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Sample records for asbestos cement dust

  1. Dust levels in an asbestos-cement factory: problem solving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon, A.

    1986-01-01

    Isasbest Ltd., an asbestos-cement factory in Israel, has established dust-preventive measures, maintained high ecological and medical standards, and assisted afflicted workers suffering from asbestos-related diseases. The problems of the handling of asbestos and its relationship to health should be approached according to the conditions in each specific workplace so that reasonable solutions can be found for proper control.

  2. Asbestos cement dust inhalation by hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, A.P.; Dagle, G.E.; Cannon, W.C.; Buschbom, R.L. (Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA (USA))

    1978-12-01

    Two groups of 96 male Syrian golden hamsters were exposed to respirable asbestos cement aerosol at concentrations of approximately 1 and approximately 10 micrograms/liter, respectively, 3 hours/day, 5 days/week. Average fiber counts ranged from 5 to about 120 fibers/cm3. Each group was randomly divided into six subgroups of 16 animals. The first subgroup was sacrificed after 3 months of exposure, the second after 6 months, and the third after 15 months. The fourth subgroup was withdrawn from exposure after 3 months, observed for an additional 3 months, and then sacrificed. The fifth and sixth subgroups were withdrawn after 3 and 6 months of exposure, respectively, and maintained for observation up to the 15-month exposure point of the third subgroup at which time all surviving animals were sacrificed. All other experimental procedures were similar to those delineated in a previous publication describing the development of an animal model, techniques, and an exposure system for asbestos cement dust inhalation. The asbestos cement exposures had no significant effect on body weight and mortality of the animals. Higher aerosol concentration and longer exposure times increased the number of macrophages and ferruginous bodies found in the lungs of the exposed animals. Recovery periods had no effect on the incidence of macrophages and ferruginous bodies. The incidence of very slight to slight fibrosis in the animals sacrificed after 15 months of exposure shows a significant (P less than 0.01) trend when the untreated control group and the 1 and 10 microgram/liter dose level groups are compared, indicating a dose-response relationship. Development of minimal fibrosis continued in animals withdrawn from exposure. No primary carcinomas of the lung and respiratory tract and no mesotheliomas were found.

  3. Nature, structure, and properties of asbestos cement dust

    OpenAIRE

    Baeten, J.; Helsen, J; Deruyttere, A

    1980-01-01

    ABSTRACT Total dust samples produced by machining three commercial asbestos-cement products (autoclaved sheet, non-autoclaved sheet, pipe) were examined for their dimensional, surface, and physicochemical characteristics. Microscopic inspection of dust fractions with different settling characteristics in air allowed determination of the simple dimensional features that apply to respirable fibres—that is, the true diameter, length, and aspect ratio and the coil diameter, coil length, and coil ...

  4. X-ray findings in roofers with long-term exposure to asbestos cement fine dusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 404 roofers with long-term exposure of asbestos-cement fine dust we studied the possible fibrogenous effects on lung and pleura by chest radiographs. The standardfilm sets of the ILO U/C 1971 and ILO 80/BRD X-ray classification of pneumoconiosis were used. 410 non-asbestos-exposed craftsmen and workers of several industries served as control group. Roofers show in n = 58 cases (14,4%) significantly increased small irregular opacities of the size 's' and 't' with the profusion 1/0 (n = 53) and 1/1 (n = 5). Furthermore up to now, 3 cases of lung-cancer in our cohort have been occured. Our findings indicate the nessecity of further preventive measures on construction sites regarding the asbestos-cement problem. (orig.)

  5. X-ray findings in roofers with long-term exposure to asbestos cement fine dusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauder, B.; Breuer, G.; Greven, U.; Woitowitz, R.H.; Roedelsperger, K.; Woitowitz, H.J.

    1982-11-01

    In 404 roofers with long-term exposure of asbestos-cement fine dust we studied the possible fibrogenous effects on lung and pleura by chest radiographs. The standardfilm sets of the ILO U/C 1971 and ILO 80/BRD X-ray classification of pneumoconiosis were used. 410 non-asbestos-exposed craftsmen and workers of several industries served as control group. Roofers show in n = 58 cases (14,4%) significantly increased small irregular opacities of the size 's' and 't' with the profusion 1/0 (n = 53) and 1/1 (n = 5). Furthermore up to now, 3 cases of lung-cancer in our cohort have occured. Our findings indicate the necessity of further preventive measures on construction sites regarding the asbestos-cement problem.

  6. Estimation of exposure to asbestos-cement dust on building sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedelsperger, K.; Woitowitz, H.J.; Krieger, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany, about 1.2 million tons of asbestos are handled on building sites, for example, by roofers, carpenters and ventilation fitters. The objective of this study was to determine both the exposure to dust during the handling of asbestos-cement products on building sites and the possible resulting fibrogenic health hazard. In order to assess the tumour risk, this cross-sectional study should be enlarged to a longitudinal study. Dust measurements were made on about 40 building sites with four static and four personal dust samplers and a Tyndallometer. Evaluation was performed by infrared spectrography and light and scanning electron microscopy. Peak concentrations of more than 100 fibres/ml of length greater than 5 micrometers or about 80 mg/m3 fine dust were observed in the vicinity of the grinding machine. The asbestos content of the fine dust was about 10%. Scanning electron microscopy showed a wide variation of fibre lengths and diameters; a large proportion of fibres with diameters below 0.2 micrometers was found. Long-term, mean values and confidence intervals of the concentration of fine dust were calculated from the measurements. For example, the mean fine dust mass concentrations for roofers cutting corners of asbestos-cement sheets with the grinding machine amounted to 2.2 mg/m3 when the cutting was done in the open air at a fixed location. When cutting was performed on the roof, the mean fine dust mass concentration amounted to 1.8 mg/m3.

  7. Dust occurring in the processing of asbestos cement as complex mixture of toxic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedelsperger, K.; Manke, J.; Brueckel, B.; Knecht, U.; Woitowitz, H.J.

    1982-10-01

    In a study on construction sites in Hessen asbestos cement fine and total dust mass concentrations were measured on 89 construction sites by static and personal sampling. For craftsmen themselves cutting with the grinding machine the mean fine dust mass concentration amounts to 1,8 mg/m/sup 3/ during roof coverings with corrugated sheets, 1,3 mg/m/sup 3/ during siding work, 2,8 mg/m/sup 3/ during installation of ventilation shafts and 1,8 mg/m/sup 3/ during installation of pipes. During fire insulation 1,5 mg/m/sup 3/ were reached without the grinding machine. The analysis of harmful components was performed by infrared spectroscopy, analytical electron microscopy and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Asbestos fine dust mass concentration above the limit value (TRK) especially resulted from personal sampling during the use of the grinding machine and from operation within doors.

  8. Survival in cohorts of asbestos cement workers and controls.

    OpenAIRE

    Albin, M; Horstmann, V; Jakobsson, K; Welinder, H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To measure the impact on survival of being exposed to asbestos cement dust. METHODS: Survival of 866 asbestos cement workers and 755 controls was studied with Cox's proportional hazards regression models with age as the basic time variable. The effect of cumulative exposure up to the age of 40 was investigated in an internal analysis of 635 asbestos cement workers who had dose estimates. RESULTS: The death risk was higher for the asbestos cement workers than for the controls with ...

  9. [The effect of the length of exposure and smoking on respiratory function in workers exposed to asbestos-cement dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milardović-Sunjara, B; Kanceljak-Macan, B; Dujmov, I

    1991-01-01

    Respiratory function tests were performed in 110 workers who were occupationally exposed to asbestos-cement dust in the period from 7 to 34 years. Due to the results obtained, the following groups of patients were analysed according to years of asbestos-cement exposure and the habit of cigarette smoking. The analysis of the years of exposure to asbestos-cement dust revealed that the workers with the exposure longer than 16 years had significantly lower FVC and FEV1 (P less than 0.001) than the workers whose exposure was less than 16 years. In view of increasing age this deterioration proved to be significantly higher than it had been expected. Of all the subjects included in this study 7% of them were found to have a partial respiratory insufficiency. The phenomenon could not be explained either by the length of exposure or by the habit of cigarette smoking. In the smoking subjects with the longest exposure, a markedly lower SaHbO2 was found as compared to the smokers with the shortest exposure (P less than 0.05). PMID:1766985

  10. Radiological changes in asbestos cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsson, K; Strömberg, U; Albin, M; Welinder, H; Hagmar, L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To explore associations between exposure to asbestos cement dust and radiographic findings in lung parenchyma and pleura. METHODS--Radiographs from 174 blue collar workers and 29 white collar workers from an asbestos cement plant formed one part of the study. Progression of small opacities was further studied in those 124 blue collar workers, for whom two radiographs taken after the end of employment were available. The median readings from five readers who used the full ILO 1980 c...

  11. Development of an animal model, techniques, and an exposure system to study the effects of asbestos cement dust inhalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, A.P.; Dagle, G.E.; Cannon, W.C.

    1978-01-01

    An aerosol exposure system and procedures for delivering asbestos cement (AC) dust to the lungs of hamsters are described. Groups of hamsters were exposed to AC aerosol concentrations of 1 and 10 ..mu..g/liter, respectively, 3 hr/day, 5 days/week, for 3 and 6 months and were sacrificed for histopathologic examination. One subgroup from both the 1- and the 10-..mu..g/liter exposure group was withdrawn from exposure after 3 months and sacrified after a 3-month recovery period to determine whether or not some of the histologic changes might be reversible. There was an apparent dose--response relationship between AC exposure and the number of asbestos bodies and small randomly distributed foci of alveolar macrophages. No other treatment-related lesions were observed. The 3-month recovery period had no apparent effect.

  12. Laying district heat pipelines with asbestos cement jackets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanitz, H.

    1981-02-01

    The author surveys the practical knowledge of asbestos cement jackets gathered throughout 20 years of laying practice. He points out defects resulting from faulty laying and advises on their possible elimination. In conclusion he gives his opinion on the subject of asbestos dust.

  13. Measures for emission reduction in asbestos-cement industry and methods for emission and immission measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichert, U.

    Emissions of asbestos fine dust connected with asbestos cement are possible during: production, processing in plants, installing at the construction site and weathering of products. Main sources for possible emissions during production are: supply of asbestos, diffuse sources, exhaust air from filter units, and waste disposal. In former times the asbestos bags reached the plant rather damaged but today the asbestos is supplied in a pressed state, in dust-tight plastic bags piled up on palettes without damage.

  14. Asbestos exposure during renovation and demolition of asbestos-cement clad buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    External asbestos cement (AC) claddings become weathered after many years by the gradual loss of cement from exposed surfaces; as a result, loosely bound layers enriched with asbestos fibers are formed. Asbestos fibers on such weathered surfaces may be mixtures of chrysotile with amosite or crocidolite. Renovation and demolition of old AC clad buildings could cause asbestos fiber emission, but this has not been investigated in the past. The exposure of workers to asbestos dust during these operations and precautions to minimize exposure now have been investigated at several building sites. Asbestos dust concentrations during water jet cleaning or painting of weathered AC roofing were approximately 0.1 to 0.2 fibers per milliliter (f/mL). Limited results suggest that concentrations may be reduced substantially by avoiding abrasion of surfaces. Concentrations during AC roof replacement averaged approximately 0.1 f/mL and were reduced markedly by employing more careful work procedures. Asbestos dust concentrations during demolition by removal of whole sheets averaged 0.3 to 0.6 f/mL for roofs and less than 0.1 f/mL for walls, reflecting the significant differences in extent of weathering between these elements. Suppression of asbestos emissions from roof sheets by wetting or sealing of weathered surfaces was not predictable because of the occurrence of asbestos fibers in dust trapped under sheet laps.

  15. Environmental health survey in asbestos cement sheets manufacturing industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari F; Bihari V; Rastogi S; Ashquin M; Ahmad I

    2007-01-01

    About 673 small-scale asbestos mining and milling facilities and 33 large - scale asbestos manufacturing plants, (17 asbestos-cement product manufacturing plants and 16 other than asbestos-cement product plants) are situated in India. The present study reveals the exposure of commercial asbestos (chrysotile) in the occupational as well as ambient air environment of the asbestos-cement (AC) sheets industry using membrane filter method of Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS). The fibre concentratio...

  16. Colorectal cancer and non-malignant respiratory disease in asbestos cement and cement workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiologically visible parenchymal changes (small opacities >= 1/0;ILO 1980 classification) were present in 20% of a sample of workers (N=174), employed for 20 years (median) in an asbestos cement plant. Exposure-response relationships were found, after controlling for age and smoking habits. In a sample of asbestos cement workers with symptoms and signs suggestive of pulmonary disease (N=33), increased lung density measured by x-ray computed tomography, and reduced static lung volumes and lung compliance was found. In a cohort of asbestos cement workers (N=1.929) with an estimated median exposure of 1.2 fibres/ml, the mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease was increased in comparison to a regional reference cohort (N=1.233). A two-to three-fold increase of non-malignant respiratory mortality was noted among workers employed for more than a decade in the asbestos cement plant, compared to cement workers (N=1.526), who in their turn did not experience and increased risk compared to the general population. In the cohorts of asbestos cement and cement workers, there was a tow-to three-fold increased incidence of cancer in the right part of the colon, compared to the general population as well as to external reference cohorts of other industrial workers (N=3.965) and fishermen (N=8.092). A causal relation with the exposure to mineral dust and fibres was supported by the findings of higher risk estimated in subgroups with high cumulated asbestos doses or longer duration of cement work. The incidence of cancer in the left part of the colon was not increased. Morbidity data, but not mortality data, disclosed the subsite-specific risk pattern. Both asbestos cement workers and cement workers has an increased incidence of rectal cancer, compared with the general population, and with the fishermen. The risk was, however, of the same magnitude among the other industrial workers. 181 refs

  17. Effects of inhaled asbestos, asbestos plus cigarette smoke, asbestos-cement and talc baby powder in hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    Chronic exposure of hamsters to chrysotile asbestos resulted in severe asbestosis in all animals and in increased mortality; concomitant exposure to cigarette smoke did not affect type or severity of asbestotic lesions. Chronic exposure to asbestos-cement dust increased the number of macrophages and ferruginous bodies. Exposure to talc baby powder caused no significant changes. Deposition of talc particles in the lungs was demonstrated by X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction and by a study with neutron-activated talc. No malignant tumours were observed in any of these studies.

  18. Individual asbestos exposure: smoking and mortality--a cohort study in the asbestos cement industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Neuberger, M.; Kundi, M

    1990-01-01

    A historical prospective cohort study comprised all persons employed from 1950 to 1981 for at least three years in the oldest asbestos cement factory in the world. From 2816 persons eligible for the study, record based estimates and measurements of dust and fibres and histories of smoking based on interviews were used to calculate individual exposures over time. After observation of 51,218 person-years and registration of 540 deaths, underlying causes of death for this cohort were compared wi...

  19. Replacement of asbestos cement fills in natural draft cooling towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, G.A.; Stackhouse, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes some of the deterioration problems which have been encountered with asbestos cement materials, the environmental and regulatory problems associated with asbestos, and some of the concerns to be addressed replacing fill material in a natural draft tower.

  20. Biological effects: asbestos-cement manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill, H

    1994-08-01

    Fourteen cohorts of asbestos-cement workers have been studied. These studies have demonstrated exposure-response relationships for lung cancer, mesothelioma and asbestosis. For lung cancer, relatively consistent results have been observed, with risk two-fold or less in 13 of the 14 cohorts. Among New Orleans workers, excess risk was restricted to those with X-ray evidence of asbestosis. Workers employed at least 21 years but without X-ray abnormalities, experienced no elevated risk, while those with small opacities (1/0 or higher) had substantially elevated risk (SMR > 400). Exposures in these two groups had been similar. These results suggest that asbestosis may be a necessary precursor for asbestos-induced lung cancer; if so, then the no-threshold model for lung cancer risk is inappropriate since there is general agreement that very low exposures will not result in radiologically detectable lung fibrosis. Further data on this potential link are needed. As in other industries, mesothelioma risk was strongly related to amphibole exposure, especially to crocidolite in asbestos-cement pipe manufacture. A cluster of cases has recently been reported in a family amosite-cement business. Among New Orleans workers, risk of asbestosis was related to cumulative exposure but there was little evidence of risk below 30 f ml-1-years. Progression of asbestosis in these workers was slow, related to past cumulative exposure and not related to lung function decline. Asbestosis risk is therefore not likely to develop in workers under current controlled exposure conditions. PMID:7978975

  1. DISPERSION AND CONCENTRATION OF ASBESTOS FIBERS IN AN ASBESTOS-CEMENT FACTORY

    OpenAIRE

    Sh. Kheradpir; M Ghiasseddin; Moztarzadeh, F.; K Mohammad

    1997-01-01

    In this survey, asbestos fiber levels within the breathing zone of employers and in the environment of an asbestos-cement factory were monitored on membrane filter and counted by phase contrast optical microscope considering length/diameter>3:I (Asbestos International Associational method). The plant was fairly old and utilized both white (chrysotile) and blue (chrocidolite) asbestos. In each workshop, 8-h time-weighted average concentrations (Ctw,) or its equivalent were calculated as fiber/...

  2. 40 CFR 427.20 - Applicability; description of the asbestos-cement sheet subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... asbestos-cement sheet subcategory. 427.20 Section 427.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Asbestos-Cement Sheet Subcategory § 427.20 Applicability; description of the asbestos-cement sheet... asbestos, Portland cement, silica, and other ingredients are used in the manufacturing of...

  3. 40 CFR 427.10 - Applicability; description of the asbestos-cement pipe subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... asbestos-cement pipe subcategory. 427.10 Section 427.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Asbestos-Cement Pipe Subcategory § 427.10 Applicability; description of the asbestos-cement pipe... asbestos. Portland cement, silica and other ingredients are used in the manufacturing of...

  4. Asbestos, cement, and cancer in the right part of the colon.

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsson, K; Albin, M; Hagmar, L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--The aim was to investigate associations between exposure to mineral fibres and dust, and cancer in subsites within the large bowel. DESIGN--Pooled retrospective cohort studies. SUBJECTS AND SETTINGS--Blue collar workers, employed for at least one year in different trades; asbestos cement or cement workers (n = 2507), other industrial workers (n = 3965), and fishermen (n = 8092). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs, national reference rates) were calculated fo...

  5. Release of asbestos fibers from weathered and corroded asbestos cement products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spurny, K.R.

    1989-02-01

    The controversy on whether weathered and corroded asbestos cement products are emitting biologically significant asbestos fiber concentrations in ambient air has not been resolved. Nor is it known if the weathered and corroded asbestos cement products release asbestos fibers which have the same carcinogenic potency as standard chrysotile. The purpose of this research project was to develop a method for sampling and measuring asbestos fiber emissions from solid planar surfaces (i.e., roofs and facades) consisting of asbestos cement products and to develop methods for studying the physical and chemical changes and the carcinogenic potency of the emitted fibers. Using this method asbestos fiber emissions in ambient air have been measured in the FRG during 1984/1986. The emissions of asbestos fibers longer than 5 microns were in the range 10(6) to 10(8) fibers/m2.hr. The ambient air concentrations of these asbestos fibers were for the most part less than 10(3) fibers/m3. It was shown that the emitted asbestos fibers were chemically changed and it was shown with animal experiments that their carcinogenic potency did not differ from the carcinogenicity of standard chrysotile fibers.

  6. Magnet with asbestos-cement insulation of coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problem of creating radiation stable insulation for magnet element coils withstanding radiation loads of above 5X10 Gy appeared in result of growth of accelerator energies and intensities. Magnet structure and technology for coil fabrication with asbestos-cement insulation are described. Results of magnetic measurements are presented. Special bay was constructed for the development of technology for fabricating coils with asbestos-cement insulation. The coil for three meter model magnet, designated for operation in the zone of target stations of hadron channels in experimental base of accelerating and storage facility was fabricated. Principle possibility of fabricating coils with asbestos-cement insulation on the base of domestic cements and asbestos was demonstrated

  7. Lichens on asbestos-cement roofs: bioweathering and biocovering effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero-Longo, S E; Castelli, D; Fubini, B; Piervittori, R

    2009-03-15

    Asbestos-cement roofs, the most widespread sources of airborne, toxic and carcinogenic asbestos fibres, are often colonized by lichens. Since these latter are physical and chemical weathering agents, they have been often considered as significant responsible of disaggregation processes increasing fibre dispersion. Consequently, official guidelines for the management of asbestos often suggest their removal. Weathering and/or covering effects of lichens on asbestos-cement, however, have never been deeply investigated and available procedures to evaluate asbestos-cement aging do not take the biological colonization into account. In this study we show that a 25% lichen cover modifies physical and chemical properties of asbestos-cement sheets containing chrysotile and crocidolite fibres. By innovatively coupling pull up tests and image analysis of linear structures, we show that fibre loss is significantly lower ( approximately 30%) where lichens develop and offer a physical barrier to the fibre detachment. Below the most covering lichens (Acarospora cervina, Candelariella ssp.), chrysotile and crocidolite undergo a partial incongruent dissolution, which in laboratory assays generally determined a reduction of their surface reactivity. Because of their biocovering and bioweathering effects, lichens on asbestos-cement play a role which differs from the current public opinion and the assumptions of some official regulations, acting as effective spontaneous bioattenuation agents. PMID:18692312

  8. Mineral fibres, fibrosis, and asbestos bodies in lung tissue from deceased asbestos cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Albin, M; L. Johansson; Pooley, F D; Jakobsson, K; Attewell, R; Mitha, R

    1990-01-01

    Lung tissue from 76 deceased asbestos cement workers (seven with mesothelioma) exposed to chrysotile asbestos and small amounts of amphiboles, has been studied by transmission electron microscopy, together with lung tissue from 96 controls. The exposed workers with mesothelioma had a significantly higher total content of asbestos fibre in the lungs than those without mesothelioma, who in turn, had higher concentrations than the controls (medians 189, 50, and 29 x 10(6) fibres/g (f/g]. Chrysot...

  9. Asbestos bodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of brake lining and asbestos cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Dumortier, P; De Vuyst, P; Strauss, P.; Yernault, J C

    1990-01-01

    Asbestos body (AB) concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage samples of 15 brake lining (BL) workers exposed only to chrysotile have been determined and compared with those from 44 asbestos cement (AC) workers extensively exposed to amphiboles. The mean AB concentrations (263 +/- 802 and 842 +/- 2086 AB/ml respectively) for those groups did not differ significantly but were much higher than those found in control groups. Analytical electron microscopy of asbestos body cores showed that in the ...

  10. The asbestos cement container and its characterization program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of packing container is designed in France, by SGN, for the reprocessing wastes conditioning: the asbestos cement container (CAC) made by the industrial process for pipes fabrication. Two types of CAC are studied, differing from each other by their wall thickness. The technology of which SGN is in charge is presented. A characterization program is operated by CEA in view of satisfying to regulatory requirements. Emphasis is placed upon the radionuclides migration study, through different asbestos cement samples

  11. Environmental health survey in asbestos cement sheets manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, F A; Bihari, V; Rastogi, S K; Ashquin, M; Ahmad, I

    2007-01-01

    About 673 small-scale asbestos mining and milling facilities and 33 large - scale asbestos manufacturing plants, (17 asbestos-cement product manufacturing plants and 16 other than asbestos-cement product plants) are situated in India. The present study reveals the exposure of commercial asbestos (chrysotile) in the occupational as well as ambient air environment of the asbestos-cement (AC) sheets industry using membrane filter method of Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS). The fibre concentrations in 15 samples collected in the occupational environment at ingredient feeding site, sheet-producing site, fibre godown were 0.079, 0.057 and 0.078 f/cc, respectively and in five samples from surrounding ambient air at factory gate resulted fibre concentration of 0.071 f/cc. All the samples have shown fibre concentration lower than the threshold limit values (TLVs) prescribed by BIS. Morphological analysis of samples, further under phase contrast and polarized microscopy indicates the presence of chrysotile asbestos, which acts as carcinogen as well as co-carcinogen. A clinical examination of exposed subjects reveals that there was no case of clubbing, crepitation, ronchi and dyspnea on exertion; however, obstruction and restriction were 10.9 per cent and 25 per cent in exposed subjects, respectively while in control there were 12 per cent and 28 per cent, respectively. The study revealed that chrysotile asbestos is emitted in the occupational as well as ambient environment that may cause adverse health impact. PMID:21957367

  12. Environmental health survey in asbestos cement sheets manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari F

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available About 673 small-scale asbestos mining and milling facilities and 33 large - scale asbestos manufacturing plants, (17 asbestos-cement product manufacturing plants and 16 other than asbestos-cement product plants are situated in India. The present study reveals the exposure of commercial asbestos (chrysotile in the occupational as well as ambient air environment of the asbestos-cement (AC sheets industry using membrane filter method of Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS. The fibre concentrations in 15 samples collected in the occupational environment at ingredient feeding site, sheet-producing site, fibre godown were 0.079, 0.057 and 0.078 f/cc, respectively and in five samples from surrounding ambient air at factory gate resulted fibre concentration of 0.071 f/cc. All the samples have shown fibre concentration lower than the threshold limit values (TLVs prescribed by BIS. Morphological analysis of samples, further under phase contrast and polarized microscopy indicates the presence of chrysotile asbestos, which acts as carcinogen as well as co-carcinogen. A clinical examination of exposed subjects reveals that there was no case of clubbing, crepitation, ronchi and dyspnea on exertion; however, obstruction and restriction were 10.9 per cent and 25 per cent in exposed subjects, respectively while in control there were 12 per cent and 28 per cent, respectively. The study revealed that chrysotile asbestos is emitted in the occupational as well as ambient environment that may cause adverse health impact.

  13. Control of asbestos fiber loss from asbestos-cement watermain. Final report Oct 80-Jun 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The Weston, Wisconsin Water Utility discovered the deterioration of a portion of its asbestos-cement watermain and subsequently research to identify an effective means of halting the release of asbestos fibers into its potable water was begun. Three techniques were investigated for eliminating or reducing the release of fibers into the water: (a) formation of a protective metallic precipitate layer on the pipe surface utilizing zinc chloride, (b) in situ cement-mortar lining of the pipe, and (c) flushing of watermains. Implementation of the above three asbestos control processes would have widely differing capital and operational costs.

  14. Colorectal cancer and non-malignant respiratory disease in asbestos cement and cement workers. Studies on mortality, cancer morbidity, and radiographical changes in lung parenchyma and pleura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsson, K.

    1993-09-01

    Radiologically visible parenchymal changes (small opacities >= 1/0;ILO 1980 classification) were present in 20% of a sample of workers (N=174), employed for 20 years (median) in an asbestos cement plant. Exposure-response relationships were found, after controlling for age and smoking habits. In a sample of asbestos cement workers with symptoms and signs suggestive of pulmonary disease (N=33), increased lung density measured by x-ray computed tomography, and reduced static lung volumes and lung compliance was found. In a cohort of asbestos cement workers (N=1.929) with an estimated median exposure of 1.2 fibres/ml, the mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease was increased in comparison to a regional reference cohort (N=1.233). A two-to three-fold increase of non-malignant respiratory mortality was noted among workers employed for more than a decade in the asbestos cement plant, compared to cement workers (N=1.526), who in their turn did not experience and increased risk compared to the general population. In the cohorts of asbestos cement and cement workers, there was a tow-to three-fold increased incidence of cancer in the right part of the colon, compared to the general population as well as to external reference cohorts of other industrial workers (N=3.965) and fishermen (N=8.092). A causal relation with the exposure to mineral dust and fibres was supported by the findings of higher risk estimated in subgroups with high cumulated asbestos doses or longer duration of cement work. The incidence of cancer in the left part of the colon was not increased. Morbidity data, but not mortality data, disclosed the subsite-specific risk pattern. Both asbestos cement workers and cement workers has an increased incidence of rectal cancer, compared with the general population, and with the fishermen. The risk was, however, of the same magnitude among the other industrial workers. 181 refs.

  15. Asbestos lung burden and asbestosis after occupational and environmental exposure in an asbestos cement manufacturing area: a necropsy study

    OpenAIRE

    Magnani, C; Mollo, F.; Paoletti, L.; BELLIS, D.; P. Bernardi; Betta, P.; Botta, M; Falchi, M.; Ivaldi, C; Pavesi, M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The largest Italian asbestos cement factory had been active in Casale Monferrato until 1986: in previous studies a substantial increase in the incidence of pleural mesothelioma was found among residents without occupational exposure to asbestos. To estimate exposure to asbestos in the population, this study evaluated the presence of histological asbestosis and the lung burden of asbestos fibres (AFs) and asbestos bodies (ABs). METHODS: The study comprises the consecutive seri...

  16. Exposure to cement dust at a Portland cement factory and the risk of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestbo, J; Knudsen, K M; Raffn, E; Korsgaard, B; Rasmussen, F V

    1991-01-01

    The relation between exposure to cement dust and cancer was examined in a population of 546 cement workers and a reference population of 858 randomly sampled men of similar age and area of residence. In 1974 all men gave lifelong occupational and smoking histories; information on incidence of cancer in the period 1974-85 was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. No increased risk of overall cancer was found among cement workers. Among men with more than 20 years exposure to cement dust, 14 cases of respiratory cancer were observed (observed/expected (O/E) 1.52, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.90-2.57) when compared with all Danish men. Men with 1-20 years exposure had O/E 1.14 (95% CI 0.59-2.19) based on nine cases of cancer. After excluding all men with documented exposure to asbestos during employment in an asbestos cement factory no increased risk of overall cancer or respiratory cancer was found among cement workers compared with white collar workers from the local reference population, using a Cox regression model controlling for age and smoking habits. Relative risks were 0.5 (95% CI 0.1-1.5) and 1.0 (95% CI 0.4-2.6) for men with 1-20 and more than 20 years of exposure to cement dust respectively compared with white collar workers. PMID:1772795

  17. Follow up study of workers manufacturing chrysotile asbestos cement products.

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, M. J.; Winter, P D; Pannett, B; Powell, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A cohort study has been carried out of 2167 subjects employed between 1941 and 1983 at an asbestos cement factory in England. The production process incorporated the use of chrysotile asbestos fibre only, except for a small amount of amosite during four months in 1976. Measured airborne fibre concentrations available since 1970 from personal samplers showed mean levels below 1 fibre/ml, although higher levels had probably occurred previously in certain areas of the factory. No excess of lung ...

  18. Mortality study in an asbestos cement factory in Naples, Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Simona Menegozzo; Pietro Comba; Daniela Ferrante; Marco De Santis; Giuseppe Gorini; Francesco Izzo; Corrado Magnani; Roberta Pirastu; Andrea Simonetti; Sara Tùnesi; Massimo Menegozzo

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate mortality among 1247 male asbestos-cement workers employed in an asbestos-cement plant located in Naples. The cohort included 1247 men hired between 1950 and 1986. The follow-up began on January 1st 1965. The vital status and causes of death were ascertained up to December 31 2005. Cause-specific mortality rates of the Campania Region population were used as reference. Relative risks were estimated using Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs), and t...

  19. Ferruginous bodies and pulmonary fibrosis in dead low to moderately exposed asbestos cement workers: histological examination.

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, L. G.; Albin, M P; Jakobsson, K. M.; Welinder, H E; Ranstam, P J; Attewell, R G

    1987-01-01

    Histological slides from the lungs of 89 dead asbestos cement workers have been examined with respect to ferruginous bodies and fibrosis. The results have been compared with individually matched controls with no known exposure to asbestos, and related to asbestos exposure, expressed as duration of exposure and cumulative asbestos dose, and smoking habits. The asbestos cement workers studied had been employed for on average 15 years, with a mean cumulative dose of 26 fibre-years per ml (f-y/ml...

  20. Asbestos cement pipes in aggressive media. CEOCOR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-01

    This study has been carried out by commission no. 6 of CEOCOR (asbestos-cement) during 28 sessions in the time from November 1968 until May 1976. The original text in French language was published in 'La Tribune du CEBEDEAU', April 1978, p. 167/183.

  1. Mortality from lung cancer and population risk attributable to asbestos in an asbestos cement manufacturing town in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Magnani, C; Leporati, M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate mortality from lung cancer and the risk attributable to asbestos separately for asbestos cement workers and for the general (non-occupationally exposed) population in the town of Casale Monferrato, where the largest Italian asbestos cement factory had been in operation in 1907-86. According to cancer registry data, in the same town the incidence of malignant mesothelioma in the general population is about 10 times higher than in comparable Italian provinces. METHO...

  2. Treatment and recycling of asbestos-cement containing waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colangelo, F. [Department of Technology, University Parthenope, Naples (Italy); Cioffi, R., E-mail: raffaele.cioffi@uniparthenope.it [Department of Technology, University Parthenope, Naples (Italy); Lavorgna, M.; Verdolotti, L. [Institute for Biomedical and Composite Materials - CNR, Naples (Italy); De Stefano, L. [Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems - CNR, Naples (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Asbestos-cement wastes are hazardous. {yields} High energy milling treatment at room temperature allows mineralogical and morphological transformation of asbestos phases. {yields} The obtained milled powders are not-hazardous. {yields} The inert powders can be recycled as pozzolanic materials. {yields} The hydraulic mortars containing the milled inert powders are good building materials. - Abstract: The remediation of industrial buildings covered with asbestos-cement roofs is one of the most important issues in asbestos risk management. The relevant Italian Directives call for the above waste to be treated prior to disposal on landfill. Processes able to eliminate the hazard of these wastes are very attractive because the treated products can be recycled as mineral components in building materials. In this work, asbestos-cement waste is milled by means of a high energy ring mill for up to 4 h. The very fine powders obtained at all milling times are characterized to check the mineralogical and morphological transformation of the asbestos phases. Specifically, after 120 min of milling, the disappearance of the chrysotile OH stretching modes at 3690 cm{sup -1}, of the main crystalline chrysotile peaks and of the fibrous phase are detected by means of infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses, respectively. The hydraulic behavior of the milled powders in presence of lime is also tested at different times. The results of thermal analyses show that the endothermic effects associated to the neo-formed binding phases significantly increase with curing time. Furthermore, the technological efficacy of the recycling process is evaluated by preparing and testing hydraulic lime and milled powder-based mortars. The complete test set gives good results in terms of the hydration kinetics and mechanical properties of the building materials studied. In fact, values of reacted lime around 40% and values of compressive

  3. Treatment and recycling of asbestos-cement containing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Asbestos-cement wastes are hazardous. → High energy milling treatment at room temperature allows mineralogical and morphological transformation of asbestos phases. → The obtained milled powders are not-hazardous. → The inert powders can be recycled as pozzolanic materials. → The hydraulic mortars containing the milled inert powders are good building materials. - Abstract: The remediation of industrial buildings covered with asbestos-cement roofs is one of the most important issues in asbestos risk management. The relevant Italian Directives call for the above waste to be treated prior to disposal on landfill. Processes able to eliminate the hazard of these wastes are very attractive because the treated products can be recycled as mineral components in building materials. In this work, asbestos-cement waste is milled by means of a high energy ring mill for up to 4 h. The very fine powders obtained at all milling times are characterized to check the mineralogical and morphological transformation of the asbestos phases. Specifically, after 120 min of milling, the disappearance of the chrysotile OH stretching modes at 3690 cm-1, of the main crystalline chrysotile peaks and of the fibrous phase are detected by means of infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses, respectively. The hydraulic behavior of the milled powders in presence of lime is also tested at different times. The results of thermal analyses show that the endothermic effects associated to the neo-formed binding phases significantly increase with curing time. Furthermore, the technological efficacy of the recycling process is evaluated by preparing and testing hydraulic lime and milled powder-based mortars. The complete test set gives good results in terms of the hydration kinetics and mechanical properties of the building materials studied. In fact, values of reacted lime around 40% and values of compressive strength in the range of 2

  4. DISPERSION AND CONCENTRATION OF ASBESTOS FIBERS IN AN ASBESTOS-CEMENT FACTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Kheradpir

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In this survey, asbestos fiber levels within the breathing zone of employers and in the environment of an asbestos-cement factory were monitored on membrane filter and counted by phase contrast optical microscope considering length/diameter>3:I (Asbestos International Associational method. The plant was fairly old and utilized both white (chrysotile and blue (chrocidolite asbestos. In each workshop, 8-h time-weighted average concentrations (Ctw, or its equivalent were calculated as fiber/ml. Average and range of concentrations were determined as well. Results indicated that asbestos fibers were dispersed all over the plant and major sources of emission were mills (raw materials and waste products and finishing. In addition, longer daily shift durations (12-h increased workers’ exposure levels more than 2 times than that of 8-h shift (α=0.05, t0.95.17. In finishing workshop by comparison of two criteria length/diameter>3:1 (Asbestos International Association with length/diameter >5:1 (American Society for Testing and Materials, test statistics on mean showed no significant difference between two counting criteria (α= 0.05, t0.975.9.

  5. Fibre type and concentration in the lungs of workers in an asbestos cement factory.

    OpenAIRE

    Gylseth, B; Mowé, G; Wannag, A

    1983-01-01

    The predominant asbestos fibre type used in the production of asbestos cement is chrysotile. The use of asbestos in relation to fibre type in a Norwegian asbestos cement plant during 1942-80 was 91.7% chrysotile, 3.1% amosite, 4.1% crocidolite, and 1.1% anthophyllite respectively. Electron microscopy and x ray microanalysis of lung tissue samples of asbestos cement workers who had died of malignant pleural mesothelioma or bronchogenic carcinoma showed a completely inverse ratio with regard to...

  6. Mortality of workers employed in two asbestos cement manufacturing plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, J. M.; Weill, H; Hammad, Y Y

    1987-01-01

    In a study of the mortality experience of 6931 employees of two New Orleans asbestos cement products manufacturing plants over 95% were traced. Chrysotile was the primary fibre used in both plants. Plant 1 also used small amounts of amosite and, later, crocidolite irregularly whereas plant 2 used crocidolite steadily in pipe production. Previously reported exposure concentration estimates were revised, based on additional air sampling data and re-evaluation of these data. Workers in the two p...

  7. Mortality study in an asbestos cement factory in Naples, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegozzo, Simona; Comba, Pietro; Ferrante, Daniela; De Santis, Marco; Gorini, Giuseppe; Izzo, Francesco; Magnani, Corrado; Pirastu, Roberta; Simonetti, Andrea; Tùnesi, Sara; Menegozzo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate mortality among 1247 male asbestos-cement workers employed in an asbestos-cement plant located in Naples. The cohort included 1247 men hired between 1950 and 1986. The follow-up began on January 1st 1965. The vital status and causes of death were ascertained up to December 31 2005. Cause-specific mortality rates of the Campania Region population were used as reference. Relative risks were estimated using Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs), and the confidence intervals were calculated at a 95% level (95% CI). A significant increase in mortality was observed for respiratory disease (81 deaths; SMR = 187; 95% CI = 149- 233), particularly for pneumoconiosis (42 deaths; SMR = 13 313; 95% CI = 9595-17 996) of which 41 deaths for asbestosis (SMR = 43 385; 95% CI = 31 134-58 857), for pleural cancer (24 deaths; SMR = 2617; 95% CI = 1677-3893), for lung cancer (84 deaths; SMR=153; 95% CI = 122-189) and for peritoneal cancer (9 deaths; SMR = 1985; 95% CI = 908-3769). Non-significant increases were also observed for rectum cancer (6 deaths; SMR = 157; 95% CI = 58-342). In conclusion, consistently with other mortality studies on asbestos-cement workers performed in different countries, an increased mortality from asbestosis, lung cancer, pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma was detected in the present cohort. PMID:21952156

  8. Mortality study in an asbestos cement factory in Naples, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Menegozzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate mortality among 1247 male asbestos-cement workers employed in an asbestos-cement plant located in Naples. The cohort included 1247 men hired between 1950 and 1986. The follow-up began on January 1st 1965. The vital status and causes of death were ascertained up to December 31 2005. Cause-specific mortality rates of the Campania Region population were used as reference. Relative risks were estimated using Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs, and the confidence intervals were calculated at a 95% level (95% CI. A significant increase in mortality was observed for respiratory disease (81 deaths; SMR = 187; 95% CI = 149-233, particularly for pneumoconiosis (42 deaths; SMR = 13 313; 95% CI = 9595-17 996 of which 41 deaths for asbestosis (SMR = 43 385; 95% CI = 31 134-58 857, for pleural cancer (24 deaths; SMR = 2617; 95% CI = 1677-3893, for lung cancer (84 deaths; SMR=153; 95% CI = 122-189 and for peritoneal cancer (9 deaths; SMR = 1985; 95% CI = 908-3769. Non-significant increases were also observed for rectum cancer (6 deaths; SMR = 157; 95% CI = 58-342. In conclusion, consistently with other mortality studies on asbestos-cement workers performed in different countries, an increased mortality from asbestosis, lung cancer, pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma was detected in the present cohort.

  9. Histological type of lung carcinoma in asbestos cement workers and matched controls.

    OpenAIRE

    L. Johansson; Albin, M; Jakobsson, K; Mikoczy, Z

    1992-01-01

    Histological types of lung carcinoma were examined in a case series of workers exposed to asbestos cement dust (n = 29) and matched controls (n = 87). The proportion of adenocarcinomas was 31% among the exposed subjects and 15% among the controls (mid-p = 0.05). Among workers with high exposure the proportion of adenocarcinoma was even higher (45%, 5/11; mid-p = 0.03). The proportion of peripheral tumours tended to be higher among exposed cases than controls (24 v 12%, mid-p = 0.12). Lobe of ...

  10. Retention patterns of asbestos fibres in lung tissue among asbestos cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Albin, M; Pooley, F D; Strömberg, U; Attewell, R; Mitha, R; L. Johansson; Welinder, H

    1994-01-01

    Retention patterns in lung tissue (determined by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry) of chrysotile, tremolite, and crocidolite fibres were analysed in 69 dead asbestos cement workers and 96 referents. There was an accumulation of tremolite with time of employment. Among workers who died within three years of the end of exposure, the 13 with high tremolite concentrations had a significantly longer duration of exposure than seven in a low to intermediate categor...

  11. Relation between lung function, exercise capacity, and exposure to asbestos cement.

    OpenAIRE

    Wollmer, P.; Eriksson, L.; Jonson, B.; Jakobsson, K; Albin, M; Skerfving, S; Welinder, H

    1987-01-01

    A group of 137 male workers with known exposure (mean 20 fibre years per millilitre) to asbestos cement who had symptoms or signs of pulmonary disease was studied together with a reference group of 49 healthy industrial workers with no exposure to asbestos. Lung function measurements were made at rest and during exercise. Evidence of lung fibrosis was found as well as of obstructive airways disease in the exposed group compared with the reference group. Asbestos cement exposure was related to...

  12. Lung cancer among asbestos cement workers. A Swedish cohort study and a review.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohlson, C G; Hogstedt, C

    1985-01-01

    A cohort study of 1176 Swedish asbestos cement workers did not indicate any asbestos related excess mortality. Possible explanations of the negative outcome are relatively low exposure levels and the predominant use of chrysotile in production. Such a tentative conclusion is supported by a review of five mortality studies of workers exposed to asbestos cement that report considerable differences in relative risks for lung cancer. These differences could be explained by various degrees of cumu...

  13. Lung cinescintigraphy in the dynamic assessment of ventilation and mucociliary clearance of asbestos cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Di Lorenzo, L; Mele, M; Pegorari, M M; Fratello, A; Zocchetti, C; Capozzi, D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To verify in vivo whether lung cinescintigraphy confirms the effect of asbestos on the patency of the smallest airways and on the efficiency of mucociliary clearance in asbestos cement workers. METHODS: 39 male subjects were examined: 30 asbestos cement workers and nine workers never exposed to occupational respiratory irritants. All subjects had a chest radiograph (International Labour Organisation (ILO) 1980); standard questionnaire on chronic bronchitis; spirometry; arterial bl...

  14. Incidence of cancer and mortality among employees in the asbestos cement industry in Denmark.

    OpenAIRE

    Raffn, E; Lynge, E; Juel, K.; Korsgaard, B

    1989-01-01

    In a cohort study of the incidence of cancer and mortality among 7996 men and 584 women employed in the Danish asbestos cement industry between 1928 and 1984 over 99% were traced. Chrysotile asbestos was the only fibre type used until 1946, when amosite and (in 1952) crocidolite were also introduced. Chrysotile constituted 89%, amosite 10%, and crocidolite 1% of the asbestos used. During the first 25 years of manufacture the exposure levels were high, especially in areas where the asbestos wa...

  15. Treatment and recycling of asbestos-cement containing waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, F; Cioffi, R; Lavorgna, M; Verdolotti, L; De Stefano, L

    2011-11-15

    The remediation of industrial buildings covered with asbestos-cement roofs is one of the most important issues in asbestos risk management. The relevant Italian Directives call for the above waste to be treated prior to disposal on landfill. Processes able to eliminate the hazard of these wastes are very attractive because the treated products can be recycled as mineral components in building materials. In this work, asbestos-cement waste is milled by means of a high energy ring mill for up to 4h. The very fine powders obtained at all milling times are characterized to check the mineralogical and morphological transformation of the asbestos phases. Specifically, after 120 min of milling, the disappearance of the chrysotile OH stretching modes at 3690 cm(-1), of the main crystalline chrysotile peaks and of the fibrous phase are detected by means of infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses, respectively. The hydraulic behavior of the milled powders in presence of lime is also tested at different times. The results of thermal analyses show that the endothermic effects associated to the neo-formed binding phases significantly increase with curing time. Furthermore, the technological efficacy of the recycling process is evaluated by preparing and testing hydraulic lime and milled powder-based mortars. The complete test set gives good results in terms of the hydration kinetics and mechanical properties of the building materials studied. In fact, values of reacted lime around 40% and values of compressive strength in the range of 2.17 and 2.29 MPa, are measured. PMID:21924550

  16. Lung cancer in asbestos cement workers in Denmark.

    OpenAIRE

    Raffn, E; Villadsen, E; Engholm, G; Lynge, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the relative and absolute risks of main types of lung cancer in a cohort of asbestos cement workers from Denmark. METHOD: A cohort of 7887 men and 576 women employed between 1928 and 1984 was compiled from the personnel files of Danish Eternit Production. The cohort was followed up for deaths, emigrations, and incident cancer cases during the period 1943-90. The observed number of lung cancer cases in the cohort was compared with the expected number based on incidences fo...

  17. [Cancer risk in asbestos-cement industry workers in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Wilczyńska, U; Szymczak, W

    1997-01-01

    A cohort study was carried out in order to evaluate the cancer risk in the asbestos-cement industry workers. The cohort consisted of workers employed in four asbestos-cement plants. One of those plants was established in 1924, the other three in the 1960s and 1970s. Currently only two of these plants continue their production. The plants used mainly chrysotile asbestos as well as crocidolite and amosite. Amphibolite asbestos was used before the mid-nineteen eighties in production of pressure pipes utilising about 15% of the total quantity of asbestos used. The measurements of the asbestos fibre concentration at work-sites have been taken occasionally since the mid 1980s, thus, the determination of a cumulative dose for individual persons in the cohort and the evaluation of the dose-effect relationship were not feasible. It could only be supposed that the concentrations at the preparatory work-site during first years of the plants' operation accounted for several tens fibres/cm3 in the production that employed the dry method. The cohort consisted of workers employed in the plant for at least three months between beginning of the plant during the post-war period, and 1980, that is during the period when amphibolite asbestos was in use. The retrospective observation was completed on 31 December 1991. The analysis of the death risk by causes was based on a standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) calculated using the person-years method. Statistical significance of SMRs was assessed by means of Poisson distribution one-sided test. The general population of Poland was used as the reference population to estimate the death risk. The cohort comprised 4,712 persons (3,563 males and 1,149 females). Of this number 4,500 persons (3,405 males and 1,095 females) were followed. The cohort availability were 95.5%. Male mortality, both total (473 deaths; SMR = 83) and due to malignant neoplasms (108 deaths; SMR = 86) was lower than in the general population. An excess of deaths from

  18. [Concentration and form of asbestos fibers in tap drinking water contaminated from a water supply pipe with asbestos-cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, K; Takizawa, Y; Muto, H; Hirano, K

    1992-10-01

    The identification and concentration of asbestos fibers in tap drinking water supplied in a central area of Akita Prefecture, Japan, were determined by phase-contrast microscopy and a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray microanalyzer. The following results were obtained. 1. Asbestos fibers were found in the tap water from two areas in which an asbestos-cement pipe was used for public water supply. The concentrations of asbestos fibers in the tap water were 2.7 x 10(4) to 27.0 x 10(4) fibers per liter of water in area A and 10.0 x 10(4) to 21.0 x 10(4) in area B. On the other hand, no asbestos fiber contamination was observed in tap water of area C, which shared a common water source with area A. A vinyl chloride pipe was used over the entire length of the water supply in route C. 2. Crocidolite was the predominant type of asbestos fiber detected in the tap water. Chrysotile and a mixture of chrysotile and amosite were also observed. 3. Almost all asbestos fibers detected in the tap water possessed the form of thick or sheaved fibers with lengths ranging from ca. 5 to 10 microns. Their shapes were very different from those of asbestos fibers found in the atmosphere. The typical form of the latter is short (ca. 1 micron in length) and needle-like. 4. It was suggested that the contamination of asbestos fibers in the tap water was caused by erosion and peeling off of the inner wall of the asbestos-cement pipe used as a conduit. In order to evaluate the safety of drinking water in Japan, an extensive survey on asbestos-fiber contamination in tap water is necessary. PMID:1464953

  19. Study to determine the feasibility of asbestos cement sheets as cladding for concrete offshore structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using asbestos cement sheets as cladding against ice action in concrete offshore structures. Physical properties and cost factors were compared for asbestos cement, steel sheets, steel and Teflon, and high strength concrete. The comparison shows that asbestos cement is not well suited to the proposed use. A library search produced only one relevant research paper. Asbestos cement has been tested in seawater (but not in a cold climate) and in the laboratory to examine its properties for use a sheet piling in a marine evironment. The results for normal and for autoclaved asbestos cement were not encouraging. Extracts from the report are included. The information available strongly suggests that asbestos cement is not well suited to the proposed use on offshore structures. To show this conclusively, it is recommended that tests on asbestos cement in cold seawater be conducted, and the results compared to those for high strength concrete and for steel sheets. These materials are considered to be more appropriate for providing protection to offshore structures. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  20. Pulmonary function in asbestos cement workers: a dose-response study.

    OpenAIRE

    Finkelstein, M

    1986-01-01

    This study has found that residence time weighted exposure (asbestos dose) may be used to model the risk and extent of pulmonary function abnormalities in a cohort of asbestos cement workers. This parameter, which incorporates both exposure concentration and latency, had previously proved useful for modelling the risk of radiographic abnormalities in this cohort. Asbestos dose and smoking were independent and additive contributors to decreased pulmonary function. It was also found that lung f...

  1. Control of asbestos-cement tube humidity with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to control asbestos-cement tube humidity by measuring fast neutron fluence passing through an article is described. The experimental data on determining the relation between increasing fast neutron number and humidity are presented. 1.5x107 neutr./s fast neutron source of 252Cf fission spectrum was used. It is shown that the method sensitivity is higher for a softened spectrum as compared to the sensitivity for nonsoftened spectrum of the fast neutron source. The calculations have shown the constant sensitivity to the humidity to the changing for 1-5 cm radius detectors. Enlarging the detector area makes it possible to increase the accuracy of measuring humidity

  2. Description of the data acquisition software for cement-asbestos machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer program for PDP8 computer is described which handles the data acquisition for cement-asbestos machines. From these data an extensive report is generated containing production management data. (Author)

  3. Leaching of asbestos-cement cooling-tower fill. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.N.; Stone, R.W.

    1981-04-01

    Cooling-tower fill is sometimes made of asbestos cement. Asbestos-cement fill has frequently been damaged by leaching and mechanical problems. This leaching was investigated. Previous studies of asbestos-cement water pipe and cooling-tower fill are summarized. Five plants were visited, and 43 others were contacted by telephone. Water and fill samples were collected and analyzed. About half of the cooling towers with asbestos-cement fill have experienced significant deterioration. To control leaching, water should not be undersaturated with respect to calcium carbonate. The Langelier saturation index is a useful tool for controlling blowdown rates and chemical feed. However, because this index does not allow for all of the relevant factors, it is not possible to recommend values that are suitable for all plants. If no scale inhibitors are used, the index should be kept as high as possible without causing calcium carbonate scale. If scale inhibitors are used, overdosing should be avoided. Asbestos-cement fill should be used only if the cooling-water chemistry can be well controlled. Specifications for asbestos-cement fill can be improved. Other design features, operating practices, and research are suggested.

  4. Structural integrity tests on cement fiberglass/asbestos panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the seismic upgrade walkdowns of some of the Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities, a number of partition walls were encountered. These walls are constructed from 1/4 inch cement fiberglass or cement asbestos wallboard panels. Some of the partition walls are located in close proximity to safety related equipment like relay cabinets containing essential relays. Light weight safety related equipment like electric conduits and panels are commonly attached to these walls. Occasionally, heavier equipment such as a transformer may also be found. To maintain functionality of the safety related equipment during a seismic event, structural integrity of the walls is required. Additionally, any structural failure of the walls could pose an interaction hazard to adjacently located relay cabinets resulting in spurious actuation of essential relays. In the absence of published structural capacities specific to SRS construction characteristics, a series of tests were performed to assess the capacity of various wall features. This paper discusses the different types of tests performed to measure the structural capacity of various wall features. The results of the tests are presented

  5. A cohort study on mortality among wives of workers in the asbestos cement industry in Casale Monferrato, Italy.

    OpenAIRE

    Magnani, C; Terracini, B; Ivaldi, C; Botta, M; Budel, P; Mancini, A; Zanetti, R.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates mortality from cancer and other diseases in a cohort of wives of asbestos cement workers in Casale Monferrato (northwest Italy). After the exclusion of women with an occupational record in the asbestos cement industry, the cohort comprised 1964 women. Their domestic exposure was estimated according to their husbands' periods of employment in the plant: 1740 had a period of domestic exposure whereas the remaining 224 married an asbestos cement worker only after he defini...

  6. Mapping of Asbestos Cement Roofs and Their Weathering Status Using Hyperspectral Aerial Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Cilia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were: (i the mapping of asbestos cement roofs in an urban area; and (ii the development of a spectral index related to the roof weathering status. Aerial images were collected through the Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer (MIVIS sensor, which acquires data in 102 channels from the visible to the thermal infrared spectral range. An image based supervised classification was performed using the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM algorithm. The SAM was trained through a set of pixels selected on roofs of different materials. The map showed an average producer’s accuracy (PA of 86% and a user’s accuracy (UA of 89% for the asbestos cement class. A novel spectral index, the “Index of Surface Deterioration” (ISD, was defined based on measurements collected with a portable spectroradiometer on asbestos cement roofs that were characterized by different weathering statuses. The ISD was then calculated on the MIVIS images, allowing the distinction of two weathering classes (i.e., high and low. The asbestos cement map was handled in a Geographic Information System (GIS in order to supply the municipalities with the cadastral references of each property having an asbestos cement roof. This tool can be purposed for municipalities as an aid to prioritize asbestos removal, based on roof weathering status.

  7. ROS-mediated genotoxicity of asbestos-cement in mammalian lung cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopp, Elke; Yadav, Santosh; Ansari, Furquan Ahmad; Bhattacharya, Kunal; von Recklinghausen, Ursula; Rauen, Ursula; Rödelsperger, Klaus; Shokouhi, Behnaz; Geh, Stefan; Rahman, Qamar

    2005-10-01

    Asbestos is a known carcinogen and co-carcinogen. It is a persisting risk in our daily life due to its use in building material as asbestos-cement powder. The present study done on V79-cells (Chinese hamster lung cells) demonstrates the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of asbestos-cement powder (ACP) in comparison with chrysotile asbestos. A co-exposure of chrysotile and ACP was tested using the cell viability test and the micronucleus assay. The kinetochore analysis had been used to analyse the pathway causing such genotoxic effects. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were determined as evidence for the production of reactive oxygen species. Both, asbestos cement as well as chrysotile formed micronuclei and induced loss of cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent way. Results of TBARS analysis and iron chelator experiments showed induction of free radicals in ACP- and chrysotile exposed cultures. CaSO4 appeared to be a negligible entity in enhancing the toxic potential of ACP. The co-exposure of both, ACP and chrysotile, showed an additive effect in enhancing the toxicity. The overall study suggests that asbestos-cement is cytotoxic as well as genotoxic in vitro. In comparison to chrysotile the magnitude of the toxicity was less, but co-exposure increased the toxicity of both. PMID:16209709

  8. ROS-mediated genotoxicity of asbestos-cement in mammalian lung cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rödelsperger Klaus

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asbestos is a known carcinogen and co-carcinogen. It is a persisting risk in our daily life due to its use in building material as asbestos-cement powder. The present study done on V79-cells (Chinese hamster lung cells demonstrates the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of asbestos-cement powder (ACP in comparison with chrysotile asbestos. A co-exposure of chrysotile and ACP was tested using the cell viability test and the micronucleus assay. The kinetochore analysis had been used to analyse the pathway causing such genotoxic effects. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were determined as evidence for the production of reactive oxygen species. Both, asbestos cement as well as chrysotile formed micronuclei and induced loss of cell viability in a concentration- and time- dependent way. Results of TBARS analysis and iron chelator experiments showed induction of free radicals in ACP- and chrysotile exposed cultures. CaSO4 appeared to be a negligible entity in enhancing the toxic potential of ACP. The co-exposure of both, ACP and chrysotile, showed an additive effect in enhancing the toxicity. The overall study suggests that asbestos-cement is cytotoxic as well as genotoxic in vitro. In comparison to chrysotile the magnitude of the toxicity was less, but co-exposure increased the toxicity of both.

