WorldWideScience

Sample records for as-found pressure test

  1. Approaching the 'As Found'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braae, Ellen Marie

    2017-01-01

    has led the self-understanding and development of the Western world for centuries. However, the ideas of novelty and progress have started to change. We are increasingly aware of the limited resources on Earth, not only in terms of materials but also in terms of space. The challenge is to find......' and ‘edit' the ‘as found' has to a certain degree always been the point of departure for landscape architecture. Yet these more fundamental shifts in premises that goes with the limited resources are so materially and culturally profound that they deeply affect the theories and methods of landscape...... architecture, and of course, also the outcome. Understanding design as a transformation of what already exits rather than a bringing into the world of something entirely new, created ex nihilo, marks an epistemological change. First and foremost, it requires a reconfiguration of our understanding...

  2. An Experimental Investigation of the Flow Physics Associated With End Wall Losses and Large Rotor Tip Clearances as Found in the Rear Stages of a High Pressure Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdanier, Reid A.; Key, Nicole L.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this work was to characterize the fundamental flow physics and the overall performance effects due to increased rotor tip clearance heights in axial compressors. Data have been collected in the three-stage axial research compressor at Purdue University with a specific focus on analyzing the multistage effects resulting from the tip leakage flow. Three separate rotor tip clearance heights were studied with nominal tip clearance heights of 1.5%, 3.0%, and 4.0% based on a constant annulus height. Overall compressor performance was investigated at four corrected speedlines (100%, 90%, 80%, and 68%) for each of the three tip clearance configurations using total pressure and total temperature rakes distributed throughout the compressor. The results have confirmed results from previous authors showing a decrease of total pressure rise, isentropic efficiency, and stall margin which is approximately linear with increasing tip clearance height. The stall inception mechanisms have also been evaluated at the same corrected speeds for each of the tip clearance configurations. Detailed flow field measurements have been collected at two loading conditions, nominal loading (NL) and high loading (HL), on the 100% corrected speedline for the smallest and largest tip clearance heights (1.5% and 4.0%). Steady detailed radial traverses of total pressure at the exit of each stator row have been supported by flow visualization techniques to identify regions of flow recirculation and separation. Furthermore, detailed radial traverses of time-resolved total pressures at the exit of each rotor row have been measured with a fast-response pressure probe. These data have helped to quantify the size of the leakage flow at the exit of each rotor. Thermal anemometry has also been implemented to evaluate the time-resolved three-dimensional components of velocity throughout the compressor and calculate blockage due to the rotor tip leakage flow throughout the compressor. These

  3. Blood Pressure Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure monitors may have some limitations. Tracking your blood pressure readings It can be helpful in diagnosing or ... more Stage 2 high blood pressure (hypertension) Elevated blood pressure and stages 1 and 2 high blood pressure ( ...

  4. Pressure locking test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, open-quotes Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.close quotes Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; we will publish the results of our thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions

  5. Pressure locking test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  6. 49 CFR 195.304 - Test pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test pressure. 195.304 Section 195.304... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.304 Test pressure. The test pressure for each pressure test conducted under... continuous hours at a pressure equal to 125 percent, or more, of the maximum operating pressure and, in the...

  7. 33 CFR 159.109 - Pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pressure test. 159.109 Section...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.109 Pressure test. Any sewage retention tank that is designed to operate under pressure must be pressurized hydrostatically at a pressure...

  8. Triplets pass their pressure test

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    All the LHC inner triplets have now been repaired and are in position. The first ones have passed their pressure tests with flying colours. The repaired inner triplet at LHC Point 1, right side (1R). Ranko Ostojic (on the right), who headed the team responsible for repairing the triplets, shows the magnet to Robert Zimmer, President of the University of Chicago and of Fermi Research Alliance, who visited CERN on 20th August.Three cheers for the triplets! All the LHC inner triplets have now been repaired and are in position in the tunnel. Thanks to the mobilisation of a multidisciplinary team from CERN and Fermilab, assisted by the KEK Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), a solution has been found, tested, validated and applied. At the end of March this year, one of the inner triplets at Point 5 failed to withstand a pressure test. A fault was identified in the supports of two out of the three quadruple magne...

  9. 49 CFR 230.35 - Pressure testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure testing. 230.35 Section 230.35 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.35 Pressure testing. The temperature of the steam locomotive boiler shall...

  10. 14 CFR 23.843 - Pressurization tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., windows, canopy, and valves, must be tested as a pressure vessel for the pressure differential specified... system to show proper functioning under each possible condition of pressure, temperature, and moisture... and stepped climbs and descents at rates corresponding to the maximum attainable within the operating...

  11. Model tests for prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, R.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations with models of reactor pressure vessels are used to check results of three dimensional calculation methods and to predict the behaviour of the prototype. Model tests with 1:50 elastic pressure vessel models and with a 1:5 prestressed concrete pressure vessel are described and experimental results are presented. (orig.) [de

  12. Radiation pressure actuation of test masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garoi, F; Ju, L; Zhao, C; Blair, D G

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of radiation pressure force as test mass actuation for laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors. It is shown that it is viable to provide radiation pressure control on test masses for frequencies above ∼0.2 Hz in high performance vibration isolation systems. A very low mass, low frequency resonator has been used to verify that radiation pressure force is not corrupted by other forces such as due to radiometer effects

  13. Multi-Canister overpack pressure testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, K.E.

    1998-01-01

    The Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) shield plug closure assembly will be hydrostatically tested at the fabricator's shop to the 150 psig design test requirement in accordance with the ASME Code. Additionally, the MCO shell and collar will be hydrostatically tested at the fabricator's shop to the 450 psig design test requirement. Commercial practice has not required a pressure test of the closure weld after spent fuel is loaded in the containers. Based on this precedent and Code Case N-595-I, the MCO closure weld will not be pressure tested in the field

  14. Almagest Declinations: Ptolemy or “As found by us”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, John C.; Zimmer, P. C.; Jones, P. B.

    2013-01-01

    Consistent results and compatibility with historical evidence were reported by Zimmer, Brandt, and Jones for Almagest declinations determined by Timocharis, Aristyllus, and Hipparcus. Unfortunately, this situation does not apply to the Almagest declinations (Book VII, Chapter 3; Toomer 1998) for Ptolemy or “As found by us.” Our formal solution gives a precision of 11.9 arc min and an epoch near 115AD. The precision is significantly worse than for the earlier observers and the date conflicts with historical data. Inspection of the (O) - (C) plots vs. year reveals that the natural clustering of trajectories seen for the other observers is not seen for the Ptolemy declinations. In addition, the spread in dates of observations estimated from the times of (O) - (C) = 0 shows a much larger value for Ptolemy than for the others. Historically, the Almagest was published around 150AD or perhaps a little later. Ptolemy’s life span was likely from c.100AD to c.175AD. Thus, the 115AD date for his observations is much too early. Maeyama (1984) moved the epoch from 115AD to 137/138AD by dropping stars from the analysis. Rawlins (manuscript, c. 1983) has an extensive discussion, drops several stars, and finds a preferred epoch of 137AD. He regards the observer as unknown. We prefer not to drop stars from the analysis unless the evidence is overwhelming. Our solution is to take Ptolemy literally. In Toomer (1998; tables on pages 331 & 332), these declinations are “As found by us” and in Taliaferro (1952; in the text) are as “we find it.” The idea of multiple observers has been suggested before and our analysis certainly supports the declinations coming from multiple observers through the years.

  15. Commonwealth Edison Company pressure locking test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunte, B.D.; Kelly, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Pressure Locking is a phenomena which can cause the unseating thrust for a gate valve to increase dramatically from its typical static unseating thrust. This can result in the valve actuator having insufficient capability to open the valve. In addition, this can result in valve damage in cases where the actuator capability exceeds the valve structural limits. For these reasons, a proper understanding of the conditions which may cause pressure locking and thermal binding, as well as a methodology for predicting the unseating thrust for a pressure locked or thermally bound valve, are necessary. This report discusses the primary mechanisms which cause pressure locking. These include sudden depressurization of piping adjacent to the valve and pressurization of fluid trapped in the valve bonnet due to heat transfer. This report provides a methodology for calculating the unseating thrust for a valve which is pressure locked. This report provides test data which demonstrates the accuracy of the calculation methodology

  16. Commonwealth Edison Company pressure locking test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunte, B.D.; Kelly, J.F.

    1996-12-01

    Pressure Locking is a phenomena which can cause the unseating thrust for a gate valve to increase dramatically from its typical static unseating thrust. This can result in the valve actuator having insufficient capability to open the valve. In addition, this can result in valve damage in cases where the actuator capability exceeds the valve structural limits. For these reasons, a proper understanding of the conditions which may cause pressure locking and thermal binding, as well as a methodology for predicting the unseating thrust for a pressure locked or thermally bound valve, are necessary. This report discusses the primary mechanisms which cause pressure locking. These include sudden depressurization of piping adjacent to the valve and pressurization of fluid trapped in the valve bonnet due to heat transfer. This report provides a methodology for calculating the unseating thrust for a valve which is pressure locked. This report provides test data which demonstrates the accuracy of the calculation methodology.

  17. Time pressure test : fireworks compositions May 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowes, R.; Arsenault, D.

    2008-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the feasibility of time-pressure tests on the pyrotechnic composition tables used to assign fireworks to dangerous goods divisions. The flash composition time was defined as the bursting charge or aural effect of the fireworks in relation to the amount of time taken for the pressure to rise. Seven fireworks samples were disassembled and tests were conducted in accordance with the UN manual for time-pressure tests in order to determine fireworks rise times and compare them to the results obtained from a sample of commercial sporting black powder. Results of the study indicated that the testing method is feasible. All 7 of the sample compositions were defined as flash compositions. The formulae of the fireworks were confirmed by chemical analysis. 1 tab.

  18. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Allebrod, Frank; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 ◦C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive......, to the electrochemical characterization of high temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis cells and the use of pseudo-reference electrodes for the separation of each electrode contribution. A future perspective of various electrochemical processes and devices that can be developed with the use of the established...

  19. High Pressure Quick Disconnect Particle Impact Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed particle impact testing to determine whether there is a particle impact ignition hazard in the quick disconnects (QDs) in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) on the International Space Station (ISS). Testing included standard supersonic and subsonic particle impact tests on 15-5 PH stainless steel, as well as tests performed on a QD simulator. This paper summarizes the particle impact tests completed at WSTF. Although there was an ignition in Test Series 4, it was determined the ignition was caused by the presence of a machining imperfection. The sum of all the test results indicates that there is no particle impact ignition hazard in the ISS ECLSS QDs. KEYWORDS: quick disconnect, high pressure, particle impact testing, stainless steel

  20. Simplified pressure method for respirator fit testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D; Xu, M; Foo, S; Pilacinski, W; Willeke, K

    1991-08-01

    A simplified pressure method has been developed for fit testing air-purifying respirators. In this method, the air-purifying cartridges are replaced by a pressure-sensing attachment and a valve. While wearers hold their breath, a small pump extracts air from the respirator cavity until a steady-state pressure is reached in 1 to 2 sec. The flow rate through the face seal leak is a unique function of this pressure, which is determined once for all respirators, regardless of the respirator's cavity volume or deformation because of pliability. The contaminant concentration inside the respirator depends on the degree of dilution by the flow through the cartridges. The cartridge flow varies among different brands and is measured once for each brand. The ratio of cartridge to leakflow is a measure of fit. This flow ratio has been measured on human subjects and has been compared to fit factors determined on the same subjects by means of photometric and particle count tests. The aerosol tests gave higher values of fit.

  1. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static pressure test. 7.307 Section 7.307... pressure test. (a) Test procedure. (1) The enclosure shall be internally pressurized to a minimum of 150 psig and the pressure maintained for a minimum of 10 seconds. (2) Following the pressure hold, the...

  2. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzichristodoulou, C.; Allebrod, F.; Mogensen, M.

    2013-05-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 °C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive media, as well as localized sampling of gas evolved at the electrodes for gas analysis. A number of safety and engineering design challenges have been addressed. Furthermore, we present a series of electrochemical cell holders that have been constructed in order to accommodate different types of cells and facilitate different types of electrochemical measurements. Selected examples of materials and electrochemical cells examined in the test station are provided, ranging from the evaluation of the ionic conductivity of liquid electrolytic solutions immobilized in mesoporous ceramic structures, to the electrochemical characterization of high temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis cells and the use of pseudo-reference electrodes for the separation of each electrode contribution. A future perspective of various electrochemical processes and devices that can be developed with the use of the established test station is provided.

  3. 49 CFR 178.814 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.814 Section 178.814... Testing of IBCs § 178.814 Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test must be... contain solids that are loaded or discharged under pressure or intended to contain liquids. (b) Special...

  4. Liquid abrasive pressure pot scoping tests report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    The primary initiatives of the LITCO Decontamination Development group at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant (ICPP) are the development of methods to eliminate the use of sodium bearing decontamination chemicals and minimization of the amount of secondary waste generated during decontamination activities. In July of 1994, a Commerce Business Daily (CBD) announcement was issued by the INEL to determine commercial interest in the development of an in-situ liquid abrasive grit blasting system. As a result of the CBD announcement, Klieber & Schulz issued an Expression of Interest letter which stated they would be interested in testing a prototype Liquid Abrasive Pressure Pot (LAPP). LITCO`s Decontamination group and Kleiber & Schulz entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in which the Decontamination Development group tested the prototype LAPP in a non-radioactive hot cell mockup. Test results are provided.

  5. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67....67 Static-pressure tests. Static-pressure tests shall be conducted by the applicant on each enclosure... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the maximum...

  6. 49 CFR 178.605 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.605 Section 178.605... Testing of Non-bulk Packagings and Packages § 178.605 Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test must be conducted for the qualification of all metal, plastic, and composite...

  7. ORION - Crew Module Side Hatch: Proof Pressure Test Anomaly Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evernden, Brent A.; Guzman, Oscar J.

    2018-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle program was performing a proof pressure test on an engineering development unit (EDU) of the Orion Crew Module Side Hatch (CMSH) assembly. The purpose of the proof test was to demonstrate structural capability, with margin, at 1.5 times the maximum design pressure, before integrating the CMSH to the Orion Crew Module structural test article for subsequent pressure testing. The pressure test was performed at lower pressures of 3 psig, 10 psig and 15.75 psig with no apparent abnormal behavior or leaking. During pressurization to proof pressure of 23.32 psig, a loud 'pop' was heard at 21.3 psig. Upon review into the test cell, it was noted that the hatch had prematurely separated from the proof test fixture, thus immediately ending the test. The proof pressure test was expected be a simple verification but has since evolved into a significant joint failure investigation from both Lockheed Martin and NASA.

  8. Research on Normal Human Plantar Pressure Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xi Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FSR400 pressure sensor, nRF905 wireless transceiver and MSP40 SCM are used to design the insole pressure collection system, LabVIEW is used to make HMI of data acquisition, collecting a certain amount of normal human foot pressure data, statistical analysis of pressure distribution relations about five stages of swing phase during walking, using the grid closeness degree to identify plantar pressure distribution pattern recognition, and the algorithm simulation, experimental results demonstrated this method feasible.

  9. 49 CFR 178.255-12 - Pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure test. 178.255-12 Section 178.255-12... Specifications for Portable Tanks § 178.255-12 Pressure test. (a) Each completed portable tank prior to... 100 °F during the test, and applying a pressure of 60 psig. The tank shall be capable of holding the...

  10. 14 CFR 25.843 - Tests for pressurized cabins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., windows, and valves, must be tested as a pressure vessel for the pressure differential specified in § 25... release valve, to stimulate the effects of closed regulator valves. (2) Tests of the pressurization system... and stepped climbs and descents at rates corresponding to the maximum attainable within the operating...

  11. Apparatus facilitates pressure-testing of metal tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyorgak, C. A.

    1965-01-01

    Burst-testing of refractory metal tubing is conducted in an apparatus in which tubular specimans are firmly gripped and test pressures and temperatures are applied. Porosity, flaw, and fatigue-stress rupture are also tested.

  12. Pressure Roller For Tape-Lift Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Eve

    1991-01-01

    Rolling device applies nearly constant, uniform pressure to surface. Simple tool exerts nearly constant pressure via compression of sheath by fixed amount. Pins hold wheels on cylinder and cylinder on tangs of handle. Cylinder and handle made of metal or plastic. Sheath press-fit or glued to cylinder. End pins attached to cylinder by adhesive or screw threads. Device intended for use in taking tape-lift samples of particulate contamination on surface.

  13. A modified isometric test to evaluate blood pressure control with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lifting and supporting weights) and have an important influence on blood pressure, it is essential to evaluate blood pressure response to iso- metric effort. This test can reveal high blood pressure that might otherwise not be detected. Only a few ...

  14. Quality Testing of Gaseous Helium Pressure Vessels by Acoustic Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Barranco-Luque, M; Hervé, C; Margaroli, C; Sergo, V

    1998-01-01

    The resistance of pressure equipment is currently tested, before commissioning or at periodic maintenance, by means of normal pressure tests. Defects occurring inside materials during the execution of these tests or not seen by usual non-destructive techniques can remain as undetected potential sources of failure . The acoustic emission (AE) technique can detect and monitor the evolution of such failures. Industrial-size helium cryogenic systems employ cryogens often stored in gaseous form under pressure at ambient temperature. Standard initial and periodic pressure testing imposes operational constraints which other complementary testing methods, such as AE, could significantly alleviate. Recent reception testing of 250 m3 GHe storage vessels with a design pressure of 2.2 MPa for the LEP and LHC cryogenic systems has implemented AE with the above-mentioned aims.

  15. The Assembly and Test of Pressure Vessel for Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kook Nam; Lee, Jong Min; Youn, Young Jung; June, Hyung Kil; Ahn, Sung Ho; Lee, Kee Hong; Kim, Young Ki; Kennedy, Timothy C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fuel Test Loop(FTL) which is capable of an irradiation testing under a similar operating condition to those of PWR(Pressurized Water Reactor) and CANDU(CANadian Deuterium Uranium reactor) nuclear power plants has been developed and installed in HANARO, KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). It consists of In-Pile Section(IPS) and Out-of Pile System(OPS). The IPS, which is located inside the pool is divided into 3-parts: the in-pool pipes, the IVA(IPS Vessel Assembly) and the support structures. The test fuel is loaded inside a double wall, inner pressure vessel and outer pressure vessel, to keep the functionality of the reactor coolant pressure boundary. The IVA is manufactured by local company and the functional test and verification were done through pressure drop, vibration, hydraulic and leakage tests. The brazing technique for the instrument lines has been checked for its functionality and performance. An IVA has been manufactured by local technique and have finally tested under high temperature and high pressure. The IVA and piping did not experience leakage, as we have checked the piping, flanges, assembly parts. We have obtained good data during the three cycle test which includes a pressure test, pressure and temperature cycling, and constant temperature

  16. Ballooning of pressure tubes - Construction of a test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, C.F.

    1995-09-01

    The test facility has been built to enable creep testing of reactor pressure tube specimens under conditions which represent those likely to be encountered in a reactor loss-of-coolant accident. The facility has been designed to be capable of specimen heating rates up to 30 K.s -1 , temperatures up to 1200 C and internal pressurization up to 6 MPa with either argon or steam. Pressure tube temperature, strain rate, and pressure instrumentation have been provided for collection of data required for analysis of creep behaviour. The facility has been designed to be suitable for testing irradiated specimens in a hot cell. The report provides a detailed description of the test rig and results from two commissioning ballooning tests. (author). 2 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  17. The need to pressure test prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forgie, J.H.; Holland, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    In the period when PCRV were relatively unproven, proof pressure testing provided a useful demonstration of vessel integritiy and a confirmation of model testing and of analysis. No failures have occurred during concrete vessel tests in the UK or in the subsequent operational life of the vessels and much has been learned of their behaviour in service. The paper examines the advantages and disadvantages of proof testing PCRV in the light of the above increased knowledge of vessel performance. The paper draws attention to certain hypothetical loading cases that could be more onerous than the proof test and suggests that pressure testing could itself cause unnecessarily high loading to parts of the vessel. Always recognising the safety considerations and demonstrations of such are of prime importance, the authors suggest that a lower pressure level could be adopted without loss of original intent. In addition some ground rules are suggested as to cases where proof testing could be omitted. (orig./HP)

  18. Pressure Testing of a Minimum Gauge PRSEUS Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Andrew J.; Rouse, Marshall; Linton, Kim A.; Li, Victor P.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced aircraft configurations that have been developed to increase fuel efficiency require advanced, novel structural concepts capable of handling the unique load conditions that arise. One such concept is the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) developed by the Boeing Company. The PRSEUS concept is being investigated by NASA s Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program for use in a hybrid-wing body (HWB) aircraft. This paper summarizes the analysis and test of a PRSEUS panel subjected to internal pressure, the first such pressure test for this structural concept. The pressure panel used minimum gauge skin, with stringer and frame configurations consistent with previous PRSEUS tests. Analysis indicated that for the minimum gauge skin panel, the stringer locations exhibit fairly linear response, but the skin bays between the stringers exhibit nonlinear response. Excellent agreement was seen between nonlinear analysis and test results in the critical portion at the center of the panel. The pristine panel was capable of withstanding the required 18.4 psi pressure load condition without exhibiting any damage. The impacted panel was capable of withstanding a pressure load in excess of 28 psi before initial failure occurred at the center stringer, and the panel was capable of sustaining increased pressure load after the initial failure. This successful PRSEUS panel pressure panel test was a critical step in the building block approach for enabling the use of this advanced structural concept on future aircraft, such as the HWB.

  19. Flange Penetrator Pressure Test Fixture. Statement of Government Interest

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phelps, Peter T

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus as a fixture for fluidly pressure testing a flange penetrator seal with the apparatus having a flange cover including a recess and a flange extension including a recess with the extension...

  20. On the scaling of pressure for integral test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Marzo, M.; Almenas, K.; Hsu, Y.Y.

    1991-01-01

    Two Small Break LOCA transients are compared to illustrate a scaling methodology for reduced pressure integral facilities. Mapping test 3004 is conducted in the MIST full pressure, full height facility. The counter-part test MIS0317 is scaled and performed in the reduced height, reduced pressure UMCP facility. Inventory is used as the chronological scale and pressure, normalized with the initial and system saturation pressures, is used as characteristic parameter to describe the system behavior. The appropriately normalized results conclusively demonstrate that: (a) the same phenomena are observed in the two facilities; (b) the sequence of events is analogous and (c) the trends described by the normalized pressure versus inventory traces are in good quantitative agreement. Each energy transport mode traversed by the two facilities is compared and the phenomena present are described in detail. The differences between the high and reduced pressure test are outlined. The findings clearly indicate that pressure and height can be scaled for transients where limited boundary conditions are applied (Auxiliary Feed Water only) and where the break is subcooled. A statement on sensitivity to the initial conditions is also included to define the limitations of the quantitative results. (orig.)

  1. Pressure vessel burst test program - Progress paper No. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Maurice R.; Sharp, Douglas E.; Coleman, Michael D.

    1992-01-01

    An updated progress report is provided on a program developed to study through test and analysis, the characteristics of blast waves and fragmentation generated by ruptured gas filled pressure vessels. Prior papers on this USAF/NASA/General Physics program were presented to the AIAA in July 1990 and June 1991. Ten pressure vessels have been burst using pneumatic pressure. Tests were designed to explore burst characteristics and used an instrumented arena. Data trends for current experiments are presented. This paper is the third progress report on the program and addresses: (1) a brief review of current methods for assessing vessel safety and burst parameters, (2) a review of pneumatic burst testing operations and testing results, including a comparison to current methods for burst assessment, and (3) a review of the basis for the current test program including planned testing.

  2. Design of a Hyperbaric Chamber for Pressure Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Sazali Shahmir Fikhri bin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A hyperbaric chamber is an application of a pressure vessel to test the integrity of components and equipments subjected to high pressure. The chamber comprises of several main parts such as a shell, heads, instrumentation attachments, threaded fasteners and support. This paper describes the design of hyperbaric chamber for pressure testing that compiles to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code. The design approach adopted is the “design by formula” method. A structural analysis of the hyperbaric chamber with a cylindrical shell and a vertical orientation, based on an operating pressure of 34.5 MPa, was done. The analysis of the stress distribution shows that the normalized principal stresses acting on the chamber are within the yield envelop based on the maximum distortional energy criteria.

  3. The pressure and leak tests in Atucha II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This work deals with the pressure and leak tests of the containment sphere in the Atucha II Nuclear Power Plant's reactor building. This sphere is a metallic container, made in highly resistant steel plate, that is, built for providing the plant with a biological and structural barrier, which -in turn- provides safety and environmental protection. The applicable rules for these tests establish that the containment erection must be complete and in equivalent conditions to those that will prevail during the NPP operation. Particularly, pressure tests were carried out for assessing the structural condition of the sphere, while the leak test is aimed at the detection of tentative leaks [es

  4. Advances in the analysis of pressure interference tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez R, N. [Petroleos Mexicanos, PEMEX, Mexico City (Mexico); Samaniego V, F. [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-12-15

    This paper presented an extension for radial, linear, and spherical flow conditions of the El-Khatib method for analyzing pressure interference tests through utilization of the pressure derivative. Conventional analysis of interference tests considers only radial flow, but some reservoirs have physical field conditions in which linear or spherical flow conditions prevail. The INTERFERAN system, a friendly computer code for the automatic analysis of pressure interference tests, was also discussed and demonstrated by way of 2 field cases. INTERFERAN relies on the principle of superposition in time and space to interpret a test of several wells with variable histories of production or injection or both. The first field case addressed interference tests conducted in the naturally fractured geothermal field of Klamath Falls, and the second field case was conducted in a river-formed bed in which linear flow conditions are dominant. The analysis was deemed to be reliable. 13 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  5. Influence of pressure change during hydraulic tests on fracture aperture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Sung-Hoon; Koh, Yong-Kwon; Kuhlman, Kristopher L; Lee, Moo Yul; Choi, Jong Won

    2013-03-01

    In a series of field experiments, we evaluate the influence of a small water pressure change on fracture aperture during a hydraulic test. An experimental borehole is instrumented at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) Underground Research Tunnel (KURT). The target fracture for testing was found from the analyses of borehole logging and hydraulic tests. A double packer system was developed and installed in the test borehole to directly observe the aperture change due to water pressure change. Using this packer system, both aperture and flow rate are directly observed under various water pressures. Results indicate a slight change in fracture hydraulic head leads to an observable change in aperture. This suggests that aperture change should be considered when analyzing hydraulic test data from a sparsely fractured rock aquifer. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  6. Three-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel During Hydrostatic Pressure Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilock, Duane M., Jr.; Thesken, John C.; Schmidt, Timothy E.

    2007-01-01

    Ambient temperature hydrostatic pressurization tests were conducted on a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) to understand the fiber stresses in COPV components. Two three-dimensional digital image correlation systems with high speed cameras were used in the evaluation to provide full field displacement and strain data for each pressurization test. A few of the key findings will be discussed including how the principal strains provided better insight into system behavior than traditional gauges, a high localized strain that was measured where gages were not present and the challenges of measuring curved surfaces with the use of a 1.25 in. thick layered polycarbonate panel that protected the cameras.

  7. 33 CFR 159.111 - Pressure and vacuum pulse test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pressure and vacuum pulse test. 159.111 Section 159.111 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... vacuum pulse test. Liquid retention components of the device with manufacturer specified venting...

  8. Automated corrosion fatigue crack growth testing in pressurized water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceschini, L.J.; Liaw, P.K.; Rudd, G.E.; Logsdon, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a novel approach to construct a test facility for developing corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties in aggressive environments. The environment studied is that of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) at 288 0 C (550 0 F) and 13.8 MPa (200 psig). To expedite data generation, each chamber was designed to accommodate two test specimens. A common water recirculation and pressurization system was employed to service two test chambers. Thus, four fatigue crack propagation rate tests could be conducted simultaneously in the pressurized water environment. The data analysis was automated to minimize the typically high labor costs associated with corrosion fatigue crack propagation testing. Verification FCGR tests conducted on an ASTM A469 rotor steel in a room temperature air environment as well as actual PWR environment FCGR tests performed on an ASTM A533 Grade B Class 2 pressure vessel steel demonstrated that the dual specimen test facility is an excellent system for developing the FCGR properties of materials in adverse environments

  9. High-pressure test loop design and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnette, R.D.; Graves, J.N.; Blair, P.G.; Baldwin, N.L.

    1980-07-01

    A high-pressure test loop (HPTL) has been constructed for the purpose of performing a number of chemistry experiments at simulated HTGR conditions of temperature, pressure, flow, and impurity content. The HPTL can be used to develop, modify, and verify computer codes for a variety of chemical processes involving gas phase transport in the reactor. Processes such as graphite oxidation, fission product transport, fuel reactions, purification systems, and dust entrainment can be studied at high pressure, which would largely eliminate difficulties in correlating existing laboratory data and reactor conditions

  10. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Stress Rupture Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nathanael J.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Leifeste, Mark R.; Yoder, Tommy B.; Keddy, Chris P.; Forth, Scott C.; Russell, Rick W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports stress rupture testing of Kevlar(TradeMark) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) at NASA White Sands Test Facility. This 6-year test program was part of the larger effort to predict and extend the lifetime of flight vessels. Tests were performed to characterize control parameters for stress rupture testing, and vessel life was predicted by statistical modeling. One highly instrumented 102-cm (40-in.) diameter Kevlar(TradeMark) COPV was tested to failure (burst) as a single-point model verification. Significant data were generated that will enhance development of improved NDE methods and predictive modeling techniques, and thus better address stress rupture and other composite durability concerns that affect pressure vessel safety, reliability and mission assurance.

  11. Pressure Drop Test of Hybrid Mixing Vane Spacer Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, D. S.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.; Chun, S. Y.; Chun, T. H

    2007-08-15

    The pressure loss test has been accomplished in the test section containing 5x5 rod bundle with a length of 2 m including 3 spacer grids. The test has been performed for the 5 kinds of spacer grids to compare the pressure loss characteristics: 1. Plain spacer grid which has the same body of the Hybrid but without vane (Plain), 2. Hybrid Vane spacer grid (Hybrid), 3. Hybrid-SC spacer grid which is constructed with coined, chamfered strip and is fabricated by spot welding, 4. Hybrid-LC spacer grid which is constructed with coined, chamfered strip and is fabricated by line welding along intersection line, 5. Westinghouse spacer grid with split vane (Plus-7). The pressure loss coefficient of the Plain, Hybrid, Hybrid-SC, Hybrid-LC, and Plus-7 spacer grid is 0.93, 1.15, 1.02, 1.04, and 1.08, respectively.

  12. Pressure-tension test for assessing fatigue in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Sayed M.; Boyd, Andrew J.; Komar, Andrew J. K.

    2017-04-01

    In a pressure-tension test, a cylindrical concrete specimen is inserted into a cylindrical steel jacket, with a rubber ``O'' ring seal at each end to prevent gas leakage. Gas pressure is then applied to the curved surface of the concrete cylinder, leaving the ends free. As the gas pressure is increased, the specimen eventually fractures across a single plane transverse to the axis of the cylinder. The gas pressure at fracture may then be considered as the tensile strength of the concrete. In this study, the pressure-tension test is used to study fatigue in concrete. A total of 22 standard concrete cylinders (100 mm × 200 mm) were tested. Both dry and wet specimens have been studied. Low-cycle loading, which involves the application of a few load cycles at high stress levels - such as a concrete structure under earthquake load - has been used in this study. It was found that the concrete specimens in a low-cycle loading fail after only a few cycles of loading and interestingly at a stress level lower than the maximum value applied in the cyclic loading. In addition, non-destructive testing (NDT) was performed to determine the progressive damage due to tensile load in concrete cylinders using Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV). It was found that UPV can be used to evaluate the damage in concrete even after the application of a very low-level of tensile stress - as low as 10% of its tensile strength.

  13. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4∼2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure

  14. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  15. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Stress Rupture Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard; Flynn, Howard; Forth, Scott; Greene, Nathanael; Kezian, Michael; Varanauski, Don; Yoder, Tommy; Woodworth, Warren

    2009-01-01

    One of the major concerns for the aging Space Shuttle fleet is the stress rupture life of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Stress rupture life of a COPV has been defined as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress levels and time. To assist in the evaluation of the aging COPVs in the Orbiter fleet an analytical reliability model was developed. The actual data used to construct this model was from testing of COPVs constructed of similar, but not exactly same materials and pressure cycles as used on Orbiter vessels. Since no actual Orbiter COPV stress rupture data exists the Space Shuttle Program decided to run a stress rupture test to compare to model predictions. Due to availability of spares, the testing was unfortunately limited to one 40" vessel. The stress rupture test was performed at maximum operating pressure at an elevated temperature to accelerate aging. The test was performed in two phases. The first phase, 130 F, a moderately accelerated test designed to achieve the midpoint of the model predicted point reliability. The more aggressive second phase, performed at 160 F was designed to determine if the test article will exceed the 95% confidence interval of the model. This paper will discuss the results of this test, it's implications and possible follow-on testing.

  16. Rupture tests with reactor pressure vessel head models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talja, H.; Keinaenen, H.; Hosio, E.; Pankakoski, P.H.; Rahka, K.

    2003-01-01

    In the LISSAC project (LImit Strains in Severe ACcidents), partly funded by the EC Nuclear Fission and Safety Programme within the 5th Framework programme, an extensive experimental and computational research programme is conducted to study the stress state and size dependence of ultimate failure strains. The results are aimed especially to make the assessment of severe accident cases more realistic. For the experiments in the LISSAC project a block of material of the German Biblis C reactor pressure vessel was available. As part of the project, eight reactor pressure vessel head models from this material (22 NiMoCr 3 7) were tested up to rupture at VTT. The specimens were provided by Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK). These tests were performed under quasistatic pressure load at room temperature. Two specimens sizes were tested and in half of the tests the specimens contain holes describing the control rod penetrations of an actual reactor pressure vessel head. These specimens were equipped with an aluminium liner. All six tests with the smaller specimen size were conducted successfully. In the test with the large specimen with holes, the behaviour of the aluminium liner material proved to differ from those of the smaller ones. As a consequence the experiment ended at the failure of the liner. The specimen without holes yielded results that were in very good agreement with those from the small specimens. (author)

  17. G-Tunnel pressurized slot-testing preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Sifre-Soto, C.; Mann, K.L.; Bellman, R.A. Jr.; Luker, S.; Dodds, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Designers and analysts of radioactive waste repositories must be able to predict the mechanical behavior of the host rock. Sandia National laboratories elected to conduct a development program on pressurized slot testing and featured (1) development of an improved method to cut slots using a chain saw with diamond-tipped cutters, (2) measurements useful for determining in situ stresses normal to slots, (3) measurements applicable for determining the in situ modulus of deformation parallel to a drift surface, and (4) evaluations of the potentials of pressurized slot strength testing. This report describes the preparations leading to the measurements and evaluations

  18. The oil pressure test of the hydraulic impeller blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wen-bo; Jia, Li-tao

    2017-12-01

    This article introduced the structure of the Kaplan runner in hydropower station and the operating process of the oil pressure test has been described. What’s more, the whole process, including filling oil to the runner hub, the movement of the runner blade, the oil circuit, have been presented in detail.Since the manipulation of the oil circuit which controlled by three Valve groups consisting of six valves was complicated, the author is planning to replace them with 3-position 3-way electromagnetic valves, so we can simplify the operation procedure.The author hopes this article can provide technical reference for the oil pressure test.

  19. Terahertz NDE of Stressed Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels - Initial Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Anatasi, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Terahertz radiation nondestructive evaluation was applied to a set of Kevlar composite overwrapped pressure vessel bottles that had undergone a series of thermal and pressure tests to simulate stress rupture effects. The bottles in these nondestructive evaluation tests were bottles that had not ruptured but had survived various times at the elevated load and temperature levels. Some of the bottles showed evidence of minor composite failures. The terahertz radiation did detect visible surface flaws, but did not detect any internal chemical or material degradation of the thin overwraps.

  20. Temperature effect compensation for fast differential pressure decay testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yan; Tong, Xiaomeng; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    To avoid the long temperature recovery period with differential pressure decay for leak detection, a novel method with temperature effect compensation is proposed to improve the testing efficiency without full stabilization of temperature. The mathematical model of conventional differential pressure decay testing is established to analyze the changes of temperature and pressure during the measuring period. Then the differential pressure is divided into two parts: the exponential part caused by temperature recovery and the linear part caused by leak. With prior information obtained from samples, parameters of the exponential part can be identified precisely, and the temperature effect will be compensated before it fully recovers. To verify the effect of the temperature compensated method, chambers with different volumes are tested under various pressures and the experiments show that the improved method is faster with satisfactory precision, and an accuracy less than 0.25 cc min −1  can be achieved when the compensation time is proportional to four times the theoretical thermal-time constant. (paper)

  1. Delayed hydrogen cracking test design for pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Roberto; Loberse, Antonio N.; Yawny, Alejandro A.; Riquelme, Pablo

    1999-01-01

    CANDU nuclear power stations pressure tubes of alloy Zr-2,5 % Nb present a cracking phenomenon known as delayed hydrogen cracking (DHC). This is a brittle fracture of zirconium hydrides that are developed by hydrogen due to aqueous corrosion on the metal surface. This hydrogen diffuses to the crack tip where brittle zirconium hydrides develops and promotes the crack propagation. A direct current potential decay (DCPD) technique has been developed to measure crack propagation rates on compact test (CT) samples machined from a non irradiated pressure tube. Those test samples were hydrogen charged by cathodic polarization in an acid solution and then pre cracked in a fatigue machine. This technique proved to be useful to measure crack propagation rates with at least 1% accuracy for DHC in pressure tubes. (author)

  2. Design and testing of high-pressure railguns and projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.R.; Fowler, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The results of high-pressure tests of four railgun designs and four projectile types are presented. All tests were conducted at the Los Alamos explosive magnetic-flux compression facility in Ancho Canyon. The data suggest that the high-strength projectiles have lower resistance to acceleration than the low strength projectiles, which expand against the bore during acceleration. The railguns were powered by explosive magneticflux compression generators. Calculations to predict railgun and power supply performance were performed by Kerrisk

  3. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Won Pil; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S.

    2007-02-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform the tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. In the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished. In the second phase (2002.4∼2005.2), an optimized design of the ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) was established and the construction of the facility was almost completed. In the third phase (2005.3∼2007.2), the construction and commission tests of the ATLAS are to be completed and some first-phase tests are to be conducted

  4. High Pressure Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Development Tests at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, David M.; Greene, Nathanael J.; Revilock, Duane; Sneddon, Kirk; Anselmo, Estelle

    2008-01-01

    Development tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of 2 COPV designs at cryogenic temperatures. This allows for risk reductions for critical components for a Gaseous Helium (GHe) Pressurization Subsystem for an Advanced Propulsion System (APS) which is being proposed for NASA s Constellation project and future exploration missions. It is considered an advanced system since it uses Liquid Methane (LCH4) as the fuel and Liquid Oxygen (LO2) as the oxidizer for the propellant combination mixture. To avoid heating of the propellants to prevent boil-off, the GHe will be stored at subcooled temperatures equivalent to the LO2 temperature. Another advantage of storing GHe at cryogenic temperatures is that more mass of the pressurized GHe can be charged in to a vessel with a smaller volume, hence a smaller COPV, and this creates a significant weight savings versus gases at ambient temperatures. The major challenge of this test plan is to verify that a COPV can safely be used for spacecraft applications to store GHe at a Maximum Operating Pressure (MOP) of 4,500 psig at 140R to 160R (-320 F to -300 F). The COPVs for these tests were provided by ARDE , Inc. who developed a resin system to use at cryogenic conditions and has the capabilities to perform high pressure testing with LN2.

  5. Blood Pressure Response during Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'Giovine, Zachary J; Solomon, Nicole; DeVore, Adam D; Wojdyla, Daniel; Patel, Chetan B; Rogers, Joseph G

    2018-02-21

    The prognostic value of peak VO2 and VE/VCO2 slope measured during cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing has been well established in patients with advanced heart failure, but blood pressure response to exercise is less well characterized. We retrospectively studied 151 outpatients who underwent CPX testing as part of an advanced heart failure (HF) evaluation. The outcome of interest was failure of medical management, defined by death, cardiac transplantation, or left ventricular assist device placement. Patients were stratified into tertiles by change in systolic blood pressure (SBP) ( 20 mmHg were associated with an increased hazard (HR 1.046, 95% CI 1.018, 1.075). In conclusion, changes in SBP during CPX testing provide additional prognostic information above standard clinical variables. The peculiar increase in risk noted in those with a rise in SBP > 20 mmHg is less clear and needs to be investigated further.

  6. Acceptance test procedure for High Pressure Water Jet System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    The overall objective of the acceptance test is to demonstrate a combined system. This includes associated tools and equipment necessary to perform cleaning in the 105 K East Basin (KE) for achieving optimum reduction in the level of contamination/dose rate on canisters prior to removal from the KE Basin and subsequent packaging for disposal. Acceptance tests shall include necessary hardware to achieve acceptance of the cleaning phase of canisters. This acceptance test procedure will define the acceptance testing criteria of the high pressure water jet cleaning fixture. The focus of this procedure will be to provide guidelines and instructions to control, evaluate and document the acceptance testing for cleaning effectiveness and method(s) of removing the contaminated surface layer from the canister presently identified in KE Basin. Additionally, the desired result of the acceptance test will be to deliver to K Basins a thoroughly tested and proven system for underwater decontamination and dose reduction. This report discusses the acceptance test procedure for the High Pressure Water Jet

  7. Simulation and test of the thermal behavior of pressure switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifang; Chen, Daner; Zhang, Yao; Dai, Tingting

    2018-04-01

    Little, lightweight, low-power microelectromechanical system (MEMS) pressure switches offer a good development prospect for small, ultra-long, simple atmosphere environments. In order to realize MEMS pressure switch, it is necessary to solve one of the key technologies such as thermal robust optimization. The finite element simulation software is used to analyze the thermal behavior of the pressure switch and the deformation law of the pressure switch film under different temperature. The thermal stress releasing schemes are studied by changing the structure of fixed form and changing the thickness of the substrate, respectively. Finally, the design of the glass substrate thickness of 2.5 mm is used to ensure that the maximum equivalent stress is reduced to a quarter of the original value, only 154 MPa when the structure is in extreme temperature (80∘C). The test results show that after the pressure switch is thermally optimized, the upper and lower electrodes can be reliably contacted to accommodate different operating temperature environments.

  8. Neutron Irradiation Tests of Pressure Transducers in Liquid Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Amand, J F; Casas-Cubillos, J; Thermeau, J P

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnets of the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will operate in pressurised superfluid helium (1 bar, 1.9 K). About 500 pressure transducers will be placed in the liquid helium bath for monitoring the filling and the pressure transients after resistive transitions. Their precision must remain better than 100 mbar at pressures below 2 bar and better than 5% for higher pressures (up to 20 bar), with temperatures ranging from 1.8 K to 300 K. All the tested transducers are based on the same principle: the fluid or gas is separated from a sealed reference vacuum by an elastic membrane; its deformation indicates the pressure. The transducers will be exposed to high neutron fluence (2 kGy, 1014 n/cm2 per year) during the 20 years of machine operation. This irradiation may induce changes both on the membranes characteristics (leakage, modification of elasticity) and on gauges which measure their deformations. To investigate these effects and select the transducer to be used in the LHC, a...

  9. Testing of Confining Pressure Impacton Explosion Energy of Explosive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzewiecki, Jan; Myszkowski, Jacek; Pytlik, Andrzej; Pytlik, Mateusz

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the results of testing the explosion effects of two explosive charges placed in an environment with specified values of confining pressure. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of variable environmental conditions on the suitability of particular explosives for their use in the prevention of natural hazards in hard coal mining. The research results will contribute to improving the efficiency of currently adopted technologies of natural hazard prevention and aid in raising the level of occupational safety. To carry out the subject matter measurements, a special test stand was constructed which allows the value of the initial pressure inside the chamber, which constitutes its integral part, to be altered before the detonation of the charge being tested. The obtained characteristics of the pressure changes during the explosion of the analysed charge helped to identify the work (energy) which was produced during the process. The test results are a valuable source of information, opening up new possibilities for the use of explosives, the development of innovative solutions for the construction of explosive charges and their initiation.

  10. Interpretation of flow dimensions from constant pressure injection test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuusela-Lahtinen, A.; Poteri, A.

    2010-06-01

    This report deals with interpretation methods of single-hole hydraulic tests. A special emphasis is on new analysis methods of a single-hole hydraulic test, called a constant pressure injection test. This hydraulic test type is used in Posiva's site investigation at Olkiluoto. Single-hole hydraulic tests are examined in order to find out methods to analyse channelling of the flow that is related to transport properties along the flow paths. The flow dimensions inferred from the constant pressure tests are considered to indicate the channelling of the flow in the scale of a single fracture or in the fracture network. One can use semi-log derivates of measurement data plotted in log-log diagrams for the interpretation of flow dimension. After that the appropriate flow solution can be chosen to infer the values of conductivity and specific storage. Channelling is studied from Posiva's data by analysing the transient injection period of a constant pressure injection test. Software called AQTESOLV is used in a new procedure, which is illustrated by studying two examples. Both examples are based on single hole hydraulic tests that are performed in the borehole OLKR10 using a 2 m test interval approximately at the depth of the planned repository of the nuclear waste (depth of about 400 - 450 m). One of the test intervals is intersected by a filled fracture and the analysed flow dimensions also indicates flow in a fractures, with inferred flow dimensions of n = 1.5 or n = 2. The flow dimension n = 1.5 represents a possibility of narrowing flowpaths. The other analysed test interval is intersected by three filled fractures. In this case, analysis of the flow dimension show behaviour that is related to a fracture network (homogeneous porous media), with interpreted flow dimensions of n = 2.5 - 3. This report also shows results for simulation of a constant pressure test in an artificial heterogeneous fracture. Flow dimension is analysed by performing simulated pumping tests

  11. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis. Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Joseph W.; Popelar, Carl F.; Page, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA a comprehensive suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for aging multilayer pressure vessels, Southwest Research Institute (R) (SwRI) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. This report describes Phase 1 of this effort which includes a preliminary material property assessment as well as a fractographic, fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analyses of an induced flaw in the outer shell of a representative multilayer vessel that was subjected to cyclic pressure test. SwRI performed this Phase 1 effort under contract to the Digital Wave Corporation in support of their contract to Jacobs ATOM for the NASA Ames Research Center.

