of the Cenomanian Cardiel Formation, Cardiel Lake area, province of Santa Cruz

    OpenAIRE

    R.R. Andreis; P.E. Zalba; M.E. Morosi

    2007-01-01

    The Cardiel Formation (Cenomanian), around 200 m in thickness in the studied area, includes different types of volcaniclastic deposits, mainly represented by fine tuffs and massive bentonites, and subordinated epiclastics such as lithic sandstones of yellowish-brown, dusky yellow, or light olive hues, siltstones and claystones. Reddened paleosols with some small axial roots and weak prismatic structures appear on top of siltstones, tuffs and bentonites. Tufites and tuffs contain the same neov...

  19. ASH and NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglioni, F; Ciccia, S; Marino, M; Bedogni, G; Bellentani, S

    2011-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) have a similar pathogenesis and histopathology but a different etiology and epidemiology. NASH and ASH are advanced stages of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD). NAFLD is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver (steatosis), without any other evident causes of chronic liver diseases (viral, autoimmune, genetic, etc.), and with an alcohol consumption ≤20-30 g/day. On the contrary, AFLD is defined as the presence of steatosis and alcohol consumption >20-30 g/day. The most common phenotypic manifestations of primary NAFLD/NASH are overweight/obesity, visceral adiposity, type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and hypertension. The prevalence of NAFLD in the general population in Western countries is estimated to be 25-30%. The prevalence and incidence of NASH and ASH are not known because of the impossibility of performing liver biopsy in the general population. Up to 90% of alcoholics have fatty liver, and 5-15% of these subjects will develop cirrhosis over 20 years. The risk of cirrhosis increases to 30-40% in those who continue to drink alcohol. About 10-35% of alcoholics exhibit changes on liver biopsy consistent with alcoholic hepatitis. Natural histories of NASH and ASH are not completely defined, even if patients with NASH have a reduced life expectancy due to liver-related death and cardiovascular diseases. The best treatment of AFLD/ASH is to stop drinking, and the most effective first-line therapeutic option for NAFLD/NASH is non-pharmacologic lifestyle interventions through a multidisciplinary approach including weight loss, dietary changes, physical exercise, and cognitive-behavior therapy. PMID:21734385

  20. The Origin of the Meridiani Sediments: the Key for Understanding the Formation of Sulfates and Layered Deposits on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, P.B.; Michalski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Following the discoveries made by the Opportunity rover at Meridiani Planum, members of the MER science team proposed that the Meridiani deposits are playa evaporites reworked by eolian processes. Alternate hypotheses have also been proposed to explain the deposits at Meridiani Planum, and these have highlighted serious problems with the provenance of the sedimentary material in the proposed playa hypothesis. These problems include: indications of cation-conservative weathering, the lack of a topographic basin, the intimate commingling of the most soluble and least soluble salts, and the overall scale of the deposit. These observations are important challenges to the playa scenario, and suggest that the sediment was derived from a different source.

  1. Variscan ore formation and metamorphism at the Felbertal scheelite deposit (Austria): constraining tungsten mineralisation from Re-Os dating of molybdenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, Johann G.; Stein, Holly J.

    2006-10-01

    The Felbertal scheelite deposit in the Eastern Alps has been regarded as the type locality for stratabound scheelite deposits. It is hosted by a Cambro-Ordovician metavolcanic arc sequence with minor Variscan granitoids (˜ 340 Ma) in the central Tauern Window. Re-Os model ages for molybdenite from the Felbertal tungsten deposit range between ˜ 358 and ˜ 336 Ma and record several pulses of magmatic-hydrothermal-metamorphic molybdenite formation. Molybdenite ages from the K2 orebody, a scheelite-rich quartz mylonite in the Western ore field, indicate that both mineralisation and mylonite are Variscan in age and suggest that the shear zone was active for ˜ 20 million years. Early stage tungsten mineralisation ( Scheelite 1) in quartzitic ores in the Eastern ore field, which is free of molybdenite, yielded very low to near blank levels of Re and Os and thus could not be dated. However, molybdenite from scheelite-quartz stringers, previously interpreted as a feeder stockwork to quartzitic scheelite ore of presumed Cambrian age, yielded Variscan Re-Os ages of ˜ 342 and ˜ 337 Ma. Dating of molybdenite contained in scheelite ores thus far provides no indication of a Cambrian component to the tungsten mineralisation. Our data are consistent with a model of either granite intrusion-related ore formation and coeval metamorphic overprint during the Early Carboniferous or, alternatively, molybdenite formation may be exclusively attributed to Variscan metamorphism (see Stein 2006).

  2. MGT 330 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    alfoniz

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 330 Week 1 Individual Assignment Functions of Management Paper (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 3 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 Summary (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Team Assignment External Internal Factors Paper (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Individual Assignment Delegation (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Summary (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 330 W...

  3. Hydrothermal processing of new fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, W.; Roy, D.M. (Materials Research Lab., Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

    1992-04-01

    The recent Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption in the Philippines, in which at least 268 people died, shows that volcanic eruptions can be highly destructive. The eruption shot ash and debris over the countryside; six towns near the volcano faced a high risk of devastating mudslides, and nearly 2000 U.S. service members and their families were evacuated from two nearby military bases. However, this paper reports that not all the consequences of volcanic eruptions are bad. Under hydrothermal conditions, volcanic ash can be transformed into zeolitic tuff and, eventually, into clay minerals that constitute agricultural soils. The Materials Research Laboratory (MRL) has recently used some artificial pozzolanas (fly ash) that when mixed with lime, under hydrothermal conditions, also produced a new type of cementitious material. This was categorized as a new fly ash cement. The formation of a new hydrothermally treated wood-fiber-reinforced composite has also been demonstrated. It is apparent, however, that with respect to concerns about detailed knowledge of the reactivity of calcium silicate-based materials under hydrothermal conditions, the application of the technology far outweighs the understanding of the underlying principles of reactivity. It would seem that an understanding of reactions on the molecular level is just beginning, and that work on hydrothermal reactions is still a potentially lucrative area of research.

  4. Characterization and Quantification of Deposits Buildup and Removal in Biomass Suspension-Fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    2010-01-01

    uptake reduction, fly ash and deposit characteristics, and deposit removal by using an advanced online deposit probe in a suspension­fired boiler using wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type and probe exposure time on the ash deposition rate, the heat uptake, the fly ash and deposit...... small in the tube bank region (flue gas temperature, 550­605 oC) during pure wood­firing. It was found that during suspension­firing of pure straw at low boiler load, the overall weight uptake is comparable with grate­firing, even though the amount of fly ash generated was significantly higher during...

  5. Overlying surficial deposits and absent areas for the Inyan Kara Formation in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set describes areas where the Inyan Kara Group is directly overlain by surficial deposits, as well as those areas where the Inyan Kara Group is absent in...

  6. Sedimentary environments and stratigraphy of the carbonate-silicilastic deposits of the Shirgesht Formation: implications for eustasy and local tectonism in the Kalmard Block, Central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    aram bayetgoll

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction   Sedimentological and sequence stratigraphic analysis providing insight into the main relationships between sequence architecture and stacking pattern, syn/post-depositional tectonics, and eustatic sea-level fluctuations (Gawthorpe and Leeder 2000; Zecchin et al. 2003, 2004; Carpentier et al. 2007. Relative variations in sea level are due to tectonic activity and eustasy. The Shirgesht Formation in the Kalmard Block of Central Iran provides a useful case study for to determine the processes responsible on internal architecture and stacking pattern of depositional sequences in a half-graben basin. In the Shirgesht Formation, siliciclastic and carbonate successions of the Kalmard Basin, the cyclic stratigraphic record is the result of the complex interaction of regional uplift, eustasy, local tectonics, sediment supply, and sedimentary processes (Bayet-Goll 2009, 2014; Hosseini-Barzi and Bayet-Goll 2009.     Material & Methods   Lower Paleozoic successions in Tabas and Kalmard blocks from Central Iran share the faunal and floral characteristics with other Gondwana sectors such as south-western Europe and north Africa–Middle East (Ghaderi et al. 2009. The geology of these areas was outlined by Ruttner et al. (1968 and by Bruton et al. (2004. The Cambrian-Middle Triassic strata in the Kalmard Block were deposited in a shallow water platform that possesses lithologic dissimilarities with the Tabas area (Aghanabati 2004. The occurrence of two active faults indicates clearly that Kalmard basin formed a mobile zone throughout the Paleozoic so that lithostratigraphic units show considerably contrasting facies in comparison with Tabas basin (Hosseini-Barzi and Bayet-Goll 2009; Bayet-Goll 2014 . The Shirgesht Formation in the Block Kalmard is mainly composed of carbonate-siliciclastic successions that disconformability overlain Kalmard Formation (attributed to Pre-Cambrian and is underlain by Gachal (Carboniferous or Rahdar (Devonian

  7. Geochemical and Nd isotopic constraints on provenance and depositional setting of the Shihuiding Formation in the Shilu Fe-Co-Cu ore district, Hainan Province, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liangliang; Zou, Shaohao; Cai, Jianxin; Xu, Deru; Zou, Fenghui; Wang, Zhilin; Wu, Chuanjun; Liu, Meng

    2016-04-01

    The Shihuiding Formation, a subordinate succession hosting the Fe-Co-Cu ores, is a suite of Neoproterozoic terrigenous clastic rocks occurring in the Shilu Fe-Co-Cu ore district of the Hainan Island, South China. Integrated petrographical, geochemical, and Nd isotopic analyses have been carried out on 23 sandstone specimens of the Shihuiding Formation in order to understand their provenance and the tectonic setting of their deposition. The samples can be divided into two groups, quartzose sandstones (13 samples) and ferruginous sandstones (10 samples). The ferruginous sandstones have average SiO2 and Fetotal contents of 77.23 wt.% and 18.09 wt.%, respectively, and this contrasts with the higher average SiO2 (94.04 wt.%) and lower Fetotal (2.67 wt.%) contents of the quartzose sandstones. The bivariant Th/Sc and Zr/Sc ratios indicate a predominantly recycled sedimentary provenance, and the low to medium degrees of weathering are commonly indicated by an average chemical index of maturity (CIM) of 81 and an average chemical index of alteration (CIA) of 68. The Shihuiding Formation sandstones have REE contents of 21-249 ppm, with LREE/HREE = 9.18 and δEu = 0.67. The εNd (970 Ma) values of -5.7 to -3.4, and model (TDM) ages of 2099-1773 Ma are compatible with a source mainly from the Paleo- to Mesoproterozoic Baoban Group, a suite of metamorphosed sedimentary rocks intruded by ca. 1450 Ma granites. Quantitative provenance modeling indicates that the Shihuiding Formation sandstones are best modeled with a mixture of 29% plagioclase-amphibole gneiss (29 P), 38% quartz-muscovite schist (38 Q), and 33% granite (33 G) detritus. Mixing the εNd values of the sandstones, calculated at 970 Ma, indicates that the sediment received 22-47% (average 34%) of its detritus from the Baoban Group quartz-muscovite schists. Components from hydrothermal fluids may also have been involved during deposition of the Shihuiding Formation sandstones, as revealed by a bivariant Al/(Al + Fe + Mn