  9. Bacteriological challenges to asbestos cement water distribution pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dunling; Cullimore, D Roy

    2010-01-01

    Asbestos cement (AC) pipes were commonly installed in the drinking water distribution systems from the mid 1920s to the late 1980s. In recent years, an increase in the number of water main breaks has occurred in the AC portions of some pipe networks, which can be partially attributed to the corrosion of the aged pipes. This study evaluated the potential role that microorganisms may have played in the degeneration and failure of AC pipes. In this study, a fresh AC pipe section was collected from the distribution network of the City of Regina, Canada and examined for microbiological activities and growth on inside surfaces of pipe sample. Black slime bacterial growths were found to be attached to inner pipe surfaces and a distinctively fibrous internal coating (patina) with iron oxides was formed over the time. The microbial populations inside the patina and the black slime were tested with BART testers. Heterotrophic aerobic bacteria (HAB) and slime forming bacteria (SLYM) dominated in both the black growths and inside the patina. Iron related bacteria, denitrification bacteria and sulfate reducing bacteria were also commonly present. Microbial challenge assays were conducted by submerging the cut segments of the AC pipe into selected bacterial cultures for a period of 10 days under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. Weight changes were determined and the surface morphology was examined for each of the assayed pipe segments. Results indicated that acid producing bacteria, SLYM and HAB could facilitate the pipe weight loss under anaerobicenvironments. PMID:21179959

  10. [Lung cancer among asbestos-cement workers in Denmark].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffn, E; Villadsen, E; Engholm, G; Lynge, E

    1998-02-01

    A cohort of 7887 men and 576 women employed between 1928 and 1984 at a Danish asbestos cement factory Dansk Eternit Fabrik A/S was followed up for deaths, immigrations, and incident cancer cases during 1943-90. The observed number of lung cancer cases was compared with the expected number based on incidence rates for the Danish population. Internal comparison was made with Poisson modelling. A total of 226 lung cancer cases was observed; 223 cases among men and three among women. The standardised incidence ratio (SIR) for all lung cancer cases for men was 1.7; for adenocarcinoma 2.6, squamous cell carcinoma 1.7, and anaplastic carcinoma 1.5. Among the 93 excess lung cancer cases, 36 were squamous cell carcinomas, 32 adenocarcinomas and 17 anaplastic carcinomas. During the first 25 years after the start of employment the excess risk was shared almost equally between the different histological types of lung cancer, but the risk of adenocarcinomas was clearly higher after this point. PMID:9477755

  11. Genetic polymorphism for glutathione-S-transferase mu in asbestos cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsson, K; Rannug, A.; Alexandrie, A K; Rylander, L; Albin, M; Hagmar, L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate whether a lack of glutathione-S-transferase mu (GSTM1) activity was related to an increased risk for adverse outcome after asbestos exposure. METHODS--A study was made of 78 male former asbestos cement workers, with retrospective cohort data on exposure, radiographical findings, and lung function. Venous blood samples were obtained for the analysis of GSTM1 polymorphism by the polymerase chain reaction technique. Chest x ray films were classified according to the Int...

  12. Ventilatory decrements in former asbestos cement workers: a four year follow up.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohlson, C G; Bodin, L; Rydman, T; Hogstedt, C

    1985-01-01

    A four year follow up of the ventilatory function in former asbestos cement workers has been performed to determine whether any further decrease occurred after cessation of exposure. Seventy five of 125 subjects were eligible for re-examination and were compared with local referents. None showed signs of asbestosis but 32% had pleural plaques at the renewed examination. Cumulative asbestos exposure calculated as fibre x years had been estimated individually in the original examination. After ...

  13. Further follow-up study of workers from an asbestos cement factory.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, H F; Benjamin, I T; Elwood, P C; Sweetnam, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    A further follow-up traced 1970 workers employed at an asbestos cement factory for at least six months between 1936 and 1977. At the beginning of this period some crocidolite was used in the factory but by the end of 1936 chrysotile had become the only type of asbestos in use. Only 378 women were employed during the period concerned, and of the 30 who had died, none had a cause of death that is generally associated with exposure to asbestos. The mortality experience of the men was examined se...

  14. Mortality among long-term employees of an Ontario asbestos-cement factory.

    OpenAIRE

    Finkelstein, M M

    1983-01-01

    Mortality was studied among a group of 328 employees of an Ontario asbestos-cement factory who had been hired before 1960 and who had been employed for a minimum of nine years. The group of 87 men who had worked in the rock wool/fibre glass operations, or who had been otherwise minimally exposed to asbestos, had mortality rates similar to those of the general Ontario population, while the group of asbestos-exposed employees had all-cause mortality rates double those of the Ontario population,...

  15. Mesothelioma mortality among former asbestos-cement workers in Israel, 1953-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulchinsky, T H; Ginsberg, G M; Shihab, S; Goldberg, E; Laster, R

    1992-01-01

    Asbestos workers have long been recognized as a high risk group for the development of mesothelioma and other cancers. In this study we collated from a variety of sources 26 mesothelioma deaths that occurred between 1978 and 1990 among a cohort of some 4,441 former workers from an asbestos-cement plant in northern Israel. Since the expected number of deaths for this number of Israeli males in this age-group over this period is 0.12 cases, the risk of this disease was more than 223 times the national rate, age and sex adjusted [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 22,351, P < 0.001]. The mean years of exposure of persons who died from mesothelioma was 16.2 (SE 2.5). The mean latency period for mesothelioma cases from onset of exposure to death was 25.6 years (SE 1.3). Additional follow-up systems are needed to ensure complete reporting of asbestos-related diseases, including epidemiologic follow-up of asbestos-exposed workers after cessation of their work, with regular analysis of death and cancer registry data for high risk groups. Asbestos-related cancer is an important element in cancer epidemiology that requires further development in Israel. Studies of former workers, their families and of persons who worked or attended school adjacent to the asbestos-cement factory, as well as follow-up of other former worker groups exposed to asbestos are recommended. PMID:1428808

  16. Controlled erosion in asbestos-cement pipe used in drinking water distribution systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Ramos, P.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of asbestos-cement pipe used for drinking water conveyance, were submerged in distilled water, and subjected to two controlled erosive treatments, namely agitation (300 rpm for 60 min) and ultrasound (47 kHz for 30 min). SEM was used to observe and compare the morphology of the new pipe with and without erosive treatment, and of samples taken from asbestos-cement pipes used in the distribution system of drinking water in Santiago city for 10 and 40-years of service. TEM was used to de...

  17. Tetrachloroethylene contamination of drinking water by vinyl-coated asbestos-cement pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakeham, S.G.; Davis, A.C.; Witt, R.T.; Tripp, B.W.; Frew, N.M.

    1980-10-01

    Drinking water transported in vinyl-coated asbestos-cement pipes often contains elevated concentrations of tetrachloroethylene, which is used as solvent during application of the vinyl coating. Tetrachloroethylene contamination of drinking waters flowing in vinyl-coated asbestos-cement pipes in Falmouth, Mass., is assessed. Problems encountered in trying to reduce this potential health hazard are reviewed. Flushing of the pipe sometimes leads to a reduced tetrachloroethylene level in that pipe, but after flushing is terminated, the level of contamination will gradually increase. (1 diagram, 17 references, 2 tables)

  18. Determinants influencing the amount of asbestos-cement roofing in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilk Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of its harmfulness to human health, asbestos has been banned in 55 countries, including the EU. In Poland, the use and production of asbestos and asbestos-containing products has been forbidden since 1997. However, there is no precise data about the amount of asbestos-containing products to be eliminated from the territory of Poland. This survey aims to identify characteristics that have a significant impact on the estimation of asbestos-containing products used in Poland. Statistical correlation between the results of the physical inventory count done in 155 municipalities was examined. As a result of the survey it was found that the amount of asbestos-cement roofing depends on the following factors: the number of individual farms in the village, the distance from the asbestos manufacturing plants, the age of the buildings and the economic situation of municipality. The results obtained may contribute to the ability to predict the amount of asbestos-containing products used in other municipalities.

  19. Evaluation of a hyperspectral scanner allowing for deterioration status assessment of asbestos-cement roofing sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascucci, Simone; Bassani, Cristiana; Fusilli, Lorenzo; Palombo, Angelo

    2007-10-01

    Aim of this study is the identification of the hyperspectral scanner operational characteristics allowing for asbestos cement (AC) roofing sheets deterioration status assessment that is related to the asbestos fibers abundance. At this purpose we made laboratory measurements on AC samples with different deterioration status collected in two industrial areas in Italy. The asbestos occurrence in the AC samples was recognized using XRD and FTIR instruments and the abundance of surfacing asbestos fibers was performed by using a high resolution scanner (SEM). The samples optical characteristics and the directional effects that can affect the AC samples were analyzed using a portable field spectrometer (ASD). The results of the ASD measurements (i.e. band-depth ratio of the continuum removed calculated for the asbestos diagnostic band at 2.32μm) were related to the relative percentage of surfacing asbestos fibers (i.e. the AC deterioration status). Since laboratory measurements confirmed that optical measurements are sensitive to variations in asbestos fiber abundance, detection limit analysis was used for defining the requirements (signal-to-noise ratio, band FWHM, and sampling range) of an optimal hyperspectral sensor most suitable for detecting the diagnostic asbestos absorption features.

  20. Radiographic asbestosis is not a prerequisite for asbestos-associated lung cancer in Ontario asbestos-cement workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, M M

    1997-10-01

    In recent years, controversy has developed about whether pre-existing asbestosis is a prerequisite for the diagnosis of asbestos-related lung cancer. This paper presents the results of a prospective study, in a cohort of Ontario asbestos-cement workers, of lung cancer in relation to radiographs obtained 20 and 25 years from first exposure to asbestos. Radiographs were interpreted by a single NIOSH-certified "B" reader, and asbestosis was defined to mean an ILO code of 1/0 or greater. There were 143 subjects (123 without asbestosis, 20 with asbestosis), with a radiograph available for interpretation at 20 years from first exposure or later. The lung cancer standardized mortality ratio (SMR) among men without asbestosis at 20 years latency was 5.53 (95% CI: 2.9-9.7). There were 128 subjects (114 without asbestosis, 14 with asbestosis) with a radiograph available for interpretation at 25 years from first exposure or later. The lung cancer SMR among men without asbestosis at 25 years latency was 5.81 (95% CI 2.7-11). The results of this study are consistent with those of epidemiologic studies of asbestos-exposed populations in a variety of exposure situations. These studies have demonstrated that lung cancer risk is elevated in the presence of radiographic asbestosis, but they have also shown that lung cancer risk may be elevated in the absence of radiographic asbestosis. PMID:9258387

  1. Relevancy of human exposure via house dust to the contaminants lead and asbestos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen AG; Lijzen JPA; SIR; LER

    2004-01-01

    The present report addresses the issues whether house dust is likely to contribute substantially to the exposure of humans, in particular for the contaminants lead and asbestos. House dust consists for 30-70% of soil material, indicating that contaminated soil can lead to contaminated house dust. It

  2. Mapping asbestos-cement roofing with the use of APEX hyperspectral airborne imagery: Karpacz area, Poland – a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Krówczyńska Małgorzata; Wilk Ewa; Pabjanek Piotr; Zagajewski Bogdan; Meuleman Koen

    2016-01-01

    Asbestos and asbestos containing products are harmful to human health, and therefore its use has been legally forbidden in the EU. Since there is no adequate data on the amount of asbestos-cement roofing in Poland, the objective of this study was to map asbestos-cement roofing with the use of hyperspectral APEX data (288 bands at the spatial resolution of 2.7 m) in the Karpacz area (southwest Poland). A field survey constituted the basis for training and verification polygons in the classific...

  3. ROS-mediated genotoxicity of asbestos-cement in mammalian lung cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Rödelsperger Klaus; Rauen Ursula; von Recklinghausen Ursula; Bhattacharya Kunal; Ansari Furquan; Yadav Santosh; Dopp Elke; Shokouhi Behnaz; Geh Stefan; Rahman Qamar

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Asbestos is a known carcinogen and co-carcinogen. It is a persisting risk in our daily life due to its use in building material as asbestos-cement powder. The present study done on V79-cells (Chinese hamster lung cells) demonstrates the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of asbestos-cement powder (ACP) in comparison with chrysotile asbestos. A co-exposure of chrysotile and ACP was tested using the cell viability test and the micronucleus assay. The kinetochore analysis had been used t...

  4. [Occupational lung diseases caused by exposure to chrysotile asbestos dust and the preventive measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliukhin, A E; Burmistrova, T B

    2014-01-01

    To reveal major principles in system of occupational lung diseases prevention among workers engaged into extraction and usage of chrysotile asbestos, the authors specified main criteria for diagnosis of asbestos-related pulmonary diseases and signs of exposure to chrysotile dust, with identification of risk groups for occupational diseases development. The authors formulated main principles of prevention and rehabilitation for workers with asbestos-related pulmonary diseases. Special attention was paid to harmonization of all medical and technical measures aimed at prevention and liquidation of occupational asbestos-related diseases. PMID:25282798

  5. 10 years' of asbestos-cement multiple-units pipes. An experience report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanitz, H. (Stadtwerke Bielefeld G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.))

    1980-02-01

    A comprehensive review of 10 years' experience with application of asbestos-cement multiple-unit pipes (Wanit system) in the Bielefeld municipal works is presented. Attention is drawn to the cost and time saving when compared with laying in hooded channels, and a detailed description of the system and of its application and laying technique are given.

  6. The exposure-response relationship for mesothelioma among asbestos-cement factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, M M

    1990-12-01

    Forty-five deaths from mesothelioma have occurred among production workers in an asbestos-cement factory. This analysis examines the fit of the cubic residence time model to the incidence of mesothelioma using a case-control method proposed by de Klerk and colleagues. The cubic residence time model was found to provide a good description of the data. PMID:2097820

  7. Personal exposure to inhalable cement dust among construction workers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, S.M.; Thomassen, Y.; Fechter-Rink, E.; Kromhout, H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective- A case study was carried out to assess cement dust exposure and its determinants among construction workers and for comparison among workers in cement and concrete production.Methods- Full-shift personal exposure measurements were performed and samples were analysed for inhalable dust and

  8. Incidence of cancer and mortality among employees in the asbestos cement industry in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffn, E; Lynge, E; Juel, K;

    1989-01-01

    In a cohort study of the incidence of cancer and mortality among 7996 men and 584 women employed in the Danish asbestos cement industry between 1928 and 1984 over 99% were traced. Chrysotile asbestos was the only fibre type used until 1946, when amosite and (in 1952) crocidolite were also...... times over the present Danish threshold limit value of 0.5 fibre/ml. In 1973 more than 41% of personal samples were higher than 2 f/ml. About 76% of the workforce left the factory within five years of starting employment. A total of 1346 deaths and 612 cases of cancer were observed in the cohort between...

  9. Malignant tumours of the gastrointestinal tract in an area with an asbestos-cement plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarić, M; Curin, K

    1996-06-01

    Data on persons who died of cancer of the gastrointestinal tract in a Croatian coastal area with an asbestos-cement plant were analysed for the period 1970-1990. By poll method applied to the families of deceased subjects, additional data on occupation, lifestyle, educational level, length of resistance and cancer mortality among relatives were collected. The investigation showed that in the study area, but also in certain narrower locations within it (subarea settlements), some of the tumours studied occurred at higher rates than expected. Although not conclusive, these findings may indicate a role of environmental exposure to asbestos, particularly in the occurrence of peritoneal mesothelioma. PMID:8635157

  10. Mapping asbestos-cement roofing with hyperspectral remote sensing over a large mountain region of the Italian Western Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassy, Federico; Candiani, Gabriele; Rusmini, Marco; Maianti, Pieralberto; Marchesi, Andrea; Rota Nodari, Francesco; Dalla Via, Giorgio; Albonico, Carlo; Gianinetto, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that 100 thousand people in the world die every year from asbestos-related cancers and more than 300 thousand European citizens are expected to die from asbestos-related mesothelioma by 2030. Both the European and the Italian legislations have banned the manufacture, importation, processing and distribution in commerce of asbestos-containing products and have recommended action plans for the safe removal of asbestos from public and private buildings. This paper describes the quantitative mapping of asbestos-cement covers over a large mountainous region of Italian Western Alps using the Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer sensor. A very large data set made up of 61 airborne transect strips covering 3263 km2 were processed to support the identification of buildings with asbestos-cement roofing, promoted by the Valle d'Aosta Autonomous Region with the support of the Regional Environmental Protection Agency. Results showed an overall mapping accuracy of 80%, in terms of asbestos-cement surface detected. The influence of topography on the classification's accuracy suggested that even in high relief landscapes, the spatial resolution of data is the major source of errors and the smaller asbestos-cement covers were not detected or misclassified. PMID:25166502

  11. Mapping Asbestos-Cement Roofing with Hyperspectral Remote Sensing over a Large Mountain Region of the Italian Western Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Frassy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization estimates that 100 thousand people in the world die every year from asbestos-related cancers and more than 300 thousand European citizens are expected to die from asbestos-related mesothelioma by 2030. Both the European and the Italian legislations have banned the manufacture, importation, processing and distribution in commerce of asbestos-containing products and have recommended action plans for the safe removal of asbestos from public and private buildings. This paper describes the quantitative mapping of asbestos-cement covers over a large mountainous region of Italian Western Alps using the Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer sensor. A very large data set made up of 61 airborne transect strips covering 3263 km2 were processed to support the identification of buildings with asbestos-cement roofing, promoted by the Valle d’Aosta Autonomous Region with the support of the Regional Environmental Protection Agency. Results showed an overall mapping accuracy of 80%, in terms of asbestos-cement surface detected. The influence of topography on the classification’s accuracy suggested that even in high relief landscapes, the spatial resolution of data is the major source of errors and the smaller asbestos-cement covers were not detected or misclassified.

  12. Asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Explains the structure and properties of asbestos, its importance in industry, and its world-wide use and production. Discusses asbestos-related diseases and suggests ways of preventing them, adding that current research is trying to make working with asbestos safer. (GA)

  13. Evaluation of the Webler-Brown model for estimating tetrachloroethylene exposure from vinyl-lined asbestos-cement pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Heeren Timothy C; Webster Thomas F; Gallagher Lisa E; Aschengrau Ann; Spence Lisa A; Ozonoff David M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background From May 1968 through March 1980, vinyl-lined asbestos-cement (VL/AC) water distribution pipes were installed in New England to avoid taste and odor problems associated with asbestos-cement pipes. The vinyl resin was applied to the inner pipe surface in a solution of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE). Substantial amounts of PCE remained in the liner and subsequently leached into public drinking water supplies. Methods Once aware of the leaching problem and prior...

  14. Pleural mesothelioma incidence in the population resident close to an asbestos-cement industry located in an Italian polluted site

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia, Fazzo; Menegozzo, Simona; Soggiu, Maria Eleonora; De Santis, Marco; Santoro, Michele; Cozza, Valentina; Brangi, Amelia; Menegozzo, Massimo; Comba, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The industrial area of "Bagnoli Coroglio" in Naples municipality was defined as a "polluted site of national concern for remediation" in 2000. A steel and a cement plants and an asbestos-cement (Eternit) and a chemical industries operated in the area. AIMS. To estimate pleural mesothelioma incidence in the districts of Naples around the industrial area. METHODS. The area potentially affected by the industrial emissions was identified by modelling; environmental asbestos exposure w...

  15. Spectroscopic and x-ray diffraction analyses of asbestos in the World Trade Center dust:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayze, Gregg A.; Clark, Roger N.; Sutley, Stephen J.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Brownfield, Isabelle; Livo, Keith E.; Morath, Laurie C.

    2009-01-01

    On September 17 and 18, 2001, samples of settled dust and airfall debris were collected from 34 sites within a 1-km radius of the WTC collapse site, including a sample from an indoor location unaffected by rainfall, and samples of insulation from two steel beams at Ground Zero. Laboratory spectral and x-ray diffraction analyses of the field samples detected trace levels of serpentine minerals, including chrysotile asbestos, in about two-thirds of the dust samples at concentrations at or below ~1 wt%. One sample of a beam coating material contained up to 20 wt% chrysotile asbestos. Analyses indicate that trace levels of chrysotile were distributed with the dust radially to distances greater than 0.75 km from Ground Zero. The chrysotile content of the dust is variable and may indicate that chrysotile asbestos was not distributed uniformly during the three collapse events.

  16. Controlled erosion in asbestos-cement pipe used in drinking water distribution systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ramos, P.

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available Samples of asbestos-cement pipe used for drinking water conveyance, were submerged in distilled water, and subjected to two controlled erosive treatments, namely agitation (300 rpm for 60 min and ultrasound (47 kHz for 30 min. SEM was used to observe and compare the morphology of the new pipe with and without erosive treatment, and of samples taken from asbestos-cement pipes used in the distribution system of drinking water in Santiago city for 10 and 40-years of service. TEM was used to determine the concentration of asbestos fibers in the test water: 365 MFL and 1690 MFL (millions of fibers per litre as an agitation and result ultrasound, respectively. The erosive treatments by means of agitation or ultrasound applied to new asbestos-cement pipes used in the drinking water distribution system were evaluated as being equivalent to 4 and 10 years of service, respectively.

    Se sometió a dos tratamientos erosivos controlados uno por agitación (300 rpm, 60 min. y otro por ultrasonido (47 kHz, 30 min. a muestras de tubos de asbesto cemento, sumergidas en agua destilada, usados para el trasporte de agua potable. Con SEM se observó la morfología de muestras de tubos sin uso, con y sin tratamiento erosivo y la de muestras extraídas de tubos de asbesto cemento de la red de distribución de agua potable de ía ciudad de Santiago con 10 y 14 años de servicio. Con TEM se determinó la concentración de fibras de asbesto en el agua de ensayo: 365 MFL y 1690 MFL (millones de fibras por litro en agitación y ultrasonido, respectivamente. Se estimó en 4 y 10 años de servicio equivalente los tratamientos erosivos de agitación y ultrasonido, respectivamente en tubos de asbesto cemento empleados en la red de agua potable.

  17. Incidence of lung cancer by histological type among asbestos cement workers in Denmark.

    OpenAIRE

    Raffn, E; Lynge, E; Korsgaard, B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--A significant twofold increased risk of lung cancer was found among 8000 men employed in the Danish asbestos cement industry between 1928 and 1984. The histological pattern of 104 lung cancer cases was studied with the aim of evaluating a relation between specific morphological types, duration of employment, and time since first employment. METHODS--Age, sex, and calendar time specific incidence of morphological subtypes of lung cancer (adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, anap...

  18. Mapping of Asbestos Cement Roofs and Their Weathering Status Using Hyperspectral Aerial Images

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Cilia; Cinzia Panigada; Micol Rossini; Gabriele Candiani; Monica Pepe; Roberto Colombo

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were: (i) the mapping of asbestos cement roofs in an urban area; and (ii) the development of a spectral index related to the roof weathering status. Aerial images were collected through the Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer (MIVIS) sensor, which acquires data in 102 channels from the visible to the thermal infrared spectral range. An image based supervised classification was performed using the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) algorithm. The SAM was tra...

  19. Asbestos--cement pipeline experience at the Raft River Geothermal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.G.; Kunze, J.F.; Sanders, R.D.

    1977-04-01

    The first buried asbestos-cement (Transite) pipeline used in high temperature (approximately 300/sup 0/F) service for transport of geothermal fluids was installed in the fall of 1975, and has seen 1/sup 1///sub 2/ years of service. The line is 4000 ft long, between the deep geothermal wells No. 1 and No. 2, in the Raft River Valley of Idaho. The experience in using this pipeline has been satisfactory, and methods have been developed for minimizing the thermal expansion/thermal shock breakage problems. Recommendations on improved design and construction practices for future pipelines are given. The substantially reduced cost (factor of 2) of an asbestos-cement pipeline compared to the conventional steel pipeline, plus the esthetically desirable effect of a buried pipeline dictate adoption of this type as standard practice for moderate temperature geothermal developments. The Raft River Geothermal Project intends to connect all future wells with pipelines of asbestos-cement, insulated with 1 to 2-inches of urethane, and buried between 2 and 3 ft. Total cost will be approximately $110,000/mile for 10-inch diameter pipe, $125,000/mile for 12-inch diameter.

  20. A research of selected textural features for detection of asbestos-cement roofing sheets using orthoimages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Książek, Judyta

    2015-10-01

    At present, there has been a great interest in the development of texture based image classification methods in many different areas. This study presents the results of research carried out to assess the usefulness of selected textural features for detection of asbestos-cement roofs in orthophotomap classification. Two different orthophotomaps of southern Poland (with ground resolution: 5 cm and 25 cm) were used. On both orthoimages representative samples for two classes: asbestos-cement roofing sheets and other roofing materials were selected. Estimation of texture analysis usefulness was conducted using machine learning methods based on decision trees (C5.0 algorithm). For this purpose, various sets of texture parameters were calculated in MaZda software. During the calculation of decision trees different numbers of texture parameters groups were considered. In order to obtain the best settings for decision trees models cross-validation was performed. Decision trees models with the lowest mean classification error were selected. The accuracy of the classification was held based on validation data sets, which were not used for the classification learning. For 5 cm ground resolution samples, the lowest mean classification error was 15.6%. The lowest mean classification error in the case of 25 cm ground resolution was 20.0%. The obtained results confirm potential usefulness of the texture parameter image processing for detection of asbestos-cement roofing sheets. In order to improve the accuracy another extended study should be considered in which additional textural features as well as spectral characteristics should be analyzed.

  1. Mechanical behavior of the asbestos-cement container for geological disposal of α level technological wastes from COGEMA reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the safety assessment of the SGN asbestos cement container concept selected by COGEMA for the conditioning of cemented technological wastes from the UP3-UP2 800 reprocessing plants, a general survey has been carried out to confirm both its confinement capacity and its mechanical strength. This safety assessment relates to the latter aspect. It implies two stages: first, the material characterization of asbestos cement and epoxide resin used in sealing and assembling; second, the finite element calculation of induced stresses and strains under storage conditions with regards to the experimented mechanical characteristics. The authors infer some damage in packaging materials in case of misoperation in conditioning process

  2. Mechanical Behaviour of the asbestos-cement container for geological disposal of α level technological wastes from Cogema reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the safety assessment of the SGN asbestos cement container concept selected by COGEMA for the conditionning of cemented α technological wastes from the UP3-UP2 800 reprocessing plants, a general survey has been carried out to confirm both its confinement capacity and its mechanical strength. This safety assessment relates to the latter aspect. It implies two stages: first, the material characterization of asbestos cement and epoxide resin used in sealing and assembling; second, the finite element calculation of induced stresses and strains under storage conditions with regards to the experimented mechanical characteristics. We infer some damage in packaging materials in case of misoperation in conditionning process

  3. Utilization from Cement Kiln Dust in Removal of Acid Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E.S.I. Saraya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The growth of industries and day to day changes in human activities has resulted in an increase in the volume and complexity of wastewater to the environment. Textile industry is one of the most water consumers industries of Egypt, thus discharges large amounts of wastewater effluents during processing, especially, in the coloring and washing steps. Cement kiln dust is a solid waste in cement manufacturing. Approximately 2.5-3.0 (6-9% million tons of cement kiln dust is produced annually in Egypt and that cause significant environmental problems. Approach: This study aims to investigate removal of some acid dyes from aqueous solution using cement kiln dust and monitoring the dye in colored cement kiln dust. Solution with 0.4 g L-1 concentration was treated with cement kiln dust until the color of dye disappears. The colored cement kiln residue was separate by filtration and dried. The concentration of dye was measured before and after treatment by UV-Vis spectroscopy as well as after washing of colored residue. Also, the colored residue was investigated with, XRD, IR and DSC techniques as well as the loss on ignition at 450°C. Results: The results found that the cement kiln dust has the power to remove all existing acid dyes and the residue has the same color of dye. When colored residue was washed with water, there was no back diffusion of dye in to water. This may be mainly due to chemical reaction that took place between cement kiln dust and dye. Thus analysis such as IR, XRD and DSC are in agreement with these results. Conclusion: CKD is efficient in the processes of dye removal from aqueous solutions. The interaction between acid dye and CKD is fast (just minutes. So, we suggest using spent CKD for dye removal of waste water.

  4. Exposure to cement dust at a Portland cement factory and the risk of cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Vestbo, J; Knudsen, K.M.; Raffn, E; Korsgaard, B; Rasmussen, F V

    1991-01-01

    The relation between exposure to cement dust and cancer was examined in a population of 546 cement workers and a reference population of 858 randomly sampled men of similar age and area of residence. In 1974 all men gave lifelong occupational and smoking histories; information on incidence of cancer in the period 1974-85 was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. No increased risk of overall cancer was found among cement workers. Among men with more than 20 years exposure to cement dust, 1...

  5. Crystal chemistry of the high temperature product of transformation of cement-asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Alberto; Gualtieri, Alessandro F; Pollastri, Simone; Rinaudo, Caterina; Croce, Alessandro; Urso, Giancarlo

    2013-03-15

    In this work, the high-temperature inertization product of a representative batch of samples of cement-asbestos (CA) from different localities in Italy have been characterized with a multidisciplinary approach. All the raw CA samples were heated at 1200°C for 15 min. After firing, they underwent a series of solid state reactions leading to global structural changes of the matrix. Effects of annealing time and temperature on the crystallization kinetics were thoroughly investigated. Both factors acted in favour of equilibrium. Three classes of CA were identified with the aid of phase diagrams and of specific plots relating chemical and mineralogical parameters. This result was considered of importance in view of the potential use of transformed cement-asbestos as a secondary raw material. In principle, the content of CA packages removed from the environment and their corresponding heat-treated products can be classified simply using XRF. This method allows for the selection of appropriate fractions in function of the most suitable recycling solution adopted. Samples belonging to the class called larnite-rich, turned out to be of great interest as possible candidate for substituting a fraction of cement in many building materials and innovative green cement productions. PMID:23380447

  6. Peach leaf responses to soil and cement dust pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletsika, Persefoni A; Nanos, George D; Stavroulakis, George G

    2015-10-01

    Dust pollution can negatively affect plant productivity in hot, dry and with high irradiance areas during summer. Soil or cement dust were applied on peach trees growing in a Mediterranean area with the above climatic characteristics. Soil and cement dust accumulation onto the leaves decreased the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) available to the leaves without causing any shade effect. Soil and mainly cement dust deposition onto the leaves decreased stomatal conductance, photosynthetic and transpiration rates, and water use efficiency due possibly to stomatal blockage and other leaf cellular effects. In early autumn, rain events removed soil dust and leaf functions partly recovered, while cement dust created a crust partially remaining onto the leaves and causing more permanent stress. Leaf characteristics were differentially affected by the two dusts studied due to their different hydraulic properties. Leaf total chlorophyll decreased and total phenol content increased with dust accumulation late in the summer compared to control leaves due to intense oxidative stress. The two dusts did not cause serious metal imbalances to the leaves, except of lower leaf K content.

  7. Change of carcinogenic chrysotile fibers in the asbestos cement (eternit) to harmless waste by artificial carbonatization: petrological and technological results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radvanec, Martin; Tuček, L'ubomír; Derco, Ján; Čechovská, Katarína; Németh, Zoltán

    2013-05-15

    Asbestos cement materials, mainly the eternit roof ceiling, being widely applied in the past, represent a serious environmental load. The solar radiation, rain and frost cause the deliberation of cement from the eternit roofing and consequently the wind contaminates the surrounding area by the asbestos (chrysotile) fibers. In combination with other carcinogens (e.g. smoking), or at reduced immunity of a man, they may cause serious respiratory diseases and lung cancer. The article presents the procedure and experimental results of artificial carbonatization, applied in the asbestos cement (eternit). The wet crushed and pulverized asbestos cement was thermally modified at 650°C and then the chrysotile fibers easily and completely reacted with the mixture of CO2 and water, producing new Mg-rich carbonates - hydromagnesite and magnesite: [Formula: see text] Applying this methodology, the asbestos-bearing waste can be stabilized and environmentally friendly permanently deposited. Finding a way of neutralizing of extreme pH values (around 12) at large eternit dumps represents also an asset of presented research. Simultaneously, the artificial carbonatization of chrysotile asbestos, applying CO2, offers an alternative way for permanent liquidation of a part of industrial CO2 emissions, contributing to multiple benefit of this methodology. PMID:23571021

  8. Dust Exposure and Respiratory Health Effects in Cement Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golamreza Pouryaghoub

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dust can be produced by almost all production processes in Portland cement factory. Dust exposure potentially can affect respiratory function. But evidence for respiratory effect of cement dust exposure has not been conclusive. In this study we assessed effect of cement dust exposure on respiratory function in a cement production factory. A respiratory symptoms questionnaire was completed and pulmonary function tests were carried out on 94 exposed and 54 non exposed workers at a cement factory in the east of Iran. Additionally, respirable dust level was determined by the gravimetric method. X-ray fluorescence (XRF technique was performed to determine the silica phases and the SiO2 contents of the bulk samples. The arithmetic means (AM of personal respirable dust were 30.18 mg/m3 in the crushing, 27 mg/m3 in the packing, 5.4 mg/m3 in the cement mill, 5.9 mg/m3 in the kiln and 5.48 mg/m3 in the maintenance that were higher than threshold limit value (TLV of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH which is 5 mg/m3. This value in the unexposed group was 0.93 mg/m3. In this study cough, sputum, wheezing and dyspnea were more prevalent among exposed subjects. Exposed workers compared to the unexposed group showed significant reduction in Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1, Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, and Forced Expiratory Flow between 25% and 75% of the FVC (FEF25-75% (P<0.05. It can be concluded that in our study there was close and direct association between cement dust exposure and functional impairment among the cement factory workers.

  9. An unjustified prognosis of the number of asbestos-related lung cancer cases caused by an increase in airborne asbestos concentrations as a result of removing of asbestos-cement products.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We have read the recently published article under an interesting title “Environmentally Related Diseases and the Possibility of Valuation ofTheir Social Costs” by I. Hajok et al. [1], the main objective of which was “to estimate the risks of the morbidity of the asbestos-related lung cancer in the general population of Poles as the result of increased exposure to asbestos fibers which occurs during the removal and disposal of asbestos-cement products in Poland.” Contrary to mesotheli...

  10. In vitro biodurability of the product of thermal transformation of cement-asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F; Viani, Alberto; Sgarbi, Giulia; Lusvardi, Gigliola

    2012-02-29

    To safely recycle the product of the thermal transformation of cement-asbestos as secondary raw material, its toxicity potential should be assessed by in vitro biodurability tests. In this work, the acellular in vitro biodurability of the products of transformation of cement-asbestos at 1200 °C (named KRY·AS) was tested using both inorganic and organic simulated lung fluids at pH 4.5. The dissolution kinetics were followed using chemical, mineralogical and microstructural analyses. The total dissolution time estimated from the experiments with inorganic HCl diluted solution is one order of magnitude higher than that determined from the experiments with buffered Gamble solution (253 days vs. 20 days). The key parameter determining the difference in dissolution rate turns out to be the solidus/liquidus ratio which prompts a fast saturation of the solution with monosilicic acid. The calculated dissolution rate constants showed that the biodurability in vitro of KRY·AS is much lower with respect to that of standard chrysotile asbestos (total estimated dissolution time of 20 days vs. 298 days, respectively). This proves a low potential toxicity of this secondary raw material. PMID:22257569

  11. Mortality of workers at two asbestos-cement plants in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Wilczyńska, U; Szymczak, W

    2000-01-01

    To assess mortality rate among workers occupationally exposed to asbestos, cohort studies were carried out in two asbestos cement plants operating since the 1960s. Asbestos cement sheets for roofing and siding have been manufactured there, using mostly chrisotile, and since 1985 also crocidolite for pressure pipes. In all, the cohort comprised 3,220 workers, including 2,616 male workers. Subject to consideration were the workers employed for at least three months in the period between the onset of the production and 1980. The vital status of the subjects was traced up to 31 December 1991. The availability of the cohort was 96.8%. Workers' mortality was analysed using standardized mortality ratio (SMR). The reference group was the general population of Poland. In the male cohort, 385 cases of death were recorded. Statistically significant excess of mortality from large intestine cancer (7 cases, SMR = 264) and pleural mesothelioma (5 cases, SMR = 2846) was found. In male workers who died from pleural mesothelioma the work history ranged from 12 to 26 years. An excess mortality from pleural mesothelioma was also noted among the female workers (2 cases, SMR = 11,275). No malignant neoplasms of other locations produced significant excess mortality either in the male or female workers. PMID:10967842

  12. Mortality among long-term employees of an Ontario asbestos-cement factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, M M

    1983-01-01

    Mortality was studied among a group of 328 employees of an Ontario asbestos-cement factory who had been hired before 1960 and who had been employed for a minimum of nine years. The group of 87 men who had worked in the rock wool/fibre glass operations, or who had been otherwise minimally exposed to asbestos, had mortality rates similar to those of the general Ontario population, while the group of asbestos-exposed employees had all-cause mortality rates double those of the Ontario population, mortality rates due to malignancies five times higher than expected, and deaths attributed to lung cancer eight times more frequent than expected. According to the best evidence available, 10 of 58 deaths among the production workers were due to malignant mesothelioma and 20 to lung cancer. The men dying of mesothelioma were younger than the men dying of lung cancer with mean ages at death of 51 and 64 years respectively. An exposure model was constructed on the basis of the available air sampling data, and individual exposure histories were calculated. These exposure histories were used to investigate the exposure-response relationships for asbestos-associated malignancies. PMID:6830709

  13. Utilization from Cement Kiln Dust in Removal of Acid Dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed E.S.I. Saraya; Mahmoud E.S. Aboul-Fetouh

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: The growth of industries and day to day changes in human activities has resulted in an increase in the volume and complexity of wastewater to the environment. Textile industry is one of the most water consumers industries of Egypt, thus discharges large amounts of wastewater effluents during processing, especially, in the coloring and washing steps. Cement kiln dust is a solid waste in cement manufacturing. Approximately 2.5-3.0 (6-9%) million tons of cement kiln dust is pr...

  14. A case control study of lung cancer and exposure to chrysotile and amphibole at a slovenian asbestos-cement plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodic Fikfak, M; Kriebel, D; Quinn, M M; Eisen, E A; Wegman, D H

    2007-04-01

    A lung cancer case-control study was conducted in a Slovenian asbestos-cement factory for which unusually good records of asbestos exposures were available. The cohort consisted of all 6714 workers employed at the Salonit Anhovo factory after 31 December 1946 who worked there for at least one day between 1964 and 1994. Fifty-eight histologically confirmed cases of primary lung cancer and 290 controls were selected from the cohort. Working life exposure histories to amphibole and chrysotile forms of asbestos were estimated separately. Airborne asbestos concentrations were low. For example, the arithmetic mean exposure to all forms of asbestos in the highest exposure period (1947-1971) was 1.2 f/cm(3). Chrysotile asbestos made up about 90% of this exposure (mean 1.1 f/cm(3)), whereas amphibole accounted for 10% (0.1 f/cm(3)). Comparing those above and below the 90 percentile of cumulative exposure, the odds ratios for all asbestos, chrysotile and amphibole were 1.5, 1.6 and 2.0, respectively, but confidence intervals were wide. There are only a few asbestos-lung cancer studies with high-quality exposure data and exposures in this low range. Though imprecise, the findings are important to the ongoing debate about asbestos risks. PMID:17351264

  15. Epidemiology study of the use of asbestos-cement pipe for the distribution of drinking water in Escambia County, Florida.

    OpenAIRE

    Millette, J R; Craun, G F; Stober, J A; Kraemer, D.F.; Tousignant, H G; Hildago, E; Duboise, R L; Benedict, J.

    1983-01-01

    Cancer mortality for the population census tracts of Escambia County, FL, which use asbestos-cement (AC) pipe for public potable water distribution, was compared with cancer mortality data collected from census tracts in the same county where other types of piping materials are used. An analysis of covariance was run to test for differences in standard mortality ratios for seven cancer sites among three potential asbestos exposure groups based on AC pipe usage. Twelve variables representing n...

  16. Mesothelioma incidence in the neighbourhood of an asbestos-cement plant located in a national priority contaminated site

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background. An epidemic of asbestos-related disease is ongoing in most industrialized countries, mainly attributable to past occupational exposure but partly due to environ-mental exposure. In this perspective, the incidence of pleural mesothelioma close to a former asbestos-cement plant in a national contaminated site was estimated. Methods. The census-tracts interested by atmospheric dispersion of facilities in the contaminated site were identified. Two subareas with different estimated env...

  17. [Lung cancer mortality in Casale Monferrato (Italy) and attributable risk to occupations in the asbestos-cement production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, C; Zanetti, R; Schiavo, D; Leporati, M; Botta, M

    1995-12-01

    The study presents mortality rates for lung cancer in the town of Casale Monferrato, where the largest Italian asbestos cement-plant was located. Cases of lung cancer dying in 1989-94 were exhaustively searched for in the register of deaths. Each case of lung cancer has been identified as ever or never employed in the factory with a linkage to the rosters of employees in the plant. Women were also identified as ever or never married to an asbestos-cement worker. The number of person-years at risk for asbestos cement workers and their wives was measured on the basis of the most recent follow-up. Mortality rates were computed separately for those exposed (workers and wives of workers) and for those with no evidence of exposure. Mortality rates for non-exposed were similar to rates in Piedmont (the region where Casale is located). The relative risk (ever exposed vs. never exposed) was 2.8 among men and 2.1 among women. Attributable risk among the exposed was 64.5% for men and 53.1% for women while among the general population it was 18.1% for men and 13.2% for women. The study confirms the dramatic effect of occupational asbestos exposure in Casale Monferrato but does not suggest an increase in lung cancer mortality among people with no occupational activity in the asbestos-cement production. PMID:8852083

  18. [Cancer morbidity risks among workers of asbestos-cement productions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagornaia, A M; Varivonchik, D V; Kundiev, Iu I; Fedorenko, Z P; Gorokh, E L; Gulak, L O; Vitte, P N; Karakashian, A N; Lepeshkina, T R; Martynovskaia, T Iu

    2008-01-01

    The retrospective assessment of morbidity rates and cancer pathology risks in workers of asbestosis-cement enterprises of Ukraine has been made. It was established that annual cancer morbidity among workers makes 88,1 per 100 000 of workers (RR = 0.26, CI 95 % 0.06-1.01). The most often cancer pathology was located in digestive organs (48.1%), respiratory organs (18.5%) (lung cancer--11.1%). The mesothelioma of pleura, peritoneum and pericardium were not found. The risks (odds ratio--OR) of cancer morbidity were increased for such organs as: respiratory organs (OR = 2.37), skin (OR = 1.78), digestive organs (OR = 1.34). PMID:18467971

  19. Mortality of workers in a French asbestos cement factory 1940-82.

    OpenAIRE

    Alies-Patin, A M; Valleron, A J

    1985-01-01

    The mortality of a complete cohort of 1506 French asbestos cement workers employed for at least five years is related to the time elapsed since first exposure. The mortality from all causes (analysed by the "man-years method") has been found to be above normal only in those subjects employed for more than 20 years, with more than 35 years of follow up. Standardised mortality ratios for cancers of all sites (ICD 140-209) and pulmonary cancer (ICD 162-163.0) have been assessed in subjects whose...

  20. Mortality and cancer morbidity in cohorts of asbestos cement workers and referents.

    OpenAIRE

    Albin, M; Jakobsson, K; Attewell, R; L. Johansson; Welinder, H

    1990-01-01

    Total and cause specific mortality and cancer morbidity were studied among 1929 asbestos cement workers with an estimated median cumulative exposure of 2.3 fibre (f)-years/ml (median intensity 1.2 f/ml, predominantly chrysotile). A local reference cohort of 1233 industrial workers and non-case referents from the exposed cohort were used for comparisons. The risk for pleural mesothelioma was significantly increased (13 cases out of 592 deaths in workers with at least 20 years latency). No case...

  1. Dust exposure and respiratory health effects in cement production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakooei, Hossein; Gholami, Abdollah; Ghasemkhani, Mehdi; Hosseini, Mostapha; Panahi, Davoud; Pouryaghoub, Golamreza

    2012-01-01

    Dust can be produced by almost all production processes in Portland cement factory. Dust exposure potentially can affect respiratory function. But evidence for respiratory effect of cement dust exposure has not been conclusive. In this study we assessed effect of cement dust exposure on respiratory function in a cement production factory. A respiratory symptoms questionnaire was completed and pulmonary function tests were carried out on 94 exposed and 54 non exposed workers at a cement factory in the east of Iran. Additionally, respirable dust level was determined by the gravimetric method. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique was performed to determine the silica phases and the SiO(2) contents of the bulk samples. The arithmetic means (AM) of personal respirable dust were 30.18 mg/m(3) in the crushing, 27 mg/m(3) in the packing, 5.4 mg/m(3) in the cement mill, 5.9 mg/m(3) in the kiln and 5.48 mg/m(3) in the maintenance that were higher than threshold limit value (TLV) of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) which is 5 mg/m(3). This value in the unexposed group was 0.93 mg/m(3). In this study cough, sputum, wheezing and dyspnea were more prevalent among exposed subjects. Exposed workers compared to the unexposed group showed significant reduction in Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV(1)), Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), and Forced Expiratory Flow between 25% and 75% of the FVC (FEF(25-75%)) (Pexposure and functional impairment among the cement factory workers. PMID:22359082

  2. Laying asbestos cement double jacket pipes DN 600 outgoing/DN 500 return - Wanit system in Muenster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttchereit, W.

    1982-05-01

    Using the example of Muenster, the author describes the laying of a district heating pipeline DN 400 (medium pipe) with asbestos cement jacket pipe DN 600 outgoing/DN500 return. He relates the peculiarities of the laying and the experiences acquired and quotes the laying costs. This district heating network consists of 50% asbestos cement pipelines; defects have not as yet occurred. The Wanit system has proved itself admirably in Muenster especially considering the narrow streets of the city's centre.

  3. Incidence of cancer and mortality among employees in the asbestos cement industry in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffn, E; Lynge, E; Juel, K; Korsgaard, B

    1989-01-01

    In a cohort study of the incidence of cancer and mortality among 7996 men and 584 women employed in the Danish asbestos cement industry between 1928 and 1984 over 99% were traced. Chrysotile asbestos was the only fibre type used until 1946, when amosite and (in 1952) crocidolite were also introduced. Chrysotile constituted 89%, amosite 10%, and crocidolite 1% of the asbestos used. During the first 25 years of manufacture the exposure levels were high, especially in areas where the asbestos was handled dry. Measurements from 1948 indicate that the fibre levels may have ranged from 100 to 1600 times over the present Danish threshold limit value of 0.5 fibre/ml. In 1973 more than 41% of personal samples were higher than 2 f/ml. About 76% of the workforce left the factory within five years of starting employment. A total of 1346 deaths and 612 cases of cancer were observed in the cohort between 1943 and 1984. Among employed men the overall mortality (O/E 1.18; 95% CI 1.12-1.25), cancer mortality (O/E 1.32; 95% CI 1.19-1.46), and overall incidence of cancer (O/E 1.22; 95% CI 1.12-1.32) were significantly increased compared with all Danish men. This was not so among employed women. For men, significant excess risks were found for cancer of the lung (O/E 1.80; 95% CI 1.54-2.10), pleura (O/E 5.46; 95% CI 2.62-10.05), mediastinum (O/E 5.00; 95% CI 1.01-14.61), stomach (O/E 1.43; 95% CI 1.03-1.93), and other male genital organs (O/E 3.03; 95% CI 1.11-6.60). The mortality was significantly increased for men for non-malignant pulmonary diseases (O/E 1.63; 95% CI 1.33-1.98). Among the group of asbestos cement workers with first employment 1928-40 an excess risk of laryngeal cancer was found (O/E 5.50;95% CI 1.77-12.82). A total of 12 cases of pleural and one of peritoneal mesotheliomas was observed when the original notification forms were reviewed for all patients with cancer in the cohort. PMID:2923830

  4. Mapping asbestos-cement roofing with the use of APEX hyperspectral airborne imagery: Karpacz area, Poland – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krówczyńska Małgorzata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Asbestos and asbestos containing products are harmful to human health, and therefore its use has been legally forbidden in the EU. Since there is no adequate data on the amount of asbestos-cement roofing in Poland, the objective of this study was to map asbestos-cement roofing with the use of hyperspectral APEX data (288 bands at the spatial resolution of 2.7 m in the Karpacz area (southwest Poland. A field survey constituted the basis for training and verification polygons in the classification process. A SAM classification method was performed with the following classification results: 62% producer’s accuracy, 73% user’s accuracy and an overall accuracy of 95%. The asbestos-cement roofing for buildings may be discriminated with a high classification accuracy with the use of hyperspectral imagery. The vast majority of the classified buildings were characterised by their small area (i.e. residential type buildings, which reduced the overall accuracy of the classification.

  5. Ventilatory decrements in former asbestos cement workers: a four year follow up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlson, C.G.; Bodin, L.; Rydman, T.; Hogstedt, C.

    1985-09-01

    A four year follow up of the ventilatory function in former asbestos cement workers has been performed to determine whether any further decrease occurred after cessation of exposure. Seventy five of 125 subjects were eligible for re-examination and were compared with local referents. None showed signs of asbestosis but 32% had pleural plaques at the renewed examination. Cumulative asbestos exposure calculated as fibre x years had been estimated individually in the original examination. After adjustment for age, height, tracheal area, and smoking category the FVC and FEV1 for all exposed subjects were on average 7% v 6% less than predicted from the referents and twice as much for the subjects with the highest exposure. The four year declines in FVC and FEV1 were larger than in the referents, significantly so for FEV1. There were no significant correlations between pleural plaque and ventilatory function after adjustment for exposure. Thus, the age adjusted reduction in ventilatory function had progressed during the follow up period despite the cessation of exposure and the lack of radiological signs of asbestosis.

  6. Structural testing of corrugated asbestos-cement roof panels at the Hanford Facilities, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a roof testing program that was carried out at the 105KE/KW Fuel Storage Basins and their surrounding facilities at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The roof panels were constructed in the mid 1950's of corrugated asbestos-cement (A/C), which showed common signs of aging. Based on the construction specifications, the panels capacity to meet current design standards was questioned. Both laboratory and in-situ load testing of the corrugated A/C panels was conducted. The objective of the complete test program was to determine the structural integrity of the existing A/C roof panels installed in the 105KE and 105KW facilities. The data from these tests indicated that the roofs are capable of resisting the design loads and are considered safe. A second phase test to address the roof resistance to personnel and roof removal/roofing system installation equipment was recommended and is underway

  7. Structural testing of corrugated asbestos-cement roof panels at the Hanford Facilities, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a roof testing program that was carried out at the 105KE/KW Spent Fuel Storage Basins and their surrounding facilities at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The roof panels were constructed in the mid 1950's of corrugated asbestos-cement (A/C), which showed common signs of aging. Based on the construction specifications, the panels capacity to meet current design standards was questioned. Both laboratory and in-situ load testing of the corrugated A/C panels was conducted. The objective of the complete test program was to determine the structural integrity of the existing A/C roof panels installed in the 105KE and 105KW facilities. The data from these tests indicated that the roofs are capable of resisting the design loads and are considered safe. A second phase test to address the roof resistance to personnel and roof removal/roofing system installation equipment was recommended and is underway

  8. Mortality of workers in a French asbestos cement factory 1940-82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alies-Patin, A.M.; Valleron, A.J.

    1985-04-01

    The mortality of a complete cohort of 1506 French asbestos cement workers employed for at least five years is related to the time elapsed since first exposure. The mortality from all causes (analysed by the man-years method) has been found to be above normal only in those subjects employed for more than 20 years, with more than 35 years of follow up. Standardized mortality ratios for cancers of all sites (ICD 140-209) and pulmonary cancer (ICD 162-163.0) have been assessed in subjects whose first exposure dates go back more than 20 years. Mortalities from cancer of all sites and from pulmonary cancer have been detected in excess in workers employed for more than 20 years and originally hired when aged 25 or under.

  9. Structural testing of corrugated asbestos-cement roof panels at the Hanford Facilities, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moustafa, S.E.; Rodehaver, S.M. [Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Frier, W.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report describes a roof testing program that was carried out at the 105KE/KW Spent Fuel Storage Basins and their surrounding facilities at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The roof panels were constructed in the mid 1950`s of corrugated asbestos-cement (A/C), which showed common signs of aging. Based on the construction specifications, the panels capacity to meet current design standards was questioned. Both laboratory and in-situ load testing of the corrugated A/C panels was conducted. The objective of the complete test program was to determine the structural integrity of the existing A/C roof panels installed in the 105KE and 105KW facilities. The data from these tests indicated that the roofs are capable of resisting the design loads and are considered safe. A second phase test to address the roof resistance to personnel and roof removal/roofing system installation equipment was recommended and is underway.

  10. Change of carcinogenic chrysotile fibers in the asbestos cement (eternit) to harmless waste by artificial carbonatization: Petrological and technological results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Carcinogenic chrysotile fibers in asbestos cement (eternit) are liquidated. ► Thermally modified eternit grist (at 650 °C, 1 h) reacts with CO2 + water. ► Carbonates hydromagnesite and magnesite are the newly formed products of artificial carbonatization. ► Neutralizing of extreme pH values (around 12) at large eternit dumps. ► An alternative methodology for permanent liquidation of a part of CO2 emissions. -- Abstract: Asbestos cement materials, mainly the eternit roof ceiling, being widely applied in the past, represent a serious environmental load. The solar radiation, rain and frost cause the deliberation of cement from the eternit roofing and consequently the wind contaminates the surrounding area by the asbestos (chrysotile) fibers. In combination with other carcinogens (e.g. smoking), or at reduced immunity of a man, they may cause serious respiratory diseases and lung cancer. The article presents the procedure and experimental results of artificial carbonatization, applied in the asbestos cement (eternit). The wet crushed and pulverized asbestos cement was thermally modified at 650 °C and then the chrysotile fibers easily and completely reacted with the mixture of CO2 and water, producing new Mg-rich carbonates – hydromagnesite and magnesite: 2Mg3Si2O5(OH)3thermallymodifiedchrysotile+5CO2+nH2O→Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2⋅4H2Ohydromagnesite+MgCO3magnesite+4SiO2 · nH2Oin amorphousphase;n=3÷9 Applying this methodology, the asbestos-bearing waste can be stabilized and environmentally friendly permanently deposited. Finding a way of neutralizing of extreme pH values (around 12) at large eternit dumps represents also an asset of presented research. Simultaneously, the artificial carbonatization of chrysotile asbestos, applying CO2, offers an alternative way for permanent liquidation of a part of industrial CO2 emissions, contributing to multiple benefit of this methodology

  11. Change of carcinogenic chrysotile fibers in the asbestos cement (eternit) to harmless waste by artificial carbonatization: Petrological and technological results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radvanec, Martin; Tuček, Ľubomír; Derco, Ján; Čechovská, Katarína [State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr, Mlynská dolina 1, SK-817 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Németh, Zoltán, E-mail: zoltan.nemeth@geology.sk [State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr, Mlynská dolina 1, SK-817 04 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Carcinogenic chrysotile fibers in asbestos cement (eternit) are liquidated. ► Thermally modified eternit grist (at 650 °C, 1 h) reacts with CO{sub 2} + water. ► Carbonates hydromagnesite and magnesite are the newly formed products of artificial carbonatization. ► Neutralizing of extreme pH values (around 12) at large eternit dumps. ► An alternative methodology for permanent liquidation of a part of CO{sub 2} emissions. -- Abstract: Asbestos cement materials, mainly the eternit roof ceiling, being widely applied in the past, represent a serious environmental load. The solar radiation, rain and frost cause the deliberation of cement from the eternit roofing and consequently the wind contaminates the surrounding area by the asbestos (chrysotile) fibers. In combination with other carcinogens (e.g. smoking), or at reduced immunity of a man, they may cause serious respiratory diseases and lung cancer. The article presents the procedure and experimental results of artificial carbonatization, applied in the asbestos cement (eternit). The wet crushed and pulverized asbestos cement was thermally modified at 650 °C and then the chrysotile fibers easily and completely reacted with the mixture of CO{sub 2} and water, producing new Mg-rich carbonates – hydromagnesite and magnesite: 2Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 3thermally} {sub modified} {sub chrysotile}+5CO{sub 2}+nH{sub 2}O→Mg{sub 5}(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}(OH){sub 2}⋅4H{sub 2}O{sub hydromagnesite}+MgCO{sub 3magnesite}+4SiO{sub 2} · nH{sub 2}O{sub in} a{sub morphous} {sub phase};n=3÷9 Applying this methodology, the asbestos-bearing waste can be stabilized and environmentally friendly permanently deposited. Finding a way of neutralizing of extreme pH values (around 12) at large eternit dumps represents also an asset of presented research. Simultaneously, the artificial carbonatization of chrysotile asbestos, applying CO{sub 2}, offers an alternative way for permanent liquidation of a part of

  12. Determinants influencing the amount of asbestos-cement roofing in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Wilk Ewa; Krówczyńska Małgorzata; Pabjanek Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Because of its harmfulness to human health, asbestos has been banned in 55 countries, including the EU. In Poland, the use and production of asbestos and asbestos-containing products has been forbidden since 1997. However, there is no precise data about the amount of asbestos-containing products to be eliminated from the territory of Poland. This survey aims to identify characteristics that have a significant impact on the estimation of asbestos-containing products used in Poland. Statistical...