  12. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs. (ACR)

  13. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs

  14. High Pressure Hydrogen Pressure Relief Devices: Accelerated Life Testing and Application Best Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, Robert M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew B. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, William J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rivkin, Carl H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-06

    Pressure relief devices (PRDs ) are used to protect high pressure systems from burst failure caused by overpressurization. Codes and standards require the use of PRDs for the safe design of many pressurized systems. These systems require high reliability due to the risks associated with a burst failure. Hydrogen service can increase the risk of PRD failure due to material property degradation caused by hydrogen attack. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has conducted an accelerated life test on a conventional spring loaded PRD. Based on previous failures in the field, the nozzles specific to these PRDs are of particular interest. A nozzle in a PRD is a small part that directs the flow of fluid toward the sealing surface to maintain the open state of the valve once the spring force is overcome. The nozzle in this specific PRD is subjected to the full tensile force of the fluid pressure. These nozzles are made from 440C material, which is a type of hardened steel that is commonly chosen for high pressure applications because of its high strength properties. In a hydrogen environment, however, 440C is considered a worst case material since hydrogen attack results in a loss of almost all ductility and thus 440C is prone to fatigue and material failure. Accordingly, 440C is not recommended for hydrogen service. Conducting an accelerated life test on a PRD with 440C material provides information on necessary and sufficient conditions required to produce crack initiation and failure. The accelerated life test also provides information on other PRD failure modes that are somewhat statistically random in nature.

  15. G-tunnel pressurized slot-testing evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Sifre-Soto, C.; Mann, K.L.; Bellman, R.A. Jr.; Luker, S.; Dodds, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Designers and analysts of radioactive waste repositories must be able to predict the mechanical behavior of the host rock. Sandia National Laboratories elected to conduct a development program to enhance mechanical-type measurements. The program was focused on pressurized slot testing and featured (1) development of an improved method to cut slots using a chain saw with diamond-tipped cutters, (2) measurements useful for determining in situ stresses normal to slots, (3) measurements applicable for determining the in situ modulus of deformation parallel to a drift surface, and (4) evaluations of pressurized slot strength testing results and methods. This report contains data interpretation and evaluations. Included are recommendations for future efforts. This third report contains the interpretations of the testing with emphasis on the measurement results as they apply to describing rock behavior. In particular, emphases are placed on (1) normal stress determinations using the flatjack cancellation (FC) method, (2) modulus of deformation determinations, and (3) high pressure investigations. Most of the material in the first two reports is not repeated here. Appropriate data are repeated in tabular form

  16. Test plan: Gas-threshold-pressure testing of the Salado Formation in the WIPP underground facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saulnier, G.J. Jr.

    1992-03-01

    Performance assessment for the disposal of radioactive waste from the United States defense program in the WIPP underground facility must assess the role of post-closure was generation by waste degradation and the subsequent pressurization of the facility. be assimilated by the host formation will Whether or not the generated gas can be assimilated by the host formation will determine the ability of the gas to reach or exceed lithostatic pressure within the repository. The purpose of this test plan is (1) to present a test design to obtain realistic estimates of gas-threshold pressure for the Salado Formation WIPP underground facility including parts of the formation disturbed by the underground of the Salado, and (2) to provide a excavations and in the far-field or undisturbed part framework for changes and amendments to test objectives, practices, and procedures. Because in situ determinations of gas-threshold pressure in low-permeability media are not standard practice, the methods recommended in this testplan are adapted from permeability-testing and hydrofracture procedures. Therefore, as the gas-threshold-pressure testing program progresses, personnel assigned to the program and outside observers and reviewers will be asked for comments regarding the testing procedures. New and/or improved test procedures will be documented as amendments to this test plan, and subject to similar review procedures

  17. Application of modern well test analysis techniques to pressure transient tests in Kizildere geothermal field, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onur, M.; Serpen, U.; Gok, I.M. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Mines; Zeybek, A.D. [Al-Mutlaq Compound, Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    2003-04-01

    The analyses of two build-up tests and one interference test in the Kizildere geothermal field, Turkey, are presented. Modern well test analysis methods based on pressure-derivative (logarithmic time rate of pressure) and non-linear regression, as well as conventional log-log and semi-log straight-line methods, have been used in the interpretation of these field pressure tests. Pressure transient models based on both homogeneous reservoirs and fractal reservoirs without matrix participation are considered in the analysis. It is shown that the use of conventional analysis methods alone can lead to an inaccurate interpretation of these field tests, and the use of modern analysis techniques in conjunction with conventional analysis techniques provides a more reliable and accurate interpretation of the well test data in the Kizildere geothermal field. The information obtained (e.g., estimates of permeability thickness and fractal dimensions) from analyses of these tests should prove useful for reservoir characterization studies in the Kizildere field, where reinjection is scheduled to begin soon. Finally, the modern interpretation methods described in this paper are recommended for analysis of well test pressure data from geothermal reservoirs. (Author)

  18. Fracture Toughness Round Robin Test International in pressure tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagarcia, M.P.; Liendo, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    Part of the pressure tubes surveillance program of CANDU type reactors is to determine the fracture toughness using a special fracture specimen and test procedure. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited decided to hold a Round Robin Test International and 9 laboratories participated worldwide in which several pressure tube materials were selected: Zircaloy-2, Zr-2.5%Nb cold worked and Zr-2.5%Nb heat treated. The small specimens used held back the thickness and curvature of the tube. J-R curves at room temperature were obtained and the crack extension values were determined by electrical potential drop techniques. These values were compared with results generated from other laboratories and a bid scatter was founded. It could be due to slight variations in the test method or inhomogeneity of the materials and a statistical study must be done to see if there is any pattern. The next step for the Round Robin Test would be to make some modifications in the test method in order to reduce the scatter. (Author)

  19. Large scale steam flow test: Pressure drop data and calculated pressure loss coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, J.B.; Spears, J.R.; Feder, A.R.; Moore, B.P.; Young, C.E.

    1993-12-01

    This report presents the result of large scale steam flow testing, 3 million to 7 million lbs/hr., conducted at approximate steam qualities of 25, 45, 70 and 100 percent (dry, saturated). It is concluded from the test data that reasonable estimates of piping component pressure loss coefficients for single phase flow in complex piping geometries can be calculated using available engineering literature. This includes the effects of nearby upstream and downstream components, compressibility, and internal obstructions, such as splitters, and ladder rungs on individual piping components. Despite expected uncertainties in the data resulting from the complexity of the piping geometry and two-phase flow, the test data support the conclusion that the predicted dry steam K-factors are accurate and provide useful insight into the effect of entrained liquid on the flow resistance. The K-factors calculated from the wet steam test data were compared to two-phase K-factors based on the Martinelli-Nelson pressure drop correlations. This comparison supports the concept of a two-phase multiplier for estimating the resistance of piping with liquid entrained into the flow. The test data in general appears to be reasonably consistent with the shape of a curve based on the Martinelli-Nelson correlation over the tested range of steam quality

  20. Pressured HIV testing "in the name of love": a mixed methods analysis of pressured HIV testing among men who have sex with men in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason J; Wu, Dan; Huang, Wenting; Fu, Hongyun; Desmond, Nicola; Ma, Wei; Kang, Dianmin; Liao, Meizhen; Marley, Gifty; Wei, Chongyi; Tang, Weiming; Liu, Chuncheng; Zhang, Ye; Pan, Stephen W; Yang, Bin; Yang, Ligang; Huang, Shujie; Tucker, Joseph D

    2018-03-01

    HIV testing has rapidly expanded into diverse, decentralized settings. While increasing accessibility to HIV testing is beneficial, it may lead to unintended consequences such as being pressured to test. We examined the frequency, correlates and contexts of pressured HIV testing among Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM) using mixed methods. We conducted an online survey of MSM (N = 1044) in May 2017. Pressured HIV testing was defined as being forced to test for HIV. We conducted logistic regression analysis to determine the associations between pressured HIV testing and socio-demographic and sexual behavioural factors. Follow-up interviews (n = 17) were conducted with men who reported pressured testing and we analysed qualitative data using a thematic analysis approach. Ninety-six men (9.2%) reported experiencing pressure to test for HIV. Regular male sex partners were the most common source of pressure (61%, 59/96), and the most common form of pressure was a threat to end a relationship with the one who was being pressured (39%, 37/96). We found a higher risk of pressured testing in men who had only used HIV self-testing compared to men who had never self-tested (AOR 2.39 (95%CI: 1.38 to 4.14)). However, this relationship was only significant among men with low education (AOR 5.88 (95% CI: 1.92 to 17.99)) and not among men with high education (AOR 1.62 (95% CI: 0.85 to 3.10)). After pressured testing, about half of men subsequently tested for HIV (55%, 53/96) without pressure - none reported being diagnosed with HIV. Consistent with this finding, qualitative data suggest that perceptions of pressure existed on a continuum and depended on the relationship status of the one who pressured them. Although being pressured to test was accompanied by negative feelings, men who were pressured into testing often changed their attitude towards HIV testing, testing behaviours, sexual behaviours and relationship with the one who pressured them to test. Pressured HIV

  1. Pressure and pressure derivative analysis for injection tests with variable temperature without type-curve matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Freddy Humberto; Martinez, Javier Andres; Montealegre Matilde

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of injection tests under nonisothermic conditions is important for the accurate estimation of the reservoir permeability and the well's skin factor; since previously an isothermical system was assumed without taking into account a moving temperature front which expands with time plus the consequent changes in both viscosity and mobility between the cold and the hot zone of the reservoir which leads to unreliable estimation of the reservoir and well parameters. To construct the solution an analytical approach presented by Boughrara and Peres (2007) was used. That solution was initially introduced for the calculation of the injection pressure in an isothermic system. It was later modified by Boughrara and Reynolds (2007) to consider a system with variable temperature in vertical wells. In this work, the pressure response was obtained by numerical solution of the anisothermical model using the Gauss Quadrature method to solve the integrals, and assuming that both injection and reservoir temperatures were kept constant during the injection process and the water saturation is uniform throughout the reservoir. For interpretation purposes, a technique based upon the unique features of the pressure and pressure derivative curves were used without employing type-curve matching (TDS technique). The formulation was verified by its application to field and synthetic examples. As expected, increasing reservoir temperature causes a decrement in the mobility ratio, then estimation of reservoir permeability is some less accurate from the second radial flow, especially, as the mobility ratio increases

  2. Testing of a portable ultrahigh pressure water decontamination system (UHPWDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovell, A.; Dahlby, J.

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the tests done with a portable ultrahigh pressure water decontamination system (UHPWDS) on highly radioactively contaminated surfaces. A small unit was purchased, modified, and used for in-situ decontamination to change the waste level of the contaminated box from transuranic (TRU) waste to low- level waste (LLW). Low-level waste is less costly by as much as a factor of five or more if compared with TRU waste when handling, storage, and disposal are considered. The portable unit we tested is commercially available and requires minimal utilities for operation. We describe the UHPWDS unit itself, a procedure for its use, the results of the testing we did, and conclusions including positive and negative aspects of the UHPWDS

  3. Active earth pressure model tests versus finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrzak Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to compare failure mechanisms observed in small scale model tests on granular sample in active state, and simulated by finite element method (FEM using Plaxis 2D software. Small scale model tests were performed on rectangular granular sample retained by a rigid wall. Deformation of the sample resulted from simple wall translation in the direction ‘from the soil” (active earth pressure state. Simple Coulomb-Mohr model for soil can be helpful in interpreting experimental findings in case of granular materials. It was found that the general alignment of strain localization pattern (failure mechanism may belong to macro scale features and be dominated by a test boundary conditions rather than the nature of the granular sample.

  4. Active earth pressure model tests versus finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Magdalena

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the paper is to compare failure mechanisms observed in small scale model tests on granular sample in active state, and simulated by finite element method (FEM) using Plaxis 2D software. Small scale model tests were performed on rectangular granular sample retained by a rigid wall. Deformation of the sample resulted from simple wall translation in the direction `from the soil" (active earth pressure state. Simple Coulomb-Mohr model for soil can be helpful in interpreting experimental findings in case of granular materials. It was found that the general alignment of strain localization pattern (failure mechanism) may belong to macro scale features and be dominated by a test boundary conditions rather than the nature of the granular sample.

  5. Hydraulic testing in granite using the sinusoidal variation of pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.H.; Holmes, D.C.; Noy, D.J.

    1982-09-01

    Access to two boreholes at the Carwynnen test site in Cornwall enabled the trial of a number of innovative approaches to the hydrogeology of fractured crystalline rock. These methods ranged from the use of seisviewer data to measure the orientation of fractures to the use of the sinusoidal pressure technique to measure directional hydraulic diffusivity. The testing began with a short programme of site investigation consisting of borehole caliper and seisviewer logging followed by some single borehole hydraulic tests. The single borehole hydraulic testing was designed to assess whether the available boreholes and adjacent rock were suitable for testing using the sinusoidal method. The main testing methods were slug and pulse tests and were analysed using the fissured porous medium analysis proposed in Barker and Black (1983). Derived hydraulic conductivity (K) ranged from 2 x 10 -12 m/sec to 5 x 10 -7 m/sec with one near-surface zone of high K being perceived in both boreholes. The results were of the form which is typical of fractured rock and indicated a combination of high fracture frequency and permeable granite matrix. The results are described and discussed. (author)

  6. Key identifiers and spelling conventions in MXit-lingo as found in conversations with Dr Math

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Butgereit

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Different human languages look different from other human languages. To use a term from the computer industry, each human language has its own “look and feel”. European English speakers can easily recognise a phrase such as “Comment allez-vous?” as being written in French while the phrase “¿Habla usted español?” is written in Spanish. Each language has its own letter frequencies, word frequencies and other identifiers. This paper describes key identifiers in MXit lingo as found in Dr Math conversations. MXit is a mobile instant messaging system which originated in South Africa and is expanding to other countries. Dr Math is a mobile tutoring system which uses MXit as a communication protocol. Primary and secondary school pupils can receive help with the mathematics homework using the Dr Math tutoring system. The pupils use MXit on their cell phones and the tutors use traditional Internet workstations. After exploring how MXit lingo is written, this paper will briefly explore why MXit lingo is written the way it is. By identifying and describing the orthographic conventions visible in the spelling of MXit lingo, although with some theoretical support, insight into the purposeful and functional nature of written, mobile communication will be revealed. In highlighting spelling that is influenced by Black South African English, an attempt will be made to contribute to the empirical development of a field of study that explores the construction of words used in South African mobile communication. Keywords: MXit, Math, letters, writing, orthography Disciplines: Linguistics, mathematics, information technology

  7. Blood Pressure Response to Submaximal Exercise Test in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Wielemborek-Musial

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The assessment of blood pressure (BP response during exercise test is an important diagnostic instrument in cardiovascular system evaluation. The study aim was to determine normal values of BP response to submaximal, multistage exercise test in healthy adults with regard to their age, gender, and workload. Materials and Methods. The study was conducted in randomly selected normotensive subjects (n=1015, 512 females and 498 males, aged 18–64 years (mean age 42.1 ± 12.7 years divided into five age groups. All subjects were clinically healthy with no chronic diseases diagnosed. Exercise stress tests were performed using Monark bicycle ergometer until a minimum of 85% of physical capacity was reached. BP was measured at rest and at peak of each exercise test stage. Results. The relations between BP, age, and workload during exercise test were determined by linear regression analysis and can be illustrated by the equations: systolic BP (mmHg = 0.346 × load (W + 135.76 for males and systolic BP (mmHg = 0.103 × load (W + 155.72 for females. Conclusions. Systolic BP increases significantly and proportionally to workload increase during exercise test in healthy adults. The relation can be described by linear equation which can be useful in diagnostics of cardiovascular diseases.

  8. THYC qualification on Vatican-1 low pressure tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, C.; Guichard, J.

    1991-06-01

    PWR cores or fuel assemblies are components of a nuclear power plant involving single and two-phase flows in rod bundles. The knowledge of the detailed two-phase and three-dimensional flow patterns is necessary to evaluate the singularity (grids) and bypass effects on the Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) in reactor cores during incidental transients. For that purpose, since 1989, the VATICAN experiment has been performed at EDF as a part of the qualification program of the three-dimensional computer code THYC, developed by EDF. The qualification strategy of the THYC software for PWR cores is the following: assuming the theoretical or experimental knowledge of regular and singular pressure drops and grid turbulence sources in single-phase, pressure drop multipliers and relative velocity in two-phase flow, the VATICAN experiment allows to evaluate the diffusion phenomena in two-phase flow. It provides thermalhydraulic measurements on a mock-up of a part of 900 MWe PWR fuel assembly in single and two-phase flows, with power and quality gradients. The first configuration of the mock-up, with simple spacer grids, is studied (VATICAN-1). The specific effects of mixing spacer grids will be compared to these data through a second configuration. The last void fraction measurements, using a γ-ray technique, performed on VATICAN-1 low pressure tests allowed to qualify a set of closure relations, particularly a model of little two-phase diffusion, adapted to two-phase flows at low pressure (5.0MPa). The qualification of subcooled boiling and diffusion models will continue on next VATICAN and other experimental campaigns [fr

  9. Quiz: Does Your Blood Pressure Pass the Test? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure Quiz: Does Your Blood Pressure Pass the Test? Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Blood pressure changes throughout the day. It is highest while ...

  10. Pressurized helium II-cooled magnet test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.P.; Lambertson, G.R.; Gilbert, W.S.; Meuser, R.B.; Caspi, S.; Schafer, R.V.

    1980-06-01

    A facility for testing superconducting magnets in a pressurized bath of helium II has been constructed and operated. The cryostat accepts magnets up to 0.32 m diameter and 1.32 m length with current to 3000 A. In initial tests, the volume of helium II surrounding the superconducting magnet was 90 liters. Minimum temperature reached was 1.7 K at which point the pumping system was throttled to maintain steady temperature. Helium II reservoir temperatures were easily controlled as long as the temperature upstream of the JT valve remained above T lambda; at lower temperatures control became difficult. Positive control of the temperature difference between the liquid and cold sink by means of an internal heat source appears necessary to avoid this problem. The epoxy-sealed vessel closures, with which we have had considerable experience with normal helium vacuum, also worked well in the helium II/vacuum environment

  11. Radiation pressure calibration and test mass reflectivities for LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsakova, Natalia; Kaune, Brigitte; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes a series of experiments which were carried out during the main operations of LISA Pathfinder. These experiments were performed by modulating the power of the measurement and reference beams. In one series of experiments the beams were sequentially switched on and off. In the other series of experiments the powers of the beams were modulated within 0.1% and 1% of the constant power. These experiments use recordings of the total power measured on the photodiodes to infer the properties of the Optical Metrology System (OMS), such as reflectivities of the test masses and change of the photodiode efficiencies with time. In the first case the powers are back propagated from the different photodiodes to the same place on the optical bench to express the unknown quantities in the measurement with the complimentary photodiode measurements. They are combined in the way that the only unknown left is the test mass reflectivities. The second experiment compared two estimates of the force applied to the test masses due to the radiation pressure that appears because of the beam modulations. One estimate of the force is inferred from the measurements of the powers on the photodiodes and propagation of this measurement to the test masses. The other estimation of the force is done by calculating it from the change in the main scientific output of the instrument - differential displacement of the two test masses.

  12. Vibration phenomena in large scale pressure suppression tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, E.; Boettcher, G.; Kolb, M.; Sattler, P.; Vollbrandt, J.

    1982-01-01

    Structure und fluid vibration phenomena (acceleration, strain; pressure, level) were observed during blow-down experiments simulating a LOCA in the GKSS full scale multivent pressure suppression test facility. The paper describes first the source related excitations during the two regimes of condensation oscillation and of chugging, and deals then with the response vibrations of the facility's wetwell. Modal analyses of the wetwell were run using excitation by hammer and by shaker in order to separate phenomena that are particular to the GKSS facility from more general ones, i.e. phenomena specific to the fluid related parameters of blowdown and to the geometry of the vent pipes only. The lowest periodicities at about 12 and 16 Hz stem from the vent acoustics. A frequency of about 36 to 38 Hz prominent during chugging seems to result from the lowest local models of two of the wetwell's walls when coupled by the wetwell pool. Further peaks found during blowdown in the spectra of signals at higher frequencies correspond to global vibration modes of the wetwell. (orig.)

  13. Miniaturized Charpy test for reactor pressure vessel embrittlement characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, M.P. Sr. [MPM Research and Consulting, Lemont, PA (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Modifications were made to a conventional Charpy machine to accommodate the miniaturized Charpy V-Notch (MCVN) specimens which were fabricated from an archived reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. Over 100 dynamic MCVN tests were performed and compared to the results from conventional Charpy V-Notch (CVN) tests to demonstrate the efficacy of the miniature specimen test. The optimized sidegrooved MCVN specimens exhibit transitional fracture behavior over essentially the same temperature range as the CVN specimens which indicates that the stress fields in the MCVN specimens reasonably simulate those of the CVN specimens and this fact has been observed in finite element calculations. This result demonstrates a significant breakthrough since it is now possible to measure the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) using miniature specimens with only small correction factors, and for some materials as in the present study, without the need for any correction factor at all. This development simplifies data interpretation and will facilitate future regulatory acceptance. The non-sidegrooved specimens yield energy-temperature data which is significantly shifted downward in temperature (non-conservative) as a result of the loss of constraint which accompanies size reduction.

  14. A modified isometric test to evaluate blood pressure control with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure at rest is not predictive of roundthe- clock values. Blood pressure should therefore be measured during effort to evaluate hypertension and its response to treatment. The effect of sustained-release verapamil (240 mg taken once a day) on blood pressure at rest and during isometric effort was therefore ...

  15. [Blood pressure and sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome in workers. STOP-Bang test versus Epworth test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Herrero, M T; Capdevila-García, L; Bellido-Cambrón, M C; Ramírez-Iñiguez de la Torre, M V; Lladosa-Marco, S

    OSAHS is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Arterial hypertension is a key risk factor to consider due to its impact on health. Cross-sectional study carried out on Spanish public service workers. The nocturnal apnoea risk using the Epworth and STOP-Bang questionnaires and their influence on the mean values of blood pressure are assessed. The detection of OSAHS using the Epworth test and, particularly with the STOP-Bang shows a significant relationship with the mean values of blood pressure, with differences between both questionnaires. The Epworth and STOP-Bang questionnaires are useful for the initial detection of OSAHS and a higher prevalence of high blood pressure. Both can be used in screening procedures in occupational health. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Standard Test Method for Saltwater Pressure Immersion and Temperature Testing of Photovoltaic Modules for Marine Environments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides a procedure for determining the ability of photovoltaic modules to withstand repeated immersion or splash exposure by seawater as might be encountered when installed in a marine environment, such as a floating aid-to-navigation. A combined environmental cycling exposure with modules repeatedly submerged in simulated saltwater at varying temperatures and under repetitive pressurization provides an accelerated basis for evaluation of aging effects of a marine environment on module materials and construction. 1.2 This test method defines photovoltaic module test specimens and requirements for positioning modules for test, references suitable methods for determining changes in electrical performance and characteristics, and specifies parameters which must be recorded and reported. 1.3 This test method does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable results is beyond the scope of this test method. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be ...

  17. Development of automatic ultrasonic testing equipment for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Kee Ok; Park, Dae Yung; Park, Moon Hoh; Koo, Kil Mo; Park, Kwang Heui; Kang, Sang Sin; Bang, Heui Song; Noh, Heui Choong; Kong, Woon Sik

    1994-08-01

    The selected weld areas of reactor pressure vessel and adjacent piping are examined by remote mechanized ultrasonic testing(MUT) equipment. Since the MUT equipment was purchased from Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in April 1985, we have performed 15 inservice inspections and 5 preservice inspections. However, the reliability of examination was recently decreased rapidly as the problems which results from the old age of equipment and the frequent movement to plant site to site have occurred frequently. Therefore, the 3-axis control system hardware in occurring many problems among the equipments of mechanized ultrasonic testing (MUT) was designed and developed to cover the examination areas of nozzle-shell weld as specified in ASME Code Section XI and to improve the examination reliability. The new 3-axis control system hardware with the performance of this project was developed to be compatible with the old one and it was used as dual system or spare parts of the old system. Furthermore, the established technologies are expected to be applied to the similar control systems in nuclear power plant. 17 figs, 2 pix, 2 tabs, 10 refs. (Author)

  18. Development of automatic Ultrasonic testing equipment for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kor R.; Kim, Jae H.; Lee, Jae C.

    1996-06-01

    The selected weld areas of a reactor pressure vessel and adjacent piping are examined by the remote mechanized ultrasonic testing (MUT) equipment. Since the MUT equipment was purchased from southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in April 1985, 15 inservice inspections and 5 preservice inspections are performed with this MUT equipment. However due to the old age of the equipment and frequent movements to plant sites, the reliability of examination was recently decreased rapidly and it is very difficult to keep spare parts. In order to resolve these problems and to meet the strong request from plant sites, we intend to develop a new 3-axis control system including hardware and software. With this control system, we expect more efficient and reliable examination of the nozzle to shell weld areas, which is specified in ASME Code Section XI. The new 3-axis control system hardware and software were designed and development of our own control system, the advanced technologies of computer control mechanism were established and examination reliability of the nozzle to shell weld area was improved. With the development of our 3-axis control system for PaR ISI-2 computer control system, the reliability of nozzle to shell weld area examination has been improved. The established technologies from the development and detailed analysis of existing control system, are expected to be applied to the similar control systems in nuclear power plants. (author). 12 refs., 4 tabs., 33 figs

  19. Acceptance Test Report for the high pressure water jet system canister cleaning fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdin, J.R.

    1995-10-25

    This Acceptance Test confirmed the test results and recommendations, documented in WHC-SD-SNF-DTR-001, Rev. 0 Development Test Report for the High Pressure Water Jet System Nozzles, for decontaminating empty fuel canisters in KE-Basin. Optimum water pressure, water flow rate, nozzle size and overall configuration were tested

  20. Acceptance Test Report for the high pressure water jet system canister cleaning fixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdin, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    This Acceptance Test confirmed the test results and recommendations, documented in WHC-SD-SNF-DTR-001, Rev. 0 Development Test Report for the High Pressure Water Jet System Nozzles, for decontaminating empty fuel canisters in KE-Basin. Optimum water pressure, water flow rate, nozzle size and overall configuration were tested

  1. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site. Nuclear chimney analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, J.M.

    1985-12-01

    Investigations of barometric pressure testing of NTS nuclear chimneys were reviewed. This review includes the models used in the interpretation, methods of analysis, and results. Analytic and semi-analytic models were presented and applied to both historical data and new data taken for this current project. An interpretation technique based on non-linear least squares methods was used to analyze this data in terms of historic and more recent chimney models. Finally, a detailed discussion of radioactive gas transport due to surface barometric pressure fluctuations was presented. This mechanism of transport, referred to as ''barometric pumping,'' is presented in terms of conditions likely to be encountered at the NTS. The report concludes with a discussion of the current understanding of gas flow properties in the alluvial and volcanic areas of the NTS, and suggestions for future efforts directed toward increasing this understanding are presented.

  2. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site. Nuclear chimney analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, J.M.

    1985-12-01

    Investigations of barometric pressure testing of NTS nuclear chimneys were reviewed. This review includes the models used in the interpretation, methods of analysis, and results. Analytic and semi-analytic models were presented and applied to both historical data and new data taken for this current project. An interpretation technique based on non-linear least squares methods was used to analyze this data in terms of historic and more recent chimney models. Finally, a detailed discussion of radioactive gas transport due to surface barometric pressure fluctuations was presented. This mechanism of transport, referred to as ''barometric pumping,'' is presented in terms of conditions likely to be encountered at the NTS. The report concludes with a discussion of the current understanding of gas flow properties in the alluvial and volcanic areas of the NTS, and suggestions for future efforts directed toward increasing this understanding are presented

  3. Design of experiments and equipment to test the ballooning characteristics of CANDU pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, C.F.; Stern, F.; Hart, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been planned and an apparatus has been designed to enable creep testing of end-of-life pressure tube specimens in a LOCA environment. Effects that could be studied include: annealing of irradiation damage during transient heating; effects of hydride blisters on pressure tube ballooning strains; and, effects of uniformly-distributed hydrogen content on pressure tube ballooning strains. The proposed experimental program will consist of separate effects creep tests on pressure tube sections under transient heating conditions

  4. Study for Relation of Pressure and Aging Degradation during LOCA Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Seog

    2013-01-01

    As result of this test, it was found that low pressure effect in aging was not significant compared with that of temperature. If temperature profile in LOCA test can satisfy the plant LOCA profile, no further analysis of pressure profile for aging degradation is necessary. For environmental qualification of electric equipment in containment building of nuclear power plant, LOCA test should be applied. During the LOCA test, temperature and pressure of LOCA chamber shall be controlled to meet a requirement of plant specific LOCA profile. It is general to keep LOCA test temperature and pressure above the plant specific LOCA profile. If the test temperature is lower than required profile in some time zone while it is higher in other time zone, calculation of total cumulated test temperature is required to compare with that of plant profile. Arrhenius equation can be applied for calculation of total temperature accumulation. If there is a deviation of pressure between test profile and plant specific profile, can we still use the same rule of temperature? Since the Arrhenius equation can't be applied to pressure, analysis of pressure effect to aging degradation is not easy. Study for relation of pressure and aging degradation during LOCA condition is described herein. To Study an aging degradation effect of pressure during LOCA test, comparison of IR during high LOCA pressure and low LOCA pressure were implemented. We expected low IR in high pressure because it contained a high concentration of oxygen which induces high aging degradation. Contrary to our expectation, IR of low pressure was lower than that of high pressure. It is assumed that high vibration of temperature profile to maintain the low pressure at high temperature induced supply of high enthalpy steam into LOCA chamber

  5. Correction of Pressure Drop in Steam and Water System in Performance Test of Boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinglong; Zhao, Xianqiao; Hou, Fanjun; Wu, Xiaowu; Wang, Feng; Hu, Zhihong; Yang, Xinsen

    2018-01-01

    Steam and water pressure drop is one of the most important characteristics in the boiler performance test. As the measuring points are not in the guaranteed position and the test condition fluctuation exsits, the pressure drop test of steam and water system has the deviation of measuring point position and the deviation of test running parameter. In order to get accurate pressure drop of steam and water system, the corresponding correction should be carried out. This paper introduces the correction method of steam and water pressure drop in boiler performance test.

  6. High pressure cells for magnetic measurements - destruction and functional tests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamarád, Jiří; Machátová, Zuzana; Arnold, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 11 (2004), s. 5022-5025 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0739; GA AV ČR IAA1010315 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : pressure cells * pressure transmitting media * CuBe * MP35N Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.226, year: 2004

  7. Uniform relativistic universe models with pressure. Part 2. Observational tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krempec, J.; Krygier, B.

    1977-01-01

    The magnitude-redshift and angular diameter-redshift relations are discussed for the uniform (homogeneous and isotropic) relativistic Universe models with pressure. The inclusion of pressure into the energy-momentum tensor has given larger values of the deceleration parameter q. An increase of the deceleration parameter has led to the brightening of objects as well as to a little larger angular diameters. (author)

  8. Adjustable guide for a testing system for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, W.

    1980-01-01

    The device consisting of a guide rail and a manipulator is introduced into the gap between pressure vessel wall and biological shield by means of suspending wire drums and manipulator drums. For adjustment of the device an elbow telescope is used. The guide rail is fixed to the pressure vessel wall by means of electromagnets. The movements of the manipulator with respect to the guide rail are performed with the aid of a motor. (DG) [de

  9. PA171 Containers on a Wood Pallet with Metal Top Adapter, Air Pressure Tests During MIL-STD-1660 Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    ... (PM-MAS) to conduct Air Pressure Tests during MIL-STD-1660, "Design Criteria for Ammunition Unit Loads" testing on the PA171 containers on a wood pallet with metal top adapter as manufactured by Alliant Tech...

  10. Irradiation surveillant test of High Flux Engineering Test Reactor (HFETR) pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Weisen; Cui Yonghai

    1991-08-01

    The result of irradiation surveillant test of HFETR pressure vessel is presented. It shows that after 3.3 x 10 20 n/cm 2 irradiation the irradiation brittleness effect in welding seam (ws) is smaller than in heat-affected zone (HAZ), and the irradiation brittleness effect in HAZ is smaller than in base material (BM). From the view point of irradiation brittleness, under present operation conditions of the HFETR, the safety margin of plasticity and toughness in the WS, BM and HAZ is sufficient within the design life of the reactor

  11. Children's Achievement Strategies and Test Performance: The Role of Time Pressure, Evaluation Anxiety, and Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plass, James A.; Hill, Kennedy T.

    1986-01-01

    Examines how test anxiety affects children in certain evaluation situations and focuses on developing more valid and effective measurement procedures in school achievement testings. Third and fourth graders were divided into three anxiety groups and tested under time and no time pressures. Anxiety level, time pressure, and sex affected…

  12. Wind pressure testing of tornado safe room components made from wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Falk; Deepak Shrestha

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of a wood tornado safe room to resist wind pressures produced by a tornado, two safe room com-ponents were tested for wind pressure strength. A tornado safe room ceiling panel and door were static-pressure-tested according to ASTM E 330 using a vacuum test system. Re-sults indicate that the panels had load capacities from 2.4 to 3.5 times that...

  13. The correlation between pulsatile intracranial pressure and indices of intracranial pressure-volume reserve capacity: results from ventricular infusion testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to examine how pulsatile and static intracranial pressure (ICP) scores correlate with indices of intracranial pressure-volume reserve capacity, i.e., intracranial elastance (ICE) and intracranial compliance (ICC), as determined during ventricular infusion testing. METHODS All patients undergoing ventricular infusion testing and overnight ICP monitoring during the 6-year period from 2007 to 2012 were included in the study. Clinical data were retrieved from a quality registry, and the ventricular infusion pressure data and ICP scores were retrieved from a pressure database. The ICE and ICC (= 1/ICE) were computed during the infusion phase of the infusion test. RESULTS During the period from 2007 to 2012, 82 patients with possible treatment-dependent hydrocephalus underwent ventricular infusion testing within the department of neurosurgery. The infusion tests revealed a highly significant positive correlation between ICE and the pulsatile ICP scores mean wave amplitude (MWA) and rise-time coefficient (RTC), and the static ICP score mean ICP. The ICE was negatively associated with linear measures of ventricular size. The overnight ICP recordings revealed significantly increased MWA (> 4 mm Hg) and RTC (> 20 mm Hg/sec) values in patients with impaired ICC ( 4 mm Hg, RTC > 20 mm Hg/sec), but not increased mean ICP (pressure-volume reserve capacity, i.e., ICE and ICC.

  14. 40 CFR 53.56 - Test for effect of variations in ambient pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (ii) Determine and record the ambient (chamber) pressure indicated by the sampler and the corresponding ambient (chamber) pressure measured by the barometer specified in paragraph (c)(4) of this section... absolute difference between the mean ambient air pressure indicated by the test sampler and the ambient...

  15. 30 CFR 250.427 - What are the requirements for pressure integrity tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... related hole-behavior observations, such as pore-pressure test results, gas-cut drilling fluid, and well... formation integrity and pore pressure in the driller's report. (b) While drilling, you must maintain the... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for pressure...

  16. Design and Test Requirements for Space Flight Pressurized Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-26

    25 5.8 Pneumatic System Configuration...temperatures, and thermal gradients. [4.2.5-4] Both membrane stress and bending stress resulting from internal pressure and external loads shall be calculated...bonding, forming, joining, machining , drilling, grinding, repair, etc., processes as applied to joining system 14 components and hardware and

  17. Reducing uncertainty in geostatistical description with well testing pressure data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, A.C.; He, Nanqun [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States); Oliver, D.S. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, La Habra, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Geostatistics has proven to be an effective tool for generating realizations of reservoir properties conditioned to static data, e.g., core and log data and geologic knowledge. Due to the lack of closely spaced data in the lateral directions, there will be significant variability in reservoir descriptions generated by geostatistical simulation, i.e., significant uncertainty in the reservoir descriptions. In past work, we have presented procedures based on inverse problem theory for generating reservoir descriptions (rock property fields) conditioned to pressure data and geostatistical information represented as prior means for log-permeability and porosity and variograms. Although we have shown that the incorporation of pressure data reduces the uncertainty below the level contained in the geostatistical model based only on static information (the prior model), our previous results assumed did not explicitly account for uncertainties in the prior means and the parameters defining the variogram model. In this work, we investigate how pressure data can help detect errors in the prior means. If errors in the prior means are large and are not taken into account, realizations conditioned to pressure data represent incorrect samples of the a posteriori probability density function for the rock property fields, whereas, if the uncertainty in the prior mean is incorporated properly into the model, one obtains realistic realizations of the rock property fields.

  18. Force and pressure tests of the GA(W)-1 airfoil with a 20% aileron and pressure tests with a 30% Fowler flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Seetharam, H. C.; Fiscko, K. A.

    1977-01-01

    Wind tunnel force and pressure tests were conducted for the GA(W)-1 airfoil equipped with a 20% aileron, and pressure tests were conducted with a 30% Fowler flap. All tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of 2.2 and a Mach number of 0.13. The aileron provides control effectiveness similar to ailerons applied to more conventional airfoils. Effects of aileron gaps from 0% to 2% chord were evaluated, as well as hinge moment characteristics. The aft camber of the GA(W)-1 section results in a substantial up-aileron moment, but the hinge moments associated with aileron deflection are similar to other configurations. Fowler flap pressure distributions indicate that unseparated flow is achieved for flap settings up to 40 deg., over a limited angle of attack range. Theoretical pressure distributions compare favorably with experiments for low flap deflections, but show substantial errors at large deflections.

  19. Timed up and go test at tap test and shunt surgery in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Masatsune; Miyajima, Masakazu; Nakajima, Madoka; Atsuchi, Masamichi; Kimura, Teruo; Tokuda, Takahiko; Kazui, Hiroaki; Mori, Etsuro

    2017-04-01

    The 3-meter Timed Up and Go test (TUG) is a reliable quantitative test for assessment of gait and balance. We aimed to establish an optimal threshold of TUG at the tap test for predicting outcomes 12 months after shunt surgery in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). The TUG was measured in a total of 151 patients with possible iNPH before and after a tap test and 12 months after shunt surgery. Among them, 81 patients underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt implantation (SINPHONI) and 70 underwent lumboperitoneal shunt implantation (SINPHONI-2). The areas under the curve (AUCs), sensitivities, and specificities for predicting shunt effectiveness were assessed. The simple differences of time on TUG at the tap test were significantly more accurate for predicting shunt effectiveness than percent improvement of time. The highest AUC for the synchronized moving cutoff point of TUG time was 0.81 (sensitivity 81.0%; specificity 81.6%) at the threshold of 5 seconds in the SINPHONI-2. For predicting improvements of ≥10 seconds 12 months after lumboperitoneal shunt implantation, the AUC was 0.90, and the sensitivity and specificity at the threshold of 5.6 seconds were 83.3% and 81.0%. Only for patients with a tap test, ventriculoperitoneal shunt implantation conveyed significantly better improvements in TUG time 12 months after surgery than lumboperitoneal shunt implantation. An improvement of 5 seconds was a useful threshold of TUG time at the tap test for predicting a ≥10-second improvement 12 months after shunt surgery, rather than the percent improvement of TUG time.

  20. Advantages of the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system for the rat colon rupture pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chengdong; Guo, Xuan; Li, Zhen; Qian, Shuwen; Zheng, Feng; Qin, Haiqing

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on colorectal anastomotic leakage to reduce the incidence of anastomotic leakage. However, how to precisely determine if the bowel can withstand the pressure of a colorectal anastomosis experiment, which is called anastomotic bursting pressure, has not been determined. A task force developed the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system to provide precise measurement of the maximum pressure that an anastomotic colon can withstand, and to compare it with the commonly used method such as the mercury and air bag pressure manometer in a rat colon rupture pressure test. Forty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the manual ball manometry (H) group, the tracing machine manometry pressure gauge head (MP) group, and the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system (ME) group. The rats in each group were subjected to a cut colon rupture pressure test after injecting anesthesia in the tail vein. Colonic end-to-end anastomosis was performed, and the rats were rested for 1 week before anastomotic bursting pressure was determined by one of the three methods. No differences were observed between the normal colon rupture pressure and colonic anastomotic bursting pressure, which were determined using the three manometry methods. However, several advantages, such as reduction in errors, were identified in the ME group. Different types of manometry methods can be applied to the normal rat colon, but the colonic anastomotic bursting pressure test using the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system is superior to traditional methods. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test): A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Macario; Ruoff, Chad M.; Kawai, Makoto; Modi, Rahul; Arbee, Jabri; Hekmat, Anahid; Robertson, Matthew; Certal, Victor; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test) was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm) between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure). Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (r s = 0.60 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0088), apnea-hypopnea index (r s = 0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p = 0.039), lowest oxygen saturation (r s = −0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p = 0.048), and oxygen desaturation index (r s = 0.62 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0057). Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP. PMID:26881088

  2. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macario Camacho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure. Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (rs=0.60 [strong positive relationship], p=0.0088, apnea-hypopnea index (rs=0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p=0.039, lowest oxygen saturation (rs=-0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p=0.048, and oxygen desaturation index (rs=0.62 [strong positive relationship], p=0.0057. Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP.

  3. Low Pressure Circuit Control and adjust System Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, R.O; Brendstrup, C.J; Ocampo, A.C

    2000-01-01

    The hydraulic mechanism (MSAC) is a system that will be employed in the movement of the control rods of the CAREM-25 reactor.In this report, the experimental work on a prototype of MSAC in a low pressure circuit is presented: also the methodology and conclusions.Basic thermalhydraulic data from the MSAC was obtained, and the most relevant control parameters were determined.The response of the mechanism to changes in the control parameters was also evaluated. In conclusion, the response of the MSAC fulfills the aspects of reliability and repetitive movement with water flow pulses control, in the low pressure circuit at the Laboratorio de Mecanica, Materiales y Mediciones of INVAP S.E

  4. Testing for altruism and social pressure in charitable giving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaVigna, Stefano; List, John A; Malmendier, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Every year, 90% of Americans give money to charities. Is such generosity necessarily welfare enhancing for the giver? We present a theoretical framework that distinguishes two types of motivation: individuals like to give, for example, due to altruism or warm glow, and individuals would rather not give but dislike saying no, for example, due to social pressure. We design a door-to-door fund-raiser in which some households are informed about the exact time of solicitation with a flyer on their doorknobs. Thus, they can seek or avoid the fund-raiser. We find that the flyer reduces the share of households opening the door by 9% to 25% and, if the flyer allows checking a Do Not Disturb box, reduces giving by 28% to 42%. The latter decrease is concentrated among donations smaller than $10. These findings suggest that social pressure is an important determinant of door-to-door giving. Combining data from this and a complementary field experiment, we structurally estimate the model. The estimated social pressure cost of saying no to a solicitor is $3.80 for an in-state charity and $1.40 for an out-of-state charity. Our welfare calculations suggest that our door-to-door fund-raising campaigns on average lower the utility of the potential donors.

  5. Measurement error in pressure-decay leak testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.N.

    1979-04-01

    The effect of measurement error in presssure-decay leak testing is considered, and examples are presented to demonstrate how it can be properly accomodated in analyzing data from such tests. Suggestions for more effective specification and conduct of leak tests are presented

  6. Heat transfer in a seven-rod test bundle with supercritical pressure water (1). Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Seki, Yohji; Dairaku, Masayuki; Suzuki, Satoshi; Enoeda, Mikio; Akiba, Masato; Mori, H.; Oka, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Heat transfer experiments in a seven-rod test bundle with supercritical pressure water has been carried out. The pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) in the test section are evaluated. In the present limited conditions, difference between HTCs at the surface facing the sub-channel center and those at the surface in the narrowest region between rods is not observed. (author)

  7. Incident at university research facility - pressure testing of gas hydrate cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2014-01-01

    A master student designed a cell for observing the development of gas hydrates as conditions in the cell were changed. The supervisor asked for a pressure test of the cell before the experiments started. The student chose-to perform the pressure test using compressed air and this resulted in one...

  8. Analysis, design and testing of high pressure waterjet nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Andre P.

    1996-01-01

    The Hydroblast Research Cell at MSFC is both a research and a processing facility. The cell is used to investigate fundamental phenomena associated with waterjets as well as to clean hardware for various NASA and contractor projects. In the area of research, investigations are made regarding the use of high pressure waterjets to strip paint, grease, adhesive and thermal spray coatings from various substrates. Current industrial methods of cleaning often use ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as chlorinated solvents, and high pressure waterjet cleaning has proven to be a viable alternative. Standard methods of waterjet cleaning use hand held or robotically controlled nozzles. The nozzles used can be single-stream or multijet nozzles, and the multijet nozzles may be mounted in a rotating head or arranged in a fan-type shape. We consider in this paper the use of a rotating, multijet, high pressure water nozzle which is robotically controlled. This method enables rapid cleaning of a large area, but problems such as incomplete coverage (e.g. the formation of 'islands' of material not cleaned) and damage to the substrate from the waterjet have been observed. In addition, current stripping operations require the nozzle to be placed at a standoff distance of approximately 2 inches in order to achieve adequate performance. This close proximity of the nozzle to the target to be cleaned poses risks to the nozzle and the target in the event of robot error or the striking of unanticipated extrusions on the target surface as the nozzle sweeps past. Two key motivations of this research are to eliminate the formation of 'coating islands' and to increase the allowable standoff distance of the nozzle.