  8. Local natural electric fields - the electrochemical factor of formation of placers and the criterion of prospectings of oil and gas deposits on the Arctic shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmiansky, Mikhail; Anokhin, Vladimir; Kholmianskaia, Galina

    2014-05-01

    On the basis litologo-facial, geo- and hydrochemical characteristics of a cross-section lito - and shelf hydrospheres, the estimation of structural features modern and paleostatic local electric fields and their influence on transportation of the suspended mineral material is made. The formula of dynamic carrying over of the ore material which is in a subcolloidal condition under the influence of natural electric field of a shelf is deduced. On a structure of a friable cover and its features on G.I. Teodorovicha's method position of oxidation-reduction border, sign Eh was reconstructed. On the basis of the established dependence between Eh and local substatic electric field of a shelf it was reconstructed paleostatic a field and its influence on the weighed mineral particles was estimated. Influence of local electric field on lithodynamic moving of ore minerals is estimated for a shelf of the Arctic seas of Russia. On the basis of this estimation and data on structure of a friable cover the map of influence of local electric field on sedimentation and transportation of ore minerals for water area of the East Arctic seas of Russia is constructed. For Laptev seas and East-Siberian the areas in which limits local electric field promoted are revealed and promotes formation Holocene placers of an ilmenite, a cassiterite and gold. For Chukchi and the Bering Seas such estimation is made for all friable cover. hydrocarbonic deposits located on water area of the Arctic shelf of the Russian Federation, initiate occurrence of jet auras of dispersion of heavy metals in ground deposits and in a layer of the sea water, blocking these deposits. Intensity of auras and their spatial position is caused by a geological structure of deposits of breeds containing them, lithodynamic and oceanologic factors. On the basis of the theoretical representations developed by M.A.Holmjansky and O.F.Putikova (Holmjansky, Putikov, 2000, 2006, 2008) application of electrochemical updating of

  9. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke;

    2002-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes are known to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, leading to C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. The process is mediated via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), with complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) playing a...... subsidiary role. In this study, we examine the relative contributions of CR1 and CR2 to the deposition of C3 fragments and MAC on B lymphocytes under circumstances where all complement pathways are operational. C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation were assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the......) bearing CR1, however, markedly reduced both C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation. Our data suggest that C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation on B lymphocytes in vivo may involve both AP and classical pathway activation, with CR1 contributing significantly to the latter. On the other hand, the...

  10. Formation of the Wiesloch Mississippi Valley-type Zn-Pb-Ag deposit in the extensional setting of the Upper Rhinegraben, SW Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Katharina; Hildebrandt, Ludwig H.; Leach, David L.; Jacob, Dorrit E.; Markl, Gregor

    2010-10-01

    The Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) Zn-Pb-Ag deposit in the Wiesloch area, Southwest Germany, is controlled by graben-related faults of the Upper Rhinegraben. Mineralization occurs as vein fillings and irregular replacement ore bodies consisting of sphalerite, banded sphalerite, galena, pyrite, sulfosalts (jordanite and geocronite), barite, and calcite in the Middle Triassic carbonate host rock. Combining paragenetic information, fluid inclusion investigations, stable isotope and mineral chemistry with thermodynamic modeling, we have derived a model for the formation of the Wiesloch deposit. This model involves fluid mixing between ascending hot brines (originating in the crystalline basement) with sedimentary formation waters. The ascending brines originally had a near-neutral pH (around 6) and intermediate oxidation state, reflecting equilibrium with granites and gneisses in the basement. During fluid ascent and cooling, the pH of the brine shifted towards more acidic (around 4) and the oxidation state increased to conditions above the hematite-magnetite buffer. These chemical characteristics contrast strongly with those of the pore and fracture fluid residing in the limestone aquifer, which had a pH between 8 and 9 in equilibrium with calcite and was rather reduced due to the presence of organic matter in the limestone. Mixing between these two fluids resulted in a strong decrease in the solubility of silver-bearing sphalerite and galena, and calcite. Besides Wiesloch, several Pb-Zn deposits are known along the Upper Rhinegraben, including hydrothermal vein-type deposits like Badenweiler and the Michael mine near Lahr. They all share the same fluid origin and formation process and only differ in details of their host rock and fluid cooling paths. The mechanism of fluid mixing also seems to be responsible for the formation of other MVT deposits in Europe (e.g., Réocin, Northern Spain; Trèves, Southern France; and Cracow-Silesia, Poland), which show notable

  11. INVESTIGATION OF FOULING DEPOSIT FORMATION DURING PASTEURIZATION OF CHILI SAUCE BY USING LAB-SCALE CONCENTRIC TUBE-PASTEURIZER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUR ATIKA ALI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the characteristics of fouling deposits obtained from chilli sauce pasteurization. A lab-scale concentric tube-pasteurizer was used to pasteurize the chilli sauce at 0.712 kg/min and 90±5°C. It was operated for 3 hours. Temperature changes were recorded during pasteurization and the data was used to plot the heat transfer profile and the fouling resistance profile. The thickness of the fouling deposit was also measured and the image was taken for every hour. The fouling deposit was collected at every hour to test its stickiness, hardness and flow behaviour. Proximate analysis was also performed and it shows that the fouling deposit from the chilli sauce is categorized as carbohydrate-based fouling deposits. Activation energy of chilli sauce is 7049.4 J.mole-1 which shows a greater effect of temperature on the viscosity. The hardness, stickiness of fouling deposit and the heat resistance increases as the chilli sauce continuously flows inside the heat exchanger.

  12. Use of rice husk ash as only source of silica in the formation of mesoporous materials Emprego da cinza da casca de arroz como única fonte de sílica na formação de materiais mesoporosos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Schwanke

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the synthesis of molecular sieves similar to MCM-41 using rice husk ash as only source of silica. For comparison purposes, a standard synthesis was performed using aerosil 200 commercial silica. The rice husk silica was obtained by heating treatment at 600 ºC and leaching for 2 h in reflux with HCl 1mol.L-1 and used in the synthesis. The samples prepared were characterized by N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM and thermogravimetric analysis (TG. By type-IV adsorption isotherms, the formation of mesoporous materials was observed. XRD showed the formation of hexagonal unidirectional pore materials similar to MCM-41. By SEM, it could be observed that the rice husk has fibrous aspect and that synthesis using calcined and leached rice husk did not react entirely because silica was only partially dissolved.Este trabalho relata o estudo da síntese de peneiras moleculares semelhantes à MCM-41, empregando cinza da casca de arroz como única fonte de sílica. Para critérios de comparação uma síntese foi realizada com sílica comercial aerosil 200. A sílica da casca de arroz foi obtida mediante tratamento térmico a 600 ºC e lixiviação em refluxo por 2 h com HCl 1 mol/L e empregada na síntese. As amostras preparadas foram caracterizadas por adsorção de N2, difração de raios X, microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV e termogravimetria. Por meio das isotermas de adsorção, do tipo IV, observa-se a formação de material mesoporoso. Nos difratogramas de raios X é identificada a formação hexagonal unidirecional de poros, indicando que material apresenta semelhanças com a MCM-41. Por MEV observa-se que a casca de arroz possui aspecto fibroso e que a síntese empregando a casca de arroz calcinada e lixiviada não reagiu na sua totalidade devido a dissolução parcial da sílica.

  13. Depositional Characteristics of Lake-Floor Fan of Cretaceous Lower Yaojia Formation in Western Part of Central Depression Region,Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Renchen; Li Guifan; Feng Zhiqiang; Liang Jiangping; Lin Changsong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the integrated subsurface data,including those of over 600 m drilled cores,more than 30 drilled wells and 600 km2 three-dimensional (3D) seismic-reflection data of the study area, the characteristics of the lake-floor fan of lower Yaojia(姚家) Formation have been clarified.An evident lacustrine slope break and a steep slope belt developed in the west of Songliao(松辽)basin during depositional period of Qingshankou(青山口)-Yaojia formations(K2).The slope gradient was about 15 m/km.During the depositional period of lower Yaojia Formation,the lake shrank and the shore line of the western Songliao basin shifted to the lacustrine slope-break.The wedge-shaped sediment body,which is interpreted as the lowstand system tract of SQy1 (LSTy1),developed in the area below the slope-break.The LSTyl is pinched out in the west of the study area.As to the thickness of LSTyl,ft is thicker in the east with SO m in its thickness than in the west The LSTyl,rich in sandstone,can be divided into lower part LSTylL and upper part LSTy1u based on two onlap seismic reflection phases,and core and logging data clearly.The various sediments' gravity flow deposits developed and the complex of lake-floor fan formed in the LSTyl under the slope-break in the western part of the central depression region.The lake-floor fan consists of various sediments' gravity flow deposits,including: (1) turbidity deposits with characteristics of Bouma sequences; (2) sand-bearing muddy debrite dominated by mud and mixed by sand; (3) mud-bearing sandy debrites characterized by dominated sand and mixed by mud; (4) sandy debris laminar flow deposits with massive or inclined bedding,and (5) sandy slump deposits developed as deforma tional sedimentary structure.During the lower lake-level period (LSTy1L),the western clinoform region was erosion or sediment pass-by area; the terrigenous clastic was directly transported to deep-water area,converted to channelized sandy debris flow,and combined with slump

  14. Phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge ash through an electrodialytic process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guedes, Paula; Couto, Nazare; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2014-01-01

    The electrodialytic separation process (ED) was applied to sewage sludge ash (SSA) aiming at phosphorus (P) recovery. As the SSA may have high heavy metals contents, their removal was also assessed. Two SSA were sampled, one immediately after incineration (SA) and the other from an open deposit (SB...

  15. MAT 221 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    mirat

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MAT 221 Week 1 Assignment 1 Simplifying Expressions (Ash) MAT 221 Week 1 DQ 1 Evaluating Algebraic Expressions (Ash) MAT 221 Week 2 Assignment 2 Inequalities (Ash) MAT 221 Week 2 DQ 1 Formulas (Ash) MAT 221 Week 3 Assignment 3 Two-Variable Inequality (Ash) MAT 221 Week 3 DQ 1 Parallel and Perpendicular (Ash) MAT 221 Week 4 Assignment 4 Financial Polynomials (Ash) MAT 221 Week 4 DQ 1 Initial Investme...

  16. Composite Ni-Co-fly ash coatings on 5083 aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagopoulos, C.N., E-mail: chpanag@metal.ntua.gr [Laboratory of Physical Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, 15780 Athens (Greece); Georgiou, E.P.; Tsopani, A.; Piperi, L. [Laboratory of Physical Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, 15780 Athens (Greece)

    2011-03-15

    Ni-Co-fly ash coatings were deposited on zincate treated 5083 wrought aluminium alloy substrates with the aid of the electrodeposition technique. Structural and chemical characterization of the produced composite coatings was performed with the aid of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) techniques. The Ni-Co-fly ash coatings were found to consist of a crystalline Ni-Co solid solution with dispersed fly ash particles. In addition, chemical analysis of the Ni-Co matrix showed that it consisted of 80 wt.% Ni and 20 wt.% Co. The co-deposition of fly ash particles leads to a significant increase of the microhardness of the coating. The corrosion behaviour of the Ni-Co-fly ash/zincate coated aluminium alloy, in a 0.3 M NaCl solution (pH = 3.5), was studied by means of potentiodynamic corrosion experiments.