  13. Mesothelioma incidence in the neighbourhood of an asbestos-cement plant located in a national priority contaminated site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Fazzo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An epidemic of asbestos-related disease is ongoing in most industrialized countries, mainly attributable to past occupational exposure but partly due to environmental exposure. In this perspective, the incidence of pleural mesothelioma close to a former asbestos-cement plant in a national contaminated site was estimated. METHODS: The census-tracts interested by atmospheric dispersion of facilities in the contaminated site were identified. Two subareas with different estimated environmental asbestos impact were distinguished. An ecological study at micro-geographic level was performed. The standardized incidence ratios (SIR for study area and the two subareas, in comparison with region and municipality were computed. The standardized incidence rate ratio (IRR between the two subareas was computed. RESULTS: Mesothelioma incidence in the study area was increased: 46 cases were observed with respect to 22.23 expected (SIR: 2.02. The increase was confirmed in analysis considering only the subjects without an occupationally exposure to asbestos: 19 cases among men (SIR = 2.48; 95% CI: 1.49-3.88; 11 case among women (SIR = 1.34; 95% CI: 0.67-2.40. The IRR between the two subareas is less than one in overall population considering all age-classes and of 3 fold (IRR = 3.14, 95% CI: 0.65-9.17 in the age-classes below 55 years. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate an increased incidence of pleural mesothelioma in the neighbourhood of asbestos-cement plant, and a possible etiological contribution of asbestos environmental exposure in detected risks.

  14. The Effect of Cement Dust on the Lung Function in a Cement Factory, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Ferasati

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at assessing cement dust exposure and its relationship to lung function at a Portland cement factory in Ilam, Iran. Lung function tests were carried out on 112 workers at the cement factory in 2008-09. Simultaneously 85 non exposed workers were used as control. Lung function tests were performed for all subjects. Additionally, total dust level was determined by the gravimetric method. Moreover, X-ray diffraction (XRD technique was performed to determine the SiO2 contents of the bulk samples. The arithmetic means (AM of personal total dust were higher in the crusher (27.49 mg/m3, packing (16.90 mg/m3, kiln (15.60 mg/m3, cement mill (13.07 mg/m3, raw mill (10.31 mg /m3 than in the maintenance (3.14 mg /m3, and administration (1.55 mg/m3. The geometrical mean (GM concentration was 12.12 mg/m3, which were considerably higher than occupational exposure limit (OEL of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH, which is 10 mg/m3. Based on the results, the probability of the long-term mean exposure exceeding to the OEL of 10 mg/m3 for total dust were higher in the kiln (100%, packing (100%, cement mill (90%, crusher (73%, raw mill (60% than in the maintenance (0%, and administration (2.3%. Ventiliatory function evaluation, as measured by the function parameters, showed that 35.7% of the exposed workers had abnormality in lung function compared with 5.7% of those unexposed. Statistical analysis of the data indicated that exposed workers compared to the unexposed groups showed significant reductions in Forced Expiratory Volume in one second percent (FEV1, Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, and FEV1/FVC (p< 0.05.

  15. Cancer of the lung, pleura, larynx and pharynx in an area with an asbestos-cement plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curin, K; Sarić, M

    1995-09-01

    Data on persons who died of cancer of the respiratory tract and pharynx in a Croatian coastal area with an asbestos-cement industry were collected and analysed for the period 1970-1990. Cancer mortality data were obtained from the Cancer Registry of Croatia. By the poll method, additional data on occupation, life style (smoking, alcohol drinking), length of residence in the area, educational level and cancer mortality among the relatives were obtained. The results of the investigation showed that the mortality rates for the lung, larynx and pharynx cancers, standardized according to age, were lower in the study area than expected (data for Croatia). Standardized mortality rates for mesothelioma were higher in the area under study for both sexes (except for women in the rural part of the area) than in Croatia. Within the study area the highest mortality rates for follow-up cancers were registered in the settlement where the asbestos-cement plant was located. Some settlements in two municipalities within the area also had higher mortality rates caused by these tumours in comparison with the rest of the study area or Croatia as a whole. In the evaluation of the obtained findings possible uneven distribution of emissions from the asbestos-cement plant caused by prevailing wind and air stream direction were considered. PMID:8645115

  16. The transformation sequence of cement-asbestos slates up to 1200 degrees C and safe recycling of the reaction product in stoneware tile mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, A F; Cavenati, C; Zanatto, I; Meloni, M; Elmi, G; Gualtieri, M Lassinantti

    2008-04-01

    Cement-asbestos is the main asbestos containing material still found in most of the European countries such as Italy. Man- and weathering-induced degradation of the cement-asbestos slates makes them a source of dispersion of asbestos fibres and represents a priority cause of concern. This concern is the main prompt for the actual policy of abatement and disposal of asbestos containing materials in controlled wastes. An alternative solution to the disposal in dumping sites is the direct temperature-induced transformation of the cement-asbestos slates into non-hazardous mineral phases. This patented process avoids the stage of mechanical milling of the material before the treatment, which improves the reactivity of the materials but may be critical for the dispersion of asbestos fibres in working and life environment. For the first time, this paper reports the description of the reaction path taking place during the firing of cement-asbestos slates up to the complete transformation temperature, 1200 degrees C. The reaction sequence was investigated using different experimental techniques such as optical and electron microscopy, in situ and ex situ quali-quantitative X-ray powder diffraction. The understanding of the complex reaction path is of basic importance for the optimization of industrial heating processes leading to a safe recycling of the transformed product. For the recycling of asbestos containing materials, the Italian laws require that the product of the crystal chemical transformation of asbestos containing materials must be entirely asbestos-free, and should not contain more than 0.1 wt% fraction of the carcinogenic substances such as cristobalite. Moreover, if fibrous phases other than asbestos (with length to diameter ratio >3) are found, they must have a geometrical diameter larger than 3 microm. We have demonstrated that using an interplay of different experimental techniques, it is possible to safely verify the complete transformation of asbestos

  17. The transformation sequence of cement-asbestos slates up to 1200 deg. C and safe recycling of the reaction product in stoneware tile mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cement-asbestos is the main asbestos containing material still found in most of the European countries such as Italy. Man- and weathering-induced degradation of the cement-asbestos slates makes them a source of dispersion of asbestos fibres and represents a priority cause of concern. This concern is the main prompt for the actual policy of abatement and disposal of asbestos containing materials in controlled wastes. An alternative solution to the disposal in dumping sites is the direct temperature-induced transformation of the cement-asbestos slates into non-hazardous mineral phases. This patented process avoids the stage of mechanical milling of the material before the treatment, which improves the reactivity of the materials but may be critical for the dispersion of asbestos fibres in working and life environment. For the first time, this paper reports the description of the reaction path taking place during the firing of cement-asbestos slates up to the complete transformation temperature, 1200 deg. C. The reaction sequence was investigated using different experimental techniques such as optical and electron microscopy, in situ and ex situ quali-quantitative X-ray powder diffraction. The understanding of the complex reaction path is of basic importance for the optimization of industrial heating processes leading to a safe recycling of the transformed product. For the recycling of asbestos containing materials, the Italian laws require that the product of the crystal chemical transformation of asbestos containing materials must be entirely asbestos-free, and should not contain more than 0.1 wt% fraction of the carcinogenic substances such as cristobalite. Moreover, if fibrous phases other than asbestos (with length to diameter ratio >3) are found, they must have a geometrical diameter larger than 3 μm. We have demonstrated that using an interplay of different experimental techniques, it is possible to safely verify the complete transformation of asbestos

  18. Recycling of the product of thermal inertization of cement-asbestos for various industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recycling of secondary raw materials is a priority of waste handling in the countries of the European community. A potentially important secondary raw material is the product of the thermal transformation of cement-asbestos, produced by prolonged annealing at 1200-1300 oC. The product is chemically comparable to a Mg-rich clinker. Previous work has assured the reliability of the transformation process. The current challenge is to find potential applications as secondary raw material. Recycling of thermally treated asbestos-containing material (named KRY.AS) in traditional ceramics has already been studied with successful results. The results presented here are the outcome of a long termed project started in 2005 and devoted to the recycling of this secondary raw materials in various industrial applications. KRY.AS can be added in medium-high percentages (10-40 wt%) to commercial mixtures for the production of clay bricks, rock-wool glasses for insulation as well as Ca-based frits and glass-ceramics for the production of ceramic tiles. The secondary raw material was also used for the synthesis of two ceramic pigments; a green uvarovite-based pigment [Ca3Cr2(SiO4)3] and a pink malayaite-based pigment [Ca(Sn,Cr)SiO5]. The latter is especially interesting as a substitute for cadmium-based pigments. This work also shows that KRY.AS can replace standard fillers in polypropylene plastics without altering the properties of the final product. For each application, a description and relevant results are presented and discussed.

  19. Incidence of lung cancer by histological type among asbestos cement workers in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffn, E; Lynge, E; Korsgaard, B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--A significant twofold increased risk of lung cancer was found among 8000 men employed in the Danish asbestos cement industry between 1928 and 1984. The histological pattern of 104 lung cancer cases was studied with the aim of evaluating a relation between specific morphological types, duration of employment, and time since first employment. METHODS--Age, sex, and calendar time specific incidence of morphological subtypes of lung cancer (adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, anaplastic carcinoma, and unspecified malignant tumour) for all Danish men were computed from 1943 to 1984, from data routinely collected by the Danish Cancer Registry. Person-years of observation were counted from 15 years after the date of first employment until date of diagnosis of cancer, death, emigration, or the end of follow up on 31 December 1984. Expected numbers of cases were computed by applying person-years at risk to the appropriate incidence rates. Observed numbers were distributed accordingly and the relative risk calculated. RESULTS--The relative risk for adenocarcinoma was 3.31 (observed (O) 24, expected (E) 7.26), for squamous cell carcinoma 1.67 (O, 37, E, 22.12), for anaplastic carcinoma 1.58 (O, 23, E, 14.53), and for unspecified malignant tumour 1.57 (O, 18, E, 11.46). An increased risk by duration of employment and time since first employment was most pronounced for adenocarcinoma. CONCLUSION--The link between adenocarcinoma and asbestos was confirmed in this, the first study of risk of lung cancer by histological category based on incident cancer cases for a whole population during a 50 year period. PMID:8431397

  20. Cement kiln dust: a potential feed ingredient for livestock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    Cement kiln dust (composition given) from a manufacturing plant in Georgia stimulated growth and improved feed efficiencies of steers provided a basal complete diet formulated to satisfy all known requirements. Carcasses of steers fed kiln dust had more fat over the ribs and a higher marbling score than controls; organ wts. were not different from controls. Reticulorumen pH was increased from 6.21 to 6.80 by the dust and the pH values of the abomasal. small-intestinal, and cecal contents were also increased. The ration containing kiln dust was higher in Pb, As, and Se than the control diet. Kidneys and livers from all steers contained no As or Hg; their Cd content was not affected by diet; kidneys of dust-fed steers had elevated, high-normal levels of Pb, but Pb of the liver was not affected; Se levels of kidney were elevated by feeding the dust, but the basal ration was marginal in Se, and no signs of Se toxicity were observed.

  1. A study of dose-response relationships for asbestos associated disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Finkelstein, M M

    1985-01-01

    The risk of an asbestos worker developing small irregular opacities on the chest radiograph is related to cumulative exposure to asbestos dust, latency, and smoking habit. In this study the use of residence-time weighted exposure as a "dose metric" was explored in a cohort of asbestos cement workers. It was found that this parameter, which incorporates both exposure concentration and latency, is useful for modelling the risk of small opacities and might also be useful for modelling the risk o...

  2. Emission of airborne fibers from mechanically impacted asbestos-cement sheets and concentration of fibrous aerosol in the home environment in Upper Silesia, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszka, Jozef S

    2009-03-15

    The emission rate ((S)) of fibers released from asbestos-cement plates due to mechanical impact was determined experimentally. The emission rate has been defined as a number of fibers (F) emitted from a unit area (m(2)) due to the unit impact energy (J). For fiber longer than 5 microm the obtained surface emission factor for asbestos-cement slabs slightly increased with deteriorating surface, changing from 2.7 x 10(3) F/(m(2)J) for samples with a very good surface to 6.9 x 10(3) F/(m(2)J) for the sample with worn surface (in the SI system the emission rate unit should be (m(-2)J(-1))). The emission rate for short fibers (L asbestos-cement sheets and 280 F/m(3) in the homes without asbestos-containing facades, located away from other asbestos sources. Although the laboratory and field measurements have been made by using the MIE Laser Fiber Monitor FM-7400 only, the obtained results indicate that the outdoor asbestos-cement building facades are significant sources of airborne fibers inside the dwellings in Upper Silesian towns. PMID:18692307

  3. Health hazards from fine asbestos dusts. An analysis of 70,656 occupational preventive medical investigations from 1973 to the end of 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, H J; Weltle, D; Bohlig, H; Valentin, H

    1989-01-01

    For the period from 1973 to the end of 1986, 70,656 data sets on occupational preventive medical examinations in employees exposed occupationally to asbestos dust (G 1.2) were made available to us by the Central Registry for Employees Exposed to Asbestos Dust (ZAS). On the basis of this data, an analysis of asbestosis risk was to be made in relation to specific areas of work, taking into consideration the beginning and duration of exposure. Proceedings for declaratory appraisal in accordance with occupational disease no. 4103 were instituted in 1760 cases in the report period. In accordance with the character of the available data, the X-ray findings in the lungs were available from the persons investigated as parameters of possible asbestosis risk on the basis of coding consistent with the International Pneumoconiosis Classification (ILO U/C 1971 and/or ILO 1980 West Germany). The major result of the statistical analyses on the mainframe macrocomputer of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg was that the relatively highest risk of asbestosis was present in persons whose exposure began before 1955. On the other hand, with increasing duration of exposure, an unequivocal rise of the asbestosis risk could not be detected on the basis of the overall population. In relation to the individual fields of work, the relatively highest risk of asbestosis was shown to be in the asbestos textile and paper industry, as well as in the asbestos cement industry. No detectable risk of asbestosis was present in the fields of mining, traffic and health service and for women in the industrial sectors of building material, gas and water, catering trade, building, commerce as well as banking and insurance. Accordingly, it can be assumed that certain fields of work are or were exposed to such a small extent or not at all that a risk of asbestosis which is relevant in terms of occupational medicine is no longer to be assumed or was not to be assumed. This applies above all to certain work

  4. Asbestos-cement panels test report, 100K Area, Hanford, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moustafa, S.E. [Wiss, Janney, Elstner and Associates, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The 105KE/105KW reactor facilities were constructed in the mid-1950s. The 105KE/105KW fuel-basin roof panels are in a radiation controlled area where there is smearable contamination. The roof panels in all of the inspected areas were constructed from corrugated asbestos-cement (A/C) panels. The corrugated A/C roof panels exhibit common signs of aging including cracking, chipping, spalling, or a combination of these processes. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has engaged Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc. (WJE) to perform laboratory and field tests on A/C roof panels of the 105KW building and also to make recommendations for panel replacement, maintenance, or upgrade that will maintain the structural integrity of the roof panels for an additional 20 years of service. This report contains the results of laboratory and in-situ testing performed by WJE. A Roof Proof Load Test Plan was prepared for WJE and approved by WHC. Conclusions and recommendations based on test results are presented for the 190-KE wall panels and 105KW roof panels.

  5. Hydrothermal Characteristics of Blended Cement Pastes Containing Silica Sand Using Cement Kiln Dust as an Activator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The hydrothermal reactivity of silica sand was studied using cement kiln dust (CKD) as an activator in addition to the Portlandcement fraction of El-Karnak cement (a blend of ordinary Portland cement and ground sand). Autoclaved El-Karnak cementpastes were studied at pressures of 0.507, 1.013 and 1.520 MPa of saturated steam with respect to their compressive strength,kinetics of hydrothermal reaction and the phase composition of the formed hydrates. The role of CKD in affecting thephysicochemical and mechanical properties of El-Karnak cement pastes was studied by autoclaving of several pastes containing5, 7.5, 10 and 20% CKD at a pressure of 1.013 MPa of saturated steam. CKD was added either as a raw CKD (unwashed) orafter washing with water (washed CKD). The results of these physicochemical studies obtained could be related as much aspossible to the role of CKD (raw or washed) in affecting the hydrothermal reactivity of silica sand in El-Karnak cement pastes.

  6. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL THROUGH KILN RECYCLING BY-PASS DUST IN A CEMENT FACTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mohsenzadeh, J. Nouri, A. Ranjbar, M. Mohammadian Fazli, A. A. Babaie

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is a major problem in the industrial areas. Cement dust is one of the important environmental pollutants. In this study the possibility of dust recycling especially kiln dust which has significant importance regarding air pollution in the cement plant, was examined. Tehran cement factory is one of the most important Iranian factories which is located in Tehran. This factory produces high volume of pollutants that are released to in environment. The possibility of reusing of kiln by pass returned dust has been examined in this factory. Different percentages of kiln by-pass dust of this factory were added to products and outcomes of its presence in parameters such as chemical compound, granulation, primary and final catch time, volume expansion, consumed water and resistance of mortar were surveyed. The result indicated that by adding the amounts of 3-8 dust the mortar resistance increase, but adding more than 15%, the mortar resistance has been decreased. Survey in consumed water proved that adding dust to cement, the trend for consuming water is decreased. After dust addition dust, primary and final catch time were compared in different samples and data which showed decrease in dust added samples. Cements with dust added showed increase in auto clave expansion. Overally, results proved that, the best percentage rate of dust addition to the cement was 15%.

  7. The use of EAF dust in cement composites: assessment of environmental impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Tina; Milacic, Radmila; Murko, Simona; Vahcic, Mitja; Mladenovic, Ana; Suput, Jerneja Strupi; Scancar, Janez

    2009-07-15

    Electric arc filter dust (EAF dust) is a waste by-product which occurs in the production of steel. Instead of being disposed of, it can be used in cement composites for civil engineering, and for balances in washing machines. To estimate the environmental impact of the use of EAF dust in cement composites leachability tests based on diffusion were performed using water and salt water as leaching agents. Compact and ground cement composites, and cement composites with addition of 1.5% of EAF dust by mass were studied. The concentrations of total Cr and Cr(VI) were determined in leachates over a time period of 175 days. At the end of the experiment the concentrations of some other metals were also determined in leachates. The results indicated that Cr in leachates was present almost solely in its hexavalent form. No leaching of Cr(VI) was observed in aqueous leachates from compact cement composites and compact cement composites to which different quantities of EAF dust have been added. In ground cement composites and in ground cement composites with addition of EAF dust, Cr(VI) was leached with water in very low concentrations up to 5 microg L(-1). Cr(VI) concentrations were higher in salt water leachates. In compact and ground cement composites with addition of EAF dust Cr(VI) concentrations were 40 and 100 microg L(-1), respectively. It was experimentally found that addition of EAF dust had almost no influence on leaching of Cr(VI) from cement composites. Leaching of Cr(VI) originated primarily from cement. Leaching of other metals from composites investigated did not represent an environmental burden. From the physico-mechanical and environmental aspects EAF dust can be used as a component in cement mixtures.

  8. Asbestos and health in the Third World: the case of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, D M

    1986-01-01

    Almost all of the asbestos used in Brazil is mined by an enterprise wholly owned by two European multinational companies, which also produce and market over two-thirds (by weight of asbestos) of the products made from asbestos. About 80 percent of the asbestos used in Brazil is finally consumed in the form of asbestos cement: for roof tiles and roofing panels, wall-board, and domestic and industrial water tanks. A survey of consumer literature and advertising printed by Eternit, S.A., and Brasilit, S.A., disclosed no mention of a potential danger from exposure to asbestos dust, and no recommendations for cutting down exposure to that dust. The situation at smaller, Brazilian-owned firms is reputed to be disastrous from the standpoint of workers' exposure to asbestos dust at the point of production. At a large asbestos-cement manufacturing plant owned by Eternit, however, exposure to asbestos dust (according to company records) seemed to be kept under 2.0 fibers per cc., the present standard for the United States.

  9. Epidemiology study of the use of asbestos-cement pipe for the distribution of drinking water in Escambia County, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millette, J.R.; Craun, G.F.; Stober, J.A.; Kraemer, D.F.; Tousignant, H.G.

    1983-11-01

    Cancer mortality for the population census tracts of Escambia County, Florida was compared with cancer mortality data collected from census tracts elsewhere within the same county. In the first group asbestos-cement (AC) pipe was used for public potable water distribution. In the second group other types of piping material are used. The differences in standard mortality ratios for seven cancer sites among three potential asbestos exposure groups based on the AC pipe usage was tested using an analysis of covariance. Twelve variables representing nonexposure-related influences on disease rates were combined in four independent factors and used as covariates in these analyses. To the level of sensitivity imposed by the limitations of the study no evidence was found for an association between the use of AC pipe for carrying drinking water and deaths due to gastrointestinal and related cancers in Escambia County, Florida. 15 references, 2 figures, 7 tables.

  10. Epidemiology study of the use of asbestos-cement pipe for the distribution of drinking water in Escambia County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millette, J R; Craun, G F; Stober, J A; Kraemer, D F; Tousignant, H G; Hildago, E; Duboise, R L; Benedict, J

    1983-01-01

    Cancer mortality for the population census tracts of Escambia County, FL, which use asbestos-cement (AC) pipe for public potable water distribution, was compared with cancer mortality data collected from census tracts in the same county where other types of piping materials are used. An analysis of covariance was run to test for differences in standard mortality ratios for seven cancer sites among three potential asbestos exposure groups based on AC pipe usage. Twelve variables representing nonexposure-related influences on disease rates were combined in four independent factors and used as covariates in these analyses. No evidence for an association between the use of AC pipe for carrying drinking water and deaths due to gastrointestinal and related cancers was found. The limitations on the sensitivity of the analysis are discussed. PMID:6559131

  11. Frequency of sister chromatid exchange and chromosomal aberrations in asbestos cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma, N; Jain, A. K.; Rahman, Q

    1991-01-01

    Exposure to asbestos minerals has been associated with a wide variety of adverse health effects including lung cancer, pleural mesothelioma, and cancer of other organs. It was shown previously that asbestos samples collected from a local asbestos factory enhanced sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosomal aberrations in vitro using human lymphocytes. In the present study, 22 workers from the same factory and 12 controls were further investigated. Controls were matched for age, sex, and...

  12. Partial Replacement of Cement with Marble Dust Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Ranjan Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The waste generated from the industries cause environmental problems. Hence the reuse of this waste material can be emphasized. MarbleDust Powder (MDP is a developing composite materialthatwillallow the concrèteindustry to optimisemateriel use, generateeconomicbenefits and build structures thatwillstrong, durable and sensitive to environnement. MDP is by-product obtained during the quarrying process from the parent marble rock; which contains high calcium oxide content of more than 50%. The potential use of MDP can be an ideal choice for substituting in a cementitious binder as the reactivity efficiency increases due to the presence of lime. In this research work, the waste MDP passing through 90 microns,has used for investigating of hardened concrete properties. Furthermore, the effect of different percentage replacement of MDP on the compressive strength, splitting tensile strength (indirect tensile strength&flexural strength has been observed. Inthis experimental study, the effect of MDP in concrete on strength ispresented. Five concrete mixtures containing 0%, 5%, 10%, and 20% MDP as cement replacement by weightbasis has been prepared. Water/cement ratio (0.43 was kept constant, in all the concretemixes. Compressive strength, split tensile strength & flexural strength of the concrete mixtures has been obtainedat 7 and 28 days. The results of the laboratory work showed thatreplacement of cement with MDP increase, upto 10% for compressive strength,&upto 15% for split tensilestrength &flexural strength of concrete.

  13. Current Problems Involving the Dismantle of Asbestos- Cement Sheets in Buildings. The Case of Central Market in Alicante

    OpenAIRE

    Sirvent Pérez, César Daniel; Piedecausa García, Beatriz; Mateo García, Mónica; Pérez Carramiñana, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The project and the works described in this article mainly deal with the removal of the current asbestos-cement covering of the roof of the Central Market in Alicante and its replacement with zinc diamond-shaped scales, similar to the originals which were implemented in 1921 when the building was put into service. These upgrades were necessary to avoid the causes (and consequences) of rainwater infiltration, as described in an earlier report in 2006, also drafted by the author of this article...

  14. Recycling of water from manufacturing of asbestos/cement panels and pipes. Monograph; Fabrication de panneaux et tuyaux en amiante-ciment avec recyclage des eaux de process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-07-15

    The company manufactures asbestos-cement panels and pipes and recycles the water used in the process. The asbestos and the cement are mixed in water. The resulting mixture is placed on a cloth rolling at high speed, is drained and forms a thin layer that serves as a base for the panels and pipes. The water drained off in both processes is decanted twice. The residue from the first decanting is recycled; that from the second is also recycled in the low pollution process, while it is discharged in the standard process.

  15. Stabilization/solidification of selenium-impacted soils using Portland cement and cement kiln dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Grubb, Dennis G; Reilly, Trevor L

    2009-09-15

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) processes were utilized to immobilize selenium (Se) as selenite (SeO(3)(2-)) and selenate (SeO(4)(2-)). Artificially contaminated soils were prepared by individually spiking kaolinite, montmorillonite and dredged material (DM; an organic silt) with 1000 mg/kg of each selenium compound. After mellowing for 7 days, the Se-impacted soils were each stabilized with 5, 10 and 15% Type I/II Portland cement (P) and cement kiln dust (C) and then were cured for 7 and 28 days. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the S/S treatments. At 28 days curing, P doses of 10 and 15% produced five out of six TCLP-Se(IV) concentrations below 10mg/L, whereas only the 15% C in DM had a TCLP-Se(IV) concentration pozzolan doses up to 10 times less than the treatments that established the BDAT. Neither pozzolan was capable of reducing the TCLP-Se(VI) concentrations below 25mg/L. Se-soil-cement slurries aged for 30 days enabled the identification of Se precipitates by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). XRD and SEM-EDX analyses of the Se(IV)- and Se(VI)-soil-cement slurries revealed that the key selenium bearing phases for all three soil-cement slurries were calcium selenite hydrate (CaSeO(3).H(2)O) and selenate substituted ettringite (Ca(6)Al(2)(SeO(4))(3)(OH)(12).26H(2)O), respectively.

  16. Stabilization/solidification of selenium-impacted soils using Portland cement and cement kiln dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Deok Hyun, E-mail: dmoon10@hotmail.com [W.M. Keck Geoenvironmental Laboratory, Center for Environmental Systems, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Department of Environmental Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Grubb, Dennis G. [W.M. Keck Geoenvironmental Laboratory, Center for Environmental Systems, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Schnabel Engineering, LLC, 510 East Gay Street, West Chester, PA 19380 (United States); Reilly, Trevor L. [W.M. Keck Geoenvironmental Laboratory, Center for Environmental Systems, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) processes were utilized to immobilize selenium (Se) as selenite (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) and selenate (SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}). Artificially contaminated soils were prepared by individually spiking kaolinite, montmorillonite and dredged material (DM; an organic silt) with 1000 mg/kg of each selenium compound. After mellowing for 7 days, the Se-impacted soils were each stabilized with 5, 10 and 15% Type I/II Portland cement (P) and cement kiln dust (C) and then were cured for 7 and 28 days. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the S/S treatments. At 28 days curing, P doses of 10 and 15% produced five out of six TCLP-Se(IV) concentrations below 10 mg/L, whereas only the 15% C in DM had a TCLP-Se(IV) concentration <10 mg/L. Several treatments satisfied the USEPA TCLP best demonstrated available technology (BDAT) limits (5.7 mg/L) for selenium at pozzolan doses up to 10 times less than the treatments that established the BDAT. Neither pozzolan was capable of reducing the TCLP-Se(VI) concentrations below 25 mg/L. Se-soil-cement slurries aged for 30 days enabled the identification of Se precipitates by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). XRD and SEM-EDX analyses of the Se(IV)- and Se(VI)-soil-cement slurries revealed that the key selenium bearing phases for all three soil-cement slurries were calcium selenite hydrate (CaSeO{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O) and selenate substituted ettringite (Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH){sub 12}.26H{sub 2}O), respectively.

  17. Effect of Duration of Exposure to Cement Dust on Respiratory Function of Non-Smoking Cement Mill Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Al-Drees, Abdul Majeed; Al Masri, Abeer A.; Al Rouq, Fawzia; Azeem, Muhammad Abdul

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of long term exposure to cement dust on lung function in non-smoking cement mill workers. This is a cross-sectional study of respiratory functions. Spirometry was performed in 100 apparently healthy volunteers; 50 non-smoking cement mill workers and 50 non-smoking un-exposed subjects. Based on the duration of exposure, cement mill workers were divided into three groups, less than 5, 5–10 and greater than 10 years. All subjects were individually matched for age, height, weight, and socioeconomic status. Pulmonary function test was performed by using an electronic spirometer. Significant reduction was observed in the mean values of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1), Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Maximal Voluntary Ventilation in cement mill workers who had been working in the cement industry for more than 10 years compared to their matched un-exposed group. Lung functions in cement mill workers were significantly impaired and results show a long term duration response effect of years of exposure to cement dust on lung functions. PMID:23325026

  18. Effect of Duration of Exposure to Cement Dust on Respiratory Function of Non-Smoking Cement Mill Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia Al Rouq

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of long term exposure to cement dust on lung function in non-smoking cement mill workers. This is a cross-sectional study of respiratory functions. Spirometry was performed in 100 apparently healthy volunteers; 50 non-smoking cement mill workers and 50 non-smoking un-exposed subjects. Based on the duration of exposure, cement mill workers were divided into three groups, less than 5, 5–10 and greater than 10 years. All subjects were individually matched for age, height, weight, and socioeconomic status. Pulmonary function test was performed by using an electronic spirometer. Significant reduction was observed in the mean values of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1, Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF and Maximal Voluntary Ventilation in cement mill workers who had been working in the cement industry for more than 10 years compared to their matched un-exposed group. Lung functions in cement mill workers were significantly impaired and results show a long term duration response effect of years of exposure to cement dust on lung functions.

  19. Effect of Heavy Metal Present in Cement Dust on Soil and Plants of Nokha (Bikaner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.(Mrs.Suruchi Gupta

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In Nokha(Bikaner cement industries emittes cement dust in nearby farmers fields. In these industries cement dust emitted contains traces of hexavalent chromium and lead well above permissible limit in area under investigation. However, cadmium and nickel were found below limits prescribed. To analyse heavy metals viz, Cr+6, lead, Cadmium and nickel one hundred and twenty samples were collected from four directions on surface and 20 cm depth, and analyzed on atomic absorption spectrophotometer. From the above study it is clear that in case of Sarvottam cement works only lead content was higher in all directions and depths than other two plants. At tiger and Nokha cement works contamination of lead was more over limited in the first 1 km except in east direction. Mobility of lead was relatively more on top soil than 20cm depth. Hexavalent chromium content in south western direction was more for Nokha cement. Whereas, it was more in east direction in case of tiger cement. This indicated influence of prevailing direction of wind on distribution of heavy metals present in cement dust.Heavy metal toxicity results in reduction in plant height, burning of leaf margins and tip, slow leaf growth and over all wilting of Prosopis cineraria, Pearlmillet and clusterbean plants, when this metal deposits in Human body results in genetic disorders. Electrostatic precipitator can be installed to reduce the cement dust emission.

  20. Cement Dust Exposure and Perturbations in Some Elements and Lung and Liver Functions of Cement Factory Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egbe Edmund Richard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cement dust inhalation is associated with deleterious health effects. The impact of cement dust exposure on the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR, liver function, and some serum elements in workers and residents near cement factory were assessed. Methods. Two hundred and ten subjects (50 workers, 60 residents, and 100 controls aged 18–60 years were studied. PEFR, liver function {aspartate and alanine transaminases (AST and ALT and total and conjugated bilirubin (TB and CB}, and serum elements {lead (Pb, copper (Cu, manganese (Mn, iron (Fe, cadmium (Cd, selenium (Se, chromium (Cr, zinc (Zn, and arsenic (As} were determined using peak flow meter, colorimetry, and atomic absorption spectrometry, respectively. Data were analysed using ANOVA and correlation at p=0.05. Results. The ALT, TB, CB, Pb, As, Cd, Cr, Se, Mn, and Cu were significantly higher and PEFR, Fe, and Zn lower in workers and residents compared to controls (p<0.05. Higher levels of ALT, AST, and Fe and lower levels of Pb, Cd, Cr, Se, Mn, and Cu were seen in cement workers compared to residents (p<0.05. Negative correlation was observed between duration of exposure and PEFR (r=-0.416, p=0.016 in cement workers. Conclusions. Cement dust inhalation may be associated with alterations in serum elements levels and lung and liver functions while long term exposure lowers peak expiratory flow rate.

  1. A New Kind of Eco-Cement Made of Cement Kiln Dust and Granular Blast Furnace Slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A research project was conducted to manufacture eco-cement for sustainable development using cement kiln dust( CKD ) and granular blast furnace slag( GBFS ).In the project, the burning process and mineral compositions of CKD clinker were investigated.Dife rent mineralizers such as CaSO4 and CaF2 , sulfur and alkali content were considered.The strength of CKD and GBFS eco-cement were evaluated.The results indicate the CKD clinker can not only form ordinary cement clinker minerals such as C3 S, C2 S and C4 AF, but also form strength to the Portland cement grade 32.5 when blend proportion is properly applied.

  2. Impact of cement dust pollution on Cedrela fissilis Vell. (Meliaceae): A potential bioindicator species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Silva, Advanio Inácio; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão; Modolo, Luzia Valentina; Lemos-Filho, José Pires; Paiva, Elder Antonio Sousa

    2016-09-01

    Considering the impacts caused to vegetation in the vicinity of cement factories, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impacts of cement dust on the structural organization and physiological/biochemical traits of Cedrela fissilis leaflets, a woody species native to tropical America. Plants were exposed to 2.5 or 5 mg cm-2 cement dust applied to the leaf surface, to the soil or simultaneously to the leaf surface and the soil.. Leaves of shoot-treated plants exhibited chlorosis, marginal and inter veins necrosis, diminished thickness, epidermal cells less turgid, cellular collapse, obstructed stomata, senescence, rolling and some abscission. In few cases, individual death was recorded. Cement dust-treated plants also presented decreased amount of photosynthetic pigments and iron (Fe) and increase in calcium (Ca) levels. The cement crust formed in leaves surface blocked from 30 to 50% of the incoming light and reduced the stomatal conductance and the potential quantum yield of photosystem II. Control or soil-treated plants did not exhibit morphophysiological changes throughout the experiment. The activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase increased in leaves of plants upon treatment with 2.5 mg cm(-2) cement dust, independent of the site application. Overall, these results indicate that C. fissilis is highly sensitive to cement dust at the initial stage of development.

  3. Impact of cement dust pollution on Cedrela fissilis Vell. (Meliaceae): A potential bioindicator species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Silva, Advanio Inácio; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão; Modolo, Luzia Valentina; Lemos-Filho, José Pires; Paiva, Elder Antonio Sousa

    2016-09-01

    Considering the impacts caused to vegetation in the vicinity of cement factories, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impacts of cement dust on the structural organization and physiological/biochemical traits of Cedrela fissilis leaflets, a woody species native to tropical America. Plants were exposed to 2.5 or 5 mg cm-2 cement dust applied to the leaf surface, to the soil or simultaneously to the leaf surface and the soil.. Leaves of shoot-treated plants exhibited chlorosis, marginal and inter veins necrosis, diminished thickness, epidermal cells less turgid, cellular collapse, obstructed stomata, senescence, rolling and some abscission. In few cases, individual death was recorded. Cement dust-treated plants also presented decreased amount of photosynthetic pigments and iron (Fe) and increase in calcium (Ca) levels. The cement crust formed in leaves surface blocked from 30 to 50% of the incoming light and reduced the stomatal conductance and the potential quantum yield of photosystem II. Control or soil-treated plants did not exhibit morphophysiological changes throughout the experiment. The activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase increased in leaves of plants upon treatment with 2.5 mg cm(-2) cement dust, independent of the site application. Overall, these results indicate that C. fissilis is highly sensitive to cement dust at the initial stage of development. PMID:27243585

  4. [Cause-specific mortality of asbestos-cement workers compensated for asbestosis in the city of Bari].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, S; Bruno, C; Comba, P; Grignoli, M

    1998-01-01

    The cause-specific mortality of 233 asbestos cement workers employed by the Fibronit company in Bari and compensated for asbestosis was investigated. Cohort members were enrolled on 31.12.1979 and followed through 30.4.1997; follow-up was completed for 98.3% of study subjects, and causes of death were ascertained for 96.6% of deceased subjects. Observed mortality was contrasted to that expected according to cause-sex-age- and calendar time-specific rates of the population resident in the Apulia Region. All causes observed mortality exceeded expected value (SMR: 117, 87 observed), due to a significant' increase in pneumoconiosis (SMR: 11238, 14 observed) and malignant neoplasms (SMR: 163, 38 observed)). A significant decrease of circulatory diseases was found (SMR: 64, 18 observed). Among cancer deaths, the following sites showed a significant excess: lung (SMR: 206, 17 observed), pleura (SMR: 2551, 4 observed), mediastinum (SMR: 2367, 2 observed) and peritoneum (SMR: 2877, 2 observed). The excess mortality due to asbestosis, respiratory cancer and peritoned neoplasms can be causally attributed to occupational asbestos exposure. PMID:9621499

  5. Carbon dioxide sequestration in cement kiln dust through mineral carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntzinger, Deborah N; Gierke, John S; Kawatra, S Komar; Eisele, Timothy C; Sutter, Lawrence L

    2009-03-15

    Carbon sequestration through the formation of carbonates is a potential means to reduce CO2 emissions. Alkaline industrial solid wastes typically have high mass fractions of reactive oxides that may not require preprocessing, making them an attractive source material for mineral carbonation The degree of mineral carbonation achievable in cement kiln dust (CKD) underambienttemperatures and pressures was examined through a series of batch and column experiments. The overall extent and potential mechanisms and rate behavior of the carbonation process were assessed through a complementary set of analytical and empirical methods, including mass change, thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The carbonation reactions were carried out primarily through the reaction of CO2 with Ca(OH)2, and CaCO3 was observed as the predominant carbonation product. A sequestration extent of over 60% was observed within 8 h of reaction without any modifications to the waste. Sequestration appears to follow unreacted core model theory where reaction kinetics are controlled by a first-order rate constant at early times; however, as carbonation progresses, the kinetics of the reaction are attenuated by the extent of the reaction due to diffusion control, with the extent of conversion never reaching completion. PMID:19368202

  6. Evaluation of the Webler-Brown model for estimating tetrachloroethylene exposure from vinyl-lined asbestos-cement pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heeren Timothy C

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From May 1968 through March 1980, vinyl-lined asbestos-cement (VL/AC water distribution pipes were installed in New England to avoid taste and odor problems associated with asbestos-cement pipes. The vinyl resin was applied to the inner pipe surface in a solution of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE. Substantial amounts of PCE remained in the liner and subsequently leached into public drinking water supplies. Methods Once aware of the leaching problem and prior to remediation (April-November 1980, Massachusetts regulators collected drinking water samples from VL/AC pipes to determine the extent and severity of the PCE contamination. This study compares newly obtained historical records of PCE concentrations in water samples (n = 88 with concentrations estimated using an exposure model employed in epidemiologic studies on the cancer risk associated with PCE-contaminated drinking water. The exposure model was developed by Webler and Brown to estimate the mass of PCE delivered to subjects' residences. Results The mean and median measured PCE concentrations in the water samples were 66 and 0.5 μg/L, respectively, and the range extended from non-detectable to 2432 μg/L. The model-generated concentration estimates and water sample concentrations were moderately correlated (Spearman rank correlation coefficient = 0.48, p Conclusion PCE concentration estimates generated using the Webler-Brown model were moderately correlated with measured water concentrations. The present analysis suggests that the exposure assessment process used in prior epidemiological studies could be improved with more accurate characterization of water flow. This study illustrates one method of validating an exposure model in an epidemiological study when historical measurements are not available.

  7. Characterization and utilization of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) as partial replacements of Portland cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Om Shervan

    The characteristics of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) and their effects as partial replacement of Portland Cement (PC) were studied in this research program. The cement industry is currently under pressure to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and solid by-products in the form of CKDs. The use of CKDs in concrete has the potential to substantially reduce the environmental impact of their disposal and create significant cost and energy savings to the cement industry. Studies have shown that CKDs can be used as a partial substitute of PC in a range of 5--15%, by mass. Although the use of CKDs is promising, there is very little understanding of their effects in CKD-PC blends. Previous studies provide variable and often conflicting results. The reasons for the inconsistent results are not obvious due to a lack of material characterization data. The characteristics of a CKD must be well-defined in order to understand its potential impact in concrete. The materials used in this study were two different types of PC (normal and moderate sulfate resistant) and seven CKDs. The CKDs used in this study were selected to provide a representation of those available in North America from the three major types of cement manufacturing processes: wet, long-dry, and preheater/precalciner. The CKDs have a wide range of chemical and physical composition based on different raw material sources and technologies. Two fillers (limestone powder and quartz powder) were also used to compare their effects to that of CKDs at an equivalent replacement of PC. The first objective of this study was to conduct a comprehensive composition analysis of CKDs and compare their characteristics to PC. CKDs are unique materials that must be analyzed differently from PC for accurate chemical and physical analysis. The present study identifies the chemical and physical analytical methods that should be used for CKDs. The study also introduced a method to quantify the relative abundance of the different

  8. The effect of various types of cement dust on sulphur dioxide oxidation in the air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadjić, V; Gentilizza, M; Halle, R

    1988-07-01

    The effect of various types of cement dust on the behaviour of sulphur dioxide in the air was investigated on model systems in different experimental conditions.Experiments were carried out with PC-15z-45s (Portland-blast furnace cement containing 15% blast furnace slag), PC-25p-35s (Portland-pozzolan cement containing 25% pozzolan) and EFD (electrofilter dust).EFD most effectively removed SO2 from the air stream. The next efficacious was PC-15z-45s, whereas PC-25p-35s was the least efficient. The efficacy of cement dusts for SO2 removal from the air stream depended on their chemical and granulometric composition and in particular on the size of specific surface.The rate of reaction was also influenced by experimental conditions-relative humidity, the length of contact, that is, the flow rate of gaseous mixture through the reactor, and the amount of cement dust.The experimental data show that in the contact between SO2 and cement dust catalytic oxidation of SO2 to sulphates takes place. Sulphates remain bound to the surface, from which they cannot be thermally desorbed, but can be released by extraction in the Soxhlet apparatus.

  9. Ecophysiological and ultrastructural effects of dust pollution in lichens exposed around a cement plant (SW Slovakia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Luca; Guttová, Anna; Grassi, Alice; Lackovičová, Anna; Senko, Dušan; Sorbo, Sergio; Basile, Adriana; Loppi, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    The study investigated the ecophysiological and ultrastructural effects of dust pollution from a cement industry in the lichen species Evernia prunastri and Xanthoria parietina, which were exposed for 30, 90 and 180 days around a cement mill, two quarries, and inhabited and agricultural sites in SW Slovakia. The results showed that dust deposition from quarrying activities and cement works at the cement mill (mainly enriched in Ca, Fe and Ti) significantly affected the photosynthetic apparatus of E. prunastri (sensitive to dust and habitat eutrophication), while X. parietina (tolerant to dust and habitat eutrophication) adapted to the new environment. The length of the exposure strongly affected the vitality of the mycobiont (measured as dehydrogenase activity) in transplanted lichens. Dust deposition led to ultrastructural alterations, including lipid droplets increase, swelling of cellular components, thylakoid degeneration and sometimes plasmolysis, which, on the whole, gave the cells an aged appearance. Photosynthetic parameters deserve further attention as potential indicators for monitoring early biological symptoms of the air pollution caused during cement production. PMID:26044142

  10. Ecophysiological and ultrastructural effects of dust pollution in lichens exposed around a cement plant (SW Slovakia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Luca; Guttová, Anna; Grassi, Alice; Lackovičová, Anna; Senko, Dušan; Sorbo, Sergio; Basile, Adriana; Loppi, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    The study investigated the ecophysiological and ultrastructural effects of dust pollution from a cement industry in the lichen species Evernia prunastri and Xanthoria parietina, which were exposed for 30, 90 and 180 days around a cement mill, two quarries, and inhabited and agricultural sites in SW Slovakia. The results showed that dust deposition from quarrying activities and cement works at the cement mill (mainly enriched in Ca, Fe and Ti) significantly affected the photosynthetic apparatus of E. prunastri (sensitive to dust and habitat eutrophication), while X. parietina (tolerant to dust and habitat eutrophication) adapted to the new environment. The length of the exposure strongly affected the vitality of the mycobiont (measured as dehydrogenase activity) in transplanted lichens. Dust deposition led to ultrastructural alterations, including lipid droplets increase, swelling of cellular components, thylakoid degeneration and sometimes plasmolysis, which, on the whole, gave the cells an aged appearance. Photosynthetic parameters deserve further attention as potential indicators for monitoring early biological symptoms of the air pollution caused during cement production.

  11. Biomonitoring spatial and temporal impact of atmospheric dust from a cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the spatial and temporal impact of dust-pollution in the vicinity of a cement industry, located in an area with dry climate. The spatial impact integrated over time was evaluated from the concentrations of Ca, Fe and Mg in in-situ Xanthoria parietina. The temporal pattern was assessed through one-month transplants of the lichen Ramalina canariensis. Four potential sources of atmospheric dust were evaluated: the limestone-quarry; the unpaved roads, the deposit area and the cement mill. Calcium concentration in lichens was considered the best cement-dust indicator. Different types of dust (clinker and grinded-limestone-dust) resulted in different time-patterns of Ca accumulation, which was also related with the different influence that wet and dry periods have in the lichen accumulation process. The dust pollution was found to be deposited locally and dependent on: the nature of dust particles and the volume and frequency of precipitation. - Biomonitoring Spatial and Temporal dust emissions in dry climates

  12. Use of Stone Dust & Granite Powder as a Partial Replacement of Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerit Saxena

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The research demonstrate the use of naturally available waste material as a partial replacement of OPC cement resulting in improving the compressive strength of cement. Since cement manufacturing process involves emission of CO2 to a considerable amount in the environment resulting in global warming, thus use of these partial substituents in cement reduces this ill effect making an environment free construction. The objective of this thesis is to find optimum percentage up to which these pozzolanic waste materials can replace OPC-43 grade cement to obtain maximum compressive strength. In this thesis OPC-43 grade cement is replaced partially by stone dust & granite powder simultaneously in the proportion of 5%, 10%, 15% & 20% by weight. Mortar cubes were casted, tested and compared in terms of compressive strength to the standard mortar mixtures. Cubes were subjected to compressive strength test to determine strength at 7 days, 28 days & 56 days. The result obtained clearly represents that on partial replacement of cement by 5% with stone dust, compressive strength obtained is maximum. On the other hand, higher strength is obtained when cement is replaced with 10% granite powder

  13. Release of asbestos fibers from asbestos cement products. Simulating in operating conditions and in landfills; Rilascio di fibre di amianto da manufatti in cemento amianto: simulazioni in condizioni operative e in condizioni di interramento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plescia, P. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome (Italy). Ist. Trattamento Materiali; Maccari, D. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy). Ist. per la Tecnolgia dei Materiali e dei Processi Energetici; De Stefano, L. [ENEL Ricerca, Brindisi (Italy). Area Ambiente; Paglietti, F.

    2000-02-01

    An investigation on samples of asbestos cement roofs chemically weathered was carried out to verify the possibility of release of fibers in atmosphere and in the ground, during the utilization and in landfill. The results point out that the asbestos cement roofs constitutes heavy potential font of pollution from fibers of asbestos on the territory and that the simple burial in landfill for domestic or inert wastes can, in the long run, increase the risk of release of fibers in groundwater and in atmosphere. [Italian] In questo lavoro sono stati testati i materiali di cemento amianto per verificare la possibilita' di rilascio di fibre in atmosfera e nel suolo, in due momenti di vita del materiale: durante l'impiego e durante l'interramento in discarica. I risultati indicano che il cemento amianto costituisce la maggiore fonte di inquinamento da fibre di amianto sul territorio e che il semplice interramento in discariche per rifiuti inerti puo', a lungo andare, aumentare il rischio di rilascio di fibre, sia in falda sia in atmosfera.

  14. High levels of dioxin-like PCBs found in organic-farmed eggs caused by coating materials of asbestos-cement fiber plates: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    During a regional monitoring project of organic-farmed, free-range and cage-free eggs, high levels of dioxin-like compounds were detected in organic-farmed eggs, using the dioxin responsive chemical-activated luciferase gene expression (DR-CALUX®) bioassay. Further evaluations performed with GC-HRMS (gas chromatography in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry) revealed elevated amounts of non-dioxin-like (non-dl) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) dominated by most lipophilic congeners like PCB 138, 153 and 180 and of dioxin-like (dl) PCBs, with a congener pattern in the descending order of PCB 118, 156, 167, 105, 189, 157, 105, 126 and PCB 77. Contaminations with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) appeared of minor priority, with only hepta- and octa-substituted dioxins above their limits of quantification (LOQs). The pattern of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) was dominated by low amounts of tetra- and penta-chlorinated congeners. To identify the source of contamination, several samples of organic-farmed eggs, soil, laying hens, feedstuff, corrugated asbestos-cement cover plates (ACPs), stable dust and debris collected in the gutter of the stable, were analyzed. Comparing PCB congener-pattern of individual samples, the source was traced back to the coating of ACPs, which covered roof and sidewalls of the stable. Because coating materials probably have been used for roofing and cladding in many countries worldwide, there is a high probability that the presented case report is not a local incident but rather describes a new source of PCB contamination, yet widely unknown or underestimated. PMID:25898153

  15. Leaf structural traits of tropical woody species resistant to cement dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Silva, Advanio Inácio; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão; Modolo, Luzia Valentina; Paiva, Elder Antonio Sousa

    2016-08-01

    Cement industries located nearby limestone outcrops in Brazil have contributed to the coating of cement dust over native plant species. However, little is known about the extent of the response of tropical woody plants to such environmental pollutant particularly during the first stages of plant development and establishment. This work focused on the investigation of possible alterations in leaf structural and ultrastructural traits of 5-month-old Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Malvaceae), 6-month-old Myracrodruon urundeuva Allemão (Anacardiaceae), and 9-month-old Trichilia hirta L. (Meliaceae) challenged superficially with cement dust during new leaf development. Leaf surface of plants, the soil or both (leaf plus soil), were treated (or not) for 60 days, under controlled conditions, with cement dust at 2.5 or 5.0 mg cm(-2). After exposure, no significant structural changes were observed in plant leaves. Also, no plant death was recorded by the end of the experiment. There was also some evidence of localized leaf necrosis in G. ulmifolia and T. hirta, leaf curling in M. urundeuva and T. hirta, and bulges formation on epidermal surface of T. hirta, after cement dust contact with plant shoots. All species studied exhibited stomata obliteration while T. hirta, in particular, presented early leaf abscission, changes in cellular relief, and organization and content of midrib cells. No significant ultrastructural alterations were detected under the experimental conditions studied. Indeed, mesophyll cells presented plastids with intact membrane systems. The high plant survival rates, together with mild morphoanatomic traits alterations in leaves, indicate that G. ulmifolia is more resistant to cement dust pollutant, followed by M. urundeuva and T. hirta. Thus, the three plant species are promising for being used to revegetate areas impacted by cement industries activities. PMID:27146683

  16. [Peculiarities of structure-function organization of microbial groups of soil contaminated by cement dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefurak, V P

    2001-01-01

    Long-term contamination of the forest soil by the cement dust leads to disturbances of stability of natural microbial groups, changes their quantitative and qualitative composition, results in substitution of some microbial associations by other ones. The intensive contamination of the soil by the effluents of cement integrated works, inhibits the intensity of nitrogen fixation processes and decay of the forest litter, development of micromycetes, results in the decrease of the length of mycelium and its biomass. PMID:11692672

  17. Mapping Asbestos-Cement Roofing with Hyperspectral Remote Sensing over a Large Mountain Region of the Italian Western Alps

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Frassy; Gabriele Candiani; Marco Rusmini; Pieralberto Maianti; Andrea Marchesi; Francesco Rota Nodari; Giorgio Dalla Via; Carlo Albonico; Marco Gianinetto

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that 100 thousand people in the world die every year from asbestos-related cancers and more than 300 thousand European citizens are expected to die from asbestos-related mesothelioma by 2030. Both the European and the Italian legislations have banned the manufacture, importation, processing and distribution in commerce of asbestos-containing products and have recommended action plans for the safe removal of asbestos from public and private buildings. Th...

  18. Physical activity in people with asbestos related pleural disease and dust-related interstitial lung disease: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Marita T; McKeough, Zoe J; Munoz, Phillip A; Corte, Peter; Bye, Peter T P; Alison, Jennifer A

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to measure the levels of physical activity (PA) in people with dust-related pleural and interstitial lung diseases and to compare these levels of PA to a healthy population. There is limited data on PA in this patient population and no previous studies have compared PA in people with dust-related respiratory diseases to a healthy control group. Participants with a diagnosis of a dust-related respiratory disease including asbestosis and asbestos related pleural disease (ARPD) and a healthy age- and gender-matched population wore the SenseWear(®) Pro3 armband for 9 days. Six-minute walk distance, Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form health survey and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were also measured. Fifty participants were recruited and 46 completed the study; 22 with ARPD, 10 with dust-related interstitial lung disease (ILD) and 14 healthy age-matched participants. The mean (standard deviation) steps/day were 6097 (1939) steps/day for dust-related ILD, 9150 (3392) steps/day for ARPD and 10,630 (3465) steps/day for healthy participants. Compared with the healthy participants, dust-related ILD participants were significantly less active as measured by steps/day ((mean difference 4533 steps/day (95% confidence interval (CI): 1888-7178)) and energy expenditure, ((mean difference 512 calories (95% CI: 196-827)) and spent significantly less time engaging in moderate, vigorous or very vigorous activities (i.e. >3 metabolic equivalents; mean difference 1.2 hours/day (95% CI: 0.4-2.0)). There were no differences in levels of PA between healthy participants and those with ARPD. PA was reduced in people with dust-related ILD but not those with ARPD when compared with healthy age and gender-matched individuals.

  19. Effect of exposure to dust on lung function of cement factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, H; Yap, C L; Zolkepli, O; Faridah, M

    2000-03-01

    Exposure to Portland cement dust has long been associated with the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and varying degrees of airway obstruction in man. Apart from respiratory diseases, it was also found to be the cause of lung and laryngeal cancer, gastrointestinal tumours and also dermatitis. This study was done to investigate the effect of dust exposure on ventilatory lung function of Portland cement factory workers in Rawang, Selangor. Spirometry tests of 62 male workers (exposed to total dust concentration of 10,180 micrograms/m3 and PM10 of 8049 micrograms/m3) and 70 subjects from UPM (exposed to mean total dust of 192 micrograms/m3 and PM10 of 177 micrograms/m3--controls) revealed significant differences in spirometry values between the groups. The workers showed i) significantly lower FEV1% and FEF25-75%, and higher FMFT, ii) reduced FEV1% with increasing level of dust exposure and iii) higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms. Therefore, we suggest that exposure to dust in the cement factory leads to higher incidence of respiratory symptoms and impaired lung function.