  9. Light water reactor pressure isolation valve performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neely, H.H.; Jeanmougin, N.M.; Corugedo, J.J.

    1990-07-01

    The Light Water Reactor Valve Performance Testing Program was initiated by the NRC to evaluate leakage as an indication of valve condition, provide input to Section XI of the ASME Code, evaluate emission monitoring for condition and degradation and in-service inspection techniques. Six typical check and gate valves were purchased for testing at typical plant conditions (550F at 2250 psig) for an assumed number of cycles for a 40-year plant lifetime. Tests revealed that there were variances between the test results and the present statement of the Code; however, the testing was not conclusive. The life cycle tests showed that high tech acoustic emission can be utilized to trend small leaks, that specific motor signature measurement on gate valves can trend and indicate potential failure, and that in-service inspection techniques for check valves was shown to be both feasible and an excellent preventive maintenance indicator. Life cycle testing performed here did not cause large valve leakage typical of some plant operation. Other testing is required to fully understand the implication of these results and the required program to fully implement them. (author)

  10. Split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests on pure tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, Richard D.; Armstrong, Ronald W.; Williams, John D.

    1998-01-01

    Pure tantalum (Ta) was loaded in compression by a split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to strain rates from 450 to 6350 s -1 . The results are compared with SHPB data for commercial Ta and with predictions from the constitutive model for Ta developed by Zerilli and Armstrong (Z-A). The main conclusions are: (1) the flow stress versus log strain rate agree with the Z-A constitutive model and other reported data, (2) uniform strain exponents computed on a true stress-strain basis for pure Ta are somewhat greater than those determined from SHPB data for commercial Ta, and (3) in both cases the uniform strain exponents versus log strain rate are in good agreement with predictions from the Z-A constitutive model for strain rates above 1500 s -1 without a clear indication of dislocation generation

  11. 30 CFR 7.104 - Internal static pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Diesel Power Packages Intended for Use in Areas of Underground Coal Mines Where Permissible Electric Equipment is Required § 7.104...

  12. Debris filtering effectiveness and pressure drop tests of debris resistance-bottom end piece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Song, Chul Hwa; Chung, Heung June; Won, Soon Yeun; Cho, Young Ro; Kim, Bok Deuk

    1992-03-01

    In this final report, described are the test conditions and test procedures for the debris filtering effectiveness and pressure drop tests for developing the Debris Resistance-Bottom End Piece (DR-BEP). And the test results are tabulated for later evaluation. (Author)

  13. Steady state performance of subcritical and supercritical pressure natural circulation in the same test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swapnalee, B.T.; Vijayan, P.K; Sharma, Manish; Pilkhwal, D.S.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    For supercritical pressure natural circulation loops, explicit correlation for steady state flow are not available. While using the subcritical natural circulation flow correlation for supercritical pressure data, it has been observed that subcritical flow correlation is not able to predict the steady state flow accurately near supercritical pressure condition. A generalized correlation has been proposed to estimate the steady state flow in supercritical pressure natural circulation loop based on a relationship between dimensionless density and dimensionless enthalpy reported in literature. This generalized correlation has been tested with the steady state supercritical pressure CO 2 data and found to be in good agreement. Subsequently supercritical pressure data for different working fluids reported in literature has also been compared with the proposed correlation. It is observed that the same generalized correlation is applicable for other fluids also. The present paper deals with the details of the test facility, the derivation of the generalized correlation and comparison with experimental data. (author)

  14. An Ultra-low Frequency Modal Testing Suspension System for High Precision Air Pressure Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoling YUAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As a resolution for air pressure control challenges in ultra-low frequency modal testing suspension systems, an incremental PID control algorithm with dead band is applied to achieve high-precision pressure control. We also develop a set of independent hardware and software systems for high-precision pressure control solutions. Taking control system versatility, scalability, reliability, and other aspects into considerations, a two-level communication employing Ethernet and CAN bus, is adopted to complete such tasks as data exchange between the IPC, the main board and the control board ,and the pressure control. Furthermore, we build a single set of ultra-low frequency modal testing suspension system and complete pressure control experiments, which achieve the desired results and thus confirm that the high-precision pressure control subsystem is reasonable and reliable.

  15. Predictive value of lumbar infusion test in normal pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of all cases in the study, 18 (90%) had positive test results and were operated on; 16 (80%) of patients reported subjective improvement, and postoperative assessments verified the improvements in 15 patients (75%). Improvements were highly significant in walking and memory. Most of the patients improved by surgery ...

  16. Strain measurement in and analysis for hydraulic test of CPR1000 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Dan; Zhuang Dongzhen

    2013-01-01

    The strain measurement in hydraulic test of CPR1000 reactor pressure vessel performed in Dongfang Heavy Machinery Co., Ltd. is introduced. The detail test scheme and method was introduced and the measurement results of strain and stress was given. Meanwhile the finite element analysis was performed for the pressure vessel, which was generally matched with the measurement results. The reliability of strain measurement was verified and the high strength margin of vessel was shown, which would give a good reference value for the follow-up hydraulic tests and strength analysis of reactor pressure vessel. (authors)

  17. Glenohumeral contact pressure in a simulated active compression test using cadaveric shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tony; Javidan, Pooya; McGarry, Michelle H; Gonzalez-Lomas, Guillem; Limpisvasti, Orr; Lee, Thay Q

    2013-03-01

    The active compression test has been described to detect superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions. Some have speculated that contact between the lesser tuberosity and the superior glenoid in the testing position causes a positive test. This study evaluated the location of peak glenohumeral contact pressures during a simulated active compression test in a cadaveric model with and without SLAP lesions. Six specimens were tested. A pressure sensor was used to record glenohumeral contact, and a motion analysis system was used to measure humeral head translation. Contact pressures and translations were measured during serial deltoid and biceps loads. These were repeated for small and large SLAP lesions. There was a notable shift in the location of peak contact pressure from the anterior-inferior glenoid to the anterior-superior glenoid with increasing deltoid load. Deltoid loading translated the humeral head posteriorly relative to the glenoid. Conversely, biceps loads countered the pull of the deltoid only when the biceps load was greater than the deltoid load. The SLAP tears did not significantly alter the degree of humeral head translation or location of the contact pressures. In the active compression test, the posterior capsule is taut and the anterior capsule is lax, which permits the deltoid to translate the humeral head posteriorly. This shift in the peak contact pressure to the superior glenoid may elicit a positive active compression test. Basic Science Study, Biomechanics, Cadaver Model. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  18. Test of 6-inch-thick pressure vessels. Series 2. Intermediate test vessels V-3, V-4, and V-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, R.H.; Merkle, J.G.; Raftenberg, M.N.; Robinson, G.C.; Smith, J.E.

    1975-11-01

    The second series of intermediate vessel tests were crack initiation fracture tests of 6-in.-thick 39-in.-OD steel vessels with sharp surface flaws approximately 2 1 / 2 in. deep by 8 in. long in the longitudinal weld seams of the test cylinders. Fracture was initiated by means of hydraulic pressurization. One vessel was tested at each of three temperatures: 75, 130, and 190 0 F. Pretest analyses were made to predict the failure pressures and strains. Fracture toughness data obtained by equivalent-energy analysis of precracked Charpy-V tests and compact-tension specimen tests were used in the fracture analyses. The vessels behaved generally as had been expected. Posttest fracture analyses were also performed for each vessel. Detailed discussions of the fracture analysis methods developed in support of the vessel tests described are included. 34 references

  19. Fast Pressure-Sensitive Paint System for Production Wind Tunnel Testing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Significant advances in the use of fast responding Pressure-Sensitive Paint have recently been achieved as demonstrated by a multi-camera fast PSP test conducted in...

  20. Post-Tensioning Duct Air Pressure Testing Effects on Web Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT) post-tensioned concrete bridges have experienced web cracking near the post-tensioning ducts during the construction process. The ducts were air pressure tested to ensure the duct can successfully be grouted...

  1. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelar, Carl F.; Cardinal, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA with a suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for the vessels described above, Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. An initial characterization of the strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth properties was performed in Phase 1. Based on the results and recommendations of Phase 1, a more extensive material property characterization effort was developed in this Phase 2 effort. This Phase 2 characterization included additional strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth of the multilayer vessel and head materials. In addition, some more limited characterization of the welds and heat affected zones (HAZs) were performed. This report

  2. Over-pressure test on BARCOM pre-stressed concrete containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, R.M.; Singh, Tarvinder; Thangamani, I.; Trivedi, Neha; Singh, Ram Kumar, E-mail: rksingh@barc.gov.in

    2014-04-01

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay has organized an International Round Robin Analysis program to carry out the ultimate load capacity assessment of BARC Containment (BARCOM) test model. The test model located in BARC facilities Tarapur; is a 1:4 scale representation of 540 MWe Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) pre-stressed concrete inner containment structure of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) unit 3 and 4. There are a large number of sensors installed in BARCOM that include vibratory wire strain gauges of embedded and spot-welded type, surface mounted electrical resistance strain gauges, dial gauges, earth pressure cells, tilt meters and high resolution digital camera systems for structural response, crack monitoring and fracture parameter measurement to evaluate the local and global behavior of the containment test model. The model has been tested pneumatically during the low pressure tests (LPTs) followed by proof test (PT) and integrated leakage rate test (ILRT) during commissioning. Further the over pressure test (OPT) has been carried out to establish the failure mode of BARCOM Test-Model. The over-pressure test will be completed shortly to reach the functional failure of the test model. Pre-test evaluation of BARCOM was carried out with the results obtained from the registered international round robin participants in January 2009 followed by the post-test assessment in February 2011. The test results along with the various failure modes related to the structural members – concrete, rebars and tendons identified in terms of prescribed milestones are presented in this paper along with the comparison of the pre-test predictions submitted by the registered participants of the Round Robin Analysis for BARCOM test model.

  3. Leak-thight seals got high pressure testing of pipes, tanks, valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrade, J.

    1985-01-01

    Leak-tight seals ensure quick, safe and efficient testing of pipes with plain-ended or flanged openings, valves with flanged or welded edges, manifields, recipients, etc. They are inserted into the pipe end manually then simply a slight turn of the seal treated wheel commences the pressure test. Hydraulic pressure is supplied by a pump through the inlet seal and air is purged through the outlet seal which then closes. The higher the pressure, the greater the sealing strength of the seal which prevents accidental unplugging. There are different types of seals: for interior plain-ended openings, for pipes with plain-ended opening, for flanged pipes. (author)

  4. Triaxial testing system for pressure core analysis using image processing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, J.; Masui, A.; Tenma, N.; Nagao, J.

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a newly developed innovative triaxial testing system to investigate strength, deformation behavior, and/or permeability of gas hydrate bearing-sediments in deep sea is described. Transport of the pressure core from the storage chamber to the interior of the sealing sleeve of a triaxial cell without depressurization was achieved. An image processing technique was used to capture the motion and local deformation of a specimen in a transparent acrylic triaxial pressure cell and digital photographs were obtained at each strain level during the compression test. The material strength was successfully measured and the failure mode was evaluated under high confining and pore water pressures.

  5. An overview of changes in pressure values of the middle ear using impedance audiometry among diver candidates in a hyperbaric chamber before and after a pressure test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoraga, J. S.; Bramantyo, B.; Bardosono, S.; Simanungkalit, S. H.; Basiruddin, J.

    2017-08-01

    Impedance audiometry is not yet routinely used in pressure tests, especially in Indonesia. Direct exposure to pressure in a hyperbaric chamber is sometimes without any assessment of the middle ear or the Eustachian tube function (ETF) of ventilation. Impedance audiometry examinations are important to assess ETF ventilation. This study determined the middle ear pressure value changes associated with the ETF (ventilation) of prospective divers. This study included 29 prospective divers aged 20-40 years without conductive hearing loss. All subjects underwent a modified diving impedance audiometry examination both before and after the pressure test in a double-lock hyperbaric chamber. Using the Toynbee maneuver, the values obtained for changes of pressure in the middle ear were significant before and after the pressure test in the right and left ears: p < 0.001 and p = 0.018, respectively. The impedance audiometry examination is necessary for the selection of candidate divers undergoing pressure tests within a hyperbaric chamber.

  6. Testing of a 4 K to 2 K heat exchanger with an intermediate pressure drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, Peter N. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Most large sub-atmospheric helium refrigeration systems incorporate a heat exchanger at the load, or in the distribution system, to counter-flow the sub-atmospheric return with the super-critical or liquid supply. A significant process improvement is theoretically obtainable by handling the exergy loss across the Joule-Thompson throttling valve supplying the flow to the load in a simple but different manner. As briefly outlined in previous publications, the exergy loss can be minimized by allowing the supply flow pressure to decrease to a sub-atmospheric pressure concurrent with heat exchange flow from the load. One practical implementation is to sub-divide the supply flow pressure drop between two heat exchanger sections, incorporating an intermediate pressure drop. Such a test is being performed at Jefferson Lab's Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF). This paper will briefly discuss the theory, practical implementation and test results and analysis obtained to date.

  7. High-Stakes Testing and Student Achievement: Does Accountability Pressure Increase Student Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L. Nichols

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between high-stakes testing pressure and student achievement across 25 states. Standardized portfolios were created for each study state. Each portfolio contained a range of documents that told the “story” of accountability implementation and impact in that state. Using the “law of comparative judgments,” over 300 graduate-level education students reviewed one pair of portfolios and made independent evaluations as to which of the two states’ portfolios reflected a greater degree of accountability pressure. Participants’ judgments yielded a matrix that was converted into a single rating system that arranged all 25 states on a continuum of accountability “pressure” from high to low. Using this accountability pressure rating we conducted a series of regression and correlation analyses. We found no relationship between earlier pressure and later cohort achievement for math at the fourth- and eighth-grade levels on the National Assessment of Educational Progress tests. Further, no relationship was found between testing pressure and reading achievement on the National Assessment of Education Progress tests at any grade level or for any ethnic student subgroup. Data do suggest, however, that a case could be made for a causal relationship between high-stakes testing pressure and subsequent achievement on the national assessment tests—but only for fourth grade, non-cohort achievement and for some ethnic subgroups. Implications and directions for future studies are discussed.

  8. Fabrication of High Temperature and High Pressure Vessel for the Fuel Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kook Nam; Lee, Jong Min; Sim, Bong Shick; Shon, Jae Min; Ahn, Seung Ho; Yoo, Seong Yeon

    2007-01-01

    The Fuel Test Loop(FTL) which is capable of an irradiation testing under a similar operating condition to those of PWR and CANDU nuclear power plants has been developed and installed in HANARO, KAERI. It is consisted of In-Pile Section(IPS) and Out-of Pile System(OPS). The IPS which is located inside the pool is divided into 3-parts; they are in-pool pipes, IVA(IPS Vessel Assembly) and the support structures. The test fuel is loaded inside a double wall, inner pressure vessel and outer pressure vessel, to keep the functionality of the reactor coolant pressure boundary. The localization of the IVA is achieved by manufacturing through local company and the functional test and verification were done through pressure drop, vibration, hydraulic and leakage tests. The brazing technique of the instrument lines has been checked for its functionality and yield. A IVA has been manufactured by local technique and will be finally tested under out of the high temperature and high pressure test

  9. Integrated experimental test program on waterhammer pressure pulses and associated structural responses within a feedwater sparger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurkkala, P.; Hoikkanen, J. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the methods and systems as utilized in an integrated experimental thermohydraulic/mechanics analysis test program on waterhammer pressure pulses within a revised feedwater sparger of a Loviisa generation VVER-440-type reactor. This program was carried out in two stages: (1) measurements with a strictly limited set of operating parameters at Loviisa NPP, and (2) measurements with the full set of operating parameters on a test article simulating the revised feedwater sparger. The experiments at Loviisa NPS served as an invaluable source of information on the nature of waterhammer pressure pulses and structural responses. These tests thus helped to set the objectives and formulate the concept for series of tests on a test article to study the water hammer phenomena. The heavily instrumented full size test article of a steam generator feedwater sparger was placed within a pressure vessel simulating the steam generator. The feedwater sparger was subjected to the full range of operating parameters which were to result in waterhammer pressure pulse trains of various magnitudes and duration. Two different designs of revised feedwater sparger were investigated (i.e. `grounded` and `with goose neck`). The following objects were to be met within this program: (1) establish the thermohydraulic parameters that facilitate the occurrence of water hammer pressure pulses, (2) provide a database for further analysis of the pressure pulse phenomena, (3) establish location and severity of these water hammer pressure pulses, (4) establish the structural response due to these pressure pulses, (5) provide input data for structural integrity analysis. (orig.). 3 refs.

  10. Suitport Feasibility: Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a space suit while the space suit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a space suit prototype on the second generation MMSEV cabin, and testing is planned using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. Pressurized testing will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, a suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents

  11. Implantable electrolyte conductance-based pressure sensing catheter, II. Device construction and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Robert; Benharash, Peyman; Schulam, Peter; Schmidt, Jacob J

    2013-12-01

    Direct measurements of arterial blood pressure most commonly use bulky external instrumentation containing a pressure transducer connected to an ex vivo fluid-filled arterial line, which is subject to several sensing artifacts. In situ blood pressure sensors, typically solid state piezoresistive, capacitive, and interferometric sensors, are unaffected by these artifacts, but can be expensive to produce and miniaturize. We have developed an alternative approach to blood pressure measurement based on deformation of an elastic tube filled with electrolyte solution. Simple measurement of the electrical conductance of this solution as the tube dimensions change allows determination of the external pressure. The sensor is made from inexpensive materials and its miniaturization is straightforward. In vitro static testing of initial sensor prototypes mounted on a catheter tip showed a linear response with applied pressure and a resolution of 1 mmHg. In vivo sensing followed catheterization of the sensor into the femoral artery of a porcine model through a 7F catheter port. The sensor performed comparably to a commercial pressure transducer also connected to the catheter port. Due to its scalability and cost, this sensor has the potential for use in a range of pressure sensing applications, such as measurement of intracranial, spinal, or interstitial pressures.

  12. Pressure test at the reactor building of the Embalse Nuclear Power Plant (CNE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutsiers, E.E.; Perrino, J.; Moreno, C.; Batistic, J.A.; Lolis, R.R.; Aviles, A.

    1991-01-01

    Upon request by the Licensing Authority, the reactor building (RB) in a nuclear power plant must be submitted to pressure tests. One of these tests is to be performed before startup and, then, a test must be carried out every 5 years in operation. The pre-operational tests took place in August 1981, under two values of relative pressure: 1.266 kg/cm 2 and 0.422 kg/cm 2 . Operational tests must only be made at the lower pressure and their objective is to verify that the loss speed remains within the range indicated in the corresponding technical specification. The first operational test was performed in August 1989. The personnel of the CNE took care of the preparation of the Work Plan, of aligning the various systems contained in the RB, of pressurization, of monitoring localized tightedness, of depressurization and of the general and quality control of the test. The measurements were carried out by the CISME (Center of Metrology Research and Service) of the National Institute of Industrial Technology (INTI) , which did also supply the necesary instruments and the data collection system. There is also a description of the work performed before the test, of the calculation method used for assessing the loss rate, of the test sequencies and of the results obtained. (Author) [es

  13. Results of pressure locking and thermal binding tests of gate valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1998-05-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in performing research investigating the performance of gate valves subjected to pressure locking and thermal binding conditions. Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most gate valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. Thermal binding can occur when thermal expansion/contraction effects cause the disc to be squeezed between the valve body seats. If the loads associated with pressure locking or thermal binding are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The authors tested a flexible-wedge gate valve and a double-disc gate valve under pressure locking and thermal binding conditions. The results show that these valves are susceptible to pressure locking; however, they are not significantly affected by thermal binding. For the flexible-wedge gate valve, pressure locking loads (in terms of stem thrust) were higher than corresponding hydrostatic opening loads by a factor of 1.1 to 1.5. For the parallel disc gate valve, pressure locking loads were higher by a factor of 2.05 to 2.4. The results also show that seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions

  14. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  15. Pre-service proof pressure and leak rate tests for the Qinshan CANDU project reactor buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrunik, K.J.; Khan, A.; Ricciuti, R.; Ivanov, A.; Chen, S.

    2003-01-01

    The Qinshan CANDU Project Reactor Buildings (Units 1 and 2) have been successfully tested for the Pre-Service Proof Pressure and Integrated Leak Rate Tests. The Unit 1 tests took place from May 3 to May 9, 2002 and from May 22 to May 25, 2002, and the Unit 2 tests took place from January 21 to January 27, 2003. This paper discusses the significant steps taken at minimum cost on the Qinshan CANDU Project, which has resulted in a) very good leak rate (0.21%) for Unit 1 and excellent leak rate (0.130%) for Unit 2; b) continuous monitoring of the structural behaviour during the Proof Pressure Test, thus eliminating any repeat of the structural test due to lack of data; and c) significant schedule reduction achieved for these tests in Unit 2. (author)

  16. Software Verification and Validation Test Report for the HEPA filter Differential Pressure Fan Interlock System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ERMI, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The HEPA Filter Differential Pressure Fan Interlock System PLC ladder logic software was tested using a Software Verification and Validation (VandV) Test Plan as required by the ''Computer Software Quality Assurance Requirements''. The purpose of his document is to report on the results of the software qualification

  17. Design and Test of a Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Thruster with Cold Helium Pressurization Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John C.; Morehead, Robert L.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    A liquid oxygen / liquid methane 2,000 lbf thruster was designed and tested in conjuction with a nozzle heat exchanger for cold helium pressurization. Cold helium pressurization systems offer significant spacecraft vehicle dry mass savings since the pressurant tank size can be reduced as the pressurant density is increased. A heat exchanger can be incorporated into the main engine design to provide expansion of the pressurant supply to the propellant tanks. In order to study the systems integration of a cold-helium pressurization system, a 2,000 lbf thruster with a nozzle heat exchanger was designed for integration into the Project Morpheus vehicle at NASA Johnson Space Center. The testing goals were to demonstrate helium loading and initial conditioning to low temperatures, high-pressure/low temperature storage, expansion through the main engine heat exchanger, and propellant tank injection/pressurization. The helium pressurant tank was an existing 19 inch diameter composite-overwrap tank, and the targert conditions were 4500 psi and -250 F, providing a 2:1 density advantage compared to room tempatrue storage. The thruster design uses like-on-like doublets in the injector pattern largely based on Project Morpheus main engine hertiage data, and the combustion chamber was designed for an ablative chamber. The heat exchanger was installed at the ablative nozzle exit plane. Stand-alone engine testing was conducted at NASA Stennis Space Center, including copper heat-sink chambers and highly-instrumented spoolpieces in order to study engine performance, stability, and wall heat flux. A one-dimensional thermal model of the integrated system was completed. System integration into the Project Morpheus vehicle is complete, and systems demonstrations will follow.

  18. Design, Analysis and Testing of a PRSEUS Pressure Cube to Investigate Assembly Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovanof, Nicolette; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Baraja, Jaime; Gould, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Due to its potential to significantly increase fuel efficiency, the current focus of NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Program is the hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft. Due to the complex load condition that exists in HWB structure, as compared to traditional aircraft configurations, light-weight, cost-effective and manufacturable structural concepts are required to enable the HWB. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept is one such structural concept. A building block approach for technology development of the PRSEUS concept is being conducted. As part of this approach, a PRSEUS pressure cube was developed as a risk reduction test article to examine a new integral cap joint concept. This paper describes the design, analysis and testing of the PRSEUS pressure cube test article. The pressure cube was required to withstand a 2P, 18.4 psi, overpressure load requirement. The pristine pressure cube was tested to 2.2P with no catastrophic failure. After the addition of barely visible impact damage, the cube was pressure loaded to 48 psi where catastrophic failure occurred, meeting the scale-up requirement. Comparison of pretest and posttest analyses with the cube test response agree well, and indicate that current analysis methods can be used to accurately analyze PRSEUS structure for initial failure response.

  19. Hydrogen degradation of 21-6-9 and medium carbon steel by disc pressure test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, D.H.; Zhou, W.X.; Xu, Z.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports the method of disc pressure test and the results for 21-6-9 stainless steel and medium carbon steel in hydrogen gas with different pressures and time of storage. The results show the hydrogen induced degradation of these two kinds of steel. An attempt was made to establish an index which uses variation of area of deformed disc to determine the degradation of ductility in a hydrogen environment. (orig.)

  20. German boiler and pressure vessel codes and standards: materials, manufacture, testing, equipment, erection and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffen, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    The methods by which the safety objectives on the operation of steam boilers and pressure vessels in Germany can be reached are set out in Technical Rules which are compiled and established in technical committees. Typical applications are described in the Technical Rules. A chart shows how the laws, provisions and Technical Rules for the sections 'steam boiler plant' and 'pressure vessels' are interlinked. This chapter concentrates on legal aspects, materials, manufacture, testing, erection and operation of boilers and pressure vessels in Germany. (U.K.)

  1. Results From a Pressure Sensitive Paint Test Conducted at the National Transonic Facility on Test 197: The Common Research Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Lipford, William E.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Goad, William K.; Goad, Linda R.

    2011-01-01

    This report will serve to present results of a test of the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique on the Common Research Model (CRM). This test was conducted at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA Langley Research Center. PSP data was collected on several surfaces with the tunnel operating in both cryogenic mode and standard air mode. This report will also outline lessons learned from the test as well as possible approaches to challenges faced in the test that can be applied to later entries.

  2. A Seafloor Test of the A-0-A Approach to Calibrating Pressure Sensors for Vertical Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, W. S. D.; Manalang, D.; Harrington, M.; Cram, G.; Tilley, J.; Burnett, J.; Martin, D.; Paros, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Seafloor geodetic observations are critical for understanding the locking and slip of the megathrust in Cascadia and other subduction zones. Differences of bottom pressure time series have been used successfully in several subduction zones to detect slow-slip earthquakes centered offshore. Pressure sensor drift rates are much greater than the long-term rates of strain build-up and thus, in-situ calibration is required to measure secular strain. One approach to calibration is to use a dead-weight tester, a laboratory apparatus that produces an accurate reference pressure, to calibrate a pressure sensor deployed on the seafloor by periodically switching between the external pressure and the deadweight tester (Cook et al, this session). The A-0-A method replaces the dead weight tester by using the internal pressure of the instrument housing as the reference pressure. We report on the first non-proprietary ocean test of this approach on the MARS cabled observatory at a depth of 900 m depth in Monterey Bay. We use the Paroscientific Seismic + Oceanic Sensors module that is designed for combined geodetic, oceanographic and seismic observations. The module comprises a three-component broadband accelerometer, two pressure sensors that for this deployment measure ocean pressures, A, up to 2000 psia (14 MPa), and a barometer to measure the internal housing reference pressure, 0. A valve periodically switches between external and internal pressures for 5 minute calibrations. The seafloor test started in mid-June and the results of 30 calibrations collected over the first 6 weeks of operation are very encouraging. After correcting for variations in the internal temperature of the housing, the offset of the pressure sensors from the barometer reading as a function of time, can be fit with a straight line for each sensor with a rms misfit of 0.1 hPa (1 mm of water). The slopes of these lines (-4 cm/yr and -0.4 cm/yr) vary by an order of magnitude but the difference in the span

  3. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Stress Rupture Test: Part 2. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard; Flynn, Howard; Forth, Scott; Greene, Nathanael; Kezirian, Michael; Varanauski, Don; Leifeste, Mark; Yoder, Tommy; Woodworth, Warren

    2010-01-01

    One of the major concerns for the aging Space Shuttle fleet is the stress rupture life of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Stress rupture life of a COPY has been defined as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress levels and time. To assist in the evaluation of the aging COPVs in the Orbiter fleet an analytical reliability model was developed. The actual data used to construct this model was from testing of COPVs constructed of similar, but not exactly same materials and pressure cycles as used on Orbiter vessels. Since no actual Orbiter COPV stress rupture data exists the Space Shuttle Program decided to run a stress rupture test to compare to model predictions. Due to availability of spares, the testing was unfortunately limited to one 40" vessel. The stress rupture test was performed at maximum operating pressure at an elevated temperature to accelerate aging. The test was performed in two phases. The first phase, 130 F, a moderately accelerated test designed to achieve the midpoint of the model predicted point reliability. A more aggressive second phase, performed at 160 F, was designed to determine if the test article will exceed the 95% confidence interval ofthe model. In phase 3, the vessel pressure was increased to above maximum operating pressure while maintaining the phase 2 temperature. After reaching enough effectives hours to reach the 99.99% confidence level of the model phase 4 testing began when the temperature was increased to greater than 170 F. The vessel was maintained at phase 4 conditions until it failed after over 3 million effect hours. This paper will discuss the results of this test, it's implications and possible follow-on testing.

  4. Small-Scale Testing of Laterally Loaded Non-Slender Piles in a Pressure Tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren Peder Hyldal; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2012-01-01

    conducting small-scale tests the low effective stresses in the soil is one of the major un-certainties. At low stresses the soil parameters will vary greatly with depth and the determination of soil parameters is therefore subject to uncertainties. This problem can be overcome by in¬creasing the effective...... stresses in the soil. A new and innovative test setup for small-scale tests is presented. Tests were successfully carried out in a pressure tank enabling the possibility of ho¬mogeneously increasing the effective stresses. The test setup is described in detail in the paper. A total of 29 quasi-static tests...

  5. Wind Tunnel Tests for Wind Pressure Distribution on Gable Roof Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Gable roof buildings are widely used in industrial buildings. Based on wind tunnel tests with rigid models, wind pressure distributions on gable roof buildings with different aspect ratios were measured simultaneously. Some characteristics of the measured wind pressure field on the surfaces of the models were analyzed, including mean wind pressure, fluctuating wind pressure, peak negative wind pressure, and characteristics of proper orthogonal decomposition results of the measured wind pressure field. The results show that extremely high local suctions often occur in the leading edges of longitudinal wall and windward roof, roof corner, and roof ridge which are the severe damaged locations under strong wind. The aspect ratio of building has a certain effect on the mean wind pressure coefficients, and the effect relates to wind attack angle. Compared with experimental results, the region division of roof corner and roof ridge from AIJ2004 is more reasonable than those from CECS102:2002 and MBMA2006.The contributions of the first several eigenvectors to the overall wind pressure distributions become much bigger. The investigation can offer some basic understanding for estimating wind load distribution on gable roof buildings and facilitate wind-resistant design of cladding components and their connections considering wind load path. PMID:24082851

  6. Effect of patient positioning on toe pressure measurement using noninvasive vascular testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansosti, Laura E; Berger, Michael D; Gerrity, Michael A; Kelly, Patrick; Meyr, Andrew J

    2015-09-01

    Interpretation of digital pressure in the assessment of healing potential for diabetic foot disease has become common because of the potential for false elevation with the ankle-brachial index. However, the specific testing protocol for segmental Doppler examinations and photoplethysmography require patients to be in the supine position, with the lower limbs at heart level, in order to minimise the effect of hydrostatic pressure. This may be difficult in many patients with lower extremity pathology, particularly those who are nonambulatory, with painful wounds, or with orthopnea. In these situations, the noninvasive vascular test may be performed with the patient in a more comfortable position, which may include sitting in a wheelchair with the leg in a dependent position. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of patient positioning on measurement of the digital pressure. Hallux pressures were measured in 20 healthy volunteers in 3 variable positions of limb dependency. The mean±standard deviation of digital pressure for subjects while lying supine with the limb at heart level was 103.5±26.0 mmHg (the recommended position for performance of the test), while sitting upright with the limb level on the table was 130.6±27.9 mmHg (+26.2%, pposition was 169.8±30.8 mmHg (+64.1%, ppositioning has a significant effect on measurement of digital pressure.

  7. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel surveillance capsule examinations. Application of American Society for Testing and Materials Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    A series of pressure vessel surveillance capsules is installed in each commercial nuclear power plant in the United States. A capsule typically contains neutron dose meters, thermal monitors, tensile specimens, and Charpy V-notch impact specimens. In order to determine property changes of the pressure vessel resulting from irradiation, surveillance capsules are periodically removed during the life of a reactor and examined. There are numerous standards, regulations, and codes governing US pressure vessel surveillance capsule programmes. These are put out by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). A majority of the pertinent ASTM standards are under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee E-10 on Nuclear Applications and Measurements of Radiation Effects. The standards, regulations, and codes pertaining to pressure vessel surveillance play an important role in ensuring reliability of the nuclear pressure vessels. ASTM E 185-73 is the Standard Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactors. This standard recommends procedures for both the irradiation and subsequent testing of surveillance capsules. ASTM E 185-73 references many additional specialized ASTM standards to be followed in specific areas of a surveillance capsule examination. A key element of surveillance capsule programmes is the Charpy V-notch impact test, used to define curves of fracture behaviour over a range of temperatures. The data from these tests are used to define the adjusted reference temperature used in determining pressure-temperature operating curves for a nuclear power plant. (author)

  8. Influence of pre/in-service inspections and tests on the reliability of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellein, R.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of the following actions on the probability of brittle failure of the reactor pressure vessels will be estimated by probabilistic fracture mechanics: ultrasonic inspection of the welds; hydro-test of the vessel; and crack growth by normal, upset and test conditions. Taking into account that the in-service inspections and tests are done at short intervals the reliability can be shown to be extremely high. (orig.)

  9. Suitport Feasibility - Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

    2011-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a spacesuit while the spacesuit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a spacesuit prototype using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. This test will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, the suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents design of a human rated second generation suitport, modifications to

  10. Experimental tests on buckling of ellipsoidal vessel heads subjected to internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.; Alix, M.

    1980-05-01

    Tests were performed on 17 ellipsoidal vessel heads of three different materials and different geometries. The results include the following: 1) Accurate definition of the geometry and particularly a direct measurement of the thickness along the meridian. 2) The properties of the material of each head, obtained from test specimens cut from the head itself after the test. 3) The recording of deflection/pressure curves with indication of the pressure at which buckling occurred. These results can be used for validation and qualification of methods for calculating the buckling load when plasticity occurs before buckling. It was possible to develop an empirical equation representing the experimental results obtained with satisfactory accuracy. This equation may be useful in pressure vessel design

  11. Uncertainty Analysis of In leakage Test for Pressurized Control Room Envelop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    In leakage tests for control room envelops(CRE) of newly constructed nuclear power plants are required to prove the control room habitability. Results of the in leakage tests should be analyzed using an uncertainty analysis. Test uncertainty can be an issue if the test results for pressurized CREs show low in leakage. To have a better knowledge of the test uncertainty, a statistical model for the uncertainty analysis is described here and a representative uncertainty analysis of a sample in leakage test is presented. A statistical method for analyzing the uncertainty of the in leakage test is presented here and a representative uncertainty analysis of a sample in leakage test was performed. By using the statistical method we can evaluate the test result with certain level of significance. This method can be more helpful when the difference of the two mean values of the test result is small

  12. G-Tunnel pressurized slot-testing preparations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Sifre-Soto, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mann, K.L.; Bellman, R.A. Jr.; Luker, S. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Dodds, D.J. [North Pacific Research, Portland, OR (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Designers and analysts of radioactive waste repositories must be able to predict the mechanical behavior of the host rock. Sandia National laboratories elected to conduct a development program on pressurized slot testing and featured (1) development of an improved method to cut slots using a chain saw with diamond-tipped cutters, (2) measurements useful for determining in situ stresses normal to slots, (3) measurements applicable for determining the in situ modulus of deformation parallel to a drift surface, and (4) evaluations of the potentials of pressurized slot strength testing. This report describes the preparations leading to the measurements and evaluations.

  13. Stress Rupture Testing and Analysis of the NASA WSTF-JPL Carbon Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nathanael; Yoder, Tommy; Saulsberry, Regor; Grimes, Lorie; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    Carbon composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) are widely used in applications from spacecraft to life support. COPV technology provides a pressurized media storage advantage over amorphous technology with weight savings on the order of 30 percent. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been supporting the development of this technology since the early 1970's with an interest in safe application of these components to reduce mass to orbit. NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has been testing components in support of this objective since the 1980s and has been involved in test development and analysis to address affects of impact, propellant and cryogenic fluids exposure on Kevlar and carbon epoxy. The focus of this paper is to present results of a recent joint WSTF-Jet Propulsion Laboratories (JPL) effort to assess safe life of these components. The WSTF-JPL test articles consisted of an aluminum liner and a carbon fiber overwrap in an industry standard epoxy resin system. The vessels were specifically designed with one plus-minus helical wrap and one hoop wrap over the helical and they measured 4.23 x 11.4 in. long. 120 test articles were manufactured in August of 1998 of one lot fiber and resin and the 110 test articles were delivered to WSTF for test. Ten of the 120 test articles were burst tested at the manufacturer to establish the delivered fiber stress. Figure 1 shows a test article in a pre burst condition and with a hoop fiber failure (no leak of pressurized media) and post burst (failure of liner and loss of pressurized media).

  14. Interrelationship of Nondestructive Evaluation Methodologies Applied to Testing of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifeste, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are commonly used in spacecraft for containment of pressurized gases and fluids, incorporating strength and weight savings. The energy stored is capable of extensive spacecraft damage and personal injury in the event of sudden failure. These apparently simple structures, composed of a metallic media impermeable liner and fiber/resin composite overwrap are really complex structures with numerous material and structural phenomena interacting during pressurized use which requires multiple, interrelated monitoring methodologies to monitor and understand subtle changes critical to safe use. Testing of COPVs at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands T est Facility (WSTF) has employed multiple in-situ, real-time nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methodologies as well as pre- and post-test comparative techniques to monitor changes in material and structural parameters during advanced pressurized testing. The use of NDE methodologies and their relationship to monitoring changes is discussed based on testing of real-world spacecraft COPVs. Lessons learned are used to present recommendations for use in testing, as well as a discussion of potential applications to vessel health monitoring in future applications.

  15. Water Flow Testing and Unsteady Pressure Analysis of a Two-Bladed Liquid Oxidizer Pump Inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jordan B.; Mulder, Andrew; Zoladz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The unsteady fluid dynamic performance of a cavitating two-bladed oxidizer turbopump inducer was characterized through sub-scale water flow testing. While testing a novel inlet duct design that included a cavitation suppression groove, unusual high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed. With potential implications for inducer blade loads, these high-frequency components were analyzed extensively in order to understand their origins and impacts to blade loading. Water flow testing provides a technique to determine pump performance without the costs and hazards associated with handling cryogenic propellants. Water has a similar density and Reynolds number to liquid oxygen. In a 70%-scale water flow test, the inducer-only pump performance was evaluated. Over a range of flow rates, the pump inlet pressure was gradually reduced, causing the flow to cavitate near the pump inducer. A nominal, smooth inducer inlet was tested, followed by an inlet duct with a circumferential groove designed to suppress cavitation. A subsequent 52%-scale water flow test in another facility evaluated the combined inducer-impeller pump performance. With the nominal inlet design, the inducer showed traditional cavitation and surge characteristics. Significant bearing loads were created by large side loads on the inducer during synchronous cavitation. The grooved inlet successfully mitigated these loads by greatly reducing synchronous cavitation, however high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed over a range of frequencies. Analytical signal processing techniques showed these oscillations to be created by a rotating, multi-celled train of pressure pulses, and subsequent CFD analysis suggested that such pulses could be created by the interaction of rotating inducer blades with fluid trapped in a cavitation suppression groove. Despite their relatively low amplitude, these high-frequency pressure oscillations posed a design concern due to their sensitivity to flow conditions and

  16. Test of 6-in. -thick pressure vessels. Series 3: intermediate test vessel V-7A under sustained loading. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, R.H.; Cate, T.M.; Holz, P.P.; King, T.A.; Merkle, J.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Smith, G.C.; Smith, J.E.; Whitman, G.D.

    1978-02-01

    HSST intermediate test vessel V-7 was repaired after being tested hydrostatically to leakage and was retested pneumatically as vessel V-7A. Except for the method of applying the load, the conditions in both tests were nearly identical. In each case, a sharp outside surface flaw 547 mm long (18 in.) by about 135 mm deep (5.3 in.) was prepared in the 152-mm-thick (6-in.) test cylinder of A533, grade B, class 1 steel. The inside surface of vessel V-7A was sealed in the region of the flaw by a thin metal patch so that pressure could be sustained after rupture. Vessel V-7A failed by rupture of the flaw ligament without burst, as expected. Rupture occurred at 144.3 MPa (20.92 ksi), after which pressure was sustained for 30 min without any indication of instability. The rupture pressure of vessel V-7A was about 2 percent less than that of vessel V-7.

  17. Test of 6-in.-thick pressure vessels. Series 3: intermediate test vessel V-7A under sustained loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, R.H.; Cate, T.M.; Holz, P.P.; King, T.A.; Merkle, J.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Smith, G.C.; Smith, J.E.; Whitman, G.D.

    1978-01-01

    HSST intermediate test vessel V-7 was repaired after being tested hydrostatically to leakage and was retested pneumatically as vessel V-7A. Except for the method of applying the load, the conditions in both tests were nearly identical. In each case, a sharp outside surface flaw 547 mm long (18 in.) by about 135 mm deep (5.3 in.) was prepared in the 152-mm-thick (6-in.) test cylinder of A533, grade B, class 1 steel. The inside surface of vessel V-7A was sealed in the region of the flaw by a thin metal patch so that pressure could be sustained after rupture. Vessel V-7A failed by rupture of the flaw ligament without burst, as expected. Rupture occurred at 144.3 MPa (20.92 ksi), after which pressure was sustained for 30 min without any indication of instability. The rupture pressure of vessel V-7A was about 2 percent less than that of vessel V-7

  18. Separate Effects Tests to Determine the Pressure Drop over Packed Beds in the PBMR HPTU Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toit, C.G. du; Rousseau, P.G.

    2014-01-01

    In this study experiments were conducted in the PBMR HPTU test facility on a small scale randomly packed cylindrical bed and a specific annular pebble bed in an effort to determine the impact of the wall effects. Tests were also conducted on test sections with structured BCC packings in an attempt to isolate the effect of porosity. The pebbles were mounted on cables and the required porosities were obtained by varying the distance between the pebbles. The required Reynolds numbers ranging between 1000 and 50000 were obtained by varying the system pressure. In the execution of the tests and the data reduction considerable care was taken to obtain good repeatability and to account for the uncertainties due to statistical variance, instrument accuracy and drift. Evaluation of the results has shown that the wall effect is negligible and that the well-known KTA correlation derived for cylindrical beds may thus be used to determine the pressure drop over the annular packed bed. The results have also shown that porosity is not the only characteristic of the packing structure that influences the pressure drop, but that amongst others the type of packing also plays an important role. (author)

  19. An evaluation of the pressure proof test concept for 2024-T3 aluminium alloy sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Newman, J. C.; Harris, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of pressure proof testing of fuselage structures with fatigue cracks to insure structural integrity was evaluated from a fracture mechanics viewpoint. A generic analytical and experimental investigation was conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with crack configurations and stress levels typical of longitudinal lap splice joints in commercial transport aircraft fuselages. The results revealed that the remaining fatigue life after a proof cycle was longer than that without the proof cycle because of crack growth retardation due to increased crack closure. However, based on a crack length that is slightly less than the critical value at the maximum proof stress, the minimum assured life or proof test interval must be no more than 550 pressure cycles for a 1.33 proof factor and 1530 pressure cycles for a 1.5 proof factor to prevent in-flight failures.

  20. Well control during the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    This Code has been prepared for use as a guide to safe practice for those concerned with well control during the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells. It is intended to provide information and guidance on those well control activities associated with high pressure wells which have an impact on safety offshore, and therefore require detailed care and attention. The Code has been produced in a United Kingdom Continental Shelf (UKCS) context, but the principles and recommendations have general relevance to similar operations elsewhere. Each chapter of the Code covers an important aspect of well control and has an introduction which describes the part each activity plays in the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells. (Author)

  1. NASA GRC's High Pressure Burner Rig Facility and Materials Test Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    The High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) at NASA Glenn Research Center is a high-velocity. pressurized combustion test rig used for high-temperature environmental durability studies of advanced materials and components. The facility burns jet fuel and air in controlled ratios, simulating combustion gas chemistries and temperatures that are realistic to those in gas turbine engines. In addition, the test section is capable of simulating the pressures and gas velocities representative of today's aircraft. The HPBR provides a relatively inexpensive. yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials. The facility has the unique capability of operating under both fuel-lean and fuel-rich gas mixtures. using a fume incinerator to eliminate any harmful byproduct emissions (CO, H2S) of rich-burn operation. Test samples are easily accessible for ongoing inspection and documentation of weight change, thickness, cracking, and other metrics. Temperature measurement is available in the form of both thermocouples and optical pyrometery. and the facility is equipped with quartz windows for observation and video taping. Operating conditions include: (1) 1.0 kg/sec (2.0 lbm/sec) combustion and secondary cooling airflow capability: (2) Equivalence ratios of 0.5- 1.0 (lean) to 1.5-2.0 (rich), with typically 10% H2O vapor pressure: (3) Gas temperatures ranging 700-1650 C (1300-3000 F): (4) Test pressures ranging 4-12 atmospheres: (5) Gas flow velocities ranging 10-30 m/s (50-100) ft/sec.: and (6) Cyclic and steady-state exposure capabilities. The facility has historically been used to test coupon-size materials. including metals and ceramics. However complex-shaped components have also been tested including cylinders, airfoils, and film-cooled end walls. The facility has also been used to develop thin-film temperature measurement sensors.

  2. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  3. Instrumentation for determining rock mass permeability by hydro-pneumatic pressure testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.O.