  17. The world-class Jinding Zn-Pb deposit: ore formation in an evaporite dome, Lanping Basin, Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, David L.; Song, Yu-Cai; Hou, Zeng-Qian

    2016-07-01

    The Jinding Zn-Pb sediment-hosted deposit in western Yunnan, China, is the fourth largest Zn deposit in Asia. Based on field observations of the ore textures, breccias, and the sandstone host rocks, the ores formed in a dome that was created by the diapiric migration of evaporites in the Lanping Basin during Paleogene deformation and thrust loading. Most of the ore occurs in sandstones that are interpreted to be a former evaporite glacier containing a mélange of extruded diapiric material, including breccias, fluidized sand, and evaporites that mixed with sediment from a fluvial sandstone system. A pre-ore hydrocarbon and reduced sulfur reservoir formed in the evaporite glacier that became the chemical sink for Zn and Pb in a crustal-derived metalliferous fluid. In stark contrast to previous models, the Jinding deposit does not define a unique class of ore deposits; rather, it should be classified as MVT sub-type hosted in a diapiric environment. Given that Jinding is a world-class ore body, this new interpretation elevates the exploration potential for Zn-Pb deposit in other diapir regions in the world.

  18. Formation of carbonatite-related giant rare-earth-element deposits by the recycling of marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zengqian; Liu, Yan; Tian, Shihong; Yang, Zhiming; Xie, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    Carbonatite-associated rare-earth-element (REE) deposits are the most significant source of the world's REEs; however, their genesis remains unclear. Here, we present new Sr-Nd-Pb and C-O isotopic data for Cenozoic carbonatite-hosted giant REE deposits in southwest China. These REE deposits are located along the western margin of the Yangtze Craton that experienced Proterozoic lithospheric accretion, and controlled by Cenozoic strike-slip faults related to Indo-Asian continental collision. The Cenozoic carbonatites were emplaced as stocks or dykes with associated syenites, and tend to be extremely enriched in Ba, Sr, and REEs and have high (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios (>0.7055). These carbonatites were likely formed by melting of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), which had been previously metasomatized by high-flux REE- and CO2-rich fluids derived from subducted marine sediments. The fertility of these carbonatites depends on the release of REEs from recycled marine sediments and on the intensity of metasomatic REE refertilization of the SCLM. We suggest that cratonic edges, particularly along ancient convergent margins, possess the optimal configuration for generating giant REE deposits; therefore, areas of metamorphic basement bounded or cut by translithospheric faults along cratonic edges have a high potential for such deposits. PMID:26035414

  19. Sedimentary uranium deposits in France and French Union; Les gisements uraniferes dans les formations sedimentaires en France et dans l'Union francaise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kervella, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The author gives the actual state of our knowledge on uranium deposits found in recent years. Till now in precambrian formations only one important deposit has been found, at Mounana (Gabon) in a series of conglomeratic sandstones belonging to the 'Francevillien'. The observed mineralization is of the uranium-vanadium type. To the carboniferous formations corresponds in France a series of deposits, among which the most important ones are located at Saint-Hippolyte. Uranium as carburans, organic-bound complexes, is contained in lacustrine schists of Westphalian or lower Stephanian formations. A number of occurrences are also known in permo-triassic formations, particularly in the Vanoise Alps, in the Maritime Alps and in the Herault, where important occurrences have recently been found not far from Lodeve. The cretaceous and tertiary systems contain uranium deposits in phosphate rocks (Morocco, Senegal, Togo, Middle-Congo). Two sedimentary oligocene deposits are known in France. Lastly, the Vinaninkarena deposit in Madagascar, known for a long time, is the only important one reported in the quaternary series. (author) [French] L'auteur fait le point des connaissances acquises sur les gisements decouverts dans les formations sedimentaires en France et dans l'Union francaise au cours des dernieres annees. Les gisements sont classes selon l'age de la formation dans laquelle on les observe. Les terrains precambriens n'ont pour l'instant fourni qu'un seul gisement notable; situe a Mouana (Gabon). C'est en decembre 1956 que cet important gisement fut decouvert dans une serie de gres conglomeratiques appartenant au Francevillien. La mineralisation observee est du type vanadium-uranium. Au carbonifere correspond en France metropolitaine une serie de gisements d'interet variable. Les plus importants sont ceux de Saint-Hippolyte (Haut-Rhin) ou l'uranium est contenu dans des schistes lacustres du Westphalien ou du

  20. Formation and characterization of the MgO protecting layer deposited by plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, M S; Byun, J C; Kim, D S; Choi, C K; Lee, J Y; Kim, K H

    1999-01-01

    MgO films were prepared on Si(100) and soda-lime glass substrates by using plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition. Various ratios of the O sub 2 /CH sub 3 MgO sup t Bu gas mixture and various gas flow rates were tested for the film fabrications. Highly (100)-oriented MgO films with good crystallinity were obtained with a 10 sccm CH sub 3 MgO sup t Bu flow without an O sub 2 gas flow. About 5 % carbon was contained in all the MgO films. The refractive index and the secondary electron emission coefficient for the best quality film were 1.43 and 0.45, respectively. The sputtering rate was about 0.2 nm/min for 10 sup 1 sup 1 cm sup - sup 3 Ar sup + ion density. Annealing at 500 .deg. C in an Ar ambient promoted the grain size without inducing a phase transition.

  1. Fly ash effects. II. The active effect of fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiqin Wang; Chengzhi Zhang; Wei Suna [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Department of Materials Science and Engineering

    2004-11-01

    This paper examines the method for determining the hydration degree of cement clinker and the pozzolanic reaction degree of fly ash in the system of cement and fly ash. In the base, the active effect of fly ash is studied. The studied results show that the active effect includes two aspects: (1) Fly ash has stronger pozzolanic activity and can react with Ca(OH)2, and (2) it can promote the hydration of cement. When the content of fly ash is less, its pozzolanic activity can exert well, but its promoting role to the hydration of cement is weaker. When the content of fly ash is more, it is less than its pozzolanic activity can be used, but its promoting role to the hydration of cement is stronger.

  2. Wildfire Ash: Chemical Composition, Ash-Soil Interactions and Environmental Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna; Hamzi, Seham; Wittenberg, Lea

    2015-04-01

    Of the five classical factors of soil formation, climate, parent material, topography, time, organisms, and recently recognized human activity, it is the latter factor which discretely includes fire and post-burn impact. However, it is considered that soil undergoing fire just experience a temporary removal of the top organic horizon, thus slightly modified and often labeled as 'temporarily disturbed' soil or soil 'under restoration/rehabilitation'. In fact the suggested seventh factor, post-burned produced ash, can act both dependently and independently of the other soil forming factors (Levin et al., 2013; Certini 2013). They are interdependent in cases where ash influences occur on time scales similar to 'natural' soil formation (Keesstra et ai., 2014) such as changes in vegetation. On the other hand, in post-fire areas a strong dependency is expected between soil-water retention mechanism, climate and topography. Wild-land fires exert many changes on the physical, chemical, mineralogical, biological, and morphological properties of soil that, in turn, affect the soil's hydrology and nutrient flux, modifying its ability to support vegetation and resist erosion. The ash produced by forest fires is a complex mixture composed of organic and inorganic particles characterized by vary physical-chemical and morphological properties. The importance of this study is straightforwardly related to the frequency and large-scales wildfires in Mediterranean region. In fact, wildfires are major environmental and land management concern in the world, where the number and severity of wildfires has increased during the past decades (Bodi, 2013). Certini (2013) assumed that cumulatively all of the vegetated land is burned in about 31 years annually affecting 330-430 Mha (over 3% of the Earth's surface) and wide range of land cover types worldwide including forests, peatlands, shrublands and grasslands. Whereas, the fire is identified as an important factor in soil formation, the

  3. Ashes for organic farming

    OpenAIRE

    Kousa, T.; Heinonen, M; Suoniitty, T.; Peltonen, K

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays only eight percent of the cultivated field area is used for organic farming. The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry has published the guidelines for the program of organic farming to diversify the supply and the consumption of organic food. The aim is to increase organically arable land to 20% by the year 2020.The demand of organic fertilizer products is strongly increasing. Interest in forestry by-products (ash, bark, zero fiber, etc.) for use in organic production has recently be...

  4. Chlorination of bromide-containing waters: Enhanced bromate formation in the presence ofsynthetic metal oxides and deposits formed indrinking water distribution systems

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chao

    2013-09-01

    Bromate formation from the reaction between chlorine and bromide in homogeneous solution is a slow process. The present study investigated metal oxides enhanced bromate formation during chlorination of bromide-containing waters. Selected metal oxides enhanced the decay of hypobromous acid (HOBr), a requisite intermediate during the oxidation of bromide to bromate, via (i) disproportionation to bromate in the presence of nickel oxide (NiO) and cupric oxide (CuO), (ii) oxidation of a metal to a higher valence state in the presence of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and (iii) oxygen formation by NiO and CuO. Goethite (α-FeOOH) did not enhance either of these pathways. Non-charged species of metal oxides seem to be responsible for the catalytic disproportionation which shows its highest rate in the pH range near the pKa of HOBr. Due to the ability to catalyze HOBr disproportionation, bromate was formed during chlorination of bromide-containing waters in the presence of CuO and NiO, whereas no bromate was detected in the presence of Cu2O and α-FeOOH for analogous conditions. The inhibition ability of coexisting anions on bromate formation at pH 8.6 follows the sequence of phosphate>>sulfate>bicarbonate/carbonate. A black deposit in a water pipe harvested from a drinking water distribution system exerted significant residual oxidant decay and bromate formation during chlorination of bromide-containing waters. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analyses showed that the black deposit contained copper (14%, atomic percentage) and nickel (1.8%, atomic percentage). Cupric oxide was further confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). These results indicate that bromate formation may be of concern during chlorination of bromide-containing waters in distribution systems containing CuO and/or NiO. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of germanium thin films using organogermanium carboxylates as precursors and formation of germania films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alpa Y Shah; Amey Wadawale; Vijaykumar S Sagoria; Vimal K Jain; C A Betty; S Bhattacharya

    2012-06-01

    Diethyl germanium bis-picolinate, [Et2Ge(O2CC5H4N)2], and trimethyl germanium quinaldate, [Me3Ge(O2CC9H6N)], have been used as precursors for deposition of thin films of germanium by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD). The thermogravimetric analysis revealed complete volatilization of complexes under nitrogen atmosphere. Germanium thin films were deposited on silicon wafers at 700°C employing AACVD method. These films on oxidation under an oxygen atmosphere at 600°C yield GeO2. Both Ge and GeO2 films were characterized by XRD, SEM and EDS measurements. Their electrical properties were assessed by current–voltage (–) characterization.