  20. Cement dust exposure and acute lung function: A cross shift study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moen Bente E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have been carried out on acute effects of cement dust exposure. This study is conducted to investigate the associations between current "total" dust exposure and acute respiratory symptoms and respiratory function among cement factory workers. Methods A combined cross-sectional and cross-shift study was conducted in Dire Dawa cement factory in Ethiopia. 40 exposed production workers from the crusher and packing sections and 20 controls from the guards were included. Personal "total" dust was measured in the workers' breathing zone and peak expiratory flow (PEF was measured for all selected workers before and after the shift. When the day shift ended, the acute respiratory symptoms experienced were scored and recorded on a five-point Likert scale using a modified respiratory symptom score questionnaire. Results The highest geometric mean dust exposure was found in the crusher section (38.6 mg/m3 followed by the packing section (18.5 mg/m3 and the guards (0.4 mg/m3. The highest prevalence of respiratory symptoms for the high exposed workers was stuffy nose (85% followed by shortness of breath (47% and "sneezing" (45%. PEF decreased significantly across the shift in the high exposed group. Multiple linear regression showed a significant negative association between the percentage cross-shift change in PEF and total dust exposure. The number of years of work in high-exposure sections and current smoking were also associated with cross-shift decrease in PEF. Conclusions Total cement dust exposure was related to acute respiratory symptoms and acute ventilatory effects. Implementing measures to control dust and providing adequate personal respiratory protective equipment for the production workers are highly recommended.

  1. Lung function and long-term exposure to cement dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F V; Borchsenius, L; Holstein, B;

    1977-01-01

    and one men were grouped as cement factory workers, 649 were grouped as blue collar workers, 218 as white collar workers and 102 men had predominantly been occupied in farming, forestry and fishing. On the average the investigated men had spent more than 75% of their total occupational life in their main......In a cross-sectional epidemiological survey a selected group of former and present cement factory workers and a random sample of the corresponding urban population underwent dynamic spirometry. Based upon life experience the subjects were grouped into four occupational categories. Three hundred...... throughout life had better ventilatory lung function than any of the other three occupational categories. No significant differences in lung function between cement factory workers and other blue collar workers with comparable smoking habits could be demonstrated by use of the maximal midexpiratory flow...

  2. Study on genotoxicity, oxidative stress biomarkers and clinical symptoms in workers of an asbestos-cement factory

    OpenAIRE

    Afaghi, Azam; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Rahzani, Kobra; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the markers of oxidative stress could be altered in workers exposed to asbestos. A comparative cross-sectional research was conducted in a group of 50 subjects exposed to asbestos and another group of 50 with the same age and sex unexposed to asbestos. Malondialdehyde (MDA), total thiol molecule (TTM), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and DNA damage, were measured in the blood samples of workers and controls. Compared to the control...

  3. Analysis of Potentially Toxic Metals in Airborne Cement Dust Around Sagamu, Southwestern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbadebo, A. M.; Bankole, O. D.

    This study analyzed the concentration levels of potentially toxic and harmful elements contained in the airborne cement dust generated in the vicinity and farther away 500 m in the conventional four cardinal directions from the West African Portland Cement Company (WAPCO) factory mill, Sagamu. The results indicated that the concentration range of these toxic elements fall between 40.0 and 280,000 μg g-1 in the cement dust samples. Also, the concentration range of these toxic elements in 1 L of air samples varies between 0.01 μg g-1 and 29.92 μg L-1. The results generally show elevated concentrations of all the elements when compared with USA threshold limit of particulate mental concentration (e.g., Pb (1.5 g m-3); Cd (0.004-0.026 g m-3) in the air. These elements in the airborne cement dusts may pose a great threat to the health of plants, animals and residents in and around the factory and also to workers and visitors to the factory.

  4. Characterization of vapor phase mercury released from concrete processing with baghouse filter dust added cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Hayes, Josh; Wu, Chang-Yu; Townsend, Timothy; Schert, John; Vinson, Tim; Deliz, Katherine; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude

    2014-02-18

    The fate of mercury (Hg) in cement processing and products has drawn intense attention due to its contribution to the ambient emission inventory. Feeding Hg-loaded coal fly ash to the cement kiln introduces additional Hg into the kiln's baghouse filter dust (BFD), and the practice of replacing 5% of cement with the Hg-loaded BFD by cement plants has recently raised environmental and occupational health concerns. The objective of this study was to determine Hg concentration and speciation in BFD as well as to investigate the release of vapor phase Hg from storing and processing BFD-added cement. The results showed that Hg content in the BFD from different seasons ranged from 0.91-1.44 mg/kg (ppm), with 62-73% as soluble inorganic Hg, while Hg in the other concrete constituents were 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than the BFD. Up to 21% of Hg loss was observed in the time-series study while storing the BFD in the open environment by the end of the seventh day. Real-time monitoring in the bench system indicated that high temperature and moisture can facilitate Hg release at the early stage. Ontario Hydro (OH) traps showed that total Hg emission from BFD is dictated by the air exchange surface area. In the bench simulation of concrete processing, only 0.4-0.5% of Hg escaped from mixing and curing BFD-added cement. A follow-up headspace study did not detect Hg release in the following 7 days. In summary, replacing 5% of cement with the BFD investigated in this study has minimal occupational health concerns for concrete workers, and proper storing and mixing of BFD with cement can minimize Hg emission burden for the cement plant. PMID:24444016

  5. 石棉相关产品生产过程粉尘危害与控制对策%Dust hazards and control countermeasures in the process of asbestos-related production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勇毅; 姜亢; 郭建中; 李琳

    2012-01-01

    Asbestos was widely used as an important mineral resource with its good performance. Due to asbestos dust generated in the production process of asbestos mining and asbestos-related products could cause serious harm to the physical health of the operating personnel, asbestos was included in the list of toxic substances released by Chinas Ministry of Health. In order to effectively control the health hazards of asbestos dust on workers, this paper based on the extensive research of asbestos mining and production enterprises, the characteristics and the job which could produce dust in the processing of asbestos mining and asbestos product producing were identified, typical work which had serious dust hazard were summarized in the in the processing of asbestos mining and asbestos product producing. Combined with our natural environment, production technology and management level and other factors , the reason why asbestos dust had serious harmful effects was analyzed, recommended countermeasures of controlling the occupational hazards of asbestos dust was proposed, in order to give advices of reducing or eliminate the hazards of asbestos-related production.%作为重要的矿产资源,石棉以其良好的性能得到广泛应用.由于石棉开采和石棉相关产品生产过程中产生的石棉粉尘对作业人员身体健康造成严重损害,石棉被列入我国卫生部发布的高毒物品名录.为有效控制石棉粉尘对作业人员的健康危害,在对我国石棉矿山和相关产品生产企业广泛调研基础上,辨识了石棉矿山开采、石棉制品生产过程存在粉尘危害的作业及特点,分析归纳石棉生产加工典型工序的粉尘危害因素.结合我国自然环境、生产技术和管理水平等因素,研究了我国石棉粉尘危害严重的原因,并提出控制石棉尘粉尘职业危害的建议对策,以期为达到降低或消除石棉相关产品生产企业石棉粉尘危害提供参考.

  6. Lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, calcium, iron, manganese and chromium (VI) levels in Nigeria and United States of America cement dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbileje, J O; Sadagoparamanujam, V-M; Anetor, J I; Farombi, E O; Akinosun, O M; Okorodudu, A O

    2013-03-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the relative abundance of heavy metals in cement dust from different cement dust factories in order to predict their possible roles in the severity of cement dust toxicity. The concentrations of total mercury (Hg), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), iron (Fe) and chromium (VI) (Cr (VI)) levels in cement dust and clinker samples from Nigeria and cement dust sample from the United States of America (USA) were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAAS), while Zn and Ca were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS), and Cr (VI) by colorimetric method. Total Cu, Ni and Mn were significantly higher in cement dust sample from USA (pcement dust compared with Nigeria cement dust or clinker (pcement dust and clinker (pMercury was more in both Nigeria cement dust and clinker (pcement dust contain mixture of metals that are known human carcinogens and also have been implicated in other debilitating health conditions. Additionally, it revealed that metal content concentrations are factory dependent. This study appears to indicate the need for additional human studies relating the toxicity of these metals and their health impacts on cement factory workers. PMID:23261125

  7. Deconstruction of the asbestos cement roof of the central market in Alicante difficulties in the practical application of RD 396/2006 (works with risk of exposure to asbestos); Deconstruccion de la cubierta de asbesto-cemento del Mercado Central de Abastos de Alicante. Dificultades en la aplicacion practica del RD 396/2006 (trabajos con riesgo de exposicion al amianto)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvent Perez, C. D.

    2010-07-01

    The project and the works described below mainly deal with the deconstruction of the current asbestos-cement roof of the Central Market in Alicante in order to replace it with another roof of zinc diamond scales, similar to the original which was implementation in 1921 when the building went into service. These works were necessary to avoid the causes (and consequences) that generate the appearance of rainwater infiltration, as was described in an earlier report that was done in 2006, also drafted by the undersigned technicians. The article shows the difficulty of the practical application of RD 396/2006 (minimum health and safety requirements for works with risks of exposure to asbestos) in a case of a certain complexity such as this, especially in areas such as economic (rising costs), technical (increasing difficulty of implementation), and the total duration of the work (total time extension due to interference with other trades). (Author) 14 refs.

  8. Multielemental neutron activation analysis of fugitive dust particulates from cement factories in Central India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of occurence and concentration of trace elements in dust particulates from and around industrial establishments is essential to know the source of pollutants and athmosphere quality. Dust particulates from two cement factories in the central part of India were analyzed for 5 minor (Cl, Fe, K, Mg, Na) and 23 trace elements (Ag, As, Ba, Br, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Dy, Eu, Ga, Hf, Hg, La, Mn, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Th, W and Zn) by INAA and RNAA techniques. Significant differences have been observed for some toxic trace elements at different locations. Mn content is particulary high in all the dust particulates. Urban particulate (SRM 1648) and Coal fly ash (SRM 163a) from NIST and Pond sediment (CRM No. 2) from NIES were also analyzed. The data have been analyzed and interpreted in terms of air quality at different locations inside the plant and two factories. (author) 35 refs.; 4 tabs

  9. Evaluation of the fate and pathological response in the lung and pleura of brake dust alone and in combination with added chrysotile compared to crocidolite asbestos following short-term inhalation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, D.M., E-mail: davidb@itox.ch [Consultant in Toxicology, Geneva (Switzerland); Rogers, R.A., E-mail: rarogers5@yahoo.com [Rogers Imaging, Needham, MA (United States); Sepulveda, R. [Rogers Imaging, Needham, MA (United States); Kunzendorf, P., E-mail: Peter.Kunzendorf@GSA-Ratingen.de [GSA Gesellschaft für Schadstoffanalytik mbH, Ratingen (Germany); Bellmann, B. [Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Ernst, H., E-mail: Heinrich.ernst@item.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Creutzenberg, O. [Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Phillips, J.I., E-mail: jim.phillips@nioh.nhls.ac.za [National Institute for Occupational Health, National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg South Africa and Department of Biomedical Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to provide an understanding of the biokinetics and potential toxicology in the lung and pleura following inhalation of brake dust following short term exposure in rats. The deposition, translocation and pathological response of brake-dust derived from brake pads manufactured with chrysotile were evaluated in comparison to the amphibole, crocidolite asbestos. Rats were exposed by inhalation 6 h/day for 5 days to either brake-dust obtained by sanding of brake-drums manufactured with chrysotile, a mixture of chrysotile and the brake-dust or crocidolite asbestos. The chrysotile fibers were relatively biosoluble whereas the crocidolite asbestos fibers persisted through the life-time of the animal. This was reflected in the lung and the pleura where no significant pathological response was observed at any time point in the brake dust or chrysotile/brake dust exposure groups through 365 days post exposure. In contrast, crocidolite asbestos produced a rapid inflammatory response in the lung parenchyma and the pleura, inducing a significant increase in fibrotic response in both of these compartments. Crocidolite fibers were observed embedded in the diaphragm with activated mesothelial cells immediately after cessation of exposure. While no chrysotile fibers were found in the mediastinal lymph nodes, crocidolite fibers of up to 35 μm were observed. These results provide support that brake-dust derived from chrysotile containing brake drums would not initiate a pathological response in the lung or the pleural cavity following short term inhalation. - Highlights: • Evaluated brake dust w/wo added chrysotile in comparison to crocidolite asbestos. • Persistence, translocation, pathological response in the lung and pleural cavity. • Chrysotile cleared rapidly from the lung while the crocidolite asbestos persisted. • No significant pathology in lung or pleural cavity observed at any time point in the brake-dust groups. • Crocidolite quickly

  10. Evaluation of the fate and pathological response in the lung and pleura of brake dust alone and in combination with added chrysotile compared to crocidolite asbestos following short-term inhalation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to provide an understanding of the biokinetics and potential toxicology in the lung and pleura following inhalation of brake dust following short term exposure in rats. The deposition, translocation and pathological response of brake-dust derived from brake pads manufactured with chrysotile were evaluated in comparison to the amphibole, crocidolite asbestos. Rats were exposed by inhalation 6 h/day for 5 days to either brake-dust obtained by sanding of brake-drums manufactured with chrysotile, a mixture of chrysotile and the brake-dust or crocidolite asbestos. The chrysotile fibers were relatively biosoluble whereas the crocidolite asbestos fibers persisted through the life-time of the animal. This was reflected in the lung and the pleura where no significant pathological response was observed at any time point in the brake dust or chrysotile/brake dust exposure groups through 365 days post exposure. In contrast, crocidolite asbestos produced a rapid inflammatory response in the lung parenchyma and the pleura, inducing a significant increase in fibrotic response in both of these compartments. Crocidolite fibers were observed embedded in the diaphragm with activated mesothelial cells immediately after cessation of exposure. While no chrysotile fibers were found in the mediastinal lymph nodes, crocidolite fibers of up to 35 μm were observed. These results provide support that brake-dust derived from chrysotile containing brake drums would not initiate a pathological response in the lung or the pleural cavity following short term inhalation. - Highlights: • Evaluated brake dust w/wo added chrysotile in comparison to crocidolite asbestos. • Persistence, translocation, pathological response in the lung and pleural cavity. • Chrysotile cleared rapidly from the lung while the crocidolite asbestos persisted. • No significant pathology in lung or pleural cavity observed at any time point in the brake-dust groups. • Crocidolite quickly

  11. 29 CFR 1910.1001 - Asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... asbestos cement, mortar, coating, grout, plaster, or similar material containing asbestos, shall be removed...) of this section. (2) This section does not apply to construction work as defined in 29 CFR 1910.12(b). (Exposure to asbestos in construction work is covered by 29 CFR 1926.1101). (3) This section does not...

  12. Steel foundry electric arc furnace dust management: stabilization by using lime and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Guray; Pinarli, Vedat

    2008-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine an appropriate treatment for steel foundry electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) prior to permanent disposal. Lime and Portland cement (PC)-based stabilization was applied to treat the EAFD that contains lead and zinc above the landfilling limits, and is listed by USEPA as hazardous waste designation K061 and by EU as 10 02 07. Three types of paste samples were prepared with EAFD content varying between 0 and 90%. The first type contained the EAFD and Portland cement, the second contained the EAFD, Portland cement, and lime, and the third contained the EAFD and lime. All the samples were subjected to toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) after an air-curing period of 28 days. pH changes were monitored and acid neutralization capacity of the samples were examined. Treatment effectiveness was evaluated in terms of reducing the heavy metal leachability to the levels below the USEPA landfilling criteria. An optimum composition for the EAFD stabilization was formulated as 30% EAFD +35% lime +35% Portland cement to achieve the landfilling criteria. The pH interval, where the solubility of the heavy metals in the EAFD was minimized, was found to be between 8.2 and 9.4.

  13. FEASIBILITY OF DEVELOPING SOURCE SAMPLING METHODS FOR ASBESTOS EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this program was to determine the feasibility of developing methods for sampling asbestos in the emissions of major asbestos sources: (1) ore production and taconite production, (2) asbestos-cement production, (3) asbestos felt and paper production, and (4) the p...

  14. Study on genotoxicity, oxidative stress biomarkers and clinical symptoms in workers of an asbestos-cement factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaghi, Azam; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Rahzani, Kobra; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the markers of oxidative stress could be altered in workers exposed to asbestos. A comparative cross-sectional research was conducted in a group of 50 subjects exposed to asbestos and another group of 50 with the same age and sex unexposed to asbestos. Malondialdehyde (MDA), total thiol molecule (TTM), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and DNA damage, were measured in the blood samples of workers and controls. Compared to the control group, the workers showed higher blood levels of DNA damage (P=0.0001) and MDA (P=0.0001). The workers showed lower TTM (P=0.02) as compared with the control group. There was no considerable difference on the level of TAC (P=0.1) between the groups. The workers indicated clinical symptoms such as breathlessness, phlegm, coughing and wheezing. There was a positive correlation between levels of 8-OHdG and MDA of asbestos workers and the smoking status suggesting the negative role of smoking. PMID:27004050

  15. Use of cement dust in the manufacture of vitrified sewer pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sherbiny, S A; Youssef, N F; Ibrahim, O A; Abadir, M F

    2004-01-01

    Waste by-pass cement dust was added in different percentages ranging from 2% to 10% to a standard mix for sewer pipes manufacture, as a substitute for expensive feldspar. It was found that a mix consisting of 45% kaolin, 36% ball clay, 9% grog and 10% by-pass dust and fired at a temperature of 1300 degrees C for 4 h yielded samples that meet the standards. It was possible to reach a water absorption of 4%, a modulus of rupture of 7.8 MPa and a resistance to acids and alkalis conforming with standard values. A test pipe was fabricated by vacuum extrusion using the suggested composition and was found to withstand a hydraulic pressure of 14 MPa for one minute without the appearance of any cracks. PMID:15219918

  16. Process development for utilizing asbestos cement waste in rotary kilns for the cement industry. Final report; Erarbeitung eines Verfahrens zur stofflichen Verwertung von zementgebundenen Asbestprodukten in Drehrohroefen fuer die Zementindustrie. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, R.; Kieser, J.; Kraehner, A.

    1999-11-01

    The law for recycling and waste demands the utilization also for waste of asbestos cement (ac). The procedure of thermal utilization of ac in the flame of a rotary cement kiln was developed and patented by the research institute IBU-tec Weimar, Germany. The ac-material has to be pre-pulverized and grinded to a degree of fineness of R{sub 90}<15%. Considerations of safety engineering lead to the idea of common fine grinding of old oil (oo) and ac. This new procedure was searched in FuE-project in 1998/99 (financial support by BMBF). A mash of ac and oo was generated as a utilization product ready for firing which was injected into the flame of the rotary cement kiln. This particles of ac smelt to spherical shaped particles at a temperature above 1500 C. They were utilized by clinker formation. The material and gas stream leaving the kiln does not contain fibres of asbestos. This was demonstrated in a small equipment burning test. The industrial realization concerning cement plant Ruedersdorf, near Berlin, was searched, technologically described and safety engineeringly and financially assessed by a project study. Process-technical and financial advantages were seen for the dry fine grinding. The wet fine grinding with old oil could be used in cement plants using old oil as fuel. (orig.) [German] Das Kreislaufwirtschafts- und Abfallgesetz (1994) fordert u.a. die stoffliche Verwertung auch fuer Asbestzementabfaelle (AZ). Das vom Institut fuer Baustoff- und Umweltschutz-Technologie Weimar 1995 entwickelte und patentierte Verfahren zur thermischen Verwertung von AZ in der Flamme eines Zementdrehrohrofens erfuellt diese Forderung. Das AZ-Material muss vorzerkleinert und bis zur Rohmehlfeinheit (R{sub 90}<15%) feingemahlen werden. Sicherheitstechnische Ueberlegungen fuehrten zu der Idee, die Feinmahlung zusammen mit Altoel (AOe) zu erproben. Diese Verfahrensvariante wurde im Rahmen eines FuE-Projektes 1998/99 untersucht (finanzielle Foerderung durch das BMBF). Als

  17. Dust extraction from gas in cement kilns, using bag filters; Depoussierage des gaz de four cimentier par les filtres a manches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmegnies, M. [CALCIA, 78 - Guerville (France). Direction Technique

    1996-12-31

    After a review of regulations concerning cement plant emissions, the two main cement production techniques (dry and semi-dry processes) are described and the electrostatic and bag filter de-dusting techniques are compared. Examples of pilot applications of these techniques in two French cement plants are presented and operating results (performances, transient procedures, costs) are discussed

  18. Properties of steel foundry electric arc furnace dust solidified/stabilized with Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Guray; Pinarli, Vedat; Salihoglu, Nezih Kamil; Karaca, Gizem

    2007-10-01

    Electric arc furnace dust from steel production is generated in considerable amounts worldwide and needs to be treated as hazardous waste. The aim of this study was to investigate the properties of electric arc furnace dust solidified/stabilized by using Portland cement. Mortar and paste samples were prepared with varying waste-to-binder ratios between 0% and 90%. A comprehensive experimental program was designed including XRF characterization, setting time, unconfined compressive strength, and toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP), synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), and acid neutralization capacity (ANC) tests. The results were evaluated in order to determine if the solidified /stabilized product can be disposed of at a landfill site with domestic waste or at a segregated landfill. The effect of using sand on S/S performance was also investigated. The results indicated that the solidification /stabilization process using PC helps the heavy metals to be bound in the cement matrix, but the TCLP leaching results exceeded the EPA landfilling limits. The SPLP leaching results conformed to the limits implying that the waste or S/S products can be disposed of at a segregated landfill; however the low ANC of the S/S products reveals that there may be leaching in the long-term. The sand used in the mortar samples adversely affected the S/S performance, causing higher heavy metal leaching levels, and lower pH levels in the leachate after the TCLP extraction than those measured in the leachate of the paste samples. PMID:17084503

  19. Properties of steel foundry electric arc furnace dust solidified/stabilized with Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Guray; Pinarli, Vedat; Salihoglu, Nezih Kamil; Karaca, Gizem

    2007-10-01

    Electric arc furnace dust from steel production is generated in considerable amounts worldwide and needs to be treated as hazardous waste. The aim of this study was to investigate the properties of electric arc furnace dust solidified/stabilized by using Portland cement. Mortar and paste samples were prepared with varying waste-to-binder ratios between 0% and 90%. A comprehensive experimental program was designed including XRF characterization, setting time, unconfined compressive strength, and toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP), synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), and acid neutralization capacity (ANC) tests. The results were evaluated in order to determine if the solidified /stabilized product can be disposed of at a landfill site with domestic waste or at a segregated landfill. The effect of using sand on S/S performance was also investigated. The results indicated that the solidification /stabilization process using PC helps the heavy metals to be bound in the cement matrix, but the TCLP leaching results exceeded the EPA landfilling limits. The SPLP leaching results conformed to the limits implying that the waste or S/S products can be disposed of at a segregated landfill; however the low ANC of the S/S products reveals that there may be leaching in the long-term. The sand used in the mortar samples adversely affected the S/S performance, causing higher heavy metal leaching levels, and lower pH levels in the leachate after the TCLP extraction than those measured in the leachate of the paste samples.

  20. Asbestos related diseases among workers of asbestos processing plants in relation to type of production and asbestos use

    OpenAIRE

    Neonila Szeszenia-Dąbrowska; Beata Świątkowska; Wojciech Sobala; Zuzanna Szubert; Urszula Wilczyńska

    2015-01-01

    Background: Asbestos dust is one of the most dangerous pneumoconiotic and carcinogenic agents. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of asbestosis and pleural mesothelioma, depending on asbestos consumption and the type of manufactured products, among former asbestos workers in Poland. Material and Methods: The study subjects included employees of 18 large state-owned asbestos processing enterprises operating in the Polish market in 1945–1998. The study is based on data obtained ...

  1. Emission of asbestos fibres from natural-draught cooling towers. Pt. 1 and 2. Part 1: Asbestos determined in plume samples from two natural-draught, wet cooling towers. Pt. 2: Behaviour of wet cooling tower internal structures made of asbestos cement. Emission von Asbestfasern aus Naturzugnasskuehltuermen. T. 1 und 2. Teil 1: Asbestgehalt in Schwadenproben aus zwei Naturzug-Nasskuehltuermen. Teil 2: Verhalten von Asbestzementeinbauten in Nasskuehltuermen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, G.; Althaus, E.; Karotke, E.; Grimm, K.; Heumann, H.G.; Rueckert, G.

    1985-01-01

    Sampling for the studies reported has been done in a relatively new nuclear power plant with natural-draught, wet cooling tower, and in an older, brown-coal fired power plant with the same type of cooling towers, both towers equipped with internal structures made of asbestos cement. Samples have been taken from the plumes, air in the environment, cooling water receiving tank, make-up water. The samples have been primarily examined for their content of asbestos fibres. The results show that relatively few asbestos is found in the environmental air and in the cooling water receiving tank. Putting it continuously, it can be said that the cooling water entrains only little amounts of the asbestos of the internal structures. The plume samples indicate emission of some thousand asbestos fibres per m/sup 3/, or less than 1 ng. Taking into account one sample exhibiting an extremely high amount of asbestos, the average emission of asbestos fibres with the plumes is 10/sup 6/ fibres per m/sup 3/, or 100 ng/m/sup 3/ of plume. The maximum air pollution thus calculated in accordance with TA Luft (Clean Air Technical Directive), for the less favourable weather conditions at a hight of 2 m above ground, is 10 fibres per one m/sup 3/ of air; including the extreme data of the single sample mentioned above, the result is some thousand fibres per m/sup 3/. The data are far below the TRK data (Technical guiding data for maximum concentration at the place of work), which state a maximum of 10/sup 6/ fibres per m/sup 3/.

  2. Investigations on corrosion and weathering of asbestos cement products (ACP) as well as on the carcinogenic effect of the weathering products. Untersuchungen ueber Korrosion und Abwitterung von Asbest-Zemnent-Produkten sowie die krebserregende Wirkung der Verwitterungsprodukte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spurny, K.R.; Marfels, H.; Pott, F.; Muhle, H.

    1988-04-01

    A method and an equipment have been developed and used for measurement of fiber emissions from corroded and weathered ACP. Emissions of fibrous dusts were measured on buildings with different types of AC-plates (roofing and facade shingles). The measured emission factors for asbestos fibers longer than 5 ..mu..m were in the range of 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 8/ fibers/m/sup 2/. They depended on the type of the AC-plates as well as on their age and corrosion intensity. The measured concentrations of asbestos fibers (longer than 5 ..mu..m) in ambient air in the vicinity of ACP were in the range of 50 to 1000 fibers/m/sup 3/. It could be shown in animal experiments that the carcinogenic potency of 'corroded' asbestos fibers did not differ from the carcinogenicity of 'normal' standard chrysotil fibers. (orig.) With 27 figs., 25 tabs., 97 refs.

  3. QUARRY DUST FINE POWDER AS SUBSTITUTE FOR ORDINARY PORTLAND CEMENT IN CONCRETE MIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KARTINI, K.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tremendous efforts have been done in the area of concrete technology to study the utilization of by-products and waste materials which can be used as a partial cement replacement in concrete production as well as identifying the benefits of these alternative materials as cement in concrete. Quarry dust as a by-product from crushing of coarse aggregates during quarrying activities has received considerable attention to enhance the properties of concrete. Thus, this paper reports the research conducted on the suitability of quarry dust fine powder (QDFP as cementitious material in concrete. The performance in terms of its mechanical and durability index were evaluated on concrete composed of various w/b ratios (0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 for replacement level of 3%, 5%, 10% and 15%, and with the inclusion of superplasticizer (Sp to enhance the workability of concrete. The performance was measured at 7, 28, 60, 90 and 120 days of age. The results show that inclusion of QDFP did not enhance the compressive strength of concrete. Rebound number (RN for QDFPSp concrete made of 0.3 and 0.4 w/b ratios achieved good quality, while for those made of 0.5 and 0.6 w/b ratios, it falls under category poor and fair respectively. In terms of durability index performance, the QDFP concrete in higher proportion (up to 15% and with increasing w/b ratio from 0.3 to 0.6 increase the coefficient of permeability, while QDFP concrete can be considered as good concrete since the water absorption recorded below than 10% by mass.

  4. [Expectations after ban on asbestos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarić, Marko

    2009-11-01

    This article brings a brief review of asbestos exposure and asbestos-related diseases in Croatia in view of the asbestos ban. The first cases of asbestosis were diagnosed in workers from an asbestos-cement factory in 1961. Between 1990 and 2007, 403 cases of asbestosis had been registered as occupational disease: 300 with parenchymal fibrosis and the rest with parenchymal and pleural changes, or pleural plaques. As a rule, asbestos-related changes were diagnosed at an early stage thanks to regular checkups of the exposed workers. Pleural plaques, considered to be the consequence of asbestos exposure, were also occasionally found in subjects who lived in areas with asbestos processing plants, but were not occupationally exposed. Early epidemiological studies on respiratory and gastrointestinal tract tumours in areas with an asbestos processing plant (1994) and an asbestos-cement plant (1995, 1996) focused on the occurrence of malignant tumours in persons exposed to asbestos at work or in the environment. More recently, the focus has shifted to the malignant pleural mesotelioma (MPM). An epidemiological study published in 2002 showed that the MPM incidence was significantly higher in the coastal area than in the rest of the country. About two thirds of patients with the tumour were occupationally exposed to asbestos. This uneven distribution of the tumour incidence is obviously related to shipbuilding and other industrial sources of asbestos exposure located in the coastal Croatia. Sources of environmental exposure to asbestos also have to be taken into account. The second part of this article ventures into the issues ahead of us, after asbestos has been banned in the country. The long latency period of cancers, and particularly of asbestos-related mesothelioma, implies that the incidence of this tumour will not drop over the next few decades. In Croatia, the average annual rate of MPM between 1991 and 2006 was 40, and ranged between 20 in 1991 to 61 in 1999. In 2006

  5. [Informative value of cardio-pulmonary exertion test in dyspnea diagnosis among asbestos-cement goods production workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhabina, S A

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with diagnosis of respiratory system changes through cardio-pulmonary exertion test in dyspneic individuals over 10 years exposed to dust at work. The results help to assess changes in the cardio-respiratory system, further prognosis and expedience of continued work in the hazardous conditions. PMID:19882774

  6. Determination of Vanadium, Tin and Mercury in Atmospheric Particulate Matter and Cement Dust Samples by Direct Current Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindy, Kamal T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution study applies direct current plasma atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES) to samples of total suspended particulate matter collected in two industrial areas and one residential area, and cement dust collected near major cement factories. These samples were analyzed for vanadium, tin, and mercury. The results indicate the…

  7. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON ASBESTOS FIBER REINFORCED FLY ASH SOIL-CEMENT FOR SOFT SOIL ENHANCEMENT%石棉纤维粉煤灰水泥加固软土试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳军; 于沉香; 凌飞; 严稳平; 刘续; 陈铂

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to improve the brittle fracture characteristics of cement soil and to study the engineering properties and mechanical mechanism of asbestos fiber reinforced soft soil.It adds the asbestos fiber into fly ash and cement soil.Thus it creates a new kind of composite soil and carries out a series of experiments on the new soil.In these experiments,asbestos fiber is added into fly ash and cement soil with different ratios(0%~9%),which results in different composite soil samples with different content of asbestos fiber.All of the composite soil samples are subjected to the direct shear test,the unconfined compression test,the diametral compression test and the scanning electron microscopy test (SEM).Thus the mechanical behavior and mechanism of fiber reinforced soft soil are illustrated.It is found that the combination of asbestos fiber and fly-ash cement can significantly enhance the strength and stability of soft soil and improve brittle fracture characteristics of cement soil.There is a range of optimal content of asbestos fiber regarding the enhancement of the strength value of the composite soil.This range is between 3%~6%.Other asbestos fiber content outside the range can reduce the enhancement effect.%为研究石棉纤维加固软土的效果和机理,改善水泥土的脆性破坏特点,提出将石棉纤维的物理加筋作用与水泥、粉煤灰的化学加固作用相结合,通过对不同纤维掺量(0%~9%)的石棉纤维粉煤水泥复合土进行直剪试验、无侧限抗压强度试验、劈裂试验、扫描电镜试验,进而对石棉纤维加筋水泥土的强度性质和影响机理进行探讨。研究表明,石棉纤维配合水泥与粉煤灰能显著提高软土的强度和稳定性,改善水泥土的破坏形式。水泥粉煤灰配比一定时,石棉纤维增强水泥复合土各强度指标值存在最优掺量,纤维添加量在3%~6%之间,石棉纤维的加筋效果在水泥土中能得到

  8. FTIR spectroscopic features of γ-ray influence on new cement kiln dust based glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddeek, Yasser B.; Mohamed, Gehan Y.; Shokry Hassan, H.; Mostafa, A. M. A.; Abd elfadeel, G.

    2015-08-01

    A harmful environmental problem such as cement kiln dust (CKD) was considered as a source of CaO and SiO2, which are useful oxides for the glass industry. So, Na2O, B2O3, Bi2O3, PbO and CKD were used to fabricate new borate based glasses. The structure of the prepared glasses was studied by FTIR before and after gamma irradiation at doses up to 120 kGy. Analysis of FTIR before irradiation revealed that CKD split the characteristic broad band of the vibrations of BO3 structural units into two bands and created two effective ranges of concentrations which were confirmed by N4 calculations. After gamma irradiation, the intensity of the FTIR bands decreased and the structure of glass was weakened when 0 ≤ CKD ≤ 23.5 mol% as a result of energy transferred by gamma rays. Increasing CKD beyond this limit created bridging oxygens, more covalent bonds and interlinked the structural groups of the glass network which may resist the irradiation effects. The glass containing 32 mol% of CKD showed higher resistance for radiation effects which was attributed to its strong covalent bonds and to [BiO6] and [PbO6] structural units.

  9. 我国石棉开采和加工企业粉尘危害研究%Study on dust hazard of asbestos mining and processing enterprises in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑜

    2011-01-01

    The asbestos fiber is harmful to one's health, which may result in pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, pleural endotheliomas or pleural plaque. At present, the majority countries in the world, particularly the developed countries, tend to gradually reduce the usage quantity of asbestos, and even be prohibited. While the asbestos has been widely produced and used in China. So study on the dust hazard status of asbestos in China is of great significance to promote the economic development and prevent the occurrence of occupational disease. In this paper,based on the sufficient investigation on asbestos processing enterprises among key enterprises and key industries in China, the territorial hazard status, the industry hazard status and the hazard status in different production links of asbestos dust were compared and analyzed. The distribution characteristics of asbestos dust hazard in region, industry and main technical procedures were analyzed, and the regions, industries and main technical procedures with more severe asbestos dust hazard were pointed out. The main reasons of severe asbestos dust hazard were analyzed,and the protection measures of asbestos dust were discussed.%石棉纤维对人体健康有不良影响,可致肺纤维化、肺癌、胸膜间皮瘤、胸膜斑等.目前世界上多数国家特别是发达国家都倾向于逐渐削减石棉的使用量以至禁止使用,而我国是石棉生产和使用大国,因此研究我国石棉粉尘危害情况对促进我国经济发展和预防职业病的发生具有重要意义.本文在对全国重点企业重点行业石棉加工企业充分调研的基础上,对石棉粉尘的区域危害状况、行业危害状况和不同生产环节的危害状况进行对比分析,分析了目前我国石棉粉尘危害的地区分布特征、行业分布特征以及主要工艺环节分布特征,并指出了石棉粉尘危害比较严重的地区、行业和生产环节,分析了上述地区、行业、生产环节

  10. Alterations in the laryngeal mucosa after exposure to asbestos.

    OpenAIRE

    Kambic, V; Radsel, Z; Gale, N

    1989-01-01

    The laryngeal mucosa of 195 workers in an asbestos cement factory (Salonit Anhovo, Yugoslavia) and in a control group was examined. The factory manufactures asbestos cement products containing about 13% of asbestos (8% amosite, 12% crocidolite, and 80% chrysotile) of different provenance. Alterations in the laryngeal mucosa were more frequent in the factory workers than in the control group. The changes, mostly consistent with chronic laryngitis, were closely related to the degree of workplac...

  11. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean C. Pfau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA, a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b exposure misclassification, (c latency of clinical disease, (d mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease.

  12. Use of Factory-Waste Shingles and Cement Kiln Dust to Enhance the Performance of Soil Used in Road Works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental work was conducted to study the use of factory-waste roof shingles to enhance the properties of fine-grained soil used in road works. Cement kiln dust (CKD, a cogenerated product of Portland cement manufacturing, was used as a stabilizing agent while the processed shingles were added to enhance the soil tensile strength. The effects of shingles on strength and stability were evaluated using the unconfined compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and California Bearing Ratio (CBR tests. The results showed that the use of CKD alone resulted in a considerable increase in the unconfined compressive strength but had a small effect on the tensile strength. The addition of shingles substantially improved the tensile strength of the stabilized soil. A significant reduction in the capillary rise and a slight decrease in the permeability were obtained as a result of shingle addition. An optimal shingle content of 10% is recommended to stabilize the soil.

  13. Pleural mesothelioma and exposure to asbestos: evaluation from work histories and analysis of asbestos bodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or lung tissue in 131 patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Pairon, J C; Orlowski, E; Iwatsubo, Y; Billon-Galland, M A; Dufour, G.; Chamming's, S; Archambault, C; Bignon, J; Brochard, P

    1994-01-01

    Exposure to asbestos was evaluated in 131 patients with pleural malignant mesothelioma in the Paris area between 1986 and 1992 using data from a detailed specific questionnaire and light microscopy analysis of the retention of asbestos bodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or lung tissue. Probable or definite exposure to significant levels of asbestos dust was identified in only 48 (36.6%) subjects, and significant asbestos body counts (above 1 asbestos body/ml in bronchoalveolar lavage flui...

  14. Removal of lead by using Raschig rings manufactured with mixture of cement kiln dust, zeolite and bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, A; Afshin, H; Behsaz, H

    2012-07-15

    The present investigation is a follow-up of study on manufacturing Raschig ring for removal of lead from aqueous solution. The mixtures were formulated using cement kiln dust, zeolite, and bentonite, normally used as natural adsorbents in the industrial scale, according to mixture design algorithm and response surface method. The pastes were prepared by addition of 28.0wt.% de-ionized water, containing 0.1wt.% carboxymethyl cellulose, with mixed powders. The adsorbents were fabricated by extrusion of the pastes in Raschig ring form and calcination at 500°C after drying in oven. The effects of starting materials on the mechanical behavior of rings were studied from view point of mixture design algorithm to optimize the adsorbent composition. This method demonstrated to yield valuable information on the effects of used materials on mechanical characteristics. The study concluded that the strength, reliability and sorption capacity of ring can be simultaneously optimized by the addition of 47.5wt.% cement kiln dust, 32.5wt.% zeolite, and 20.0wt.% bentonite. In the next part of work, the sorption kinetics was investigated. The kinetic study indicated that the modified model can successfully correlate the sorption data. The equilibrium result showed the possibility of lead immobilization by fabricated rings. PMID:22608209

  15. Concentration and size of asbestos in water supplies.

    OpenAIRE

    Millette, J R; Clark, P. J.(SUPA-School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK); Pansing, M F; Twyman, J D

    1980-01-01

    A review of the results of over 1500 asbestos analyses from U.S. water supplies suggests that the majority of water consumers are not exposed to asbestos concentrations in their drinking water over 1 x 10(6) fibers per liter. There are, however, some populations that are exposed to waterborne asbestos concentrations over 10 x 10(6) fibers per liter caused by natural erosion, mine processing wastes, waste pile erosion, corrosion of asbestos cement pipe, or disintegration of asbestos tile roofs...

  16. Exposure and risks from wearing asbestos mitts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tindall Matthew

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very high fibre inhalation exposure has been measured while people were wearing personal protective equipment manufactured from chrysotile asbestos. However, there is little data that relates specifically to wearing asbestos gloves or mitts, particularly when used in hot environments such as those found in glass manufacturing. The aim of this study was to assess the likely personal exposure to asbestos fibres when asbestos mitts were used. Results Three types of work activity were simulated in a small test room with unused mitts and artificially aged mitts. Neither pair of mitts were treated to suppress the dust emission. The measured respirable fibre exposure levels ranged from Conclusion People who wore asbestos mitts were likely to have been exposed to relatively low levels of airborne chrysotile asbestos fibres, certainly much lower than the standards that were accepted in the 1960's and 70's. The cancer risks from this type of use are likely to be very low.

  17. Strength of Ternary Blended Cement Sandcrete Containing Afikpo Rice Husk Ash and Saw Dust Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Ettu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the compressive strength of ternary blended cement sandcrete containing Afikpo rice husk ash (RHA and sawdust ash (SDA. 105 sandcrete cubes of 150mm x 150mm x 150mm were produced with OPC-RHA binary blended cement, 105 with OPC-SDA binary blended cement, and 105 with OPC-RHA-SDA ternary blended cement, each at percentage OPC replacement with pozzolan of 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%. Three cubes for each percentage replacement of OPC with pozzolan and the control were tested for saturated surface dry bulk density and crushed to obtain their compressive strengths at 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 50, and 90 days of curing. The 90-day strengths obtained from ternary blending of OPC with equal proportions of RHA and SDA were 11.80N/mm2for 5% replacement, 11.20N/mm2for 10% replacement, 10.60N/mm2for 15% replacement, 10.00N/mm2for 20% replacement, and 9.10N/mm2for 25% replacement, while that of the control was 10.90N/mm2. This suggests that very high sandcrete strength values could be obtained with OPCRHA-SDA ternary blended cement with richer mixes, high quality control, and longer days of hydration. Thus, OPC-RHA-SDA ternary blended cement sandcrete could be used for various civil engineering and building works, especially where early strength is not a major requirement.

  18. Asbestos in seashore Southern area of Bari

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari seashore was place, in the past, of uncontrolled waste disposal. The importance of such situation became evident when Bari Municipal Administration attempted the recovery of Torre Quetta beach. Sampling and analysis in the area showed the presence of quantities of asbestos residues probably coming from Fibronit, an asbestos-cement industry in Bari closed since 1985 and, at present, polluted site of national relevance

  19. The Distribution of PM10 and PM2.5 Dust Particles Diameter in Airborne at the Cement Factory Neighboring Area, Citeureup - Bogor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution analysis in PM10 and PM2.5 dust particle diameter has been carried out at residence area around the cement factory, Citeureup - Bogor to estimate deposition of dust particles that is accepted by public. The dust particles were sampled at the dwellings by using a cascade impactor on four wind directions and 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 m radius from the Plant one as the center of the cement factory at Citeureup - Bogor. Measurements at the north direction were the Gunung Putri, Kranggan, Bojong Nangka villages, and Gunung Putri dwellings. The south directions were Tarikolot and Pasir Mukti villages. The west directions were guest house, Puspanegara, Puspasari, and Citatah villages. The northwest directions were Puspanegara, Gunung Putri, Puspasari, and Kranggan villages. The analysis result showed that the diameter distribution of PM10 dust particles at outdoor is ranging from 0.4 to 4.7 μm, and has the weight percentage is high in average approximate 17.91 % of total dust weight on 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 m radius. The distributions of indoor PM2.5 dust particles diameter show a stable 12.27 % weight percentage of total dust weight from 0.4 to 2.1 μm. (author)

  20. Pleural malignant mesothelioma and non-occupational exposure to asbestos in Casale Monferrato, Italy.

    OpenAIRE

    Magnani, C; Terracini, B; Ivaldi, C; Botta, M; Mancini, A; Andrion, A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess and quantify the occurrence of pleural malignant mesotheliomas in people who neither experienced occupational exposure to asbestos nor were married to (or known to live with) workers exposed to asbestos in the workplace. The study was conducted in the area of the local health authority of Casale Monferrato, in north western Italy, where a large factory that produced asbestos cement was active up to 1985. No other major activities related to asbestos have ever been presen...

  1. Asbestos Exposure among Construction Workers During Demolition of Old Houses in Tehran, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein KAKOOEI; NORMOHAMMADI, Mohhammad

    2013-01-01

    Air quality in demolition practices has seldom been evaluated in Iran. Accordingly, we evaluated asbestos exposure among Tehran construction workers during the demolition of old houses. To identify possible sources of asbestos exposure, including thermal insulations, chimney pipes and cement sheets, were all sampled. This study also were taken the personal air samples to evaluate any asbestos exposure during the demolition. The asbestos fibers found in the samples were analyzed by phase-contr...

  2. Respiratory Health among Cement Workers in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Zeleke, Zeyede K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known on dust exposure and respiratory health among cement cleaners. There are only a few follow-up studies on respiratory health among cement factory workers and also studies on acute effects of cement dust exposure are limited in numbers. Objective: This study aimed at assessing cement dust exposure and adverse respiratory health effects among Ethiopian cement production workers, with particular focus on cement cleaners. Method: The first paper was...

  3. Asbestos: Protect Your Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Protect Your Family How to Identify Materials That May Contain Asbestos ... Improper removal may actually increase your and your family’s exposure to asbestos fibers. Top of Page Asbestos ...

  4. Thoracic dust exposure is associated with lung function decline in cement production workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordby, Karl-Christian; Notø, Hilde; Eduard, Wijnand; Skogstad, Marit; Fell, Anne Kristin; Thomassen, Yngvar; Skare, Øivind; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Abderhalden, Rolf; Kongerud, Johny; Kjuus, Helge

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesised that exposure to workplace aerosols may lead to lung function impairment among cement production workers.Our study included 4966 workers in 24 cement production plants. Based on 6111 thoracic aerosol samples and information from questionnaires we estimated arithmetic mean exposure levels by plant and job type. Dynamic lung volumes were assessed by repeated spirometry testing during a mean follow-up time of 3.5 years (range 0.7-4.6 years). The outcomes considered were yearly change of dynamic lung volumes divided by the standing height squared or percentage of predicted values. Statistical modelling was performed using mixed model regression. Individual exposure was classified into quintile levels limited at 0.09, 0.89, 1.56, 2.25, 3.36, and 14.6 mg·m(-3), using the lowest quintile as the reference. Employees that worked in administration were included as a second comparison group.Exposure was associated with a reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced expiratory volume in 6 s and forced vital capacity. For FEV1 % predicted a yearly excess decline of 0.84 percentage points was found in the highest exposure quintile compared with the lowest.Exposure at the higher levels found in this study may lead to a decline in dynamic lung volumes. Exposure reduction is therefore warranted. PMID:27103386

  5. In situ ESEM study of the thermal decomposition of chrysotile asbestos in view of safe recycling of the transformation product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F; Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti; Tonelli, Massimo

    2008-08-15

    The thermal transformation of asbestos into non-hazardous crystalline phases and their recycling is a promising solution for the "asbestos problem". The most common asbestos-containing industrial material produced worldwide is cement-asbestos. Knowledge of the kinetics of thermal transformation of asbestos fibers in cement-asbestos is of paramount importance for the optimization of the firing process at industrial scale. Here, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used for the first time to follow in situ the thermal transformation of chrysotile fibers present in cement-asbestos. It was found that the reaction kinetics of thermal transformation of chrysotile was highly slowed down in the presence of water vapor in the experimental chamber with respect to He. This was explained by chemisorbed water on the surface of the fibers which affected the dehydroxylation reaction and consequently the recrystallization into Mg-silicates. In the attempt to investigate alternative and faster firing routes for the decomposition of asbestos, a low melting glass was mixed with cement-asbestos and studied in situ to assess to which extent the decomposition of asbestos is favored. It was found that the addition of a low melting glass to cement-asbestos greatly improved the decomposition reaction and decreased the transformation temperatures. PMID:18234421

  6. In situ ESEM study of the thermal decomposition of chrysotile asbestos in view of safe recycling of the transformation product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal transformation of asbestos into non-hazardous crystalline phases and their recycling is a promising solution for the 'asbestos problem'. The most common asbestos-containing industrial material produced worldwide is cement-asbestos. Knowledge of the kinetics of thermal transformation of asbestos fibers in cement-asbestos is of paramount importance for the optimization of the firing process at industrial scale. Here, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used for the first time to follow in situ the thermal transformation of chrysotile fibers present in cement-asbestos. It was found that the reaction kinetics of thermal transformation of chrysotile was highly slowed down in the presence of water vapor in the experimental chamber with respect to He. This was explained by chemisorbed water on the surface of the fibers which affected the dehydroxylation reaction and consequently the recrystallization into Mg-silicates. In the attempt to investigate alternative and faster firing routes for the decomposition of asbestos, a low melting glass was mixed with cement-asbestos and studied in situ to assess to which extent the decomposition of asbestos is favored. It was found that the addition of a low melting glass to cement-asbestos greatly improved the decomposition reaction and decreased the transformation temperatures

  7. [Improving system of prevention and rehabilitation for asbestos-related broncho-pulmonary diseases in workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    To improve a system of prevention and rehabilitation for broncho-pulmonary diseases among workers engaged into extraction and utilization of chrysotile asbestos, the authors specified major criteria for diagnosis of asbestos-related pulmonary diseases and signs of exposure to asbestos-containing dust, with definition of risk groups for broncho-pulmonary diseases. The authors formulated main concepts of prevention and rehabilitation for asbestos-related pulmonary diseases in workers engaged into asbestos industry. Special attention was paid to harmonization of all medical and technical measures aimed to prevention and liquidation of asbestos-related diseases. PMID:21789804

  8. Asbestos in the Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The United States Government is concerned about asbestos-containing products in the home because sometimes asbestos fibers can be released from these produces. If asbestos fibers are inhaled, certain types of cancer may later develop. Asbestos in homes poses several problems. Household members have little or no protection from exposure to asbestos…

  9. Occupational characteristics of respiratory cancer patients exposed to asbestos in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everatt, R. Petrauskaitdot e.; Smolianskiedot n, G.; Tossavainen, A.; Cicdot enas, S.; Jankauskas, R.

    2009-02-01

    Objective: To assess characteristics of asbestos exposure in respiratory cancer patients in Lithuania. Methods. Information on occupational exposure to asbestos was collected by personal interviews and occupational characteristics were evaluated among 183 lung cancer and mesothelioma patients with cumulative asbestos exposure >=0.01 fibre years hospitalized at the Institute of Oncology, Vilnius. Additionally, some results of workplace air measurements were reviewed. Results. Cases with estimated cumulative exposure >=5 fibre years had worked mainly in the construction industry (49%), installation and maintenance (13%), foundry and metal products manufacturing (6%), heating trades and boilerhouses (6%) as fitters/maintenance technicians, construction workers, welders, electricians or foremen. Typical asbestos materials used by the patients were asbestos powder, asbestos cement sheets and pipes, asbestos cord, brake and clutch linings. Patients were exposed to asbestos when insulating boilers, furnaces, pipes in power stations, industrial facilities, ships, locomotives, buildings, while covering and repairing roofs, at the asbestos cement plant or unloading asbestos products. Most patients with estimated cumulative exposure of >=0.01-4.9 fibre years worked as lorry, bus or tractor drivers and motor vehicle mechanics. In 2002-2007 workplace air asbestos concentrations exceeded the limit value of 0.1 f/cm3 in 11 samples out of 208 measurements. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate that since the 1960s occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos was extensive in Lithuania.

  10. Occupational characteristics of respiratory cancer patients exposed to asbestos in Lithuania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrauskaite Everatt, R; Smolianskien, G; Jankauskas, R [Institute of Hygiene, Etmonu 3/6, LT-01129 Vilnius (Lithuania); Tossavainen, A [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41a A, FI-00250 Helsinki (Finland); Cicens, S, E-mail: grazina.smolianskiene@dmc.l [Institute of Oncology, Vilnius University, Santaritkiu 1, LT-08660 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2009-02-01

    Objective: To assess characteristics of asbestos exposure in respiratory cancer patients in Lithuania. Methods. Information on occupational exposure to asbestos was collected by personal interviews and occupational characteristics were evaluated among 183 lung cancer and mesothelioma patients with cumulative asbestos exposure >=0.01 fibre years hospitalized at the Institute of Oncology, Vilnius. Additionally, some results of workplace air measurements were reviewed. Results. Cases with estimated cumulative exposure >=5 fibre years had worked mainly in the construction industry (49%), installation and maintenance (13%), foundry and metal products manufacturing (6%), heating trades and boilerhouses (6%) as fitters/maintenance technicians, construction workers, welders, electricians or foremen. Typical asbestos materials used by the patients were asbestos powder, asbestos cement sheets and pipes, asbestos cord, brake and clutch linings. Patients were exposed to asbestos when insulating boilers, furnaces, pipes in power stations, industrial facilities, ships, locomotives, buildings, while covering and repairing roofs, at the asbestos cement plant or unloading asbestos products. Most patients with estimated cumulative exposure of >=0.01-4.9 fibre years worked as lorry, bus or tractor drivers and motor vehicle mechanics. In 2002-2007 workplace air asbestos concentrations exceeded the limit value of 0.1 f/cm{sup 3} in 11 samples out of 208 measurements. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate that since the 1960s occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos was extensive in Lithuania.

  11. Occupational characteristics of respiratory cancer patients exposed to asbestos in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess characteristics of asbestos exposure in respiratory cancer patients in Lithuania. Methods. Information on occupational exposure to asbestos was collected by personal interviews and occupational characteristics were evaluated among 183 lung cancer and mesothelioma patients with cumulative asbestos exposure ≥0.01 fibre years hospitalized at the Institute of Oncology, Vilnius. Additionally, some results of workplace air measurements were reviewed. Results. Cases with estimated cumulative exposure ≥5 fibre years had worked mainly in the construction industry (49%), installation and maintenance (13%), foundry and metal products manufacturing (6%), heating trades and boilerhouses (6%) as fitters/maintenance technicians, construction workers, welders, electricians or foremen. Typical asbestos materials used by the patients were asbestos powder, asbestos cement sheets and pipes, asbestos cord, brake and clutch linings. Patients were exposed to asbestos when insulating boilers, furnaces, pipes in power stations, industrial facilities, ships, locomotives, buildings, while covering and repairing roofs, at the asbestos cement plant or unloading asbestos products. Most patients with estimated cumulative exposure of ≥0.01-4.9 fibre years worked as lorry, bus or tractor drivers and motor vehicle mechanics. In 2002-2007 workplace air asbestos concentrations exceeded the limit value of 0.1 f/cm3 in 11 samples out of 208 measurements. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate that since the 1960s occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos was extensive in Lithuania.

  12. Asbestos related diseases among workers of asbestos processing plants in relation to type of production and asbestos use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neonila Szeszenia-Dąbrowska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asbestos dust is one of the most dangerous pneumoconiotic and carcinogenic agents. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of asbestosis and pleural mesothelioma, depending on asbestos consumption and the type of manufactured products, among former asbestos workers in Poland. Material and Methods: The study subjects included employees of 18 large state-owned asbestos processing enterprises operating in the Polish market in 1945–1998. The study is based on data obtained from asbestos company records and the Central Register of Occupational Diseases data on the cases of asbestosis and mesothelioma for the period from 1970 till 2012 as well as data from Amiantus Programme. The analysis was performed for 5 sectors comprising plants classified according to the products manufactured and applied production technology. Results: In the study period, 2160 cases of asbestosis and 138 cases of mesothelioma were reported. The plants processed a total of about 2 million tonnes of asbestos, including about 7.5% of crocidolite. Total asbestos consumption was a strong predictor of the rate of asbestosis incidence (R2 = 0.68, p = 0.055. The highest risk occurrence of asbestosis was observed in the production of textiles and sealing products. Mesothelioma occurred only in plants where crocidolite had been ever processed. Conclusions: Total asbestos consumption was a strong predictor of the rate of asbestosis incidence. The observation confirms the relationship between exposure to crocidolite and the occurrence of mesothelioma, regardless of the manufactured products, and suggests the absence of such a link for the total volume of asbestos consumption. Med Pr 2015;66(1:1–9

  13. An experiment to develop conversion factors to standardise measurements of airborne asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodic-Fikfak, Metoda

    2007-06-01

    Various researchers and agencies recommend different conversion factors for different asbestos exposures. The aim of this study was to develop conversion factors from particles per cm3 (p cm(-3)) to fibres per cm3 (f cm(-3)) and from mg m(-3) to f cm(-3). More than 1000 exposure measurements were available in the Slovenian asbestos-cement factory Salonit Anhovo. Three types of measurement of asbestos concentrations in the air were used: a konimeter measuring p cm-3, a gravimetric method measuring mg m-3 and a membrane filter method measuring f cm-3. Operation-specific conversion factors among these methods were developed. One conversion factor was obtained for asbestos-pipe-dry jobs (4.7) and one for asbestos-sheet-dry jobs (1.6). Only one conversion factor (0.8) was used for asbestos-cement-pipe-wet and asbestos-cement-pipe-dry jobs. For asbestos cement sheets, two conversion factors were obtained (0.3 and 1.2). The development of five different conversion factors made it possible to calculate cumulative exposure to asbestos from historical data and to decrease exposure misclassification. PMID:17562601

  14. Investigation into the use of cement kiln dust in high density sludge (HDS) treatment of acid mine water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Allison L; Walsh, Margaret E

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential to replace lime with cement kiln dust (CKD) in high density sludge (HDS) treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD). The bench-scale study used two water samples: AMD sampled from a lead-zinc mine with high concentrations of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), and arsenic (As) (Fe/Zn-AMD) and a synthetic AMD solution (Syn-AMD) spiked with ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3). Arsenic was found to be significantly reduced with CKD-HDS treatment of Fe/Zn-AMD compared to lime-HDS treatment, to concentrations below the stringent mine effluent discharge regulation of 0.10 mg As/L (i.e., 0.04 ± 0.02 mg/L). Both CKD- and lime-HDS treatment of the two AMD samples resulted in settled water Fe concentrations above the stringent discharge guideline of 0.3 mg Fe/L. CKD addition in the HDS process also resulted in high settled water turbidity, above typical discharge guidelines of 15 mg TSS/L. CKD-HDS treatment was found to result in significantly improved settled solids (i.e., sludge) quality compared to that generated in the lime-HDS process. HDS treatment with CKD resulted in 25-88% lower sludge volume indices, 2 to 9 times higher % wet solids, and 10 to 20 times higher % dry solids compared to lime addition. XRD and XPS testing indicated that CKD-HDS sludge consisted of mainly CaCO3 and SiO2 with Fe(3+) precipitates attached at particle surfaces. XRD and XPS testing of the lime-HDS generated sludge showed that it consisted of non-crystalline Fe oxides typical of sludge formed from precipitates with a high water concentration. Increased sedimentation rates were also found for CKD (1.3 cm/s) compared to lime (0.3 cm/s). The increased solids loading with CKD addition compared to lime addition in the HDS process was suggested to both promote surface complexation of metal precipitates with insoluble CKD particles and increase compression effects during Type IV sedimentation. These mechanisms collectively contributed to the reduced water content of

  15. Comparative hazards of chrysotile asbestos and its substitutes: A European perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, P T; Levy, L S; Patrick, G.; Pigott, G H; Smith, L. L.