    1981-01-01

    In order to eliminate the problems encountered with existing pressure test equipment, a downhole control unit was designed for conducting tests in NX boreholes. The unit maintains a preset minimum differential pressure between the packers and the test section, and controls inflation and deflation of the packers. The packer response to inflation and deflation commands is greatly increased in deep borings since the control unit is located downhole, and inflation is accomplished with the testing fluid (which is normally either water or air). For increased flexibility, the control unit was designed with the capacity for operating as either a single- or double-packer system by the use of simple ground surface control commands

  4. Application of a microcomputer-based data system to ultimate strength tests of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodfin, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Sandia is evaluating the degree to which existing finite element computer codes can predict the structural behavior of containment buildings beyond the elastic range. The study also is attempting to discover whether any intrinsic functional relationship exists relating leakage to pressure. Test equipment and instrumentation are described

  5. Acceptance test report for high pressure water jet system feed pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    This document summarizes results of WHC-SD-SNF-ATP-016, Rev. 0 ''Acceptance Test Procedure High Pressure Water Jet System'', conducted on December 20, 1995 and December 22, 1995. This jet supplies water at 15,000 psi at sign 15 gpm to nozzles to clean surfaces of empty fuel storage canisters

  6. Water Permeability of Pervious Concrete Is Dependent on the Applied Pressure and Testing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghong Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Falling head method (FHM and constant head method (CHM are, respectively, used to test the water permeability of permeable concrete, using different water heads on the testing samples. The results indicate the apparent permeability of pervious concrete decreasing with the applied water head. The results also demonstrate the permeability measured from the FHM is lower than that from the CHM. The fundamental difference between the CHM and FHM is examined from the theory of fluid flowing through porous media. The testing results suggest that the water permeability of permeable concrete should be reported with the applied pressure and the associated testing method.

  7. Improved PFB operations - 400-hour turbine test results. [Pressurized Fluidized Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.; Benford, S. M.; Zellars, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with a 400-hr small turbine test in the effluent of a pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) at an average temperature of 770 C, an average relative gas velocity of 300 m/sec, and average solid loadings of 200 ppm. Consideration is given to combustion parameters and operating procedure as well as to the turbine system and turbine test operating procedures. Emphasis is placed on erosion/corrosion results.

  8. High voltage tests of an electrostatic accelerator for different mixtures of gases at various pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellborg, R.

    1996-01-01

    An account is given of high voltage tests of an electrostatic accelerator. High voltage conditioning is measured and is reported for the same accelerator tube after different periods of usage. Tests of different mixtures of sulphur hexafluoride and nitrogen have been performed. A considerable amount of data was obtained for various parameters connected with the high voltage system for different proportions of nitrogen in sulphur hexafluoride at various gas pressures. (orig.)

  9. Testing methods of pressure distribution of bra cups on breasts soft tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, B.; Nemcokova, R.; Svoboda, M.

    2017-10-01

    Objective of this study is to evaluate testing methods of pressure distribution of bra cups on breasts soft tissue, the system which do not affect the space between the wearer's body surface and bra cups and thus do not influence the geometry of the measured body surface and thus investigate the functional performance of brassieres. Two measuring systems were used for the pressure comfort evaluating: 1) The pressure distribution of a wearing bra during 20 minutes on women's breasts has been directly measured using pressure sensor, a dielectricum which is elastic polyurethane foam bra cups. Twelve points were measured in bra cups. 2) Simultaneously the change of temperature in the same points bra was tested with the help of noncontact system the thermal imager. The results indicate that both of those systems can identify different pressure distribution at different points. The same size of bra designing features bra cups made from the same material and which is define by the help of same standardised body dimensions (bust and underbust) can cause different value of a compression on different shape of a woman´s breast soft tissue.

  10. ASSERT validation against the Stern Laboratories' single-phase pressure drop tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddington, G.M.; Kiteley, J.C.; Carver, M.B.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary validation of ASSERT-IV against the single-phase pressure drop tests from the 37-element CHF (critical heat flux) experiments conducted at Stern Laboratories, and shows how this study fits into the overall ASSERT validation plan. The effects on the pressure drop of several friction and form loss models are evaluated, including the geometry-based K-factor model. The choice of friction factor has a small effect on the predicted channel pressure drop, compared to the form loss model choice. Using the uniform K-factors of Hameed, the computed pressure drops are in excellent agreement with the experimental results from the nominal pressure tube tests. For future ASSERT applications, either Hameed's uniform K-factors or the geometry-based model using Idelchik's thick-edged orifice equation are recommended, as are the friction factor correlations of Colebrook-White, Selander, and Aly and Groeneveld. More analysis of the geometry-based K-factor model is required. (author). 23 refs., 4 tabs., 9 figs

  11. Characterizing hydraulic fractures in shale gas reservoirs using transient pressure tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wang

    2015-06-01

    This work presents an unconventional gas reservoir simulator and its application to quantify hydraulic fractures in shale gas reservoirs using transient pressure data. The numerical model incorporates most known physical processes for gas production from unconventional reservoirs, including two-phase flow of liquid and gas, Klinkenberg effect, non-Darcy flow, and nonlinear adsorption. In addition, the model is able to handle various types and scales of fractures or heterogeneity using continuum, discrete or hybrid modeling approaches under different well production conditions of varying rate or pressure. Our modeling studies indicate that the most sensitive parameter of hydraulic fractures to early transient gas flow through extremely low permeability rock is actually the fracture-matrix contacting area, generated by fracturing stimulation. Based on this observation, it is possible to use transient pressure testing data to estimate the area of fractures generated from fracturing operations. We will conduct a series of modeling studies and present a methodology using typical transient pressure responses, simulated by the numerical model, to estimate fracture areas created or to quantity hydraulic fractures with traditional well testing technology. The type curves of pressure transients from this study can be used to quantify hydraulic fractures in field application.

  12. A fracture mechanics and reliability based method to assess non-destructive testings for pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Hideo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation has not been made on the effects of carrying out preservice and in-service nondestructive tests for securing the soundness, safety and maintainability of pressure vessels, spending large expenses and labor. Especially the problems concerning the time and interval of in-service inspections lack the reasonable, quantitative evaluation method. In this paper, the problems of pressure vessels are treated by having developed the analysis method based on reliability technology and probability theory. The growth of surface cracks in pressure vessels was estimated, using the results of previous studies. The effects of nondestructive inspection on the defects in pressure vessels were evaluated, and the influences of many factors, such as plate thickness, stress, the accuracy of inspection and so on, on the effects of inspection, and the method of evaluating the inspections at unequal intervals were investigated. The analysis of reliability taking in-service inspection into consideration, the evaluation of in-service inspection and other affecting factors through the typical examples of analysis, and the review concerning the time of inspection are described. The method of analyzing the reliability of pressure vessels, considering the growth of defects and preservice and in-service nondestructive tests, was able to be systematized so as to be practically usable. (Kako, I.)

  13. High prevalence of malnutrition among patients with solid non-hematological tumors as found by using skinfold and circumference measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Garófolo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Malnutrition in cancer patients has many causes. Nutritional status is usually assessed from weight/height indices. These present limitations for the nutritional assessment of cancer patients: their weights include tumor mass, and lean mass changes are not reflected in weight/height indices. The objective was to evaluate differences between two anthropometric methods and compare deficits, in non-hematological tumor patients and hematological disease patients. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study at Instituto de Oncologia Pediátrica, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Children and adolescents were evaluated between March 1998 and January 2000. Traditional anthropometric measurements were obtained in the first month of treatment (induction therapy, by weight-for-height (W/H using z-scores index for children and body mass index (BMI for adolescents. Body composition evaluations consisted of specific anthropometric measurements: triceps skinfold thickness (TSFT, mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC and arm muscle circumference (AMC. Data were analyzed to compare nutritional assessment methods for diagnosing malnutrition prevalence. The chi-squared test was used for comparative analyses between tumor patients and hematological disease patients. RESULTS: Analysis was done on 127 patients with complete data. Higher percentages of deficits were found among tumor patients, by W/H z-scores or BMI and by MUAC and AMC. Higher percentages of deficits were shown by TSFT (40.2% and MUAC (35.4% than by W/H z-scores or BMI (18.9%. CONCLUSION: Non-hematological tumor patients presented higher malnutrition prevalence than did hematological disease patients. Body composition measurements by TSFT and MUAC detected more patients with malnutrition than did W/H or BMI.

  14. Pressure drop performance evaluation for test assemblies with the newly developed top and bottom nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. K.; Park, N. K.; Su, J. M.; Kim, H. K.; Lee, J. N.; Kim, K. T.

    2003-01-01

    To perform the hydraulic test for the newly developed top and bottom nozzles, two kinds of test assemblies were manufactured i. e. one is the test assembly which has the newly developed top and bottom nozzles and the other is Guardian test assembly which is commercially in mass production now. The test results show that the test assembly with one top nozzle and two bottom nozzles has a greater pressure loss coefficient than Guardian test assembly by 60.9% and 90.4% at the bottom nozzle location. This cause is due to the debris filtering plate for bottom nozzle to improve a filtering efficiency aginst foreign material. In the region of mid grid and top nozzle, there is no difference in pressure loss coefficient between the test assemblies since the componet features in these regions are very similar or same each other. The loss coefficients are 14.2% and 21.9% for model A and B respectively in the scale of test assembly, and the value would be within the 10% in the scale of real fuel assembly. As a result of hydraulic performance evaluation, model A is superior to model B

  15. Evaluation of oxidative behavior of polyolefin geosynthetics utilizing accelerated aging tests based on temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengjia

    Polyolefin geosynthetics are susceptible to oxidation, which eventually leads to the reduction in their engineering properties. In the application of polyolefin geosynthetics, a major issue is an estimate of the materials durability (i.e. service lifetime) under various aging conditions. Antioxidant packages are added to the polyolefin products to extend the induction time, during which antioxidants are gradually depleted and polymer oxidation reactions are prevented. In this PhD study, an improved laboratory accelerating aging method under elevated and high pressure environments was applied to evaluate the combined effect of temperature and pressure on the depletion of the antioxidants and the oxidation of polymers. Four types of commercial polyolefn geosynthetic materials selected for aging tests included HDPE geogrid, polypropylene woven and nonwoven geotextiles. A total of 33 different temperature/pressure aging conditions were used, with the incubation duration up to 24 months. The applied oven temperature ranged from 35°C to 105°C and the partial oxygen pressure ranged from 0.005 MPa to 6.3 MPa. Using the Oxidative Induction Time (OIT) test, the antioxidant depletion, which is correlated to the decrease of the OIT value, was found to follow apparent first-order decay. The OIT data also showed that, the antioxidant depletion rate increased with temperature according to the Arrhenius equation, while under constant temperatures, the rate increased exponentially with the partial pressure of oxygen. A modified Arrhenius model was developed to fit the antioxidant depletion rate as a function of temperature and pressure and to predict the antioxidant lifetime under various field conditions. This study has developed new temperature/pressure incubation aging test method with lifetime prediction models. Using this new technique, the antioxidant lifetime prediction results are close to regular temperature aging data while the aging duration can be reduced considerably

  16. Mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel steels studied by static and dynamic torsion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munier, A.; Maamouri, M.; Schaller, R.; Mercier, O.

    1993-01-01

    Internal friction measurements and torsional plastic deformation tests have been performed in reactor pressure vessel steels (unirradiated, irradiated and irradiated/annealed specimens). The results of these experiments have been interpreted with help of transmission electron microscopy observations (conventional and in situ). It is shown how the interactions between screw dislocations and obstacles (Peierls valleys, impurities and precipitates) could explain the low temperature hardening and the irradiation embrittlement of ferritic steels. In addition, it appears that the nondestructive internal friction technique could be used advantageously to follow the evolution of the material properties under irradiation, as for instance the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel steels. (orig.)

  17. Estimation of fracture toughness and critical crack length of zircaloy pressure tube from ring tension test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Anantharaman, S.; Balakrishnan, K.S.; Sriharsha, H.K.

    1999-09-01

    Transverse fracture, toughness data of zircaloy pressure tubes are needed for assuring leak-before-break, if any, during their in-reactor residence. These data are conventionally computed from burst tests and/or using compact tension specimens. A study was undertaken to derive fracture toughness of zircaloy in the temperature range ambient to 300 deg C, from the transverse tensile properties. The fracture toughness properties so derived were used to estimate the values of critical crack length of zircaloy pressure tubes in the above temperature range. (author)

  18. Well control during the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    This Code has been prepared for use as a guide to safe practice for those concerned with well control during the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells. It is intended to provide information and guidance on those well control activities associated with high pressure wells which have an impact on safety offshore, and therefore require detailed care and attention. The Code has been produced in a United Kingdom Continental Shelf (UKCS) context, but the principles and recommendations have general relevance to similar operations elsewhere. (author)

  19. Analysis and Testing of a Metallic Repair Applicable to Pressurized Composite Aircraft Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Development of repair technology is vital to the long-term application of new structural concepts on aircraft structure. The design, analysis, and testing of a repair concept applicable to a stiffened composite panel based on the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure was recently completed. The damage scenario considered was a mid-bay to mid-bay saw-cut with a severed stiffener, flange, and skin. A bolted metallic repair was selected so that it could be easily applied in the operational environment. The present work describes results obtained from tension and pressure panel tests conducted to validate both the repair concept and finite element analysis techniques used in the design effort. Simulation and experimental strain and displacement results show good correlation, indicating that the finite element modeling techniques applied in the effort are an appropriate compromise between required fidelity and computational effort. Static tests under tension and pressure loadings proved that the proposed repair concept is capable of sustaining load levels that are higher than those resulting from the current working stress allowables. Furthermore, the pressure repair panel was subjected to 55,000 pressure load cycles to verify that the design can withstand a life cycle representative for a transport category aircraft. These findings enable upward revision of the stress allowables that had been kept at an overly-conservative level due to concerns associated with repairability of the panels. This conclusion enables more weight efficient structural designs utilizing the composite concept under investigation.

  20. Association between pressure pain sensitivity and autonomic function as assessed by a tilt table test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Søren; Bergmann, Natasha; Karpatschof, Benny

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that pressure sensitivity of the sternum (PPS) is associated with autonomic nervous system (ANS) function as assessed by tilt table test (TTT). in patients with stable ischemic heart disease. OBJECTIVES: (1) To evaluate an association between PPS and systolic...... blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR) responses to TTT; and (2) to test the hypothesis that a reduction of resting PPS raises the PPS, SBP and HR responses to TTT response and lowers risk factors for ANS dysfunction (ANSD). METHODS: Cross-sectional study: In 361 patients with stable ischemic heart...... disease we measured PPS, SBP, and HR during TTT. Intervention study: We reassessed subjects with persistent stress who concluded a stress intervention trial by a second TTT. RESULTS: Cross-sectional study: Resting PPS and the PPS response to TTT were correlated (r = - 0.37). The PPS response to TTT...

  1. Estimation of the hot extrusion process pressure cycle of zircaloy tubes by torsion and compression tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, D; Banchik, D.A; Gonzalez, I; Dagradi, J; Rodriguez, C

    2002-01-01

    In the production of Zircaloy-4 tubes for nuclear reactors, the first semi-processed tubular form is obtained using the extrusion process. Empirical equations are normally used, which can be applied to extrusion with axial symmetry, or analytical ones are used such as Seibel's equation to evaluate the extrusion process based on the material flow tension. When we use the flow tension corresponding to the mean value of the velocity of extrusion deformation, the extrusion pressure is significantly underestimated, with relation to the experimentally measured pressure. This is because of the flow tension's heavy dependence on the velocity of deformation, which is typical of commercial zirconium alloys. Therefore, the pressure was estimated by calculating the power dissipated during the deformation assuming a velocity field of homogenous deformation in each stage of deformation but without considering friction forces between the work and the extrusion matrix. The flow tension for the torsion tests performed are compared with the results obtained by compression as reported in the literature. These results are compared with four extrusion sequences carried out with different: reduction rates, temperatures, and deformation velocities. The flow tension from the compression test presents greater tension values than those estimated by the torsion test. The origin of these differences is discussed and the conclusion is that they can be attributed to the different crystallography textures generated in both tests. Once the correction is made for the texture variation, the flow tension values evaluated with both testing types in samples of Zircaloy-4 are the same. The peculiarities of each test in relation to the extrusion process are discussed. Despite the very simplified hypotheses that were assumed, the extrusion pressures calculated with the compression and torsion flow tension results, considering their dependence on the speed of deformation and temperature variation during

  2. Reliability of a test measuring transversus abdominis muscle recruitment with a pressure biofeedback unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Garnier, Katharina; Köveker, Kirstin; Rackwitz, Berid; Kober, Ulrike; Wilke, Sabine; Ewert, Thomas; Stucki, Gerold

    2009-03-01

    There are indications that segmental stabilising exercises (SSEs) are effective in the treatment of low back pain. The evaluation of successful training in SSE performance in patients requires a reliable outcome measure. The PRONE test gives an indication of the activity of the transversus abdominis muscle. Performed in prone lying using a pressure biofeedback unit, it has been used as an aid to training and to assess the subject's ability to perform SSEs correctly. To evaluate inter-observer and test-retest reliability of the PRONE test. Repeated measures by three observers on 2 days. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich, Germany. Forty nurses (39 females and one male), aged between 24 and 62 years, with at least one episode of low back pain. During the test, movement of the abdominal wall was monitored by measuring a change in pressure during muscle contraction termed 'abdominal hollowing'. Defined observation and palpation criteria were verified by the observers to ensure correct execution of the test. Participants were tested on two separate days. On the first day, Observer A performed two similar test sets, each with four exercises. On the second test day, Observers B and C conducted one test set each. This study found an intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20 to 0.67] for inter-observer reliability, and an ICC of 0.81 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.90) for test-retest reliability. Kappa values and the limits of agreement were also calculated with similar results. For this subject group, the PRONE test had relatively low inter-observer reliability but, as may be expected, higher test-retest reliability. It is suggested that by providing visual feedback, the PRONE test may enhance patients' insight into their deep abdominal muscle recruitment and thereby increase their motivation to exercise.

  3. Low-Pressure Testing of the Mars Science Laboratory’s Solid Sampling System: Test Methods and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S.; von der Heydt, M.; Hanson, C.; Jandura, L.

    2009-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission is scheduled to launch in 2011 with an extensive suite of in situ science instruments. Acquiring, processing and delivering appropriate samples of rock and martian regolith to the instruments is a critical component in realizing the science capability of these payload elements. However, there are a number of challenges in validating the design of these systems. In particular, differences in the environment (atmospheric pressure and composition, temperature, gravity), target materials (variation in rock and soil properties), and state of the hardware (electrical potential, particulate coatings) may effect sampling performance. To better understand the end-to-end system and allow development of mitigation strategies if necessary, early testing of high-fidelity engineering models of the hardware in the solid sample chain is being conducted. The components of the sample acquisition, processing & delivery chain that will be tested are the drill, scoop, sieves, portioners, and instrument inlet funnels. An evaluation of the environmental parameter space was conducted to identify a subset that may have significant effects on sampling performance and cannot be well bounded by analysis. Accordingly, support equipment to enable testing at Mars surface pressures (5-10 Torr), with carbon dioxide was designed and built. A description of the testing set-up, investigations, and preliminary results will be presented.

  4. Apparatus for materials testing in high-pressure hydrogen at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gang; He, Jianhong; Fukuyama, Seiji; Yokogawa, Kiyoshi

    1997-11-01

    A new type of apparatus for materials testing in high-pressure hydrogen up to 10 MPa at low temperatures down to 20 K was developed. The apparatus consists of the pressure vessel, cooled by a two-step external cooling method, and the hydraulic loading system. In the first cooling step the specimen in the pressure vessel is cooled to 84 K using a cooling tube between the coolant shroud filled with liquid nitrogen and the pressure vessel. In the second cooling step the specimen is cooled to 20 K using a helium refrigerator. The apparatus is designed to measure the actual load on the specimen with an external load cell irrespective of the axial load caused by high pressure and friction at the sliding seals. As an example of the application of the apparatus, the tensile properties of type 304L stainless steel in 1 MPa hydrogen and helium at low temperature are measured and hydrogen environment embrittlement of the steel is briefly discussed.

  5. Helium leak testing of a radioactive contaminated vessel under high pressure in a contaminated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    At ANL-W, with the shutdown of EBR-II, R ampersand D has evolved from advanced reactor design to the safe handling, processing, packaging, and transporting spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. New methods of processing spent fuel rods and transforming contaminated material into acceptable waste forms are now in development. Storage of nuclear waste is a high interest item. ANL-W is participating in research of safe storage of nuclear waste, with the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site in New Mexico the repository. The vessel under test simulates gas generated by contaminated materials stored underground at the WIPP site. The test vessel is 90% filled with a mixture of contaminated material and salt brine (from WIPP site) and pressurized with N2-1% He at 2500 psia. Test acceptance criteria is leakage -7 cc/seconds at 2500 psia. The bell jar method is used to determine leakage rate using a mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD). The efficient MSLD and an Al bell jar replaced a costly, time consuming pressure decay test setup. Misinterpretation of test criterion data caused lengthy delays, resulting in the development of a unique procedure. Reevaluation of the initial intent of the test criteria resulted in leak tolerances being corrected and test efficiency improved

  6. Significant issues and changes for ANSI/ASME OM-1 1981, part 1, ASME OMc code-1994, and ASME OM Code-1995, Appendix I, inservice testing of pressure relief devices in light water reactor power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seniuk, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper identifies significant changes to the ANSI/ASME OM-1 1981, Part 1, and ASME Omc Code-1994 and ASME OM Code-1995, Appendix I, {open_quotes}Inservice Testing of Pressure Relief Devices in Light-Water Reactor Power Plants{close_quotes}. The paper describes changes to different Code editions and presents insights into the direction of the code committee and selected topics to be considered by the ASME O&M Working Group on pressure relief devices. These topics include scope issues, thermal relief valve issues, as-found and as-left set-pressure determinations, exclusions from testing, and cold setpoint bench testing. The purpose of this paper is to describe some significant issues being addressed by the O&M Working Group on Pressure Relief Devices (OM-1). The writer is currently the chair of OM-1 and the statements expressed herein represents his personal opinion.

  7. Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program intermediate-scale pressure vessel tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, R.H.; Merkle, J.G.; Smith, G.C.; Whitman, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The tests of intermediate-size vessels with sharp flaws permitted the comparison of experimentally observed behavior with analytical predictions of the behavior of flawed pressure vessels. Fracture strains estimated by linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) were accurate in the cases in which the flaws resided in regions of high transverse restraint and the fracture toughness was sufficiently low for unstable fracture to occur prior to yielding through the vessel wall. When both of these conditions were not present, unstable fracture did occur, always preceded by stable crack growth; and the cylinders with flaws initially less than halfway through the wall attained gross yield prior to burst. Predictions of failure pressure of the vessels with flawed nozzles, based upon LEFM estimates of failure strain, were very conservative. LEFM calculations of critical load were based upon small-specimen fracture toughness test data. Whenever gross yielding preceded failure, the actual strains achieved were considerably greater than the estimated strains at failure based on LEFM. In such cases the strength of the vessel may be no longer dependent upon plane-strain fracture toughness but upon the capacity of the cracked section to carry the imposed load stably in the plastic range. Stable crack growth, which has not been predictable quantitatively, is an important factor in elastic-plastic analysis of strength. The ability of the flawed vessels to attain gross yield in unflawed sections has important qualitative implications on pressure vessel safety margins. The gross yield condition occurs in light-water-reactor pressure vessels at about 2 x design pressure. The intermediate vessel tests that demonstrated a capacity for exceeding this load confirm that the presumed margin of safety is not diminished by the presence of flaws of substantial size, provided that material properties are adequate

  8. Structural analysis and testing of a miniature flexible joint under pressure and vector loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Junxue; Wang, Chao; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Yang, Jingxian; Yang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The structural characteristics of a miniature tactical motor flexible joint subjected to pressure and vector loading were investigated using finite element analysis and bench test. Three-dimensional non-linear finite element analysis was conducted using ANSYS Code Version 11.0. The axial deflection, vectoring torque, and stress distributions in elastomeric and reinforcement rings were presented. The predicted values were consistent with the test data. Results indicate that the axial compressive stiffness increased gradually and nonlinearly with pressure, while the angular stiffness remained nearly constant in the vectoring angle range from 0 .deg. to 6 .deg. Under pressure loading, the elastomeric shear stress was negative, high at both sides, and low at the center of the cross-section, while the reinforcement hoop stress was compressive at the inner radius and tensile at the outer radius. The compressive stress was also high. The flexible joint exhibited higher stress level with altered stress distribution when subjected to additional vector loading. Existing empirical formulas for reinforcement hoop compressive stress were determined to be not applicable to the miniature flexible joint, which significantly overestimated the stress caused by pressure and underestimated the stress caused by vectoring.

  9. Initial development and testing of a novel foam-based pressure sensor for wearable sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyth Barry

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper provides an overview of initial research conducted in the development of pressure-sensitive foam and its application in wearable sensing. The foam sensor is composed of polypyrrole-coated polyurethane foam, which exhibits a piezo-resistive reaction when exposed to electrical current. The use of this polymer-coated foam is attractive for wearable sensing due to the sensor's retention of desirable mechanical properties similar to those exhibited by textile structures. Methods The development of the foam sensor is described, as well as the development of a prototype sensing garment with sensors in several areas on the torso to measure breathing, shoulder movement, neck movement, and scapula pressure. Sensor properties were characterized, and data from pilot tests was examined visually. Results The foam exhibits a positive linear conductance response to increased pressure. Torso tests show that it responds in a predictable and measurable manner to breathing, shoulder movement, neck movement, and scapula pressure. Conclusion The polypyrrole foam shows considerable promise as a sensor for medical, wearable, and ubiquitous computing applications. Further investigation of the foam's consistency of response, durability over time, and specificity of response is necessary.

  10. Simulated Seismic Load Tests on Dam Core Material to Scrutinize Pore Water Pressure Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar Farooq, Qazi; Uchimura, Taro

    2010-05-01

    Dam Core is the back bone of the large earthen dam and primarily constructed with fine grained soils. In this research Cyclic tri-axial tests are used to simulate the effect of different earthquake intensities on medium to high confined Fujinomori clay (replicated dam core material). Seismic load intensity is reproduced in the laboratory by applying different cyclic stress amplitudes, while the numbers of cycles (N) were kept constant. Both isotropic and anisotropic conditions are included in the test plan. Key discussions are distresses generated by seismic loading such as pore water pressure (PWP), deformations, possibility of micro cracking, and effective strength reduction. With increase in cyclic stress amplitude, exponential increases in pore pressure (PWP), sudden decrease in mean effective principal stress (P') which ultimately increases overall instability in dam core, large deformations, and generation of micro / macro cracking are primary conclusions.

  11. Design of the background gas pressure diagnostic for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.R.; Stever, R.D.; Goerz, D.A.; Pickles, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Background Gas Pressure (BGP) diagnostic is a collection of pressure gauges inside the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) vacuum vessel to measure neutral gas density near the plasma region. These measurements will help us understand the role of background neutrals in particle and power balance, particularly in the maintenance of the cold halo plasma that shields the hot core plasma from returning neutrals. The diagnostic consists of magnetron-type, cold-cathode gauges, each stripped of its permanent magnet, and utilizing the MFTF-B ambient B-field in strengths of 1 to 25 kG. As part of the design effort, tests were performed to characterize gauge operation in strong magnetic field strengths and to evaluate the parameters affecting performance. This paper describes the BGP diagnostic and presents the details of the mechanical and electrical design

  12. Testing of Full Scale Flight Qualified Kevlar Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Yoder, Tommy; Forsyth, Brad; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    Many decades ago NASA identified a need for low-mass pressure vessels for carrying various fluids aboard rockets, spacecraft, and satellites. A pressure vessel design known as the composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) was identified to provide a weight savings over traditional single-material pressure vessels typically made of metal and this technology has been in use for space flight applications since the 1970's. A typical vessel design consisted of a thin liner material, typically a metal, overwrapped with a continuous fiber yarn impregnated with epoxy. Most designs were such that the overwrapped fiber would carry a majority of load at normal operating pressures. The weight advantage for a COPV versus a traditional singlematerial pressure vessel contributed to widespread use of COPVs by NASA, the military, and industry. This technology is currently used for personal breathing supply storage, fuel storage for auto and mass transport vehicles and for various space flight and aircraft applications. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was recently asked to review the operation of Kevlar 2 and carbon COPVs to ensure they are safely operated on NASA space flight vehicles. A request was made to evaluate the life remaining on the Kevlar COPVs used on the Space Shuttle for helium and nitrogen storage. This paper provides a review of Kevlar COPV testing relevant to the NESC assessment. Also discussed are some key findings, observations, and recommendations that may be applicable to the COPV user community. Questions raised during the investigations have revealed the need for testing to better understand the stress rupture life and age life of COPVs. The focus of this paper is to describe burst testing of Kevlar COPVs that has been completed as a part of an the effort to evaluate the effects of ageing and shelf life on full scale COPVs. The test articles evaluated in this discussion had a diameter of 22 inches for S/N 014 and 40 inches for S/N 011. The

  13. Beam Test of a Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavity for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. A 99.5% alumina ring was inserted in a high pressure RF test cell and subjected to an intense proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of the performance of this dielectric loaded high pressure RF cavity will be presented.

  14. Loss-of-Fluid Test findings in pressurized water reactor core's thermal-hydraulic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core's thermal-hydraulic behavior findings from experiments performed at the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The potential impact of these findings on the safety and economics of PWR's generation of electricity is also discussed. Reviews of eight important findings in the core's physical behavior and in experimental methods are presented with supporting evidence

  15. Study on the high temperature, high pressure operation technique of fuel test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Dae Young; Lee, Chung Young; Sim, Bong Shick; Kim, Jun Yun

    2001-04-01

    The project, 'Feasibility review on the installation of FTL in HANARO' charged by KISTEP has been performed for the technical evaluation of the steady state fuel test loop during 4 months from Dec. 2000 to Mar. 2001. This study describes the high temperature, high pressure technology of the FTL. This report includes the followings : - The construction of FTL - The operation schemes of the steady state - The operation procedures of FTL

  16. Study on the high temperature, high pressure operation technique of fuel test loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Dae Young; Lee, Chung Young; Sim, Bong Shick; Kim, Jun Yun

    2001-04-01

    The project, 'Feasibility review on the installation of FTL in HANARO' charged by KISTEP has been performed for the technical evaluation of the steady state fuel test loop during 4 months from Dec. 2000 to Mar. 2001. This study describes the high temperature, high pressure technology of the FTL. This report includes the followings : - The construction of FTL - The operation schemes of the steady state - The operation procedures of FTL.

  17. Does aqueductal stenosis influence the lumbar infusion test in normal-pressure hydrocephalus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, Emilio Luis; Santamarta, David

    2016-12-01

    Late-onset idiopathic aqueductal stenosis may present with clinical features indistinct from idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Moreover, aqueductal stenosis (AS) is not always detected by conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to compare the hydrodynamic pattern among NPH patients according to the patency of the aqueduct. Fifty-six consecutive lumbar infusion tests were performed in patients with NPH syndrome. Precipitating causes of hydrocephalus were excluded, and aqueductal patency was examined through high-resolution, T2-weighted 3D MRI. Patients were classified into two groups: non-patent aqueduct and patent aqueduct. Mean values of pressure and pulse amplitude were obtained from basal and plateau stages of infusion studies. Twelve of 56 patients with NPH-like symptoms presented with morphological AS (21.4 %). Patent aqueduct and non-patent aqueduct groups had similar values of mean opening lumbar pressure (8.2 vs. 8.1 mmHg), and mean opening pulse amplitude (3.1 vs. 2.9 mmHg). Mean pressure in the plateau stage (28.6 vs. 23.2 mmHg), and mean pulse amplitude in the plateau stage (12.5 vs. 10.6 mmHg) were higher in the patent aqueduct group. These differences were not statistically significant. Only Rout was significantly higher in the patent aqueduct group (13.6 vs. 10.1 mmHg/ml/min). One-third of NPH patients with AS presented Rout >12 mmHg/ml/min. No differences in mean pressure or pulse amplitude during basal and plateau epochs of the lumbar infusion test in NPH patients were detected, regardless of aqueductal patency. However, Rout was significantly higher in patients with patent aqueduct.

  18. Acoustic emission test on a 25mm thick mild steel pressure vessel with inserted defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, P.G.; Dawson, D.G.; Hanley, D.J.; Kirby, N.

    1976-12-01

    Acoustic emission measurements have been taken on an experimental mild steel vessel with 4 inserted defects ranging in severity up to 90% of through thickness. The vessel was subjected to a series of pressure excursions of increasing magnitude until failure occurred by extension of the largest inserted defect through the vessel wall. No acoustic emission was detected throughout any part of the tests which would indicate the presence of such serious defects or of impending failure. Measurements of acoustic emission from metallurgical specimens are included and the results of post test inspection using conventional NDT and metallographic techniques are reported. (author)

  19. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The static... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH...

  20. A computerized neuropsychological test battery designed for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background A tool for standardized and repeated neuropsychological assessments in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) is needed. The objective of this study was to develop a computerized neuropsychological test battery designed for INPH and to evaluate its reliability, validity and patient’s ability to complete the tests. Methods Based on a structured review of the literature on neuropsychological testing in INPH, the eight tests most sensitive to the INPH cognitive profile were implemented in a computerized format. The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) was also included. Tests were presented on a touch-screen monitor, with animated instructions and speaker sound. The battery was evaluated with the following cohorts: A. Test-retest reliability, 44 healthy elderly; B. Validity against standard pen and pencil testing, 28 patients with various cognitive impairments; C. Ability to complete test battery, defined as completion of at least seven of the eight tests, 40 investigated for INPH. Results A. All except the figure copy test showed good test-retest reliability, r = 0.67-0.90; B. A high correlation was seen between conventional and computerized tests (r = 0.66-0.85) except for delayed recognition and figure copy task; C. Seventy-eight percent completed the computerized battery; Patients diagnosed with INPH (n = 26) performed worse on all tests, including depression score, compared to healthy controls. Conclusions A new computerized neuropsychological test battery designed for patients with communicating hydrocephalus and INPH was introduced. Its reliability, validity for general cognitive impairment and completion rate for INPH was promising. After exclusion of the figure copy task, the battery is ready for clinical evaluation and as a next step we suggest validation for INPH and a comparison before and after shunt surgery. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.org NCT01265251. PMID:25279138

  1. Influence of headspace pressure on methane production in Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, David; Montes, Jesús A; Rico, José Luis; Rico, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    The biochemical methane potential test is the most commonly applied method to determine methane production from organic wastes. One of the parameters measured is the volume of biogas produced which can be determined manometrically by keeping the volume constant and measuring increases in pressure. In the present study, the effect of pressure accumulation in the headspace of the reactors has been studied. Triplicate batch trials employing cocoa shell, waste coffee grounds and dairy manure as substrates have been performed under two headspace pressure conditions. The results obtained in the study showed that headspace overpressures higher than 600mbar affected methane production for waste coffee grounds. On the contrary, headspace overpressures within a range of 600-1000mbar did not affect methane production for cocoa shell and dairy manure. With the analyses performed in the present work it has not been possible to determine the reasons for the lower methane yield value obtained for the waste coffee grounds under high headspace pressures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Orthostatic blood pressure test for risk stratification in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Münch

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD in young adults, mainly ascribed to ventricular tachycardia (VT. Assuming that VT is the major cause of (pre- syncope in HCM patients, its occurrence is essential for SCD risk stratification and primarily preventive ICD-implantation. However, evidence of VT during syncope is often missing. As the differentiation of potential lethal causes for syncope such as VT from more harmless reasons is crucial, HCM patients were screened for orthostatic dysregulation by using a simple orthostatic blood pressure test.Over 15 months (IQR [9;20] 100 HCM patients (55.8±16.2 yrs, 61% male were evaluated for (pre-syncope and VT (24h-ECGs, device-memories within the last five years. Eighty patients underwent an orthostatic blood pressure test. Logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis.In older patients (>40 yrs a positive orthostatic test result increased the chance of (pre- syncope by a factor of 63 (95%-CI [8.8; 447.9], p<0.001; 93% sensitivity, 95%-CI [76; 99]; 74% specificity, 95%-CI [58; 86]. No correlation with VT was shown. A prolonged QTc interval also increased the chance of (pre- syncope by a factor of 6.6 (95%-CI [2.0; 21.7]; p=0.002.The orthostatic blood pressure test is highly valuable for evaluation of syncope and presyncope especially in older HCM patients, suggesting that orthostatic syncope might be more relevant than previously assumed. Considering the high complication rates due to ICD therapies, this test may provide useful information for the evaluation of syncope in individual risk stratification and may help to prevent unnecessary device implantations, especially in older HCM patients.

  3. Superposition well-test method for reservoir characterization and pressure management during CO2 injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    As a significant fraction of a carbon storage project's budget is devoted to site characterization and monitoring, there has been an intense drive in recent years to both lower cost and improve the quality of data obtained. Two data streams that are cheap and always available are pressure and flow rate measurements from the injection well. Falloff testing, in which the well is shut-in for some period of time and the pressure decline curve measured, is often used to probe the storage zone and look for indications of hydraulic barriers, fracture-dominated flow, and other reservoir characteristics. These tests can be used to monitor many hydromechanical processes of interest, including hydraulic fracturing and fault reactivation. Unfortunately, the length of the shut-in period controls how far away from the injector information may be obtained. For operational reasons these tests are typically kept short and infrequent, limiting their usefulness. In this work, we present a new analysis method in which ongoing injection data is used to reconstruct an equivalent falloff test, without shutting in the well. The entire history of injection may therefore be used as a stand in for a very long test. The method relies upon a simple superposition principle to transform a multi-rate injection sequence into an equivalent single-rate process. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method using injection data from the Snøhvit storage project. We also explore its utility in an active pressure management scenario. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Integrity assessment of TAPS reactor pressure vessel at extended EOL using surveillance test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Shah, Priti Kotak

    2008-05-01

    Integrity assessment of pressure vessels of nuclear reactors (RPV) primarily concentrates on the prevention of brittle failure and conditions are defined under which brittle failure can be excluded. Accordingly, two approaches based on Transition Temperature Concept and Fracture Mechanics Concept were adopted using the impact test results of three credible surveillance data sets obtained from the surveillance specimens of Tarapur Atomic Power Station. RT NDT data towards end of life (EOL) were estimated from the impact test results in accordance with the procedures of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2 and were used as primary input for assessment of the vessel integrity. SA302B (nickel modified) steel cladded with stainless steel is used as the pressure vessel material for the two 210 MWe boiling water reactors of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). The reactors were commissioned during the year 1969. The chemical compositions of SA302B (modified) steel used in fabricating the vessel and the specified tensile property and the Charpy impact property requirements of the steel broadly meet ASME specified requirements. Therefore, the pressure temperature limit curves prescribed by General Electric (G.E.) were compared with those as obtained using procedures of ASME Section XII, Appendix G. The tensile and the Charpy impact properties at 60 EFPY of vessel operation as derived from the surveillance specimens even fulfilled the specified requirements for the virgin material of ASME. Integrity assessment carried out using the two approaches indicated the safety of the vessel for continued operation up to 60 EFPY. (author)

  5. An experimental platform for triaxial high-pressure/high-temperature testing of rocks using computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Guenther; Lapene, Alexandre; Castanier, Louis M.; Kovscek, Anthony R.

    2018-04-01

    A conventional high-pressure/high-temperature experimental apparatus for combined geomechanical and flow-through testing of rocks is not X-ray compatible. Additionally, current X-ray transparent systems for computed tomography (CT) of cm-sized samples are limited to design temperatures below 180 °C. We describe a novel, high-temperature (>400 °C), high-pressure (>2000 psi/>13.8 MPa confining, >10 000 psi/>68.9 MPa vertical load) triaxial core holder suitable for X-ray CT scanning. The new triaxial system permits time-lapse imaging to capture the role of effective stress on fluid distribution and porous medium mechanics. System capabilities are demonstrated using ultimate compressive strength (UCS) tests of Castlegate sandstone. In this case, flooding the porous medium with a radio-opaque gas such as krypton before and after the UCS test improves the discrimination of rock features such as fractures. The results of high-temperature tests are also presented. A Uintah Basin sample of immature oil shale is heated from room temperature to 459 °C under uniaxial compression. The sample contains kerogen that pyrolyzes as temperature rises, releasing hydrocarbons. Imaging reveals the formation of stress bands as well as the evolution and connectivity of the fracture network within the sample as a function of time.

  6. Controlling the variable of pressure in the production of test footwear impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Riches, Philip; Bandey, Helen; Savage, Kathleen; NicDaéid, Niamh

    2012-09-01

    Footwear impression lifting and enhancement techniques may be affected by several variables introduced during the production of test footwear impressions, thus limiting the usefulness of enhancement technique comparisons and the results obtained. One such variable is the force applied when the impressed mark is being made. Producing consistent test impressions for research into footwear enhancement techniques would therefore be beneficial. This study was designed to control pressure in the production of test footwear impressions when mimicking a stamping action. Twenty-seven volunteers were asked to stamp on two different surfaces and the average stamping force was recorded. Information from the data obtained was used to design and build a mechanical device which could be calibrated to consistently deliver footwear impressions with the same force onto a receiving surface. Preliminary experiments using this device and different contaminants on the footwear sole have yielded consistent and repeatable impressions. Controlling the variable of pressure for the production of test impressions in this study demonstrated that the differences observed were visual (due to the amount of contaminant transferred and subsequent enhancement) and did not affect the replication of outer sole characteristics. This paper reports the development of the device and illustrates the quality of the impressions produced. Copyright © 2011 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of Creep-Fatigue Integrity for High Temperature Pressure Vessel in a Sodium Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyeong-Yeon; Lee, Dong-Won

    2014-01-01

    In this study, high temperature integrity evaluation on a pressure vessel of the expansion tank operating at elevated temperature of 510°C in the sodium test facility of the SEFLA(Sodium Thermal-hydraulic Experiment Loop for Finned-tube Sodium-to-Air heat exchanger) to be constructed at KAERI has been performed. Evaluations of creep fatigue damage based on a full 3D finite element analyses were conducted for the expansion tank according to the recent elevated temperature design codes of ASME Section III Subsection NH and French RCC-MRx. It was shown that the expansion tank maintains its integrity under the intended creep-fatigue loads. Quantitative code comparisons were conducted for the pressure vessel of austenitic stainless steel 316L

  8. Stable crack growth during over stressing or proof testing of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njo, D.H.

    1985-07-01

    In an earlier study several years ago an attempt has been made by a study group in Switzerland formed by representatives of utilities, manufacturers, inspection agency and the licensing authority to evaluate systematically the advantages and disadvantages of a proof test for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) taking into account the different aspects involved. In this study, the present day practice in the requirements regarding proof testing in several countries with nuclear power plants were assessed. Using the method of fracture mechanics, taking into account the proof test conditions and material behaviour at hand, qualified quantitative statements were then sought for. One of the important findings of the study was that a sufficiently accurate determination of stable crack growth (SCG) during proof testing is a necessary precondition for a qualified quantitative statement. At that time this requirement could not be met. The aim of the present exercise of collecting available information on SCG was twofold: to get an overview of the present day requirements on pre-service and in-service proof testing of reactor pressure vessels in different countries with NPPs; to collect data on stable crack growth due to over stressing during proof tests to be used in the quantitative assessment, using fracture mechanics methods, and the potential benefit, if any, of proof tests. In the framework of the present study, the originally stipulated aims could not be achieved. It turned out to be a very complex and difficult problem, where various important aspects are little known and could not be assessed without further comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigations

  9. Research of explosives in an environment of high pressure and temperature using a new test stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Drzewiecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the test stand for determining the blast abilities of explosives in high pressure and temperature conditions as well as the initial results of the research are presented. Explosives are used in rock burst and methane prevention to destroy precisely defined fragments of the rock mass where energy and methane are accumulated. Using this preventive method for fracturing the structure of the rocks which accumulate the energy or coal of the methane seam very often does not bring the anticipated results. It is because of the short range of destructive action of the post-blast gases around the blast hole. Evaluation of the blast dynamics of explosives in a test chamber, i.e. in the pressure and temperature conditions comparable to those found “in situ”, will enable evaluation of their real usefulness in commonly used mining hazard preventive methods. At the same time, it will enable the development of new designs of the explosive charges used for precisely determined mining hazards. In order to test the explosives for their use in difficult environmental conditions and to determine the characteristics of their explosion, a test chamber has been built. It is equipped with a system of sensors and a high-frequency recording system of pressure and temperature during a controlled explosion of an explosive charge. The results of the research will enable the development of new technologies for rock burst and methane prevention which will significantly increase workplace health and safety level. This paper presented results constitute the initial phase of research started in the middle of 2014.

  10. Intraocular pressure dynamics with prostaglandin analogs: a clinical application of water-drinking test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özyol P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pelin Özyol,1 Erhan Özyol,1 Ercan Baldemir2 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Biostatistics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Mugla, Turkey Aim: To evaluate the clinical applicability of the water-drinking test in treatment-naive primary open-angle glaucoma patients. Methods: Twenty newly diagnosed primary open-angle glaucoma patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in this prospective study. The water-drinking test was performed at baseline and 6 weeks and 3 months after prostaglandin analog treatment. Peak and fluctuation of intraocular pressure (IOP measurements obtained with the water-drinking test during follow-up were analyzed. Analysis of variance for repeated measures and paired and unpaired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean baseline IOP values in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma were 25.1±4.6 mmHg before prostaglandin analog treatment, 19.8±3.7 mmHg at week 6, and 17.9±2.2 mmHg at month 3 after treatment. The difference in mean baseline IOP of the water-drinking tests was statistically significant (P<0.001. At 6 weeks of prostaglandin analog treatment, two patients had high peak and fluctuation of IOP measurements despite a reduction in baseline IOP. After modifying treatment, patients had lower peak and fluctuation of IOP values at month 3 of the study. Conclusion: Peak and fluctuation of IOP in response to the water-drinking test were lower with prostaglandin analogs compared with before medication. The water-drinking test can represent an additional benefit in the management of glaucoma patients, especially by detecting higher peak and fluctuation of IOP values despite a reduced mean IOP. Therefore, it could be helpful as a supplementary method in monitoring IOP in the clinical practice. Keywords: glaucoma, intraocular pressure, water-drinking test, prostaglandin analog, intra­ocular pressure fluctuation

  11. Testing of a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Multi-Bay Pressure Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn; Rouse, Marshall; Przekop, Adam; Lovejoy, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project to develop technologies to reduce aviation's impact on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe to enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations. NASA and The Boeing Company have worked together to develop a structural concept that is lightweight and an advancement beyond state-of-the-art composite structures. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is an integrally stiffened panel design where elements are stitched together. The PRSEUS concept is designed to maintain residual load carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. A series of building block tests were evaluated to explore the fundamental assumptions related to the capability and advantages of PRSEUS panels. The final step in the building block series is an 80%-scale pressure box representing a portion of the center section of a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) transport aircraft. The testing of this article under maneuver load and internal pressure load conditions is the subject of this paper. The experimental evaluation of this article, along with the other building block tests and the accompanying analyses, has demonstrated the viability of a PRSEUS center body for the HWB vehicle. Additionally, much of the development effort is also applicable to traditional tube-and-wing aircraft, advanced aircraft configurations, and other structures where weight and through-the-thickness strength are design considerations.