  6. Formation of the world's largest REE deposit through protracted fluxing of carbonatite by subduction-derived fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Ming-Xing; Liu, Yu-Long; Williams, Ian S.; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Yang, Xiao-Yong; Ding, Xing; Wei, Gang-Jian; Xie, Lu-Hua; Deng, Wen-Feng; Sun, Wei-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Rare Earth Elements (REE) are essential to modern society but the origins of many large REE deposits remain unclear. The U-Th-Pb ages, chemical compositions and C, O and Mg isotopic compositions of Bayan Obo, the world's largest REE deposit, indicate a protracted mineralisation history with unusual chemical and isotopic features. Coexisting calcite and dolomite are in O isotope disequilibrium; some calcitic carbonatite samples show highly varied δ26Mg which increases with increasing Si and Mg; and ankerite crystals show decreases in Fe and REE from rim to centre, with highly varied REE patterns. These and many other observations are consistent with an unusual mineralisation process not previously considered; protracted fluxing of calcitic carbonatite by subduction-released high-Si fluids during the closure of the Palaeo-Asian Ocean. The fluids leached Fe and Mg from the mantle wedge and scavenged REE, Nb and Th from carbonatite, forming the deposit through metasomatism of overlying sedimentary carbonate.

  7. Ash Management Review—Applications of Biomass Bottom Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpuneet S. Ghuman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In industrialized countries, it is expected that the future generation of bioenergy will be from the direct combustion of residues and wastes obtained from biomass. Bioenergy production using woody biomass is a fast developing application since this fuel source is considered to be carbon neutral. The harnessing of bioenergy from these sources produces residue in the form of ash. As the demand for bioenergy production increases, ash and residue volumes will increase. Major challenges will arise relating to the efficient management of these byproducts. The primary concerns for ash are its storage, disposal, use and the presence of unburned carbon. The continual increase in ash volume will result in decreased ash storage facilities (in cases of limited room for landfill expansion, as well as increased handling, transporting and spreading costs. The utilization of ash has been the focus of many studies, hence this review investigates the likely environmental and technological challenges that increased ash generation may cause. The presence of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, chlorine, sulphur and silicon influences the reactivity and leaching to the inorganic phases which may have significant impacts on soils and the recycling of soil nutrient. Discussed are some of the existing technologies for the processing of ash. Unburned carbon present in ash allows for the exploration of using ash as a fuel. The paper proposes sieve fractionation as a suitable method for the separation of unburnt carbon present in bottom ash obtained from a fixed-bed combustion system, followed by the application of the gasification technology to particle sizes of energy importance. It is hoped that this process will significantly reduce the volume of ash disposed at landfills.

  8. Composition, diagenetic transformation and alkalinity potential of oil shale ash sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil shale is a primary fuel in the Estonian energy sector. After combustion 45-48% of the oil shale is left over as ash, producing about 5-7 Mt of ash, which is deposited on ash plateaus annually almost without any reuse. This study focuses on oil shale ash plateau sediment mineralogy, its hydration and diagenetic transformations, a study that has not been addressed. Oil shale ash wastes are considered as the biggest pollution sources in Estonia and thus determining the composition and properties of oil shale ash sediment are important to assess its environmental implications and also its possible reusability. A study of fresh ash and drillcore samples from ash plateau sediment was conducted by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. The oil shale is highly calcareous, and the ash that remains after combustion is derived from the decomposition of carbonate minerals. It is rich in lime and anhydrite that are unstable phases under hydrous conditions. These processes and the diagenetic alteration of other phases determine the composition of the plateau sediment. Dominant phases in the ash are hydration and associated transformation products: calcite, ettringite, portlandite and hydrocalumite. The prevailing mineral phases (portlandite, ettringite) cause highly alkaline leachates, pH 12-13. Neutralization of these leachates under natural conditions, by rainwater leaching/neutralization and slow transformation (e.g. carbonation) of the aforementioned unstable phases into more stable forms, takes, at best, hundreds or even hundreds of thousands of years.

  9. Formation of the Martian Polar Layered Terrains: Quantifying Polar Water Ice and Dust Surface Deposition during Current and Past Orbital Epochs with the NASA Ames GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Jeremy; Murphy, Jim

    2016-10-01

    Structural and compositional variability in the layering sequences comprising Mars' polar layered terrains (PLT's) is likely explained by orbital-forced climatic variations in the sedimentary cycles of water ice and dust from which they formed [1]. The PLT's therefore contain a direct, extensive record of the recent climate history of Mars encoded in their structure and stratigraphy, but deciphering this record requires understanding the depositional history of their dust and water ice constituents. 3D Mars atmosphere modeling enables direct simulation of atmospheric dynamics, aerosol transport and quantification of surface accumulation for a range of past and present orbital configurations. By quantifying the net yearly polar deposition rates of water ice and dust under Mars' current and past orbital configurations characteristic of the last several millions of years, and integrating these into the present with a time-stepping model, the formation history of the north and south PLT's will be investigated, further constraining their age and composition, and, if reproducible, revealing the processes responsible for prominent features and stratigraphy observed within the deposits. Simulating the formation of the deposits by quantifying net deposition rates during past orbital epochs and integrating these into the present, effectively 'rebuilding' the terrains, could aid in understanding deeper stratigraphic trends, correlating between geographically-separated deposits, explaining the presence and shapes of large-scale polar features, and correlating stratigraphy with geological time. Quantification of the magnitude and geographical distribution of surface aerosol accumulation will build on the work of previous GCM-based investigations [3]. Construction and analysis of hypothetical stratigraphic sequences in the PLT's will draw from previous climate-controlled stratigraphy methodologies [2,4], but will utilize GCM-derived net deposition rates to model orbital

  10. The Pre-Sturtian Negativeδ13C Excursion of the Dajiangbian Formation Deposited on the Western Margin of Cathaysia Block in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianjun Feng; Qirui Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The Dajiangbian Formation in South China is a siliciclastic-dominated sedimentary succession with low-grade metamorphism deposited on the western margin of the Cathaysia Block, and is capped by a glaciogenic diamictite (the Sizhoushan Formation). The Sizhoushan glaciogenic strata can be attributed to the Jiangkou glacial (Sturtian glacial) episode as they share stratigraphic and lithological similarities with Jiangkou strata in South China. Some carbonate, chert and shale units throughout the upper part of the Dajiangbian Formation were sampled for carbonate carbon isotope (δ13Ccarb) and organic carbon isotope (δ13Corg) analyses. A range of geochemical indices including oxygen isotopes (δ18O) and Mn/Sr (Fe/Sr) ratios suggest that primary carbon isotope values were preserved in the upper Dajiangbian Formation. The upper Dajiangbian Formation shows δ13Ccarb of-0.1‰, upward decreasing towards to-5.4‰. We suggest that the negativeδ13C excursion beneath the Sizhoushan diamictite is correlative with the Pre-Sturtian Islayδ13Ccarb anomaly and allows correlation with the global Neoproterozoic isotope stratigraphy. We find that carbonate and organic carbon isotope data of the upper Dajiangbian Formation are coupled, consistent with the δ13Ccarb-δ13Corg pattern observed on multiple continents.

  11. Skarn formation and trace elements in garnet and associated minerals from Zhibula copper deposit, Gangdese Belt, southern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Ciobanu, Cristiana L.; Cook, Nigel J.; Zheng, Youye; Sun, Xiang; Wade, Benjamin P.

    2016-10-01

    Trace element concentrations in garnet and associated minerals from the mid-Miocene Zhibula Cu skarn, Gangdese Belt, Tibet reflect a diversity of local environments, evolving fluid parameters and partitioning with coexisting minerals. Exoskarn occurs as massive but narrow intervals within a Lower Jurassic volcano-sedimentary sequence containing limestone, the main skarn protolith. Endoskarn is present at the contact with mid-Miocene granodiorite dikes. Prograde skarn associations are garnet-dominant but also include diopside-dominant pyroxene in variable amounts. Garnet compositions in exoskarn change from andradite (And)- to grossular (Gr)-dominant from the massive intervals to bands/lenses within marble/tuff, but not in endoskarn. In both cases however, associations at the protolith contact include anorthite and wollastonite, both indicative of skarnoid or distal (relative to fluid source) skarn formation. Exoskarns also contain vesuvianite. Retrograde clinozoisite, actinolite and chlorite replace pre-existing skarn minerals. Garnet displays brecciation and replacement by Al-richer garnet. Depending on partitioning among coexisting minerals, chondrite-normalised REY (REE + Y) fractionation trends for garnet depict endo- to exoskarn diversity, the dominance of And- vs. Gr-rich garnet (in turn related to proximal-to-distal relationship to fluid source), as well as prograde-to-retrograde evolution in the same sample. A strong variation in Eu-anomaly, from positive to negative, in And-dominant garnet can be correlated with variation in salinity of ore-forming fluids, concordant with published fluid inclusion data. Trends depicted by And- and Gr-dominant garnets are consistent with published data from skarns elsewhere, in which the dominant substitution mechanism for REY is YAG-type. Zhibula garnets are enriched in a range of trace elements less commonly reported, including W, Sn, and As, but also Mo (as high as 730 ppm), an element seldom analysed for in silicates

  12. The Kharapeh orogenic gold deposit: Geological, structural, and geochemical controls on epizonal ore formation in West Azerbaijan Province, Northwestern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niroomand, Shojaeddin; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Moore, Farib; Mohajjel, Mohammad; Marsh, Erin E.

    2011-01-01

    The Kharapeh gold deposit is located along the northwestern margin of the Sanandaj–Sirjan Zone (SSZ) in the West Azerbaijan province, Iran. It is an epizonal orogenic gold deposit formed within the deformed zone between central Iran and the Arabian plate during the Cretaceous–Tertiary Zagros orogeny. The deposit area is underlain by Cretaceous schist and marble, as well as altered andesite and dacite dikes. Structural analysis indicates that the rocks underwent tight to isoclinal recumbent folding and were subsequently co-axially refolded to upright open folds during a second deformation. Late- to post-tectonic Cenozoic granites and granodiorites occur northeast of the deposit area. Mineralization mainly is recognized within NW-trending extensional structures as veins and breccia zones. Normal faults, intermediate dikes, and quartz veins, oriented subparallel to the axial surface of the Kharapeh antiform, indicate synchronous extension perpendicular to the fold axis during the second folding event. The gold-bearing quartz veins are >1 km in length and average about 6 m in width; breccia zones are 10–50 m in length and ≤1 m in width. Hydrothermal alteration mainly consists of silicification, sulfidation, chloritization, sericitization, and carbonatization. Paragenetic relationships indicate three distinct stages—replacement and silicification, brecciation and fracture filling, and cataclastic brecciation—with the latter two being gold-rich. Fluid inclusion data suggest mineral deposition at temperatures of at least 220–255°C and depths of at least 1.4–1.8 km, from a H2O–CO2±CH4 fluid of relatively high salinity (12–14 wt.% NaCl equiv.), which may reflect metamorphism of passive margin carbonate sequences. Ore fluid δ18O values between about 7‰ and 9‰ suggest no significant meteoric water input, despite gold deposition in a relatively shallow epizonal environment. Similarities to other deposits in the SSZ suggest that the deposit formed as

  13. Compact Layers of Hybrid Halide Perovskites Fabricated via the Aerosol Deposition Process—Uncoupling Material Synthesis and Layer Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Panzer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the successful fabrication of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite layers by the aerosol deposition method (ADM. The layers show high structural purity and compactness, thus making them suitable for application in perovskite-based optoelectronic devices. By using the aerosol deposition method we are able to decouple material synthesis from layer processing. Our results therefore allow for enhanced and easy control over the fabrication of perovskite-based devices, further paving the way for their commercialization.