    1999-01-01

    Although the use of amphibole asbestos (crocidolite and amosite) has been banned in most European countries because of its known effects on the lung and pleura, chrysotile asbestos remains in use in a number of widely used products, notably asbestos cement and friction linings in vehicle brakes and clutches. A ban on chrysotile throughout the European Union for these remaining applications is currently under consideration, but this requires confidence in the safety of substitute materials. Th...

  16. Asbestos in Colorado Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Cynthia A.

    This study determined, by means of a random sample, how many of Colorado's public schools have asbestos materials and estimated the potential risk of exposure presented by these materials. Forty-one schools were surveyed. Bulk samples of possible asbestos materials were collected and analyzed using the K-squared Asbestos Screening Test to…

  17. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Asbestos-Containing Materials from Surveillance Maintenance and Transition Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this sampling and analysis instruction is to define the waste characterization requirements for disposition of asbestos-containing material in the form of thermal system insulation and transite cement asbestos board found in or near the Hanford Site facilities

  18. Novel selective dyeing method for chrysotile asbestos detection in concrete materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oke, Yoshihiko; Yamasaki, Nakamichi; Amamoto, Go Y; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Maeta, Naomi; Fujimaki, Hirokazu; Hashida, Toshiyuki

    2008-03-01

    There are a tremendous number of asbestos-containing buildings without any surveys on the presence of asbestos because of the difficulty to detect asbestos in building materials simply and quickly, although a great deal of worldwide effort was put into removing asbestos of which inhalation causes serious diseases. In this study, we newly developed a simple dyeing method to detect chrysotile asbestos, the most commonly used type of asbestos, in asbestos-cement composite materials using magnesium-chelating organic dyes. As an essential process for selective dyeing of chrysotile asbestos, special pretreatment with a calcium-chelating agent was developed to prevent the dyes from reacting with calcium, which is the major component of concrete materials. Our developed selective dyeing method was shown to possess sufficient sensitivity for detecting chrysotile asbestos in an amount greater than 0.1 mass% in concrete specimens, and there was an approximately linear relationship between the area fraction of dyed spots and the mass fraction of chrysotile asbestos. Our results may provide a basis for further development of a simple on-site detection method for chrysotile asbestos in building materials and may facilitate the progress of control and removal of asbestos in the environment. PMID:18441814

  19. Predicting the mortality from asbestos-related diseases based on the amount of asbestos used and the effects of slate buildings in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Young; Kim, Young-Chan; Kim, Yongku; Hong, Won-Hwa

    2016-01-15

    Asbestos has been used since ancient times, owing to its heat-resistant, rot-proof, and insulating qualities, and its usage rapidly increased after the industrial revolution. In Korea, all slates were previously manufactured in a mixture of about 90% cement and 10% chrysotile (white asbestos). This study used a Generalized Poisson regression (GPR) model after creating databases of the mortality from asbestos-related diseases and of the amount of asbestos used in Korea as a means to predict the future mortality of asbestos-related diseases and mesothelioma in Korea. Moreover, to predict the future mortality according to the effects of slate buildings, a comparative analysis based on the result of the GPR model was conducted after creating databases of the amount of asbestos used in Korea and of the amount of asbestos used in making slates. We predicted the mortality from asbestos-related diseases by year, from 2014 to 2036, according to the amount of asbestos used. As a result, it was predicted that a total of 1942 people (maximum, 3476) will die by 2036. Moreover, based on the comparative analysis according to the influence index, it was predicted that a maximum of 555 people will die from asbestos-related diseases by 2031 as a result of the effects of asbestos-containing slate buildings, and the mortality was predicted to peak in 2021, with 53 cases. Although mesothelioma and pulmonary asbestosis were considered as asbestos-related diseases, these are not the only two diseases caused by asbestos. However the results of this study are highly important and relevant, as, for the first time in Korea, the future mortality from asbestos-related diseases was predicted. These findings are expected to contribute greatly to the Korean government's policies related to the compensation for asbestos victims. PMID:26513124

  20. Predicting the mortality from asbestos-related diseases based on the amount of asbestos used and the effects of slate buildings in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Young; Kim, Young-Chan; Kim, Yongku; Hong, Won-Hwa

    2016-01-15

    Asbestos has been used since ancient times, owing to its heat-resistant, rot-proof, and insulating qualities, and its usage rapidly increased after the industrial revolution. In Korea, all slates were previously manufactured in a mixture of about 90% cement and 10% chrysotile (white asbestos). This study used a Generalized Poisson regression (GPR) model after creating databases of the mortality from asbestos-related diseases and of the amount of asbestos used in Korea as a means to predict the future mortality of asbestos-related diseases and mesothelioma in Korea. Moreover, to predict the future mortality according to the effects of slate buildings, a comparative analysis based on the result of the GPR model was conducted after creating databases of the amount of asbestos used in Korea and of the amount of asbestos used in making slates. We predicted the mortality from asbestos-related diseases by year, from 2014 to 2036, according to the amount of asbestos used. As a result, it was predicted that a total of 1942 people (maximum, 3476) will die by 2036. Moreover, based on the comparative analysis according to the influence index, it was predicted that a maximum of 555 people will die from asbestos-related diseases by 2031 as a result of the effects of asbestos-containing slate buildings, and the mortality was predicted to peak in 2021, with 53 cases. Although mesothelioma and pulmonary asbestosis were considered as asbestos-related diseases, these are not the only two diseases caused by asbestos. However the results of this study are highly important and relevant, as, for the first time in Korea, the future mortality from asbestos-related diseases was predicted. These findings are expected to contribute greatly to the Korean government's policies related to the compensation for asbestos victims.

  1. Malignant mesothelioma: global incidence and relationship with asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Claudio; Bianchi, Tommaso

    2007-06-01

    Mesothelioma incidence varies markedly from one country to another. The highest annual crude incidence rates (about 30 cases per million) are observed in Australia, Belgium, and Great Britain. A lot of data indicate a relationship between mesothelioma and asbestos. The hot areas for mesothelioma exactly correspond to the sites of industries with high asbestos use, such as shipbuilding and asbestos-cement industry. However, in many countries with high asbestos consumption, mesothelioma incidence is low. The reasons for this fact are not clear. The latency periods elapsing between first exposure to asbestos and development of mesothelioma are mostly longer than 40 yr. An inverse relationship exists between intensity of asbestos exposure and length of the latency period. Mesothelioma generally develops after long-time exposures to asbestos. Some recent studies show that the risk increases with the duration of exposure. Possible co-factors in the pathogenesis of asbestos-related mesothelioma include genetic predisposition, diets poor in fruit and vegetables, viruses, immune impairment, recurrent serosal inflammation. The study of co-morbidity in mesothelioma could give an insight into the pathogenesis of the tumor. While a levelling-off in mesothelioma incidence has been registered in some countries, a worsening of the epidemic is predictable in large parts of the world. PMID:17634686

  2. Safety and Health Topics: Asbestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Asbestos This page requires that javascript be enabled for ... Hazards and Toxic Substances Hazardous Waste What is asbestos? Asbestos is the name given to a group ...

  3. Influence of calcium carbonate on the decomposition of asbestos contained in end-of-life products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belardi, G. [Environmental Geology and GeoEngineering Institute (CNR), Area della ricerca RM1, via Salaria km 29,300, 00016 Monterotondo (Rome) (Italy); Piga, L., E-mail: luigi.piga@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy)

    2013-12-10

    Highlights: • We characterized end-of-life asbestos-containing materials. • In the range 620–680 °C, calcite and quartz affect decomposition of asbestos. • Hypothesized decomposition reactions match with solid phases revealed by XRD analysis. • TGA of the content of chrysotile gives good results both in air and in nitrogen. - Abstract: Three bearing-asbestos wastes, friction material, vinyl-asbestos (linoleum) and cement-asbestos mainly containing chrysotile were characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRDP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with microanalysis observations and thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) were carried out on the materials as received and after heating at 1100 °C in order to observe their structural changes and thermal behaviours. A quantitative determination of chrysotile in the friction material was also carried out. To study the influence of CaCO{sub 3} on the decomposition of asbestos, the three techniques were also applied on the linoleum and cement-asbestos at room temperature and at 1100 °C after leaching of the materials with 1:3 HCl to remove the carbonates present in the wastes. The results show that the presence of CaCO{sub 3} prevents the asbestos to decompose according to the known decomposition reactions and leads to the formation of calcium-silicate compounds. When CaCO{sub 3} is removed by washing with HCl, decomposition of asbestos proceeds according to the expected reactions.

  4. Influence of calcium carbonate on the decomposition of asbestos contained in end-of-life products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We characterized end-of-life asbestos-containing materials. • In the range 620–680 °C, calcite and quartz affect decomposition of asbestos. • Hypothesized decomposition reactions match with solid phases revealed by XRD analysis. • TGA of the content of chrysotile gives good results both in air and in nitrogen. - Abstract: Three bearing-asbestos wastes, friction material, vinyl-asbestos (linoleum) and cement-asbestos mainly containing chrysotile were characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRDP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with microanalysis observations and thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) were carried out on the materials as received and after heating at 1100 °C in order to observe their structural changes and thermal behaviours. A quantitative determination of chrysotile in the friction material was also carried out. To study the influence of CaCO3 on the decomposition of asbestos, the three techniques were also applied on the linoleum and cement-asbestos at room temperature and at 1100 °C after leaching of the materials with 1:3 HCl to remove the carbonates present in the wastes. The results show that the presence of CaCO3 prevents the asbestos to decompose according to the known decomposition reactions and leads to the formation of calcium-silicate compounds. When CaCO3 is removed by washing with HCl, decomposition of asbestos proceeds according to the expected reactions

  5. Chrysotile asbestos exposure in the manufacturing of thermal insulating boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagia, L J; Vyas, J B; Shaikh, M I; Dodia, S L

    2010-08-01

    Exposure to asbestos fibers has been extensively studied in milling, mining of asbestos fibers, and in industries manufacturing asbestos-cement sheets, pipes, etc. However, very few studies have been reported in asbestos textiles, brake lining workers, and insulation products. In the present investigation, chrysotile exposure monitoring was carried out in a small thermal insulating boards manufacturing facility. Twenty-eight samples were analyzed from various locations like feeding of raw materials, weighing, pressing, machine grinding, and hand finishing of final products. Twenty-five percent of the samples were found to be above ACGIH TLV of 0.1 fibers per milliliter. However, mean fiber concentrations were found to be lower than 0.1 fibers per milliliter, except for the process of feeding of raw materials where the mean fiber concentration was 0.1087+/-0.0631 fibers per milliliter. PMID:19626449

  6. Asbestos in cooling-tower waters. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water discharges from cooling towers constructed with asbestos fill were found to contain chrysotile--asbestos fibers at concentrations as high as 108 fibers/liter. The major source of these fibers, appears to be the components of the towers rather than the air drawn through the towers or the makeup water taken into the towers. Suggested mechanisms for the release of chrysotile fibers from cooling-tower fill include freeze-thaw cycles and dissolution of the cement due to acidic components of the circulating water. Ash- or other material-settling ponds were found to reduce asbestos-fiber concentrations in cooling-tower effluent. The literature reviewed did not support the case for a causal relationship between adverse human health effects and drinking water containing on the order of 106 chrysotile--asbestos fibers/liter; for this and other reasons, it is not presently suggested that the use of asbestos fill be discontinued. However, caution and surveillance are dictated by the uncertainties in the epidemiological studies, the absence of evidence for a safe threshold concentration in water, and the conclusive evidence for adverse effects from occupational exposure. It is recommended that monitoring programs be carried out at sites where asbestos fill is used; data from such programs can be used to determine whether any mitigative measures should be taken. On the basis of estimates made in this study, monitoring for asbestos in drift from cooling towers does not appear to be warranted

  7. Asbestos exposure and health hazards: a global emergency, Epidemiological evidence and denial theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Zazzara

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available On June 3rd 2013, in Turin, Italy, the Swiss industrialist Schmidheiny has been sentenced to 18 years imprisonment for intentional disaster for 3,000 asbestos-linked tumours in Italian workers at cement multinational Eternit. The indiscriminate use of asbestos, however, continues worldwide. Although many studies have shown that asbestos is associated with an increased risk of mortality and morbidity, denial theories were spread over time, showing how the logic of profit governs the production of asbestos. We examined the history of the epidemiological evidence of asbestos related risks and, second, the main sources of exposure in Italy and in the world, occupational, non-occupational, and post-disaster exposure (as occurred after L’Aquila earthquake in April 2009. The theme of inequality and social justice is ever so alarming in the fight against asbestos and its lobbies.

  8. Asbestos Related Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond Bégin; André Dufresne; François Plante; Serge Massé

    1994-01-01

    An updated summary of current understanding of asbestos related disorders is presented, along with a review of the history of the disorders, and the mineralogy, biological tissue burden, pathogenesis, pathology and clinical aspects of the asbestos related disorders, with particular emphasis on important information for the clinician.

  9. SURVEY OF ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES IN TRADES AND MINING OCCUPATIONS AND IN FACTORY AND MINING COMMUNITIES AS A MEANS OF PREDICTING HEALTH RISKS OF NONOCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO FIBROUS MINERALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Malcolm; ,

    1984-01-01

    A review based on 36 published epidemiological studies is given of disease patterns that have developed among industrial workers, miners, and millers who had been exposed to dusts of one or more of the commercial asbestos minerals or to dusts from minerals perceived to be asbestos-like. Health data are also reviewed for individuals exposed to asbestos dusts in nonoccupational settings. From the published reports it is clear that there are very significant differences in the health effects of the several asbestos or asbestos-like minerals.

  10. Asbestos in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Thomas; Johnston, Ronnie; McIvor, Arthur; Watterson, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the asbestos hazard in Scotland and draws upon a systematic oral history project to analyze from the workers' perspective the nature of exposure, the limitations of government regulatory initiatives, and the ramifications of contracting asbestos-related diseases for sufferers and their families. Current issues are investigated, stressing the agency of workers, trade unions, sympathetic local councils, and, especially, the victims' pressure groups. The occupational and environmental health threats of asbestos in Scotland remain significant, although recent E.U.- and U.K.-based decisions to ban further use of asbestos together with active campaigning by local activist groups have helped to reduce them. Mesothelioma mortality rates remain high, due to historic exposures, and much work remains to be done to reduce the number and plight of asbestos-exposed workers. PMID:15281377

  11. ABCs of Asbestos in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    Information about asbestos in the schools is provided in this pamphlet. The document describes the nature and dangers of asbestos and the passage of the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act in 1986. The responsibilities of school boards and other school officials to protect students and employees from asbestos exposure are explained as well as…

  12. Development of Asbestos - Free Brake Pad Using Bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Aigbodion

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of asbestos-free brake pad using bagasse was investigated with a view to replace the use of asbestos whose dust is carcinogenic. The bagasse were sieve into sieve grades of 100, 150, 250, 350 and 710µm. the sieve bagasse was used in production of brake pad in ratio of 70%bagasse-30%resin using compression moulding. The properties examined are microstructure analysis, hardness, compressive strength, density, flame resistance, water and oil absorption. The microstructure reveals uniform distribution of resin in the bagasse. The results obtained showed that the finer the sieve size the better the properties. The results obtained in this work were compared with that of commercial brake pad (asbestos based and optimum formulation laboratory brake pad Palm Kernel Shell based (PKS, the results are in close agreement. Hence bagasse can be used in production of asbestos-free brake pad.

  13. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of asbestos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was applied to test the possibility of detecting and identifying asbestos in different samples in view of the perspective at field operation without sample preparation which is peculiar to this technique. Several like-resin materials were first investigated by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, in order to find an asbestos container assuring safe laboratory operation during the material characterization aimed to identify indicators suitable for a quick identification on field. Successively, spectra of asbestos samples of both in serpentine and amphibole forms were measured and the variability in elemental composition was calculated from the emission spectra. Ratios of intensities of characteristic elements were tested as indicators for asbestos recognition. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy results were compared with those obtained by analyzing the same asbestos samples with a scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, a good correlation was found for Mg/Si and Fe/Si, thus showing the capability of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for this category of materials. In particular, it was demonstrated that the method based on two indicators derived from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy intensity ratios allows to discriminate between asbestos and cements in single shot measurements suitable to field operation

  14. Possibilities of utilization of water hyacinth for making water hyacinth-cement boards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portland cement when casted in the form of thin sheets, alone is too brittle and rigid to develop enough serviceable value. An additional fibrous material reinforces such a cement product and improves its tensile strength. The fibrous material forms a continuos phase in a cement base. The use of fibres as a reinforcing material has been known to man from the days of ancient civilisation when he first started making sunbaked mud bricks. It was found that if the mix contained fibrous material, the bricks became stronger on drying. Asbestos fibre is predominantly used in various asbestos cement products as a reinforcing material since it is fibrous, non-combustible and has sufficient tensile strength. When mixed with 10-20% asbestos fibres, the cement gives a strong material which is commonly available as corrugated or plain sheets used for building and other purposes. As a part of the project on utilization of water hyacinth, RRL, Jorhat, undertook investigations on the possibilities of making water hyacinth-cement sheets similar to asbestos-cement sheets. Another objective of this investigation was to develop a technology for making boards from water hyacinth and cement for rural housing and other purposes in a scale appropriate to the rural sector. Water hyacinth fibre has certain similarities with asbestos fibre. For example, both are polymers as well as fibrous. However, asbestos fibre is non-combustible whilst water hyacinth fibre is combustible. This of course does not pose any difficulty since the fibres remain in a cement matrix in the form of a sheet which is almost completely impervious. For the same reason the decomposition due to weathering and microbial action is also arrested. Crysotile asbestos, which is primarily used for making asbestos-cement sheets, makes fibres very rapidly in water as does pulp from water hyacinth. This characteristic of water hyacinth pulp is definitely a disadvantage in paper making in modern high speed machines but may be of

  15. Allegheny County Asbestos Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Asbestos permit data issued by the County for commercial building demolitions and renovations as required by the EPA. This file is updated daily and can be...

  16. The asbestos war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazan-Allen, Laurie

    2003-01-01

    That asbestos is still being sold despite overwhelming evidence linking it to debilitating and fatal diseases is testament to the effectiveness of a campaign, spear-headed by Canadian interests, to promote a product already banned in many developed countries. Blessed by government and commercial support, asbestos apologists have implemented a long-term coordinated strategy targeting new consumers in Asia, the Far East and Latin America. At industry-backed "conferences" and on government-funded junkets, they spin a web of deceit, telling all who will listen that "chrysotile (white asbestos) can be used safely." The fact that Canada exports over 95% of all the chrysotile it mines suggests that while chrysotile is supposedly safe enough for foreigners, it is not safe enough for Canadians. Asbestos victims in many countries have struggled to gain public recognition of the human cost of asbestos use. In recent years, nongovernmental organizations working with these groups have created a global anti-asbestos virtual network; with the commitment and support of thousands of "virtual members," this network challenges industry's propaganda and exposes the forces that support its cynical attempt to offload this dangerous substance on developing countries. PMID:12967154

  17. 海排灰的氯盐含量对三灰结合料微观机理影响研究%Study of Influence of Content of Chloride and Salt in Sea-Removed Dust on Microcosmic Mechanism for Binder of Cement-Lime-Fly Ash(3 dusts)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁炜; 包龙生; 于玲

    2009-01-01

    Study of microcosmic mechanism of '3 dusts' binder hydrated product, based on sea-removed dust, has revealed influence of chlorid ion on thrength of subbase materials. Study results show that cement and lime have consolidating effect on chloride ion in sea removed dust. Adequate amount of chloride ion in sea removed dust is helpful to subbase.%对基于海排灰的三灰结合料水化产物的微观机理进行研究,揭示氯离子对底基层材料强度形成的影响.研究表明:水泥、石灰材料对海排灰中的氯离子有固化作用,海排灰中适量的氯离子对底基层材料有益.

  18. Toxicity of lunar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Linnarsson, Dag; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L; Loftus, David J; Prisk, G Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust...

  19. WATER QUALITY AND TREATMENT CONSIDERATIONS FOR CEMENT-LINED AND A-C PIPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both cement mortar lined (CML) and asbestos-cement pipes (A-C) are widely used in many water systems. Cement linings are also commonly applied in-situ after pipe cleaning, usually to prevent the recurrence of red water or tuberculation problems. Unfortunately, little consideratio...

  20. Materials characterization of dusts generated by the collapse of the World Trade Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Gregory P.; Sutley, Stephen J.; Brownfield, Isabelle; Lowers, Heather; Bern, Amy M.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Clark, Roger N.; Gent, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    The major inorganic components of the dusts generated from the collapse of the World Trade Center buildings on September 11, 2001 were concrete materials, gypsum, and man-made vitreous fibers. These components were likely derived from lightweight Portland cement concrete floors, gypsum wallboard, and spray-on fireproofing and ceiling tiles, respectively. All of the 36 samples collected by the USGS team had these materials as the three major inorganic components of the dust. Components found at minor and trace levels include chrysotile asbestos, lead, crystalline silica, and particles of iron and zinc oxides. Other heavy metals, such as lead, bismuth, copper, molybdenum, chromium, and nickel, were present at much lower levels occurring in a variety of chemical forms. Several of these materials have health implications based on their chemical composition, morphology, and bioaccessibility.

  1. Serum type III procollagen peptide in asbestos workers: an early indicator of pulmonary fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Serum type III procollagen peptide (PIIIP) concentrations were determined in 36 male workers exposed to asbestos fibres in the production of asbestos cement items and in 13 healthy male controls. Mean (SD) PIIIP serum concentrations were 9.3 (1.5) ng/ml (range 7-12) in the controls and 13.7 (3.5)ng/ml (range 7.5-20) in the asbestos workers; the difference was statistically significant (p less than 0.01). The exposed workers were subdivided according to presence or absence of radiological sign...

  2. Asbestos in Schools: A Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    Asbestos, a mineral known to cause cancer in humans, is present in an unknown number of schools where it may be hazardous to the health of students and employees. Although the Federal Government has programs designed to address the asbestos situation, it has not determined in what specific circumstances asbestos is a hazard. Therefore, State and…

  3. Pleural malignant mesothelioma and non occupational exposure to asbestos in Casale Monferrato, Italy; Mesotheliome pleural malin et exposition environnementale l'amiante a Casale Monferrato, Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnani, C.; Terracini, B.; Ivaldi, C.; Botta, M.; Mancini, A.; Andrion, A.

    1998-03-01

    The objective is to study the possibility of the risk of a pleural malignant mesothelioma associated to an environmental exposure to asbestos coming from industry, by estimating the incidence of mesotheliomas in a population without professional exposure but living near a asbestos-cement factory.

  4. Microwave irradiation of asbestos containing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Dangerous wastes, i.e. fly ashes, nuclear waste, asbestos containing materials, can be regarded as multi-component materials having a wide range of compositions, and usually it is the presence of only some of these components that makes all the mixture a product to be disposed of. Thus, a process allowing selective treatment of the 'unwanted' portion of the waste, and to do this volumetrically, could represent an enormous advantage in terms of time and money, especially as far as materials presenting low thermal conductivity are concerned. This is the case of asbestos containing materials, which are mixtures of gypsum, cement, and minor polymeric components, whose inertitazion requires long heat treatments at temperature higher than the decomposition temperature of amphiboles, the dangerous mineral fibre in commercial items. Shorter heating time under 2.45 GHz irradiation, have suggested that the selectivity of microwave radiation for OH groups contained in the crystalline amphibole can be exploited to inertize asbestos containing materials. The experiments were performed either on small samples in closed multimode cavity or on large pieces under an open applicator. In both cases, depending on the output power and on sample positioning and lining, it was possible to lead the samples to complete inertisation, or, prolonging the thermal treatment, to vitrification. The treated samples are constituted mainly of enstatite, an harmless magnesium silicate, which could then be inserted as secondary raw materials in the body composition of many ceramic materials, like tiles and bricks. The open applicator with a remote control panel allowed the treatment of portion of contamined soil, such as, for example, the ground surrounding asbestos mining and treatment installations. The maximum installed power, 18 kW, is higher than that used in closed cavities, and inevitably the same happens regarding power losses. Improvements of applicator design for power

  5. Asbestos in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements and analysis of more than 100 samples of tap-water, originated from different countries of the Federal Republik of Germany, have been performed by means of the standardized TEM-procedure (ISO). The results have shown that the drinking water is contaminated with fine fibers, with chrysotile and amphibole asbestos. The majority of investigated samples contained less than 106 fibers/liter, and the fibers were thin and shorter than 5 μm. Nevertheless, in some tap-water samples the asbestos fiber concentrations were higher than 106 fibers/liter and/or the content of long fibers (longer than 5 μm) was relatively high. It is recommended tapwater with asbestos fiber concentrations over 106 fibers/liter and/or with greater content of long fibers should not be used for cooking or drinking unless filtered. (orig.)

  6. Cross-shift study of acute respiratory effects in cement production workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Omid Aminian; Maryam Aslani; Khosro Sadeghniiat Haghighi

    2014-01-01

    Cement dust exposure is associated with increased respiratory impairment. As the major occupational hazard in the cement production industry is cement particles, our aim was to more thoroughly examine the acute effects of occupational exposure to cement dust on the respiratory system. A cross-shift study was conducted in a cement factory in Iran. 100 high exposed workers from production and packing sections and 100 low exposed from office workers were included. Environmental total dust was me...

  7. Water in Asbestos

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, Yu D; Tsiok, E N

    2015-01-01

    We present the molecular simulation study of the behavior of water and sodium chloride solution confined in lizardite asbestos nanotube which is a typical example of hydrophilic confinement. The local structure, orientational and dynamic properties are studied. It is shown that the diffusion coefficient drops about two orders of magnitude comparing to the bulk case, and water in lizardite asbestos tubes experiences vitrification rather then crystallization upon cooling in accordance with the results for some other hydrophilic confinements. The behavior of sodium chloride solutions also considered and the formation of double layer is observed. It is shower that both sodium and chlorine have larger diffusion coefficients then water.

  8. Nonpulmonary outcomes of asbestos exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunderson-Schelvan, Melisa; Pfau, Jean C; Crouch, Robert; Holian, Andrij

    2011-01-01

    The adverse pulmonary effects of asbestos are well accepted in scientific circles. However, the extrapulmonary consequences of asbestos exposure are not as clearly defined. In this review the potential for asbestos to produce diseases of the peritoneum, immune, gastrointestinal (GIT), and reproductive systems are explored as evidenced in published, peer-reviewed literature. Several hundred epidemiological, in vivo, and in vitro publications analyzing the extrapulmonary effects of asbestos were used as sources to arrive at the conclusions and to establish areas needing further study. In order to be considered, each study had to monitor extrapulmonary outcomes following exposure to asbestos. The literature supports a strong association between asbestos exposure and peritoneal neoplasms. Correlations between asbestos exposure and immune-related disease are less conclusive; nevertheless, it was concluded from the combined autoimmune studies that there is a possibility for a higher-than-expected risk of systemic autoimmune disease among asbestos-exposed populations. In general, the GIT effects of asbestos exposure appear to be minimal, with the most likely outcome being development of stomach cancer. However, IARC recently concluded the evidence to support asbestos-induced stomach cancer to be "limited." The strongest evidence for reproductive disease due to asbestos is in regard to ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, effects on fertility and the developing fetus are under-studied. The possibility of other asbestos-induced health effects does exist. These include brain-related tumors, blood disorders due to the mutagenic and hemolytic properties of asbestos, and peritoneal fibrosis. It is clear from the literature that the adverse properties of asbestos are not confined to the pulmonary system. PMID:21534087

  9. What Are Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases? Asbestos-related lung diseases are ... as the peritoneum (PER-ih-to-NE-um). Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases Figure A shows the location ...

  10. Cement Conundrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China aims to streamline the crowded cement industry Policymakers are looking to build a concrete wall around the cement-making industry as they seek to solidify the fluid cement market and cut excessive production.

  11. Overview of Asbestos Issues in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyoung Ryoul

    2009-01-01

    Asbestos is a carcinogen that causes diseases such as mesothelioma and lung cancer in humans. There was a sharp increase in the use of asbestos in Korea in the 1970s as Korea's economy developed rapidly, and asbestos was only recently banned from use. Despite the ban of its use, previously applied asbestos still causes many problems. A series of asbestos-related events that recently occurred in Korea have caused the general public to become concerned about asbestos. Therefore, it is necessary...

  12. Clinical and radiological observations on asbestos-related pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlig, H.; Hain, E.

    1980-01-01

    The papers in this session, which are summarized briefly, do not cover the wide range of radiological and clinical problems resulting from inhalation of asbestos dust. Pleural effusions are found in persons exposed occupationally to asbestos, even in the absence of asbestosis, but they are difficult to attribute to such exposure. Asbestosis of the lung shows no striking symptoms and can also be diagnosed only after all other possibilities have been excluded. There are no convincing or striking morphological peculiarities that suggest that an 'asbestos lung cancer' exists. Mesotheliomas of the pleura and of the peritoneum are usually resistant to therapy of any kind, although several possibilities are discussed. Radiological surveillance is presented as being still the most effective and reliable method for medical surveillance of asbestos workers. Circumscribed pleural thickening is benign but a good indicator of exposure to mineral dusts. Diffuse pleural thickening occurs frequently in nonexposed groups and cannot, therefore, be used as an indication of exposure; however, it cannot yet be ruled out as being significant epidemiologically.

  13. Increased mortality in COPD among construction workers exposed to inorganic dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergdahl, I A; Torén, K; Eriksson, K; Hedlund, U; Nilsson, T; Flodin, R; Järvholm, B

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if occupational exposure to dust, fumes or gases, especially among never-smokers, increased the mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A cohort of 317,629 Swedish male construction workers was followed from 1971 to 1999. Exposure to inorganic dust (asbestos, man-made mineral fibres, dust from cement, concrete and quartz), gases and irritants (epoxy resins, isocyanates and organic solvents), fumes (asphalt fumes, diesel exhaust and metal fumes), and wood dust was based on a job-exposure matrix. An internal control group with "unexposed" construction workers was used, and the analyses were adjusted for age and smoking. When all subjects were analysed, there was an increased mortality from COPD among those with any airborne exposure (relative risk 1.12 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.22)). In a Poisson regression model, including smoking, age and the major exposure groups, exposure to inorganic dust was associated with an increased risk (hazard ratio (HR) 1.10 (95% CI 1.06-1.14)), especially among never-smokers (HR 2.30 (95% CI 1.07-4.96)). The fraction of COPD among the exposed attributable to any airborne exposure was estimated as 10.7% overall and 52.6% among never-smokers. In conclusion, occupational exposure among construction workers increases mortality due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, even among never-smokers. PMID:15065829

  14. Increased mortality in COPD among construction workers exposed to inorganic dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergdahl, I A; Torén, K; Eriksson, K; Hedlund, U; Nilsson, T; Flodin, R; Järvholm, B

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if occupational exposure to dust, fumes or gases, especially among never-smokers, increased the mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A cohort of 317,629 Swedish male construction workers was followed from 1971 to 1999. Exposure to inorganic dust (asbestos, man-made mineral fibres, dust from cement, concrete and quartz), gases and irritants (epoxy resins, isocyanates and organic solvents), fumes (asphalt fumes, diesel exhaust and metal fumes), and wood dust was based on a job-exposure matrix. An internal control group with "unexposed" construction workers was used, and the analyses were adjusted for age and smoking. When all subjects were analysed, there was an increased mortality from COPD among those with any airborne exposure (relative risk 1.12 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.22)). In a Poisson regression model, including smoking, age and the major exposure groups, exposure to inorganic dust was associated with an increased risk (hazard ratio (HR) 1.10 (95% CI 1.06-1.14)), especially among never-smokers (HR 2.30 (95% CI 1.07-4.96)). The fraction of COPD among the exposed attributable to any airborne exposure was estimated as 10.7% overall and 52.6% among never-smokers. In conclusion, occupational exposure among construction workers increases mortality due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, even among never-smokers.

  15. Health hazards from environmental asbestos and asbestos in rooms; Gesundheitsgefaehrdung durch Asbest aus der Umwelt und im Innenraum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohme, K. [Medizinal-, Lebensmittel- und Veterinaeruntersuchungsamt Thueringen, Hygiene-Inst. Erfurt (Germany); Huehn, W. [Medizinal-, Lebensmittel- und Veterinaeruntersuchungsamt Thueringen, Hygiene-Inst. Erfurt (Germany)

    1993-05-01

    Asbestos-comprising building and other materials are sources to a potential health hazard by means of asbestos fibres from environment and indoor, from which asbestos fibres may be released by atmospheric influences, aging processes, working or using. Inhalation of asbestos fibres is the deciding factor for the essentiell healthy consequences of asbestos. Only fibres of critical dimensions (length L > 5 {mu}m, diameter D < 3 {mu}m and proportion L:D > 3:1) have a pathogenic potential. Inhalated asbestos-comprising dust may lead to diseases on asbestosis of the lungs and/or pleura, lung cancer, mesothelioms of pleura or peritoneum principally. In result of the present concentrations of asbestos fibres in environment and indoor (from lower than 50 to 200 fibres/m{sup 3} respectively up to 20000 fibres/m{sup 3}) diseases on lung asbestosis are not to be expected. Diseases on lung cancer and mesothelioms are possible. Smoker have a tenfold higher risk to fall ill with asbestos caused lung cancer than non-smokers. In comparison with it, differences on mesothelioms were not observed. In all the asbestos-caused lifetime-risk is determined to 2 . 10{sup -5} at an immission load of 100 fibres/m{sup 3} (unit-risk). A rising of asbestos fibres pollution and, therefore, of health hazard seems not much probably. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ausgangspunkte fuer eine moegliche Gesundheitsgefaehrdung durch Asbestfasern aus der Umwelt und im Innenraum wind im wesentlichen asbesthaltige Bau- und Werkstoffe, aus denen durch atmosphaerische Einfluesse, Alterung, Bearbeitung oder Nutzung Asbestfasern freigesetzt werden koennen. Entscheidend fuer die wesentlichen gesundheitlichen Auswirkungen von Asbest ist die Aufnahme von Asbestfasern aus der Luft durch Einatmen. Ein krankheitsausloesendes Potential weisen nur Fasern kritischer Abmessungen (Laenge L > 5 {mu}m, Durchmesser D < 3 {mu}m und L:D > 3:1) auf. Eingeatmeter Asbestfaserstaub kann grundsaetzlich zu Erkrankungen an Asbestose der Lunge und

  16. Environmental contamination of chrysotile asbestos and its toxic effects on antioxidative system of Lemna gibba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, A K; Ahmad, I; Musthapa, M S; Ansari, F A

    2007-04-01

    Asbestos was monitored in various plant samples around an asbestos cement factory. Asbestos residue was found on the surface of all plant samples monitored. Based on asbestos concentration found in different plant samples during monitoring and on the property of asbestos to cause reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidative stress in animal models, laboratory experiments were conducted to assess the toxicity of chrysotile asbestos on an aquatic macrophyte, duckweed (Lemna gibba.). L. gibba plants were exposed to four concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 microg/mL) of chrysotile asbestos under laboratory conditions, and alterations in the glutathione and ascorbate antioxidative system were estimated at postexposure days 7, 14, 21, and 28 in order to assess changes in their level as suitable biomarkers of chrysotile contamination. Chrysotile exposure caused a decrease in total and reduced glutathione and an enhancement in the oxidized glutathione as well as the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. An increase in ascorbate pool size, and reduced as well as oxidized ascorbate was found to be accompanied by a decrease in the ratio of reduced/oxidized ascorbate. Alteration in the glutathione and ascorbate level might be considered as a biomarker of exposure to an unsafe environment because these are essential compounds of the general antioxidative strategy to overcome oxidative stress due to environmental constraints. Because an increase in the oxidation rate of antioxidants weakens cellular defenses and indicates a precarious state, they could constitute indicators of toxicity. PMID:17354032

  17. Long-term mortality from pleural and peritoneal cancer after exposure to asbestos: Possible role of asbestos clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone-Adesi, Francesco; Ferrante, Daniela; Bertolotti, Marinella; Todesco, Annalisa; Mirabelli, Dario; Terracini, Benedetto; Magnani, Corrado

    2008-08-15

    Models based on the multistage theory of carcinogenesis predict that the rate of mesothelioma increases monotonically as a function of time since first exposure (TSFE) to asbestos. Predictions of long-term mortality (TSFE >or= 40 years) are, however, still untested, because of the limited follow-up of most epidemiological studies. Some authors have suggested that the increase in mesothelioma rate with TSFE might be attenuated by clearance of asbestos from the lungs. We estimated mortality time trends from pleural and peritoneal cancer in a cohort of 3,443 asbestos-cement workers, followed for more than 50 years. The functional relation between mesothelioma rate and TSFE was evaluated with various regression models. The role of asbestos clearance was explored using the traditional mesothelioma multistage model, generalized to include a term representing elimination over time. We observed 139 deaths from pleural and 56 from peritoneal cancer during the period 1950-2003. The rate of pleural cancer increased during the first 40 years of TSFE and reached a plateau thereafter. In contrast, the rate of peritoneal cancer increased monotonically with TSFE. The model allowing for asbestos elimination fitted the data better than the traditional model for pleural (p = 0.02) but not for peritoneal cancer (p = 0.22). The risk for pleural cancer, rather than showing an indefinite increase, might reach a plateau when a sufficiently long time has elapsed since exposure. The different trends for pleural and peritoneal cancer might be related to clearance of the asbestos from the workers' lungs. PMID:18528868

  18. Asbestos exposure in Israel: findings, issues and needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, E D

    1984-02-01

    In Israel, since the 1950s, at least several thousand workers, their wives and children, and possibly many others, have been or still may be exposed to hazardous amounts of airborne asbestos fibers. These are found both in asbestos-based industries (asbestos cement, textiles and brake linings) and trades with asbestos exposure (construction, shipyard repair, boiler maintenance, insulation work). These people are at increased risk for disability or illness, or for premature death from asbestosis, from lung cancer, from exacerbation of preexisting respiratory disease (especially if they smoke), from mesothelioma, from gastrointestinal cancer, and from other malignancies. Although there has been progress, much still has to be done in the areas of legislation, standard setting, exposure control, technology, surveillance, smoking cessation, and medical care and follow-up. Compensation is needed to care for those workers currently or previously exposed, as well as for their families and others at risk. A national policy for protecting and caring for those formerly or currently exposed is indicated by the review of the situation in Israel. PMID:6368466

  19. Urinary asbestos fibers and inorganic particles in past asbestos workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaina, Sara; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Ballarin, Maria Nicoletta; Scoizzato, Luca; Carradori, Giorgio; Fedeli, Ugo; Capella, Silvana; Belluso, Elena

    2016-05-01

    To assess the validity of the procedure as a test of asbestos exposure, we compared urinary asbestos fibers with occupational and environmental exposure data in a random sample of 48 subjects with high past asbestos exposure. Occupational and environmental exposure was estimated on questionnaire, pleural plaques were diagnosed with computed tomography, and inorganic fibers and particles were identified by scanning electron microscope with an energy-dispersive spectrometry. Few urinary asbestos fibers (in 15% of workers and 17% of cases with pleural plaques) and high amount of urinary silicate (particularly nonfibrous particles) were detected. Asbestos undergoes dissolution in lung tissues, but the secondary minerals are largely unknown. These materials, possibly nonfibrous silicates or metals, could be excreted with urine. Therefore, another study including a control group is warranted to discriminate the occupational origin of minerals in the urine. PMID:25455013

  20. Asbestos Abatement in Oklahoma Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    The intent of this paper is to provide the information necessary to develop and implement an acceptable asbestos removal plan. The information is taken from current (September 1980) federal and state regulations and recommendations. The information describing asbestos removal operations is organized chronologically to simplify using this document…

  1. Why asbestos should be banned

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Cremers

    2013-01-01

    There has been an outburst of public anger after the ‘discovery’ of asbestos polluted social housing, despite there being several other topical asbestos related incidents. This coupled with the spectacular Turin trial against some captains of industry who were sentenced for knowingly exposing their

  2. Asbestos, radiation and oncogenic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an attempt to clarify the mechanisms of asbestos carcinogenicity, the effects of the interaction between asbestos and gamma radiation on cytotoxicity and oncogenic transformation were studied in vitro in C3H 10T1/2 mouse embryo fibroblasts. The data demonstrated that asbestos fibres, at a concentration which itself was ineffective in inducing oncogenic transformation in vitro, did potentiate the oncogenicity of gamma rays. However asbestos did not appear capable of acting as a promoter when added to 10T1/2 cells 3 days after irradiation. Thus, in the context of the 2-stage model of carcinogenesis, asbestos can be aptly categorized as a co-carcinogen. (U.K.)

  3. 30 CFR 71.702 - Asbestos standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) using the OSHA Reference Method in OSHA's asbestos standard found in 29 CFR 1910.1001, Appendix A, or a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Asbestos standard. 71.702 Section 71.702... Contaminants § 71.702 Asbestos standard. (a) Definitions. Asbestos is a generic term for a number...

  4. Retrospective assessment of occupational asbestos exposure among 220 patients with respiratory cancer hospitalized at Vilnius University Institute of Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No cases of lung cancer or mesothelioma have ever been diagnosed or compensated as asbestos-related in Lithuania. This paper attempts to estimate the proportion of those occupationally exposed to asbestos among respiratory cancer patients. Occupational exposure to asbestos was assessed retrospectively for 218 lung cancer and 2 mesothelioma patients admitted to Institute of Oncology, Vilnius University. The evaluation was based on personal interview data using an internationally established questionnaire. Cumulative exposure to asbestos at work was evaluated in fibre-years. A cumulative asbestos exposure of ≥25 fibre-years was found for 7 patients (3.2%), in further 135 (61.2%) a cumulative exposure from 0.01 to 24.99 fibre-years was assessed. The most common occupations among heavily (≥25 fibre-years) exposed patients were smith, welder or insulator in foundries, construction, shipyard as well as asbestos cement and glass industry. Preliminary findings indicate that a fraction (3.2%) of the respiratory cancer cases could be attributed to occupational exposure to asbestos. Since 1560 or more cases of lung cancer are registered every year in Lithuania, about 50 cases per year could be predicted to be asbestos-related. (author)

  5. Global problems from exposure to asbestos.

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, A L

    1993-01-01

    Considerable human-derived data the health consequences of asbestos exposure are available. Usually, less information is available from laboratory models of asbestos-related health effects. Animal data mirror the experience in man, and cellular studies help in to understand the mechanistic changes related to asbestos. Although it is clearly carcinogenic, asbestos has shown much variability when examined for its mutagenic activity. Asbestos, a commercial term referring to a family of six natur...

  6. Asbestos and radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the effects of inhaled agents on the lung, a characterization of both the lung and the inhaled agent is essential. Since deposition of the agent is the result of a dynamic process involving the particles as they move through the tracheobronchial tree, the authors' goal is to understand this interaction. To lay the groundwork for this they present basic tracheobronchial anatomy and physiology. Then they examine information on deposition and clearance of asbestos and radon and discuss how this relates to the resultant pathology

  7. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  8. Asbestos products, hazards, and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, Barry

    2006-01-01

    Asbestos is present in the United States in a multitude of products used in past decades, and in some products that continue to be imported and domestically produced. We have limited information on the hazards posed by some of these individual products and no information at all on most of them. Legal discovery of corporate documents has shed some light on the use of asbestos in some products and exposures from asbestos in others, sometimes adding considerably to what was in the published literature. But liability concerns have motivated corporate efforts to curtail governmental public health guidance on long-recognized hazards to workers. Liability considerations have also evidently led, in the case of asbestos brake linings, to the support of publication in the scientific literature of review articles denying in the 21st century what had been widely accepted and established in health policy in the 20th century. This report is an effort to illustrate the suppression and emergence of scientific knowledge in a climate of regulation and liability. Examples discussed are vinyl-asbestos flooring, feminine hygiene products, automotive friction materials, and asbestos contamination of other minerals such as talc and vermiculite. Global efforts to deal with the hazards of continuing marketing of asbestos products are also discussed. PMID:16878394

  9. Asbestos Exposure Assessment Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcot, Divya K.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to particular hazardous materials in a work environment is dangerous to the employees who work directly with or around the materials as well as those who come in contact with them indirectly. In order to maintain a national standard for safe working environments and protect worker health, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set forth numerous precautionary regulations. NASA has been proactive in adhering to these regulations by implementing standards which are often stricter than regulation limits and administering frequent health risk assessments. The primary objective of this project is to create the infrastructure for an Asbestos Exposure Assessment Database specific to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) which will compile all of the exposure assessment data into a well-organized, navigable format. The data includes Sample Types, Samples Durations, Crafts of those from whom samples were collected, Job Performance Requirements (JPR) numbers, Phased Contrast Microscopy (PCM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results and qualifiers, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), and names of industrial hygienists who performed the monitoring. This database will allow NASA to provide OSHA with specific information demonstrating that JSC s work procedures are protective enough to minimize the risk of future disease from the exposures. The data has been collected by the NASA contractors Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) and Wyle Laboratories. The personal exposure samples were collected from devices worn by laborers working at JSC and by building occupants located in asbestos-containing buildings.

  10. Airborne asbestos exposures associated with the installation and removal of roofing products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotter, Jason T; Roberts, Ben; Henshaw, John L; Pierce, Jennifer S

    2016-08-01

    Asbestos-containing roofing products were widely used throughout the 20th century, and certain products are still used in limited quantities today. Roofing products are generally considered non-friable and are not expected to release appreciable amounts of airborne asbestos fibers; however, despite the variety of roofing products that have contained asbestos over time, there are no comprehensive analyses of the exposure data associated with these products in the published literature. The objective of this study was to analyze the available data and characterize asbestos exposures associated with the installation, removal, and replacement of built-up roofing (BUR), felts, flashings, shingles, coatings, cements, and mastics under a variety of work practices. Published and unpublished literature that contained the following information was included in the analysis: (1) airborne fiber concentrations determined by PCM; (2) a description of the product(s) used; and (3) a description of the task(s) performed. More than 800 personal air samples from 12 studies performed between 1982 and 2010 were identified which fit the inclusion criteria. The findings indicate that short-term and full-shift exposures from the use of asbestos-containing roofing products were typically well below applicable occupational exposure limits. Additionally, the cumulative exposures associated with roofing work would be well below published chrysotile no-observed-adverse-effect-levels (NOAELs) for asbestos-related diseases. PMID:27124394

  11. Asbestosis as a precursor of asbestos related lung cancer: results of a prospective mortality study.

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, J. M.; Weill, H

    1991-01-01

    A prospective mortality study of 839 men employed in the manufacture of asbestos cement products in 1969 examined lung cancer risk in relation to lung fibrosis seen on chest x ray film, controlling for age, smoking, and exposure to asbestos. Twenty or more years after hire, no excess of lung cancer was found among workers without radiographically detectable lung fibrosis, even among long term workers (greater than or equal to 21.5 years); nor was there a trend in risk by level of cumulative e...

  12. Symptoms, ventilatory function, and environmental exposures in Portland cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Abrons, H L; Petersen, M R; Sanderson, W T; Engelberg, A L; Harber, P

    1988-01-01

    Data on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function were obtained for 2736 Portland cement plant workers and 755 controls. Personal dust samples contained a geometric mean concentration of 0.57 mg/m3 for respirable dust and 2.90 mg/m3 for total dust. Cement workers and controls had similar prevalences of symptoms, except that 5.4% of the cement workers had dyspnoea compared with 2.7% of the controls. The mean pulmonary function indices were similar for the two groups. Among cement plant worke...

  13. Asbesto, asbestose e câncer: critérios diagnósticos Asbestos, asbestosis and cancer: diagnostic criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VERA LUIZA CAPELOZZI

    2001-07-01

    about 10,000 workers in the mining activity, and an unknown number of workers in asbestos-cement industry. A study, with scientific appropriate investigation, with the purpose to evaluate the effects of asbestos exposure over the health of the mine workers in this country, was done by interinstitution researchers, and untitled "Morbidity and mortality among workers exposed to asbestos in mining activities -- 1940/1996". With the experience achieved in the course of this study, the objective of this report is to make an overview of asbestos-related diseases, mainly with respect to difficulties in establishing the histopathologic diagnosis.

  14. The asbestos hazard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellini, M. [Siena Univ., Siena (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze della Terra

    2000-07-01

    This lecture arises from my own opinion about the positive role of Earth Sciences in general, and Mineralogy in particular, in defining and solving environmental and health problems. These disciplines should cooperate with other sciences in defining what is the problem, and how the problem might be solved, taking into account economical, social and environmental aspects. However, it seems that quite often scientific and technical knowledge is simply not existent in everyday life. At best, it is just confined within a narrow, negative role; the social request is that science contributes only in passively monitoring, analyzing and counting phenomena that cannot be overturned (or that are, in any case, governed elsewhere). The history of the asbestos issue has been a dramatic example of the failure of science in helping people while making important decisions.

  15. Reported historic asbestos mines, historic asbestos prospects, and other natural occurrences of asbestos in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Clinkenbeard, John P.

    2011-01-01

    The map (Plate.pdf), pamphlet (Pamphlet.pdf), and the accompanying datasets in this report provide information for 290 sites in California where asbestos occurs in natural settings, using descriptions found in the geologic literature. Data on location, mineralogy, geology, and relevant literature for each asbestos site are provided. Using the map and digital data in this report, the user can examine the distribution of previously reported asbestos and their geological characteristics in California. This report is part of an ongoing study by the U.S. Geological Survey to identify and map sites where asbestos mineralization occurs in the United States, which includes similar maps and datasets of natural asbestos localities within the Eastern United States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1189/), the Central United States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1211/), the Rocky Mountain States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1182/), the Southwestern United States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1095/), and the Northwestern United States (Oregon and Washington) (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2010/1041/). These reports are intended to provide State and local government agencies and other stakeholders with geologic information on reported asbestos mineralization in the United States.

  16. [Pulmonary concentration of asbestos fibers in steel workers with pleural mesothelioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, P G; Somigliana, A; Festa, R; Bercich, L

    2010-01-01

    those found in asbestos-cement workers and in asbestos-textile workers. These data suggest to consider the cases of mesothelioma occurred in the steel workers at least as "possible" exposure, even in the absence of adequate information on the circumstances of contact with asbestos. This study, although based on a small number of cases, is the only one ever held in Italy on workers in this sector. PMID:20684435

  17. Prevention of Asbestos-Related Disease in Countries Currently Using Asbestos

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Marsili; Benedetto Terracini; Vilma S. Santana; Juan Pablo Ramos-Bonilla; Roberto Pasetto; Agata Mazzeo; Dana Loomis; Pietro Comba; Eduardo Algranti

    2016-01-01

    More than 40 years of evaluation have consistently confirmed the carcinogenicity of asbestos in all of its forms. This notwithstanding, according to recent figures, the annual world production of asbestos is approximatively 2,000,000 tons. Currently, about 90% of world asbestos comes from four countries: Russia, China, Brazil and Kazakhstan; and the wide use of asbestos worldwide represents a global threat. The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the asbestos health impact and to ...

  18. Diffusion model for acid corrosion of cemented materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dijk, J.C.; De Moel, P.J.; Nooyen, W.F.; Nuiten, P.C.

    1986-09-25

    The acid corrosion of cemented materials is an important aspect in engineering practice. Corrosion affects the strength of materials and may cause a deterioration of water quality. This article deals with corrosion due to non-erosive acid attacks. A diffusion model is presented in which the depth of attack increases in proportion to the square root of both time, the hydronium ion concentration in the water, and the inverse of the total concentration of lime in the solid phase. Experiments verifying the model are presented. The experiments also reveal that the corrosion of asbestos cement proceeds faster as compared to concrete because of desintegration of the structure of asbestos cement. The diffusion model also worked out to be applicable for corrosion by agressive CO/sub 2/. The lower corrosion rate due to the formation of CaCO/sub 3/ can for this case be described by a lower diffusion coefficient. 4 tabs., 6 figs., 9 refs.

  19. Naturally occurring asbestos-A recurring public policy challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential environmental hazards and associated public health issues related to exposure to respirable dusts from the vicinity of natural in-place asbestos deposits (commonly referred to as naturally occurring asbestos, NOA) have gained the regulatory and media spotlight in many areas around the United States, such as Libby, MT, Fairfax County, VA, and El Dorado Hills, CA, among others. NOA deposits may be present in a variety of geologic formations. It has been suggested that airborne asbestos may be released from NOA deposits, and absent appropriate engineering controls, may pose a potential health hazard if these rocks are crushed or exposed to natural weathering and erosion or to human activities that create dust. The issue that needs to be addressed at a policy level is the method of assessing exposures to elongated rock fragments ubiquitous in dust clouds in these same environments and the associated risk. Elongated rock fragments and single crystal minerals present in NOA have been construed by some as having attributes, including the health effects, of asbestos fibers. However, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), and the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) found that the scientific evidence did not support this assumption. As in many environmental fields of study, the evidence is often disputed. Regulatory policy is not uniform on the subject of rock fragments, even within single agencies. The core of the issue is whether the risk parameters associated with exposures to commercial asbestos can or should be applied to rock fragments meeting an arbitrary set of particle dimensions used for counting asbestos fibers. Inappropriate inclusion of particles or fragments results in dilution of risk and needless expenditure of resources. On the other hand, inappropriate exclusion of particles or fragments may result in increased and unnecessary risk. Some of the fastest growing counties in

  20. Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler (RAFS) Operation Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler (RAFS) is a field instrument that provides an in-situ measurement of asbestos releasability from consistent and reproducible mechanical agitation of the source material such as soil. The RAFS was designed to measure concentration (asbestos st...

  1. Earth mineral resource of the month: asbestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the characteristics and feature of asbestos. According to the author, asbestos is a generic name for six needle-shaped minerals that possess high tensile strengths, flexibility, and resistance to chemical and thermal degradation. These minerals are actinolite, amosite, anthophyllite, chrysolite, crocilodite and tremolite. Asbestos is used for strengthening concrete pipe, plastic components, and gypsum plasters.