  12. Inspection device for external examination of pressure vessels, preferably for ultrasonic testing of reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figlhuber, D.; Gallwas, J.; Weber, R.; Weber, J.

    1978-01-01

    The inspection device is placed in the annular gap between pressure vessel and biological shield of the BWR. In the annulus there is arranged at least one longitudinal rail which has got vertical guideways. Along it there can be moved on testing paths a manipulator with the ultrasonic search unit. The manipulator drive is outside of the inspection annulus. It is coupled to the manipulator by means of a tension member being guided over a reversing unit mounted at the upper end of the longitudinal rail. As a tension member there may be used a drag chain; the drive and the reversing unit are provided with corresponding chain wheels. (DG) [de

  13. NASA Prototype All Composite Tank Cryogenic Pressure Tests to Failure with Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlink, Rudolph J.; Pena, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This Paper will describe the results of pressurization to failure of 100 gallon composite tanks using liquid nitrogen. Advanced methods of health monitoring will be compared as will the experimental data to a finite element model. The testing is wholly under NASA including unique PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) based active vibration technology. Other technologies include fiber optics strain based systems including NASA AFRC technology, Acoustic Emission, Acellent smart sensor, this work is expected to lead to a practical in-Sutu system for composite tanks.

  14. Evaluation of dynamic fracture toughness for Yong Gwang unit 5 reactor pressure vessel materials (Baseline Tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Se Hwan; Kim, Joo Hag; Hong, Jun Hwa; Kwon, Sun Chil; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    The dynamic fracture toughness (K{sub d}) of intermediate shell and its weld in SA 508 CI. 3 Yong Gwang 5 reactor pressure vessel was determined and evaluated. Precracked thirty six Charpy specimens were tested by using an instrumented impact tester. The purpose of present work is to evaluate and confirm the un-irradiated dynamic fracture toughness and to provide pre-irradiation baseline data for future evaluation on dynamic fracture toughness change during operation. 18 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  15. Nondestructive Magnetic Adaptive Testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel degradation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomáš, Ivan; Vértesy, G.; Gillemot, F.; Székely, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 432, 1-3 (2012), s. 371-377 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1323 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : neutron irradiation * steel degradation * nuclear reactor pressure vessel * magnetic NDT * magnetic minor hysteresis loops * Magnetic Adaptive Testing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2012 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnucmat.2012.09.006

  16. Equivalent threshold sound pressure levels for acoustic test signals of short duration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben; Daugaard, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    . The measurements were performed with two types of headphones, Telephonics TDH-39 and Sennheiser HDA-200. The sound pressure levels were measured in an IEC 318 ear simulator with Type 1 adapter (a flat plate) and a conical ring. The audiometric methods used in the experiments were the ascending method (ISO 8253......-1) and a transformed up/down procedure. Twenty-eight normal hearing test subjects (13 females and 15 males) in the age range from 18 to 26 years participated in the experiments. The results of this investigation will be used in standardisation (ISO/TC43/WG1)....

  17. Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen in a high-pressure fluid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jy-An; Feng, Zhili; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Liu, Kenneth C

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides fatigue testing of a material specimen while the specimen is disposed in a high pressure fluid environment. A specimen is placed between receivers in an end cap of a vessel and a piston that is moveable within the vessel. Pressurized fluid is provided to compression and tension chambers defined between the piston and the vessel. When the pressure in the compression chamber is greater than the pressure in the tension chamber, the specimen is subjected to a compression force. When the pressure in the tension chamber is greater than the pressure in the compression chamber, the specimen is subjected to a tension force. While the specimen is subjected to either force, it is also surrounded by the pressurized fluid in the tension chamber. In some examples, the specimen is surrounded by hydrogen.

  18. The online sealing performance test of the primary circuit pressure boundary check valve in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yunfei; Huang Huimin

    2013-01-01

    The primary circuit pressure boundary check valves of 320 MW pressurized water reactor is a nuclear grade I key equipment. The sealing demand is very high, which is directly related to the internal leakage rate of the primary circuit system. After the welding check valve is repaired, the sealing performance is judged by color printing checks. If there is water or humid vapor in the pipe, it will affect the accuracy of the color printing checks. For the particularity of the online check valve tightness test, online detecting device is designed by the hydraulic pressure drop method in other nuclear power plants, but the method has some shortcomings and restrictions. In this paper, we design a reliable and portable test equipment by the low-pressure gas seal test flow measurement, which make accurate and quantitative judgment of sealing property after the pressure boundary check valves are repaired. (authors)

  19. Application of advanced irradiation analysis methods to light water reactor pressure vessel test and surveillance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, R.; Dudey, N.; McElroy, W.; Wullaert, R.; Fabry, A.

    1977-01-01

    Inaccurate characterization and inappropriate application of neutron irradiation exposure variables contribute a substantial amount of uncertainty to embrittlement analysis of light water reactor pressure vessels. Damage analysis involves characterization of the irradiation environment (dosimetry), correlation of test and surveillance metallurgical and dosimetry data, and projection of such data to service conditions. Errors in available test and surveillance dosimetry data are estimated to contribute a factor of approximately 2 to the data scatter. Non-physical (empirical) correlation procedures and the need to extrapolate to the vessel may add further error. Substantial reductions in these uncertainties in future programs can be obtained from a more complete application of available damage analysis tools which have been developed for the fast reactor program. An approach to reducing embrittlement analysis errors is described, and specific examples of potential applications are given. The approach is based on damage analysis techniques validated and calibrated in benchmark environments

  20. Fast Responding Pressure-Sensitive Paint for Large-Scale Wind Tunnel Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work focuses on implementing fast-response pressure-sensitive paint for measurements of unsteady pressure in rotorcraft applications. Significant...

  1. High strain rate tensile testing of sheet materials using three Hopkinson pressure bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary G.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to circumvent the inherent problems associated with Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar (SHTB systems, a new experimental technique is proposed for the high strain rate tensile testing of sheet specimens in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB systems. Existing solutions employ a multiple gage section hat-shaped specimen to transform the incoming pulse from compression into tension at the specimen level. However, multiple gage section specimens are not suitable for studying the post-necking behavior of materials as the required symmetry of the mechanical system is no longer guaranteed in the post-necking range. Here, we present a new load-inversion device that is used in conjunction with three Hopkinson pressure bars for the tensile loading of single gage section sheet specimen. The device is designed to transform the compression load applied at its boundaries into a tensile loading of the specimen. Two output bars are used to measure the total force applied on the specimen boundaries, while Digital Image Correlation (DIC is used to determine the strain histories on the specimen surface based on photographs acquired at a frequency of about 100 kHz. In addition to uniaxial tensile experiments on TRIP780 steel sheet specimens at strain rates ranging from 200/s to 1000/s, results are presented on the dynamic fracture testing of notched tensile specimens.

  2. Initial psychometric testing and validation of the patient participation in pressure injury prevention scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, Wendy; Harbeck, Emma; Bucknall, Tracey; McInnes, Elizabeth; Thalib, Lukman; Whitty, Jennifer; Wallis, Marianne; Gillespie, Brigid

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop the Patient Participation in Pressure injury Prevention (PPPIP) scale and undertake initial testing of some of its psychometric properties. Clinical practice guidelines recommend patient involvement in pressure injury prevention. There is some evidence that patients are willing to participate in this activity, but there are currently no instruments to measure this participation. This methodological study used data collected as part of a cluster randomized trial to develop and test the PPPIP scale. A sample of 688 of patients with complete PPPIP scale data was used. A stratified random subsample, (Subsample A) was created and the remainder became Subsample B. Item analysis, exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha reliability were undertaken in Subsample A. Confirmatory factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha reliability were undertaken in Subsample B. Data collection occurred between June 2014 - May 2015. In Subsample A (n = 320), inter-item correlations, item total correlations met the acceptance criteria and an exploratory factor analysis identified a one factor solution. In Subsample B (n = 368), the confirmatory factor analysis supported this one factor. In both subsamples, the Cronbach's alpha was 0·86. This study provides preliminary evidence of acceptable reliability and validity of the PPPIP scale in two subsamples of hospitalized patients who had limited mobility. It may be used in research and quality improvement activities. As a better conceptual understanding of patient participation emerges, the PPPIP scale may require refinement. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Implantation and testing of a novel episcleral pressure transducer: A new approach to telemetric intraocular pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariacher, Siegfried; Ebner, Martina; Hurst, José; Szurman, Peter; Januschowski, Kai

    2018-01-01

    Measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) is an essential tool in monitoring glaucoma. Single IOP assessments during clinical routine examinations represent punctual values and are not able to identify IOP fluctuations and spikes. Telemetric IOP measurements are able to monitor IOP during the day and night, and are location-independent. Six telemetric episcleral IOP sensors were investigated after minimally invasive subconjunctival implantation in 6 eyes of 6 New-Zealand-White rabbits. Three of the 4 edges of the implant were fixated intrasclerally with non-absorbable sutures. The sutures were stitched into the edges of the implants' silicone rubber encasements. Telemetric IOP measurements were validated 1 week, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 12 weeks and 30 weeks after implantation. For each validation the anterior chamber was cannulated and connected to a height-adjustable water column. Different intracameral pressure levels (10-45 mmHg) were generated by height adjustment of the water column. Measurement reliability and concordance between telemetric and intracameral IOP was validated using Bland-Altman analysis. Overall comparison (10-45 mmHg) between telemetric and intracameral pressure revealed a standard deviation of ±1.0 mmHg. A comparison of pressure values in the range between 10 and 30 mmHg revealed a standard deviation of ±0.8 mmHg. Device deficiency was related to follow-up length: 4 weeks after implantation, 3 of the 6 sensors showed malfunction, with all sensors having failed 30 weeks after implantation. The most likely reason for the sensor malfunction is the loss of hermeticity as a result of penetration of the encasement during the episcleral fixation, resulting from the lack of preformed suture holes at the implants encasement. However, no clinical signs of injury or inflammation of the conjunctiva, sclera, implantation site or any other involved structures were observed, except for an expected mild short-term irritation postoperatively. The episcleral

  4. Pressure Decay Testing Methodology for Quantifying Leak Rates of Full-Scale Docking System Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Wasowski, Janice L.; Garafolo, Nicholas G.; Penney, Nicholas; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a new docking system to support future space exploration missions to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. This system, called the Low Impact Docking System, is a mechanism designed to connect the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to the International Space Station, the lunar lander (Altair), and other future Constellation Project vehicles. NASA Glenn Research Center is playing a key role in developing the main interface seal for this docking system. This seal will be relatively large with an outside diameter in the range of 54 to 58 in. (137 to 147 cm). As part of this effort, a new test apparatus has been designed, fabricated, and installed to measure leak rates of candidate full-scale seals under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Using this test apparatus, a pressure decay testing and data processing methodology has been developed to quantify full-scale seal leak rates. Tests performed on untreated 54 in. diameter seals at room temperature in a fully compressed state resulted in leak rates lower than the requirement of less than 0.0025 lbm, air per day (0.0011 kg/day).

  5. Pressure scaled water impact test of a 12.5 inch diameter model of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    A total of 59 tail first drops were made. Model entry conditions simulated full scale vertical velocities of approximately 75 to 110 ft/sec with horizontal velocities up to 45 ft/sec and impact angles to + or - 10 deg. These tests were conducted at scaled atmospheric pressures (1.26 psia or 65 mm.Hg). The model, test program, test facility, test equipment, instrumentation system, data reduction procedures, and test results are described.

  6. Technical communication: design and in vitro testing of a pressure-sensing syringe for endotracheal tube cuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Alexander H; Slocum, Alexander H; Spiegel, Joan E

    2012-05-01

    Endotracheal intubation is a frequently performed procedure in the prehospital setting, intensive care unit, and for patients undergoing surgery. The endotracheal tube cuff must be inflated to a pressure that prevents air leaks without compromising tracheal mucosal blood flow. For simultaneous endotracheal tube cuff inflation and measurement, we designed and tested a novel pressure-sensing syringe in vitro. The prototype was developed using a standard 10-mL polycarbonate syringe body that houses a plunger and a silicone rubber bellows, the pressure-sensing element. Bellow feasibility was determined and modeled using finite element analysis. Repeatability testing at each pressure measurement for each bellows (pressure versus deflection) was within an average standard deviation of 0.3 cm to 1.61 cm (1%-5% error). Using an aneroid manometer for comparison, there was excellent linear correlation with a Spearman rank of 0.99 (P < 0.001), up to 30 cm H(2)O.

  7. Multistep triaxial strength tests: investigating strength parameters and pore pressure effects on Opalinus Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graesle, W.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The impact of natural variability between rock samples from a single formation is a common problem for the characterisation of THM properties of rocks. Data variation arising from heterogeneity between samples often obscures details of material behaviour. Besides efforts to reduce this statistical noise by careful selection of samples, there are essentially two approaches to overcome this problem: - To generate very large data sets for better statistics. - To avoid the impact of natural variability by yielding an extensive data set from a single sample. The multistep strength test follows the latter approach to characterise the mechanical behaviour of Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri and the possible impact of pore pressure effects. The concept of the multistep strength test comprises three test sections, each focused on the investigation of one mechanical characteristic of Opalinus Clay. Any section is composed of a series of strain controlled load cycles at various levels of confining pressure. 1) The linear elastic limit, i.e. the onset of nonlinearity in the stress-strain-relationship σ dev (ε 1 ) during strain-controlled triaxial loading, is determined in section 1. It defines a lower limit for the onset of damage. Avoiding sample damage is essential during this test section to ensure that all measurements reflect the behaviour of undisturbed material. Therefore, a rather strict and well detectable criterion for the onset of nonlinearity is required to enable a timely termination of any load phase. 2) Section 2 is focused on shear strength. Any load cycle is stopped as soon as peak stress is detected. As progressive damage of the sample is unavoidable during this process, it must be expected that only very few measured peak stresses approximately represent properties of the undamaged material. 3) Test section 3 is a conventional test of residual strength. Tests are carried out on cylindrical samples (100 mm

  8. Choking under the pressure of a positive stereotype: gender identification and self-consciousness moderate men's math test performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagler, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Choking under pressure occurs when an individual underperforms due to situational pressure. The present study examined whether being the target of a positive social stereotype regarding math ability causes choking among men. Gender identification and self-consciousness were hypothesized to moderate the effect of math-gender stereotypes on men's math test performance. Men high in self-consciousness but low in gender identification significantly underperformed when exposed to gender-relevant test instructions. No significant effects were found under a gender-irrelevant condition. These findings are discussed in the contexts of research on stereotype threat, stereotype lift, and choking under pressure.

  9. Ablative material testing for low-pressure, low-cost rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, G. Paul; Smith, Timothy D.

    1995-01-01

    The results of an experimental evaluation of ablative materials suitable for the production of light weight, low cost rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles are presented. Ten individual specimens of four different compositions of silica cloth-reinforced phenolic resin materials were evaluated for comparative erosion in a subscale rocket engine combustion chamber. Gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen were used as propellants, operating at a nominal chamber pressure of 1138 kPa (165 psi) and a nominal mixture ratio (O/F) of 3.3. These conditions were used to thermally simulate operation with RP-1 and liquid oxygen, and achieved a specimen throat gas temperature of approximately 2456 K (4420 R). Two high-density composition materials exhibited high erosion resistance, while two low-density compositions exhibited approximately 6-75 times lower average erosion resistance. The results compare favorably with previous testing by NASA and provide adequate data for selection of ablatives for low pressure, low cost rocket engines.

  10. Background Pressure Profiles for Sonic Boom Vehicle Testing in the NASA Glenn 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond; Shaw, Stephen; Adamson, Eric; Simerly, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to identify test facilities that offer sonic boom measurement capabilities, an exploratory test program was initiated using wind tunnels at NASA research centers. The subject of this report is the sonic boom pressure rail data collected in the Glenn Research Center 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The purpose is to summarize the lessons learned based on the test activity, specifically relating to collecting sonic boom data which has a large amount of spatial pressure variation. The wind tunnel background pressure profiles are presented as well as data which demonstrated how both wind tunnel Mach number and model support-strut position affected the wind tunnel background pressure profile. Techniques were developed to mitigate these effects and are presented.

  11. Beam Profile Measurement in MTA Beam Line for High Pressure RF Cavity Beam Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, M.R.; Bross, A.; Chung, M.; Greer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwartz, T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent High Pressure RF (HPRF) cavity experiment at MuCool Test Area (MTA) has used 400 MeV Linac proton beam to study the beam loading effect. When the energetic proton beam passes through the cavity, it ionizes the inside gas and produces the electrons. These electrons consume RF power inside the cavity. Number of electrons produced per cm inside the cavity (at 950 psi Hydrogen gas) per incident proton is ∼ 1200. The measurement of beam position and profile are necessary. MTA is flammable gas (Hydrogen) hazard zone so we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrument using Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper presents quantitative information about beam position and beam profile. Neutral density filter was used to avoid saturation of CCD camera. Image data is filtered and fitted with Gaussian function to compute the beam size. The beam profile obtained from scintillation screen shall be compared with multi-wire beam profile.

  12. Device for automated remote ultrasonic testing of welded joints of circular pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuzo, M.

    1989-01-01

    The device consists of an ultrasonic head consisting of a system of ultrasonic probes mounted on supports on a revolving plate. The frame of the device consists of two faces holding two tubes for guiding the ultrasonic head by means of a guiding screw and a nut. The frame is supported on the controlled surface with magnetic wheels. The frame drive may drive the ultrasonic head in the vertical direction and the whole device in the horizontal direction. The circular movement of the probes is effected separately by a drive on the upper plate. The frame travels along a guide strip on rollers. The device may also be used for ultrasonic testing of cylindrical pressure vessels. (J.B.). 2 figs

  13. Research and Development of Automated Eddy Current Testing for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Kyle L.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Nichols, Charles T.; Spencer, Paul R.; Lucero, Ralph E.

    2012-01-01

    Eddy current testing (ET) was used to scan bare metallic liners used in the fabrication of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) for flaws which could result in premature failure of the vessel. The main goal of the project was to make improvements in the areas of scan signal to noise ratio, sensitivity of flaw detection, and estimation of flaw dimensions. Scan settings were optimized resulting in an increased signal to noise ratio. Previously undiscovered flaw indications were observed and investigated. Threshold criteria were determined for the system software's flaw report and estimation of flaw dimensions were brought to an acceptable level of accuracy. Computer algorithms were written to import data for filtering and a numerical derivative filtering algorithm was evaluated.

  14. NASA/GE Energy Efficient Engine low pressure turbine scaled test vehicle performance report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, M. J.; Cherry, D. G.; Pedersen, J.

    1983-01-01

    The low pressure turbine for the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine is a highly loaded five-stage design featuring high outer wall slope, controlled vortex aerodynamics, low stage flow coefficient, and reduced clearances. An assessment of the performance of the LPT has been made based on a series of scaled air-turbine tests divided into two phases: Block 1 and Block 2. The transition duct and the first two stages of the turbine were evaluated during the Block 1 phase from March through August 1979. The full five-stage scale model, representing the final integrated core/low spool (ICLS) design and incorporating redesigns of stages 1 and 2 based on Block 1 data analysis, was tested as Block 2 in June through September 1981. Results from the scaled air-turbine tests, reviewed herein, indicate that the five-stage turbine designed for the ICLS application will attain an efficiency level of 91.5 percent at the Mach 0.8/10.67-km (35,000-ft), max-climb design point. This is relative to program goals of 91.1 percent for the ICLS and 91.7 percent for the flight propulsion system (FPS).

  15. High Powered Tests of Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavities for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. Alumina of purities ranging from 96 to 99.8% was tested in a high pressure RF test cell at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of breakdown studies with pure nitrogen gas, and oxygen-doped nitrogen gas indicate the peak surface electric field on the alumina ranges between 10 and 15 MV/m. How these results affect the design of a prototype cooling channel cavity will be discussed.

  16. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Greene, N.; Palko, Joseph L.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Sutter, James; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to a previously reported experimental investigation and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel s residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV

  17. Applying Flammability Limit Probabilities and the Normoxic Upward Limiting Pressure Concept to NASA STD-6001 Test 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sandra L.; Beeson, Harold; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Repeated Test 1 extinction tests near the upward flammability limit are expected to follow a Poisson process trend. This Poisson process trend suggests that rather than define a ULOI and MOC (which requires two limits to be determined), it might be better to define a single upward limit as being where 1/e (where e (approx. equal to 2.7183) is the characteristic time of the normalized Poisson process) of the materials burn, or, rounding, where approximately 1/3 of the samples fail the test (and burn). Recognizing that spacecraft atmospheres will not bound the entire oxygen-pressure parameter space, but actually lie along the normoxic atmosphere control band, we can focus the materials flammability testing along this normoxic band. A Normoxic Upward Limiting Pressure (NULP) is defined that determines the minimum safe total pressure for a material within the constant partial pressure control band. Then, increasing this pressure limit by a factor of safety, we can define the material as being safe to use at the NULP + SF (where SF is on the order of 10 kilopascal, based on existing flammability data). It is recommended that the thickest material to be tested with the current Test 1 igniter should be 3 mm thick (1/8 inches) to avoid the problem of differentiating between an ignition limit and a true flammability limit.

  18. Development of the test facilities for the measurement of core flow and pressure distribution of SMART reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Y.J.; Euh, D.J.; Youn, Y.J.; Chu, I.C.; Kwon, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    A design of SMART reactor has been developed, of which the primary system is composed of four internal circulation pumps, a core of 57 fuel assemblies, eight cassettes of steam generators, flow mixing head assemblies, and other internal structures. Since primary design features are very different from conventional reactors, the characteristics of flow and pressure distribution are expected to be different accordingly. In order to analyze the thermal margin and hydraulic design characteristics of SMART reactor, design quantification tests for flow and pressure distribution with a preservation of flow geometry are necessary. In the present study, the design feature of the test facility in order to investigate flow and pressure distribution, named “SCOP” is described. In order to preserve the flow distribution characteristics, the SCOP is linearly reduced with a scaling ratio of 1/5. The core flow rate of each fuel assembly is measured by a venturi meter attached in the lower part of the core simulator having a similarity of pressure drop for nominally scaled flow conditions. All the 57 core simulators and 8 S/G simulators are precisely calibrated in advance of assembling in test facilities. The major parameters in tests are pressures, differential pressures, and core flow distribution. (author)

  19. Queckenstedts's test : electromanometric examination of CSF pressure on jugular compression and its clinical value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakke, Johannes Peter Willem Frederik

    1969-01-01

    Isovolumetric CSF pressure recording provides a very accurate analogue of hydrodynamic events occurring in the subarachnoid space. This study was undertaken to determine normal parameters of CSF pressure rise and fall on jugular compression for e1ectro manometric CSF pressure measurement and to

  20. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel integrity insurance by crack arrestability evaluation using load from CVN tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.

    1997-01-01

    The present work is undertaken in the framework of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance and aims at revisiting the crack arrest approach to structural integrity insurance. This approach, performed under normal plant operation conditions, can also offer an attractive alternative to the crack initiation philosophy promoted for accidental analysis. To this end, an accidental conservative, cost effective and robust methodology is forwarded and demonstrated: it makes use of the crack arrest information contained in the instrumented Charpy V-notch impact test and/or in the shear fracture appearance of broken samples. Particular attention is paid to the appraisal of uncertainties and the related safety margin. The resulting capability is placed in perspective with the state-of-the-art crack initiation methodology based on the slow bend testing of recracked specimens, presently under standardization world-wide. The investigation leads to highlight three conceptual weaknesses of current enfgineering and regulatory practices. Improved crack arrestability evaluation emerges as an optimal approach to insure safe PWR operation up to design end-of-life and beyond

  1. Effects of operator time pressure and noise on manual ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enkvist, J.; Edland, A.; Svenson, O.

    2002-01-01

    In earlier studies of manual ultrasonic testing, great variations have been found in operator performance, often attributed to operator fatigue. However, no conclusive findings have been reported. In the present study, twenty operators performed manual ultrasonic inspections of six test-pieces with manufactured flaws. The operators performed the inspections under stress (high arousal - time pressure and noise) and no-stress conditions; one condition the first day and the other the second and last day. According to the Yerkes-Dodson Law there is an optimal arousal level where performance is highest. It was hypothesised that the stress condition led to a level of arousal so high that it would affect the results negatively. However, contrary to the hypotheses it was found that the manipulation increased operator performance. Operators with the stress condition day 1 performed better than the other operators (under the no-stress condition). This was interpreted as the 'stress first' (group 1) operators had established efficient performance patterns the first day - affecting also the second day. Operators beginning with stress condition also tended to be more motivated. It was concluded that operator performance is affected by arousal. (author)

  2. Natural Circulation High Pressure Loop Dynamics Around Operating Point, Tests and Modelling With Retran 02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masriera, N.A; Doval, A.S; Mazufri, C.M

    2000-01-01

    The Natural Circulation High Pressure Loop (CAPCN) reproduces in scale all the one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic phenomena occurring in the primary loop of CAREM-25 reactor.It plays an important role in the qualification process of calculating computer codes.This facility demanded to develop several technological solutions in order to achieve the measuring and control quality required by that process.This engineering and experimental development allowed completing the first stage of dynamic tests during 1998.The trends of recorded data were systematically evaluated in terms of the deviations of main variables in response to different perturbations.By this analysis a group of eight transients was selected, providing a Minimum Representative Set (MRS) of dynamic tests, allowing the evaluation of all dynamic phenomena.Each of these transients was simulated with RETRAN-02, using a spreadsheet to facilitate the consistent elaboration and modification of input files.Comparing measured data and computer simulations, it may be concluded that it is possible to reproduce the dynamic response of all the transients with a level of approximation quite homogeneous and generally acceptable.It is possible to identify the detailed physical models that fit better the dynamic phenomena, and which of the limitations of RETRAN code are more relevant

  3. Full scale test results for ship ice impact forces and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoneim, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    A set of full scale impact tests were carried out for the icebreakers Canmar Kigoriak and Robert LeMeur in first and multi-year ice conditions in the southern Beaufort Sea. Preliminary results of the testing program were published in Ghoneim et al. (1984). This paper presents some salient results of further analysis of the data. This includes a description of the different types of ice ramming mechanisms and the corresponding ice force time histories and ship response. A comparison between the bow force peak values for the kigoriak and the Robert LeMeur is made and the reasons for the difference are evaluated. The question of dynamic magnification of the response is investigated. The relationship between the peak impact force and the ramming velocity is evaluated for both ships and compared with theoretical and empirical formulations. Other parametric relationships are presented, including such parameters as force duration and relative magnitude of the impact and beaching bow forces. The added mass is evaluated from measured accelerations and calculated bow forces and are shown to be time dependent. The relationship between ice pressure and corresponding contact area is discussed. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented

  4. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of Rock Dynamic Test with Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of rock dynamic properties by split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB was experimentally and numerically evaluated with ANSYS/LS-DYNA. The effects of different diameters, different loading rates, and different propagation distances on wave dispersion of input bars in SHPB with rectangle and half-sine wave loadings were analyzed. The results show that the dispersion effect on the diameter of input bar, loading rate, and propagation distance under half-sine waveform loading is ignorable compared with the rectangle wave loading. Moreover, the degrees of stress uniformity under rectangle and half-sine input wave loadings are compared in SHPB tests, and the time required for stress uniformity is calculated under different above-mentioned loadings. It is confirmed that the stress uniformity can be realized more easily using the half-sine pulse loading compared to the rectangle pulse loading, and this has significant advantages in the dynamic test of rock-like materials. Finally, the Holmquist-Johnson-Concrete constitutive model is introduced to simulate the failure mechanism and failure and fragmentation characteristics of rock under different strain rates. And the numerical results agree with that obtained from the experiment, which confirms the effectiveness of the model and the method.

  5. The performance of blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors as screening tests for ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, M R; Wald, N J; Morris, J K

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarises the main evidence and conclusions relating to using blood pressure measurement as a screening test to identify people who will develop ischaemic heart disease (IHD) or stroke, as recently published in a Health Technology Assessment report. While blood pressure is recognised as an important cause of stroke and IHD, and lowering blood pressure can substantially lower the risk of these diseases, the measurement of blood pressure is a poor screening test. It is not good in distinguishing those who will and will not develop these diseases. The poor screening performance is illustrated by the findings that in the largest cohort study, persons in the top 10% of the distribution of systolic blood pressure experienced only 21% of all IHD events and 28% of all strokes at a given age. Using several cardiovascular risk factors in combination does not add materially to the poor screening performance of blood pressure alone. Among persons in a specified age group, the 5% at highest risk experience 17% of all heart disease deaths with risk computation based on blood pressure alone, 22% when based on blood pressure and apolipoprotein B (or LDL cholesterol) in combination, and only 28% using these two, smoking and three other cardiovascular risk factors all in combination. Identifying patients at the time of hospital discharge following myocardial infarction or stroke is the most effective screening test to identify those who will die of cardiovascular disease. In patients with a history of myocardial infarction or stroke the cardiovascular death rate in the absence of treatment is about 5% per year, a risk that persists for at least 15 years. In the absence of treatment, about half of all deaths from heart disease in a population occur after hospital discharge following the first infarct. Among persons with no history of cardiovascular disease, age is a better screening test than the reversible risk factors, and the best policy is to offer treatment to all

  6. Effects of time pressure and noise on non-destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enkvist, J.; Svenson, Ola

    2001-12-01

    Manual ultrasonic testing (UT) is the most frequently used non-destructive testing (NDT) method for in-service inspection of components important to safety and/or plant availability. Earlier, great variations have been found in operator performance, often attributed to operator fatigue. However, no conclusive findings have been reported. According to the Yerkes-Dodson law there is an optimal arousal level where performance is highest, for simple tasks this optimum is higher than for more complex tasks. In the present study twenty operators performed manual ultrasonic inspections of six test pieces with manufactured flaws. The operators performed the inspections under stress (high arousal - time pressure and noise) and non-stress conditions; one condition the first day and the other the second and last day. It was hypothesised that the stress condition led to a level of arousal so high that it would affect the results negatively. The results confirmed that the operators were affected by the stress condition. However, contrary to the hypotheses it was found that the manipulation increased operator performance. Operators with the stress condition the first day performed better than the other operators did (under both the stress and the non-stress condition). This was interpreted as the 'stress first' (group 1) operators had established efficient performance patterns the first day - affecting also the second day. Operators beginning with stress condition also tended to be more motivated. It was concluded that operator performance is affected by arousal. The operators with non-stress first (group 2) worked hard with the complex task but their arousal level was assumed to be above the optimal, resulting in a low hit rate

  7. Effects of time pressure and noise on non-destructive testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enkvist, J.; Svenson, Ola [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Psychology; Edland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    Manual ultrasonic testing (UT) is the most frequently used non-destructive testing (NDT) method for in-service inspection of components important to safety and/or plant availability. Earlier, great variations have been found in operator performance, often attributed to operator fatigue. However, no conclusive findings have been reported. According to the Yerkes-Dodson law there is an optimal arousal level where performance is highest, for simple tasks this optimum is higher than for more complex tasks. In the present study twenty operators performed manual ultrasonic inspections of six test pieces with manufactured flaws. The operators performed the inspections under stress (high arousal - time pressure and noise) and non-stress conditions; one condition the first day and the other the second and last day. It was hypothesised that the stress condition led to a level of arousal so high that it would affect the results negatively. The results confirmed that the operators were affected by the stress condition. However, contrary to the hypotheses it was found that the manipulation increased operator performance. Operators with the stress condition the first day performed better than the other operators did (under both the stress and the non-stress condition). This was interpreted as the 'stress first' (group 1) operators had established efficient performance patterns the first day - affecting also the second day. Operators beginning with stress condition also tended to be more motivated. It was concluded that operator performance is affected by arousal. The operators with non-stress first (group 2) worked hard with the complex task but their arousal level was assumed to be above the optimal, resulting in a low hit rate.

  8. Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDs) into structural and process designs. Substantial progress in underground construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. MWK equipment at the grade level and the first tier are being set in the structure.

  9. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test... ......do ......do The air-supply hose, detachable coupling, and demand valve of the demand class or pressure-demand valve of the pressure-demand class for Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure...

  10. Fluctuating pressures on fan blades of a turbofan engine, flight test investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenster, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Miniature pressure transducers were used to measure the fluctuating pressure on the fan blades of a JT15D engine in flight to aid in understanding fan-noise generation. Although the blade pressures can be considered very useful in determining far-field noise sources in the subsonic fan-blade tip speeds, other mechanisms, and as shock waves in the transonic and supersonic fan-blade tip speeds, limit their usefulness in these higher speed ranges.

  11. Test of 6-in.-thick pressure vessels. Series 4: intermediate test vessels V-5 and V-9 with inside nozzle corner cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, J.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Holz, P.P.; Smith, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Failure testing is described for two 99-cm-diam (39-in.), 15.2-cm-thick (6-in.) steel pressure vessels, each containing one flawed nozzle. Vessel V-5 was tested at 88 0 C (190 0 F) and failed by leaking without fracturing after extensive stable crack growth. Vessel V-9 was tested at 25 0 C (75 0 F) and failed by fracturing. Material properties measured before the tests were used for pretest and posttest fracture analyses. Test results supported by analysis indicate that inside nozzle corner cracks are not subject to plane strain under pressure loading. The preparation of inside nozzle corner cracks is described in detail. Extensive experimental data are tabulated and plotted

  12. Test of 6-in. -thick pressure vessels. Series 4: intermediate test vessels V-5 and V-9 with inside nozzle corner cracks. [BWR and PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, J.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Holz, P.P.; Smith, J.E.

    1977-08-01

    Failure testing is described for two 99-cm-diam (39-in.), 15.2-cm-thick (6-in.) steel pressure vessels, each containing one flawed nozzle. Vessel V-5 was tested at 88/sup 0/C (190/sup 0/F) and failed by leaking without fracturing after extensive stable crack growth. Vessel V-9 was tested at 25/sup 0/C (75/sup 0/F) and failed by fracturing. Material properties measured before the tests were used for pretest and posttest fracture analyses. Test results supported by analysis indicate that inside nozzle corner cracks are not subject to plane strain under pressure loading. The preparation of inside nozzle corner cracks is described in detail. Extensive experimental data are tabulated and plotted.

  13. Propagule pressure-invasibility relationships: testing the influence of soil fertility and disturbance with Lespedeza cuneata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, Gregory R; Foster, Bryan L; Brassil, Chad E

    2014-02-01

    Although invasion risk is expected to increase with propagule pressure (PP), it is unclear whether PP-invasibility relationships follow an asymptotic or some other non-linear form and whether such relationships vary with underlying environmental conditions. Using manipulations of PP, soil fertility and disturbance, we tested how each influence PP-invasibility relationships for Lespedeza cuneata in a Kansas grassland and use recruitment curve models to determine how safe sites may contribute to plant invasions. After three growing seasons, we found that the PP-invasibility relationships best fit an asymptotic model of invasion reflecting a combination of density-independent and density-dependent processes and that seeds were aggregated within the plant community despite efforts to uniformly sow seeds. Consistent with some models, community invasibility decreased with enhanced soil fertility or reduced levels of disturbance in response to changes in the fraction of safe sites. Our results illustrate that disturbance and soil fertility can be a useful organizing principle for predicting community invasibility, asymptotic models are a reasonable starting point for modeling invasion, and new modeling techniques—coupled with classic experimental approaches—can enhance our understanding of the invasion process.

  14. Reference values for lung function tests: II. Maximal respiratory pressures and voluntary ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Neder

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The strength of the respiratory muscles can be evaluated from static measurements (maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, MIP and MEP or inferred from dynamic maneuvers (maximal voluntary ventilation, MVV. Although these data could be suitable for a number of clinical and research applications, no previous studies have provided reference values for such tests using a healthy, randomly selected sample of the adult Brazilian population. With this main purpose, we prospectively evaluated 100 non-smoking subjects (50 males and 50 females, 20 to 80 years old, selected from more than 8,000 individuals. Gender-specific linear prediction equations for MIP, MEP and MVV were developed by multiple regression analysis: age and, secondarily, anthropometric measurements explained up to 56% of the variability of the dependent variables. The most cited previous studies using either Caucasian or non-Caucasian samples systematically underestimated the observed values of MIP (P<0.05. Interestingly, the self-reported level of regular physical activity and maximum aerobic power correlates strongly with both respiratory and peripheral muscular strength (knee extensor peak torque (P<0.01. Our results, therefore, provide a new frame of reference to evaluate the normalcy of some useful indexes of respiratory muscle strength in Brazilian males and females aged 20 to 80.

  15. Resting and post bronchial challenge testing carbon dioxide partial pressure in individuals with and without asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Miedinger

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There is conflicting evidence about resting carbon dioxide levels in asthmatic individuals. We wanted to determine if transcutaneously measured carbon dioxide levels prior and during bronchial provocation testing differ according to asthma status reflecting dysfunctional breathing. METHODS: We investigated active firefighters and policemen by means of a validated questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, spirometry, bronchial challenge testing with methacholine (MCT and measurement of transcutaneous blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PtcCO(2 at rest prior performing spirometry, one minute and five minutes after termination of MCT. A respiratory physician blinded to the PtcCO(2 results assigned a diagnosis of asthma after reviewing the available study data and the files of the workers medical screening program. RESULTS: The study sample consisted of 128 male and 10 female individuals. Fifteen individuals (11% had physician-diagnosed asthma. There was no clinically important difference in median PtcCO(2 at rest, one and five minutes after recovery from MCT in asthmatics compared to non-asthmatics (35.6 vs 35.7 mmHg, p = 0.466; 34.7 vs 33.4 mmHg, p = 0.245 and 37.4 vs 36.4 mmHg, p = 0.732. The median drop in PtcCO(2 during MCT and the increase after MCT was lower in asthmatics compared to non-asthmatics (0.1 vs 3.2 mmHg, p = 0.014 and 1.9 vs 2.9 mmHg, p = 0.025. CONCLUSIONS: PtcCO(2 levels at rest prior and during recovery after MCT do not differ in individuals with or without physician diagnosed asthma. The fall and subsequent increase in PtcCO(2 levels are higher in non-asthmatics than in asthmatics and seems to be related with increased number of respiratory maneuvers during MCT.

  16. Two-phase flow in volatile oil reservoir using two-phase pseudo-pressure well test method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifi, M.; Ahmadi, M. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2009-09-15

    A study was conducted to better understand the behaviour of volatile oil reservoirs. Retrograde condensation occurs in gas-condensate reservoirs when the flowing bottomhole pressure (BHP) lowers below the dewpoint pressure, thus creating 4 regions in the reservoir with different liquid saturations. Similarly, when the BHP of volatile oil reservoirs falls below the bubblepoint pressure, two phases are created in the region around the wellbore, and a single phase (oil) appears in regions away from the well. In turn, higher gas saturation causes the oil relative permeability to decrease towards the near-wellbore region. Reservoir compositional simulations were used in this study to predict the fluid behaviour below the bubblepoint. The flowing bottomhole pressure was then exported to a well test package to diagnose the occurrence of different mobility regions. The study also investigated the use of a two-phase pseudo-pressure method on volatile and highly volatile oil reservoirs. It was concluded that this method can successfully predict the true permeability and mechanical skin. It can also distinguish between mechanical skin and condensate bank skin. As such, the two-phase pseudo-pressure method is particularly useful for developing after-drilling well treatment and enhanced oil recovery process designs. However, accurate relative permeability and PVT data must be available for reliable interpretation of the well test in volatile oil reservoirs. 18 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  17. Synthesizing ocean bottom pressure records including seismic wave and tsunami contributions: Toward realistic tests of monitoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tatsuhiko; Tsushima, Hiroaki

    2016-11-01

    The present study proposes a method for synthesizing the ocean bottom pressure records during a tsunamigenic earthquake. First, a linear seismic wave simulation is conducted with a kinematic earthquake fault model as a source. Then, a nonlinear tsunami simulation is conducted using the sea bottom movement calculated in the seismic wave simulation. By using these simulation results, this method can provide realistic ocean bottom pressure change data, including both seismic and tsunami contributions. A simple theoretical consideration indicates that the dynamic pressure change caused by the sea bottom acceleration can contribute significantly until the duration of 90 s for a depth of 4000 m in the ocean. The performance of a tsunami monitoring system was investigated using the synthesized ocean bottom pressure records. It indicates that the system based on the hydrostatic approximation could not measure the actual tsunami height when the time does not elapse enough. The dynamic pressure change and the permanent sea bottom deformation inside the source region break the condition of a simple hydrostatic approximation. A tsunami source estimation method of tFISH is also examined. Even though the synthesized records contain a large dynamic pressure change, which is not considered in the algorithm, tFISH showed a satisfactory performance 5 min after the earthquake occurrence. The pressure records synthesized in this study, including both seismic wave and tsunami contributions, are more practical for evaluating the performance of our monitoring ability, whereas most tsunami monitoring tests neglect the seismic wave contribution.

  18. Testing a Model of Resistance to Peer Pressure among Mexican-Origin Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamaca, Mayra Y.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the factors associated with resistance to peer pressure toward antisocial behaviors among a sample of Mexican-origin adolescents (n=564) living in a large Southwestern city in the U.S. A model examining the influence of generational status, emotional autonomy from parents, and self-esteem on resistance to peer pressure was…

  19. A systematic review of the effect of pre-test rest duration on toe and ankle systolic blood pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Measurement of toe and ankle blood pressure is commonly used to evaluate peripheral vascular status, yet the pre-test rest period is inconsistent in published studies and among practitioners, and could affect results. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate all research that has investigated the effect of different periods of pre-test rest on toe and ankle systolic blood pressure. Methods The following databases were searched up to April 2012: Medline (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1947), CINAHL (from 1937), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (from 1800). No language or publication restrictions were applied. Eighty-eight content experts and researchers in the field were contacted by email to assist in the identification of published, unpublished, and ongoing studies. Studies evaluating the effect of two or more pre-test rest durations on toe or ankle systolic blood pressure were eligible for inclusion. No restrictions were placed on participant characteristics or the method of blood pressure measurement. Outcomes included toe or ankle systolic blood pressure and adverse effects. Abstracts identified from the search terms were independently assessed by two reviewers for potential inclusion. Results 1658 abstracts were identified by electronic searching. Of the 88 content experts and researchers in the field contacted by email a total of 33 replied and identified five potentially relevant studies. No studies were eligible for inclusion. Conclusions There is no evidence of the effect of different periods of pre-test rest duration on toe and ankle systolic blood pressure measurements. Rigorous trials evaluating the effect of different durations of pre-test rest are required to direct clinical practice and research. PMID:24708870

  20. The pathophysiology of chronic noncommunicating hydrocephalus: lessons from continuous intracranial pressure monitoring and ventricular infusion testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian

    2017-08-11

    OBJECTIVE The pathophysiology of chronic noncommunicating hydrocephalus (ncHC) is poorly understood. This present study explored whether lessons about the pathophysiology of this clinical entity might be retrieved from results of overnight monitoring of pulsatile and static intracranial pressure (ICP) and ventricular infusion testing. METHODS The study cohort included adult patients (> 20 years of age) with chronic ncHC due to aqueductal stenosis in whom symptoms had lasted a minimum of 6 months. A reference cohort consisted of age- and sex-matched patients managed for communicating HC (cHC). Information about symptoms and clinical improvement following surgery was retrieved from a quality register, and results of overnight ICP recordings and ventricular infusion testing were retrieved from the hospital ICP database. RESULTS The cohort with ncHC consisted of 61 patients of whom 6 (10%) were managed conservatively, 34 (56%) by endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV), and 21 (34%) using ETV and subsequent shunt surgery. In patients responding to surgery, pulsatile ICP (mean ICP wave amplitude) was significantly increased to a similar magnitude in patients with ncHC and the reference cohort (cHC). Furthermore, intracranial compliance (ICC) was reduced in clinical responders. The results of ventricular infusion testing provided evidence that patients responding to ETV have impaired ventricular CSF absorption, while those requiring shunt placement after ETV present with impaired CSF absorption both in the intraventricular and extraventricular compartments. CONCLUSIONS The study may provide some lessons about the pathophysiology of chronic ncHC. First, increased pulsatile ICP and impaired ICC characterize patients with chronic ncHC who respond clinically to CSF diversion surgery, even though static ICP is not increased. Second, in patients responding clinically to ETV, impaired ventricular CSF absorption may be a key factor. Patients requiring shunt placement for clinical

  1. Apparatus for material tests using an internal loading system in high-pressure gas at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imade, M.; Fukuyama, S.; Yokogawa, K.

    2008-07-01

    A new type of apparatus for material tests using an internal loading system in high-pressure gas up to 100MPa at room temperature without conventional material testing equipment was developed. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure control system and a pressure vessel, in which a piston is installed in the cylinder of the pressure vessel. The load caused by the pressure difference between spaces separated by the piston in the vessel cylinder is applied on the specimen connected to the piston in the vessel cylinder. The actual load on the specimen is directly measured by an external load cell and the displacement of the specimen is also measured by an external extensometer. As an example of the application of the apparatus, a tensile test on SUS316 stainless steel the Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) G4303, which is comparable to the type 316 stainless steel ASTM A276, was conducted in 90MPa hydrogen and argon. Hydrogen showed a marked effect on the tensile property of the material. The hydrogen gas embrittlement of the material was briefly discussed.

