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Sample records for ascaridae

  1. First report of parasitism by Hexametra boddaertii (Nematoda: Ascaridae) in Oxyrhopus guibei (Serpentes: Colubridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peichoto, María E; Sánchez, Matías N; López, Ariel; Salas, Martín; Rivero, María R; Teibler, Pamela; Toledo, Gislayne de Melo; Tavares, Flávio L

    2016-07-15

    The current study summarizes the postmortem examination of a specimen of Oxyrhopus guibei (Serpentes, Colubridae) collected in Iguazu National Park (Argentina), and found deceased a week following arrival to the serpentarium of the National Institute of Tropical Medicine (Argentina). Although the snake appeared to be in good health, a necropsy performed following its death identified the presence of a large number of roundworms in the coelomic cavity, with indications of peritonitis and serosal adherence. Additional observations from the necropsy revealed small calcifications in the mesothelium of the coelomic cavity; solid and expressive content in the gallbladder; massive gastrointestinal obstruction due to nematodes; and lung edema and congestion. Histopathological analyses of lung sections also showed proliferative heterophilic and histiocytic pneumonia. Parasites isolated from both the intestine and coelomic cavity were identified as Hexametra boddaertii by a combination of light and scanning electron microscopic examination. Results from this necropsy identify O. guibei as a new host for H. boddaertii, and is the first report of a natural infection by Hexametra in Argentina. Since Hexametra parasites may contribute to several pathological conditions in humans, and with the recent availability of O. guibei specimens through the illegal pet trade, it is necessary to consider the possibility of zoonotic helminth transmission of Hexametra from snake to human. PMID:27270391

  2. A new species of Spauligodon (Nematoda; Oxyuroidea; Pharyngodonide) and other Helminths in Ptychozoon Kuhli (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from East Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Lee Grismer, L

    2016-06-01

    Spauligodon geckonis sp. nov. from the intestines of Ptychozoon kuhli (Gekkonidae) from East Malaysia is described and illustrated. Spauligodon geckonis sp. nov. represents the 52nd species assigned to the genus and the third species from the Oriental Region. The new species is separated from congeners by the unique combination of aspinose filamentous tail and spicule in the male and spinose filamentous tail and fusiform, two knobbed eggs in the female. Gravid individuals 3 species of Nematoda, Meteterakis singaporensis, Physalopteroides grismeri, and Skrjabinelazia machidai, as well as larvae assignable to the Ascaridae were also found. PMID:27078659

  3. Infestação por ancilostomídeos e toxocarídeos em cães e gatos apreendidos em vias públicas, São Paulo (Brasil) Ancylostoma and toxocara infestation in dogs and cats impounded on through-fares of S. Paulo, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Valdson de Angelis Côrtes; Gil Vianna Paim; Rufino Antunes de Alencar Filho

    1988-01-01

    Foram examinadas fezes, coletadas após o sacrifício, de 9.150 cães e 674 gatos, capturados nas vias públicas do Município de São Paulo, SP (Brasil), visando o encontro de ovos e parásitos das famílias Ancylostomidae e Ascaridae. A coleta do material ocorreu durante os anos de 1980-1985. As seguintes taxas de infestação foram observadas: 59,83% dos cães e 22,26% dos gatos estiveram positivos para ovos de Ancylostoma sp., enquanto que 11,70% dos cães e 17,65% dos gatos apresentaram ovos de Toxo...

  4. Molecular characterization of Ascaridia galli infecting native chickens in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazh, Eman K A

    2013-09-01

    Family: Ascaridae as a whole is distributed among Africa and adjacent regions and in many areas of the world. The nematode Ascaridia galli is one of the most pathogenic and economically important parasites of poultry. The adult affect the small intestine of the hosts feeding on digested food materials. Its control costs million dollars annually. The genomic DNA was extracted from nematode parasites, A. galli, from specific host, native chickens. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was applied to ensure that the DNA content aids in the further studies. Two primers were used in the PCR reactions. The two primers were screened, only the second primer gave total amplified fragment markers 818 bp. The gene sequences obtained from Egyptian A. galli was compared with another one of accession number (AY587609) showing that the sequence was similar in some points from 346 to 1244 sequence, to make a phylogenetic relationships of A. galli with other nematodes on the data base showing that it was to some extent similar to Heterorhabditis spp. PMID:23793336

  5. Biodiversity and distribution of helminths and protozoa in naturally infected horses from the biosphere reserve La Sierra Madre de Chiapas", México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güiris, A D M; Rojas, H N M; Berovides, A V; Sosa, P J; Pérez, E M E; Cruz, A E; Chávez, H C; Moguel, A J A; Jimenez-Coello, M; Ortega-Pacheco, A