  14. Ophiolite-Hosted Copper and Gold Deposits of Southeastern Turkey: Formation and Relationship with Seafloor Hydrothermal Processes

    OpenAIRE

    AKINCI, ÖMER TEZCAN

    2009-01-01

    The paper documents evidence about the physical and chemical controls on the behaviour of Au and Cu sulphide deposits in fossil seafloor hydrothermal systems of SE Turkey. Observations from actively forming sulphides at mid-ocean ridges (MOR) and in back-arc environments are compared briefly with ancient analogues of gold and pyritic copper deposits such as Kisecik, Ergani and Siirt-Madenköy, formed at mid-oceanic ridges, or possibly at seamounts and back-arc settings. Many ophiolite-hosted ...

  15. Application of gravimetric and aeromagnetic data to the study of uranium ore-formation of granite-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emplacement status and dynamic field of magma of some granitic massifs in the south of China are analyzed by using gravimetric and aeromagnetic data in this paper, and granitic massifs are classified according to their intensity of dynamic field. Based on the inverse calculation of gravimetric data of Miaoershan-Yuechengling, Zhuguangshan and Guidong granitic massifs, the deep distribution form of these massifs is discussed, then three movement ways of magma flow are proposed, and finally, the emplacement sites of rich-large uranium deposits and area of uranium ore concentration, are pointed out, and the close relation between aeromagnetic anomalies and rich-large uranium deposits are pointed out as well

  16. Spreading dynamic of viscous volcanic ash in stimulated jet engine conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    song, wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado

    2016-04-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash is widely recognised as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The volcanic ash deposition process in a jet turbine is potentially complex. Volcanic ash in the air stream enters the inner liners of the combustors and partially or completely melts under the flames up to 2000 °C, at which point part of the ash deposits in the combustor fuel nozzle. Molten volcanic particles within high energy airflow escape the combustor to enter the turbine and impact the stationary (e.g., inlet nozzle guide vanes) and rotating airfoils (e.g., first stage high-pressure turbine blades) at high speed (up to Mach 1.25) in different directions, with the result that ash may stick, flow and remain liquid or solidify. Thus, the wetting behaviour of molten volcanic ash particle is fundamental to investigate impingement phenomena of ash droplet on the surface of real jet engine operation. The topic of wetting has received tremendous interest from both fundamental and applied points of view. However, due to the interdisciplinary gap between jet engine engineering and geology science, explicit investigation of wetting behaviour of volcanic ash at high temperature is in its infancy. We have taken a big step towards meeting this challenge. Here, we experimentally and theoretically investigate the wetting behaviour of viscous volcanic ash over a wide temperature range from 1100 to 1550 °C using an improved sessile-drop method. The results of our experiment demonstrate that temperature and viscosity play a critical role in determining the wetting possibility and governing the spreading kinetics of volcanic ash at high temperatures. Our systemic analysis of spreading of molten volcanic ash systems allows us to report on the fundamental differences between the mechanisms controlling spreading of organic liquids at room temperature and molten volcanic ash droplets.

  17. Phytostabilization of mine tailings covered with fly ash and sewage sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Neuschütz, Clara

    2009-01-01

    Establishing plant communities is essential for the restoration of contaminated land. As potential cover materials, fly ash and sewage sludge can prevent formation of acid mine drainage from sulfidic mine waste. The aim of the thesis was to i) screen for plants that can be established in, and prevent leakage of metals and nutrients from sludge on top of ash and tailings, and ii) investigate root growth into sealing layers of ash and sludge. Analyses were performed under laboratory, greenhouse...

  18. Modelling the resuspension of volcanic ash from the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, H. F.; Wallace, K.

    2015-12-01

    The 1912 eruption of Novarupta-Katmai was the world's most voluminous eruption since the 1815 eruption of Tombora. The eruption produced 17 km3 of ashfall and 11 km3 of pyroclastic flow deposits that filled nearby valleys, creating what is today known as the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes. These voluminous pyroclastic deposits continue to pose hazards when strong winds in the valley resuspend ash in times of low snow cover. These resuspension events may be confined to the valley and only recorded when there are local observations (web camera images, field crew). Occasionally, however, these events can loft ash up to altitudes of several kilometers and extend up to 250 km downwind, where it becomes an aviation hazard. A compilation of satellite observations and pilot reports indicate that such significant events occurred on at least 19 occasions since 2003. The longest duration events occurred in the autumn months of September and October. Predicting the resuspension of ash requires estimates of when the ash is exposed (low snow cover), the magnitude of surface wind gusts, and the threshold friction velocity (u*). Models of u* require a characterization of the source ash (density, grain-size distribution) as well as soil moisture. We have sampled source deposits and have installed instruments in the Katmai region to record the relevant meteorological parameters in order to better predict these resuspension events. Using real-time measurements coupled with high-resolution (6 km, 1 hour) meteorological forecast products and a reanalysis of conditions that produced historic events, we constrain the parameters applicable the resuspension of Novarupta ash thus improving our ability to forecast this potential ash hazard. The volcanic ash dispersion and deposition model, Ash3d, will be used to forecast the transport of the resuspended ash.

  19. Composition and Formation of Gabbro-Peridotite Hosted Seafloor Massive Sulfide Deposits from the Ashadze-1 Hydrothermal Field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Firstova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents mineralogical and geochemical data on seafloor massive sulfides (SMS from the Ashadze-1 hydrothermal field at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR. The Ashadze-1 deposit is associated with the uplifted lower crust and upper mantle (oceanic core complex, OCC of the MAR segment characterized by asymmetric mode of accretion. The OCC is represented by deep-seated gabbro-peridotite rocks exhumed on the rift valley slope along the detachment fault, during seafloor spreading. Hydrothermal processes in OCC environments result in different deposit composition and morphology compared to basalt-hosted systems. Abundant chimneys and enrichment in particular metals, including copper, zinc, gold, cobalt and tin are typical for this type of SMS deposit. The Ashadze-1 deposit is considered an example of a hydrothermal system in the initial stage of evolution marked by the young age of the sulfides (<7.2 kyr. The mineralogy of Ashadze-1 reflects primary ore-forming processes unaffected by post formation alteration. We propose a model for the primary ore-forming hydrothermal process in an ultramafic-hosted environment on the modern seafloor.

  20. INF 325 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    SINDHU

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com INF 325 Week 1 DQ 1 Network Management (Ash) INF 325 Week 1 DQ 2 Ethernet Network (Ash) INF 325 Week 1 Commercial Internet Expansion (Ash) INF 325 Week 2 DQ 1 UTP Cord Problem (Ash) INF 325 Week 2 DQ 2 Managed Switches (Ash) INF 325 Week 2 Leased Lines (Ash) INF 325 Week 3 DQ 1 WPA (Ash) INF 325 Week 3 DQ 2 Remote Access Management (Ash) INF 325 Week 3 Mobile Service (Ash) INF 325 Week 4 DQ 1 Ro...

  1. INF 336 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    MADURA

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com INF 336 Week 1 DQ 1 Risk Management (Ash) INF 336 Week 1 DQ 2 Organizational Structure (Ash) INF 336 Week 2 DQ 1 Supply Process Improvements (Ash) INF 336 Week 2 DQ 2 Outsourcing (Ash) INF 336 Week 2 Assignment Article Review (Ash) INF 336 Week 3 DQ 1 Capital Goods (Ash) INF 336 Week 3 DQ 2 Quality (Ash) INF 336 Week 3 Assignment Need Definition (Ash) INF 336 Week 4 DQ 1 Procuring Services (Ash) ...

  2. MGT 401 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    kennith

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 401 Week 1 Individual Assignment Strategic Management Process Paper (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 Class Activity Week 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 Learning Team Business Model Comparison Example (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 Class Activity (Ash) MGT 401 Week 3 Individual Assignment Business Plan Evaluation (Ash) ...

  3. INF 410 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    MADHURA

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com     INF 410 Week 1 DQ 1 Project Life Cycle (Ash) INF 410 Week 1 DQ 2 The Importance of Project Management (Ash) INF 410 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) INF 410 Week 2 DQ 1 Project Charter (Ash) INF 410 Week 2 DQ 2 Project Management Plan (Ash) INF 410 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) INF 410 Week 3 DQ 1 Risk Identification (Ash) INF 410 Week 3 DQ 2 Triple Constraint (Ash) INF 410 Week 3 Quiz (Ash) INF 410 Week 4 DQ...

  4. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukes, N. J.; Klein, C.; Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The transition zone comprises Campbellrand microbialaminated (replacing "cryptalgalaminate") limestone and shale, with minor dolomite, conformably overlain by the Kuruman Iron Formation of which the basal part is characterized by siderite-rich microbanded iron-formation with minor magnetite and some hematite-containing units. The iron-formation contains subordinate intraclastic and microbialaminated siderite mesobands and was deposited in deeper water than the limestones. The sequence is virtually unaltered with diagenetic mineral assemblages reflecting a temperature interval of about 110 degrees to 170 degrees C and pressures of 2 kbars. Carbonate minerals in the different rock types are represented by primary micritic precipitates (now recrystallized to microsparite), early precompactional sparry cements and concretions, deep burial limpid euhedral sparites, and spar cements precipitated from metamorphic fluids in close contact with diabase sills. Paragenetic pathways of the carbonate minerals are broadly similar in all lithofacies with kerogen intimately associated with them. Kerogen occurs as pigmentation in carbonate crystals, as reworked organic detritus in clastic-textured carbonate units, and as segregations of kerogen pigment around late diagenetic carbonate crystals. Locally kerogen may also be replaced by carbonate spar. Carbon isotope compositions of the carbonate minerals and kerogen are dependent on their mode of occurrence and on the composition of the dominant carbonate species in a specific lithofacies. Integration of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic results makes it possible to distinguish between depositional, early diagenetic, deep burial, and metamorphic effects on the isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals and the kerogen in the sequence. Major conclusions are that deep burial thermal decarboxylation led to 13C depletion in euhedral ferroan sparites and 13C enrichment in kerogen (organic carbon). Metamorphic