  2. Initial pressure spike and its propagation phenomena in sodium-water reaction tests for MONJU steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, M.; Hiroi, H.; Tanaka, N.; Hori, M.

    1977-01-01

    With the objective of demonstrating the safe design of steam generators for prototype LMFBR MONJU against the postulated large-leak accident, a number of large-leak sodium-water reaction tests have been conducted using the SWAT-1 and SWAT-3 rigs. Investigation of the potential effects of pressure load on the system is one of the major concerns in these tests. This paper reports the behavior of initial pressure spike in the reaction vessel, its propagation phenomena to the simulated secondary cooling system, and the comparisons with the computer code for one-dimensional pressure wave propagation problems. Both rigs used are the scaled-down models of the helically coiled steam generators of MONJU. The SWAT-1 rig is a simplified model and consists of a reaction vessel (1/8 scale of MONJU evaporator with 0.4 m dia. and 2.5 m height) and a pressure relief system i.e., a pressure relief line and a reaction products tank. On the other hand, the SWAT-3 rig is a 1/2.5 scale of MONJU SG system and consists of an evaporator (reaction vessel with 1.3 m dia. and 6.35 m height), a superheater, an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), a piping system simulating the secondary cooling circuit and a pressure relief system. The both water injection systems consist of a water injection line with a rupture disk installed in front of injection hole and an electrically heated water tank. Choice of water injection rates in the scaled-down models is made based on the method of iso-velocity modeling. Test results indicated that the characteristics of the initial pressure spike are dominated by those of initial water injection which are controlled by the conditions of water heater and the size of water injection hole, etc

  3. High Strain Rate Testing of Rocks using a Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiessler, Ruprecht; Kenkmann, Thomas; Poelchau, Michael; Nau, Siegfried; Hess, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic mechanical testing of rocks is important to define the onset of rate dependency of brittle failure. The strain rate dependency occurs through the propagation velocity limit (Rayleigh wave speed) of cracks and their reduced ability to coalesce, which, in turn, significantly increases the strength of the rock. We use a newly developed pressurized air driven Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar (SHPB), that is specifically designed for the investigation of high strain rate testing of rocks, consisting of several 10 to 50 cm long strikers and bar components of 50 mm in diameter and 2.5 meters in length each. The whole set up, composed of striker, incident- and transmission bar is available in aluminum, titanium and maraging steel to minimize the acoustic impedance contrast, determined by the change of density and speed of sound, to the specific rock of investigation. Dynamic mechanical parameters are obtained in compression as well as in spallation configuration, covering a wide spectrum from intermediate to high strain rates (100-103 s-1). In SHPB experiments [1] one-dimensional longitudinal compressive pulses of diverse shapes and lengths - formed with pulse shapers - are used to generate a variety of loading histories under 1D states of stress in cylindrical rock samples, in order to measure the respective stress-strain response at specific strain rates. Subsequent microstructural analysis of the deformed samples is aimed at quantification fracture orientation, fracture pattern, fracture density, and fracture surface properties as a function of the loading rate. Linking mechanical and microstructural data to natural dynamic deformation processes has relevance for the understanding of earthquakes, landslides, impacts, and has several rock engineering applications. For instance, experiments on dynamic fragmentation help to unravel super-shear rupture events that pervasively pulverize rocks up to several hundred meters from the fault core [2, 3, 4]. The dynamic, strain

  4. Suitport Feasibility - Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests with the Marman Clamp and Pneumatic Flipper Suitport Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Rodriggs, Liana; Allton, Charles; Jennings, Mallory; Aitchision, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a space suit while the space suit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. Two second generation suitports were designed and tested. The previously reported second generation Marman Clamp suitport and a newer concept, the Pneumatic Flipper Suitport. These second generation suitports demonstrated human donning and doffing of the Z1 spacesuit with an 8.3 psi pressure differential across the spacesuit. Testing was performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. The test included human rated suitports, the suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test brought these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents the results of the testing, including unexpected difficulties with doffing, and engineering solutions implemented to ease the difficulties. A review of suitport functions, including a discussion of the need to doff a pressurized suit in earth gravity, is included. Recommendations for future design and testing are documented.

  5. Suitport Feasibility - Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests with the Marmon Clamp and Pneumatic Flipper Suitport Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Rodriggs, Liana; Alton, Charles; Jennings, Mallory; Aitchison, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a space suit while the space suit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. Two second generation suitports were designed and tested. The previously reported second generation Marman Clamp suitport and a newer concept, the Pneumatic Flipper Suitport. These second generation suitports demonstrated human donning and doffing of the Z1 spacesuit with an 8.3 psi pressure differential across the spacesuit. Testing was performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. The test included human rated suitports, the suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test brought these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents the results of the testing, including unexpected difficulties with doffing, and engineering solutions implemented to ease the difficulties. A review of suitport functions, including a discussion of the need to doff a pressurized suit in earth gravity, is included. Recommendations for future design and testing are documented.

  6. Computer-controlled pneumatic pressure algometry--a new technique for quantitative sensory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polianskis, R; Graven-Nielsen, T; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2001-01-01

    Hand-held pressure algometry usually assesses pressure-pain detection thresholds and provides little information on pressure-pain stimulus-response function. In this article, a cuff pressure algometry for advanced pressure-pain function evaluation is proposed. The experimental set-up consisted of a pneumatic tourniquet cuff, a computer-controlled air compressor and an electronic visual analogue scale (VAS) for constant pain intensity rating. Twelve healthy volunteers were included in the study. In the first part, hand-held algometry and cuff algometry were performed over the gastrocnemius muscle with constant compression rate. In the second part, the cuff algometry was performed with different compression rates to evaluate the influence of the compression rate on pain thresholds and other psychophysical data. Pressure-pain detection threshold (PDT), pain tolerance threshold (PTT), pain intensity, PDT-PTT time and other psychophysical variables were evaluated.Pressure-pain detection thresholds recorded over the gastrocnemius muscle with a hand-held and with a cuff algometer, were 482 +/- 19 kPa and 26 +/- 1.6 kPa, respectively. Pressure and pain intensities were correlated during cuff algometry. During increasing cuff compression, the subjective pain tolerance limit on VAS was 5.6 +/- 0.95 cm. There was a direct correlation between the number of compressions, the compression rate and pain thresholds. The cuff algometry technique is appropriate for pressure-pain stimulus-response studies. Cuff algometry allowed quantification of psychophysical response to the change of stimulus configuration. Copyright 2001 European Federation of Chapters of the International Association for the Study of Pain.

  7. Risky substance use and peer pressure in Swiss young men: Test of moderation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Joseph; Baggio, Stéphanie; Grazioli, Véronique S; Mohler-Kuo, Meichun; Daeppen, Jean-Bernard; Gmel, Gerhard

    2016-11-01

    Peer pressure (PP) toward misconduct is a well-known risk factor for substance use. However, the way it interacts with social factors and the associations of the aspects of PP other than PP toward misconduct have been understudied. This study examined the associations of three aspects of PP with risky substance use and tested whether the associations of PP toward misconduct were moderated by social factors. A representative sample of 5,680 young Swiss males completed a questionnaire assessing risky alcohol, cigarette, and cannabis use, PP toward misconduct, toward peer involvement, and toward peer conformity, as well as social support (SS) and neighbourhood cohesion. Multinomial logistic regression models were used. PP toward misconduct was positively associated with all substance use outcomes. The PP toward misconduct-risky alcohol use association was stronger in individuals reporting high than in those reporting low levels of PP toward peer involvement, SS, and neighbourhood cohesion. The PP toward misconduct-risky cannabis use association was stronger in individuals reporting high than in those reporting low levels of SS and neighbourhood cohesion. The PP toward misconduct-smoking association was stronger in individuals reporting high than in those reporting low levels of PP toward peer involvement. The risk for substance use associated with PP toward misconduct varies as a function of social factors. Being well connected with others (high level of PP toward peer involvement and SS), and living in a cohesive neighbourhood may amplify the risk for risky substance use associated with PP toward misconduct. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Test beam results of a low-pressure micro-strip gas chamber with a secondary-electron emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, S.; Anderson, D.F.; Zimmerman, J.; Sbarra, C.; Salomon, M.

    1994-10-01

    We present recent results, from a beam test, on the angular dependence of the efficiency and the distribution of the signals on the anode strips of a low-pressure microstrip gas chamber with a thick CsI layer as a secondary-electron emitter. New results of CVD diamond films as secondary-electron emitters are discussed

  9. BWR Mark I pressure suppression study: characterization of the vertical load function utilizing bench top model tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, E.W.; Lai, W.

    1977-02-01

    A study was conducted to characterize the mechanisms which give rise to observed oscillations in the vertical load function (VLF) of bench top pool dynamics tests. This is part of a continuing investigation at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory of the General Electric Mark I Nuclear Reactor pressure suppression system

  10. Test-Based Education for Students with Disabilities and English Language Learners: The Impact of Assessment Pressures on Educational Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter Clyde

    2016-01-01

    The article presents a longitudinal study of an urban charter middle school to examine the impact testing pressures can have on the education of students with disabilities and English language learners, and how this may lead to a narrowing of the content they are taught. The study examines various sources of data, including the school's evolving…

  11. Test concept for weld seam testing by means of ultrasonics on the core containment vessel of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappes, W.; Rockstroh, B.; Walte, F.; Huebschen, G.; D'Annucci, F.; Bonitz, F.; Franke, H.

    1996-01-01

    A test solution was found for the mechanised ultrasonic testing of Austenitic X weld seams on the core containment vessel of pressurised water reactors in the combination of the piezo-electric test heads 55SEL3 and SEK3, with which the necessary sensitivity of detection is achieved. Different variants of the test head system were tested, where the systems produced with piezo-electric composite test heads with a height of 15 mm are suitable for use in narrow gaps between the core containment vessel and the thermal shield. The test head materials were selected with regard to compliance with the required resistance to radiation. A further variant is based on EMUS group radiators for exciting SH waves which, owing to the low effect on the SH wave of the weld seam structure and the electronic setting of the sounding angle, make a simple test head system consisting of only two test heads possible. (orig./MM) [de

  12. EXPERIMENTAL TESTS OF VANADIUM STRENGTH MODELS AT HIGH PRESSURES AND STRAIN RATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H; Barton, N R; Becker, R C; Bernier, J V; Cavallo, R M; Lorenz, K T; Pollaine, S M; Remington, B A; Rudd, R E

    2010-03-02

    Experimental results showing significant reductions from classical in the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth rate due to high pressure material strength or effective lattice viscosity in metal foils are presented. On the Omega Laser in the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, target samples of polycrystalline vanadium are compressed and accelerated quasi-isentropically at {approx}1 Mbar pressures, while maintaining the samples in the solid-state. Comparison of the results with constitutive models for solid state strength under these conditions show that the measured RT growth is substantially lower than predictions using existing models that work well at low pressures and long time scales. High pressure, high strain rate data can be explained by the enhanced strength due to a phonon drag mechanism, creating a high effective lattice viscosity.

  13. Investigation of the safety testing of extraordinary thick steel material for pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajmelka, K.

    1978-10-01

    With increasing size of nuclear reactors it was necessary to increase the wall thickness of the reactor pressure vessels. So, for example the wall thickness of the pressure vessel of the LWR pressurized water reactor type with 1.200.000 kW performance is 250 mm. The fabrication of these extraordinary thick steel plates is accurately carried out, nevertheless it is very important to control the characteristics of strength. For this reason extraordinarily thick steel plates of forged manganese-molybdenum-nickel steel produced in Japan and used for the production of reactor pressure vessels was utilized. The aim of this investigation is to know if and how the K sub(IR)- values correspond to the actual regulation for the prevention of brittle fracture and to determine the characteristics. (orig./RW) [de

  14. Identification of the Thickness of Nugget on Worksheet Spot Welding Using Non Destructive Test (NDT) – Effect of Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifa, A.; Baskoro, A. S.; Sugeng, S.; Badruzzaman, B.; Endramawan, T.

    2018-02-01

    Resistance Spot Welding (RSW) is a process of connecting between two worksheet with thermomechanical loading process, RSW is widely used in automotive industry, the quality of splicing spot welding is influenced by several factors. One of the factors at the time of the welding process is pressure. The quality of welding on the nuggets can be determined by undertaking non-destructive testing by using Non Destructive Test (NDT) - Ultrasonic Test. In the NDT test is done by detecting the thickness of the nugget area, the purpose of research conducted to determine the effect of pressure to welding quality with Nugget thickness gauge measurement with Non Destructive Test method and manual measurement with micrometer, Experimental welding process by entering the welding parameters that have been specified and pressure variables 1 -5 bars on the worksheet thickness of 1 mm. The results of testing with NDT show there is addition of thickness in nugget superiority after compare with measurement result of thickness of nugget with micrometer which slightly experience thickness in nugget area, this indicates that the welding results have a connection between worksheet 1 and worksheet 2.

  15. Non-uniform Pressure Distribution in Draw-Bend Friction Test and its Influence on Friction Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Jain, Mukesh K.; Metzger, Don R.

    2005-01-01

    From various draw-bend friction tests with sheet metals at lubricated conditions, it has been unanimously reported that the friction coefficient increases as the pin diameter decreases. However, a proper explanation for this phenomenon has not been given yet. In those experiments, tests were performed for different pin diameters while keeping the same average contact pressure by adjusting applied tension forces. In this paper, pressure profiles at pin/strip contacts and the changes in the pressure profiles depending on pin diameters are investigated using finite element simulations. To study the effect of the pressure profile changes on friction measurements, a non-constant friction model (Stribeck friction model), which is more realistic for the lubricated sheet metal contacts, is implemented into the finite element code and applied to the simulations. The study shows that the non-uniformity of the pressure profile increases and the pin/strip contact angle decreases as the pin diameter decreases, and these phenomena increase the friction coefficient, which is calculated from the strip tension forces using a conventional rope-pulley equation

  16. A friction test between steel and a brittle material at high contact pressures and high sliding velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picart D.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to characterize the interface behaviour between an aggregate material and steel. This work focuses on contact pressures and sliding velocities reaching 100 MPa and 10 m/s. The set-up consists in a cylindrical sample of the aggregate material which slips into a steel tube. The tube is both a confinement vessel and a sliding surface. Thanks to confinement, the material can be tested under high stresses without failure. The interface pressure is generated by an axial compression. The sample is pressed on a spring, so it can be simultaneously compressed and rubbed on the tube. The set-up has been tested in the case of a quasi-static loading and the 100 MPa pressure has been reached. Then the set-up was mounted on a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar device in order to reach higher velocities. Numerical simulations have been realized to check the feasibility and the relevance of this dynamic test. These results are analysed and compared to the experimental ones.

  17. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 195 - Risk-Based Alternative to Pressure Testing Older Hazardous Liquid and Carbon Dioxide Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... pressure tested, based on the inherent risk of a given pipeline segment. The first step is to determine the... test requirements depending on the inherent risk of a given pipeline segment. The overall risk... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Risk-Based Alternative to Pressure Testing Older...

  18. Case Study regarding the test of the new screw compressor with high delivery pressure - 45 bara - on the test bench (with air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin PETRESCU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Screw compressors, which are part of positive displacement compressors, can find an increasing use in gas industry and beyond due to their advantages. Maximal parameters of these devices, done by Comoti under GHH-Rand license stop at a maximum flow of 3000 Nm3/hour and 26 bara discharge pressure. The needs of potential beneficiaries have imposed the necessity to design and manufacture a new family of screw compressors and oil injection able to develop a discharge pressure of 45 bara with flow rates up to 5000 Nm3/hour. This paper presents the design and experimental test phases – for the first screw compressor with discharge of pressure up to 45 bara – CU90 HP. Continue research and development have allowed to this type of screw-compressor – to find a market position, diversifying its size range in the last decade in a manner more explosive, if we refer to other types of compressors.

  19. On-line testing of response time and calibration of temperature and pressure sensors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    Periodic calibrations and response time measurements are necessary for temperature and pressure sensors in the safety systems of nuclear power plants. Conventional measurement methods require the test to be performed at the sensor location or involve removing the sensor from the process and performing the tests in a laboratory or on the bench. The conventional methods are time consuming and have the potential of causing wear and tear on the equipment, can expose the test personnel to radiation and other harsh environments, and increase the length of the plant outage. Also, the conventional methods do not account for the installation effects which may have an influence on sensor performance. On-line testing methods alleviate these problems by providing remote sensor response time and calibration capabilities. For temperature sensors such as Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) and thermocouples, an on-line test method called the Loop Current Step Response (LCSR) technique has been developed, and for pressure transmitters, an on-line method called noise analysis which was available for reactor diagnostics was validated for response time testing applications. Both the LCSR and noise analysis tests are performed periodically in U.S. nuclear power plants to meet the plant technical specification requirements for response time testing of safety-related sensors. Automated testing of the calibration of both temperature and pressure sensors can be accomplished through an on-line monitoring system installed in the plant. The system monitors the DC output of the sensors over the fuel cycle to determine if any calibration drift has occurred. Changes in calibration can be detected using signal averaging and intercomparison methods and analytical redundancy techniques. (author)

  20. The Analysis of Loop Seal Purge Time for the KHNP Pressurizer Safety Valve Test Facility Using the GOTHIC Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Ae; Kim, Chang Hyun; Kweon, Gab Joo; Park, Jong Woon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    The pressurizer safety valves (PSV) in Pressurized Water Reactors are required to provide the overpressure protection for the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) during the overpressure transients. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP) plans to build the PSV test facility for the purpose of providing the PSV pop-up characteristics and the loop seal dynamics for the new safety analysis. When the pressurizer safety valve is mounted in a loop seal configuration, the valve must initially pass the loop seal water prior to popping open on steam. The loop seal in the upstream of PSV prevents leakage of hydrogen gas or steam through the safety valve seat. This paper studies on the loop seal clearing dynamics using GOTHIC-7.2a code to verify the effects of loop seal purge time on the reactor coolant system overpressure.

  1. 800 C Silicon Carbide (SiC) Pressure Sensors for Engine Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    MEMS-based 4H-SiC piezoresistive pressure sensors have been demonstrated at 800 C, leading to the discovery of strain sensitivity recovery with increasing temperatures above 400 C, eventually achieving up to, or near, 100 recovery of the room temperature values at 800 C. This result will allow the insertion of highly sensitive pressure sensors closer to jet, rocket, and hypersonic engine combustion chambers to improve the quantification accuracy of combustor dynamics, performance, and increase safety margin. Also, by operating at higher temperature and locating closer to the combustion chamber, reduction of the length (weight) of pressure tubes that are currently used will be achieved. This will result in reduced costlb to access space.

  2. Bayes Analysis and Reliability Implications of Stress-Rupture Testing a Kevlar/Epoxy COPV Using Temperature and Pressure Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, S. Leigh; Kezirian, Michael T.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2009-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) that have survived a long service time under pressure generally must be recertified before service is extended. Flight certification is dependent on the reliability analysis to quantify the risk of stress rupture failure in existing flight vessels. Full certification of this reliability model would require a statistically significant number of lifetime tests to be performed and is impractical given the cost and limited flight hardware for certification testing purposes. One approach to confirm the reliability model is to perform a stress rupture test on a flight COPV. Currently, testing of such a Kevlar49 (Dupont)/epoxy COPV is nearing completion. The present paper focuses on a Bayesian statistical approach to analyze the possible failure time results of this test and to assess the implications in choosing between possible model parameter values that in the past have had significant uncertainty. The key uncertain parameters in this case are the actual fiber stress ratio at operating pressure, and the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime; the former has been uncertain due to ambiguities in interpreting the original and a duplicate burst test. The latter has been uncertain due to major differences between COPVs in the database and the actual COPVs in service. Any information obtained that clarifies and eliminates uncertainty in these parameters will have a major effect on the predicted reliability of the service COPVs going forward. The key result is that the longer the vessel survives, the more likely the more optimistic stress ratio model is correct. At the time of writing, the resulting effect on predicted future reliability is dramatic, increasing it by about one "nine," that is, reducing the predicted probability of failure by an order of magnitude. However, testing one vessel does not change the uncertainty on the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime since testing several vessels would be necessary.

  3. Unpaired 5' ppp-nucleotides, as found in arenavirus double-stranded RNA panhandles, are not recognized by RIG-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marq, Jean-Baptiste; Kolakofsky, Daniel; Garcin, Dominique

    2010-06-11

    Arenavirus and bunyavirus RNA genomes are unusual in that they are found in circular nucleocapsids, presumably due to the annealing of their complementary terminal sequences. Moreover, arenavirus genome synthesis initiates with GTP at position +2 of the template rather than at the precise 3' end (position +1). After formation of a dinucleotide, 5' pppGpC(OH) is then realigned on the template before this primer is extended. The net result of this "prime and realign" mechanism of genome initiation is that 5' pppG is found as an unpaired 5' nucleotide when the complementary genome ends anneal to form a double-stranded (dsRNA) panhandle. Using 5' pppRNA made in vitro and purified so that all dsRNA side products are absent, we have determined that both this 5' nucleotide overhang, as well as mismatches within the dsRNA (as found in some arenavirus genomes), clearly reduce the ability of these model dsRNAs to induce interferon upon transfection into cells. The presence of this unpaired 5' ppp-nucleotide is thus another way that some viruses appear to use to avoid detection by cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors.

  4. Residential tornado safe room from commodity wood products – impact and wind pressure testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. Falk; James J. Bridwell; C. Adam Senalik; Marshall Begel

    2018-01-01

    A tornado safe room is a shelter designed to provide protection during a tornado and is specifically engineered to resist the high wind pressures and debris impact generated by these high wind events. The required performance criteria of these shelters has been established and is found in the International Code Council Standard for the Design and Construction of Storm...

  5. Awareness and Knowledge of Cardiovascular Risk through Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Testing in College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, J. A.; Panza, G.; Zaleski, A.; Taylor, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States, yet knowledge of CVD risk factors is surprisingly low in college students. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an individualized blood pressure, cholesterol, and CVD education intervention on college freshmen. Methods:…

  6. Blood Pressure and Impedance Cardiography duríng Tilt Table Test

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Vondra, Vlastimil; Plachý, M.; Fráňa, P.; Leinveber, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 36, - (2009), s. 429-432 ISSN 0276-6574 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200650801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : blood pressure * heart rate * thoracic impedance cardiography Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering http://cinc.mit.edu/archives/2009/pdf/0429.pdf

  7. Derivation of a measure of systolic blood pressure mutability: a novel information theory-based metric from ambulatory blood pressure tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Danitza J; Vogel, Eugenio E; Saravia, Gonzalo; Stockins, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    We provide ambulatory blood pressure (BP) exams with tools based on information theory to quantify fluctuations thus increasing the capture of dynamic test components. Data from 515 ambulatory 24-hour BP exams were considered. Average age was 54 years, 54% were women, and 53% were under BP treatment. The average systolic pressure (SP) was 127 ± 8 mm Hg. A data compressor (wlzip) designed to recognize meaningful information is invoked to measure mutability which is a form of dynamical variability. For patients with the same average SP, different mutability values are obtained which reflects the differences in dynamical variability. In unadjusted linear regression models, mutability had low association with the mean systolic BP (R(2) = 0.056; P < .000001) but larger association with the SP deviation (R(2) = 0.761; P < .001). Wlzip allows detecting levels of variability in SP that could be hazardous. This new indicator can be easily added to the 24-hour BP monitors improving information toward diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lumbar Puncture Test in Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus: Does the Volume of CSF Removed Affect the Response to Tap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, S K; Serulle, Y; Miskin, N P; Rusinek, H; Golomb, J; George, A E

    2017-07-01

    There is limited evidence to support the use of high-volume lumbar taps over lower-volume taps in the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus. The purpose of this study is to detect whether the volume of CSF removed from patients undergoing high-volume diagnostic lumbar tap test for normal pressure hydrocephalus is significantly associated with post-lumbar tap gait performance. This retrospective study included 249 consecutive patients who underwent evaluation for normal pressure hydrocephalus. The patients were analyzed both in their entirety and as subgroups that showed robust response to the lumbar tap test. The volume of CSF removed was treated as both a continuous variable and a discrete variable. Statistical tests were repeated with log-normalized volumes. This study found no evidence of a relationship between the volume of CSF removed during the lumbar tap test and subsequent gait test performance in the patient population (Pearson coefficient r = 0.049-0.129). Log normalization of the volume of CSF removed and controlling for age and sex failed to yield a significant relationship. Subgroup analyses focusing on patients who showed greater than 20% improvement in any of the gait end points or who were deemed sufficiently responsive clinically to warrant surgery also yielded no significant relationships between the volume of CSF removed and gait outcomes, but there were preliminary findings that patients who underwent tap with larger-gauge needles had better postprocedure ambulation among patients who showed greater than 20% improvement in immediate time score ( P = .04, n = 62). We found no evidence to support that a higher volume of CSF removal impacts gait testing, suggesting that a high volume of CSF removal may not be necessary in a diagnostic lumbar tap test. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Performance, Facility Pressure Effects, and Stability Characterization Tests of NASA's Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Peterson, Peter Y.; Williams, George J.; Gilland, James; Hofer, Richard; Mikellides, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Technology Demonstration Unit-1 (TDU-1) has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for flight system development. Part of the technology maturation effort included experimental evaluation of the TDU-1 thruster with conducting and dielectric front pole cover materials in two different electrical configurations. A graphite front magnetic pole cover thruster configuration with the thruster body electrically tied to cathode, and an alumina front pole cover thruster configuration with the thruster body floating were evaluated. Both configurations were also evaluated at different facility background pressure conditions to evaluate background pressure effects on thruster operation. Performance characterization tests found that higher thruster performance was attained with the graphite front pole cover configuration with the thruster electrically tied to cathode. A total thrust efficiency of 68% and a total specific impulse of 2,820 s was demonstrated at a discharge voltage of 600 V and a discharge power of 12.5 kW. Thruster stability regimes were characterized with respect to the thruster discharge current oscillations and with maps of the discharge current-voltage-magnetic field (IVB). Analysis of TDU-1 discharge current waveforms found that lower normalized discharge current peak-to-peak and root mean square magnitudes were attained when the thruster was electrically floated with alumina front pole covers. Background pressure effects characterization tests indicated that the thruster performance and stability were mostly invariant to changes in the facility background pressure for vacuum chamber pressure below 1×10-5 Torr-Xe (for thruster flow rates of 20.5 mg/s). Power spectral density analysis of the discharge current waveforms showed that increasing the vacuum chamber background pressure resulted in a higher discharge current dominant breathing mode frequency. Finally, IVB

  10. USING OF NON-DESTRUCTIVE TEST OF ACCOUSTIC EMISSION FOR PROLONGING THE OPERATION LIFE OF COMPOSITE PRESSURE CYLINDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk CÁB1

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Financial crisis in the years 2008 to 2013 had a negative effects also in a state administration, and as well in a purchase, renewing and services of technical means of fire protection. Under the terms of School educational and vocational establishment of the Fire and Rescue Service of the Czech republic (FRS CR, center in Frydek - Mistek, this condition was fully displayed at the FRS CR at the state of composite pressure cylinders (PCs, that are from the point of view of operation of the breathing apparatuses, and other technical means such as bags, sealing means, means for works on water, that are inevitable for their operability. In this article prolongation of an operation life of PCs is described, on the basis of supplementary nondestructive acoustic emission testing (AT, that is a part of hydraulic pressure test. In conclusion it is written the state of PCs after the operation life having been prolonged and before their final decommissioning.

  11. Development and testing of a new apparatus for the measurement of high-pressure low-temperature phase equilibria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, José M.S.; von Solms, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    A new apparatus for the study of high-pressure phase equilibria at low temperatures using an analytical method was designed, assembled and tested. The apparatus was specially developed for the study of multi-phase equilibria in systems containing hydrocarbons, water and hydrate inhibitors......, at temperatures ranging from 213K to 353K and pressures up to 40MPa. The core of the apparatus is a variable-volume equilibrium cell, equipped with a 360° sapphire window and connected to an analytical system by three capillary samplers.The quality of the apparatus was confirmed through several tests, including...... the study of the system methane+water. An equilibrium point for the quaternary system methane+n-hexane+methanol+water is also presented....

  12. Development of Gaseous Iodine Generation and Sampling Systems Operated under High Pressure and Temperature Conditions for CFVS Performance Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Chul; Jung, Woo Young; Lee, Jong Chan; Kim, Gyu Tae; Lee, Doo Yong [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A Containment Filtered Venting System (hereafter CFVS) is one of the major features to prevent the damage of the containment integrity from the severe accident such as a station blackout. The main functions of CFVS are the filtration of particulate and gaseous form of fission products from the containment. In severe accidents, elemental iodine and organic iodides are main gaseous iodine species in the containment building of nuclear power plant. One of the important purposes of CFVS is to minimize the risk caused by the release of fission products such as radioactive materials. For these reason, the experiment of iodine scrubbing efficiency is very important performance parameter for the CFVS. Generally, Sublimation is an easy way to make gaseous elemental iodine in this system. In elemental iodine generation system, the system can control the pressure and temperature to make sublimation condition of iodine by argon gas and circulating thermostat. Moreover, the elemental iodine vapor pressure is estimated by data sheet shown in Reference 2. The organic iodine such as CH{sub 3}I is generated with two-fluid nozzle technique. The two-fluid nozzle can generate fine CH3I droplets which are easily evaporated from liquid to gas. Elemental iodine sampling system has online and off-line sampling scrubbing columns. In this study, the iodine generation and sampling systems is developed to be used in the iodine scrubbing test for the CFVS. The system can generate the gaseous elemental iodine and organic iodide to be injected into test section at high pressure and temperature conditions. The sampling system can sample the gaseous elemental In this study, the iodine generation and sampling systems is developed to be used in the iodine scrubbing test for the CFVS. The system can generate the gaseous elemental iodine and organic iodide to be injected into test section at high pressure and temperature conditions. The sampling system can sample the gaseous elemental.

  13. Summary report on parametric pressure propagation test T0127-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauske, H.K. [Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (US)

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results of two ferrocyanide propagating reaction generated aerosol tests, conducted as a part of a series of tests directed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The tests discussed in this document are designated as T0208-1 and T0209-1. The tests were carried out in a 49 L containment volume equipped with an aerosol filter housing. The test setup is described in Section 2.0. Each test used an {approx} 50 gm. sample of InFarm-1 bottom flow sheet material which was vacuum dried, screened through a 140 mesh sieve, and rehydrated to 1 wgt. % water content prior to testing. The test sample and reaction ignition method are described in Section 3.0. A special test protocol was defined and followed for the tests as described in Section 4.0 and Appendix B. Test results are discussed in Section 5.0. Both tests yielded a significant aerosol sample on the filter element. These filter elements and aerosol deposits have been sent to WHC for analysis, and any information as to the content or chemical composition of the trapped particulate material awaits the results of WHC efforts in this regard. The reaction propagation tests were conducted at 60{degrees}C and 120{degrees}C respectively. The average propagation velocities are consistent with other related observations.

  14. Application of automatic inspection system to nondestructive test of heat transfer tubes of primary pressurized water cooler in the high temperature engineering test reactor. Joint research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Furusawa, Takayuki

    2001-07-01

    Heat transfer tubes of a primary pressurized water cooled (PPWC) in the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) form the reactor pressure boundary of the primary coolant, therefore are important from the viewpoint of safety. To establish inspection techniques for the heat transfer tubes of the PPWC, an automatic inspection system was developed. The system employs a bobbin coil probe, a rotating probe for eddy current testing (ECT) and a rotating probe for ultrasonic testing (UT). Nondestructive test of a half of the heat transfer tubes of the PPWC was carried out by the automatic inspection system during reactor shutdown period of the HTTR (about 55% in the maximum reactor power in this paper). The nondestructive test results showed that the maximum signal-to-noise ratio was 1.8 in ECT. Pattern and phase of Lissajous wave, which were obtained for the heat transfer tube of the PPWC, were different from those obtained for the artificially defected tube. In UT echo amplitude of the PPWC tubes inspected was lower than 20% of distance-amplitude calibration curve. Thus, it was confirmed that there was no defect in depth, which was more than the detecting standard of the probes, on the outer surface of the heat transfer tubes of the PPWC inspected. (author)

  15. Testing the limits of model membrane simulations-bilayer composition and pressure scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Nikoleta; Ivanova, Anela

    2018-03-30

    Studying transfer of bioactive compounds across cell membranes by simulations attracts growing attention. To perform such calculations accurately, it is necessary to verify the validity of computational protocols established for description of unperturbed lipid bilayers also with translocating substances present. The current work reports the results from 1 μs long atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two types of model plasma membranes-one built of a single phospholipid (DPPC) and one constructed of four types of phospholipids-in the presence of a drug-peptide complex experimentally known to cross cell membranes. The influence of membrane composition and of applied pressure scaling algorithm on the simulations outcome is analyzed with particular focus on membrane structure and on complex-lipid interactions during the initial penetration stage. It is found that the mixed composition of the membrane is important for correct assessment of the interactions with the complex both from purely structural perspective and because of the uneven charge distribution. The structure of the mixed lipid bilayer is affected more markedly by the pressure scaling algorithm. When the pressure is isotropically scaled, lipids are distributed almost homogeneously along the membrane in liquid ordered state. On semi-isotropic scaling, the lipid tails undergo significant rearrangement and a long-range ordered state is established. This results in "freezing" of the membrane and expulsion of the complex. The statistical analysis of the MD data points to the conclusion that a mixed-lipid membrane model with isotropic pressure scaling would be more suitable for describing the process of complex translocation across neoplastic membranes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The Effect of Spinal Tap Test on Different Sensory Modalities of Postural Stability in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abram, Katrin; Bohne, Silvia; Bublak, Peter; Karvouniari, Panagiota; Klingner, Carsten M; Witte, Otto W; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Axer, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Postural instability in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a most crucial symptom leading to falls with secondary complications. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of spinal tap on postural stability in these patients. Seventeen patients with clinical symptoms of NPH were examined using gait scale, computerized dynamic posturography (CDP), and neuropsychological assessment. Examinations were done before and after spinal tap test. The gait score showed a significant improvement 24 h after spinal tap test in all subtests and in the sum score (p tap test. CDP showed significant improvements after spinal tap test in the Sensory Organization Tests 2 (p = 0.017), 4 (p = 0.001), and 5 (p = 0.009) and the composite score (p = 0.01). Patients showed best performance in somatosensory and worst performance in vestibular dominated tests. Vestibular dominated tests did not improve significantly after spinal tap test, while somatosensory and visual dominated tests did. Postural stability in NPH is predominantly affected by deficient vestibular functions, which did not improve after spinal tap test. Conditions which improved best were mainly independent from visual control and are based on proprioceptive functions.

  17. SULTAN test facility for large-scale vessel coolability in natural convection at low pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouge, S.

    1997-01-01

    The SULTAN facility (France/CEA/CENG) was designed to study large-scale structure coolability by water in boiling natural convection. The objectives are to measure the main characteristics of two-dimensional, two-phase flow, in order to evaluate the recirculation mass flow in large systems, and the limits of the critical heat flux (CHF) for a wide range of thermo-hydraulic (pressure, 0.1-0.5 MPa; inlet temperature, 50-150 C; mass flow velocity, 5-4400 kg s -1 m -2 ; flux, 100-1000 kW m -2 ) and geometric (gap, 3-15 cm; inclination, 0-90 ) parameters. This paper makes available the experimental data obtained during the first two campaigns (90 , 3 cm; 10 , 15 cm): pressure drop differential pressure (DP) = f(G), CHF limits, local profiles of temperature and void fraction in the gap, visualizations. Other campaigns should confirm these first results, indicating a favourable possibility of the coolability of large surfaces under natural convection. (orig.)

  18. Pressure-Fed LOX/LCH4 Reaction Control System for Spacecraft: Transient Modeling and Thermal Vacuum Hotfire Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Melcher, J. C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    An integrated cryogenic liquid oxygen, liquid methane (LOX/LCH4) reaction control system (RCS) was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. The RCS is a subsystem of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), a pressure-fed LOX/LCH4 propulsion system composed of a single 2,800 lbf main engine, two 28 lbf RCS engines, and two 7 lbf RCS engines. Propellants are stored in four 48 inch diameter 5083 aluminum tanks that feed both the main engine and RCS engines in parallel. Helium stored cryogenically in a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) flows through a heat exchanger on the main engine before being used to pressurize the propellant tanks to a design operating pressure of 325 psi. The ICPTA is capable of simultaneous main engine and RCS operation. The RCS engines utilize a coil-on-plug (COP) ignition system designed for operation in a vacuum environment, eliminating corona discharge issues associated with a high voltage lead. There are two RCS pods on the ICPTA, with two engines on each pod. One of these two engines is a heritage flight engine from Project Morpheus. Its sea level nozzle was removed and replaced by an 85:1 nozzle machined using Inconel 718, resulting in a maximum thrust of 28 lbf under altitude conditions. The other engine is a scaled down version of the 28 lbf engine, designed to match the core and overall mixture ratios as well as other injector characteristics. This engine can produce a maximum thrust of 7 lbf with an 85:1 nozzle that was additively manufactured using Inconel 718. Both engines are film-cooled and capable of limited duration gas-gas and gas-liquid operation, as well as steady-state liquid-liquid operation. Each pod contains one of each version, such that two engines of the same thrust level can be fired as a couple on opposite pods. The RCS feed system is composed of symmetrical 3/8 inch lines

  19. Design, fracture control, fabrication, and testing of pressurized space-vehicle structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, H. W.; Christensen, R. H.; Dixon, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    The relationship between analysis, design, fabrication, and testing of thin shells is illustrated by Saturn S-IVB, Thor, Delta, and other single-use and reusable large-size cryogenic aluminum tankage. The analyses and design to meet the design requirements are reviewed and include consideration of fracture control, general instability, and other failure modes. The effect of research and development testing on the structure is indicated. It is shown how fabrication and nondestructive and acceptance testing constrain the design. Finally, qualification testing is reviewed to illustrate the extent of testing used to develop the Saturn S-IVB.

  20. Fish oil-supplementation from 9 to 12 months of age affects infant attention in a free-play test and is related to change in blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbild, Helle Liliegren; Harsløf, Laurine Bente Schram; Christensen, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    This intervention examined whether fish-oil-supplementation in late infancy modifies free-play test scores and if this is related to blood pressure (BP) and mean RR interval.......This intervention examined whether fish-oil-supplementation in late infancy modifies free-play test scores and if this is related to blood pressure (BP) and mean RR interval....

  1. A Study on the Small Punch Test for Fracture Strength Evaluation of CANDU Pressure Tube Embrittled by Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nho, Seung Hwan; Ong, Jang Woo; Yu, Hyo Sun; Chung, Se Hi

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the usefulness of small punch(SP) test using miniaturized specimens as a method for fracture strength evaluation of CANDU pressure tube embrittled by hydrogen. According to the test results, the fracture strength evaluation as a function of hydrogen concentration at -196 .deg. C was much better than that at room temperature, as the difference of SP fracture energy(Esp) with hydrogen concentration was more significant at -196 .deg. C than at room temperature for the hydrogen concentration up to 300ppm-H. It was also observed that the peak of average AE energy, the cumulative average AE energy and the cumulative average AE energy per equivalent fracture, strain increased with the increase of hydrogen concentration. From the results of load-displacement behaviors, Esp behaviors, macro- and micro-SEM fractographs and AE test it has been concluded that the SP test method using miniaturized specimen(10mmx10mmx0.5mm) will be a useful test method to evaluate the fracture strength for CANDU pressure tube embrittled by hydrogen

  2. Performance, Facility Pressure Effects, and Stability Characterization Tests of NASA's Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Gilland, James; Peterson, Peter; Hofer, Richard; Mikellides, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    NASAs Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Technology Demonstration Unit-1 (TDU-1) Hall thruster has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for flight system development. Part of the technology maturation effort included experimental evaluation of the TDU-1 thruster with conducting and dielectric front pole cover materials in two different electrical configurations. A graphite front pole cover thruster configuration with the thruster body electrically tied to cathode and an alumina front pole cover thruster configuration with the thruster body floating were evaluated. Both configurations were also evaluated at different facility background pressure conditions to evaluate background pressure effects on thruster operation. Performance characterization tests found that higher thruster performance was attained with the graphite front pole cover configuration with the thruster electrically tied to cathode. A total thrust efficiency of 68 and a total specific impulse of 2,820 s was demonstrated at a discharge voltage of 600 V and a discharge power of 12.5 kW. Thruster stability regimes were characterized with respect to the thruster discharge current oscillations and with maps of the current-voltage-magnetic field (IVB). Analysis of TDU-1 discharge current waveforms found that lower normalized discharge current peak-to-peak and root mean square magnitudes were attained when the thruster was electrically floated with alumina front pole covers. Background pressure effects characterization tests indicated that the thruster performance and stability was mostly invariant to changes in the facility background pressure for vacuum chamber pressure below 110-5 Torr-Xe (for thruster flow rate above 8 mgs). Power spectral density analysis of the discharge current waveform showed that increasing the vacuum chamber background pressure resulted in a higher discharge current dominant frequency. Finally the IVB maps of the TDU-1

  3. Preliminary Testing of a Pressurized Space Suit and Candidate Fabrics Under Simulated Mars Dust Storm and Dust Devil Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; deLeon, Pablo G.; Lee, Pascal; McCue, Terry R.; Hodgson, Edward W.; Thrasher, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    In August 2009 YAP Films (Toronto) received permission from all entities involved to create a documentary film illustrating what it might be like to be on the surface of Mars in a space suit during a dust storm or in a dust devil. The science consultants on this project utilized this opportunity to collect data which could be helpful to assess the durability of current space suit construction to the Martian environment. The NDX-1 prototype planetary space suit developed at the University of North Dakota was used in this study. The suit features a hard upper torso garment, and a soft lower torso and boots assembly. On top of that, a nylon-cotton outer layer is used to protect the suit from dust. Unmanned tests were carried out in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel (MARSWIT) at the NASA Ames Research Center, with the suit pressurized to 10 kPa gauge. These tests blasted the space suit upper torso and helmet, and a collection of nine candidate outer layer fabrics, with wind-borne simulant for five different 10 min tests under both terrestrial and Martian surface pressures. The infiltration of the dust through the outer fabric of the space suit was photographically documented. The nine fabric samples were analyzed under light and electron microscopes for abrasion damage. Manned tests were carried out at Showbiz Studios (Van Nuys, California) with the pressure maintained at 20 2 kPa gauge. A large fan-created vortex lifted Martian dust simulant (Fullers Earth or JSC Mars-1) off of the floor, and one of the authors (Lee) wearing the NDX-1 space suit walked through it to judge both subjectively and objectively how the suit performed under these conditions. Both the procedures to scale the tests to Martian conditions and the results of the infiltration and abrasion studies will be discussed.

  4. Overview of pressure-drawdown production-test results for the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC et al. Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate production research well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, S.H.; Carle, D.; Weatherill, B. [APA Petroleum Engineering Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Dallimore, S.R. [Geological Survey of Canada, Pacific Geoscience Centre, Sidney, BC (Canada); Collett, T.S. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Satoh, T. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, T. [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Schlumberger's Modular Dynamic Tester (MDT) cased hole wireline tool was used during a pressure drawdown production test at the Mallik 5L-38 well to successfully test separate hydrate intervals as well as free gas and water zones. This paper provided an overview of the pressure-drawdown testing operations and results. Preliminary analysis of the gas hydrate porous-media response was also presented. Two important phenomena were observed during the hydrate tests: (1) free gas was produced on a steady state basis following the initial clean-up flow of water, and (2) the pressure response upon shut-in displayed porous media effects and indicated both flow contribution and pressure effects beyond the surface area of the hydrate open to the wellbore. Since analytical pressure transient analysis software cannot incorporate dynamic reservoir parameters, conventional analytical techniques were used to evaluate the test data.