    2010-06-24

    A cross sectional survey was performed to identify gastrointestinal helminths and protozoans in naturally infected horses from the biosphere reserve known as "La Sierra Madre de Chiapas", Mexico (El Triunfo and La Sepultura). During a three-year survey, fecal samples from 90 horses and parasites from 2 necropsied animals were collected. Five families from the Nematoda class: Ascaridae, Kathlanidae, Oxyuridae, Strongylidae and Trichostrongylidae were found, whereas, only one family from the class Cestoda, was observed: Anoplocephalidae. One family from the class Insecta, was observed: Gasterophiilidae. The number of species of parasites ranged from 13 to 18 with an average of 15 per animal. Adult parasites were recovered from the large intestine luminal contents at necropsy. Species recovered included: Strongylus vulgaris, S. equinus, S. edentatus, Oxyuris equi, Parascaris equorum, Coronocyclus coronatum, C. labiatus, C. labratus, Cyathostomum tetracanthum, Cylicocyclus insigne, C. leptostomus, Cylicodontophorus bicoronatus, Cylicostephanus asymetricus, C. bidentatus, C. minutus, C. longibursatus, Petrovinema poculatum, Poteriostomum imparidentatum, Cylicostephanus goldi, Tridentoinfundibulum gobi, Triodontophorus serratus and T. tenuicollis. One species of Diptera were recovered from stomach and identified: Gasterophilus intestinalis. Furthermore, different species of protozoa were recovered from fresh horse-dung and identified in four classes: Sporozoa, Litostomatea, Ciliasida and Suctoria. Nine families: Cryptosporidiidae, Eimeriidae, Balantidiidae, Buetschliidae, Blepharocorythidae, Cycloposthiidae, Spirodiniididae, Ditoxidae, Acinetidae; and 31 ciliates species were recorded: Allantosoma dicorniger, A. intestinalis, Alloiozona trizona, Blepharosphaera intestinalis, Blepharoprosthium pireum, Blepharoconus benbrooki, Bundleia postciliata, Didesmis ovalis, D. quadrata, Sulcoarcus pellucidulus, Blepharocorys angusta, B. cardionucleata, B. curvigula, B. juvata, B

  6. Risk factors connected to gastrointestinal parasites in mantled Alouatta palliata mexicana and black howler monkeys Alouatta pigra living in continuous and in fragmented rainforests in Mexico

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Genoveva TREJO-MAC(I)AS; Alejandro ESTRADA

    2012-01-01

    In this study we document the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites (helminths and protozoans) found in fecal samples of populations of Alouatta palliata mexicana and of A.pigra in Los Tuxtlas and in Palenque,southeast Mexico,and its relation to habitat condition,sex/age and season.Nineteen parasite morphotypes were detected in the fecal samples from populations of the two howler monkeys,of which 58% were shared by both species.When considering all parasite species,populations of the two howler species were more likely to be parasitized in fragmented habitat compared to continuous habitat.Individuals of both howler monkey species that lived in fragmented habitat had a higher prevalence of Controrchis biliophilus.A.p.mexicana individuals had a higher prevalence of Trypanoxyuris minutus than A.pigra,probably the result of the larger group sizes found in the former species,and T.minutus was more likely to be found in A.palliata individuals that lived in fragmented habitat.Adult A.p.mexicana males had a higher risk of being parasitized compared to adult females,but these differences were not detected in A.pigra.Parasite species such as Entamoeba sp.,Nematoda sp.28.Nematoda sp.B and Parabronema sp.where only found during the wet season m both howler monkey species.Populations of both howler monkey species had a higher prevalence of Nematoda sp.A in the wet season and Ascaridae eggs were only detected during the wet season in A.pigra.Other parasites detected displayed no clear seasonal pattern.

  7. Risk factors connected to gastrointestinal parasites in mantled Alouatta palliata mexicana and black howler monkeys Alouatta pigra living in continuous and in fragmented rainforests in Mexico

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    Genoveva TREJO-MACÍAS, Alejandro ESTRADA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we document the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites (helminths and protozoans found in fecal samples of populations of Alouatta palliata mexicana and of A. pigra in Los Tuxtlas and in Palenque, southeast Mexico, and its relation to habitat condition, sex/age and season. Nineteen parasite morphotypes were detected in the fecal samples from populations of the two howler monkeys, of which 58% were shared by both species. When considering all parasite species, populations of the two howler species were more likely to be parasitized in fragmented habitat compared to continuous habitat. Individuals of both howler monkey species that lived in fragmented habitat had a higher prevalence of Controrchis biliophilus. A. p. mexicana individuals had a higher prevalence of Trypanoxyuris minutus than A. pigra, probably the result of the larger group sizes found in the former species, and T. minutus was more likely to be found in A. palliata individuals that lived in fragmented habitat. Adult A. p. mexicana males had a higher risk of being parasitized compared to adult females, but these differences were not detected in A. pigra. Parasite species such as Entamoeba sp., Nematoda sp. 28, Nematoda sp. B and Parabronema sp. where only found during the wet season in both howler monkey species. Populations of both howler monkey species had a higher prevalence of Nematoda sp. A in the wet season and Ascaridae eggs were only detected during the wet season in A. pigra. Other parasites detected displayed no clear seasonal pattern [Current Zoology 58 (3: 375-383, 2012].