  2. Asbestos Training Curriculum Project. [Draft Copy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Ron

    This package contains two types of asbestos training materials: (1) an instructor's guide for "Asbestos in the Home: A Homeowner's Course"; and (2) "Asbestos Abatement Certification: Small-Scale Worker Student Manual," a 16-hour course, with instructor's guide. The instructor's guide for the 6-hour homeowner's course contains eight sections that…

  3. Occupational cancer study on asbestos: Differentiation of high-risk groups. Asbestos research report 2; Berufskrebsstudie Asbest: Beitrag zur Eingrenzung von Hochrisikogruppen. Forschungsbericht Asbest 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woitowitz, H.J. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Arbeits- und Sozialmedizin; Lange, H.J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Statistik und Epidemiologie; Roedelsperger, K. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Arbeits- und Sozialmedizin; Pache, L. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Statistik und Epidemiologie; Woitowitz, R.H. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Arbeits- und Sozialmedizin; Ulm, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Statistik und Epidemiologie

    1989-06-01

    3,988 men and women with a history of at least 3 years of occupational asbestos fibre exposure participated in a cohort study. The mortality rates of this group were compared with the mortality figures of the non-occupationally exposed population of the FRG. Subgroup I included, at more than 50%, former employees of companies which produce and use asbestos cement products or asbestos boards, or asbestos press plates. Subgroup II largely recruited former employees of companies which produce or use asbestos textiles or asbestos cement products. For 106 expected deaths from ``malignant neoplasias in total``, subgroup I also showed 106 according to death certificate and 123 according to best available information. For 35 expected deaths from lung cancer, 37 were found according to death certificate and 44 according to best available information. For 25 expected deaths from ``malignant neoplasias in total``, subgroup II showed a statistically significant increase of 42 according to death certificate and 50 deaths according best available information. For 7 expected deaths from lung cancer, there was a statistically significant increase of 14 according to death certificate and 17 according to best available information. Assessment of the tumour risks shows a significant increase of ``lung cancer`` as the cause of death in the production and use of asbestos cement products for cohort members of both subgroups, and in the production and use of frictional coatings for subgroup II. The highest mortality by mesothelioma was found in former employees in the production segments ``asbestos textiles``, ``asbestos cement`` and ``asbestos insulation materials``. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] 3988 Maenner und Frauen mit mindestens dreijaehriger Asbestfaserstaub-Gefaehrdung am Arbeitsplatz nahmen an einer Kohortenstudie teil. Es wurden die Sterblichkeitsraten dieser Personengruppen mit Mortalitaetsziffern in der uebrigen Bevoelkerung der BRD verglichen. Untergruppe I bestand zu mehr als 50

  4. Mesothelioma mortality surveillance and asbestos exposure tracking in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Fazzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Spatial distribution of mortality from pleural mesothelioma (which in the ICD-10 Revision has a specific code: C45.0 in Italy for the period 2003-2009 is described. Previous mortality studies at national level employed the topographic code "Malignant neoplasms of pleura", because of unavailability of a specific code in ICD-9 Revision for pleural mesothelioma. METHODS: Standardized mortality ratios were computed for all municipalities, using each regional population as reference; for municipalities in Regions with rate higher than the national rate, the latter has been used as reference. SMRs were computed specifically also for each Italian Polluted Sites "of national concern for environmental remediation" (IPS with asbestos exposure sources, composed by one or more municipalities, using regional rate as reference. Spatial Scan Statistics procedure, using SatScan software, was applied in cluster analysis: the country was divided into geographic macro-areas and the relative risks (RR express the ratio of risk within the cluster to the risk of the macro-area outside the cluster. Clusters with p-value < 0.10 were selected. RESULTS: The national standardized annual mortality rate was 1.7 cases per 100 000. Several areas with evident burden of asbestos-related disease were detected. Significant clusters were found in correspondence to asbestos-cement industries (e.g. Casale Monferrato, women: RR = 28.7, shipyards (e.g. Trieste, men: RR = 4.8, petrochemical industries (e.g. Priolo, men: RR = 6.9 and a stone quarry contaminated by fluoro-edenite fibres (Biancavilla, women: RR = 25.9. Some of the increased clusters correspond to IPS. CONCLUSIONS: The results may contribute to detect asbestos exposure and to set priorites for environmental remediation.

  5. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    OpenAIRE

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec; Davorin Matanović; Gracijan Krklec

    1994-01-01

    During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures) and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production...

  6. Pleural mesothelioma: Case-report of uncommon occupational asbestos exposure in a small furniture industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddone, Enrico; Imbriani, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between asbestos exposure and malignant mesothelioma is no longer disputed, although it is not always easy to trace past occupational exposure. This report describes a case of uncommon asbestos exposure of a small furniture industry worker, who subsequently died of pleural malignant mesothelioma, to stress the crucial importance of a full reconstruction of the occupational history, both for legal and compensation purposes. Sarcomatoid pleural mesothelioma was diagnosed in a 70-year-old man, who was previously employed as a carpenter in a small furniture industry. He worked for about 6 years in the small factory, was exposed to asbestos during the assembly of the furniture inspired by classical architecture, in which asbestos cement tubes were used to reproduce classical columns. During this production process no specific work safety measures were applied, nor masks or local aspirators. No extra-professional exposure to asbestos was identified. This mesothelioma case was investigated by the Public Prosecutor's assignment that commissioned expert evidence on the legal accountability for the disease. Despite its uncommon expositive circumstance, the length of latency (about 30 years), the duration of exposure, the clinical and histochemical features are all consistent with literature evidence, accounting for the occupational origin of this malignancy. PMID:26988890

  7. Pleural mesothelioma: Case-report of uncommon occupational asbestos exposure in a small furniture industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Oddone

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between asbestos exposure and malignant mesothelioma is no longer disputed, although it is not always easy to trace past occupational exposure. This report describes a case of uncommon asbestos exposure of a small furniture industry worker, who subsequently died of pleural malignant mesothelioma, to stress the crucial importance of a full reconstruction of the occupational history, both for legal and compensation purposes. Sarcomatoid pleural mesothelioma was diagnosed in a 70-year-old man, who was previously employed as a carpenter in a small furniture industry. He worked for about 6 years in the small factory, was exposed to asbestos during the assembly of the furniture inspired by classical architecture, in which asbestos cement tubes were used to reproduce classical columns. During this production process no specific work safety measures were applied, nor masks or local aspirators. No extra-professional exposure to asbestos was identified. This mesothelioma case was investigated by the Public Prosecutor’s assignment that commissioned expert evidence on the legal accountability for the disease. Despite its uncommon expositive circumstance, the length of latency (about 30 years, the duration of exposure, the clinical and histochemical features are all consistent with literature evidence, accounting for the occupational origin of this malignancy.

  8. Emission of asbestos fibres from natural-draught cooling towers. Pt. 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampling for the studies reported has been done in a relatively new nuclear power plant with natural-draught, wet cooling tower, and in an older, brown-coal fired power plant with the same type of cooling towers, both towers equipped with internal structures made of asbestos cement. Samples have been taken from the plumes, air in the environment, cooling water receiving tank, make-up water. The samples have been primarily examined for their content of asbestos fibres. The results show that relatively few asbestos is found in the environmental air and in the cooling water receiving tank. Putting it continuously, it can be said that the cooling water entrains only little amounts of the asbestos of the internal structures. The plume samples indicate emission of some thousand asbestos fibres per m3, or less than 1 ng. Taking into account one sample exhibiting an extremely high amount of asbestos, the average emission of asbestos fibres with the plumes is 106 fibres per m3, or 100 ng/m3 of plume. The maximum air pollution thus calculated in accordance with TA Luft (Clean Air Technical Directive), for the less favourable weather conditions at a hight of 2 m above ground, is 10 fibres per one m3 of air; including the extreme data of the single sample mentioned above, the result is some thousand fibres per m3. The data are far below the TRK data (Technical guiding data for maximum concentration at the place of work), which state a maximum of 106 fibres per m3. (orig.)

  9. Legal Aspects of Asbestos Abatement. Responses to the Threat of Asbestos-Containing Materials in School Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kristin

    Exposure to asbestos in the air poses serious health threats, particularly to children. The use of asbestos in schools after World War II may have exposed millions of persons before regulations controlling asbestos use began appearing in the 1970s. Federal efforts to reduce exposure to asbestos have included passage of the Asbestos School Hazard…

  10. Analysis of latency time and its determinants in asbestos related malignant mesothelioma cases of the Italian register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaccio, Alessandro; Binazzi, Alessandra; Cauzillo, Gabriella; Cavone, Domenica; Zotti, Renata De; Ferrante, Pierpaolo; Gennaro, Valerio; Gorini, Giuseppe; Menegozzo, Massimo; Mensi, Carolina; Merler, Enzo; Mirabelli, Dario; Montanaro, Fabio; Musti, Marina; Pannelli, Franco; Romanelli, Antonio; Scarselli, Alberto; Tumino, Rosario

    2007-12-01

    Italy was an important producer of raw asbestos until 1992 (when it was banned) and it is now experiencing severe public health consequences due to large-scale industrial use of asbestos in shipbuilding and repair, asbestos-cement production, railways, buildings, chemicals and many other industrial sectors. Latency of malignant mesothelioma generally shows a large variability and the relationship with the modality of asbestos exposure is still not fully clarified. We present an analysis of latency period among the case list collected by the Italian mesothelioma register (ReNaM) in the period of diagnosis 1993-2001 (2544 malignant mesothelioma (MM) cases with asbestos exposure history). Exposure is assessed retrospectively by interview. Statistical univariate analyses were performed to estimate median and variability measures of latency time by anatomical site, gender and diagnosis period. The role of diagnostic confidence level, the morphology of the tumour and the modalities of asbestos exposure were verified in a regression multivariate model. We found a median latency period of 44.6 years increasing in recent years with a linear trend. Anatomical site, gender and morphology were not relevant for MM latency time whereas a shorter latency period was documented among occupationally exposed subjects (43 years) with respect to environmentally and household exposed ones (48 years). PMID:17980576

  11. [Wonder matter and assassin. The perception of the asbestos danger as a mirror of the time 1930-1990].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J H M

    2005-01-01

    In the seventies and eighties of the twentieth century the ideas of the dangers concerning the use of asbestos changed dramatically. The mineral, which had, more than half a century before been introduced in the Netherlands as a miraculous mineral, was completely banned from use. Asbestos became known as a 'silent killer' and 'the blue sand of death', and as a symbol of the hidden hazards of a deteriorating environment caused by unscrupulous companies and indolent authorities. Asbestos seems to fit perfectly into the ubiquitous hazards which Ulrich Beck defines in his concept of the 'risk society' as the dangerous side effects of industrial production. Yet the perception of the risk associated with asbestos depended more on socio-cultural characteristics than on scientifically risk assessments. In the first half of the twentieth century the use of asbestos was limited and therefore did not cause any concern. Economic crisis and war silenced the first alarming signals of asbestos related disease from foreign experts and a handful of Dutch physicians. The asbestos workers themselves were held responsible for their own health and safety. In the 1951 asbestosis became recognised as an industrial disease. Preventive measures with regard to the industrial use of asbestos were prescribed by law. Workers shared the responsibilities for a safe use with employers and authorities. However, during this period, all the attention was directed towards economic growth. Supervision by the labour inspection was scarce and workers and employers were not very interested in upholding the safety measures. Among asbestos workers the use of protective clothes and dust masks was generally seen as unmanly. In the sixties the foreign literature on the connection between the exposure to asbestos and the occurrence of lung cancer and mesothelioma became known among Dutch specialists. The results of these studies were confirmed by research among Dutch insulation workers. At the same time the

  12. [Dynamic studies of the leukocyte phagocytic activity after exposure of rats to asbestos and basalt fibers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurbánková, M

    1993-05-01

    The paper presents the results of the dynamic one-year follow-up of the phagocytic activity of Wistar-rats peripheral blood leukocytes following intraperitoneal administration of asbestos and basalt fibres (Man-Made Mineral Fibres--MMMF). We investigated the phagocytic activity of leukocytes in peripheral blood following intraperitoneal administration of asbestos and basalt fibres to rats 2, 24, 48 h as well as 1, 2, 4, 8 weeks and 6 and 12 months after dosing. We investigated the time dependent of the changes of relative granulocytes count, percentage of phagocytizing cells from leukocytes, percentage of phagocytizing granulocytes and percentage of phagocytizing monocytes. The results of our experiment showed that asbestos and basalt fibres differed in their effects on the parameters studied. Granulocyte count as well as the phagocytic activity of leukocytes during the one-year dynamic follow-up in both dust--exposed groups of animals were found to change in two phases, characterised by the initial stimulation of the acute phase (I), followed by the suppression of the parameters in the chronic phase (II). Exposure to asbestos and basalt fibres led, in phase II, to impairment of the phagocytic activity of granulocytes. Asbestos fibres at the same time significantly decreased also the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Exposure to basalt fibres did not affect the phagocytic activity of monocytes in phase II. It follows from the results of the experiment, that the monocytic component of leukocytes probably plays an important role in the development of diseases caused by exposure to fibrous dusts and basalt fibres have smaller biological effects compared with asbestos fibres.

  13. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  14. Asbestos in drinking water: a status report.

    OpenAIRE

    Cotruvo, J A

    1983-01-01

    The conference is briefly reviewed in the light of its impact on future regulatory decisions regarding the possible control of asbestos fiber in drinking water. The results of animal feeding studies indicate that asbestos fails to demonstrate toxicity in whole-animal lifetime exposures. The epidemiologic evidence of risk from ingestion of water containing asbestos fibers is not convincing, and in view of the lack of confirmation by animal studies, the existence of a risk has not been proven; ...

  15. Hazards of lung biopsy in asbestos workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Lerman, Y.; Ribak, J; Selikoff, I J

    1986-01-01

    An investigation into the problem of the frequency and hazards of lung biopsy in asbestos workers was performed in two ways. The first study was into the frequency of lung biopsy among 2907 long term asbestos insulation workers in 1981-3 and the second was into the frequency of fatal complications of lung biopsy in 168 deaths from asbestosis among 2271 consecutive deaths of asbestos insulation workers 1967-76. Only 25 (0.9%) of the 2907 asbestos insulation workers reported having had either a...

  16. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma following asbestos exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manavoğlu, O; Orhan, B; Evrensel, T; Ozçelik, T; Yolcu, I; Kunt, E

    1996-01-01

    Clinical, epidemiological, and pathological studies have demonstrated that asbestosis plays a major role in the etiology of mesothelioma. The direct exposure of workers in industrialized countries to asbestos fibers and nonoccupational household contact elevate the risk of malignant mesothelioma. An increased risk has been found in certain geographic areas of Turkey due to the presence of asbestos deposits and the use of the material known as "white soil" as an insulation. We present a malignant mesothelioma case from rural eastern Turkey with a history of asbestos exposure from using "white soil". We review the epidemiological aspects of asbestos as they relate to mesothelioma. PMID:9216805

  17. Mesothelioma relative to asbestos, radiation, and methylcholanthrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carcinogenicity of chrysotile asbestos fibers (Canadian and Rhodesian) for the mesothelium of pleura and peritoneum of NEDH rats was explored by injection of 2 mg of asbestos fibers suspended in saline intratracheally, intrapleurally, or intraperitoneally, with or without ancillary radiation treatment, or alternatively, by injection of asbestos plus 1 mg of 3-methylcholanthrene. A highly significant incidence of mesothelioma (3.8%) was noted in 159 rats treated with asbestos alone, as compared with 0.1% in 1417 control rats. Additional treatment with radiation or 3-methylcholanthrene increased this incidence to 11.8% and 25.5%, respectively

  18. Asbestos and Asbestos-related Diseases in Vietnam: In reference to the International Labor Organization/World Health Organization National Asbestos Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Hai; Lan Tran, Thi Ngoc; Le, Giang Vinh; Movahed, Mehrnoosh; Jiang, Ying; Pham, Nguyen Ha; Ogawa, Hisashi; Takahashi, Ken

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes progress on formulating a national asbestos profile for the country of Vietnam. The Center of Asbestos Resource, Vietnam, formulated a National Profile on Asbestos-related Occupational Health, with due reference to the International Labor Organization/World Health Organization National Asbestos Profile. The Center of Asbestos Resource was established by the Vietnamese Health Environment Management Agency and the National Institute of Labor Protection, with the support of ...

  19. Oversight Hearings on Asbestos Health Hazards to Schoolchildren. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, First Session on H.R. 1435 and H.R. 1524 (January 8, 16, and February 22, 1979).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    Testimony and prepared statements presented during three days of hearings in January and February, 1979, concern the problems of asbestos in school buildings. Medical research indicates that the inhalation of asbestos dust vastly increases a person's chances of contacting fatal diseases such as lung cancer, mesothelioma, and asbestosis. Asbestos…

  20. Cancer Mortality and Incidence in Cement Industry Workers in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Kim, Tae-Woo; Jang, Seung Hee; Ryu, Hyang-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Cement contains hexavalent chromium, which is a human carcinogen. However, its effect on cancer seems inconclusive in epidemiologic studies. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to elucidate the association between dust exposure in the cement industry and cancer occurrence. Methods The cohorts consisted of male workers in 6 Portland cement factories in Korea. Study subjects were classified into five groups by job: quarry, production, maintenance, laboratory, and office wo...

  1. Asbestos release during removal of resilient floor covering materials by recommended work practices of the resilient floor covering institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marion Glenn; Crossman, Robert N

    2003-06-01

    The release of asbestos during maintenance and removal of resilient floor covering is of concern to health professionals and many regulators. This study assesses the asbestos levels observed during removal of resilient floor covering products using the "Recommended Work Practices" (1995) of the Resilient Floor Covering Institute or other methods requiring containment (Controls). The 1995 "work practices" require wet removal or dry heat removal but do not require the use of respirators. Wet removals of sheet vinyl/separated backing, 12" x 12" vinyl asbestos tile/mastic, and 9" x 9" asphalt tiles/mastic were conducted and the air was sampled during each procedure. Settled dust samples were collected at the sites of RFCI square tile removal and pieces of each type of tile were broken in a mini-enclosure to evaluate asbestos emissions. Analyses of the air samples collected during the removals showed that the RFCI methods did not produce asbestos counts significantly different from the Control methods requiring containment. Only a small number (0.7%) of fibers and structures, counted and measured by Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy, would have been counted using the rules for Phase Contrast Microscopy in the 7400 method specified by Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations. This indicates workers in similar situations without respirators are likely to have unknown exposure levels. A high percentage of these fibers and structures are 5 micrometers or less in length, smaller than 0.5 micrometer in diameter, and are easily inhaled. The RFCI air sample and settled dust data may cause regulators to consider requiring respiratory protection, cleanup procedures, and methods to control asbestos migration. Other areas that might be addressed are clearance levels and their measurement, removal area size, bulk sample analysis by transmission electron microscopy if polarized light microscopy reports less than 1 percent asbestos, better worker exposure

  2. Prevention of Asbestos-Related Disease in Countries Currently Using Asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Daniela; Terracini, Benedetto; Santana, Vilma S; Ramos-Bonilla, Juan Pablo; Pasetto, Roberto; Mazzeo, Agata; Loomis, Dana; Comba, Pietro; Algranti, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    More than 40 years of evaluation have consistently confirmed the carcinogenicity of asbestos in all of its forms. This notwithstanding, according to recent figures, the annual world production of asbestos is approximatively 2,000,000 tons. Currently, about 90% of world asbestos comes from four countries: Russia, China, Brazil and Kazakhstan; and the wide use of asbestos worldwide represents a global threat. The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the asbestos health impact and to discuss the role of epidemiological investigations in countries where asbestos is still used. In these contexts, new, "local" studies can stimulate awareness of the size of the problem by public opinion and other stakeholders and provide important information on the circumstances of exposure, as well as local asbestos-related health impacts. This paper suggests an agenda for an international cooperation framework dedicated to foster a public health response to asbestos, including: new epidemiological studies for assessing the health impact of asbestos in specific contexts; socio-cultural and economic analyses for contributing to identifying stakeholders and to address both the local and global implications of asbestos diffusion; public awareness on the health and socio-economic impact of asbestos use and banning. PMID:27187433

  3. Prevention of Asbestos-Related Disease in Countries Currently Using Asbestos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Marsili

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available More than 40 years of evaluation have consistently confirmed the carcinogenicity of asbestos in all of its forms. This notwithstanding, according to recent figures, the annual world production of asbestos is approximatively 2,000,000 tons. Currently, about 90% of world asbestos comes from four countries: Russia, China, Brazil and Kazakhstan; and the wide use of asbestos worldwide represents a global threat. The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the asbestos health impact and to discuss the role of epidemiological investigations in countries where asbestos is still used. In these contexts, new, “local” studies can stimulate awareness of the size of the problem by public opinion and other stakeholders and provide important information on the circumstances of exposure, as well as local asbestos-related health impacts. This paper suggests an agenda for an international cooperation framework dedicated to foster a public health response to asbestos, including: new epidemiological studies for assessing the health impact of asbestos in specific contexts; socio-cultural and economic analyses for contributing to identifying stakeholders and to address both the local and global implications of asbestos diffusion; public awareness on the health and socio-economic impact of asbestos use and banning.

  4. Heterogeneous reactions of sulfur dioxide on dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Yunchuan

    2006-01-01

    The source of urban atmospheric particles is broad, and the major source is the building dust from urban construction. Calcium is the tagged element and Portland cement is the major component of building dust. In this study, CaO was regarded as the representative oxide of building dust,and mixtures were synthesized in terms of the major element ingredients of building dust. The heterogeneous uptake of SO2 on CaO, mixtures, Portland cement and building dust samples was investigated. In situ FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to identify the products of the reactions. In addition, the crystal phases and the surface properties of the samples were characterized by XRD patterns and BET specific surface area. The results show that in the presence of oxygen, sulfur dioxide can be adsorbed to sulfite and further catalytically oxidized to sulfate on the surface of CaO, the mixtures, Portland cement and building dust. The reactivity of SO2 on the surface of dust and oxides is basically a first order. The main ingredient of building dust sample is SiO2, and the one of Portland cement is Ca3SiO5.

  5. Comparison of cooling ability of asbestic-cement and mesh sprinkler of cooling tower

    OpenAIRE

    Кравченко, Владимир Петрович; Морозов, Евгений Николаевич; Галацан, Марк Петрович

    2012-01-01

    The technological calculation of a cooling tower with a pass checker from the asbestos-cement and modern reticulated checker from a polyethylene is executed. Got results, allow executing the feasibility study of reconstruction of cooling tower with pass checker substituting by a modern construction

  6. Asbestos-related diseases of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbestos fibers can lead to pulmonary fibrosis, thickening of the pleura and malignancies. These pathologic changes are possible rather than determinate and depend on the type of asbestos fiber, length of exposure to fibers and individual factors. In Germany asbestos fibers were widely used until 1993. Worldwide, there is currently no general ban on the use of asbestos. The leading cause of asbestos-related diseases is occupational exposure. Due to a long latency period the appearance of such diseases may be delayed for more than 40 years so that the final number of cases has not yet been reached. Occupationally-derived asbestos-related diseases of the thorax are asbestosis, asbestos-related benign pleurisy and malignant pleural mesothelioma. Bronchial carcinoma can also be caused by asbestos exposure. For proof of occupational exposure, radiologists are required to report the presence of characteristic findings. The detection, in particular by chest X-ray and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), requires high quality images and standardized evaluation. The standardized ILO classification and the semi-quantitative HRCT coding are medical findings on which statutory registration criteria are based. (orig.)

  7. Asbestos and Asbestosis. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Karen L., Comp.

    Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral found in several forms and because of its temperature-resisting properties, flexibility, and strength, it was widely used in the construction industry, automobile industry, and textile industry. Asbestos becomes dangerous when it crumbles and breaks releasing fibers that can cause asbestosis and certain…

  8. Asbestos in Buildings: What You Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safe Buildings Alliance, Washington, DC.

    Thirty-one critical questions about asbestos, its use in school buildings, and the risks it poses to health are answered in this booklet. Issued by the Safe Buildings Alliance, an incorporated association of manufacturers that once supplied asbestos-containing materials for building construction, the booklet's purpose is to provide information…

  9. Health management system for occupational asbestos exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From October 2006 to May 2007, we performed physical check up and chest X-ray for 979 asbestos exposed cases who enrolled National Health Management System for Occupational Asbestos Exposure based on Health and Labor Ministry. All cases had asbestos-related pulmonary or pleural findings on chest X-ray or chest computed tomography (CT). We analyzed their status of asbestos exposure and results of chest X-ray or chest CT. More than half of them were shipyard workers and sailors. There were 66 cases with pneumoconiosis, and 61 cases out of 66 were diagnosed as an asbestosis. Further examinations were required for 57 cases (5.8%). Chest CT showed a case of suspicious lung cancer and thracoscopical biopsy revealed each one of benign asbestos pleurisy and malignant pleural mesothelioma. (author)

  10. 40 CFR 61.142 - Standard for asbestos mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for asbestos mills. 61.142... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Asbestos § 61.142 Standard for asbestos mills. (a) Each owner or operator of an asbestos mill shall...

  11. Two cases of asbestosis and one case of rounded atelectasis due to non-occupational asbestos exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candura, S M; Binarelli, A; Ragno, G; Scafa, F

    2008-03-01

    Asbestos is a well-known cause of several neoplastic (malignant mesothelioma, lung cancer) and non-neoplastic (asbestosis, pleuropathies) occupational diseases. Lower-level exposure in the general environment may induce pleural plaques and thickenings, and is associated with an increased mesothelioma risk. We present two patients (a 68-year-old man and a 72-year-old woman) who developed asbestosis (in association with pleural plaques and calcifications), and a 78-year-old man who developed rounded atelectasis (with pleural plaques and benign effusion), after living for several decades in the proximity of large Italian asbestos-cement plant. None of them had been exposed to asbestos occupationally. Besides living in a contaminated area, the woman used to clean the work clothes of her brother, who was employed in the local asbestos factory. The three cases indicate that non-neoplastic, long-latency asbestos-related diseases which are usually observed as a consequence of occupational exposures, may rarely develop in subjects living in contaminated geographical sites and buildings. These unusual environmental diseases raise the diagnostic problem of differentiating them from other, more common respiratory illnesses, and impose the duties of patient notification, assessment and follow-up, to assess the possibility of progression of disease and increased neoplastic risk. PMID:18507198

  12. Evaluation of the use of Environmental Asbestos in Siverek

    OpenAIRE

    Erkan Ceylan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Environmental asbestos exposure and asbestos related diseases are common in Siverek. We aimed to investigate, whether environmental asbestos exposure ongoing in Siverek or not, used for which purposes if this still in usage and the manner of supplying in this study. Material and Method: A questionnaire was made for this study between March 2012-April 2012 in the districts that are asbestos usage is known in Siverek. Results: Rates of asbestos usage history were for plastering walls 2.3% ...

  13. Asbestos in Colombia: A silent enemy = Asbesto en Colombia: un enemigo silencioso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossa Giraldo, Ana Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asbestos is a group of fibrous non-metallic minerals, composed of double chain silicates, that shows high resistance to tension and chemical degradation and low thermal conductivity. Despite being recognized as carcinogenic agents by the World Health Organization (WHO, based on experimental evidences and population studies, asbestos are still used in many countries at the expense of the health of workers. This has become a worldwide problem associated with the increase of asbestos-related diseases in exposed persons. In this article, we review asbestos and their associated diseases; the use, exposure and existing regulations on asbestos both in Colombia and in other countries. Finally, we raise the possibility of evaluating the usefulness of genetic monitoring in addition to following-up exposed individuals. This would enable a better surveillance in our country with respect to lung cancer, mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases.

  14. Asbestos Tailings as Aggregates for Asphalt Mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xinoming; XU Linrong

    2011-01-01

    To use many asbestos tailings collected in Ya-Lu highway, and to explore the feasibility of using asbestos tailings as aggregates in common asphalt mixtures, and properties of some asphalt mixtures were evaluated as well. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescent (XRF), and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) were employed to determine the solid waste content of copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium. Volume properties and pavement performances of AC-25 asphalt mixture with asbestos tailings were also evaluated compared with those with basalt as aggregates.XRD and XRF measurement results infer that asbestos tailing is an excellent road material. Volume properties of AC-25 asphalt mixture with asbestos tailings satisfied the related specifications. No heavy metals and toxic pollution were detected in AAS test and the value of pH test is 8.23, which is help to the adhesion with asphalt in the asphalt concrete. When compared with basalt, high temperature property and the resistance to low temperature cracking of AC-25 asphalt mixture was improved by using asbestos tailings as aggregates. In-service AC-25 asphalt pavement with asbestos tailings also presented excellent performance and British Pendulum Number (BPN) coefficient of surface.

  15. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  16. Monitoring Natural Occurring Asbestos in ophiolite sequences and derived soils: implication with human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punturo, Rosalda; Bloise, Andrea; Cirrincione, Rosolino

    2016-04-01

    The present contribution focuses on soils that developed on serpentinite-metabasite bedrocks, which could potentially be rich in asbestos minerals and, as a consequence, have a negative impact on agricultural activity and on environmental quality. In order to investigate the natural occurrences of asbestos (NOA) on the surface of the soil formed from serpentinites and metabasite, we selected a study area located in Sila Piccola (Calabrian Peloritani Orogen, southern Italy), where previous studies highlighted the presence of asbestiform minerals within the large ophiolitic sequences that crop out (Punturo et al., 2015; Bloise et al., 2015). Agricultural soil samples have been collected mainly close to urban centres and characterized by using different analytical techniques such as X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectrometry (TEM-EDS), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) Results pointed out as all the collected soil samples contain serpentine minerals (e.g., chrysotile), asbestos amphiboles, clays, chlorite, muscovite, plagioclase and iron oxides in various amounts. Electron microscope images of the soils show that their contain a variety of aggregating agents such as organic matter and clay in which individual fibres of chrysotile and tremolite-actinolite are trapped. The investigation showed that both serpentinite and metabasite rocks act as a perennial source of contamination for the agriculture lands because of the high amount of tremolite-actinolite found in the studied soil samples developed on such lithotypes. Even if asbestiform minerals usually occur in aggregates which cannot be suspended in the air, agricultural activities such as plowing can destroy these soil aggregates with the creation of dust containing inhalable asbestos fibres that evolve into airborne increasing the exposure of population to them. Since the dispersion of fibres could be associated with

  17. Assessment of LANL asbestos waste management documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intent of this effort is to evaluate the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for asbestos to determine if it meets applicable DOE, EPA, and OSHA requirements. There are numerous regulations that provide specific guidelines on the management of asbestos waste. An annotated outline for a generic asbestos WAC was developed using the type of information specified by 5820.2A. The outline itself is included in Appendix A. The major elements that should be addressed by the WAC were determined to be as follows: Waste Forms; Waste Content/Concentration; Waste Packaging; and Waste Documentation/Certification

  18. [Screening for asbestos-related conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brauer, C.; Baandrup, U.; Jacobsen, P.;

    2009-01-01

    Screening programs for early detection of asbestos-related cancer have been considered. Conventional X-ray, computed tomography of the thorax, and the biomarkers osteopontin and mesothelin have been critically reviewed in the literature, together with survival data from screening programs in...... asbestos-exposed populations. Data do not currently support implementation of screening programs for asbestos-exposed persons in Denmark. Since mesothelioma is most often an occupational disease, these patients should be admitted to an occupational clinic for aetiological evaluation Udgivelsesdato: 2009/2/2...

  19. [Mortality from pleural and peritoneal cancer in a cohort of asbestos workers, many years after start of the exposure: possible role of fibers clearance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesi, F Barone; Ferrante, D; Bertolotti, M; Todesco, A; Mirabelli, D; Terracini, B; Magnani, C

    2007-01-01

    The multistage theory of carcinogenesis assumes rates of mesothelioma increasing monotonically as a function of time since first exposure (TSFE) to asbestos. However, some authors have suggested that the increase in mesothelioma rate with TSFE might be attenuated by clearance of asbestos from the lungs. We estimated mortality time trends from pleural and peritoneal cancer in a cohort of 3443 asbestos-cement workers. The role of asbestos clearance was explored using the traditional mesothelioma multistage model, generalized to include a term representing elimination over time. We observed 139 deaths from pleural and 56 from peritoneal cancer during the period 1950-2003. The rate of pleural cancer increased during the first 40 years of TSFE and reached a plateau thereafter. In contrast, the rate of peritoneal cancer increased monotonically with TSFE. The model allowing for asbestos elimination fitted the data better than the traditional model for pleural (p = 0.02) but not for peritoneal cancer (p = 0.22). The risk for pleural cancer, rather than showing an indefinite increase, might reach a plateau when a sufficiently long time has elapsed since exposure. The different trends for pleural and peritoneal cancer might be related to clearance of the asbestos from the workers' lungs. PMID:18409718

  20. Pollution and Prevention of Pb during Cement Calcination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Emission pollution and prevention measures of Pb during cement calcination were discussed. The content of Pb and the variation of composition were explored by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and X-ray diffraction. The results show that a number of Pb emits during cement calcination, F and C1 promote the emission of Pb, and Pb is enriched in kiln dust. The smaller the particle of kiln dust, the higher the content of Pb. When utilizing the raw materials with a high content of Pb, a more efficient dust collector should be used and the kiln dust should be used as the addition of cement. Pb in clinker is enriched in the intermediate phase. The reduction of silica modulus is useful to increase the solidification content of Pb in clinker. The solidification content of Pb in calcium sulphoaluminate mineral is higher than that in calcium aluminate mineral.

  1. Reported Historic Asbestos Mines, Historic Asbestos Prospects, and Natural Asbestos Occurrences in the Southwestern United States (Arizona, Nevada, and Utah)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    This map and its accompanying dataset provide information for 113 natural asbestos occurrences in the Southwestern United States (U.S.), using descriptions found in the geologic literature. Data on location, mineralogy, geology, and relevant literature for each asbestos site are provided. Using the map and digital data in this report, the user can examine the distribution of previously reported asbestos occurrences and their geological characteristics in the Southwestern U.S., which includes sites in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. This report is part of an ongoing study by the U.S. Geological Survey to identify and map reported natural asbestos occurrences in the U.S., which thus far includes similar maps and datasets of natural asbestos occurrences within the Eastern U.S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1189/), the Central U.S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1211/), and the Rocky Mountain States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1182/. These reports are intended to provide State and local government agencies and other stakeholders with geologic information on natural occurrences of asbestos in the U.S.

  2. Reported Historic Asbestos Mines, Historic Asbestos Prospects, and Other Natural Occurrences of Asbestos in Oregon and Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2010-01-01

    This map and its accompanying dataset provide information for 51 natural occurrences of asbestos in Washington and Oregon, using descriptions found in the geologic literature. Data on location, mineralogy, geology, and relevant literature for each asbestos site are provided. Using the map and digital data in this report, the user can examine the distribution of previously reported asbestos occurrences and their geological characteristics in the Pacific Northwest States of Washington and Oregon. This report is part of an ongoing study by the U.S. Geological Survey to identify and map reported natural asbestos occurrences in the United States, which thus far includes similar maps and datasets of natural asbestos occurrences within the Eastern United States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1189/), the Central United States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1211/), the Rocky Mountain States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1182/), and the Southwestern United States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1095/). These reports are intended to provide State and local government agencies and other stakeholders with geologic information on natural occurrences of asbestos in the United States.

  3. ILO to promote global asbestos ban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Rory

    2006-01-01

    The International Labour Office (ILO) is to pursue a global ban on asbestos, the world's biggest ever industrial killer. The landmark decision came with the adoption of a resolution on 14 June 2006 at the ILO conference in Geneva and followed a high level union campaign. Rory O'Neill asked Jukka Takala, director of ILO's Safe Work program, what ILO will now do to help make the world asbestos-free.

  4. Health risk associated with airborne asbestos

    OpenAIRE

    Pawełczyk, Adam; Božek, František

    2015-01-01

    The following paper presents an assessment of health risks associated with air polluted with respirable asbestos fibers in towns of southwest Poland. The aim of the work was to determine whether or not any prevention measures are necessary in order to reduce the level of exposure to the pollutant. The risk assessment was carried out based on the air analyses and the latest asbestos toxicity data published by the Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), USA and Office of Environmental Health ...

  5. Use of asbestos in the Israeli Defense Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlezinger, Z

    1986-01-01

    The Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) have adopted the current standards for asbestos in the workplace (1 fiber/ml). Although average daily exposure to asbestos is relatively limited, nevertheless, the army personnel concerned are defined as "asbestos workers." Four main areas of asbestos use were monitored, and medical examinations of susceptible personnel were performed. Recommendations were suggested for improving conditions. The IDF is now in the process of eliminating the use of materials containing asbestos, with the aim of eliminating asbestos use in the IDF within a three-to five-year period. PMID:3812492

  6. Asbestos: the measures taken by CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Recently, the Canton's Department for Installation, Equipment, and Housing launched a survey into the presence of asbestos in buildings built in Geneva before 1991. Their initial findings have caused some concern to the public, with buildings and landmarks such as the TSR Tower, the Temple de la Madeleine, and the Cathedral of Saint-Pierre all found to contain asbestos. Several employees here also contacted the Bulletin to find out more about CERN's approach in dealing with asbestos. In the 1960s, asbestos' use was widespread. Its low cost and attractive properties made it a popular choice for insulating buildings. It was used in buildings throughout the world, including many at CERN. However, since the 1970s the use of asbestos has been gradually limited. In France, the first specific rules for the protection of workers came about in 1977. Since then, its use was limited more and more, under pressure from European directives. Finally, a European directive in 1999 widened the ban on asbestos. It covered ...

  7. El Dorado Air Quality Management District's Approach to Dealing With Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C.

    2012-12-01

    In 2005, Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) in El Dorado County made headlines with the discovery significant amounts of tremolite/actinolite asbestos in areas where residents had built, or were in the process of building, homes and residences. The El Dorado Air Quality Management District has been involved in all aspects of dealing with NOA from the very beginning of its discovery, from overseeing the rehabilitation of school sites to expanding and rewriting fugitive dust rules at construction sites. A discussion of best management practices which have been developed will be given, as well as how the El Dorado Air Quality Management District has worked to educate members of the public, as well as workers in the field, about NOA to aid in maintaining the health and safety of the public.

  8. Pleural malignant mesothelioma epidemic: incidence, modalities of asbestos exposure and occupations involved from the Italian National Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaccio, Alessandro; Binazzi, Alessandra; Marzio, Davide Di; Scarselli, Alberto; Verardo, Marina; Mirabelli, Dario; Gennaro, Valerio; Mensi, Carolina; Riboldi, Luciano; Merler, Enzo; Zotti, Renata De; Romanelli, Antonio; Chellini, Elisabetta; Silvestri, Stefano; Pascucci, Cristiana; Romeo, Elisa; Menegozzo, Simona; Musti, Marina; Cavone, Domenica; Cauzillo, Gabriella; Tumino, Rosario; Nicita, Carmela; Melis, Massimo; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2012-05-01

    Due to the large scale use of asbestos (more than 3.5 million tons produced or imported until its definitive banning in 1992), a specific national surveillance system of mesothelioma incident cases is active in Italy, with direct and individual anamnestic etiological investigation. In the period between 1993 and 2004, a case-list of 8,868 pleural MM was recorded by the Italian National Register (ReNaM) and the modalities of exposure to asbestos fibres have been investigated for 6,603 of them. Standardized incidence rates are 3.49 (per 100,000 inhabitants) for men and 1.25 for women, with a wide regional variability. Occupational asbestos exposure was in 69.3% of interviewed subjects (N = 4,577 cases), while 4.4% was due to cohabitation with someone (generally, the husband) occupationally exposed, 4.7% by environmental exposure from living near a contamination source and 1.6% during a leisure activity. In the male group, 81.5% of interviewed subjects exhibit an occupational exposure. In the exposed workers, the median year of first exposure was 1957, and mean latency was 43.7 years. The analysis of exposures by industrial sector focuses on a decreasing trend for those traditionally signaled as "at risk" (asbestos-cement industry, shipbuilding and repair and railway carriages maintenance) and an increasing trend for the building construction sector. The systematic mesothelioma surveillance system is relevant for the prevention of the disease and for supporting an efficient compensation system. The existing experience on all-too-predictable asbestos effects should be transferred to developing countries where asbestos use is spreading. PMID:21647880

  9. Asbestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... strong and flexible enough to be spun and woven and are heat resistant. Because of these characteristics, ... product use, demolition work, building or home maintenance, repair, and remodeling. In general, exposure may occur only ...

  10. Pleural mesothelioma: dose-response relation at low levels of asbestos exposure in a french population-based case-control study; Mesotheliome pleural: relation dose-reponse a faibles niveaux d'exposition a l'amiante dans une etude cas-temoins au sein d'une polulation francaise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwatsubo, Y.; Pairo, J.C.; Boutin, C.; Menard, O.; Massin, N.; Caillaud, D.; Orlowski, E.; Galateau-Salle, F.; Bignon, J.; Brochard, P.

    1998-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to study the dose-response relationship between professional exposure to asbestos and the supervening of the pleural mesothelioma in general population. This work notes an excess of death by pulmonary cancer among the asbestos-cement workers but one can regret the weakness of the exposure estimation (only one source of exposure is considered) and that some others risk factors have not been taken into account (tobacco, for example). (N.C.)

  11. [Issues related to long-term asbestos use and manufacture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosić, Ivancica

    2009-11-01

    Extensive measures to ban mining, manufacture, use, and trade of asbestos and asbestos materials have been taken worldwide. In this century asbestos will continue to be an economic, industrial, health, social, and environmental issue. Five thousand products that are still in use have been inherited from a century of asbestos processing. In 1999, the EU member states decided to take steps that would eventually terminate the use of asbestos. At the same time, about 4000 t of asbestos had been imported to Croatia every year. EU member states started to enforce asbestos ban in 2005. This encouraged the Croatian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare to issue a list of toxicants whose manufacture, trade, and use were banned, and which included asbestos and asbestos products. In 2007, several national acts came to force regulating protection of workers occupationally exposed to asbestos. Asbestos is ubiquitous in the environment. It has been released from construction materials during renovations, demolitions, maintenance, and other building activities. It is released by drilling, blowing, demolishing, loading, transport, and improper storage of asbestos materials. Asbestos was often used for insulation. It was favoured for its resistance to heat, fire, moisture, noise, electricity, friction, and fraying. Materials used for firefighting, insulation, protection from noise, and construction frequently contain one or more types of asbestos. Landfills present a particular problem, since asbestos materials can not be recognised macroscopically. Asbestos can be identified by standardised polarising microscopy. This raises the need for education, because human exposure should be kept as low as possible to prevent the development of asbestos-related diseases. PMID:20853772

  12. One-year follow-up of the phagocytic activity of leukocytes after exposure of rats to asbestos and basalt fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurbánková, M

    1994-10-01

    The phagocytic activity of leukocytes in peripheral blood was investigated after 2, 24, and 48 hr; 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks; and 6 and 12 months following intraperitoneal administration of asbestos and basalt fibers to Wistar rats. Asbestos and basalt fibers differed in their effects on the parameters studied. Both granulocyte count and phagocytic activity of leukocytes during the 1-year dynamic follow-up in both dust-exposed groups of animals changed in two phases, characterized by the initial stimulation of the acute phase I, followed by the suppression of the parameters in the chronic phase II. Exposure to asbestos and basalt fibers led, in phase II, to impairment of the phagocytic activity of granulocytes. Asbestos fibers also significantly decreased phagocytic activity of monocytes. Exposure to basalt fibers did not affect the phagocytic activity of monocytes in phase II. Results suggest that the monocytic component of leukocytes plays an important role in the development of diseases caused by exposure to fibrous dusts, but basalt fibers have lesser biological effects than asbestos fibers.

  13. Asbestos mines, prospects, and occurrences in the US

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Location and mineralogical characteristics of former mines, prospects, and occurrences of asbestos in the continental US. No asbestos producing mines are currently...

  14. Comparative Toxicology of Libby Amphibole and Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary sentence: Comparative toxicology of Libby amphibole (LA) and site-specific naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) provides new insights on physical properties influencing health effects and mechanisms of asbestos-induced inflammation, fibrosis, and tumorigenesis.Introduction/...

  15. [Precancerous conditions of the larynx in workers exposed to dust and their prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podol'skaia, E V

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of examinations of 522 workers exposed to various industrial dusts and 361 workers exposed to different concentrations of carcinogenic asbestos dust. The examinations showed a significantly higher incidence of total processes in the upper respiratory tract which manifested as chronic subatrophic nasopharingitis and hyperplastic laryngitis. Also, they demonstrated a significantly higher incidence of local processes that manifested as hyperplasia of the laryngeal mucosa and contact fibromas. These laryngeal lesions can be viewed as etiologically associated with the effect of industrial dusts having traumatic (abrasive and glass dust) and carcinogenic (asbestos) properties. Patients with the above laryngeal pathologies should be removed from the dust environment and sent to physical examinations with emphasis on occupational diseases.

  16. Asbestos: The Need for and Feasibility of Air Pollution Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Div. of Medical Sciences.

    The monograph presents a brief summary of the problems associated with airborne asbestos. It discusses the evidence regarding the pathogenicity of asbestos in man and animals, considers the evidence of human non-occupational exposure to asbestos, evaluates the evidence regarding health risks associated with various degrees and types of exposure,…

  17. Asbestos: A Lingering Danger. AIO Red Paper #20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Stuart

    Its unique qualities makes asbestos extremely useful in industry, yet it is termed one of the most dangerous and insidious substances in the work place. Composed of mostly fibers, asbestos is readily freed into the atmosphere during handling, constituting a real health risk. There are two ways asbestos can enter the human body: by inhalation or…

  18. Asbestos and Probable Microscopic Polyangiitis

    OpenAIRE

    George S Rashed Philteos; Kelly Coverett; Rajni Chibbar; Ward, Heather A; Cockcroft, Donald W

    2004-01-01

    Several inorganic dust lung diseases (pneumoconioses) are associated with autoimmune diseases. Although autoimmune serological abnormalities are common in asbestosis, clinical autoimmune/collagen vascular diseases are not commonly reported. A case of pulmonary asbestosis complicated by perinuclear-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (myeloperoxidase) positive probable microscopic polyangiitis (glomerulonephritis, pericarditis, alveolitis, multineuritis multiplex) is described and the possible...

  19. Fluidized Bed Asbestos Sampler Design and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen E. Wright; Barry H. O' Brien

    2007-12-01

    A large number of samples are required to characterize a site contaminated with asbestos from previous mine or other industrial operations. Current methods, such as EPA Region 10’s glovebox method, or the Berman Elutriator method are time consuming and costly primarily because the equipment is difficult to decontaminate between samples. EPA desires a shorter and less costly method for characterizing soil samples for asbestos. The objective of this was to design and test a qualitative asbestos sampler that operates as a fluidized bed. The proposed sampler employs a conical spouted bed to vigorously mix the soil and separate fine particulate including asbestos fibers on filters. The filters are then analyzed using transmission electron microscopy for presence of asbestos. During initial testing of a glass prototype using ASTM 20/30 sand and clay fines as asbestos surrogates, fine particulate adhered to the sides of the glass vessel and the tubing to the collection filter – presumably due to static charge on the fine particulate. This limited the fines recovery to ~5% of the amount added to the sand surrogate. A second prototype was constructed of stainless steel, which improved fines recovery to about 10%. Fines recovery was increased to 15% by either humidifying the inlet air or introducing a voltage probe in the air space above the sample. Since this was not a substantial improvement, testing using the steel prototype proceeded without using these techniques. Final testing of the second prototype using asbestos suggests that the fluidized bed is considerably more sensitive than the Berman elutriator method. Using a sand/tremolite mixture with 0.005% tremolite, the Berman elutriator did not segregate any asbestos structures while the fluidized bed segregated an average of 11.7. The fluidized bed was also able to segregate structures in samples containing asbestos at a 0.0001% concentration, while the Berman elutriator method did not detect any fibers at this

  20. Immunological Effects of Silica and Asbestos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takemi Otsuki; Fuminori Hyodoh; Ayako Ueki; Yasumitsu Nishimura; Megumi Maeda; Shuko Murakami; Hiroaki Hayashi; Yoshie Miura; Masayasu Kusaka; Takashi Nakano; Kazuya Fukuoka; Takumi Kishimoto

    2007-01-01

    Silicosis patients (SILs) and patients who have been exposed to asbestos develop not only respiratory diseases but also certain immunological disorders. In particular, SIL sometimes complicates autoimmune diseases such as systemic scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis (known as Caplan syndrome), and systemic lupus erythematoses. In addition, malignant complications such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma often occurr in patients exposed to asbestos, and may be involved in the reduction of tumor immunity. Although silica-induced disorders of autoimmunity have been explained as adjuvant-type effects of silica, more precise analyses are needed and should reflect the recent progress in immunomolecular findings. A brief summary of our investigations related to the immunological effects of silica/asbestos is presented. Recent advances in immunomolecular studies led to detailed analyses of the immunological effects of asbestos and silica. Both affect immuno-competent cells and these effects may be associated with the pathophysiological development of complications in silicosis and asbestos-exposed patients such as the occurrence of autoimmune disorders and malignant tumors, respectively. In addition,immunological analyses may lead to the development of new clinical tools for the modification of the pathophysiological aspects of diseases such as the regulation of autoimmunity or tumor immunity using cellmediated therapies, various cytokines, and molecule-targeting therapies. In particular, as the incidence of asbestosrelated malignancies is increasing and such malignancies have been a medical and social problem since the summer of 2005 in Japan, efforts should be focused on developing a cure for these diseases to eliminate nationwide anxiety.

  1. Quantification of short and long asbestos fibers to assess asbestos exposure: a review of fiber size toxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Boulanger, Guillaume; Andujar, Pascal; Pairon, Jean-Claude; Billon-Galland, Marie-Annick; Dion, Chantal; Dumortier, Pascal; Brochard, Patrick; Sobaszek, Annie; Bartsch, Pierre; Paris, Christophe; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    The fibrogenicity and carcinogenicity of asbestos fibers are dependent on several fiber parameters including fiber dimensions. Based on the WHO (World Health Organization) definition, the current regulations focalise on long asbestos fibers (LAF) (Length: L ≥ 5 μm, Diameter: D  3). However air samples contain short asbestos fibers (SAF) (L 

  2. Enfermedades pleurales benignas inducidas por asbesto Benign pleural diseases induced by asbestos

    OpenAIRE

    J. Boldú; V. M. Eguía

    2005-01-01

    La exposición al asbesto es una causa importante de patología pleural y se puede producir con intensidades moderadas o ligeras dada la capacidad del asbesto de concentrarse en la pleura. Ello motiva junto a la prolongada latencia existente entre la exposición y la enfermedad, que sigamos viendo durante muchos años manifestaciones clínicas pleurales de exposición previa, a pesar del uso del asbesto cada vez más limitado en las últimas décadas. Dicha exposición puede presentarse con distintas m...

  3. TNF-α inhibits asbestos-induced cytotoxicity via a NF-κB-dependent pathway, a possible mechanism for asbestos-induced oncogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Haining; Bocchetta, Maurizio; Kroczynska, Barbara; Elmishad, Amira G.; Chen, Yuanbin; Liu, Zemin; Bubici, Concetta; Mossman, Brooke T; Pass, Harvey I.; Joseph R. Testa; Franzoso, Guido; Carbone, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Asbestos is the main cause of human malignant mesothelioma (MM). In vivo, macrophages phagocytize asbestos and, in response, release TNF-α and other cytokines that contribute to carcinogenesis through unknown mechanisms. In vitro, asbestos does not induce transformation of primary human mesothelial cells (HM); instead, asbestos is very cytotoxic to HM, causing extensive cell death. This finding raised an apparent paradox: How can asbestos cause MM if HM exposed to asbestos die? We found that ...

  4. Monitoring and analysis of asbestos concentration in working environment of different asbestos-producing technologies in a certain area%某地区不同石棉生产方法作业环境中石棉水平

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋兆强; 陈钧强; 楼建林; 苗超; 邵迪初; 张幸

    2015-01-01

    目的 分析浙江省恶性间皮瘤聚集性发病地区1984至2010年作业环境的石棉水平,提高当地对恶性间皮瘤的认识和早期诊断率,保护工人健康.方法 在当地疾病预防控制中心收集1984至2010年浙江省某石棉加工地区的石棉纺织企业、家庭手纺、刹车片生产、石棉板生产作业场所空气中石棉的总粉尘浓度监测资料,共收集到时间加权平均浓度(TWA)数据766份,MAC数据1 233份.对其中29个家庭手纺作业点在同一时间同一采样点平行测定石棉质量浓度及纤维计数浓度.在该地石棉企业采集石棉原料及积尘,对粉尘成分进行X线衍射检测分析.结果 该石棉加工地区1984至2010年使用的石棉原料为四川省、青海省、新疆维吾尔自治区、俄罗斯、津巴布韦的温石棉,可混有SiO2、CaCO3等杂质.石棉板生产曾使用蓝石棉作为原料.石棉纺织企业上世纪60年代至80年代粉尘浓度远超过国家标准,此后粉尘浓度明显下降,但高于国家标准.石棉纺织企业作业环境中粉尘浓度超标率为95.2%,原料、梳棉、机纺、编织、劳保工作场所中粉尘浓度的超标率均在90%以上,其中梳棉显著较高.家庭手纺质量浓度的超标率为37.9%,纺机旁粉尘浓度和超标率较高.石棉板生产打浆和刹车片生产磨片的作业环境粉尘浓度较高.结论 石棉加工各种生产方法的粉尘浓度均有超标的情况,使作业工人处于恶性间皮瘤等石棉相关疾病的风险中,应引起高度重视.%Objective to analyze asbestos exposure level between 1984 and 2010 in a district of malignant mesothelioma with clustering incidence in Zhejiang Province,in order to improve the recognizing and early diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma,protect the health of workers.Methods monitoring data of total asbestos dust concentration in the air of workplace from 1984 to 2010 in asbestos textile enterprises,family hand spinning operation

  5. Asbestos-related diseases in Thailand and review literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhannachart, Ponglada; Dumavibhat, Narongpon; Siriruttanapruk, Somkiat

    2012-08-01

    Asbestos is a harmful substance that can cause both malignancy and non-malignancy in humans. Although it has been used in Thailand for several years, few cases of asbestos-related diseases were reported. Concerning about high consumption and long exposure of asbestos in the country, the incurable but preventable diseases caused by asbestos will be the health problem in the near future. The authors presented 2 cases with asbestos-related diseases, one diagnosed as malignant mesothelioma and the other as asbestosis.

  6. Asbestos and Probable Microscopic Polyangiitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George S Rashed Philteos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several inorganic dust lung diseases (pneumoconioses are associated with autoimmune diseases. Although autoimmune serological abnormalities are common in asbestosis, clinical autoimmune/collagen vascular diseases are not commonly reported. A case of pulmonary asbestosis complicated by perinuclear-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (myeloperoxidase positive probable microscopic polyangiitis (glomerulonephritis, pericarditis, alveolitis, multineuritis multiplex is described and the possible immunological mechanisms whereby asbestosis fibres might be relevant in induction of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are reviewed in the present report.

  7. Evaluation of the use of Environmental Asbestos in Siverek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Ceylan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Environmental asbestos exposure and asbestos related diseases are common in Siverek. We aimed to investigate, whether environmental asbestos exposure ongoing in Siverek or not, used for which purposes if this still in usage and the manner of supplying in this study. Material and Method: A questionnaire was made for this study between March 2012-April 2012 in the districts that are asbestos usage is known in Siverek. Results: Rates of asbestos usage history were for plastering walls 2.3% (n:6, molasses making 22.7% (n:59 in Siverek. The data of this study has revealed that asbestos exposure still continues decreased significantly with the in Siverek. Discussion: For this reason planning and implementation of training activities about the harms of asbestos is required for community awareness especially in rural areas.

  8. Asphalt cement poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  9. Biomonitoring Study of Heavy Metals in Blood from a Cement Factory Based Community

    OpenAIRE

    Bank M.S.; Spengler J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of cement factory pollution, emissions, and kiln dust on contaminant exposure in human populations, including school environments, in close proximity to these point sources. In Ravena, New York, USA and vicinity, environmental pollution from a local cement plant is considered significant and substantial according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxic Release Inventory, published in 2006, 2007, and 2010. We hypothesized that cement facto...

  10. Influence of the cement production aerotechnogenic emissions on the filtration properties of the soil

    OpenAIRE

    O. Iziumova

    2015-01-01

    The results of investigations over the filtration properties of ash-laden black soil under the cement production pollution emissions have been given. The general tendencies in formation of the quantitative characteristics of the soil filtration properties estimated by filtration coefficient under cement dust pollution have been clarified.

  11. Enfermedades pleurales benignas inducidas por asbesto Benign pleural diseases induced by asbestos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boldú

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La exposición al asbesto es una causa importante de patología pleural y se puede producir con intensidades moderadas o ligeras dada la capacidad del asbesto de concentrarse en la pleura. Ello motiva junto a la prolongada latencia existente entre la exposición y la enfermedad, que sigamos viendo durante muchos años manifestaciones clínicas pleurales de exposición previa, a pesar del uso del asbesto cada vez más limitado en las últimas décadas. Dicha exposición puede presentarse con distintas manifestaciones tanto malignas como el mesotelioma como benignas, siendo las principales de éstas el derrame pleural benigno, las placas pleurales, la fibrosis pleural difusa y la atelectasia redonda.Exposure to asbestos is an important cause of pleural pathology and can be produced with light or moderate tendencies given the capacity of asbestos to concentrate in the pleura. Together with the prolonged latency existing between exposure and the disease, this means that for many years we will continue to see pleural clinical manifestations from past exposure, in spite of the increasingly limited use of asbestos in recent decades. This exposure can show itself in different manifestations, both malign, such as mesothelioma, and benign, principally benign pleural effusion, pleural plaques, diffuse pleural fibrosis and massive atelectasis.