  5. Effects of Cross-Linking on the Hydrostatic Pressure Testing for HDPE Pipe Material using Electron Beam Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Jamil Bin Hashim

    2011-01-01

    One of the most inventive, sustainable strategies used in engineering field is to improve the quality of material and minimize production cost of material for example in this paper is HDPE material. This is because HDPE is an oil base material. This paper proposes to improve its hydrostatic pressure performance for HDPE pipe. The burst test is the most direct measurement of a pipe materials resistance to hydrostatic pressure. Test will be conducted in accordance with ASTM standard for HDPE pipe that undergo electron beam irradiation cross-linking. Studies show the effect of electron beam irradiation will improve the mechanical properties of HDPE pipe. When cross-linking is induced, the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and young modulus is increase correspond to the radiation dose. This happen because the structure of HDPE, which is thermoplastic change to thermosetting. This will indicate the variability of irradiation dose which regard to the pipe pressure rating. Hence, the thickness ratio of pipe will be re-examining in order to make the production of HDPE pipe become more economical. This research review the effects of electron beam on HDPE pipe, as well as to reduce the cost of its production to improve key properties of selected plastic pipe products. (author)

  6. Residual Strength Pressure Tests and Nonlinear Analyses of Stringer- and Frame-Stiffened Aluminum Fuselage Panels with Longitudinal Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard D.; Rouse, Marshall; Ambur, Damodar R.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The results of residual strength pressure tests and nonlinear analyses of stringer- and frame-stiffened aluminum fuselage panels with longitudinal cracks are presented. Two types of damage are considered: a longitudinal crack located midway between stringers, and a longitudinal crack adjacent to a stringer and along a row of fasteners in a lap joint that has multiple-site damage (MSD). In both cases, the longitudinal crack is centered on a severed frame. The panels are subjected to internal pressure plus axial tension loads. The axial tension loads are equivalent to a bulkhead pressure load. Nonlinear elastic-plastic residual strength analyses of the fuselage panels are conducted using a finite element program and the crack-tip-opening-angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. Predicted crack growth and residual strength results from nonlinear analyses of the stiffened fuselage panels are compared with experimental measurements and observations. Both the test and analysis results indicate that the presence of MSD affects crack growth stability and reduces the residual strength of stiffened fuselage shells with long cracks.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of the pressure-based direct integrity test for membranes used in drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnery, John G; Jacangelo, Joseph G; Boden, Leslie I; Vorhees, Donna J; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy

    2009-12-15

    We conducted a sensitivity analysis of the commonly employed pressure-based direct integrity test (DIT), the most sensitive test for defects in low-pressure hollow fiber (LPHF) microfiltration and ultrafiltration systems used in drinking water treatment. Incorporating uncertainty to assess the practice of DIT, we find the resolution in some tests may be insufficient to verify the presence of a barrier to oocysts of Cryptosporidium. Applying distributions and boundaries derived from literature and practice, we solved for the defect size resolution (DSR) using Monte Carlo and Probability Bounds Analysis for five commercial membrane designs. Surface tension was modeled using annual temperature profiles from three rivers. Contact angle measurement error and variability were derived from literature, respectively, as a standard deviation of 5.7 degrees and +/- 9.6 degrees median change due to natural organic matter (NOM) fouling. These measures of contact angle uncertainty and variability were combined in a normal distribution with the discrete values currently applied. Additionally we considered model uncertainty, applying the maximum bubble pressure method, an established method of surface tension measurement in liquids in which the maximum air pressure in a submerged capillary is developed after the contact angle becomes zero prior to bubble formation. Where the DSR exceeds 3 microm the test design is not compliant with applicable drinking water regulations. Implications include uncertain and variable log-removal values (LRV) as determined by DIT due to the possible emergence of defects large enough to allow oocysts to pass without detection by the DIT. Specifically, we found the DSR may exceed 3 microm and may be as large as 8 microm. With the variable contact angle model, all lower bound possibilities are compliant, whereas the upper bound is over 80% noncompliant for three of five commercial designs. Using the Maximum Bubble Pressure Method, the lower bounds in

  8. Using cognitive pre-testing methods in the development of a new evidenced-based pressure ulcer risk assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, S; Nixon, J; Keen, J; Muir, D; Wilson, L; McGinnis, E; Stubbs, N; Dealey, C; Nelson, E A

    2016-11-16

    Variation in development methods of Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Instruments has led to inconsistent inclusion of risk factors and concerns about content validity. A new evidenced-based Risk Assessment Instrument, the Pressure Ulcer Risk Primary Or Secondary Evaluation Tool - PURPOSE-T was developed as part of a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) funded Pressure Ulcer Research Programme (PURPOSE: RP-PG-0407-10056). This paper reports the pre-test phase to assess and improve PURPOSE-T acceptability, usability and confirm content validity. A descriptive study incorporating cognitive pre-testing methods and integration of service user views was undertaken over 3 cycles comprising PURPOSE-T training, a focus group and one-to-one think-aloud interviews. Clinical nurses from 2 acute and 2 community NHS Trusts, were grouped according to job role. Focus group participants used 3 vignettes to complete PURPOSE-T assessments and then participated in the focus group. Think-aloud participants were interviewed during their completion of PURPOSE-T. After each pre-test cycle analysis was undertaken and adjustment/improvements made to PURPOSE-T in an iterative process. This incorporated the use of descriptive statistics for data completeness and decision rule compliance and directed content analysis for interview and focus group data. Data were collected April 2012-June 2012. Thirty-four nurses participated in 3 pre-test cycles. Data from 3 focus groups, 12 think-aloud interviews incorporating 101 PURPOSE-T assessments led to changes to improve instrument content and design, flow and format, decision support and item-specific wording. Acceptability and usability were demonstrated by improved data completion and appropriate risk pathway allocation. The pre-test also confirmed content validity with clinical nurses. The pre-test was an important step in the development of the preliminary PURPOSE-T and the methods used may have wider instrument development application

  9. Using cognitive pre-testing methods in the development of a new evidenced-based pressure ulcer risk assessment instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Coleman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation in development methods of Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Instruments has led to inconsistent inclusion of risk factors and concerns about content validity. A new evidenced-based Risk Assessment Instrument, the Pressure Ulcer Risk Primary Or Secondary Evaluation Tool - PURPOSE-T was developed as part of a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR funded Pressure Ulcer Research Programme (PURPOSE: RP-PG-0407-10056. This paper reports the pre-test phase to assess and improve PURPOSE-T acceptability, usability and confirm content validity. Methods A descriptive study incorporating cognitive pre-testing methods and integration of service user views was undertaken over 3 cycles comprising PURPOSE-T training, a focus group and one-to-one think-aloud interviews. Clinical nurses from 2 acute and 2 community NHS Trusts, were grouped according to job role. Focus group participants used 3 vignettes to complete PURPOSE-T assessments and then participated in the focus group. Think-aloud participants were interviewed during their completion of PURPOSE-T. After each pre-test cycle analysis was undertaken and adjustment/improvements made to PURPOSE-T in an iterative process. This incorporated the use of descriptive statistics for data completeness and decision rule compliance and directed content analysis for interview and focus group data. Data were collected April 2012-June 2012. Results Thirty-four nurses participated in 3 pre-test cycles. Data from 3 focus groups, 12 think-aloud interviews incorporating 101 PURPOSE-T assessments led to changes to improve instrument content and design, flow and format, decision support and item-specific wording. Acceptability and usability were demonstrated by improved data completion and appropriate risk pathway allocation. The pre-test also confirmed content validity with clinical nurses. Conclusions The pre-test was an important step in the development of the preliminary PURPOSE-T and the

  10. Pressurized thermal shocks: the JRC Ispra experimental test rig and analytical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, A.; Lucia, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    The paper tackles some issues of particular interest for the remanent (remaining) life prediction for the pressurized components exposed to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) loads, that have been tackled in analytical work performed in the framework of the MPA - JRC collaboration for the PTS experimental research at the JRC Ispra. These issues regard in general application of damage mechanics, fracture mechanics and artificial intelligence (including the treatment of uncertainties in the PTS analysis and experiments). The considered issues are essential for further understanding and modelling of the crack behaviour and of the component response in PTS conditions. In particular, the development of the FRAP preprocessor and development and implementation of a methodology for analysis of local non-stationary heat transfer coefficients during a PTS, have been explained more in detail. FRAP is used as a frontend, for the finite element code ABAQUS, for the heat transfer, stress and fracture mechanics analyses. The ABAQUS results are used further on, for the probabilistic fatigue crack growth analysis performed by the COVASTOL code. (author)

  11. Intraocular pressure and Schirmer tear test values in maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane S. Honsho

    Full Text Available Abstract: The purpose of this study was to establish baseline data on lacrimal quantity (STT-1 and intraocular pressure (IOP in captive maned wolves. Ten healthy adult maned wolves were contained with a snare pole and muzzle and kept in decubitus of the left side. STT-1 measurement was performed on the lateral third of the lower conjunctival sac for one minute. The cornea was desensitized and intraocular pressure was measured with an tonopen. Average STT-1 in both eyes was 11±5mm.min-1, with no statistical difference between the left and right eye (p=0.960. Average IOP in both eyes was 20±6mmHg, with no statistical difference between the left and right eye (p=0.836. Average STT-1 was lower than, and IOP was the same as normal levels found in dogs. There was no statistical difference in the age of the animals, and STT-1 and IOP values. In the present paper, average maned wolf STT-1 levels were lower compared with those found in dogs, while the IOP was the same in maned wolves as in dogs. Due to the increased incidence in providing emergency care for maned wolf victims of road kill and fires, determination reference values of ocular parameters may improve the correct diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  12. Development of a test method for distillation of diesel-biodiesel-alcohols mixtures at reduced pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, R.; Iosub, I.; Clenci, A.; Zaharia, C.; Iorga-Simăn, V.

    2017-10-01

    Increased environmental awareness and depletion of fossil petroleum resources are driving the automotive industry to seek out and use alternative fuels. For instance, the biofuel is a major renewable energy source to supplement declining fossil fuel resources. The addition of alcohols like methanol and ethanol is practical in biodiesel blends due to its miscibility with the pure biodiesel. Alcohols also improve physico-chemical properties of biodiesel blends, which lead to improved combustion efficiency. Proper volatility of fuels is critical to the operation of internal combustion engines with respect to both performance and emissions. Volatility may be characterised by various measurements, the most common of which are vapour pressure, distillation and the vapour/liquid ratio. The presence of ethanol or other oxygenates may affect these properties and, as a result, performance and emissions, as well. However, in the case of diesel-biodiesel-alcohols mixtures, the variance of component volatility makes difficult the analysis of the overall volatility. Thus, the paper presents an experimental method of distilling diesel-biodiesel-alcohols mixtures by adjusting the boiler pressure of an i-Fischer Dist equipment.

  13. Analysis of pressure falloff tests of non-Newtonian power-law fluids in naturally-fractured bounded reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omotayo Omosebi

    2015-12-01

    This article presents an analytic technique for interpreting pressure falloff tests of non-Newtonian Power-law fluids in wells that are located near boundaries in dual-porosity reservoirs. First, dimensionless pressure solutions are obtained and Stehfest inversion algorithm is used to develop new type curves. Subsequently, long-time analytic solutions are presented and interpretation procedure is proposed using direct synthesis. Two examples, including real field data from a heavy oil reservoir in Colombian eastern plains basin, are used to validate and demonstrate application of this technique. Results agree with conventional type-curve matching procedure. The approach proposed in this study avoids the use of type curves, which is prone to human errors. It provides a better alternative for direct estimation of formation and flow properties from falloff data.

  14. Development of base pressure similarity parameters for application to space shuttle launch vehicle power-on aerodynamic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulyma, P. R.; Penny, M. M.

    1978-01-01

    A base pressure data correlation study was conducted to define exhaust plume similarity parameters for use in Space Shuttle power-on launch vehicle aerodynamic test programs. Data correlations were performed for single bodies having, respectively, single and triple nozzle configurations and for a triple body configuration with single nozzles on each of the outside bodies. Base pressure similarity parameters were found to differ for the single nozzle and triple nozzle configurations. However, the correlation parameter for each was found to be a strong function of the nozzle exit momentum. Results of the data base evaluation are presented indicating an assessment of all data points. Analytical/experimental data comparisons were made for nozzle calibrations and correction factors derived, where indicated for use in nozzle exit plane data calculations.

  15. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horschel, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix

  16. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horschel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  17. Minimum critical crack depths in pressure vessels guidelines for nondestructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, M.R.; Townley, C.H.A.

    1983-09-01

    Estimates of the minimum critical depths which can be expected in high quality vessels designed to certain British and American Code rules are given. A simple means of allowing for fatigue crack growth in service is included. The data which are presented can be used to decide what sensitivity and what reporting levels should be employed during an ultrasonic inspection of a pressure vessel. It is emphasised that the minimum crack depths are those which would be relevant to a vessel in which the material is stressed to its maximum permitted value during operation. Stresses may, in practice, be significantly less than this. Less restrictive inspection standards may be established, if it were considered worthwhile to carry out a detailed stress analysis of the particular vessel under examination. (author)

  18. The Effect of Spinal Tap Test on Different Sensory Modalities of Postural Stability in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Abram

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Postural instability in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH is a most crucial symptom leading to falls with secondary complications. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of spinal tap on postural stability in these patients. Methods: Seventeen patients with clinical symptoms of NPH were examined using gait scale, computerized dynamic posturography (CDP, and neuropsychological assessment. Examinations were done before and after spinal tap test. Results: The gait score showed a significant improvement 24 h after spinal tap test in all subtests and in the sum score (p Conclusion: Postural stability in NPH is predominantly affected by deficient vestibular functions, which did not improve after spinal tap test. Conditions which improved best were mainly independent from visual control and are based on proprioceptive functions.

  19. Relation of serum uric acid to an exaggerated systolic blood pressure response to exercise testing in men with normotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae, Sae Young; Bunsawat, Kanokwan; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Kim, Yeon Soo; Touyz, Rhian M; Park, Jeong Bae; Franklin, Barry A

    2018-03-01

    The authors investigated the hypothesis that high serum uric acid concentrations may be related to an exaggerated systolic blood pressure (SBP) response to maximal exercise testing in men with normotension, independent of potential confounding variables. In 4640 healthy men with normotension who underwent maximal treadmill exercise testing and fasting blood chemistry studies, including serum uric acid concentrations, an exaggerated SBP response, defined as SBP ≥ 210 mm Hg, was detected in 152 men (3.3%). After adjusting for potential confounders, participants in the highest quartile of serum uric acid (>6.6 mg/dL) had a higher odds ratio of demonstrating an exaggerated SBP to maximal exercise (odds ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-3.86) compared with participants in the lowest quartile of serum uric acid (response to maximal exercise testing in men with normotension, independent of established coronary risk factors. ©2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Fast Pressure-Sensitive Paint System for Production Wind Tunnel Testing, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ground-based testing resources are essential for the development of aerospace systems. While these facilities can be expensive to maintain and operate, the cost to...

  1. IN-SITU TEST OF PRESSURE PIPELINE VIBRATION BASED ON DATA ACQUISITION AND SIGNAL PROCESSING

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Huimin; Xu, Cundong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Rongrong; Jie, Junkun; Ding, Lianying

    2015-01-01

    Pipeline vibration of high frequency and large amplitude is an important factor that impacts the safe operation of pumping station and the efficiency of the pumps. Through conducting the vibration in-situ test of pipeline system in the pumping station, we can objectively analyze the mechanism of pipeline vibration and evaluate the stability of pipeline operation. By using DASP (data acquisition & signal processing) in the in-situ test on the 2# pipeline of the third pumping station in the gen...

  2. Nondestructive testing during the fabrication of pressure vessels with half pipe jackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherner, D.

    1985-01-01

    The most important precondition to guarantee the optimum quality of half pipe jackets is the precise fixing and observance of the manufacturing conditions. For this reason the manufacturing conditions are explained in detail. The second important point is the test for gas tightness of the half pipe jacket system. The sources of mistakes in connection with the test for gas tightness are of fundamental importance. (orig./PW) [de

  3. Impact testing of polymer-filled auxetics using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fíla, T.; Zlámal, P.; Jiroušek, O.; Falta, J.; Koudelka_ml., P.; Kytýř, D.; Doktor, T.; Valach, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 1700076. ISSN 1438-1656 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : bridge decks * filled polymers * filling * honeycomb structures * impact testing * mechanical testing * Poisson ratio * polyurethanes Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 2.319, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adem.201700076/abstract

  4. Intraexaminer and interexaminer reliability of pressure biofeedback unit for assessing lumbopelvic stability during 6 lower limb movement tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Daniel Camara; Lauria, Alessandra Christoff; Pereira, André Roberto Scarpelli; Andrade, Guilherme Trivellato; Ferreira, Manuela Loureiro; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique; Van Dillen, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess examiners' intrarater and interrater reliability to use a pressure biofeedback unit (PBU) during 6 lower limb movement tests based on Movement System Impairment classification model for low back pain (LBP) in people with nonspecific LBP. Thirty subjects (13 men and 17 women) with chronic nonspecific LPB were assessed during 6 lower limb movement tests based on Movement System Impairment classification using a PBU. Each test was performed twice by 2 assessors with a 48-hour interval between test sessions. Reliability indices of PBU measures (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]) were calculated. Intrarater reliability for hip and knee movement tests was good to excellent (ICC(3,3), 0-.60-0.95). Interrater reliability for hip and knee movement tests was fair to excellent (ICC(2,3), 0.40-0.86). Standard error of the measurement and smallest detectable change for the movement tests ranged from 1.4 to 11.3 mm Hg and from 3.9 to 31.3 mm Hg, respectively. The results of this study indicate that trained examiners can reliably perform PBU measures for patients with chronic LBP. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. In vitro comparison of Günther Tulip and Celect filters: testing filtering efficiency and pressure drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, M; Malvé, M; Peña, E; Martínez, M A; Leask, R

    2015-02-05

    In this study, the trapping ability of the Günther Tulip and Celect inferior vena cava filters was evaluated. Thrombus capture rates of the filters were tested in vitro in horizontal position with thrombus diameters of 3 and 6mm and tube diameter of 19mm. The filters were tested in centered and tilted positions. Sets of 30 clots were injected into the model and the same process was repeated 20 times for each different condition simulated. Pressure drop experienced along the system was also measured and the percentage of clots captured was recorded. The Günther Tulip filter showed superiority in all cases, trapping almost 100% of 6mm clots both in an eccentric and tilted position and trapping 81.7% of the 3mm clots in a centered position and 69.3% in a maximum tilted position. The efficiency of all filters tested decreased as the size of the embolus decreased and as the filter was tilted. The injection of 6 clots raised the pressure drop to 4.1mmHg, which is a reasonable value that does not cause the obstruction of blood flow through the system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. How does high stakes testing influence teachers' classroom instruction?: Institutional pressures and classroom instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Mika Yoder

    2011-12-01

    This study examined how a total of eight math and science elementary school teachers changed their classroom instruction in response to high stakes and low stakes testing in one school district. The district introduced new assessment in the school year of 2005--06 to meet the requirement set forth by the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB)---that the assessment should be aligned with the state academic standards. I conducted interviews with teachers and school administrators at two elementary schools, district officials, and a representative of a non-profit organization during the school year 2007--08 to examine how the new assessment introduced in 2005--06 had shaped classroom instruction. Concepts from New Institutional Theory and cognitive approaches to policy implementation guided the design of this study. This study focused on how materials and activities associated with high stakes testing promoted ideas about good instruction, and how these ideas were carried to teachers. The study examined how teachers received messages about instruction and how they responded to the messages. The study found that high stakes testing influenced teachers' classroom instruction more than low stakes testing; however, the instructional changes teachers made in response to state testing was at the content level. The teachers' instructional strategies did not change. The teachers' instructional changes varied with the degree of implementation of existing math curriculum and with the degree of support they received in understanding the meaning of assessment results. The study concluded that, among the six teachers I studied, high stakes testing was not a sufficient intervention for changing teachers' instructional strategies. The study also addressed the challenges of aligning instructional messages across assessment, standards, and curriculum.

  7. Psychometric Testing of INTEGRARE, an Instrument for the Assesment of Pressure Ulcer Risk in Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel-Gálvez, Ana María; Romero-Castillo, Rocío; Fernández-García, Elena; Barrientos-Trigo, Sergio

    2017-08-21

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the psychometric properties of INTEGRARE, an instrument based on Nursing Outcome Classification. A multicenter, cross-sectional, methodological design was used. The study included 3,835 patients. Internal consistency α = 0.86. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated the unidimensionality of the scale, indicating a good model fit (CMIN/DF = 4; GFI, CFI, NFI, IFI = 0.999; RMSEA = 0.028). INTEGRARE is a valid and reliable instrument with high sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy in measuring pressure ulcer (PU) risk in inpatients. This instrument allows us to know the effectiveness of nursing interventions, providing evidence for the validation of the diagnosis Risk for pressure ulcer (00249) as well as on health outcomes, due to the fact that PUs are nursing-sensitive outcomes. Evaluar las propiedades psicométricas de INTEGRARE, un instrumento basado en la Clasificación de Resultados de Enfermería. MÉTODO: Se optó por un diseño transversal multicéntrico. El estudio incluyó a 3,835 pacientes. Consistencia interna α = 0.86. El análisis factorial confirmatorio demostró la unidimensionalidad de la escala, indicando un buen ajuste del modelo (CMIN/DF = 4; GFI, CFI, NFI, IFI = 0.999; RMSEA = 0.028). INTEGRARE es un instrumento válido y fiable con alta sensibilidad, especificidad y precisión diagnóstica en la medición de riesgo de úlcera por presión (UPP) en pacientes hospitalizados. IMPLICACIONES PARA LA PRÁCTICA ENFERMERA: Este instrumento nos permite conocer la efectividad de las intervenciones enfermeras, aportando evidencia para la validación del diagnóstico Riesgo de úlcera por presión (00249), así como sobre los resultados de salud, debido a que las UPP son resultados sensibles a la práctica enfermera. © 2017 NANDA International, Inc.

  8. Test Report for MSFC Test No. 83-2: Pressure scaled water impact test of a 12.5 inch diameter model of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster filament wound case and external TVC PCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Water impact tests using a 12.5 inch diameter model representing a 8.56 percent scale of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster configuration were conducted. The two primary objectives of this SRB scale model water impact test program were: 1. Obtain cavity collapse applied pressure distributions for the 8.56 percent rigid body scale model FWC pressure magnitudes as a function of full-scale initial impact conditions at vertical velocities from 65 to 85 ft/sec, horizontal velocities from 0 to 45 ft/sec, and angles from -10 to +10 degrees. 2. Obtain rigid body applied pressures on the TVC pod and aft skirt internal stiffener rings at initial impact and cavity collapse loading events. In addition, nozzle loads were measured. Full scale vertical velocities of 65 to 85 ft/sec, horizontal velocities of 0 to 45 ft/sec, and impact angles from -10 to +10 degrees simulated.

  9. Highlights of unsteady pressure tests on a 14 percent supercritical airfoil at high Reynolds number, transonic condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Robert W.; Seidel, David A.; Igoe, William B.; Lawing, Pierce L.

    1987-01-01

    Steady and unsteady pressures were measured on a 2-D supercritical airfoil in the Langley Research Center 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at Reynolds numbers from 6 x 1,000,000 to 35 x 1,000,000. The airfoil was oscillated in pitch at amplitudes from plus or minus .25 degrees to plus or minus 1.0 degrees at frequencies from 5 Hz to 60 Hz. The special requirements of testing an unsteady pressure model in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel are discussed. Selected steady measured data are presented and are compared with GRUMFOIL calculations at Reynolds number of 6 x 1,000,000 and 30 x 1,000,000. Experimental unsteady results at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 1,000,000 and 30 x 1,000,000 are examined for Reynolds number effects. Measured unsteady results at two mean angles of attack at a Reynolds number of 30 x 1,000,000 are also examined.

  10. Baseline Systolic Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Stress Test Can Predict Exercise Indices following Cardiac Rehabilitation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Sardari

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systolic blood pressure recovery (rSBP is of prognostic value for predicting the survival and co-morbidity rate in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. This study investigated the association between rSBP and exercise indices after complete cardiac rehabilitation program (CR in a population-based sample of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG.Methods: The sample population consisted of 352 patients who underwent pure CABG. The patients underwent standard symptom-limited exercise testing immediately before and also after the completion of the CR sessions. rSBP was defined as the ratio of the systolic blood pressure at 3 minutes in recovery to the systolic blood pressure at peak exercise.Results: An abnormal baseline rSBP after exercise was a strong predictor of exercise parameters in the last session, including metabolic equivalents (β = -0.617, SE = 0.127, p value < 0.001 and peak O2 consumption (β = -1.950, SE = 0.363, p value < 0.001 measured in the last session adjusted for baseline exercise characteristics, demographics, function class, and left ventricular ejection fraction.Conclusion: The current study strongly emphasizes the predictive role of baseline rSBP after exercise in evaluating exercise parameters following CR. This baseline index can predict abnormal METs value, peak O2 consumption, post-exercise heart rate, and heart rate recovery after a 24-session CR program.

  11. Development and testing of bio-inspired microelectromechanical pressure sensor arrays for increased situational awareness for marine vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusek, J; Triantafyllou, M S; Kottapalli, A G P; Asadnia, M; Miao, J; Woo, M E; Lang, J H

    2013-01-01

    The lateral line found on most species of fish is a sensory organ without analog in humans. Using sensory feedback from the lateral line, fish are able to track prey, school, avoid obstacles, and detect vortical flow structures. Composed of both a superficial component, and a component contained within canals beneath the fish’s skin, the lateral line acts in a similar fashion to an array of differential pressure sensors. In an effort to enhance the situational and environmental awareness of marine vehicles, lateral-line-inspired pressure sensor arrays were developed to mimic the enhanced sensory capabilities observed in fish. Three flexible and waterproof pressure sensor arrays were fabricated for use as a surface-mounted ‘smart skin’ on marine vehicles. Two of the sensor arrays were based around the use of commercially available piezoresistive sensor dies, with innovative packaging schemes to allow for flexibility and underwater operation. The sensor arrays employed liquid crystal polymer and flexible printed circuit board substrates with metallic circuits and silicone encapsulation. The third sensor array employed a novel nanocomposite material set that allowed for the fabrication of a completely flexible sensor array. All three sensors were surface mounted on the curved hull of an autonomous kayak vehicle, and tested in both pool and reservoir environments. Results demonstrated that all three sensors were operational while deployed on the autonomous vehicle, and provided an accurate means for monitoring the vehicle dynamics. (paper)

  12. Overview of pressure drawdown production test results for the Japex/JNOC/GSC Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate research well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, S.; Carle, D. [APA Petroleum Engineering Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Dallimore, S. [Geological Survey of Canada, Sidney, BC (Canada); Collett, T. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Satoh, T. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, T. [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Schlumberger's Modular Dynamic Tester (MDT) cased hole wireline tool was used during a pressure drawdown production test at the Mallik 5L-38 well to successfully test 3 separate hydrate intervals as well as free gas and water zones. The MDT test was initially performed to reduce reservoir pressure below the hydrate stability point, and to shut-in and observe the pressure build-up. It was assumed that the rate of gas production would be too small to measure, so the rate of hydrate dissociation would have to be inferred from changing pressure versus time data. Two important phenomena were observed during the hydrate tests: (1) free gas was produced on a steady state basis following the initial clean-up flow of water, and (2) the pressure response upon shut-in displayed porous media effects and indicated both flow contribution and pressure effects beyond the surface area of the hydrate open to the wellbore. In response to these observations, the MDT test procedures for the hydrate intervals were changed to include multiple flow and build-up periods, as well as injection and pressure fall-off periods. The factors that should be considered in interpreting the pressure transient data obtained during the MDT tests of the hydrate intervals include wellbore and perforation geometry with respect to the pressure affected area in the reservoir; radial and time dependent hydrate saturation changes which result in dynamic multiphase fluid flow, changing relative permeability, and changing system compressibility; the addition of free gas during the shut-in periods from continued hydrate dissociation; and the changing presence and character of boundaries due either to localized fractures or the limit of the hydrate dissociation front. Since analytical pressure transient analysis software cannot incorporate such dynamic reservoir parameters, conventional analytical techniques were used to evaluate the test data. 1 fig.

  13. Process evaluation of a cluster-randomised trial testing a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Shelley; McInnes, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Wallis, Marianne; Banks, Merrilyn; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-02-13

    As pressure ulcers contribute to significant patient burden and increased health care costs, their prevention is a clinical priority. Our team developed and tested a complex intervention, a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle promoting patient participation in care, in a cluster-randomised trial. The UK Medical Research Council recommends process evaluation of complex interventions to provide insight into why they work or fail and how they might be improved. This study aimed to evaluate processes underpinning implementation of the intervention and explore end-users' perceptions of it, in order to give a deeper understanding of its effects. A pre-specified, mixed-methods process evaluation was conducted as an adjunct to the main trial, guided by a framework for process evaluation of cluster-randomised trials. Data was collected across eight Australian hospitals but mainly focused on the four intervention hospitals. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected across the evaluation domains: recruitment, reach, intervention delivery and response to intervention, at both cluster and individual patient level. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. In the context of the main trial, which found a 42% reduction in risk of pressure ulcer with the intervention that was not significant after adjusting for clustering and covariates, this process evaluation provides important insights. Recruitment and reach among clusters and individuals was high, indicating that patients, nurses and hospitals are willing to engage with a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle. Of 799 intervention patients in the trial, 96.7% received the intervention, which took under 10 min to deliver. Patients and nurses accepted the care bundle, recognising benefits to it and describing how it enabled participation in pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) care. This process evaluation found no major failures

  14. Development of the Measurement Technology of Fretting Wear Test Parameters under the Environment of High Temperature and Pressure - Final Report -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Lee, Young Ho; Song, Ju Sun

    2006-01-01

    This report is dealing with the results of the development procedure of a load cell that could be applied to the fretting wear tester in high temperature and pressure water condition in order to measure the contact force between the nuclear fuel rods and their supports. The strain gage of WK-06-062TT-350 was used with considering the temperature limits and the economical concerns in this study and two rosette pairs were bonded on opposite sides with a 180 .deg. C angle between each other to establish the Wheatstone full bridge circuit. To design bi-axial load cells with good performance in a high temperature and pressure water condition, we should preferentially consider the shape and size of a force sensing element and the waterproofing method at the same time. Because of a limited test section within the autoclave of the fretting wear tester, the load cell should have a relatively small size. In addition, strain gages and their lead wire should be shielded against high temperature water. A simple cylinder type is adopted for the shape of the force sensing element in consideration of easy waterproofing. This force measurement system consists of a force sensing element, a cylinder type cap with a hole, a base case, a force transfer screw, two metallic sealants, tube connector and metallic tube. In this study, a fluoro plastic-coated Nickel-plated Copper wire was used as signal wires for the purpose of the cable shield against the metallic tube in which the wires are inserted. Also, a metallic sealant that was made from Silver-coated Copper was used for waterproofing between the force sensing element and the cylinder type cap in the high temperature and pressure water condition. This enables an easy fabrication without a welding process for waterproofing. From the strain analysis result of the sensing element, the estimated coupling error between the normal and shear component is less than 4%. We determined the location of the strain gages based on the above result

  15. Using NIF to Test Theories of High-Pressure, High-Rate Plastic Flow in Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Robert E.; Arsenlis, A.; Cavallo, R. M.; Huntington, C. M.; McNaney, J. M.; Park, H. S.; Powell, P.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Remington, B. A.; Swift, D.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Yang, L.

    2017-10-01

    Precisely controlled plasmas are playing key roles both as pump and probe in experiments to understand the strength of solid metals at high energy density (HED) conditions. In concert with theoretical advances, these experiments have enabled a predictive capability to model material strength at Mbar pressures and high strain rates. Here we describe multiscale strength models developed for tantalum starting with atomic bonding and extending up through the mobility of individual dislocations, the evolution of dislocation networks and so on until the ultimate material response at the scale of an experiment. Experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) probe strength in metals ramp compressed to 1-8 Mbar. The model is able to predict 1 Mbar experiments without adjustable parameters. The combination of experiment and theory has shown that solid metals can behave significantly differently at HED conditions. We also describe recent studies of lead compressed to 3-5 Mbar. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA273.

  16. Continuous Flow Pressure Driven Microfluidic Techniques for Point of Care Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luck T. EREKU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent advent of the miniaturization technology witnessed over the last decades has led to development and creation of several conventional microfluidic techniques. A microfluidic platform can be broken down into a set of fluidic unit operations which are miniaturized versions of orthodox large scale (bio-chemical laboratory operations. These miniaturized operations are designed for easy integration and automation within a well-defined fabrication technology; which permits simple, easy, fast, and cost-efficient implementation of different application-specific bio-chemical processes for point care diagnostics. Processes that can be automated at this scale include nucleic acid extraction, amplification and detection. The improvement in technology within the previous decades has led to significant developments of techniques used in implementing several microfluidic processes. The auspicious developments that have greatly impacted areas in medical research, therapeutics and POCT applications are brought into focus by this research on a continuous flow configuration. Through these visualization platforms such as pressure driven flow, magneto-hydrodynamics dielectrophoresis, large-scale integration are analyzed under continuous flow characteristics. Finally this review also provides adequate examples whilst investigating the strengths and limitations of every technique.

  17. Energy efficient engine. Low pressure turbine test hardware detailed design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, D. G.; Gay, C. H.; Lenahan, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    The low pressure turbine for the energy efficient engine is a five-stage configuration with moderate aerodynamic loading incorporating advanced features of decambered airfoils and extended blade overlaps at platforms and shrouds. Mechanical integrity of 18,000 hours on flowpath components and 36,000 hours on all other components is achieved along with no aeromechanical instabilities within the steady-state operating range. Selection of a large number (156) of stage 4 blades, together with an increased stage 4 vane-to-blade gap, assists in achieving FAR 36 acoustic goals. Active clearance control (ACC) of gaps at blade tips and interstage seals is achieved by fan air cooling judiciously applied at responsive locations on the casing. This ACC system is a major improvement in preventing deterioration of the 0.0381 cm (0.015 in.) clearances required to meet the integrated-core/low-spool turbine efficiency goal of 91.1% and the light propulsion system efficiency goal of 91.7%.

  18. Influence of blood pressure manometer feedback on the parameters of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Myung-Whan; Kim, Ji Soo; Koo, Ja-Won

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the merits of a blood pressure (BP) manometry feedback method for measurement of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Sixty ears of 30 normal volunteers were prospectively investigated. The vestibular evoked myogenic potentials were recorded under 3 different conditions: in the feedback-negative (FB-) condition, ie, in a sitting position without feedback; in the feedback-positive (FB+) condition, ie, in a sitting position with self-monitored BP feedback (using a BP cuff); and in a supine condition, ie, in a supine position without feedback. The interaural amplitude difference (IAD) ratios and interaural latency differences were analyzed. The mean IAD ratio was smaller in the FB+ condition than in the FB- and supine conditions, but the difference was without statistical significance. The upper limits of the normal range of the IAD ratios were 39.5%, 18.3%, and 25.9% for the FB-, FB+, and supine conditions, respectively. The interaural latency difference of p13 was significantly smaller in the supine condition than in the FB- and FB+ conditions. Although the reduction of the mean IAD ratio did not reach statistical significance by feedback monitoring in our study, feedback using a BP manometer may have some clinical significance, in that a more stable IAD ratio may be obtained with a narrower normal range and a smaller variation.

  19. Long-Term Durability of Pressure-Treated Wood in a Severe Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Grant Kirker; Patricia Lebow

    2013-01-01

    Improved estimates of the long-term durability of treated wood products are needed to guide choices about construction materials and allow estimates of design life. This report summarizes the long-term decay and insect resistance of treated wood post and lumber specimens placed in ground contact at a test site of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,...

  20. Ultrasonic data acquisition installation for basis and in-service testing of nuclear pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmann, G.; Engl, G.

    1976-01-01

    The safety of nuclear installations requires continuous safety inspections during construction and operation. Essential parts of this safety inspection are the basis and in-line inspections. For this purpose installation systems are used which allow an optimal statement to be made regarding the conditions of tested components

  1. Irradiation testing of internally pressurized and/or graphite coated Zircaloy-4 clad fuel rods in the NRX Reactor (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, R.C.; Sherman, J.

    1978-11-01

    Irradiation tests on 0.612 inch O.D. by 117-inch long Zircaloy-4 clad fuel rods were performed to assess the effects on fuel rod performance of (1) internal helium pre-pressurization to 500 psi as fabricated, (2) the presence of a graphite barrier coating on the inside cladding surface, and (3) combined pre-pressurization and graphite coating. Periodic dimensional examinations were performed on the test rods, and the results were compared with data obtained from two previously irradiated test rods--both unpressurized and uncoated and one intentionally defected. These comparisons indicate that both pre-pressurization and graphite coating can substantially improve fuel element performance capability

  2. NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation High Overall Pressure Ratio Compressor Research Pre-Test CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestina, Mark L.; Fabian, John C.; Kulkarni, Sameer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative and cost-shared approach to reducing fuel burn under the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. NASA and General Electric (GE) Aviation are working together aa an integrated team to obtain compressor aerodynamic data that is mutually beneficial to both NASA and GE Aviation. The objective of the High OPR Compressor Task is to test a single stage then two stages of an advanced GE core compressor using state-of-the-art research instrumentation to investigate the loss mechanisms and interaction effects of embedded transonic highly-loaded compressor stages. This paper presents preliminary results from NASA's in-house multistage computational code, APNASA, in preparation for this advanced transonic compressor rig test.

  3. Ultrasonic testing of large blocks for prestressed cast iron pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelling, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    Ultrasonic tests were made on plate specimen and large blocks of perlit cast iron with lamellar graphite. Aims of the investigations were the control of material porperties, the flaw detection and flaw classification. The material properties were classified by sound velocity and attenuation measurements. Flaw detection and flaw size estimation methods were modified with regard to the acoustic properties, the microstructure and the reflectivity of typical flaws in castings. Special localisation and flaw size estimation techniques are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Improved ultrasonic nondestructive testing of pressure vessels. Annual progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederick, J.R.; Fairchild, R.C.; Anderson, B.H.

    1977-07-01

    A synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing (SAFT UT) is described. The technique employs a single scanned transducer operating in pulse-echo mode with digital data acquisition and synthetic aperture post-processing to provide high lateral and longitudinal resolution. The extension of previously developed algorithms to provide volumetric processing and display is described. The design of a refreshed grey-scale display to provide interactive display of SAFT UT data is described

  5. Pressurized water and steam tests. EdF's R and D studies on valves and fittings and on components of industrial circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This document gives a presentation of the means developed by the R and D direction of Electricite de France (EdF) for the tests performed on valves and fittings devoted to industrial installations: an internal calibration and metrology laboratory devoted to pressure, temperature and mechanical vibration tests, performing data acquisition and processing means, an internal water chemistry laboratory, and a series of test facilities for pressurized water and steam tests (Cumulus, Cypres, Cythere, GB, Coccinelle, Babette 1 and 2 loops). A description of the principal functions, functioning principle, performances, and performable tests is given for each loop. (J.S.)

  6. Dynamic pressure probe response tests for robust measurements in periodic flows close to probe resonating frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhun Şahin, Fatma; Schiffmann, Jürg

    2018-02-01

    A single-hole probe was designed to measure steady and periodic flows with high fluctuation amplitudes and with minimal flow intrusion. Because of its high aspect ratio, estimations showed that the probe resonates at a frequency two orders of magnitude lower than the fast response sensor cut-off frequencies. The high fluctuation amplitudes cause a non-linear behavior of the probe and available models are neither adequate for a quantitative estimation of the resonating frequencies nor for predicting the system damping. Instead, a non-linear data correction procedure based on individual transfer functions defined for each harmonic contribution is introduced for pneumatic probes that allows to extend their operating range beyond the resonating frequencies and linear dynamics. This data correction procedure was assessed on a miniature single-hole probe of 0.35 mm inner diameter which was designed to measure flow speed and direction. For the reliable use of such a probe in periodic flows, its frequency response was reproduced with a siren disk, which allows exciting the probe up to 10 kHz with peak-to-peak amplitudes ranging between 20%-170% of the absolute mean pressure. The effect of the probe interior design on the phase lag and amplitude distortion in periodic flow measurements was investigated on probes with similar inner diameters and different lengths or similar aspect ratios (L/D) and different total interior volumes. The results suggest that while the tube length consistently sets the resonance frequency, the internal total volume affects the non-linear dynamic response in terms of varying gain functions. A detailed analysis of the introduced calibration methodology shows that the goodness of the reconstructed data compared to the reference data is above 75% for fundamental frequencies up to twice the probe resonance frequency. The results clearly suggest that the introduced procedure is adequate to capture non-linear pneumatic probe dynamics and to

  7. Nuclear register applications and pressure tests to foresee reservoirs exploitation with water drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio F, X.; Redosado G, V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper illustrates how the pulsed neutron log and well test analysis aid proper reservoir management in strong water reservoirs. These techniques have been applied to Cetico reservoir which belongs to Corrientes Field which is located in the Peruvian Jungle. Corrientes is the most important field operated by PETROPERU S.A. As a result of the analysis we current know the present areal water saturation distribution and also have improve the reservoir characterization al of which is being used for increasing the oil production and reserves. (author). 4 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  8. Design and Testing of a Controller for the Martian Atmosphere Pressure and Humidity Instrument DREAMS-P/H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapani Nikkanen, Timo; Schmidt, Walter; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri

    2013-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA), driven by the goal of performing a soft landing on Mars, is planning to launch the Entry, descent and landing Demonstrator Module (EDM)[1] simultaneously with the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) as a part of the ExoMars program towards Mars in 2016. As a secondary objective, the EDM will gather meteorological data and observe the electrical environment of the landing site with its Dust characterisation, Risk assessment, and Environmental Analyser on the Martian Surface (DREAMS). The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) is participating in the project by designing, building and testing a pressure and a humidity instrument for Mars, named DREAMS-P and DREAMS-H, respectively. The instruments are based on previous FMI designs, including ones flown on board the Huygens, Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory.[2] Traditionally, the FMI pressure and humidity instruments have been controlled by an FPGA. However, the need to incorporate more autonomy and modifiability into instruments, cut the development time and component costs, stimulated interest to study a Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Microcontroller Unit (MCU) based instrument design. Thus, in the DREAMS-P/H design, an automotive MCU is used as the instrument controller. The MCU has been qualified for space by tests in and outside FMI. The DREAMS-P/H controller command and data interface utilizes a RS-422 connection to receive telecommands from and to transmit data to the Central Electronics Unit (CEU) of the DREAMS science package. The two pressure transducers of DREAMS-P and one humidity transducer of DREAMS-H are controlled by a single MCU. The MCU controls the power flow for each transducer and performs pulse counting measurements on sensor and reference channels to retrieve scientific data. Pressure and humidity measurements are scheduled and set up according to a configuration table assigned to each transducer. The configuration tables can be modified during the flight. The whole

  9. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; and Combustion Gas Turbine. Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  11. Field testing for extreme universe space observatory aboard a super pressure balloon (EUSO-SPB): Logistics and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Austin

    Extreme Universe Space Observatory aboard a Super Pressure Balloon (EUSO-SPB) is a prototype cosmic ray detector that will, for the first time, record cosmic rays from above. It is planned to fly for nearly 100 days at an altitude of 33 km, looking downward onto Earth's atmosphere, and measure the ultraviolet light emitted by ultra-high energy cosmic ray extensive air showers. It is the primary scientific payload aboard the 2017 NASA super pressure balloon flight launched from Wanaka, NZ. It was necessary to perform an end-to-end characterization of the instrument, as post test recovery is not guaranteed. A laser underflight study for EUSO-SPB is planned to occur to evaluate the assembled instrument's response to realistic optical tracks. In case of failure, it was necessary to conduct ground-to-ground testing, where laser test beams at "flight-like" distances through Earth's atmosphere would be provided. The Black Rock Mesa (BRM) Telescope Array (TA) test site in Delta, Utah was chosen as the location for the instrument field testing. The assembled and working EUSO-SPB instrument was transported using a ground loading, weather-sealed, air-suspension trailer and a custom "vibration-proof" dolly. During transportation, the maximum acceleration experienced by the instrument was 1.2 g's. Test beams were provided by a fixed energy, vertical laser at 21 km and by a steerable, variable energy, laser at 24 km. Hundreds of thousands of pulsed, UV laser shots were successfully recorded during the six nights of operation, with various energies, directions, and triggering methods. Energy sweeps were performed with a 45° tilted away laser at 24 km to determine the nominal energy threshold of EUSO-SPB in a balloon simulated geometry for two different lens configurations. First results show that the 2 lens configuration of EUSO-SPB was approximately twice as sensitive as the 3 lens configuration to laser light, with 50% energy thresholds of 1 mj and 2 mj, respectively. Cloud

  12. The characterization of NMR signal for blood pressure monitoring system and its testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Murdaka Eka Jati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A blood monitoring system based on NMR method has been designed on constructed. This set-up of equipment used magnetic permanent, radio frequency (RF, receiver coil (RC, function generator (FG, amplifier which included the filter, as well as the oscilloscope digital storage. The background of this research was based on the sensitivity of NMR signal. The signal must be separated from signals background. This method was done by adjusting the frequency on FG, which was connected to radio frequency (RF coil, on empty sample. Subsequently, NMR signal was received by RC, and that signal could be shown on oscilloscope at resonance condition. The true frequency on NMR signal was Larmor frequency, and the other was background. The two variables of this experiment were the position of RF coil and the location temperature (20 up to 30oC. In conclusion, the resonance frequency of NMR signal (as Larmor frequency was 4.7 MHz (at static magnetic field of 1,600 gauss and it could be separated from background signals (3.4 and 6.2 MHz, and that signal was almost constant to room temperature. The equipment was used for sample testing. It gave systole/diastole data of 110/70 mmHg (on sphygmomanometer that was similar to 17/9 mV (on NMR signal. ABSTRAK Telah dikembangkan alat pemantauan tekanan darah berdasar prinsip NMR.

  13. Use of the nine-step inflation/deflation test and resting middle-ear pressure range as predictors of middle-ear barotrauma in aircrew members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, A; Abousetta, A

    2014-07-01

    To explore the role of the nine-step inflation/deflation tympanometric test and resting middle-ear pressure range as predictors of barotrauma in aircrew members. A prospective, non-randomised study was conducted on 100 aircrew members. Resting middle-ear pressure was measured and the nine-step inflation/deflation test performed on all subjects before flights. Subjects were allocated to two groups according to resting middle-ear pressure range (group A, within the range of +26 to +100 and -26 to -100 mmH2O; group B, -25 to +25 mmH2O). All aircrew members were assessed after flights regarding the presence and the grade of barotrauma. In both groups, the sensitivity and specificity values of the entire post-inflation/deflation test were close to those of the post-deflation part of the test. The post-deflation test had a higher negative predictive value than the post-inflation test. Ears with resting middle-ear pressure lower than -55 mmH2O experienced barotrauma, regardless of good or poor post-inflation or post-deflation test results. In an aircrew member, a resting middle-ear pressure within the range of -55 and +50 mmH2O, together with good post-deflation test results, are considered reliable predictors for fitness to fly.