  5. Ash in the Soil System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, P.

    2012-04-01

    Ash is the organic and inorganic residue produced by combustion, under laboratory and field conditions. This definition is far away to be accepted. Some researchers consider ash only as the inorganic part, others include also the material not completely combusted as charcoal or biochar. There is a need to have a convergence about this question and define clear "what means ash". After the fire and after spread ash onto soil surface, soil properties can be substantially changed depending on ash properties, that can be different according to the burned residue (e.g wood, coal, solid waste, peppermill, animal residues), material treatment before burning, time of exposition and storage conditions. Ash produced in boilers is different from the produced in fires because of the material diferent propertie and burning conditions. In addition, the ash produced in boilers is frequently treated (e.g pelletization, granulation, self curing) previously to application, to reduce the negative effects on soil (e.g rapid increase of pH, mycorrhiza, fine roots of trees and microfauna). These treatments normally reduce the rate of nutrients dissolution. In fires this does not happen. Thus the implications on soil properties are logically different. Depending on the combustion temperature and/or severity, ash could have different physical (e.g texture, wettability) and chemical properties (e.g amount and type of total and leached nutrients) and this will have implications on soil. Ash can increase and decrease soil aggregation, wettablity and water retention, bulk density, runoff and water infiltration. Normally, ash increases soil pH, Electrical Conductivity, and the amount of some basic nutrients as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. However it is also a potential source of heavy metals, especially if ash pH is low. However the effect of ash on soil in space and time depends especially of the ash amount and characteristics, fire temperature, severity, topography, aspect

  6. Experimental constraints on kinetic and equilibrium silicon isotope fractionation during the formation of non-biogenic chert deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Desiree L.; van den Boorn, Sander H J M; Geilert, Sonja; Vroon, Pieter Z.; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon isotopic compositions (δ30Si) of modern and ancient siliceous sedimentary rocks provide valuable information on conditions in depositional environments, but interpretations are hampered by the lack of experimentally validated fractionation factors. Here, we present new constraints on the mag

  7. Ice formation via deposition nucleation on mineral dust and organics: dependence of onset relative humidity on total particulate surface area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Zamin A.; Florea, Octavian; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2008-04-01

    We present ice nucleation results for Arizona test dust, kaolinite, montmorillonite, silica, silica coated with a hydrophobic octyl chain, oxalic acid dihydrate, Gascoyne leonardite (a humic material), and Aldrich humic acid (sodium salt). The focus was on deposition mode nucleation below water saturation at 233 K. Particles were deposited onto a hydrophobic cold stage by atomization of a slurry/solution and exposed to a constant partial pressure of water vapor. By lowering the temperature of the stage, the relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) was gradually increased until ice nucleation was observed using digital photography. Different numbers of particles were deposited onto the cold stage by varying the atomization solution concentration and deposition time. For the same total particulate surface area, mineral dust particles nucleated ice at lower supersaturations than all other materials. The most hydrophobic materials, i.e. Gascoyne leonardite and octyl silica, were the least active. For our limit of detection of one ice crystal, the ice onset RHi values were dependent on the total surface area of the particulates, indicating that no unique threshold RHi for ice nucleation prevails.

  8. Ice formation via deposition nucleation on mineral dust and organics: dependence of onset relative humidity on total particulate surface area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanji, Zamin A; Florea, Octavian; Abbatt, Jonathan P D [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada)], E-mail: zkanji@chem.utoronto.ca

    2008-04-15

    We present ice nucleation results for Arizona test dust, kaolinite, montmorillonite, silica, silica coated with a hydrophobic octyl chain, oxalic acid dihydrate, Gascoyne leonardite (a humic material), and Aldrich humic acid (sodium salt). The focus was on deposition mode nucleation below water saturation at 233 K. Particles were deposited onto a hydrophobic cold stage by atomization of a slurry/solution and exposed to a constant partial pressure of water vapor. By lowering the temperature of the stage, the relative humidity with respect to ice (RH{sub i}) was gradually increased until ice nucleation was observed using digital photography. Different numbers of particles were deposited onto the cold stage by varying the atomization solution concentration and deposition time. For the same total particulate surface area, mineral dust particles nucleated ice at lower supersaturations than all other materials. The most hydrophobic materials, i.e. Gascoyne leonardite and octyl silica, were the least active. For our limit of detection of one ice crystal, the ice onset RH{sub i} values were dependent on the total surface area of the particulates, indicating that no unique threshold RH{sub i} for ice nucleation prevails.

  9. Influence of Different Defects in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on TiO2 Nanoparticle Formation through Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acauan, Luiz; Dias, Anna C; Pereira, Marcelo B; Horowitz, Flavio; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2016-06-29

    The chemical inertness of carbon nanotubes (CNT) requires some degree of "defect engineering" for controlled deposition of metal oxides through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The type, quantity, and distribution of such defects rules the deposition rate and defines the growth behavior. In this work, we employed ALD to grow titanium oxide (TiO2) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT). The effects of nitrogen doping and oxygen plasma pretreatment of the CNT on the morphology and total amount of TiO2 were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route were identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The TiO2 mass fraction deposited with the same number of cycles for the pristine CNT, nitrogen-doped CNT, and plasma-treated CNT were 8, 47, and 80%, respectively. We demonstrate that TiO2 nucleation is dependent mainly on surface incorporation of heteroatoms and their distribution rather than structural defects that govern the growth behavior. Therefore, selecting the best way to functionalize CNT will allow us to tailor TiO2 distribution and hence fabricate complex heterostructures. PMID:27269125

  10. Influence of Different Defects in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on TiO2 Nanoparticle Formation through Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acauan, Luiz; Dias, Anna C; Pereira, Marcelo B; Horowitz, Flavio; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2016-06-29

    The chemical inertness of carbon nanotubes (CNT) requires some degree of "defect engineering" for controlled deposition of metal oxides through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The type, quantity, and distribution of such defects rules the deposition rate and defines the growth behavior. In this work, we employed ALD to grow titanium oxide (TiO2) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT). The effects of nitrogen doping and oxygen plasma pretreatment of the CNT on the morphology and total amount of TiO2 were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route were identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The TiO2 mass fraction deposited with the same number of cycles for the pristine CNT, nitrogen-doped CNT, and plasma-treated CNT were 8, 47, and 80%, respectively. We demonstrate that TiO2 nucleation is dependent mainly on surface incorporation of heteroatoms and their distribution rather than structural defects that govern the growth behavior. Therefore, selecting the best way to functionalize CNT will allow us to tailor TiO2 distribution and hence fabricate complex heterostructures.

  11. Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III Year 6 - Activity 1.10 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Azenkeng, Alexander; McCollor, Donald; Galbreath, Kevin; Jensen, Robert; Lahr, Brent

    2012-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been conducting research on gasification for six decades. One of the objectives of this gasification research has been to maximize carbon conversion and the water–gas shift process for optimal hydrogen production and syngas quality. This research focus and experience were a perfect fit for the National Center for Hydrogen Technology ® (NCHT®) Program at the EERC for improving all aspects of coal gasification, which ultimately aids in the production and purification of hydrogen. A consortia project was developed under the NCHT Program to develop an improved predictive model for ash formation and deposition under the project entitled “Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III: Development of the CABRE III Model.” The computer-based program is now applicable to the modeling of coal and ash behavior in both entrained-flow and fluidized-bed gasification systems to aid in overall gasification efficiency. This model represents a significant improvement over the CABRE II model and runs on a Microsoft Windows PC platform. The major achievements of the CABRE III model are partitioning of inorganic transformations between various phases for specific gas cleanup equipment; slag property predictions, including standard temperature–viscosity curves and slag flow and thickness; deposition rates in gasification cleanup equipment; provision for composition analysis for all input and output streams across all process equipment, including major elements and trace elements of interest; composition analysis of deposit streams for various deposit zones, including direct condensation on equipment surfaces (Zone A), homogeneous particulate deposition (Zone B), and entrained fly ash deposition (Zone C); and physical removal of ash in cyclones based on D50 cut points. Another new feature of the CABRE III model is a user-friendly interface and detailed reports that are easily exportable into Word documents, Excel

  12. Geochemical Behaviors of REE and Other Trace Elements during the Formation of Strata-bound Skarns and Related Deposits:A Case Study of the Dongguashan Cu(Au) Deposit,Anhui Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Qicong; LIU Congqiang

    2003-01-01

    REE and other trace elements in the altered marbles, massive skarns and ores, as well as garnet and quartz were determined in order to examine the behaviors of trace elements during hydrothermal alteration. It is demonstrated that the high-field-strength (HFS) elements Zr, Hf, Th and Nb were immobile while other trace elements were mobile during the formation of skarns and related deposits. REE and ore-forming elements such as Cu and Ag in hydrothermally-altered marbles and skarns were provided primarily by hydrothermal fluids. In the direction transverse of the strata, the more deeply the marbles were altered, the higher the total REE abundance and the larger the negative Eu anomalies would be. The chondrite-normalized REE patterns of skarns are similar to those of the marbles, but the former are distinguished by much higher REE contents and more remarkable negative Eu anomalies. Those patterns were apparently not inherited from the marble protolith, but were controlled by garnets, which were determined by the hydrothermal solutions involved in the infiltration metasomatism. The hydrothermal fluids are characterized by having slightly right-hand dipping REE patterns, being enriched in LREE and having strongly negative Eu anomalies. The uptake of REE from hydrothermal fluids during the growth of garnet crystals resulted in the garnets having similar REE patterns to the hydrothermal fluids. Based on the spatial variation of REE in skarns and the structures of the hosting strata, we can get a better understanding of the transport path and pattern of the fluids involved in the formation of skarns and their related deposits. REE geochemistry investigation can help elucidate the genesis of skarns and skarn-related deposits.

  13. Dielectric properties of fly ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Raghavendra; R L Raibagkar; A B Kulkarni

    2002-02-01

    This paper reports the dielectric properties of fly ash. The dielectric measurements were performed as a function of frequency and temperature. The sample of fly ash shows almost similar behaviour in the frequency and temperature range studied. The large value of dielectric constant in the typical frequency range is because of orientation polarization and tight binding force between the ions or atoms in the fly ash. The sample of fly ash is of great scientific and technological interest because of its high value of dielectric constant (104).