  12. Radiaton-resistant electrical insulation on the base of cement binders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems of designing radiation-resistant electrical insulations on the base of BATs and Talum cements for the UNK magnets operating under constant and pulse modes are discussed. The data characterizing dielectrical ad physico-mechanical properties of 25 various compositions are given. Two variants of manufacturing coils are considered: solid and with the use of asbestos tape impregnated with aluminous cement solution. The data obtained testify to the fact that the advantages of insulation on Talum cement are raised radiation resistance, high strength (particularly compression strength), weak porosity, high elasticity modulus and high thermal conductivity. BATs cement insulation is characterized by high radiation resistance, absence of shrinkage, rather low elasticity modulus and high dielectrical characteristics under normal conditions. The qualities of the solid insulation variant are its high technological effectiveness and posibility to fill up the spaces of complex configuration. In case of using as solid insulation Talum cement, however special measures for moisture removal are required. The advantage of insulation on the base of the asbestos tape is its reliability. For complex configuration magnets, however to realize is such insulation somewhat difficult

  13. 29 CFR 1915.1001 - Asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... addition to the definition in 29 CFR 1926.32(f), one who is capable of identifying existing asbestos... leaks, and any leaks sealed. (2) Electrical circuits in the enclosure shall be deactivated, unless... work as defined in 29 CFR part 1915, including but not limited to the following: (1) Demolition...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1101 - Asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... conditions of the current workplace. Competent person means, in addition to the definition in 29 CFR 1926.32.... (2) Electrical circuits in the enclosure shall be deactivated, unless equipped with ground-fault...) Scope and application. This section regulates asbestos exposure in all work as defined in 29 CFR...

  15. Asbestos free friction composition for brake linings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Ganguly; Raji George

    2008-02-01

    An asbestos free friction material composite for brake linings is synthesized containing fibrous reinforcing constituents, friction imparting and controlling additives, elastomeric additives, fire retarding components and a thermosetting resin. The composite shows exemplary friction characteristics and has great resistance to wear and shows good temperature stability.

  16. Translocation pathways for inhaled asbestos fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantegazza F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We discuss the translocation of inhaled asbestos fibers based on pulmonary and pleuro-pulmonary interstitial fluid dynamics. Fibers can pass the alveolar barrier and reach the lung interstitium via the paracellular route down a mass water flow due to combined osmotic (active Na+ absorption and hydraulic (interstitial pressure is subatmospheric pressure gradient. Fibers can be dragged from the lung interstitium by pulmonary lymph flow (primary translocation wherefrom they can reach the blood stream and subsequently distribute to the whole body (secondary translocation. Primary translocation across the visceral pleura and towards pulmonary capillaries may also occur if the asbestos-induced lung inflammation increases pulmonary interstitial pressure so as to reverse the trans-mesothelial and trans-endothelial pressure gradients. Secondary translocation to the pleural space may occur via the physiological route of pleural fluid formation across the parietal pleura; fibers accumulation in parietal pleura stomata (black spots reflects the role of parietal lymphatics in draining pleural fluid. Asbestos fibers are found in all organs of subjects either occupationally exposed or not exposed to asbestos. Fibers concentration correlates with specific conditions of interstitial fluid dynamics, in line with the notion that in all organs microvascular filtration occurs from capillaries to the extravascular spaces. Concentration is high in the kidney (reflecting high perfusion pressure and flow and in the liver (reflecting high microvascular permeability while it is relatively low in the brain (due to low permeability of blood-brain barrier. Ultrafine fibers (length

  17. Health risk associated with airborne asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełczyk, Adam; Božek, František

    2015-07-01

    The following paper presents an assessment of health risks associated with air polluted with respirable asbestos fibers in towns of southwest Poland. The aim of the work was to determine whether or not any prevention measures are necessary in order to reduce the level of exposure to the pollutant. The risk assessment was carried out based on the air analyses and the latest asbestos toxicity data published by the Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), USA and Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA). It was found that in some sites, the concentration of the asbestos fibers exceeded the acceptable levels, which should be a reason of special concern. The highest concentration of asbestos was found in town centers during the rush hours. In three spots, the calculated maximum health risk exceeded 1E-04 which is considered too high according to the adopted standards. So far, it has not yet been possible to find a reasonable method of ensuring the hazard reduction. PMID:26070993

  18. Essential Components of a Perimeter Air Monitoring Plan and Worker Protection Program at Sites Involving the Excavation of Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdeb, T. F.

    2012-12-01

    Preparing a Perimeter Air Monitoring Plan that provides the essential information and methods of evaluation needed to assure that the health of the surrounding community is adequately protected and adapting currently existing Cal/OSHA regulations to be relevant to the protection of workers at sites involving the excavation of Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) is oftentimes challenging in California. Current guidelines regarding what constitutes an effective air monitoring program are often lacking in details regarding what should be sampled and analyzed to characterize a site and what evaluation techniques should be applied to process the results of monitoring, and the current Cal/OSHA asbestos related regulations regarding worker protection are for the most part largely pertinent to the abatement of asbestos in buildings. An overview of the essential components of an effective Baseline and Perimeter Air Monitoring Plan will be presented that includes a brief discussion of the various asbestos types and fiber sizes that may need to be considered, possible approachs for evaluating temporal and spatial variability, review of selected site boundary target concentrations, and consideration of the potential for airborne dust and soil containing asbestos (and other contaminants) to migrate and accumulate offsite eventually contributing to "background creep" --the incremental increase of overall airborne asbestos concentrations in the areas surrounding the site due to the re-entrainment of asbestos from the settled dust and/or transported soil. In addition to the above, the current Cal/OSHA asbestos regulations related to worker protection will be briefly discussed with respect to their relevancy at NOA sites with an overview of the adaptations to the regulations that were developed as a result of some fairly lengthy discussions with representatives of Cal/OSHA. These adaptations include, among other things, defining how regulated areas (asbestos concentrations over 1

  19. THE USE OF SISAL FIBRE AS REINFORCEMENT IN CEMENT BASED COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romildo Dias Tolêdo Filho

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The inclusion of fibre reinforcement in concrete, mortar and cement paste can enhance many of the engineering properties of the basic materials, such as fracture toughness, flexural strength and resistance to fatigue, impact, thermal shock and spalling. In recent years, a great deal of interest has been created worldwide on the potential applications of natural fibre reinforced, cement based composites. Investigations have been carried out in many countries on various mechanical properties, physical performance and durability of cement based matrices reinforced with naturally occurring fibres including sisal, coconut, jute, bamboo and wood fibres. These fibres have always been considered promising as reinforcement of cement based matrices because of their availability, low cost and low consumption of energy. In this review, the general properties of the composites are described in relation to fibre content, length, strength and stiffness. A chronological development of sisal fibre reinforced, cement based matrices is reported and experimental data are provided to illustrate the performance of sisal fibre reinforced cement composites. A brief description on the use of these composite materials as building products has been included. The influence of sisal fibres on the development of plastic shrinkage in the pre-hardened state, on tensile, compressive and bending strength in the hardened state of mortar mixes is discussed. Creep and drying shrinkage of the composites and the durability of natural fibres in cement based matrices are of particular interest and are also highlighted. The results show that the composites reinforced with sisal fibres are reliable materials to be used in practice for the production of structural elements to be used in rural and civil construction. This material could be a substitute asbestos-cement composite, which is a serious hazard to human and animal health and is prohibited in industrialized countries. The

  20. Medical monitoring of asbestos-exposed workers: experience from Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świątkowska, Beata; Szeszenia-Dąbrowska, Neonila; Wilczyńska, Urszula

    2016-08-01

    In Poland, the use of asbestos was banned in 1997 and asbestos plants have been closed since then. Despite their closure, cases of asbestos-related occupational diseases among former asbestos workers are still being recorded in the Central Register of Occupational Diseases. Between 2001 and 2014, there were 2726 asbestos-related illnesses, classified and reported as diseases associated with occupational exposure to asbestos. In 2000, Poland introduced a programme called Amiantus, targeted at former asbestos-processing plant workers. The programme provided periodic medical examinations to workers and free access to medications for treatment of asbestos-related illnesses. Introduction of the programme provided additional data to generate a reliable estimation of the number of asbestos-related occupational diseases, including cancer. The average latency period for asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma is about 40 years so there may still be some health impact to former workers necessitating follow-up. We present the Polish experience of implementing a medical examination programme for asbestos-exposed workers and provide a list of activities to consider when planning for such a programme. PMID:27516637

  1. Impact performance of the fibre-cement composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transition zone of short filament fibres randomly dispersed in a paste of ordinary portland cement is analysed. Composites of vegetable fibres (malva, sisal and coir) are compared with those containing chrysotile asbestos and polypropylene fibres. The series of composites are prepared to be tested at the ages of 7, 28, 90 and 180 days. The water-cement ratio is 0.38 and at the age of 28 days specimens with ratio of 0.30 and 0.46 are also tested. The backscattered electron image and energy dispersive spectroscopy identify the major properties of the fibre-matrix interface. The microstructural characteristics are directly associated with the toughness of the composites, once the energy dissipation at transition zone is confirmed. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job

  3. The Global Health Dimensions of Asbestos and Asbestos-Related Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ken; Landrigan, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The Collegium Ramazzini (CR) reaffirms its long-standing position that responsible public health action is to ban all extraction and use of asbestos, including chrysotile. This current statement updates earlier statements by the CR with a focus on global health dimensions of asbestos and asbestos-related diseases (ARDs). The ARD epidemic will likely not peak for at least a decade in most industrialized countries and for several decades in industrializing countries. Asbestos and ARDs will continue to present challenges in the arena of occupational medicine and public health, as well as in clinical research and practice, and have thus emerged as a global health issue. Industrialized countries that have already gone through the transition to an asbestos ban have learned lessons and acquired know-how and capacity that could be of great value if deployed in industrializing countries embarking on the transition. The accumulated wealth of experience and technologies in industrialized countries should thus be shared internationally through global campaigns to eliminate ARDs. PMID:27325079

  4. Asbestos-related diseases of the lungs and pleura: uses, trends and management over the last century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becklake, M R; Bagatin, E; Neder, J A

    2007-04-01

    Asbestos is a descriptive term for a group of naturally occurring minerals known to mankind since ancient times. The main types of asbestos (chrysotile, and the amphiboles crocidolite and amosite) differ in chemical structure, biopersistence in human tissue and toxicity. Commercial exploitation, with little thought for environmental controls, increased over the twentieth century, particularly after World War II, to accommodate globalisation and the demands of the world's burgeoning cities. As its ill-health effects, both non-malignant (fibrosis of the lungs or asbestosis; pleural effusion, plaques and thickening) and malignant (mesothelioma, lung and other cancers), became evident, public pressure rose to control its use. The last decades of the last century saw decreases in exposure and rates of asbestosis in industrialised and in some less-industrialised countries, where pleural plaques and malignant mesothelioma are currently the most frequent manifestations of asbestos exposure. Longer follow-up of asbestos-exposed cohorts in mining and manufacturing has also strengthened the evidence of a fibre gradient in toxicity, with chrysotile exhibiting lower toxicity than the amphiboles, and amosite lower toxicity than crocidolite. The last decades of the twentieth century saw stabilisation and/or declines in mesothelioma rates in several industrialised countries. In less-industrialised countries, data on disease are sparse, exposure generally high and rates may peak in the future. Management of asbestos-related disease in the workplace requires collaboration between workers and unions (responsible for monitoring workplace dust levels, to which they must have access) and companies (responsible for engineering controls), reinforced by appropriate government regulations and by community support. PMID:17394680

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweigh cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary surface pipe and intermediate casing cementing conditions historically encountered in the US and establishment of average design conditions for ULHS cements. Russian literature concerning development and use of ultra-lightweight cements employing either nitrogen or ULHS was reviewed, and a summary is presented. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was conducted to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS. This protocol is presented and discussed. finally, results of initial testing of ULHS cements is presented along with analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project

  6. Toxicología del asbesto Toxicology of asbest

    OpenAIRE

    G. Luis; Hernández, C; C. Rubio; I. Frías; Gutiérrez, A.; A. Hardisson

    2009-01-01

    El asbesto o amianto está constituido por un grupo de minerales metamórficos fibrosos ampliamente extendidos en el mundo. Las principales variedades de asbesto son las serpentinas y los anfíboles. El asbesto llega al organismo al inhalar sus fibras y partículas. La exposición a este material puede ocasionar diferentes enfermedades irreversibles como asbestosis, mesotelioma maligno, placas pleurales y cáncer de pulmón. Todas ellas presentan un período de latencia largo. En 1978 el asbesto fue ...

  7. Software for Apportionment of Asbestos-Related Mesotheliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with an asbestos-related mesothelioma may be legally entitled to financial compensation. In this context, a physician may be called upon to apportion the contribution of an asbestos containing product or facility where there was asbestos exposure in the development of that individual's mesothelioma. This task is mathematically not simple. It is a complex function of each and the entire individual's above-background asbestos exposures. Factors to be considered for each of these exposures are the amount of exposure to mesotheliogenic fibers, each of the asbestos containing products' potency to cause mesothelioma, and the time period when the exposures occurred relative to when the mesothelioma was diagnosed. In this paper, the known factors related to asbestos-related mesothelioma risk are briefly reviewed and the software that is downloadable and fully functional in a Windows® environment is also provided. This software allows for rapid assessment of relative contributions and deals with the somewhat tedious mathematical calculations. With this software and a reasonable occupational history, if it is decided that the mesothelioma was due to above-background asbestos exposure, the contribution of an asbestos containing product or a time period of asbestos exposure can be apportioned.

  8. Chlor-alkali producers evaluate safer alternatives to asbestos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently, 75% of all US capacity for producing chlor-alkali - more than 40% of the world's capacity - has used asbestos diaphragm-cell technology. Although the Environmental Protection Agency continues to exempt asbestos use in diaphragms from restrictions, producers are considering alternatives. In Germany, stringent regulations will ban asbestos in chlor-alkali production after 1994. Heavy fines were levied recently against some chlor-alkali producers in the United States when EPA inspectors found asbestos fibers in cell renewal areas. Restrictions on the mining of asbestos raise the cost of obtaining adequate amounts of high-quality asbestos and gradually raise the cost of transporting and discarding spent diaphragms. Two alternatives are to use newly developed, non-asbestos diaphragms or to convert to existing ion-exchange membrane-cell technology. Only the former seems economical in the United States. The non-asbestos diaphragm is based on an inorganic polymer composite developed in 1988 as an asbestos substitute. The composite received Du Pont's Plunkett Award for Innovation with Teflon trademark, landed on the National Development Association's 1991 Honor Roll and became a 1991 R ampersand D 100 Award winner. 6 figs

  9. Software for Apportionment of Asbestos-Related Mesotheliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Patients with an asbestos-related mesothelioma may be legally entitled to financial compensation. In this context, a physician may be called upon to apportion the contribution of an asbestos containing product or facility where there was asbestos exposure in the development of that individual's mesothelioma. This task is mathematically not simple. It is a complex function of each and the entire individual's above-background asbestos exposures. Factors to be considered for each of these exposures are the amount of exposure to mesotheliogenic fibers, each of the asbestos containing products' potency to cause mesothelioma, and the time period when the exposures occurred relative to when the mesothelioma was diagnosed. In this paper, the known factors related to asbestos-related mesothelioma risk are briefly reviewed and the software that is downloadable and fully functional in a Windows® environment is also provided. This software allows for rapid assessment of relative contributions and deals with the somewhat tedious mathematical calculations. With this software and a reasonable occupational history, if it is decided that the mesothelioma was due to above-background asbestos exposure, the contribution of an asbestos containing product or a time period of asbestos exposure can be apportioned. PMID:27445546

  10. Asbestos case and its current implications for global health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Marsili

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding a major body of evidence on the carcinogenicity of all asbestos fibres and a general consensus of the scientific community on the health impact of this agent, asbestos is still produced and used in a large number of countries, thus determining further harm for future generations. Prevention of asbestos-related disease requires international cooperation, transfer of know-how and dissemination of successful procedures in order to contrast asbestos exposure in the frame of a global environmental health approach.

  11. Hydration Characteristics and Immobilization of Cr (VI) in Slag Cement-CKD Pastes under Hydrothermal Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M R Shatat; Gomaa A M Ali; M A Tantawy

    2015-01-01

    The effect of hydrothermal curing regimes on the hydration characteristics of slag cement containing different ratios of cement kiln dust has been studied. The samples for this study were combination of slag cement and cement kiln dust (5%-25%) without and with immobilization of 5% Cr (VI) by mass. Pastes were hydrothermally treated at 180℃ for different periods (2-24 h) in well closed stainless steel capsule. The hydration characteristics of these pastes were studied by measuring the compressive strength, bulk density, total porosity and combined water content. The findings were further supported by XRD and SEM analysis. The results indicated that the hydration characteristics of slag cement paste containing cement kiln dust 10% by mass were enhanced, especially at later ages (24 h) of hydration. That is due to the hydrothermal curing regimes of immobilized pastes accelerating hydration reactions and precipitation of CaCrO4, indicating that Cr (VI) can be solidiifed in the cement paste. This precipitation leads to pore formation in hydrated slag cement pastes.

  12. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  13. Estimating the Additional Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Korea: Focused on Demolition of Asbestos Containing Materials in Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Chan; Hong, Won-Hwa; Zhang, Yuan-Long; Son, Byeung-Hun; Seo, Youn-Kyu; Choi, Jun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    When asbestos containing materials (ACM) must be removed from the building before demolition, additional greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are generated. However, precedent studies have not considered the removal of ACM from the building. The present study aimed to develop a model for estimating GHG emissions created by the ACM removal processes, specifically the removal of asbestos cement slates (ACS). The second objective was to use the new model to predict the total GHG emission produced by ACM removal in the entire country of Korea. First, an input-equipment inventory was established for each step of the ACS removal process. Second, an energy consumption database for each equipment type was established. Third, the total GHG emission contributed by each step of the process was calculated. The GHG emissions generated from the 1,142,688 ACS-containing buildings in Korea was estimated to total 23,778 tonCO₂eq to 132,141 tonCO₂eq. This study was meaningful in that the emissions generated by ACS removal have not been studied before. Furthermore, the study deals with additional problems that can be triggered by the presence of asbestos in building materials. The method provided in this study is expected to contribute greatly to the calculation of GHG emissions caused by ACM worldwide. PMID:27626433

  14. Characteristics of mercury cycling in the cement production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyang; Wang, Shuxiao; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Hai; Wu, Qingru; Hao, Jiming

    2016-01-25

    The mercury cycling caused by dust shuttling significantly increases the atmospheric emissions from cement production. A comprehensive understanding of this mercury cycling can promote the development of mercury emission control technologies. In this study, the characteristics of mercury cycling in the cement production process were first investigated. Furthermore, the mercury enrichment and effects of dust treatment were evaluated based on the field tests conducted in two Chinese cement plants. The mercury cycling between the kiln system and the raw mill system was the most important aspect and contributed 57-73% to the total amount of mercury emitted from the kiln system. Mercury emitted from the kiln system with flue gas was enriched as high as 3.4-8.8 times in the two tested plants compared to the amount of mercury in the raw materials and coal due to mercury cycling. The mercury enrichment can be significantly affected by the proportion of mercury cycled back to the kiln system. The effects of dust treatment were evaluated, and dust treatment can efficiently reduce approximately 31-70% of atmospheric mercury emissions in the two plants. The reduction proportion approximately linearly decreased with the proportion of mercury removed from the collected dust. PMID:26448491

  15. [Epidemiological surveillance of malignant mesothelioma cases in Italy: incidence and asbestos exposure figures by the Italian mesothelioma registry (ReNaM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaccio, Alessandro; Binazzi, Alessandra; Cauzillo, Gabriella; Chellini, Elisabetta; De Zotti, Renata; Gennaro, Valerio; Menegozzo, Massimo; Mensi, Carolina; Merler, Enzo; Mirabelli, Dario; Musti, Marina; Pannelli, Franco; Romanelli, Antonio; Scarselli, Alberto; Tosi, Sergio; Tumino, Rosario; Nesti, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    The Study describes the epidemiological surveillance of mesothelioma cases carried out by the Italian mesothelioma register (ReNaM). A Regional Operating Centre (COR) is present in nearly all Italian regions (17 out of 20) and it collects malignant mesothelioma cases and investigate the modalities of asbestos exposure by using a structured questionnaire. The register produces malignant mesothelioma incidence measures and analyses of the modalities of the asbestos exposure. The standardized incidence rate of malignant mesothelioma in 2001 was 2.98 (in 100,000 inhabitants) among men and 0.98 among women; a professional (certain, probable, possible) exposure has been detected in 67.4% of defined cases. In addition to the conventional sectors (shipbuilding, railways repair and demolition, asbestos-cement production), also textile, building, transport, chemical and glass industries, petroleum and sugar refineries, electricity production and distribution plants are getting involved. Despite the absence of some regions completing the national coverage and the non homogeneity in collecting and coding data, the epidemiological surveillance of malignant mesothelioma carried out by ReNaM is an important tool for the scientific knowledge and the prevention of asbestos-related diseases. PMID:18050854

  16. Thermal performance of sisal fiber-cement roofing tiles for rural constructions Desempenho térmico de telhas de fibrocimento reforçadas com polpa de sisal para construções rurais

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Henrique Denzin Tonoli; Sérgio Francisco dos Santos; José Antonio Rabi; Wilson Nunes dos Santos; Holmer Savastano Junior

    2011-01-01

    Roofing provides the main protection against direct solar radiation in animal housing. Appropriate thermal properties of roofing materials tend to improve the thermal comfort in the inner ambient. Nonasbestos fiber-cement roofing components reinforced with cellulose pulp from sisal (Agave sisalana) were produced by slurry and dewatering techniques, with an optional addition of polypropylene fibers. Nonasbestos tiles were evaluated and compared with commercially available asbestos-cement sheet...

  17. Naturally Occurring Asbestos in the Southern Nevada Region: Potential for Human Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, B. J.; Metcalf, R. V.; Berry, D.; McLaurin, B.; Kent, D.; Januch, J.; Goossens, D.

    2015-12-01

    Naturally occurring fibrous actinolite, winchite, magnesioriebeckite, richterite, magnesiohornblende, and erionite have been found in rock, soil, and dust in southern Nevada and northwestern Arizona. The areas containing naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) include urban areas (e.g. Boulder City) and rural areas where people routinely enjoy outdoor activities including horseback riding, running, hiking, bicycling, and off-road-vehicle (ORV) recreation. A recent study showing mesothelioma in young people and women suggests some form of environmental exposure. Rock, soil, dust and clothing were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); additional rock samples were analyzed using wavelength dispersive electron probe microanalysis (EPMA); additional soil samples were analyzed using PLM (polarizing light microscopy) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy) using the Fluidized Bed Asbestos Segregator preparation method. Winds have transported and mixed the Ca-amphiboles, which are primarily from Nevada, with the Na-amphiboles that are primarily from northwestern Arizona. Erionite, which has not previously been reported in this area, was a common soil component found in 5 of 6 samples. The erionite source has not yet been determined. Winds have transported the amphibole and erionite particles into the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area - an ORV recreation area located 35 km north of Boulder City that otherwise would not be geologically predicted to contain fibrous amphiboles. In Boulder City, wind directions are primarily bimodal N-NE and S-SW with the strongest winds in the spring coming from the S-SW. The arid climate in this part of the Mojave Desert greatly increases the potential for wind erosion and human exposures. These results suggest that the entire Las Vegas Basin has, at times, received these particles through wind transport. Because the most likely human exposure pathway is through inhalation of dust, the Las Vegas

  18. Guidance Manual: Asbestos Operations & Maintenance Work Practices. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Building Sciences, Washington, DC.

    This technical manual provides detailed guidance to building owners, asbestos program managers, and operations and maintenance (O&M) workers for managing asbestos-containing materials (ACM) in buildings. The manual addresses four different types of ACM found in buildings and three different levels of precaution which may be warranted by specific…

  19. Fungal weathering of asbestos in semi arid regions of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Shabori; John, P J; Ledwani, Lalita

    2016-02-01

    The science of Geomicrobiology, which deals with mineral- microbe interaction in nature contributes effectively to three important processes namely- mineral and metal bioremediation, biomining and soil mineral formation by microbes. Bioremediation one of the important process of the above, degrades or transforms hazardous contaminants to less toxic compounds. Several groups of fungi have proved highly efficient in this aspect, with asbestos being one such toxic entity in the environment on which their activity was studied. The present investigation uses the same tool as a device for detoxifying asbestos, a potent carcinogenic entity; with fungal isolates native to the asbestos mines of Rajasthan, India, being investigated for the first time. The cellular mechanism of asbestos toxicity is mainly attributed to the presence of iron in its chemical composition which catalyzes generation of free radicals leading to oxidation of biomolecules. The two dominant novel species found therein, identified as Aspergillus tubingenesis and Coemansia reversa have proved capable of actively removing iron from asbestos fibers as studied by scanning electron microscopy- electron diffraction X-ray (SEM-EDX) analysis. This probably could lead to a reduction in toxicity of asbestos, due to reduced iron concentration as reported in related studies. Many fungi are known to release iron chelating compounds, siderophores, which could be instrumental in the study. The findings related to two new fungal species being added to the list of earlier identified fungal bioremediators of asbestos, widens the prospect of using bioremediation as an effective tool for asbestos detoxification.

  20. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy...

  1. Asbestos exposures of mechanics performing clutch service on motor vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Howard J; Van Orden, Drew R

    2008-03-01

    A study was conducted to assess historical asbestos exposures of mechanics performing clutch service on motor vehicles. For most of the 20th century, friction components used in brakes and manual transmission clutches contained approximately 25-60% chrysotile asbestos. Since the late 1960s, asbestos exposure assessment studies conducted on mechanics performing brake service have frequently reported levels below the current OSHA permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 0.1 fiber/cc (flcc). Although there is a robust asbestos exposure data set for mechanics performing brake service, there are almost no data for mechanics removing and replacing clutches in manual transmission vehicles. Personal and area airborne asbestos samples were collected during the removal of asbestos-containing clutches from 15 manual transmissions obtained from salvage facilities by an experienced mechanic. Clutch plates and debris were analyzed for asbestos using EPA and ISO published analytical methods. More than 100 personal and area air samples were collected and analyzed for asbestos fibers using NIOSH methods 7400 and 7402. A separate study involved a telephone survey of 16 automotive mechanics who began work prior to 1975. The mechanics were asked about the duration, frequency, and methods used to perform clutch service. Wear debris in the bell housing surrounding clutches had an average of 0.1% chrysotile asbestos by weight, a value consistent with similar reports of brake debris. Asbestos air sampling data collected averaged 0.047 flcc. Mechanics participating in the telephone survey indicated that clutch service was performed infrequently, the entire clutch assembly was normally replaced, and there was no need to otherwise handle the asbestos-containing clutch plates. These mechanics also confirmed that wet methods were most frequently used to clean debris from the bell housing. Combining the asbestos exposure that occurred when mechanics performed clutch service, along with the duration

  2. [Asbestos at the time of the First World War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, C; Bianchi, T

    2015-11-22

    Between the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th numerous asbestos industries began operations in various parts of the world. At the time of the First World War there is ample evidence of the use of this mineral in shipbuilding, the aircraft industry and in the construction industry. In the years 1912-17 the writer Franz Kafka was co-proprietor of a small asbestos factory in Prague. Some of the writer's novels and journal pages were inspired by this experience. In this way asbestos entered into the history of 20th century European literature. In 1917 asbestos extraction was started at the quarry in Balangero, near Turin, Italy. Risks related to the use of asbestos were known at the beginning of the 20th century and legislation aimed at preventing the harmful effects of the mineral were approved in Italy.

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  4. Managing Asbestos in Place: A Building Owner's Guide to Operations and Maintenance Programs for Asbestos-Containing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    Instructions for building owners on the selection and application of appropriate asbestos control and abatement actions are presented in this guidebook. Chapter 1 offers background information on the asbestos problem. Chapter 2 describes the purpose and scope of an operations and maintenance (O&M) program. The third chapter discusses planning…

  5. Assessment of asbestos exposure during a simulated agricultural activity in the proximity of the former asbestos mine of Balangero, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turci, Francesco; Favero-Longo, Sergio Enrico; Gazzano, Claudia; Tomatis, Maura; Gentile-Garofalo, Laura; Bergamini, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The natural occurrence of asbestos (NOA) in rural areas is a serious concern for human health and the dispersion route of asbestos in the proximity of natural asbestos-rich settings has been marginally evaluated so far. NOA may affect air, but also water and soil quality. In rural areas population may be exposed to asbestos with a largely unknown impact on human health. This work investigates the potential exposure of a farmer cultivating a field nearby the largest former asbestos mine of Western Europe (Balangero, Italy). The concentration of waterborne asbestos in the stream used to water the field was measured (ca. 2×10(5) fibers per liter, ff/L) and the cultivated ultramafic topsoil characterized, evidencing a remarkable occurrence of chrysotile. The worker's personal exposure and the environmental fiber dispersion during a simulated agricultural activity (tillage) were quantified in two independent trials. During the trials, the worker was exposed to average concentrations of 16 and 26 ff/L, with a peak of 40 ff/L. These data inform about the possible exposure of an agricultural worker to asbestos concentration higher than the accepted threshold of 2 ff/L. The release of asbestos fibers into the environment was negligible (0-2 ff/L). PMID:26852207

  6. Treatment of airborne asbestos and asbestos-like microfiber particles using atmospheric microwave air plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We use atmospheric microwave air plasma to treat ceramic fiber and stainless fiber as asbestos alike micro fiber particle. → Spheroidization of certain type of ceramic fiber and stainless fiber particle. → The evaluation of the treated particles by the fiber vanishing rate. → Good fiber vanishing rate is observed for fiber particle with diameter below 10 μm. → The treatment of pure asbestos and a suggestion of the use of this method for the treatment airborne asbestos. - Abstract: Atmospheric microwave air plasma was used to treat asbestos-like microfiber particles that had two types of ceramic fiber and one type of stainless fiber. The treated particles were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experiment results showed that one type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica = 1:1) and the stainless fiber were spheroidized, but the other type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica = 7:3) was not. The conversion of the fibers was investigated by calculating the equivalent diameter, the aspect ratio, and the fiber content ratio. The fiber content ratio in various conditions showed values near zero. The relationship between the normalized fiber vanishing rate and the energy needed to melt the particles completely per unit surface area of projected particles, which is defined as η, was examined and seen to indicate that the normalized fiber vanishing rate decreased rapidly with the increase in η. Finally, some preliminary experiments for pure asbestos were conducted, and the analysis via XRD and phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) showed the availability of the plasma treatment.

  7. Treatment of airborne asbestos and asbestos-like microfiber particles using atmospheric microwave air plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averroes, A., E-mail: aulia.a.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Sekiguchi, H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Sakamoto, K. [Street Design Corporation, 6-9-30 Shimo odanaka, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa 211-0041 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} We use atmospheric microwave air plasma to treat ceramic fiber and stainless fiber as asbestos alike micro fiber particle. {yields} Spheroidization of certain type of ceramic fiber and stainless fiber particle. {yields} The evaluation of the treated particles by the fiber vanishing rate. {yields} Good fiber vanishing rate is observed for fiber particle with diameter below 10 {mu}m. {yields} The treatment of pure asbestos and a suggestion of the use of this method for the treatment airborne asbestos. - Abstract: Atmospheric microwave air plasma was used to treat asbestos-like microfiber particles that had two types of ceramic fiber and one type of stainless fiber. The treated particles were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experiment results showed that one type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica = 1:1) and the stainless fiber were spheroidized, but the other type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica = 7:3) was not. The conversion of the fibers was investigated by calculating the equivalent diameter, the aspect ratio, and the fiber content ratio. The fiber content ratio in various conditions showed values near zero. The relationship between the normalized fiber vanishing rate and the energy needed to melt the particles completely per unit surface area of projected particles, which is defined as {eta}, was examined and seen to indicate that the normalized fiber vanishing rate decreased rapidly with the increase in {eta}. Finally, some preliminary experiments for pure asbestos were conducted, and the analysis via XRD and phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) showed the availability of the plasma treatment.

  8. Asbestos-related pleuropulmonary diseases: iconographic essay; Alteracoes pleurais e parenquimatosas relacionadas a exposicao ao asbesto: ensaio iconografico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavo de Souza Portes Meirelles [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rodrigues, Reynaldo Tavares; Nery, Luiz Eduardo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Bagatin, Ericson [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina Preventiva e Social; Terra-Filho, Mario [Instituto do Coracao (InCor). Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: gmeirelles@gmail.com

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study is to illustrate the main imaging findings of asbestos-related diseases. Pleural and pulmonary asbestos-related diseases range from benign conditions, like pleural effusion and pleural plaques, to some neoplasias, such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma. Pleural effusion is the earliest finding after asbestos exposure, but the imaging findings are not specific. Diffuse pleural thickening involves the visceral pleura and pleural plaques are considered to be hallmarks of exposure. Asbestosis is the pulmonary fibrosis due to asbestos. Rounded atelectasis is a peripheral lung collapse in these individuals, generally related to pleural disease. Some neoplasias, like lung carcinoma and pleural mesothelioma, are more prevalent in asbestos-exposed subjects. (author)

  9. Assessment of mineral dust cytotoxicity toward rat alveolar macrophages using a 51Cr release assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assay was developed to assess the cytotoxicity of mineral dust by measuring release of 51Cr from prelabeled rat alveolar macrophages. Optimal conditions for the assay are described, the most notable being use of 2% albumin instead of fetal calf serum. The assay demonstrated loss of label into the supernatant when prelabeled macrophages were cultured with the two pathogenic mineral dusts, quartz and chrysotile asbestos. In contrast the inert mineral dust titanium dioxide had very little effect on 51Cr release by rat alveolar macrophages

  10. Development of a testing method for asbestos fibers in treated materials of asbestos containing wastes by transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A high sensitive and selective testing method for asbestos in treated materials of asbestos containing wastes was developed. • Asbestos can be determined at a limits are a few million fibers per gram and a few μg g−1. • High temperature melting treatment samples were determined by this method. Asbestos fiber concentration were below the quantitation limit in all samples, and total fiber concentrations were determined as 47–170 × 106 g−1. - Abstract: Appropriate treatment of asbestos-containing wastes is a significant problem. In Japan, the inertization of asbestos-containing wastes based on new treatment processes approved by the Minister of the Environment is promoted. A highly sensitive method for testing asbestos fibers in inertized materials is required so that these processes can be approved. We developed a method in which fibers from milled treated materials are extracted in water by shaking, and are counted and identified by transmission electron microscopy. Evaluation of this method by using asbestos standards and simulated slag samples confirmed that the quantitation limits are a few million fibers per gram and a few μg/g in a sample of 50 mg per filter. We used this method to assay asbestos fibers in slag samples produced by high-temperature melting of asbestos-containing wastes. Fiber concentrations were below the quantitation limit in all samples, and total fiber concentrations were determined as 47–170 × 10−6 f/g. Because the evaluation of treated materials by TEM is difficult owing to the limited amount of sample observable, this testing method should be used in conjunction with bulk analytical methods for sure evaluation of treated materials

  11. Development of a testing method for asbestos fibers in treated materials of asbestos containing wastes by transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Takashi, E-mail: tyama@nies.go.jp [Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Kida, Akiko [Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime University, 3-5-7 Tarumi, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8566 (Japan); Noma, Yukio [Department of Environmental Science, Fukuoka Womens University, 1-1-1 Kasumigaoka, Higashiku, Fukuoka 813-8529 (Japan); Terazono, Atsushi [Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Sakai, Shin-ichi [Environmental Preservation Research Center, Kyoto University, Yoshidahonmachi, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • A high sensitive and selective testing method for asbestos in treated materials of asbestos containing wastes was developed. • Asbestos can be determined at a limits are a few million fibers per gram and a few μg g{sup −1}. • High temperature melting treatment samples were determined by this method. Asbestos fiber concentration were below the quantitation limit in all samples, and total fiber concentrations were determined as 47–170 × 10{sup 6} g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Appropriate treatment of asbestos-containing wastes is a significant problem. In Japan, the inertization of asbestos-containing wastes based on new treatment processes approved by the Minister of the Environment is promoted. A highly sensitive method for testing asbestos fibers in inertized materials is required so that these processes can be approved. We developed a method in which fibers from milled treated materials are extracted in water by shaking, and are counted and identified by transmission electron microscopy. Evaluation of this method by using asbestos standards and simulated slag samples confirmed that the quantitation limits are a few million fibers per gram and a few μg/g in a sample of 50 mg per filter. We used this method to assay asbestos fibers in slag samples produced by high-temperature melting of asbestos-containing wastes. Fiber concentrations were below the quantitation limit in all samples, and total fiber concentrations were determined as 47–170 × 10{sup −6} f/g. Because the evaluation of treated materials by TEM is difficult owing to the limited amount of sample observable, this testing method should be used in conjunction with bulk analytical methods for sure evaluation of treated materials.

  12. Review of carcinogenicity of asbestos and proposal of approval standards of an occupational cancer caused by asbestos in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sanghyuk; Youn, Kan-Woo; Shin, Donghee; Lee, Myeoung-Jun; Choi, Sang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenicity of asbestos has been well established for decades and it has similar approval standards in most advanced countries based on a number of studies and international meetings. However, Korea has been lagging behind such international standards. In this study, we proposed the approval standards of an occupational cancer due to asbestos through intensive review on the Helsinki Criteria, post-Helsinki studies, job exposure matrix (JEM) based on the analysis of domestic reports and recognized occupational lung cancer cases in Korea. The main contents of proposed approval standards are as follows; ① In recognizing an asbestos-induced lung cancer, diagnosis of asbestosis should be based on CT. In addition, initial findings of asbestosis on CT should be considered. ② High Exposure industries and occupations to asbestos should be also taken into account in Korea ③ An expert's determination is warranted in case of a worker who has been concurrently exposed to other carcinogens, even if the asbestos exposure duration is less than 10 years. ④ Determination of a larynx cancer due to asbestos exposure has the same approval standards with an asbestos-induced lung cancer. However, for an ovarian cancer, an expert's judgment is necessary even if asbestosis, pleural plaque or pleural thickening and high concentration asbestos exposure are confirmed. ⑤ Cigarette smoking status or the extent should not affect determination of an occupational cancer caused by asbestos as smoking and asbestos have a synergistic effect in causing a lung cancer and they are involved in carcinogenesis in a complicated manner. PMID:26719804

  13. Malignant Mesothelioma after Household Exposure to Asbestos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raya Saba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mesothelioma (MM is an aggressive cancer that has been closely linked to asbestos exposure. Initially recognized as an occupational cancer in male workers, MM was later found to occur in their family members as well. We report the case of an 89-year-old female who presented with abdominal distention, pain, and findings consistent with malignant ascites. Family history was significant for fatal mesothelioma in her husband of 40 years, who was a worker at a tile factory. The diagnosis of MM was confirmed on pathologic examination of the omental core biopsy.

  14. BOA: Pipe asbestos insulation removal robot system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BOA system is a mobile pipe-external robotic crawler used to remotely strip and bag asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations. Steam and process lines within the DOE weapons complex warrant the use of a remote device due to the high labor costs and high level of radioactive contamination, making manual removal extremely costly and highly inefficient. Currently targeted facilities for demonstration and remediation are Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee

  15. The role of free radicals in asbestos-induced diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, D W; Graceffa, P; Pryor, W A; Weitzman, S A

    1992-01-01

    Asbestos exposure causes pulmonary fibrosis and malignant neoplasms by mechanisms that remain uncertain. In this review, we explore the evidence supporting the hypothesis that free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an important mechanism by which asbestos mediates tissue damage. There appears to be at least two principal mechanisms by which asbestos can induce ROS production; one operates in cell-free systems and the other involves mediation by phagocytic cells. Asbestos and other synthetic mineral fibers can generate free radicals in cell-free systems containing atmospheric oxygen. In particular, the hydroxyl radical often appears to be involved, and the iron content of the fibers has an important role in the generation of this reactive radical. However, asbestos also appears to catalyze electron transfer reactions that do not require iron. Iron chelators either inhibit or augment asbestos-catalyzed generation of the hydroxyl radical and/or pathological changes, depending on the chelator and the nature of the asbestos sample used. The second principal mechanism for asbestos-induced ROS generation involves the activation of phagocytic cells. A variety of mineral fibers have been shown to augment the release of reactive oxygen intermediates from phagocytic cells such as neutrophils and alveolar macrophages. The molecular mechanisms involved are unclear but may involve incomplete phagocytosis with subsequent oxidant release, stimulation of the phospholipase C pathway, and/or IgG-fragment receptor activation. Reactive oxygen species are important mediators of asbestos-induced toxicity to a number of pulmonary cells including alveolar macrophages, epithelial cells, mesothelial cells, and endothelial cells. Reactive oxygen species may contribute to the well-known synergistic effects of asbestos and cigarette smoke on the lung, and the reasons for this synergy are discussed. We conclude that there is strong evidence supporting the premise that reactive

  16. Reported Historic Asbestos Mines, Historic Asbestos Prospects, and Natural Asbestos Occurrences in the Rocky Mountain States of the United States (Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, and Wyoming)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2007-01-01

    This map and its accompanying dataset provide information for 48 natural asbestos occurrences in the Rocky Mountain States of the United States (U.S.), using descriptions found in the geologic literature. Data on location, mineralogy, geology, and relevant literature for each asbestos site are provided. Using the map and digital data in this report, the user can examine the distribution of previously reported asbestos occurrences and their geological characteristics in the Rocky Mountain States. This report is part of an ongoing study by the U.S. Geological Survey to identify and map reported natural asbestos occurrences in the U.S., which thus far includes similar maps and datasets of natural asbestos occurrences within the Eastern U.S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1189/) and the Central U.S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1211/). These reports are intended to provide State and local government agencies and other stakeholders with geologic information on natural occurrences of asbestos in the U.S.

  17. Evaluation of palm kernel fibers (PKFs for production of asbestos-free automotive brake pads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K. Ikpambese

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, asbestos-free automotive brake pads produced from palm kernel fibers with epoxy-resin binder was evaluated. Resins varied in formulations and properties such as friction coefficient, wear rate, hardness test, porosity, noise level, temperature, specific gravity, stopping time, moisture effects, surface roughness, oil and water absorptions rates, and microstructure examination were investigated. Other basic engineering properties of mechanical overload, thermal deformation fading behaviour shear strength, cracking resistance, over-heat recovery, and effect on rotor disc, caliper pressure, pad grip effect and pad dusting effect were also investigated. The results obtained indicated that the wear rate, coefficient of friction, noise level, temperature, and stopping time of the produced brake pads increased as the speed increases. The results also show that porosity, hardness, moisture content, specific gravity, surface roughness, and oil and water absorption rates remained constant with increase in speed. The result of microstructure examination revealed that worm surfaces were characterized by abrasion wear where the asperities were ploughed thereby exposing the white region of palm kernel fibers, thus increasing the smoothness of the friction materials. Sample S6 with composition of 40% epoxy-resin, 10% palm wastes, 6% Al2O3, 29% graphite, and 15% calcium carbonate gave better properties. The result indicated that palm kernel fibers can be effectively used as a replacement for asbestos in brake pad production.

  18. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  19. Asbestos removal at the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbestos was used as an insulation material at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station on tanks, vessels, piping, duct work, building and equipment. It must be removed before any equipment disassembling and removal can be started. Asbestos is located in both Radiologically Controlled Areas (RCA) and Non-Radiologically Controlled Areas (Non-RCA) in the plant. Precautions and special handling procedures must be followed in order to minimize potential hazard to personnel and the environment. In the handling of asbestos material, guidelines can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations. A thorough survey was conducted to identify the location and quantity of asbestos in the plant. The amount of asbestos in the plant involves about 9000 linear feet of piping (100 cu. yard in volume) in the Non-RCA and 21,000 linear feet of piping (330 cu. yard in volume) in the RCA. This asbestos removal effort is expected to be completed at Shippingport within 12 months duration beginning August, 1985. In this paper, activities associated with asbestos removal, prerequisites to be performed before the project is started, sequence of operations, procedures and instructions, potential hazards and precautions and methods of disposal will be discussed. Recommendations for similar efforts in the future will be provided

  20. POZZOLAN AND CEMENTS WITH POZZOLAN

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Hasan; Hanifi BİNİCİ

    1995-01-01

    Cement, one of the basic material of construction engineering, has an important place in view of strength and cost of structures. Cement consumption is increasing parallel to development of building construction sector. For cement producers, minimal cost is desired by using new and economical material sources. On the other hand, the controllers and contractors need cheaper, safer and higher strength materials. From this respect cement industry tends to use cement with pozzolan. In Türkiye, ce...

  1. A statistical evaluation of asbestos air concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both area and personal air samples collected during an asbestos abatement project were matched and statistically analysed. Among the many parameters studied were fibre concentrations and their variability. Mean values for area and personal samples were 0.005 and 0.024 f cm--3 of air, respectively. Summary values for area and personal samples suggest that exposures are low with no single exposure value exceeding the current OSHA TWA value of 0.1 f cm-3 of air. Within- and between-worker analysis suggests that these data are homogeneous. Comparison of within- and between-worker values suggests that the exposure source and variability for abatement are more related to the process than individual practices. This supports the importance of control measures for abatement. Study results also suggest that area and personal samples are not statistically related, that is, there is no association observed for these two sampling methods when data are analysed by correlation or regression analysis. Personal samples were statistically higher in concentration than area samples. Area sampling cannot be used as a surrogate exposure for asbestos abatement workers. (author)

  2. Determination of chrysotile asbestos in air by XRD combined with separation procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-Ray diffractometric determination of chrysotile asbestos down to 0.01 mg is described. Sample preparation uses a combination of heavy liquid separation, acid treatment and flotation. Dust collected by a high-volume air sampler was detached from a membrane filter by irradiation of ultrasonic waves in acetone. Airborne dust of 20-50 mg collected in a bag-filter was directly used. To remove organic matter, the sample was suspended in a heavy liquid of ethyl iodide. Dilute hydrochloric acid was added to the sediment to remove dissoluble matter. After addition of water, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS) and ethanol, flotation was carried out at pH 4.8. Collected foam was centrifuged and the sediment was mounted on a non-diffracting plate for XRD analysis. The integral intensity of the chrysotile (004) diffraction line was measured to determine chrysotile concentration using a calibration graph, which was linear in the range of 0.01-0.12 mg. Recovery of chrysotile was about 90% for samples of 20-42 mg containing 0.1 mg of chrysotile in the matrix of quartz, carbon black, gypsum, cotton, rock wool, etc., and also for a bag-filter dust sample of 40 mg to which 0.1 mg chrysotile was added. (author)

  3. Evaluation for asbestos exposure in lung cancer surgery cases. Relationships between asbestos body count and pleural plaques and between asbestos body count and pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to examine the significance of pleural plaques and pulmonary fibrosis in the evaluation of asbestos exposure level. The subjects were patients who had undergone surgery for lung cancer. There were 64 patients who had pleural plaques based on surgical findings (pleural plaque group) and 9 patients who had neither a history of asbestos exposure nor pleural plaque (control group). An examination was performed regarding the extent of pleural plaques and the presence or absence of pulmonary fibrosis. The relationships between these findings and the asbestos body count in the resected lung were investigated. If chest CT showed no pleural plaque, the case was classified as class 0. If chest CT showed pleural plaques, the CT slice with the most extensive pleural plaque in either side was selected. If the plaque extended to less than one quarter of the inner chest wall, the case was classified as class 1. If the extent was one quarter or more, the case was classified as class 2. The cases were considered to have pulmonary fibrosis if the fibrotic findings were equivalent to those of asbestosis of type 1 or more by chest X-ray photography (XP) and if fibrosis was observed in CT. All other cases were considered not to have pulmonary fibrosis. The median asbestos body counts were 1,018 bodies per gram of dried lung in the pleural plaque group and 263 per gram of dried lung in the control group. There was a statistically significant difference between these groups (p=0.0034). There were 25 patients with class 0 pleural plaque, 17 patients with class 1, and 22 patients with class 2. Their median asbestos body counts were 612, 439, and 5,626 bodies, respectively. All class 0 or 1 patients had an asbestos body count of less than 5,000 bodies. There was no significant difference in the counts between patients with class 0 and 1. All class 2 patients had an asbestos body count of 1,000 bodies or more. The count of class 2 patients was significantly higher

  4. Asbestos body formation and iron accumulation in mouse peritoneal granulomas after the introduction of crocidolite asbestos fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the cell biology of the development of asbestos bodies after a single intraperitoneal injection of a suspension of crocidolite asbestos fibers into the mouse peritoneal cavity. The majority of the infected fibers were found in aggregates of peritoneal macrophages, exudate cells, and fibrous tissue. These aggregates developed into granulomas containing not only numerous asbestos fibers, but also cells of various types, including macrophages, multinucleated giant cells, fibroblasts, plasma cells, granulocytes, and mast cells. Cytoplasmic ferritin was abundantly present in macrophages and giant cells. In addition, iron-rich inclusion bodies were detected. The results of this study show that asbestos body formation can occur outside the pleural cavity. Asbestos body formation occurred in the granulomas after periods of 1 month and longer. On the basis of morphologic criteria, various types of asbestos body were distinguished. X-ray microanalysis showed that variations in the density of the coat could attributed to the presence of chemical elements in various concentrations. Evidence is presented that asbestos body formation is an extracellular phenomenon

  5. Effect of gaseous cement industry effluents on four species of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talec, Amélie; Philistin, Myrvline; Ferey, Frédérique; Walenta, Günther; Irisson, Jean-Olivier; Bernard, Olivier; Sciandra, Antoine

    2013-09-01

    Experiments were performed at lab scale in order to test the possibility to grow microalgae with CO2 from gaseous effluent of cement industry. Four microalgal species (Dunaliella tertiolecta, Chlorella vulgaris, Thalassiosira weissflogii, and Isochrysis galbana), representing four different phyla were grown with CO2 enriched air or with a mixture of gasses mimicking the composition of a typical cement flue gas (CFG). In a second stage, the culture submitted to the CFG received an increasing concentration of dust characteristic of cement industry. Results show that growth for the four species is not affected by the CFG. Dust added at realistic concentrations do not have any impact on growth. For dust concentrations in two ranges of magnitude higher, microalgae growth was inhibited. PMID:23811523

  6. Investigative studies for the use of an inactive asbestos mine as a disposal site for asbestos wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidarakos, Evangelos; Anastasiadou, Kalliopi; Koumantakis, Emmanuil; Nikolaos, Stappas

    2008-05-30

    Although, according to European legislation the use of Asbestos Containing Materials is forbidden, many buildings in Greece still contain asbestos products, which must be removed at some point in the near future. Therefore, suitable disposal sites must be found within Greece, so that the unverified disposal of asbestos waste in municipal waste Landfills is brought to an end. In the present work, an innovative approach to the disposal problem of asbestos wastes in Greece has been examined, through a risk assessment analysis of the inactive asbestos mine of Northern Greece and an evaluation of its suitability as a disposal site for asbestos wastes in the future. According to the research carried out, two areas (Site 1 and Site 2) inside the mine area are suitable for the construction of a disposal site for asbestos wastes. The geological investigations showed that in Site 1 and Site 2 ultrabasic rocks of ophiolite complex were prevalent, which have been intensely serpentinized and converted into the fibrous shape of serpentine (asbestos). Concentrations of hazardous substances such as heavy metals in the soil of Site 1 and Site 2 oscillate at low levels, with the exception of the concentrations of nickel and chrome which are high. The investigative work also included the collection of meteorological data and the monitoring of the water level of the artificial lake, which has developed inside the open mine. The main aim is to safely dispose asbestos wastes inside the mine, to minimize any pollution of the wider vicinity of the mine, as well as to engage in restoration activities.

  7. Do cement nanoparticles exist in space ?

    CERN Document Server

    Bilalbegovic, G; Mohacek-Grosev, V

    2014-01-01

    The calcium-silicate-hydrate is used to model properties of cement on Earth. We study cementitious nanoparticles and propose these structures as components of cosmic dust grains. Quantum density functional theory methods are applied for the calculation of infrared spectra of Ca4Si4O14H4, Ca6Si3O13H2, and Ca12Si6O26H4 clusters. We find bands distributed over the near, mid and far-infrared region. A specific calcium-silicate-hydrate spectral feature at 14 microns, together with the bands at 10 and 18 microns which exist for other silicates as well, could be used for a detection of cosmic cement. We compare calculated bands with the 14 microns features in the spectra of HD 45677, HD 44179, and IRC+10420 which were observed by Infrared Space Observatory and classified as remaining. High abundance of oxygen atoms in cementitious nanoparticles could partially explain observed depletion of this element from the interstellar medium into dust grains.

  8. Analyses of asbestos using microscopic and x-ray diffractometric approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbestos such as chrysotile, crocidolite (riebeckite asbestos), and amosite (grunerite asbestos) in building materials have been analyzed using microscopic and/or X-ray diffractometric methods. Fibrous asbestos particles in air and building materials have often been observed and counted using optical microscope and scanning or transmission electron microscope. Using electron microscopic analyses, trace asbestos around 0.1 mass% can be easily detected because of higher spatial resolution; however, these microscopic analyses are unsuitable for obtaining mass concentration. Asbestos in building materials have been measured using substrate standard correction/X-ray diffractometric analysis based on JIS A 1481 with acid treatment for dissolving matrix components; the trace asbestos might be determined. On the other hand, asbestos in pulverized building materials can directly be determined using conventional powder X-ray diffractometer analysis without chemical treatments. We reviewed microscopic and X-ray diffractometric methods concerned with quantitative analyses of asbestos. (author)

  9. Screening and surveillance of workers exposed to mineral dusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, G.R.

    1997-12-31

    This publication resulted from a World Health Organisation initiated project to investigate the harmonisation of definitions, approaches and methodologies for the screening and surveillance of workers exposed to mineral dust. The first part of the book provides definitions of screening and surveillance and describes the main elements of such programmes. The second part discusses the practical aspect of the screening and surveillance of working populations exposed to crystalline silica, coal mine dust and asbestos. Although no single set of guidelines is applicable to the development and implementation of a programme for the screening and surveillance of workers exposed to mineral dust, the recommendations, together with certain caveats, should provide a useful starting point. Annexes provide examples of existing programmes in various countries and environments and discuss the use and interpretation of questionnaires, lung spirometry and chest radiography. Overall the book should be of interest to occupational health professionals.

  10. AIR POLLUTION AND LUNG CAPACITY OF PEOPLE LIVING AROUND THE CEMENT INDUSTRY, INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Erwin Azizi Jayadipraja; Anwar Daud; Alimuddin Hamzah Assegaf; Maming

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds: A cement industry is one of anthropogenic sources of air pollution. In polluting the air, the industry creates some dust particles, nitrogen oxide (NO2), sulfur oxide (SO2), and carbon monoxide (CO). Research Purpose: The research aimed at finding out the ambient air quality around a cement industry and relating it with the lung capacity of people living around the area. Methodology: This was a cross sectional studies by measuring the ambient air quality in the morning, noo...

  11. Radiation pneumonitis in a patient exposed to asbestos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case report is presented of a 58 year old man who had for many years run an asbestos importing and fibreizing plant. He developed radiation pneumonitis following radiotherapy to a squamous cell carcinoma of the middle 3rd of the oesophagus. Detailed lung studies at autopsy revealed asbestos bodies associated with macrophages in many alveoli and areas of subpleural fibrosis typical of asbestos exposure. This was the most florid case of radiation seen in the Westminster Hospital for some years and the first seen in patients treated for carcinoma of the oesophagus using a three field technique. It is suggested that when planning radiotherapy to an asbestos-exposed patient, a possible increase in lung sensitivity to radiation should be considered when planning dosage. (U.K.)

  12. Chronic occupational exposure to asbestos: more than medical effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebovits, A.H.; Byrne, M.; Bernstein, J.; Strain, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-nine workers chronically exposed to asbestos were interviewed regarding their perceived health status and concerns, their health behaviors, particularly their smoking behavior, and their psychologic well-being. In contrast to a non-exposed comparison group of postal workers, asbestos workers exhibited significantly elevated levels of somatic concern (P less than .03), and significantly lower levels of mental health functioning only when experiencing high levels of stress (P less than .01). Despite feeling significantly more susceptible to developing cancer (P less than .0001), 34% of asbestos workers were cigarette smokers (compared to 32% of the postal group) and long-term mask usage was minimal. Asbestos workers' increased sensitivity to stress and changes in health status along with the lack of adaptation of health-promotive behaviors indicate the need for interventions to attend to the psychologic effects of increased risk status.

  13. Modeling Mesothelioma Risk Associated with Environmental Asbestos Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Maule, Milena Maria; Magnani, Corrado; Dalmasso, Paola; Mirabelli, Dario; Merletti, Franco; Biggeri, Annibale

    2007-01-01

    Background Environmental asbestos pollution can cause malignant mesothelioma, but few studies have involved dose–response analyses with detailed information on occupational, domestic, and environmental exposures. Objectives In the present study, we examined the spatial variation of mesothelioma risk in an area with high levels of asbestos pollution from an industrial plant, adjusting for occupational and domestic exposures. Methods This population-based case–control study included 103 inciden...