  14. Rare Earth Element and yttrium compositions of Archean and Paleoproterozoic Fe formations revisited: New perspectives on the significance and mechanisms of deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planavsky, Noah; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Kamber, Balz; Hofmann, Axel; Knudsen, Andrew; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2010-11-01

    The ocean and atmosphere were largely anoxic in the early Precambrian, resulting in an Fe cycle that was dramatically different than today's. Extremely Fe-rich sedimentary deposits—i.e., Fe formations—are the most conspicuous manifestation of this distinct Fe cycle. Rare Earth Element (REE) systematics have long been used as a tool to understand the origin of Fe formations and the corresponding chemistry of the ancient ocean. However, many earlier REE studies of Fe formations have drawn ambiguous conclusions, partially due to analytical limitations and sampling from severely altered units. Here, we present new chemical analyses of Fe formation samples from 18 units, ranging in age from ca. 3.0 to 1.8 billion years old (Ga), which allow a reevaluation of the depositional mechanisms and significance of Precambrian Fe formations. There are several temporal trends in our REE and Y dataset that reflect shifts in marine redox conditions. In general, Archean Fe formations do not display significant shale-normalized negative Ce anomalies, and only Fe formations younger than 1.9 Ga display prominent positive Ce anomalies. Low Y/Ho ratios and high shale-normalized light to heavy REE (LREE/HREE) ratios are also present in ca. 1.9 Ga and younger Fe formations but are essentially absent in their Archean counterparts. These marked differences in Paleoproterozoic versus Archean REE + Y patterns can be explained in terms of varying REE cycling in the water column. Similar to modern redox-stratified basins, the REE + Y patterns in late Paleoproterozoic Fe formations record evidence of a shuttle of metal and Ce oxides across the redoxcline from oxic shallow seawater to deeper anoxic waters. Oxide dissolution—mainly of Mn oxides—in an anoxic water column lowers the dissolved Y/Ho ratio, raises the light to heavy REE ratio, and increases the concentration of Ce relative to the neighboring REE (La and Pr). Fe oxides precipitating at or near the chemocline will capture these REE

  15. Recent and past Saharan dust deposition in the Carpathian Basin and its possible effects on interglacial soil formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, György

    2016-04-01

    Several hundred tons of windblown dust material are transported every year from Saharan dust source areas into direction of Europe, modifying important climatic and other environmental processes of distant areas. North African aerosols have been also identified several times a year in the Carpathian Basin, where under the influence of certain synoptic meteorological conditions Saharan dust accumulation can clearly be observed. Previous satellite based studies were suitable to estimate the frequency and magnitude of Saharan dust episodes in the investigation area, however, the assessment of North African dust deposition can be done with model simulations. In this study, calculations were made by using the data of BSC-DREAM8b (Barcelona Supercomputing Center's Dust REgional Atmospheric Model) v1.0 and v2.0 database. Simulation results of the BSC-DREAM8b v1.0 are available from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2012, while the results of the updated v2.0 calculations are ready for the period between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2014. BSC DREAM8b v1.0 model simulations for the period between 2000 and 2012 provided an annual mean of 0.0285 g/m2/y dry and 0.034 g/m2/y wet deposition values in the Carpathian Basin, which is equivalent to a total of 0.0636 g/m2/y. The updated v2.0 version for the period of 2006-2014 gave significantly larger values: 0.133 g/m2/y dry; 0.085 g/m2/y wet and 0.219 g/m2/y total annual dust deposition. By comparing the results of the overlapping period between 2006 and 2012 of the v1.0 and v2.0 simulations, the updated depositional scheme of the newer version provided ˜3.7-fold values in case of dry deposition and ˜1.9-fold increase in results of the wet deposition. Information available from individual events showed that the simulated wet and dry dust deposition rates are significantly underestimated. This is also suggested by previous model calculations which reported values between 5 and 10 g/m2/y for modern dust flux in the investigated area

  16. Ash dust co-centration in the vicinity of the ash disposal site depending on the size of the pond (“Water Mirror”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Gršić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power plants Nikola Tesla “A” and “B” are large sources of ash from their ashes/slag deposit sites. Total sizes of ashes/slag depots are 600ha and 382ha, with active cassettes having dimensions ∼200 ha and ∼130 ha. The active cassettes of the disposal sites are covered by rather large waste ponds, the sizes of vary depending on the working condition of a sluice system and on meteorological conditions. Modeling of ash lifting was attempted using results from the dust lifting research. The relation between sizes of ponds and air dust concentration in the vicinity of ash disposal sites was analyzed. As expected, greater sizes of dried disposal site surfaces in combination with stronger winds gave greater dust emission and greater air dust concentration.

  17. Patterns and sources of variation in pollen deposition and pollen tube formation in flowers of the endemic monoecious shrub Cnidoscolus souzae (Euphorbiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arceo-Gómez, G; Alonso, C; Abdala-Roberts, L; Parra-Tabla, V

    2016-07-01

    Pollen deposition and pollen tube formation are key components of angiosperm reproduction but intraspecific variation in these has rarely been quantified. Documenting and partitioning (populations, plants and flowers) natural variation in these two aspects of plant reproduction can help uncover spatial mosaics of reproductive success and underlying causes. In this study, we assess variation in pollen deposition and pollen tube formation for the endemic monoecious shrub Cnidoscolus souzae throughout its distribution range in Mexico, and determine how this variation is structured among populations, plants and flowers. We also infer the relative importance of pollen quantity and quality in determining pollination success in this species. While we found no evidence suggesting that pollen receipt limits C. souzae reproduction across 19 populations, we did find extensive variation in pollen load size and pollen tube number per flower. Total variation in pollen receipt and pollen tube number was mostly explained by intra-individual and among-population variance. Furthermore, pollen load size had a stronger effect on the number of pollen tubes at the base of the style than pollen germination rate, suggesting that pollen quantity may be more important than quality for pollen tube success in C. souzae. Our results suggest that both small within-plant flower differences and broad-scale differences in community attributes can play an important role in determining pollination success. We emphasise the need to evaluate patterns and sources of variation in pollen deposition and pollen tube formation as a first step in understanding the causes of variation in pollination success over broad spatial scales. PMID:26916543

  18. The contribution to nitrogen deposition and ozone formation in South Norway from atmospheric emissions related to the petroleum activity in the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solberg, S.; Walker, S.-E.; Knudsen, S.; Lazaridis, M.; Beine, H.J.; Semb, A

    1999-03-01

    A photochemical plume model has been developed and refined. The model is designed to simulate the advection and photochemistry for several simultaneous point sources as well as the atmospheric mixing. the model has been used to calculate nitrogen deposition and ozone formation due to offshore emissions in the North Sea. Based on meteorological data for 1992 the calculations give a total contribution of 60-80 mg (N)/m{sub 2} at most in South Norway. Emission from British and Norwegian sector is calculated to contribute less than 5% each to the AOT40 index for ozone. (author)

  19. The contribution to nitrogen deposition and ozone formation in South Norway from atmospheric emissions related to the petroleum activity in the North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A photochemical plume model has been developed and refined. The model is designed to simulate the advection and photochemistry for several simultaneous point sources as well as the atmospheric mixing. the model has been used to calculate nitrogen deposition and ozone formation due to offshore emissions in the North Sea. Based on meteorological data for 1992 the calculations give a total contribution of 60-80 mg (N)/m2 at most in South Norway. Emission from British and Norwegian sector is calculated to contribute less than 5% each to the AOT40 index for ozone. (author)

  20. Tectonically induced climate and its control on the distribution of depositional systems in a continental foreland basin, Cloverly and Lakota Formations (Lower Cretaceous) of Wyoming, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, William S.; Suttner, Lee J.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2007-12-01

    Continental sediments of the Cloverly and Lakota Formations (Lower Cretaceous) in Wyoming are subdivided into three depositional systems: perennial to intermittent alluvial, intermittent to ephemeral alluvial, and playa. Chert-bearing sandstones, conglomerates, carbonaceous mudrocks, blocky mudrocks, and skeletal limestones were deposited by perennial to intermittent alluvial systems. Carbonaceous mudrocks contain abundant wood fragments, cuticle and cortical debris, and other vascular plant remains representing deposition in oxbow lakes, abandoned channels, and on floodplains under humid to seasonal conditions. Intraformational conglomerates, sandstones, bioturbated and blocky mudrocks with caliche nodules, and bioturbated limestones characterize deposition in intermittent to ephemeral alluvial systems. Bioturbated limestones are encased in bioturbated mudrocks with abundant pseudo-slickensides. The presence of caliche nodules in some of the blocky to bioturbated mudrocks is consistent with supersaturation and precipitation of calcium carbonate from groundwater under semi-arid conditions. Caliche nodules, pseudo-slickensides, and carbonate-rich floodplain sediments are interpreted to have been deposited by intermittent to ephemeral alluvial systems under seasonal to semi-arid climatic conditions. Laminated mudrocks, siltstones, vuggy carbonates, bedded to nodular evaporites, pebbly mudrocks, and diamictites were deposited in evaporative alkaline lakes or playas. Pebbly mudrocks and diamictites are interpreted to represent deposition from channelized and unchannelized hyperconcentrated flows on a playa, resulting from intense rain events within the basin. The areal abundance and distribution of these depositional systems change systematically across the overfilled portion of the Early Cretaceous Cordilleran foreland basin in Wyoming. The lower part (A-interval) of the Cloverly and Lakota Formations is characterized by deposits of perennial to intermittent rivers

  1. Influence of Bed Ash and Fly Ash Replacement in Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Summoogum-Utchanah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluates the influence of fly ash and bottom ash as partial cement substitutes in mortars by studying the particle size distribution, consistency, flow, fresh density, air content, compressive strength and flexural strength characteristics. The results revealed that fly ash and cement had relatively the same particle size distribution unlike bottom ash. In the fresh state, as the amount of pozzolans increased in the mixtures, the mortars showed an enhancement in workability, were susceptible to water loss by bleeding, and exhibited a decline in fresh density. The early strength gains of the fly ash samples were low but reached higher than the control after 28 days of curing. The flexural strength increased as the fly ash content rose to reach a maximum at 20 % replacement. However, the 2-day compressive strength of bottom ash samples was higher than the control but decreased after 28 days of curing while the flexural strength declined with addition of bottom ash except at 5 % substitution.

  2. Multifrequency radar imaging of ash plumes: an experiment at Stromboli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnadieu, Franck; Freret-Lorgeril, Valentin; Delanoë, Julien; Vinson, Jean-Paul; Peyrin, Frédéric; Hervier, Claude; Caudoux, Christophe; Van Baelen, Joël; Latchimy, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    the beam, providing additional constraints on particle sizes and sedimentation process from ash clouds. Furthermore, proximal deposits were analyzed by sieving samples collected near the craters and processing data from a laser disdrometer. Ash samples constantly show a unimodal distribution ranging from 44 microns to 1 mm (more rarely 2 mm), with a mode in the range 0.1-0.3 mm. This is expected to be representative of the coarse content of the ash plumes generated by Strombolian explosions at Stromboli, i.e. mainly coarse ash, and will be used to constrain inversions of the radar signals.

  3. Formation of hydroxyapatite coating on titanium at 200°C through pulsed laser deposition followed by hydrothermal treatment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Komath; P Rajesh; C V Muraleedharan; H K Varma; R Reshmi; M K Jayaraj

    2011-04-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has emerged as an acceptable technique to coat hydroxyapatite on titanium-based permanent implants for the use in orthopedics and dentistry. It requires substrate temperature higher than 400°C to form coatings of good adhesion and crystallinity. As this range of temperatures is likely to affect the bulk mechanical properties of the implant, lowering the substrate temperature during the coating process is crucial for the long-term performance of the implant. In the present study, hydroxyapatite target was ablated using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (355 nm) onto commercially pure titanium substrates kept at 200°C. The coating thus obtained has been subjected to hydrothermal treatment at 200°C in an alkaline medium. The coatings were analysed using microscratch test, optical profilometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). XRD, EDS and FTIR showed that the as-deposited coating contained amorphous calcium phosphate and the hydrothermal treatment converted it into crystalline hydroxyapatite. The micro-morphology was granular, with an average size of 1 micron. In the microscratch test, a remarkable increase in adhesion with the substrate was seen as a result of the treatment. The plasma plume during the deposition has been analysed using optical emission spectroscopy, which revealed atomic and ionic species of calcium, phosphorous and oxygen. The outcomes demonstrate the possibility of obtaining adherent and crystalline hydroxyapatite on titanium substrate at 200°C through pulsed laser deposition and subsequent hydrothermal treatment.