  14. Asbestos: a chronology of its origins and health effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Huncharek, M

    1990-01-01

    The emotionalised subject of asbestos is treated in chronological terms: how the "magic mineral" known in ancient times in Europe and Asia became in the late nineteenth century an important industrial resource of particular interest to the navies of the world; and how its malign effects gradually became apparent during the present century. The media have made asbestos a notorious villain, but it still has properties and applications useful to society if they are properly controlled in the sam...

  15. Domestic Asbestos Exposure: A Review of Epidemiologic and Exposure Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Goswami

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of asbestos resulting from living with and handling the clothing of workers directly exposed to asbestos has been established as a possible contributor to disease. This review evaluates epidemiologic studies of asbestos-related disease or conditions (mesothelioma, lung cancer, and pleural and interstitial abnormalities among domestically exposed individuals and exposure studies that provide either direct exposure measurements or surrogate measures of asbestos exposure. A meta-analysis of studies providing relative risk estimates (n = 12 of mesothelioma was performed, resulting in a summary relative risk estimate (SRRE of 5.02 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.48–10.13. This SRRE pertains to persons domestically exposed via workers involved in occupations with a traditionally high risk of disease from exposure to asbestos (i.e., asbestos product manufacturing workers, insulators, shipyard workers, and asbestos miners. The epidemiologic studies also show an elevated risk of interstitial, but more likely pleural, abnormalities (n = 6, though only half accounted for confounding exposures. The studies are limited with regard to lung cancer (n = 2. Several exposure-related studies describe results from airborne samples collected within the home (n = 3, during laundering of contaminated clothing (n = 1 or in controlled exposure simulations (n = 5 of domestic exposures, the latter of which were generally associated with low-level chrysotile-exposed workers. Lung burden studies (n = 6 were also evaluated as a surrogate of exposure. In general, available results for domestic exposures are lower than the workers’ exposures. Recent simulations of low-level chrysotile-exposed workers indicate asbestos levels commensurate with background concentrations in those exposed domestically.

  16. Domestic Asbestos Exposure: A Review of Epidemiologic and Exposure Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Emily; Craven, Valerie; Dahlstrom, David L.; Alexander, Dominik; Mowat, Fionna

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of asbestos resulting from living with and handling the clothing of workers directly exposed to asbestos has been established as a possible contributor to disease. This review evaluates epidemiologic studies of asbestos-related disease or conditions (mesothelioma, lung cancer, and pleural and interstitial abnormalities) among domestically exposed individuals and exposure studies that provide either direct exposure measurements or surrogate measures of asbestos exposure. A meta-analysis of studies providing relative risk estimates (n = 12) of mesothelioma was performed, resulting in a summary relative risk estimate (SRRE) of 5.02 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.48–10.13). This SRRE pertains to persons domestically exposed via workers involved in occupations with a traditionally high risk of disease from exposure to asbestos (i.e., asbestos product manufacturing workers, insulators, shipyard workers, and asbestos miners). The epidemiologic studies also show an elevated risk of interstitial, but more likely pleural, abnormalities (n = 6), though only half accounted for confounding exposures. The studies are limited with regard to lung cancer (n = 2). Several exposure-related studies describe results from airborne samples collected within the home (n = 3), during laundering of contaminated clothing (n = 1) or in controlled exposure simulations (n = 5) of domestic exposures, the latter of which were generally associated with low-level chrysotile-exposed workers. Lung burden studies (n = 6) were also evaluated as a surrogate of exposure. In general, available results for domestic exposures are lower than the workers’ exposures. Recent simulations of low-level chrysotile-exposed workers indicate asbestos levels commensurate with background concentrations in those exposed domestically. PMID:24185840

  17. Airborne Asbestos Exposures from Warm Air Heating Systems in Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Burdett, Garry J.; Dewberry, Kirsty; Staff, James

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the concentrations of airborne asbestos that can be released into classrooms of schools that have amosite-containing asbestos insulation board (AIB) in the ceiling plenum or other spaces, particularly where there is forced recirculation of air as part of a warm air heating system. Air samples were collected in three or more classrooms at each of three schools, two of which were of CLASP (Consortium of Local Authorities Special Programme) system-built d...

  18. Occupational Asbestos Exposure and Lung Cancer—A Systematic Review of the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Snabe; Bælum, Jesper; Rasmussen, Jesper;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the scientific literature concerning asbestos and lung cancer, emphasizing low-level exposure. A literature search in PubMed and Embase resulted in 5,864 citations. Information from included studies was extracted using SIGN. Twenty-one statements were...... evidence graded. The results show that histology and location are not helpful in differentiating asbestos-related lung cancer. Pleural plaques, asbestos bodies, or asbestos fibers are useful as markers of asbestos exposure. The interaction between asbestos and smoking regarding lung cancer risk is between...

  19. Asbestos exposure in a steam-electric generating plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scansetti, G.; Pira, E.; Botta, G.C.; Turbiglio, M.; Piolatto, G. (Turin Univ. (Italy). Inst. of Occupational Health)

    1993-12-01

    A study on asbestos risk in an old multi-fuel-fired steam-electric power station was carried out. In spite of the presence of large amounts of asbestos-containing materials (20 km of asbestos insulated pipes), the mean airborne concentration of asbestos was as low as 1.55 fibres 1.[sup -1](SD 2.05) under normal operating conditions. Much higher concentrations may obviously occur during maintenance or renovation operations. Man-made mineral fibres (MMMF) were detected only occasionally in some samples. Three non-consecutive sputum samples were collected for all the 521 workers included in the study: 3.1% had asbestos bodies (AB), but in no case were there more than four AB per gramme sputum. Small opacities, in most cases irregular of mixed type, were presented in 15 out of 470 radiograms of acceptable quality (3.2%). No AB were found in these cases. Pleural changes were less common: two out of five bilateral cases had AB in the sputum. It is concluded that repeated AB counts in the sputum turned out to be more useful than the search of pleural abnormalities by traditional postero-anterior (PA) view in detecting the signs of low asbestos exposure. (Author)

  20. Electromagnetic mixed waste processing system for asbestos decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of this three-phase program is to develop an integrated process for treating asbestos-containing material that is contaminated with radioactive and hazardous constituents. The integrated process will attempt to minimize processing and disposal costs. The objectives of Phase 1 were to establish the technical feasibility of asbestos decomposition, inorganic radionuclide nd heavy metal removal, and organic volatilization. Phase 1 resulted in the successful bench-scale demonstration of the elements required to develop a mixed waste treatment process for asbestos-containing material (ACM) contaminated with radioactive metals, heavy metals, and organics. Using the Phase 1 data, a conceptual process was developed. The Phase 2 program, currently in progress, is developing an integrated system design for ACM waste processing. The Phase 3 program will target demonstration of the mixed waste processing system at a DOE facility. The electromagnetic mixed waste processing system employs patented technologies to convert DOE asbestos to a non-hazardous, radionuclide-free, stable waste. The dry, contaminated asbestos is initially heated with radiofrequency energy to remove organic volatiles. Second,the radionuclides are removed by solvent extraction coupled with ion exchange solution treatment. Third, the ABCOV method converts the asbestos to an amorphous silica suspension at low temperature (100 degrees C). Finally the amorphous silica is solidified for disposal

  1. Asbestos exposure and mesothelioma incidence and mortality in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangelova, Katya; Dimitrova, Irina

    2016-06-01

    Bulgaria totally banned the import, production and use of asbestos in 2005, but produced and used asbestos products during the last 3-4 decades of the 20th century. The aim of this study was to follow the incidence and mortality of mesothelioma in Bulgaria in relation to past occupational exposures. A literature search between 1960 and 2014 was conducted to obtain information on asbestos consumption, occupational exposure and asbestos-related diseases (ARDs). Data on registered mesotheliomas were provided by the National Cancer Register and data for recognized occupational ARDs were provided by the National Social Security Institute. An increase in the incidence of mesothelioma from 5 to 58 from 1993 to 2013, with 666 cases in the 21-year period, was registered. Incidence, mortality rates, deaths and male-to-female ratios and were lower in comparison to industrialized countries. The increase in mesothelioma incidence is considered as a consequence of more recent production and use of asbestos and asbestos products and the high occupational exposure between 1977 and 1989, while the lower rate of mesothelioma deaths and male-to-female ratio need to be investigated further. PMID:27180335

  2. 40 CFR Appendix E to Subpart E of... - Interim Method of the Determination of Asbestos in Bulk Insulation Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials... may also adhere to fibers to an extent sufficient to cause confusion in identification....

  3. Asbestos exposure during quarrying and processing of serpentinites: a case study in Valmalenco, Central Alps, Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, A.; Rimoldi, B.

    2012-04-01

    Serpentinites are metamorphic rocks derived from ultramafics such as peridotites (lherzolites and/or harzburgites), with a typical mineralogical assemblage of antigorite, olivine, diopside and minor magnetite, chlorite and chrysotile. If the rock mass has good geotechnical properties, these stones are quarried because of their wide variety of green shades and outstanding technical properties. Excellent stones are produced in the Malenco Valley, Central Alps (northern Italy, Sondrio): here the geological set-up is dominated by the ultramafic Malenco massif (lower crust-mantle complex), exposed at the Penninic to Austroalpine boundary zone. Different processing operations give origin to valuable products like stoves, funeral monuments, design home appliances; important building element as roof slabs, tiles for floor and wall coverings constitute the main commercial line of production. In this area, good quality long fibre chrysotile asbestos was mined since the XIX century, till the seventies. The asbestos fissures (mostly slip-fiber) are well known in Valmalenco, associated to an important ENE-WSW striking fracture and hydrothermal vein system. Some actual serpentinite quarries "cross" at times tunnels of the old asbestos mines, because the fracture and vein system "guides" the extraction. At present time, this area represents an excellent example of naturally occurring asbestos (NOA). For these reasons, workers' exposure to asbestos during quarrying and processing cannot be ruled out, and must be assessed according to national laws. From 2004 to nowadays, the INAIL Regional Management of Lombardia, with the collaboration of University of Milan-Bicocca, carried out extensive monitoring campaigns both in quarries and in processing laboratories. More than 300 massive samples (rocks and veins) and 250 airborne dust samples were collected during the surveys. One of the main problems in the study of massive serpentinites is the accurate identification of the different

  4. 1988至2014年青岛市某石棉厂石棉相关疾病发病情况%The incidence of asbestos-related diseases about on asbestos enterprises in Qingdao from 1988 to 2014

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋平平; 王艳; 孙建岭; 高燕; 刘娟; 陈艳霞

    2016-01-01

    239 patients lose their lives,motality is 38.74%.Conclusion There is a high incidence of a disease about asbestos related disease in the asbestos products factory,it has close relationship with asbestos exposure time,the dust concentration of workplace and type of work et al.Asbestos related diseases are still the main problem in Qingdao.

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  6. Review of carcinogenicity of asbestos and proposal of approval standards of an occupational cancer caused by asbestos in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Im, Sanghyuk; Youn, Kan-woo; Shin, Donghee; Lee, Myeoung-jun; Choi, Sang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenicity of asbestos has been well established for decades and it has similar approval standards in most advanced countries based on a number of studies and international meetings. However, Korea has been lagging behind such international standards. In this study, we proposed the approval standards of an occupational cancer due to asbestos through intensive review on the Helsinki Criteria, post-Helsinki studies, job exposure matrix (JEM) based on the analysis of domestic reports and re...

  7. DEMOLISHING A COLD-WAR-ERA FUEL-STORAGE BASIN SUPERSTRUCTURE LADEN WITH ASBESTOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The K East (KE) Basin facilities are located near the north end of the Hanford Site's 100 K area. The facilities were built in 1950 as part of the KE Reactor complex and constructed within 400 meters of the Columbia River, which is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest and by volume the fourth largest river in the United States. The basin, located adjacent to the reactor, was used for the underwater storage of irradiated nuclear fuel discharged from the reactor. The basin was covered by a superstructure comprising steel columns and beams, concrete, and cement asbestos board (CAB) siding. The project's mission was to complete demolition of the structure over the K East basin within six months of tumover from facility deactivation activities. The demolition project team implemented open-air demolition techniques to demolish the facility to slab-on-grade. Several innovative techniques were used to control contamination and maintain contamination control within the confines of the demolition exclusion zone. The techniques, which focused on a defense-in-depth approach, included spraying fixatives on interior and exterior surfaces before demolition began; applying fixatives; misting using a fine spray of water during demolition; and demolishing the facility systematically. Another innovation that aided demolition was to demolish the building with the non-friable CAB remaining in place. The CAB siding covered the exterior of the building, portions of the interior walls, and was an integral part of the multiple layered roof. The project evaluated the risks involved in removing the CAB material in a radiologically contaminated environment and determined that radiological dose rates and exposure to radiological contamination and industrial hazards would be significantly reduced by removing the CAB during demolition using heavy equipment. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without spreading contamination (radiological or asbestos) demonstrates that similar

  8. DEMOLISHING A COLD-WAR-ERA FUEL STORAGE BASIN SUPERSTRUCTURE LADEN WITH ASBESTOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LLOYD ER; ORGILL TK; DAGAN EB

    2008-11-25

    The K East (KE) Basin facilities are located near the north end of the Hanford Site's 100 K area. The facilities were built in 1950 as part of the KE Reactor complex and constructed within 400 meters of the Columbia River, which is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest and by volume the fourth largest river in the United States. The basin, located adjacent to the reactor, was used for the underwater storage of irradiated nuclear fuel discharged from the reactor. The basin was covered by a superstructure comprising steel columns and beams, concrete, and cement asbestos board (CAB) siding. The project's mission was to complete demolition of the structure over the K East basin within six months of tumover from facility deactivation activities. The demolition project team implemented open-air demolition techniques to demolish the facility to slab-on-grade. Several innovative techniques were used to control contamination and maintain contamination control within the confines of the demolition exclusion zone. The techniques, which focused on a defense-in-depth approach, included spraying fixatives on interior and exterior surfaces before demolition began; applying fixatives; misting using a fine spray of water during demolition; and demolishing the facility systematically. Another innovation that aided demolition was to demolish the building with the non-friable CAB remaining in place. The CAB siding covered the exterior of the building, portions of the interior walls, and was an integral part of the multiple layered roof. The project evaluated the risks involved in removing the CAB material in a radiologically contaminated environment and determined that radiological dose rates and exposure to radiological contamination and industrial hazards would be significantly reduced by removing the CAB during demolition using heavy equipment. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without spreading contamination (radiological or asbestos) demonstrates

  9. DEMOLISHING A COLD-WAR-ERA FULE-STORAGE BASIN SUPERSTRUCTURE LADEN WITH ASBESTOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The K East (KE) Basin facilities are located near the north end of the Hanford Site's 100 K area. The facilities were built in 1950 as part of the KE Reactor complex and constructed within 400 meters of the Columbia River, which is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest and by volume the fourth largest river in the United States. The basin, located adjacent to the reactor, was used for the underwater storage of irradiated nuclear fuel discharged from the reactor. The basin was covered by a superstructure comprising steel columns and beams, concrete, and cement asbestos board (CAB) siding. The project's mission was to complete demolition of the structure over the KE Basin within six months of turnover from facility deactivation activities. The demolition project team applied open-air demolition techniques to bring the facility to slab-on-grade. Several innovative techniques were used to control contamination and maintain contamination control within the confines of the demolition exclusion zone. The techniques, which focused on a defense-in-depth approach, included spraying fixatives on interior and exterior surfaces before demolition began; applying fixatives during the demolition; misting using a fine spray of water during demolition; and demolishing the facility systematically. Another innovative approach that made demolition easier was to demolish the building with the non-friable CAB remaining in place. The CAB siding covered the exterior of the building and portions of the interior walls, and was an integral part of the multiple-layered roof. The project evaluated the risks involved in removing the CAB material in a radiologically contaminated environment and determined that radiological dose rates and exposure to radiological contamination and industrial hazards would be significantly reduced by using heavy equipment to remove the CAB during demolition. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without spreading contamination (radiological or

  10. DEMOLISHING A COLD WARE ERA FULE STORAGE BASIN SUPERSTRUCTURE LADEN WITH ASBESTOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LLOYD ER; STEVENS JM; DAGAN EB; ORGILL TK; GREEN MA; LARSON CH; ZINSLI LC

    2009-01-12

    The K East (KE) Basin facilities are located near the north end of the Hanford Site's 100 K area. The facilities were built in 1950 as part of the KE Reactor complex and constructed within 400 meters of the Columbia River, which is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest and by volume the fourth largest river in the United States. The basin, located adjacent to the reactor, was used for the underwater storage of irradiated nuclear fuel discharged from the reactor. The basin was covered by a superstructure comprising steel columns and beams, concrete, and cement asbestos board (CAB) siding. The project's mission was to complete demolition of the structure over the KE Basin within six months of turnover from facility deactivation activities. The demolition project team applied open-air demolition techniques to bring the facility to slab-on-grade. Several innovative techniques were used to control contamination and maintain contamination control within the confines of the demolition exclusion zone. The techniques, which focused on a defense-in-depth approach, included spraying fixatives on interior and exterior surfaces before demolition began; applying fixatives during the demolition; misting using a fine spray of water during demolition; and demolishing the facility systematically. Another innovative approach that made demolition easier was to demolish the building with the non-friable CAB remaining in place. The CAB siding covered the exterior of the building and portions of the interior walls, and was an integral part of the multiple-layered roof. The project evaluated the risks involved in removing the CAB material in a radiologically contaminated environment and determined that radiological dose rates and exposure to radiological contamination and industrial hazards would be significantly reduced by using heavy equipment to remove the CAB during demolition. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without spreading contamination

  11. Quantification of short and long asbestos fibers to assess asbestos exposure: a review of fiber size toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Guillaume; Andujar, Pascal; Pairon, Jean-Claude; Billon-Galland, Marie-Annick; Dion, Chantal; Dumortier, Pascal; Brochard, Patrick; Sobaszek, Annie; Bartsch, Pierre; Paris, Christophe; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    The fibrogenicity and carcinogenicity of asbestos fibers are dependent on several fiber parameters including fiber dimensions. Based on the WHO (World Health Organization) definition, the current regulations focalise on long asbestos fibers (LAF) (Length: L ≥ 5 μm, Diameter: D  3). However air samples contain short asbestos fibers (SAF) (L air samples collected in buildings with asbestos containing materials (ACM) were composed only of SAF, sometimes in a concentration of ≥10 fibers.L-1. This exhaustive review focuses on available information from peer-review publications on the size-dependent pathogenetic effects of asbestos fibers reported in experimental in vivo and in vitro studies. In the literature, the findings that SAF are less pathogenic than LAF are based on experiments where a cut-off of 5 μm was generally made to differentiate short from long asbestos fibers. Nevertheless, the value of 5 μm as the limit for length is not based on scientific evidence, but is a limit for comparative analyses. From this review, it is clear that the pathogenicity of SAF cannot be completely ruled out, especially in high exposure situations. Therefore, the presence of SAF in air samples appears as an indicator of the degradation of ACM and inclusion of their systematic search should be considered in the regulation. Measurement of these fibers in air samples will then make it possible to identify pollution and anticipate health risk. PMID:25043725

  12. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  13. Hydrothermal conversion of chrysotile asbestos using near supercritical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present research investigates, develops and evaluates the transformation of chrysotile asbestos into a non-hazardous material, such as forsterite, using an economically viable and safe method. The aim of this study is to convert fibrous chrysotile asbestos into an anhydrous magnesium silicate with a non-hazardous lamellar morphology using supercritical steam. The treatment method is characterized as hydrothermal in a temperature and pressure range of 300-700 deg. C and 1.75-5.80 MPa, respectively. Small amounts of asbestos (2.5 g) were treated in each experiment. Deionised water was used as the treatment solution. The treatment duration varied from approximately 1-5 h. Additional experiments took place using solutions of distilled water and small amounts of acetic acid, with the aim of attaining optimal treatment conditions. Crystal phases of the samples were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The main phases present in the treated samples were forsterite, enstatite, and chrysotile asbestos. Lizardite and periclase were also found. The morphology of the treated chrysotile asbestos fibers was identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The fibrous form of chrysotile asbestos was converted into non-fibrous form of forsterite. In fact, none of the fibrous-needle-like morphology, with length equal to or greater than 5 μm and diameter less than 3 μm, which was responsible for the toxicity of the original material, was visible in the solid phase. The dissolution of magnesium from chrysotile asbestos was measured using volumetric determination by titration with EDTA. Leaching of magnesium into the liquid phase was observed. Clearly, the highest concentrations of dissolved magnesium are observed after hydrothermal treatment of chrysotile asbestos using acetic acid 1% (8.4-14.6%). Lowest concentrations of dissolved magnesium are obtained after hydrothermal treatment of chrysotile asbestos without using additives. Observing the results of the hydrothermal

  14. Hydrothermal conversion of chrysotile asbestos using near supercritical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasiadou, Kalliopi; Axiotis, Dimosthenis [Laboratory of Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania, P.C. 73100 (Greece); Gidarakos, Evangelos, E-mail: gidarako@mred.tuc.gr [Laboratory of Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania, P.C. 73100 (Greece)

    2010-07-15

    The present research investigates, develops and evaluates the transformation of chrysotile asbestos into a non-hazardous material, such as forsterite, using an economically viable and safe method. The aim of this study is to convert fibrous chrysotile asbestos into an anhydrous magnesium silicate with a non-hazardous lamellar morphology using supercritical steam. The treatment method is characterized as hydrothermal in a temperature and pressure range of 300-700 deg. C and 1.75-5.80 MPa, respectively. Small amounts of asbestos (2.5 g) were treated in each experiment. Deionised water was used as the treatment solution. The treatment duration varied from approximately 1-5 h. Additional experiments took place using solutions of distilled water and small amounts of acetic acid, with the aim of attaining optimal treatment conditions. Crystal phases of the samples were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The main phases present in the treated samples were forsterite, enstatite, and chrysotile asbestos. Lizardite and periclase were also found. The morphology of the treated chrysotile asbestos fibers was identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The fibrous form of chrysotile asbestos was converted into non-fibrous form of forsterite. In fact, none of the fibrous-needle-like morphology, with length equal to or greater than 5 {mu}m and diameter less than 3 {mu}m, which was responsible for the toxicity of the original material, was visible in the solid phase. The dissolution of magnesium from chrysotile asbestos was measured using volumetric determination by titration with EDTA. Leaching of magnesium into the liquid phase was observed. Clearly, the highest concentrations of dissolved magnesium are observed after hydrothermal treatment of chrysotile asbestos using acetic acid 1% (8.4-14.6%). Lowest concentrations of dissolved magnesium are obtained after hydrothermal treatment of chrysotile asbestos without using additives. Observing the results of the hydrothermal

  15. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  16. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  17. Cement og politik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    as well as in the public sphere. Most of the extensive job creating measures he carried out as a minister for public works necessarily involved the use of great amounts of cement – the primary produce of F.L. Smidth & Co. Gunnar Larsen thus became an easy target for Communist propaganda, picturing him...... of the Soviet Union (including an F.L. Smidth & Co. cement plant in former Estonia). He spent the last 15 months of the occupation in Sweden and was arrested after having returned to Copenhagen in May, 1945. Although a Copenhagen city court prison sentence for economic collaboration was reversed, he had...

  18. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  19. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  20. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  1. Novorossiysk agglomeration landscapes and cement production: geochemical impact assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseenko, A. V.; Pashkevich, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    The article deals with assessing the environmental impact of marl mining and cement production in Novorossiysk city (Krasnodar krai, Russia). The existing methods of studying the environmental effects caused by the cement industry have been reviewed. Soil and aquatic vegetation sampling has been carried out and the gross concentration of metals in the samples has been defined. The research has been conducted in the certified and accredited laboratory using emission spectral analysis. The external control has been carried out via X-ray fluorescence analysis. Based on the collected data, main chemical pollutants in soil cover and water area near the cement plant have been identified. The contaminants released by urban enterprises and motor vehicle emissions, as well as fugitive dust from dumps and the cement factory, lead to multi-element lithogeochemical anomaly at geochemical barriers in soils. Accumulation of pollutants in soil depends on the type of land use and the area relief. The most contaminated aquatic landscapes have been identified in the inner bay. According to this information, the technical proposals can be prepared for environmental safety management in strongly polluted city areas, as well as for the reclamation design in the areas currently experiencing the negative impact of cement production.

  2. Lung function reduction and chronic respiratory symptoms among workers in the cement industry: a follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeleke Zeyede K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are only a few follow-up studies of respiratory function among cement workers. The main aims of this study were to measure total dust exposure, to examine chronic respiratory symptoms and changes in lung function among cement factory workers and controls that were followed for one year. Methods The study was conducted in two cement factories in Ethiopia. Totally, 262 personal measurements of total dust among 105 randomly selected workers were performed. Samples of total dust were collected on 37-mm cellulose acetate filters placed in closed faced Millipore-cassettes. Totally 127 workers; 56 cleaners, 44 cement production workers and 27 controls were randomly selected from two factories and examined for lung function and interviewed for chronic respiratory symptoms in 2009. Of these, 91 workers; 38 cement cleaners (mean age 32 years, 33 cement production workers (36 years and 20 controls (38 years were examined with the same measurements in 2010. Results Total geometric mean dust exposure among cleaners was 432 mg/m3. The fraction of samples exceeding the Threshold Limit Value (TLV of 10 mg/m3 for the cleaners varied from 84-97% in the four departments. The levels were considerably lower among the production workers (GM = 8.2 mg/m3, but still 48% exceeded 10 mg/m3. The prevalence of all the chronic respiratory symptoms among both cleaners and production workers was significantly higher than among the controls. Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1 and FEV1/Forced Vital Capacity (FEV1/FVC were significantly reduced from 2009 to 2010 among the cleaners (p Conclusions The high prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms and reduction in lung function is probably associated with high cement dust exposure. Preventive measures are needed to reduce the dust exposure.

  3. Pleural plaques related to “take-home” exposure to asbestos: An international case series

    OpenAIRE

    Peretz, Alon; Van Hee, Victor C.; Kramer, Mordechai R.; Pitlik, Silvio; Keifer, Matthew C.

    2009-01-01

    Context: While a large number of studies indicate the risks of high-level exposures to asbestos in the workplace setting, a relatively small number of studies describe the risk of pleural disease related to “take-home” asbestos brought into the household by workers exposed to asbestos. Consequently, the risk of pleural disease in family members of asbestos-exposed workers is likely underappreciated. Case presentations: Two families of siblings, one in Israel and one in the US, were evaluated ...

  4. Lung asbestos bodies and pulmonary cancer in subjects without occupational exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrion, A.; Pira, E.; Fadda, T.; Mollo, F.

    1982-10-01

    Lung asbestos bodies were searched for in 65 subjects with pulmonary cancer and without occupational exposure and in 65 matched controls. No significant association between the presence of asbestos bodies and occurrence of lung cancer was found. Nevertheless, adenocarcinoma was significantly associated with the presence of lung asbestos bodies in men. The latter result suggest that, even in non-professionally exposed subjects, the possibility of relationships between asbestos exposure and lung cancer cannot be excluded.

  5. Malignant mesothelioma: clustering in a family producing asbestos cement in their home.

    OpenAIRE

    Otte, K.E.; Sigsgaard, T I; Kjaerulff, J

    1990-01-01

    In a family with a remarkable aggregation of malignant mesothelioma the father, mother, and a son all died of the condition, whereas two other sons and a daughter were unaffected. From 1944 to 1961 the family produced a material that was used to fix screws in drilled holes and consisted of amosite, gypsum, and sand. It was produced in the basement of their villa and was described as being a dusty job. The father died in 1984 aged 74, the son in 1985 aged 45, and the mother in 1987 aged 79. It...

  6. Asbestos cement jacket thermally insulated with PUR foam plastic - properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke-Reineke, L. (Gesellschaft fuer Asbestzement-Erzeugnisse m.b.H. und Co. K.G., Herne (Germany, F.R.))

    1977-10-01

    AZ jacket pipes insulated with PUR foam plastic have been used in district heating grids for eight years. No system failure has as yet been recorded. The article discusses the properties of the system and the requirements to be met by district heating mains and shows that the AZ jacket pipe represents an attractive alternative to the conventional method in which the line is run through conduits as it combines their favourable properties with those of the buried pipe systems using no conduits. This opens new possibilities for the forthcoming expansion in the supply of district heat.

  7. Solubility of chrysotile asbestos and basalt fibers in relation to their fibrogenic and carcinogenic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, F M; Nikitina, O V

    1994-10-01

    Fiber length and persistence are thought to be determinants for the development of toxic, fibrogenic, and carcinogenic effects of fibrous dusts. When the solubilities of chrysotile asbestos (CA) and basalt fibers (BF) were compared by measuring the loss of silica and magnesium in Leineweber's solution, CA was shown to be the more soluble. In a 6-month inhalation experiment, chrysotile at a mean concentration of 25 mg/m3 had a higher clearance rate than other comparable dusts. In acute toxicity studies, chrysotile and basalt fibers were administered intraperitoneally. At a dose of 1.7 g/kg body weight of CA, one third of the animals died. A dose of 2.7 g/kg body weight killed all the animals. With BF, even at a dose of 10 g/kg body weight all the animals survived. When the two fibers were administered over a 6-month period, either intratracheally or by inhalation, fibrotic lesions were more common in the group that received CA. Intraperitoneal administration of CA led to three times as many deaths from peritoneal mesothelioma as administration of BF. It appears, therefore, that in spite of its higher solubility and lower persistence, CA was the more toxic, fibrogenic and carcinogenic fiber, which gives rise to the hypothesis that the surface chemistry of the fibers is the determinant for biological activity.

  8. Produktie van cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit JRK; Coenen PWHG; Matthijsen AJCM; LAE; TAUW

    1995-01-01

    This document on cement production has been published within the SPIN project. In this project information has been collected on industrial plants or industrial processes to afford support to governmental policy on emission reduction. This document contains information on the processes, emission sou

  9. Osteotransductive bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessens, F C; Planell, J A; Boltong, M G; Khairoun, I; Ginebra, M P

    1998-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bone cements (CPBCs) are osteotransductive, i.e. after implantation in bone they are transformed into new bone tissue. Furthermore, due to the fact that they are mouldable, their osteointegration is immediate. Their chemistry has been established previously. Some CPBCs contain amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and set by a sol-gel transition. The others are crystalline and can give as the reaction product dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), carbonated apatite (CA) or hydroxyapatite (HA). Mixed-type gypsum-DCPD cements are also described. In vivo rates of osteotransduction vary as follows: gypsum-DCPD > DCPD > CDHA approximately CA > HA. The osteotransduction of CDHA-type cements may be increased by adding dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCP) and/or CaCO3 to the cement powder. CPBCs can be used for healing of bone defects, bone augmentation and bone reconstruction. Incorporation of drugs like antibiotics and bone morphogenetic protein is envisaged. Load-bearing applications are allowed for CHDA-type, CA-type and HA-type CPBCs as they have a higher compressive strength than human trabecular bone (10 MPa).

  10. Study on Strength of Innovative Mortar Synthesis with Epoxy Resin, Fly Ash and Quarry Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sudheer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Generally, mortar is a uniform combination of Fine aggregate and cement. In this study an innovative concept adopts to synthesis a hybrid mortar with Epoxy resin, Fly ash and quarry dust which are replacing the fine aggregate and cement. The alternative materials are preferably waste products such as quarry dust and fly ash in order to moderate the cost of mortar. The main objective of this work is to study the compressive strength of mortar cubes by various combinations of cement and fine aggregate replaced by Epoxy resin, fly ash, and quarry dust at the age of 7 days. The results of mortarmade with cement replaced with 20%, 25%, and 30% (w/w of Epoxy resin, and fine aggregate replaced by (0% QD - 100% FA (100% QD - 0% FA and (70% QD - 30% FA of quarry dust and fly ash were compared with conventional mortar cubes. It was observed that all mortar cubes made with Epoxy resin, fly ash, and quarry dust had found to have a compressive strength of more than 150% when compared to compressive strength with normal cement of OPC53 grade at the age of 7 days (Approx.35.5Mpa

  11. 75 FR 7284 - NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletin-Asbestos Fibers and Other Elongate Mineral Particles: State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletin--Asbestos... available for public comment entitled ``NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletin--Asbestos Fibers and Other..., ``NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletin--Asbestos Fibers and Other Elongate Mineral Particles: State of...

  12. 75 FR 59261 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Asbestos...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools Rule and Revised Asbestos Model Accreditation Plan Rule; EPA ICR No. 1365.09... the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). This ICR, entitled: ``Asbestos-Containing Materials...

  13. Asbestos-in-Schools: A Guide to New Federal Requirements for Local Education Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Toxic Substances.

    In 1986, the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) was signed into law requiring the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop regulations which provide a comprehensive framework for addressing asbestos problems in secondary and elementary schools. The new rule, The Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools Rule, requires all…

  14. 77 FR 30528 - Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Science Advisory Board; Libby Amphibole Asbestos...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... AGENCY Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Science Advisory Board; Libby Amphibole Asbestos... teleconference of the SAB Libby Amphibole Asbestos Panel to discuss the Panel's revised draft review report of EPA's Toxicological Review of Libby Amphibole Asbestos (August 2011 Draft). DATES: The...

  15. How To Manage Asbestos in School Buildings: AHERA Designated Person's Self-Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Seattle, WA.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires schools to appoint an asbestos management coordinator called the "AHERA (Asbestos Hazardous Emergency Response Act) designated person" (DP) who is responsible for a number of asbestos-related activities. This manual presents some recommendations designed to help those persons appointed to this…

  16. 40 CFR 61.149 - Standard for waste disposal for asbestos mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in) upright format signs specified in 29 CFR 1910.145(d)(4) and this paragraph; and (iii) Display the... asbestos mills. 61.149 Section 61.149 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Standard for Asbestos § 61.149 Standard for waste disposal for asbestos mills. Each owner or operator...

  17. Role of Substrate on Quartz Cementation in Quartz Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farver, J. R.; Winslow, D.; Onasch, C.

    2010-12-01

    Quartz cementation in quartz aggregates has been experimentally investigated. The starting material was disaggregated detrital quartz grains from the well-sorted, mature St. Peter Sandstone. The ‘as-is’ grains have patches of iron oxide coatings and some have euhedral overgrowths that contain iron oxide dust rims. In addition a set of experiments was run using grains that were cleaned by soaking in sodium hydrosulfite and sodium bisulfate solutions to remove exposed iron oxide coatings. Experimental charges consisted of amorphous silica powder (≈30 mg) to provide a source of silica for the quartz cement, AlCl3 powder (≈3 mg) to provide a tracer for Cathodoluminescence (CL) identification of cement formed during the experiment, 25 wt% NaCl brine solution (≈25 mg) to increase the silica solubility and to better mimic oil field brines, and the natural quartz grains (100-130 mg). The charges were weld-sealed in Au capsules and run in cold-seal pressure vessels at 250°C to 450°C at 150 MPa confining pressure for up to 8 weeks. After the experiments, the samples were vacuum impregnated with a low viscosity epoxy containing a blue dye. After curing, the sample charge was sawn in half along its long axis and one half was polished (to 1 micron diamond paste) for analysis. The nature and amount of quartz cement in the samples were determined by a combination of CL, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Photomosaics of the samples were created and the amount of cement, porosity, and average grain sizes were determined by point-counting. The cement formed during the experiment was easily recognized from the quartz grains (and previous overgrowths) by the difference in luminescence. The results indicate the amorphous silica powder provides a ready source for silica for quartz cementation due to its greater solubility than the quartz. The cementation rates are rapid (>14% cement formed in 2 weeks at 450°C and >7% in 8 weeks at 250°C). Compared to

  18. Toxicología del asbesto Toxicology of asbest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Luis

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available El asbesto o amianto está constituido por un grupo de minerales metamórficos fibrosos ampliamente extendidos en el mundo. Las principales variedades de asbesto son las serpentinas y los anfíboles. El asbesto llega al organismo al inhalar sus fibras y partículas. La exposición a este material puede ocasionar diferentes enfermedades irreversibles como asbestosis, mesotelioma maligno, placas pleurales y cáncer de pulmón. Todas ellas presentan un período de latencia largo. En 1978 el asbesto fue declarada sustancia cancerígena siendo totalmente prohibido su uso en España en el año 2002.Asbest is a group of fibrous metamorphic minerals widespread in the world. The principal varieties of asbestos are serpentines and amphiboles. Asbest reaches human when the fiber an particles are inhaled. The exposure can cause irreversible diseases, like asbestosis, malignant mesothelioma, pleural plaques and lung cancer. All of them have a long latency period. In 1978, asbest was considered a carcinogenic substance and was totally forbidden in Spain during 2002.

  19. Treatment of airborne asbestos and asbestos-like microfiber particles using atmospheric microwave air plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averroes, A; Sekiguchi, H; Sakamoto, K

    2011-11-15

    Atmospheric microwave air plasma was used to treat asbestos-like microfiber particles that had two types of ceramic fiber and one type of stainless fiber. The treated particles were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experiment results showed that one type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica=1:1) and the stainless fiber were spheroidized, but the other type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica=7:3) was not. The conversion of the fibers was investigated by calculating the equivalent diameter, the aspect ratio, and the fiber content ratio. The fiber content ratio in various conditions showed values near zero. The relationship between the normalized fiber vanishing rate and the energy needed to melt the particles completely per unit surface area of projected particles, which is defined as η, was examined and seen to indicate that the normalized fiber vanishing rate decreased rapidly with the increase in η. Finally, some preliminary experiments for pure asbestos were conducted, and the analysis via XRD and phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) showed the availability of the plasma treatment.

  20. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  1. Cancer mortality in Chinese chrysotile asbestos miners: exposure-response relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorong Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to assess the relationship of mortality from lung cancer and other selected causes to asbestos exposure levels. METHODS: A cohort of 1539 male workers from a chrysotile mine in China was followed for 26 years. Data on vital status, occupation and smoking were collected from the mine records and individual contacts. Causes and dates of death were further verified from the local death registry. Individual cumulative fibre exposures (f-yr/ml were estimated based on converted dust measurements and working years at specific workshops. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs for lung cancer, gastrointestinal (GI cancer, all cancers and nonmalignant respiratory diseases (NMRD stratified by employment years, estimated cumulative fibre exposures, and smoking, were calculated. Poisson models were fitted to determine exposure-response relationships between estimated fibre exposures and cause-specific mortality, adjusting for age and smoking. RESULTS: SMRs for lung cancer increased with employment years at entry to the study, by 3.5-fold in ≥ 10 years and 5.3-fold in ≥ 20 years compared with <10 years. A similar trend was seen for NMRD. Smokers had greater mortality from all causes than nonsmokers, but the latter also had slightly increased SMR for lung cancer. No excess lung cancer mortality was observed in cumulative exposures of <20 f-yrs/ml. However, significantly increased mortality was observed in smokers at the levels of ≥ 20 f-yrs/ml and above, and in nonsmokers at ≥ 100 f-yrs/ml and above. A similarly clear gradient was also displayed for NMRD. The exposure-response relationships with lung cancer and NMRD persisted in multivariate analysis. Moreover, a clear gradient was shown in GI cancer mortality when age and smoking were adjusted for. CONCLUSION: There were clear exposure-response relationships in this cohort, which imply a causal link between chrysotile asbestos exposure and lung cancer and nonmalignant

  2. The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, D.; Janssen, D.; Mann, K.A.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The cement-bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement-bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage or microcracks and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect th

  3. POZZOLAN AND CEMENTS WITH POZZOLAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan KAPLAN

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Cement, one of the basic material of construction engineering, has an important place in view of strength and cost of structures. Cement consumption is increasing parallel to development of building construction sector. For cement producers, minimal cost is desired by using new and economical material sources. On the other hand, the controllers and contractors need cheaper, safer and higher strength materials. From this respect cement industry tends to use cement with pozzolan. In Türkiye, cement with pozzolan is produced by adding the pozzolan, which has a large reservoir in the country, in cement in sertain amount. However this type of cement is consumed in the construction sector, sortage of scientific investigation and speculative news on the subject.are worried the users and producers. In this paper, prior to an experimental study on the cements having pozzolan additive, historical development of pozzolan, reservoir of Turkiye, and comparison with portland cement is carried out. Advantages and disadvantages of pozzolan are also discussed in some points.

  4. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  5. Pulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and asbestos - similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig A; Murphy, Fiona A; MacFarlane, Marion; Chernova, Tatyana; Schinwald, Anja

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a valuable industrial product but there is potential for human pulmonary exposure during production and their fibrous shape raises the possibility that they may have effects like asbestos, which caused a worldwide pandemic of disease in the20th century that continues into present. CNT may exist as fibres or as more compact particles and the asbestos-type hazard only pertains to the fibrous forms of CNT. Exposure to asbestos causes asbestosis, bronchogenic carcinoma, mesothelioma, pleural fibrosis and pleural plaques indicating that both the lungs and the pleura are targets. The fibre pathogenicity paradigm was developed in the 1970s-80s and has a robust structure/toxicity relationship that enables the prediction of the pathogenicity of fibres depending on their length, thickness and biopersistence. Fibres that are sufficiently long and biopersistent and that deposit in the lungs can cause oxidative stress and inflammation. They may also translocate to the pleura where they can be retained depending on their length, and where they cause inflammation and oxidative stress in the pleural tissues. These pathobiological processes culminate in pathologic change - fibroplasia and neoplasia in the lungs and the pleura. There may also be direct genotoxic effects of fibres on epithelial cells and mesothelium, contributing to neoplasia. CNT show some of the properties of asbestos and other types of fibre in producing these types of effects and more research is needed. In terms of the molecular pathways involved in the interaction of long biopersistent fibres with target tissue the events leading to mesothelioma have been a particular area of interest. A variety of kinase pathways important in proliferation are activated by asbestos leading to pre-malignant states and investigations are under way to determine whether fibrous CNT also affects these molecular pathways. Current research suggests that fibrous CNT can elicit effects similar to asbestos but more

  6. Mineralogical Characteristics of Carbonate Rock-Hosted Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, E.; Roh, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) occurs in rocks and soils as a result of natural weathering and human activities. The parent rocks of asbestos have been associated with ultramafic and mafic rocks, and carbonate rock. The previous studies on naturally occurring asbestos were mainly limited to ultramafic and mafic rock-hosted asbestos and studies on carbonate rock-hosted asbestos are relatively rare in South Korea. Therefore, this study was aimed to characterize mineralogy of carbonate rock-hosted NOA at Muju and Jangsu, Jeonbuk province and Seosan and Asan, Chungnam province. The rock types at the four sites are consisting mainly of Precambrian metasedimentary rock. XRD and PLM analyses showed fibrous minerals in the sites were tremolite and actinolite of acicular and columnar forms. SEM-EDS analyses showed that asbestiform tremolite and actinolite had various ratios of length and diameters over 12:1, and needle and columnar forms. A columnar forms of tremolite and actinolite were showed small acicular at the edge of the particle. Its main chemical compositions are mainly Si, O, Mg, Ca, which were identical to tremolite. Actinolite contains Fe in addition to Si, O, Mg, Ca. EPMA analyses of asbestos occurred at Muju indicated that chemical composition are 55% SiO2, 23.2% MgO, 13.1 % CaO, and 0.61 % FeO and the chemical formula calculated as (K0.01Na0.01)Ca2.01(Mg4.94Fe0.05) (Al0.004Si7.98)O22(OH)2, which is close to ideal tremolite. In addition to tremolite, actinolite was also occurred at Seosan, Chungnam. XRD analyses showed that antigorite was existed at Muju, but PLM and SEM analyses showed the antigorite was platy structure, not asbestiform. These results indicate that asbestiform tremolite and actinolite with acicular forms contains in carbonate rocks at Muju and Jangsu, Jeonbuk and Seosan and Asan, Chungnam province South Korea.

  7. Coal acid mine drainage treatment using cement kiln dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Alberto Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Los sulfuros están presentes en distintas rocas. Durante las actividades mineras y el proceso de remoción de sulfuros se pueden producir Drenajes Ácidos de Minería (DAM, con iones de sulfato (SO4-2. Los DAMs son fuente de polución en las actividades mineras y en Colombia su descarga en los cuerpos de agua debe cumplir las regulaciones nacionales (pH entre 5 y 9. Polvo de horno cementero (CKD, con carbonato de calcio principalmente, de una planta de Cementos Argos S.A. fue usado para neutralizar un DAM generado en la biodesulfurización de carbón. Los DAMs neutralizados tuvieron pHs entre 7,72 y 8,05 y la eliminación de sulfatos entre 67% a 70%. El precipitado se secó y analizó para determinar su composición química y mineralógica. Se encontró humedad entre 69% y 81%; yeso con un 50% de pureza aproximadamente y carbonato de calcio. Esta composición lo hace adecuado para uso en la producción de cemento.

  8. Electromagnetic mixed waste processing system for asbestos decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE sites contain a broad spectrum of asbestos materials (cloth, pipe lagging, sprayed insulation and other substances) which are contaminated with a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes due to its use during the development of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. These wastes consist of cutting oils, lubricants, solvents, PCB's, heavy metals and radioactive contaminants. The radioactive contaminants are the activation, decay and fission products of DOE operations. The asbestos must be converted by removing and separating the hazardous and radioactive materials to prevent the formation of mixed wastes and to allow for both sanitary disposal and effective decontamination. Currently, no technology exists that can meet these sanitary and other objectives

  9. US cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Gallium scanning in differentiating malignant from benign asbestos-related pleural disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the utility of 67gallium citrate in delineating malignant pleural mesothelioma from benign asbestos-related pleural disease, 49 patients with malignant mesothelioma and 16 with benign asbestos-related pleural disease were studied. Seven patients with malignant mesothelioma had no history of asbestos exposure, while the remaining 58 patients were exposed. Forty-three of the 49 patients (88%) with malignant mesothelioma had a positive 67gallium scan including 36 of the 42 (86%) patients with asbestos exposure and all 7 patients without a history of asbestos exposure. Three of 16 patients (19%) with benign asbestos-related pleural disease had a positive scan. 67Gallium radionuclide imaging is nonspecific but may be valuable in noninvasive monitoring of asbestos-exposed populations, which have a high risk for the late development of benign and/or malignant pleural disease

  11. Fibre-type dusts - sources and effects; Faserige Staeube - Vorkommen und Wirkungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, H. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Toxikologie und Aerosolforschung, Hannover (Germany)

    1991-07-01

    The Federal Environmental Protection Agency of Germany reports that annual consumption of asbestos had peaked at about 180.000 t in the seventies. Major dust concentration levels ocurred above all in the asbestos-processing industries. However, dust levels were measured rather sporadically since the importance of dust control had been ignored for a long time. The long latency period between exposure to asbestos and resulting injuries had, in effect, very much delayed any realization of the true extent of health impairment. Although lung cancer as a concomitant of asbestosis had been included in the list of vocational diseases since 1943, the long-shaped form of asbestos particles had not been identified conclusively as the cancerogenic agent until 1972. The author gives a brief summary to help orientation in this difficult field. (orig./VHE) [Deutsch] Bis Ende der siebziger Jahre fand Asbest eine weite Anwendung. Nach Informationen des Umweltbundesamtes lag der hoechste Verbrauch von Asbest in den Siebziger Jahren bei etwa 180.000 t/Jahr. Vor allem in der asbestverarbeitenden Industrie traten erhebliche Staubkonzentrationen auf. Staubmessungen wurden jedoch nur sporadisch durchgefuehrt, weil die Bedeutung einer Staubminderung lange Zeit verkannte wurde. Wegen der langen Latenzzeit zwischen Asbestexposition und den dadurch verursachten Schadwirkungen ergeben sich erst sehr spaet Hinweise auf das ganze Ausmass der Gesundheitsschaeden. Obwohl Lungenkrebs bei Asbestose bereits seit 1943 in die Liste der Berufskrankheiten aufgenommen wurde, klaerte sich erst 1972, dass die langgestreckte Form von Asbestpartikeln das krebserzeugende Agens darstellt. Inzwischen ist durch eine intensive Aufklaerung der Bevoelkerung die krebserzeugende Wirkung von Asbest allgemein bekannt. Bei der Einschaetzung der Risikohoehe bestehen bei vielen Buergern jodoch nur unklare Vorstellungen. Die vorliegende kurze Zusammenfassung soll eine Orientierungshilfe auf diesem schwierigen Gebiet sein

  12. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    Patients with isolated erosion of the long incus process suffer from severe hearing loss caused by lack of continuity of the ossicular chain. This study is a retrospective evaluation of the hearing results using two different surgical procedures. Since January 1993, 12 consecutive patients with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those in a group of 20 historical controls who underwent surgery in 1991 and 1992 using incus autograft interposition. Among the 12 index patients, 7 (58%) achieved improvement in PTA of > 10 dB, in 3 there was no difference and in 2 a slight decline. Among the 20 controls, 14 (70%) achieved improvement in PTA of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy to perform, presents less risk of damage to the stapes and cochlea, requires less extensive surgery and does not exclude other surgical methods in cases of reoperation. PMID:10909000

  13. Worldwide Asbestos Supply and Consumption Trends from 1900 through 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    This Circular updates and supersedes U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Open-File Report 03–083, "Worldwide Asbestos Supply and Consumption Trends from 1900 to 2000," with the addition of supply and consumption estimates and analysis from 2001 through 2003 and revisions to the consumption estimates for 1998 through 2000. The text from Open-File Report 03–083 also has been updated in this Circular to include revisions to and expansion of the time-series coverage. The use of asbestos is one of the most controversial issues surrounding the industrial minerals industry. Its carcinogenic nature, an overall lack of knowledge of minimum safe exposure levels, its widespread use for more than 100 years, and the long latency for the development of lung cancer and mesothelioma are the main contributing factors to these controversies. Another factor is that, despite decades of research, the mechanisms responsible for its carcinogenic properties are still largely unknown. The United States produced about 3.29 million metric tons (Mt) of asbestos and used approximately 31.5 Mt between 1900 and 2003. About half of this amount was used after 1960. In 2002, the last asbestos mine in the United States closed, marking the end of more than 110 years of U.S. asbestos production. Cumulative world production from 1900 through 2003 was about 181 Mt. If one assumes that unusually large stocks were not maintained and that world consumption roughly equaled production, then about half of the world production and consumption occurred between the end of 1976 and the end of 2003. The United States and Western European nations were the largest consumers of asbestos during the first two-thirds of the 20th century. They were surpassed by the collective production and consumption of Kazakhstan and Russia by the 1970s. After the onset of the health issues concerning asbestos in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the decline in world production and consumption began to be evident in the late 1970s and

  14. The geology of asbestos in the United States and its practical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, B. S.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) has drawn the attention of numerous health and regulatory agencies and citizen groups. NOA can be released airborne by (1) the disturbance of asbestos-bearing bedrocks through human activities or natural weathering, and (2) the mining and milling of some mineral deposits in which asbestos occurs as an accessory mineral(s). Because asbestos forms in specific rock types and geologic conditions, this information can be used to focus on areas with the potential to contain asbestos, rather than devoting effort to areas with minimal NOA potential. All asbestos minerals contain magnesium, silica, and water as essential constituents, and some also contain major iron and/or calcium. Predictably, the geologic environments that host asbestos are enriched in these components. Most asbestos deposits form by metasomatic replacement of magnesium-rich rocks. Asbestos-forming environments typically display shear or evidence for a significant influx of silica-rich hydrothermal fluids. Asbestos-forming processes can be driven by regional metamorphism, contact metamorphism, or magmatic hydrothermal systems. Thus, asbestos deposits of all sizes and styles are typically hosted by magnesium-rich rocks (often also iron-rich) that were altered by a metamorphic or magmatic process. Rock types known to host asbestos include serpentinites, altered ultramafic and some mafic rocks, dolomitic marbles and metamorphosed dolostones, metamorphosed iron formations, and alkalic intrusions and carbonatites. Other rock types appear unlikely to contain asbestos. These geologic insights can be used by the mining industry, regulators, land managers, and others to focus attention on the critical locales most likely to contain asbestos.

  15. [Haemotoxicity of dental luting cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, A; Welker, D

    1989-06-01

    A glass ionomer luting cement (AquaCem) shows a relatively low haemolytic activity in comparison with two zinc phosphate cements. Especially the initial irritation by this cement is smaller. Although it is possible that AquaCem particularly, in unfavourable cases, may damage the pulpa dentin system; this is due to the slowly decrease of the haemolytic activity with increasing of the probes. We found that Adhesor showed in dependence of the batches a varying quality. PMID:2626769

  16. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement. PMID:19010682

  17. Dust particle dynamics in atmospheric dust devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekova, Yulia; Popel, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Dust particle dynamics is modeled in the Dust Devils (DDs). DD is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a meter wide and a few meters tall) to large (more than 100 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall) in Earth's atmosphere. We develop methods for the description of dust particle charging in DDs, discuss the ionization processes in DDs, and model charged dust particle motion. Our conclusions are consistent with the fact that DD can lift a big amount of dust from the surface of a planet into its atmosphere. On the basis of the model we perform calculations and show that DDs are important mechanism for dust uplift in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Influence of DD electric field on dynamics of dust particles is investigated. It is shown that influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is significant near the ground. At some altitude (more then a quarter of the height of DD) influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is negligible. For the calculation of the dynamics of dust electric field can be approximated by effective dipole located at a half of the height of DD. This work was supported by the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  18. High strength and high modulus polyvinyl alcohol fiber——the optimal substitute for asbestos%高强高模聚乙烯醇纤维是替代石棉的最理想材料

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高祖安

    2012-01-01

    综述分析了石棉及其石棉行业存在严重危害性等实际情况,对国外开发的各种石棉替代品的试验、试用和实际应用情况进行了对比。结果表明,聚乙烯醇(PVA)纤维具有高强高模、低伸长、耐酸碱、抗溶剂、耐老化、水泥粘着力好、性价比高等优良特点,以及国外近20年的基础研究和工程应用实践证明,被国际公认为替代石棉的最理想材料。最后提出在我国加快PVA纤维代替石棉的迫切性与必要性。%This paper summarizes and analyzes the serious harm to human health caused by asbestos and asbestos industry and other actual situations, then have a comparison through experiment, trial and practical application of various kinds of asbestos substitutes developed abroad. The results indicate that PVA fibers have good performances of high strength and high modulus, low elongation, acid and alkali resistant, anti-solvent, anti-aging, good cement adhesiveness, cost effective and etc. On basis of the nearly 20 years' basic research and engineering practice in abroad, PVA is considered to be the optimal substitute for asbestos. Finally the paper leads to a conclusion that it's urgent and necessary to accelerate the development of PVA alternative technology of asbestos.

  19. Possibilities of Pelletizing and Briquetting of Dusts from Castings Grinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pribulová

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Foundry dust can be divided into three groups: metallic dust with Fe content over 70%, mixed dust with Fe or SiO2 content between 10 –70% and sand wastes with minimum content of SiO2 about 70%. Dust from castings grinding with high Fe content (87.9% is still landfillin Slovakia. The aim of experiments with dust from grinding has been to find the cheapest way of dust agglomeration with minimumamount of binder because of melting in the electric induction furnace. The dust was pelletized and briquetted and as binders bentonite, water glass and cement were used. Briquettes made from dust from grinding with addition of water glass got compression strength after three months on the air about 82 kPa. Briquettes with addition of water glass were melted together with cast iron in electric induction furnace. Yield of metal from briquettes was around 80% and slag quantity around 4% (without briquettes the slag quantity was 1.4%.

  20. Managing for Successful Control of Naturally Occurring Asbestos During Large Scale Grading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saur, R.; Harnish, D.; Cavanaugh, J.; Kendall, K.; Virdee, A.; Ludlam, D.

    2012-12-01

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company recently completed environmental remediation and civil grading of a 35-acre site in San Francisco Bay Area, and the project became recognized with local agencies as having excellent controls systems for naturally-occurring asbestos (NOA). The project began in 2010 and was completed in 2012, and involved excavating and grading over 100,000 tons of soil containing NOA. The work was subject to requirements by state, local and regional agencies, including an asbestos dust mitigation plan for the Bay Area Air Quality Management District. Effective control of NOA is attributed to management approaches combined with effective monitoring and state-of-the-art controls. Management Planning. The contract for construction specified NOA compliance management and controls, including having a NOA-control "czar" ultimately responsible for effective mitigation. An important element was daily pre-planning for excavation/grading that involved both the NOA mitigation experts and construction staff. Personnel Planning and Training. All construction personnel were trained before work regarding NOA hazards and mitigations. Daily tailboards with all construction personnel included discussions of the NOA controls integral to the daily work. Supervision. A NOA mitigation compliance leader was assigned to each excavation operation, responsible for continuously monitoring wind direction and work to ensure mitigation met requirements, and that disturbed areas were hydrosealed or covered. Adaptive Management - Daily and weekly debriefs occurred with those responsible for NOA controls to evaluate effectiveness, and identify improvements needed. If a monitoring result exceeded the project trigger level, work shut down and a root-cause analysis was performed to determine appropriate corrective actions. Deviations of results from background were researched as to cause, and any adjustments identified. Nearby non-project activities were monitored, as they occasionally