  4. Geology and formation of titaniferous placer deposits in Upper Jogaz Valley area, Fanuj, Sistan and Baluchestan province, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Javad Moghaddasi; Javad Yazdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Fanuj titaniferous placer deposits are located 35 km northwest of the Fanuj, Sistan and Baluchestan province (1) . The studied area comprises a (2) small part of the late Cretaceous Fanuj-Maskutan (Rameshk) ophiolite complex (Arshadi and Mahdavi, 1987). Reconnaissance and comprehensive exploration programs in the Fanuj district (East of the 1:100000 Fanuj quadrangle map,Yazdi, 2010) revealed that the Upper Jogaz Valley area has the highest concentration of titaniferous pla...

  5. Formation of copper tin sulfide films by pulsed laser deposition at 248 and 355 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt; Crovetto, Andrea; Canulescu, Stela;

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the laser wavelength on the deposition of copper tin sulfide (CTS) and SnS-rich CTS with a 248-nm KrF excimer laser (pulse length τ = 20 ns) and a 355-nm frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser (τ = 6 ns) was investigated. A comparative study of the two UV wavelengths shows that the CTS...

  6. Formation of Graphene Grain Boundaries on Cu(100) Surface and a Route Towards Their Elimination in Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Qinghong Yuan; Guangyao Song; Deyan Sun; Feng Ding

    2014-01-01

    Grain boundaries (GBs) in graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) greatly degrade the electrical and mechanical properties of graphene and thus hinder the applications of graphene in electronic devices. The seamless stitching of graphene flakes can avoid GBs, wherein the identical orientation of graphene domain is required. In this letter, the graphene orientation on one of the most used catalyst surface — Cu(100) surface, is explored by density functional theory (DFT) calculatio...

  7. Textural, compositional, and sulfur isotope variations of sulfide minerals in the Red Dog Zn-Pb-Ag deposits, Brooks Range, Alaska: Implications for Ore Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, K.D.; Leach, D.L.; Johnson, C.A.; Clark, J.L.; Fayek, M.; Slack, J.F.; Anderson, V.M.; Ayuso, R.A.; Ridley, W.I.

    2004-01-01

    The Red Dog Zn-Pb deposits are hosted in organic-rich mudstone and shale of the Mississippian Kuna Formation. A complex mineralization history is defined by four sphalerite types or stages: (1) early brown sphalerite, (2) yellow-brown sphalerite, (3) red-brown sphalerite, and (4) late tan sphalerite. Stages 2 and 3 constitute the main ore-forming event and are volumetrically the most important. Sulfides in stages 1 and 2 were deposited with barite, whereas stage 3 largely replaces barite. Distinct chemical differences exist among the different stages of sphalerite. From early brown sphalerite to later yellow-brown sphalerite and red-brown sphalerite, Fe and Co content generally increase and Mn and Tl content generally decrease. Early brown sphalerite contains no more than 1.9 wt percent Fe and 63 ppm Co, with high Mn (up to 37 ppm) and Tl (126 ppm), whereas yellow-brown sphalerite and red-brown sphalerite contain high Fe (up to 7.3 wt %) and Co (up to 382 ppm), and low Mn (red-brown sphalerite, and most likely reflect submicroscopic inclusions of galena, chalcopyrite and/or tetrahedrite in the sphalerite. In situ ion microprobe sulfur isotope analyses show a progression from extremely low ??34S values for stage 1 (as low as -37.20???) to much higher values for yellow-brown sphalerite (mean of 3.3???; n = 30) and red-brown sphalerite (mean of 3.4; n = 20). Late tan sphalerite is isotopically light (-16.4 to -27.2???). The textural, chem ical, and isotopic data indicate the following paragenesis: (1) deposition of early brown sphalerite with abundant barite, minor pyrite, and trace galena immediately beneath the sea floor in unconsolidated mud; (2) deposition of yellow-brown sphalerite during subsea-floor hydrothermal recrystallization and coarsening of preexisting barite; (3) open-space deposition of barite, red-brown sphalerite and other sulfides in veins and coeval replacement of barite; and (4) postore sulfide deposition, including the formation of late tan

  8. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-07-18

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface.

  9. The problems of mass transfer and formation of deposits of corrosion products on fuel assemblies of a VVER-1200 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionov, Yu. A.; Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of examination of materials published both in Russia and abroad, as well as their own investigations, the authors explain the reasons for the occurrence of such effects as AOA (Axial Offset Anomalies) and an increase in the coolant pressure difference in the core of nuclear reactors of the VVER type. To detect the occurrence of the AOA effect, the authors suggest using the specific activity of 58Co in the coolant. In the VVER-1200 design the thermohydraulic regime for fuel assemblies in the first year of their service life involves slight boiling of the coolant in the upper part of the core, which may induce the occurrence of the AOA effect, intensification of corrosion of fuel claddings, and abnormal increase in deposition of corrosion products. Radiolysis of the water coolant in the boiling section (boiling in pores of deposits) may intensify not only general corrosion but also a localized (nodular) one. As a result of intensification of the corrosion processes and growth of deposits, deterioration of the radiation situation in the rooms of the primary circuit of a VVER-1200 reactor as compared to that at nuclear power plants equipped with reactors of the VVER-1000 type is possible. Recommendations for preventing the AOA effect at nuclear power plants with VVER-1200 reactors on the matter of the direction of further investigations are made.

  10. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-01-01

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface. PMID:25034006

  11. Can ash clog soil pores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoof, Cathelijne; Stoof, Cathelijne; Gevaert, Anouk; Gevaert, Anouk; Baver, Christine; Baver, Christine; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Morales, Veronica; Morales, Veronica; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Martin, Deborah; Martin, Deborah; Steenhuis, Tammo; Steenhuis, Tammo

    2015-04-01

    Wildfire can greatly increase a landscape's vulnerability to flooding and erosion events, and ash is thought to play a large role in controlling runoff and erosion processes after wildfire. Although ash can store rainfall and thereby reduce runoff and erosion for a limited period after wildfires, it has also been hypothesized to clog soil pores and reduce infiltration. Several researchers have attributed the commonly observed increase in runoff and erosion after fire to the potential pore-clogging effect of ash. Evidence is however incomplete, as to date, research has solely focused on identifying the presence of ash in the soil, with the actual flow processes associated with the infiltration and pore-clogging of ash remaining a major unknown. In several laboratory experiments, we tested the hypothesis that ash causes pore clogging to the point that infiltration is hampered and ponding occurs. We first visualized and quantified pore-scale infiltration of water and ash in sand of a range of textures and at various infiltration rates, using a digital bright field microscope capturing both photo and video. While these visualization experiments confirm field and lab observation of ash washing into soil pores, we did not observe any clogging of pores, and have not been able to create conditions for which this does occur. Additional electrochemical analysis and measurement of saturated hydraulic conductivity indicate that pore clogging by ash is not plausible. Electrochemical analysis showed that ash and sand are both negatively charged, showing that attachment of ash to sand and any resulting clogging is unlikely. Ash also had quite high saturated conductivity, and systems where ash was mixed in or lying on top of sand had similarly high hydraulic conductivity. Based on these various experiments, we cannot confirm the hypothesis that pore clogging by ash contributes to the frequently observed increase in post-fire runoff, at least for the medium to coarse sands

  12. Reducing carbon-in-ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigel S. Dong [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    High levels of carbon-in-ash lead to reduced power plant efficiency and higher fuel costs, degrade the performance of electrostatic precipitators and increase emissions of particulates. Increased carbon levels in the fly ash can lead to problems with ash use in cement/concrete production. This report reviews current measures and technologies that can be used to prevent excessive carbon-in-ash in pulverised coal combustion (PCC) power plants. These include coal cleaning, coal fineness improvement, reduction of distribution imbalance of coal among burners, increasing coal-air mixing rates at both burner and OFA levels and optimising excess air ratios. A plasma-assisted combustion enhancement technology can help achieve better ignition and more stable flame for coals that are normally difficult to burn. Computer-based combustion optimisation using expert systems, neural network systems and coal combustion simulation is becoming an invaluable means to tackle the carbon-in-ash issue. This report also reviews the regulations in nine major coal-consuming countries, which stipulate the maximum unburnt carbon levels permitted for fly ash for use in concrete/cement production. The Loss on Ignition (LOI) parameter is used in all national standards, although it is considered inadequate and may exclude some usable fly ash from being utilised. Performance-based regulations are more appropriate and have been adopted by Canada and USA. The EU and Canada now permit the use of fly ash produced from co-combustion of coal and biomass. China and Russia allow very high LOI levels for certain fly ash but the other countries require similar LOI limits for fly ash for use in concrete. Finally, this report discusses measures and technologies for reduction of carbon-in-ash, including classification, froth flotation, triboelectrostatic separators, thermal processes and carbon surface modification. 146 refs., 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  13. A particle assembly/constrained expansion (PACE) model for the formation and structure of porous metal oxide deposits on nuclear fuel rods in pressurized light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, Donald W., E-mail: brenner@ncsu.edu; Lu, Shijing; O’Brien, Christopher J.; Bucholz, Eric W.; Rak, Zsolt

    2015-02-15

    A new model is proposed for the structure and properties of porous metal oxide scales (aka Chalk River Unidentified Deposits (CRUD)) observed on the nuclear fuel rod cladding in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The model is based on the thermodynamically-driven expansion of agglomerated octahedral nickel ferrite particles in response to pH and temperature changes in the CRUD. The model predicts that porous nickel ferrite with internal {1 1 1} surfaces is a thermodynamically stable structure under PWR conditions even when the free energy of formation of bulk nickel ferrite is positive. This explains the pervasive presence of nickel ferrite in CRUD, observed CRUD microstructures, why CRUD maintains its porosity, and variations in porosity within the CRUD observed experimentally. This model is a stark departure from decades of conventional wisdom and detailed theoretical analysis of CRUD chemistry, and defines new research directions for model validation, and for understanding and ultimately controlling CRUD formation.

  14. A particle assembly/constrained expansion (PACE) model for the formation and structure of porous metal oxide deposits on nuclear fuel rods in pressurized light water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Donald W.; Lu, Shijing; O'Brien, Christopher J.; Bucholz, Eric W.; Rak, Zsolt

    2015-02-01

    A new model is proposed for the structure and properties of porous metal oxide scales (aka Chalk River Unidentified Deposits (CRUD)) observed on the nuclear fuel rod cladding in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The model is based on the thermodynamically-driven expansion of agglomerated octahedral nickel ferrite particles in response to pH and temperature changes in the CRUD. The model predicts that porous nickel ferrite with internal {1 1 1} surfaces is a thermodynamically stable structure under PWR conditions even when the free energy of formation of bulk nickel ferrite is positive. This explains the pervasive presence of nickel ferrite in CRUD, observed CRUD microstructures, why CRUD maintains its porosity, and variations in porosity within the CRUD observed experimen