  14. Investigation of mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing pressure core sediments recovered from the Eastern Nankai Trough using transparent acrylic cell triaxial testing system (TACTT-system)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, J.; Masui, A.; Konno, Y.; Jin, Y.; Kida, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Tenma, N.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrate-bearing pressure core sediments have been sheared in compression using a newly developed Transparent Acrylic Cell Triaxial Testing (TACTT) system to investigate the geophysical and geomechanical behavior of sediments recovered from the deep seabed in the Eastern Nankai Trough, the first Japanese offshore production test region. The sediments were recovered by hybrid pressure core system (hybrid PCS) and pressure cores were cut by pressure core analysis tools (PCATs) on board. These pressure cores were transferred to the AIST Hokkaido centre and trimmed by pressure core non-destructive analysis tools (PNATs) for TACTT system which maintained the pressure and temperature conditions within the hydrate stability boundary, through the entire process of core handling from drilling to the end of laboratory testing. An image processing technique was used to capture the motion of sediment in a transparent acrylic cell, and digital photographs were obtained at every 0.1% of vertical strain during the test. Analysis of the optical images showed that sediments with 63% hydrate saturation exhibited brittle failure, although nonhydrate-bearing sediments exhibited ductile failure. In addition, the increase in shear strength with hydrate saturation increase of natural gas hydrate is in agreement with previous data from synthetic gas hydrate. This research was financially supported by the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) that carries out Japan's Methane Hydrate R&D Program by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI).

  15. Factory test results on NOx recycle system using pressure swing adsorption method (PSA-method) for Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Masami; Nakamura, Kou; Shimizu, Yoshinao; Kubota, Masaru; Takeishi, Masayuki; Kumura, Seiji

    2005-01-01

    At Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRR), a great deal of NOx is mainly used as oxidizing reagent of Pu. This NOx has been conventionally manufactured by reaction of sodium nitrite and nitric acid. Problem, however, was how to process the radioactive waste materials left after immunization of the non-radioactive sodium nitrite occurring in manufacturing and the residual NOx used in the reprocessing. This paper reports the factory test results on the recycle system for NOx from denitrating tower off-gas using PSA method (vacuum pressure swing adsorption method) which has been developed to reduce waste materials occurring in the manufacture of NOx and the processing of residual NOx in the off-gas. (author)

  16. Tests of Round and Flat Spoilers on a Tapered Wing in the NACA 19-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Bowen, John D

    1941-01-01

    Several arrangements of round and flat spanwise spoilers attached to the upper surface of a tapered wing were tested in the NACA 19-foot pressure wind tunnel to determine the most effective type, location, and size of spoiler necessary to reduce greatly the lift on the wings of large flying boats when moored. The effect of the various spoilers on the lift, the drag, and the pitching-moment characteristics of the tapered wing was measured over a range of angles of attack from zero to maximum lift. The most effective type of spoiler was found to be the flat type with no space between it and the wing surface. The chordwise location of such a spoiler was not critical within the range investigated, from 5 to 20 percent of the wing chord from the leading edge.

  17. LOFT/LP-SB-3, Loss of Fluid Test, Cold Leg Break LOCA, No High Pressure injection System (HPIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: The LOFT Integral Test Facility is a scale model of a LPWR. The intent of the facility is to model the nuclear, thermal-hydraulic phenomena which would take place in a LPWR during a LOCA. The general philosophy in scaling coolant volumes and flow areas in LOFT was to use the ratio of the LOFT core [50 MW(t)] to a typical LPWR core [3000 MW(t)]. For some components, this factor is not applied; however, it is used as extensively as practical. In general, components used in LOFT are similar in design to those of a LPWR. Because of scaling and component design, the LOFT LOCA is expected to closely model a LPWR LOCA. 2 - Description of test: The sixth OECD LOFT experiment was conducted on 5 March 1984. It simulated a 1.8-in cold leg break LOCA with no HPIS available. This experiment was designed mainly for investigation of plant recovery effectiveness using secondary bleed and feed during core uncover and addressed accumulator injection at low pressure differentials. 3 - Experimental limitations or shortcomings: Short core and steam generator, excessive core bypass, other scaling compromises, and lack of adequate measurements in certain areas

  18. Pressure distributions from high Reynolds number transonic tests of an NACA 0012 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladson, Charles L.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Johnson, William G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the 2-D test section of the Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel on a NACA 0012 airfoil to obtain aerodynamic data as a part of the Advanced Technology Airfoil Test (ATAT) program. The test program covered a Mach number range of 0.30 to 0.82 and a Reynolds number range of 3.0 to 45.0 x 10 to the 6th power. The stagnation pressure was varied between 1.2 and 6.0 atmospheres and the stagnation temperature was varied between 300 K and 90 K to obtain these test conditions. Tabulated pressure distributions and integrated force and moment coefficients are presented as well as plots of the surface pressure distributions. The data are presented uncorrected for wall interference effects and without analysis.

  19. Pore pressure measurement plan of near field rock used on three dimensional groundwater flow analysis in demonstration test of cavern type disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Kazuhiro; Terada, Kenji; Matsumura, Katsuhide; Koyama, Toshihiro; Yajima, Kazuaki

    2008-01-01

    Demonstration test of underground cavern type disposal facilities is planed though carrying out construction of full scale engineering barrier system which simulated in the underground space in full scale and under actual environment. This test consists of three part, these are construction test, performance test and measurement test. Behavior of near field rock mass is measured about hydrological behavior under and after construction to evaluate effect at test facility. To make plan of pore pressure measurement, three dimensional groundwater flow analysis has been carried out. Based on comparison of analysis before and after test, detail plan has been studied. (author)

  20. Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion Project. Quarterly report, April--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived as streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed Include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning, techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing, Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: 1 . Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating, Fluidized Bed Gas Source; 2. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; 3. Combustion Gas Turbine; 4. Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during, this reporting period was continuing, the detailed design of the FW portion of the facility towards completion and integrating the balance-of-plant processes and particulate control devices (PCDS) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of the process structural steel is complete and the construction of steel for the coal preparation structure is complete.

  1. In vitro efficacy of cold atmospheric pressure plasma on S. sanguinis biofilms in comparison of two test models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorynia, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Dental plaque critically affects the etiology of caries, periodontitis and periimplantitis. The mechanical removal of plaque can only be performed partially due to limited accessibility. Therefore, plaque still represents one of the major therapeutic challenges. Even though antiseptic mouth rinses reduce the extent of biofilm temporarily, plaque removal remains incomplete and continuous usage can even result in side effects. Here we tested argon plasma produced by kinpen09 as one option to inactivate microorganisms and to eliminate plaque. biofilms cultivated in either the European Biofilm Reactor (EUREBI or in 24 well plates were treated with argon plasma. In both test systems a homogeneous, good analyzable and stable biofilm was produced on the surface of titan plates within 72 h (>6,9 log CFU/ml. Despite the significantly more powerful biofilm production in EUREBI, the difference of 0.4 log CFU/ml between EUREBI and the 24 well plates was practically not relevant. For that reason both test models were equally qualified for the analysis of efficacy of cold atmospheric pressure plasma. We demonstrate a significant reduction of the biofilm compared to the control in both test models. After plasma application of 180 s the biofilm produced in EUREBI or in 24 well plates was decreased by 0.6 log CFU/ml or 0.5 log CFU/ml, respectively. In comparison to recently published studies analyzing the efficacy of kinpen09, produces a hardly removable biofilm. Future investigations using reduced distances between plasma source and biofilm, various compositions of plasma and alternative plasma sources will contribute to further optimization of the efficacy against biofilms.

  2. In vitro efficacy of cold atmospheric pressure plasma on S. sanguinis biofilms in comparison of two test models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorynia, Susanne; Koban, Ina; Matthes, Rutger; Welk, Alexander; Gorynia, Sabine; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Kocher, Thomas; Kramer, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Dental plaque critically affects the etiology of caries, periodontitis and periimplantitis. The mechanical removal of plaque can only be performed partially due to limited accessibility. Therefore, plaque still represents one of the major therapeutic challenges. Even though antiseptic mouth rinses reduce the extent of biofilm temporarily, plaque removal remains incomplete and continuous usage can even result in side effects. Here we tested argon plasma produced by kinpen09 as one option to inactivate microorganisms and to eliminate plaque. S. sanguinis biofilms cultivated in either the European Biofilm Reactor (EUREBI) or in 24 well plates were treated with argon plasma. In both test systems a homogeneous, good analyzable and stable biofilm was produced on the surface of titan plates within 72 h (>6,9 log10 CFU/ml). Despite the significantly more powerful biofilm production in EUREBI, the difference of 0.4 log10 CFU/ml between EUREBI and the 24 well plates was practically not relevant. For that reason both test models were equally qualified for the analysis of efficacy of cold atmospheric pressure plasma. We demonstrate a significant reduction of the biofilm compared to the control in both test models. After plasma application of 180 s the biofilm produced in EUREBI or in 24 well plates was decreased by 0.6 log10 CFU/ml or 0.5 log10 CFU/ml, respectively. In comparison to recently published studies analyzing the efficacy of kinpen09, S. sanguinis produces a hardly removable biofilm. Future investigations using reduced distances between plasma source and biofilm, various compositions of plasma and alternative plasma sources will contribute to further optimization of the efficacy against S. sanguinis biofilms.

  3. Effect of molecular weight and testing rate on adhesion property of pressure-sensitive adhesives prepared from epoxidized natural rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Imran; Poh, B.T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Elucidation of adhesion property of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25). → Correlation of peel and shear strength with molecular weight and rate of testing. → Confirmation of miscibility of tackifier and ENR 25 by DSC and FTIR study. → Applicability of Fox equation in ENR 25/coumarone-indene resin system. -- Abstract: The dependence of peel strength and shear strength of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25)-based pressure-sensitive adhesive on molecular weight and rate of testing was investigated using coumarone-indene as the tackifying resin. Toluene and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were used as the solvent and substrate respectively throughout the study. A SHEEN hand coater was used to coat the adhesive on the substrate at a coating thickness of 120 μm. All the adhesion properties were determined by a Llyod Adhesion Tester operating at different rates of testing. Result shows that peel strength and shear strength increases up to an optimum molecular weight of 6.5 x 10 4 of ENR 25. For peel strength, the observation is attributed to the combined effects of wettability and mechanical strength of rubber at the optimum molecular weight, whereas for the shear strength, it is ascribed to the increasing amount of adhesive present in the coating layer which enhances the shear resistance of the adhesive. Peel strength and shear strength also increases with increase in rate of testing, an observation which is associated to the viscoeslastic response of the adhesive. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study confirms the miscibility of tackifier and the ENR 25.

  4. Development of a New Analog Test System Capable of Modeling Tectonic Deformation Incorporating the Effects of Pore Fluid Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Nakajima, H.; Takeda, M.; Aung, T. T.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding and predicting the tectonic deformation within geologic strata has been a very important research subject in many fields such as structural geology and petroleum geology. In recent years, such research has also become a fundamental necessity for the assessment of active fault migration, site selection for geological disposal of radioactive nuclear waste and exploration for methane hydrate. Although analog modeling techniques have played an important role in the elucidation of the tectonic deformation mechanisms, traditional approaches have typically used dry materials and ignored the effects of pore fluid pressure. In order for analog models to properly depict the tectonic deformation of the targeted, large-prototype system within a small laboratory-scale configuration, physical properties of the models, including geometry, force, and time, must be correctly scaled. Model materials representing brittle rock behavior require an internal friction identical to the prototype rock and virtually zero cohesion. Granular materials such as sand, glass beads, or steel beads of dry condition have been preferably used for this reason in addition to their availability and ease of handling. Modeling protocols for dry granular materials have been well established but such model tests cannot account for the pore fluid effects. Although the concept of effective stress has long been recognized and the role of pore-fluid pressure in tectonic deformation processes is evident, there have been few analog model studies that consider the effects of pore fluid movement. Some new applications require a thorough understanding of the coupled deformation and fluid flow processes within the strata. Taking the field of waste management as an example, deep geological disposal of radioactive waste has been thought to be an appropriate methodology for the safe isolation of the wastes from the human environment until the toxicity of the wastes decays to non-hazardous levels. For the

  5. Relating pressure measurements to phenomena observed in high speed video recordings during tests of explosive charges in a semi-confined blast chamber

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mostert, FJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tests with explosive charges of 0.5 kg and 2 kg were conducted in the semi-confined blast chamber at the CSIR DBEL test range. Pressure measurements were obtained with side-on and face-on sensors mounted in the walls of the chamber and high speed...

  6. Three-Month Test-Retest Reliability of Center of Pressure Motion During Standing Balance in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajda, Douglas A; Motl, Robert W; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2016-01-01

    Balance impairment and an increased rate of falls are commonly reported in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Force platform-generated center of pressure (COP) metrics have previously been recommended as an outcome measure to quantify balance deficits and distinguish between fallers and nonfallers in MS. Information is limited regarding the preservation of postural control in individuals with MS over extended time frames in the absence of an intervention. This report examines the test-retest reliability and magnitude of change of COP motion during standing balance over 3 months. Twenty individuals with MS and a history of falling underwent testing on two occasions 3 months apart in the absence of an intervention. On both occasions, participants completed two 30-second trials of three conditions: eyes open, eyes closed, and eyes open with concurrent cognitive challenge (dual task). Measures of COP area, velocity, and temporal structure were calculated and included in the reliability analysis. The COP metrics displayed fair-to-excellent reliability over 3 months without an intervention. Reliability was maintained across the three commonly used balance conditions. These results offer insight into the reliability of COP measures over a 3-month period in MS and can inform the use of COP metrics for future study design (eg, sample size estimates) and balance outcome assessment during randomized controlled trials and fall-prevention studies in individuals with MS.

  7. Use of Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Materials for Extended Life Evaluations Using Power and Test Reactor Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.; Nanstad, R.K.; Odette, G.R.

    2012-01-01

    The most important component in assuring safety of the nuclear power plant is the reactor pressure (RPV). Surveillance programs have been designed to cover the licensed life of operating nuclear RPVs. The original surveillance programs were designed when the licensed life was 40 years. More than one-half of the operating nuclear plants in the USA have an extended license out to 60 years, and there are plans to continue to operate many plants out to 80 years. Therefore, the surveillance programs have had to be adjusted or enhanced to generate key data for 60 years, and now consideration must be given for 80 or more years. To generate the necessary data to assure safe operation out to these extended license lives, test reactor irradiations have been initiated with key RPV and model alloy steels, which include several steels irradiated in the current power reactor surveillance programs out to relatively high fluence levels. These data are crucial in understanding the radiation embrittlement mechanisms and to enable extrapolation of the irradiation effects on mechanical properties for these extended time periods. This paper describes the potential radiation embrittlement mechanisms and effects when assessing much longer operating times and higher neutron fluence levels. Potential methods for adjusting higher neutron flux test reactor data for use in predicting power reactor vessel conditions are discussed. (author)

  8. A method for reducing model error while interpreting pressure derivative in well test analysis : application to Hassi Messaoud Algerian oil field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachar, S. [PED/AMT/Sonatrach Inc., Alger (Algeria); Deghmoum, A.H. [CRD/AMT/Sonatrach Inc., Alger (Algeria); Tiab, D. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

    2003-07-01

    A new method for reducing well test model error was presented. Improvements in exploiting the shape and the particular points of a pressure derivative curve have led to significant progress in reservoir characterization and development. The quality of measured pressure data can be affected by external or internal noise, resulting in amplified errors in computing pressure derivatives. The noise can also result in unreliable data of wellbore storage, flow regimes, reservoir permeability, and boundary limits. This newly developed model adjusts the derivative pressure in cases of vertical and horizontal wells, homogenous composite reservoirs, or naturally fractured reservoirs. It also includes buildup or drawdown tests. The numerical model is based on Tiab's Direct Synthesis method and is adapted to the Golub method. The paper presents case studies where the method has been applied to the Hassi Messaoud Algerian oil reservoir. 20 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  9. THE EXPOSURE OF GUINEA PIGS TO PRESSURE-PULSES GENERATED DURING THE END-TO-END TEST (NO. 2) OF ATLAS MISSILE 8-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    THE EXPOSURE OF GUINEA PIGS TO PRESSURE-PULSES GENERATED DURING THE END-TO-END TEST (NO. 2) OF ATLAS MISSILE 8-D (MARCH 3) extent of the blast hazard...charge. Three guinea pigs were placed on the pressure control unit which was located beneath the ramp 90 ft from the missile. In addition, ten guinea pigs were...pressure pulse was slow rising (9-14 msec) and endured for about 25 msec. The three guinea pigs at that location were unharmed. At the 30-ft ranges

  10. Relation Between Pressure and Volume Unloading During Ramp Testing in Patients Supported with a Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Mette H; Hassager, Christian; Balling, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) is the key to describing left ventricular (LV) unloading, however, the relation between pressure and the echocardiography-derived surrogate of LV volume (left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD)) as a function of pump speed (RPM) in continuous......-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) patients is unknown. In this study the pressure-volume relationship as a function of RPM during ramp testing was investigated by simultaneously measuring PCWP by Swan-Ganz catheter and LVEDD by echocardiography. The ramp protocol started at usual pump setting...

  11. Saying goodbye to fiche: Users see 'step change' as EUB Well Test Pressure Database goes online

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polczer, S.

    2002-11-01

    Digitization and on-line accessibility of the entire Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) pressure test database has been announced. On-line access to the database marks the end of the over eight million microfiche and some 450,000 well test document file, chronicling the engineering reports of more than 300,000 wells drilled in the province. In an era when reserve reporting is taking prominence among securities regulators, the well test database is a key tool to verify reserve numbers. Having on-line access to the database enables companies to meet financial and operating disclosures with greater speed and accuracy than was possible up to now. Wells are organized into geographic areas and the database is searchable by township, range and legal subdivision. Although there are gaps in the data and the data available is by no means completely reliable, it has changed companies' decision-making capability by enabling strategic decisions to be made in a matter of minutes instead of days or weeks as was the case prior to on-line availability of the file. In addition to engineers, reserve evaluators and financial professionals, the biggest beneficiaries of the file will be small junior independents looking to pick up 'crumbs' left on the table by the majors, which they considered 'uneconomic' as they pulled back from exploring Western Canada. Once the Alberta file is complete, Rapid Technology Corporation, the company that undertook the mammoth task of capturing and digitizing the EUB data, plans to include wells from Saskatchewan, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories, to be determined by customer demand.

  12. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, C. A.; Blanchard, W. R.; Kozub, T. A.; Aristova, M.; McGahan, C.; Natta, S.; Pagdon, K.; Zelenty, J.

    2010-01-14

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber

  13. Two-phase flow experiments on Counter-Current Flow Limitation in a model of the hot leg of a pressurized water reactor (2015 test series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Matthias; Lucas, Dirk; Pietruske, Heiko; Szalinski, Lutz

    2016-12-15

    Counter-Current Flow Limitation (CCFL) is of importance for PWR safety analyses in several accident scenarios connected with loss of coolant. Basing on the experiences obtained during a first series of hot leg tests now new experiments on counter-current flow limitation were conducted in the TOPFLOW pressure vessel. The test series comprises air-water tests at 1 and 2 bar as well as steam-water tests at 10, 25 and 50 bar. During the experiments the flow structure was observed along the hot leg model using a high-speed camera and web-cams. In addition pressure was measured at several positions along the horizontal part and the water levels in the reactor-simulator and steam-generator-simulator tanks were determined. This report documents the experimental setup including the description of operational and special measuring techniques, the experimental procedure and the data obtained. From these data flooding curves were obtained basing on the Wallis parameter. The results show a slight shift of the curves in dependency of the pressure. In addition a slight decrease of the slope was found with increasing pressure. Additional investigations concern the effects of hysteresis and the frequencies of liquid slugs. The latter ones show a dependency on pressure and the mass flow rate of the injected water. The data are available for CFD-model development and validation.

  14. Two-phase flow experiments on Counter-Current Flow Limitation in a model of the hot leg of a pressurized water reactor (2015 test series)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, Matthias; Lucas, Dirk; Pietruske, Heiko; Szalinski, Lutz

    2016-12-01

    Counter-Current Flow Limitation (CCFL) is of importance for PWR safety analyses in several accident scenarios connected with loss of coolant. Basing on the experiences obtained during a first series of hot leg tests now new experiments on counter-current flow limitation were conducted in the TOPFLOW pressure vessel. The test series comprises air-water tests at 1 and 2 bar as well as steam-water tests at 10, 25 and 50 bar. During the experiments the flow structure was observed along the hot leg model using a high-speed camera and web-cams. In addition pressure was measured at several positions along the horizontal part and the water levels in the reactor-simulator and steam-generator-simulator tanks were determined. This report documents the experimental setup including the description of operational and special measuring techniques, the experimental procedure and the data obtained. From these data flooding curves were obtained basing on the Wallis parameter. The results show a slight shift of the curves in dependency of the pressure. In addition a slight decrease of the slope was found with increasing pressure. Additional investigations concern the effects of hysteresis and the frequencies of liquid slugs. The latter ones show a dependency on pressure and the mass flow rate of the injected water. The data are available for CFD-model development and validation.

  15. Testing the effects of ethinylestradiol and of an environmentally relevant mixture of xenoestrogens as found in the Douro River (Portugal) on the maturation of fish gonads--a stereological study using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Paula; Rocha, Maria J; Cruzeiro, Catarina; Malhão, Fernanda; Reis, Bruno; Urbatzka, Ralph; Monteiro, Rogério A F; Rocha, Eduardo

    2012-11-15

    In natural environments fish populations are exposed to many potential xenoestrogens, whereby understanding the impacts of mixtures continue to be of great interest. The main objective of this study was, therefore, to understand whether and how an environmentally relevant mixture of xenoestrogens found in the Douro River estuary can disrupt the normal gametogenesis in fish. For this purpose, adult zebrafish of both sexes were exposed for 21 days to an environmental mixture (MIX) of 11 xenoestrogens from diverse sources. A 100 ng/L ethinylestradiol (EE2) positive control was added. A quantitative (stereological) analysis with systematic sampling was made in the gonads, and using light microscopy both the relative and the absolute volumes of the gametogenic stages were estimated. Data point that the EE2 stimulus induced changes in structural compartments; with decreasing trends for the advanced maturation stages both in males and females. There was also a trend for a greater amount of interstitial tissue in males. Along with an interstitial fibrosis increase detected, the presence of a proteinaceous fluid was observed in both sexes and experimental groups (EE2 and MIX). Other histopathologic alterations were observed in the EE2 female group, such as the presence of foci of granulomatous inflammation and follicular mineralization in the germinal parenchyma and luminal areas. The most interesting finding of this study was that the exposure to the MIX caused a decrease of the relative volume of spermatozoa in zebrafish. This kind of estrogenic effect has not earlier been structurally quantified in such a fine detail with unbiased stereology in fish gonads. Despite the ultimate consequences of such disruptions being unknown, it could be logically argued that reduction or slowing-down of the appearance of the most mature cohorts and/or eventual interstitial fibrosis and other pathologic changes can adversely affect breeding. The findings add further explanatory bases for understanding the negative impacts of xenoestrogens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A Pressure Test to Make 10 Molecules in 90 Days: External Evaluation of Methods to Engineer Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, Arturo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Eluere, Raissa; King, Andrew M; Young, Eric M; Dudley, Quentin M; Karim, Ashty; Pratt, Katelin; Bristol, Cassandra; Forget, Anthony; Ghodasara, Amar; Warden-Rothman, Robert; Gan, Rui; Cristofaro, Alexander; Borujeni, Amin Espah; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Li, Jian; Kwon, Yong-Chan; Wang, He; Tatsis, Evangelos; Rodriguez-Lopez, Carlos; O'Connor, Sarah; Medema, Marnix H; Fischbach, Michael A; Jewett, Michael C; Voigt, Christopher; Gordon, D Benjamin

    2018-03-28

    Centralized facilities for genetic engineering, or "biofoundries", offer the potential to design organisms to address emerging needs in medicine, agriculture, industry, and defense. The field has seen rapid advances in technology, but it is difficult to gauge current capabilities or identify gaps across projects. To this end, our foundry was assessed via a timed "pressure test", in which 3 months were given to build organisms to produce 10 molecules unknown to us in advance. By applying a diversity of new approaches, we produced the desired molecule or a closely related one for six out of 10 targets during the performance period and made advances toward production of the others as well. Specifically, we increased the titers of 1-hexadecanol, pyrrolnitrin, and pacidamycin D, found novel routes to the enediyne warhead underlying powerful antimicrobials, established a cell-free system for monoterpene production, produced an intermediate toward vincristine biosynthesis, and encoded 7802 individually retrievable pathways to 540 bisindoles in a DNA pool. Pathways to tetrahydrofuran and barbamide were designed and constructed, but toxicity or analytical tools inhibited further progress. In sum, we constructed 1.2 Mb DNA, built 215 strains spanning five species ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Streptomyces albidoflavus, Streptomyces coelicolor, and Streptomyces albovinaceus), established two cell-free systems, and performed 690 assays developed in-house for the molecules.

  17. Identification of Alternative Vapor Intrusion Pathways Using Controlled Pressure Testing, Soil Gas Monitoring, and Screening Model Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanming; Holton, Chase; Luo, Hong; Dahlen, Paul; Gorder, Kyle; Dettenmaier, Erik; Johnson, Paul C

    2015-11-17

    Vapor intrusion (VI) pathway assessment and data interpretation have been guided by an historical conceptual model in which vapors originating from contaminated soil or groundwater diffuse upward through soil and are swept into a building by soil gas flow induced by building underpressurization. Recent studies reveal that alternative VI pathways involving neighborhood sewers, land drains, and other major underground piping can also be significant VI contributors, even to buildings beyond the delineated footprint of soil and groundwater contamination. This work illustrates how controlled-pressure-method testing (CPM), soil gas sampling, and screening-level emissions calculations can be used to identify significant alternative VI pathways that might go undetected by conventional sampling under natural conditions at some sites. The combined utility of these tools is shown through data collected at a long-term study house, where a significant alternative VI pathway was discovered and altered so that it could be manipulated to be on or off. Data collected during periods of natural and CPM conditions show that the alternative pathway was significant, but its presence was not identifiable under natural conditions; it was identified under CPM conditions when measured emission rates were 2 orders of magnitude greater than screening-model estimates and subfoundation vertical soil gas profiles changed and were no longer consistent with the conventional VI conceptual model.

  18. Determination of reference values for intraocular pressure and Schirmer tear test results in clinically normal domestic donkeys (Equus asinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selk Ghaffari, Masoud; Sabzevari, Amin; Ghamsari, SeyedMehdi; Shad, Hussein

    2017-11-25

    This study was conducted to establish normal reference range for the Schirmer tear test (STT) and intraocular pressure (IOP) in clinically normal donkeys for use in clinical practice. Sixteen adult Ethiopian domestic donkeys were used in this study. Complete ophthalmic examinations were performed without chemical restraint. STT values were evaluated in both eyes of all donkeys using a commercial STT strip. IOP was measured in both eyes with a Tono-Pen Vet (Reichert. USA) without using regional nerve blocks. STT values for all eyes (n=32) were 22.1±6.9 mm/minute with a range of 13-35 mm/minute. Comparison of mean STT values between right (n=16) and left eyes (n=16) showed no differences (P=0.6). Mean ±sd IOP values by applanation tonometry were 17.8±3.7 mmHg (range 13.5-24.5 mmHg). Comparison of mean IOP values between right (n=16) and left eyes (n=16) showed no differences (P=0.7). This initial survey provides means and ranges for IOP and STT values in donkeys. These data will assist veterinary ophthalmologists in more accurate diagnosis and management of ophthalmic diseases in donkeys, including keratoconjunctivitis sicca and glaucoma. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. The European iNPH Multicentre Study on the predictive values of resistance to CSF outflow and the CSF Tap Test in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Carsten; Hellström, Per; Klinge, Petra Margarete

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the CSF Tap Test (CSF TT) and resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) for the outcome of shunting in a sample of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH).......The objective was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the CSF Tap Test (CSF TT) and resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) for the outcome of shunting in a sample of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH)....

  20. A comparison of RANS computations and wind tunnel tests for RMS pressures on a high-rise building model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, I.M.; Bronkhorst, A.J.; Bentum, C.A. van; Franke, J.

    2012-01-01

    Five root-mean-square (RMS) pressure models are used in combination with different turbulence models to determine whether it is possible to obtain a conservative estimate of RMS pressures on a high-rise building model from a RANS calculation. When a precursor domain is used for the generation of

  1. Test Planning, Collection and Analysis of Pressure Data Resulting from Army Weapon Systems. Volume II. Modeling of Far Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    gives a way of comparing various pressure traces in terms of the internal dynamics. The agreement seeu between measured und predicted pressure traces is...subject, has been extensively reviewed (for instance, References 10 and 11). In order to quantify the damage to the lung due to blast overpres- -* sure

  2. Safety assessment of the SMART design during SBLOCA tests using the high pressure safety injection pump of the SMART-ITL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hwang; Ryu, Sung Uk; Jeon, Byong-Guk; Yang, Jin-Hwa; Yoon, Eun-Koo; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Min, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Jong-Kuk; Choi, Nam-Hyun; Bang, Yun-Gon; Seo, Chan-Jong; Yi, Sung-Jae; Park, Hyun-Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    SMART is a small-sized integral pressurized light water reactor designed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) from 1997 and received standard design approval (SDA) by the Korean regulatory body in July 2012. Single reactor pressure vessel contains all of the main components including a pressurizer (PZR), steam generators (SG) and reactor coolant pumps (RCP) without any large-size pipes. Several tests to verify a safety and performance of SMART design were carried out. This paper introduces a comparison with three SBLOCA tests. Overall thermal-hydraulic phenomena were observed and showed a traditional trend to decrease a system pressure and temperature. A collapsed water level of the hot side indicated that the safety injection system was successfully operated to recover the reactor coolant system (RCS) and protect the core uncover. An SBLOCA test simulating a guillotine break on the SIS, SCS, and PSV was performed. It was enough to keep a steady-state condition before the SBLOCA test begins. An actuation signal as the boundary condition was properly simulated during the transient test. The scenarios of the SBLOCA in the SMART design were reproduced well using the SMART-ITL facility. The safety injection is effective to protect the core uncover as well as to cool down the RCS. All of the measured parameters show reasonable behaviors.

  3. Safety assessment of the SMART design during SBLOCA tests using the high pressure safety injection pump of the SMART-ITL facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Hwang; Ryu, Sung Uk; Jeon, Byong-Guk; Yang, Jin-Hwa; Yoon, Eun-Koo; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Min, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Jong-Kuk; Choi, Nam-Hyun; Bang, Yun-Gon; Seo, Chan-Jong; Yi, Sung-Jae; Park, Hyun-Sik

    2016-01-01

    SMART is a small-sized integral pressurized light water reactor designed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) from 1997 and received standard design approval (SDA) by the Korean regulatory body in July 2012. Single reactor pressure vessel contains all of the main components including a pressurizer (PZR), steam generators (SG) and reactor coolant pumps (RCP) without any large-size pipes. Several tests to verify a safety and performance of SMART design were carried out. This paper introduces a comparison with three SBLOCA tests. Overall thermal-hydraulic phenomena were observed and showed a traditional trend to decrease a system pressure and temperature. A collapsed water level of the hot side indicated that the safety injection system was successfully operated to recover the reactor coolant system (RCS) and protect the core uncover. An SBLOCA test simulating a guillotine break on the SIS, SCS, and PSV was performed. It was enough to keep a steady-state condition before the SBLOCA test begins. An actuation signal as the boundary condition was properly simulated during the transient test. The scenarios of the SBLOCA in the SMART design were reproduced well using the SMART-ITL facility. The safety injection is effective to protect the core uncover as well as to cool down the RCS. All of the measured parameters show reasonable behaviors

  4. Evaluation of seismic characteristic of cylindrical water storage tank by vibration test. Dependence of dynamic fluid pressure distribution on input acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Akira; Shimizu, Yasutaka; Suzuki, Michiaki; Fujita, Katsuhisa

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale cylindrical water storage tanks with a large ratio of radius to thickness, which means they have thin walls, cause the coupling vibration with the fluid stored in a tank and the tank structure itself. It is important for the seismic-proof design of the water storage tanks to investigate the mechanism and the influence of this coupling vibration. This paper describes the results of a vibration test with a 1/10th scale reduced model of a large scale industrial cylindrical water storage tank, and also refers to the dependence of the dynamic fluid pressure distribution on input acceleration and its influence on the seismic-proof design. First, a seismic excitation experiment was performed for the scale model tank. Secondly, a large amplitude excitation experiment was conducted using sinusoidal wave of the input excitation by various magnitude. Finally, the dynamic fluid pressure distribution, shear force and bending moment measured by the test were compared with the calculation results of the present methods of the seismic-proof design. The results of the vibration test showed the dependence of the dynamic fluid pressure distribution on the input acceleration which meant that the magnitude and the distribution of the measured pressure fluctuate non-linearly. Taking the influence of the varying pressure of the ovaling vibration on the dynamic fluid pressure distribution into consideration, it was found that the measured values of the dynamic fluid pressure distribution were approximately equaled to the calculated ones. The shearing and bending moment of the tanks, which were important on the seismic-proof design evaluation, were in approximate accordance with the results of the present methods regardless of the magnitude of the input acceleration. (author)

  5. Propagation of ultrasonic pulses in the testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by means of acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klot, R. von.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments are being conducted with a thick steel plate (d = 82,5 mm) and a large vessel (d = 22 mm) to investigate whether surface waves are excited when the sound source (ultrasonic transmitter) is several wavelengths below the surface where the receivers are located. It has been discovered that the amplitude value of the received signal, which is fixed using a discriminator threshold, propagates at the surface of both components at the velocity of the surface wave, which is 3.0 m/ms. In the case of a narrow-band transmitter and receiver with centre frequencies of 140 kHz, the bulk waves are so long that the flexural wave a 0 is excited by interference. In the case of thick plates the flexural wave turns into surface waves which propagate on both surfaces. When a broad-band receiver and transmitter with centre frequencies of 675 kHz are used, there is no excitation of plate waves since the bulk wave pulses are too short. In the latter configuration the received signal is composed of a number of bulk wave pulses, which, according to the above measurements of the sound velocity, give an envelope curve with the characteristic features of plate waves. In the case of the plate, the ultrasonic transmitter is correctly located for an amplitude range of 26 dB for both frequencies. The locating accuracy is approximately equal to the distance of the source from the surface. On the basis of this result, it is expected that the use of acoustic emission to test nuclear reactor pressure vessels will permit correct location of faults at all depths in the wall of the vessel, by means of the velocity of the surface wave. (orig.) [de

  6. Design and commission of an experimental test rig to apply a full-scale pressure load on composite sandwich panels representative of an aircraft secondary structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crump, D A; Dulieu-Barton, J M; Savage, J

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a test rig, which is used to apply a representative pressure load to a full-scale composite sandwich secondary aircraft structure. A generic panel was designed with features to represent those in the composite sandwich secondary aircraft structure. To provide full-field strain data from the panels, the test rig was designed for use with optical measurement techniques such as thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) and digital image correlation (DIC). TSA requires a cyclic load to be applied to a structure for the measurement of the strain state; therefore, the test rig has been designed to be mounted on a standard servo-hydraulic test machine. As both TSA and DIC require an uninterrupted view of the surface of the test panel, an important consideration in the design is facilitating the optical access for the two techniques. To aid the test rig design a finite element (FE) model was produced. The model provides information on the deflections that must be accommodated by the test rig, and ensures that the stress and strain levels developed in the panel when loaded in the test rig would be sufficient for measurement using TSA and DIC. Finally, initial tests using the test rig have shown it to be capable of achieving the required pressure and maintaining a cyclic load. It was also demonstrated that both TSA and DIC data can be collected from the panels under load, which are used to validate the stress and deflection derived from the FE model

  7. How and Why Would You Do a Pressure Holding Test on an Aseptic Installation for which You Want to Check the Integrity? Theory and Practical Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancel, Olivier; Grissely, Raoul; Stering, Magnus; Pisarik, Luc

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses the Boyle-Mariotte Law to restate a few general principles and applies them to rationalise pressure holding tests on sterile installations. The authors offer a methodology to achieve this, as well as a few mathematical models to determine test durations and acceptance limits, as functions of the breach sizes to be considered and the measurement instruments used. Apart from the theoretical approach, readers are offered a few examples to illustrate the models.

  8. Development of Mini-Compact Tension Test Method for Determining Fracture Toughness Master Curves for Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Small specimens are playing the key role in evaluating properties of irradiated materials. The use of small specimens provides several advantages. Typically, only a small volume of material can be irradiated in a reactor at desirable conditions in terms of temperature, neutron flux, and neutron dose. A small volume of irradiated material may also allow for easier handling of specimens. Smaller specimens reduce the amount of radioactive material, minimizing personnel exposures and waste disposal. However, use of small specimens imposes a variety of challenges as well. These challenges are associated with proper accounting for size effects and transferability of small specimen data to the real structures of interest. Any fracture toughness specimen that can be made out of the broken halves of standard Charpy specimens may have exceptional utility for evaluation of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) since it would allow one to determine and monitor directly actual fracture toughness instead of requiring indirect predictions using correlations established with impact data. The Charpy V-notch specimen is the most commonly used specimen geometry in surveillance programs. Validation of the mini compact tension specimen (mini-CT) geometry has been performed on previously well characterized Midland beltline Linde 80 (WF-70) weld in the unirradiated condition. It was shown that the fracture toughness transition temperature, To, measured by these Mini-CT specimens is almost the same as To value that was derived from various larger fracture toughness specimens. Moreover, an International collaborative program has been established to extend the assessment and validation efforts to irradiated Linde 80 weld metal. The program is underway and involves the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Central Research Institute for Electrical Power Industry (CRIEPI), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The irradiated Mini-CT specimens from broken halves of previously tested Charpy

  9. Modeling and testing of static pressure within an optical fiber cable spool using distributed fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chengju; Ren, Liyong; Qu, Enshi; Tang, Feng; Liang, Quan

    2012-11-01

    Based on the force analysis, we establish a theoretical model to study the static pressure distribution of the fiber cable spool for the fiber optic guided missile (FOG-M). Simulations indicate that for each fiber layer in the fiber cable spool, the applied static pressure on it asymptotically converges as the number of fiber layers increases. Using the distributed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing technique, the static pressure of fiber cable layers in the spool on the cable winding device was measured. Experiments show that the Bragg wavelength of FBG in every layer varies very quickly at the beginning and then becomes gently as the subsequent fiber cable was twisted onto the spool layer by layer. Theoretical simulations agree qualitatively with experimental results. This technology provides us a real-time method to monitor the pressure within the fiber cable layer during the cable winding process.

  10. Children who are pressured to eat at home consume fewer high-fat foods in laboratory test meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heewon; Keller, Kathleen L

    2012-02-01

    Parents use greater pressure to eat with children who weigh less, but the impact of this practice is unclear. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the association between parental reports of eating pressure and children's actual intake across four identical ad libitum meals. Sixty-eight ethnically diverse, 4- to 6-year-old children from New York, NY, participated in this study from 2005 to 2007. Eating pressure was measured by the Child Feeding Questionnaire. Height and weight were measured and converted to body mass index z scores. Meals consisted of macaroni and cheese, string beans, carrots, grapes, graham crackers, cheese sticks, milk, pudding, and a sugar-sweetened beverage. Multiple regressions were performed to determine the extent to which pressure to eat predicted food intake after adjusting for BMI z score and child weight concern. Pressure to eat was negatively associated with child BMI z score (r=-0.37; Peat is associated with lower intake of some high-fat foods in the laboratory, where no pressure is applied. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbo-Pump Inducer Dynamic Environment Characterization through Water Model and Hot-Fire Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Patrick; Patton, Marc; Schwartz, Alan; Stanton, David

    2006-01-01

    The Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (LPOTP) inducer on the Block II configuration Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) experienced blade leading edge ripples during hot firing. This undesirable condition led to a minor redesign of the inducer blades. This resulted in the need to evaluate the performance and the dynamic environment of the redesign, relative to the current configuration, as part of the design acceptance process. Sub-scale water model tests of the two inducer configurations were performed, with emphasis on the dynamic environment due to cavitation induced vibrations. Water model tests were performed over a wide range of inlet flow coefficient and pressure conditions, representative of the scaled operating envelope of the Block II SSME, both in flight and in ground hot-fire tests, including all power levels. The water test hardware, facility set-up, type and placement of instrumentation, the scope of the test program, specific test objectives, data evaluation process and water test results that characterize and compare the two SSME LPOTP inducers are discussed. In addition, dynamic characteristics of the two water models were compared to hot fire data from specially instrumented ground tests. In general, good agreement between the water model and hot fire data was found, which confirms the value of water model testing for dynamic characterization of rocket engine turbomachinery.

  12. Applying Petroleum the Pressure Buildup Well Test Procedure on Thermal Response Test—A Novel Method for Analyzing Temperature Recovery Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Kurevija

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The theory of Thermal Response Testing (TRT is a well-known part of the sizing process of the geothermal exchange system. Multiple parameters influence the accuracy of effective ground thermal conductivity measurement; like testing time, variable power, climate interferences, groundwater effect, etc. To improve the accuracy of the TRT, we introduced a procedure to additionally analyze falloff temperature decline after the power test. The method is based on a premise of analogy between TRT and petroleum well testing, since the origin of both procedures lies in the diffusivity equation with solutions for heat conduction or pressure analysis during radial flow. Applying pressure build-up test interpretation techniques to borehole heat exchanger testing, greater accuracy could be achieved since ground conductivity could be obtained from this period. Analysis was conducted on a coaxial exchanger with five different power steps, and with both direct and reverse flow regimes. Each test was set with 96 h of classical TRT, followed by 96 h of temperature decline, making for almost 2000 h of cumulative borehole testing. Results showed that the ground conductivity value could vary by as much as 25%, depending on test time, seasonal period and power fluctuations, while the thermal conductivity obtained from the falloff period provided more stable values, with only a 10% value variation.

  13. Deployment of a Pressure Sensitive Paint System for Measuring Global Surface Pressures on Rotorcraft Blades in Simulated Forward Flight: Preliminary PSP Results from Test 581 in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Anthony Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Wong, Oliver D.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Crafton, James; Forlines, Alan; Goss, Larry; Gregory, James W.; Juliano, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    This report will present details of a Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) system for measuring global surface pressures on the tips of rotorcraft blades in simulated forward flight at the 14- x 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The system was designed to use a pulsed laser as an excitation source and PSP data was collected using the lifetime-based approach. With the higher intensity of the laser, this allowed PSP images to be acquired during a single laser pulse, resulting in the collection of crisp images that can be used to determine blade pressure at a specific instant in time. This is extremely important in rotorcraft applications as the blades experience dramatically different flow fields depending on their position in the rotor disk. Testing of the system was performed using the U.S. Army General Rotor Model System equipped with four identical blades. Two of the blades were instrumented with pressure transducers to allow for comparison of the results obtained from the PSP. This report will also detail possible improvements to the system.

  14. Application of RELAP5/MOD3.3 to Calculate Thermal Hydraulic Behavior of the Pressurizer Safety Valve Performance Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Kim, Young Ae; Oh, Seung Jong; Park, Jong Woon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    The increase of the acceptance tolerance of Pressurizer Safety Valve (PSV) test is vital for the safe operation of nuclear power plants because the frequent tests may make the valves decrepit and become a cause of leak. Recently, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP) is building a PSV performance test facility to provide the technical background data for the relaxation of the acceptance tolerance of PSV including the valve pop-up characteristics and the loop seal dynamics (if the plant has the loop seal in the upstream of PSV). The discharge piping and supports must be designed to withstand severe transient hydrodynamic loads when the safety valve actuates. The evaluation of hydrodynamic loads is a two-step process: first the thermal hydraulic behavior in the piping must be defined, and then the hydrodynamic loads are calculated from the thermal hydraulic parameters such as pressure and mass flow. The hydrodynamic loads are used as input to the structural analysis.

  15. Cyclic Crack Growth Testing of an A.O. Smith Multilayer Pressure Vessel with Modal Acoustic Emission Monitoring and Data Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziola, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital Wave Corp. (DWC) was retained by Jacobs ATOM at NASA Ames Research Center to perform cyclic pressure crack growth sensitivity testing on a multilayer pressure vessel instrumented with DWC's Modal Acoustic Emission (MAE) system, with captured wave analysis to be performed using DWCs WaveExplorerTM software, which has been used at Ames since 2001. The objectives were to document the ability to detect and characterize a known growing crack in such a vessel using only MAE, to establish the sensitivity of the equipment vs. crack size and / or relevance in a realistic field environment, and to obtain fracture toughness materials properties in follow up testing to enable accurate crack growth analysis. This report contains the results of the testing.

  16. Analysis of systemic blood pressure in response to the progressive exercise test of upper and lower limbs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Oliveira de Almeida

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the behavior of systemic blood pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing incremental test of upper and lower limbs. Methods: This is an exploratory, descriptive and prospective study  conducted with a sample of 38 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  from the outpatient clinic of Centro de Reabilitação Pulmonar ‘Lar Escola São Francisco’ at Escola Paulista de Medicina of Universidade Federal de São Paulo, where in two visits and after a random assignment, a  group of  patients underwent an evaluation and progressive effort test. The results were collected and compiled in spreadsheets, and subsequently submitted to statistical analysis. Rresults: It was evaluated 38 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  classified as severe or very severe according to the Global Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD classification, after  presenting FEV1 ≤ 50% of the predicted value after the use of bronchodilators. Systolic blood pressure measurements immediately after the tests showed  higher values  for this variable  in the group that underwent tests  for lower limbs (192.0 ± 27.82 mmHg when compared to the group for  upper limbs  (166.09 ± 22.56 mmHg, p  = 0.0032. The same  finding was seen  for diastolic blood pressure and the group of  lower limbs  presented  a mean  pressure  of 107.33 ± 14.37 mmHg, while in the group of upper limbs the mean pressure was 89.35 ± 12.64 mmHg (p = 0.0003. The  variations in blood pressure during the  upper limb exercises were analyzed, showing a mean of 36 ± 19.7 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and 7.7 ± 10.8 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. The group undergoing lower limb exercises  presen ted  a mean of 62 ± 20.9 mmHg and 24.7 ± 11.3 mmHg for systolic and diastolic blood pressures, respectively. The difference between values was statistically significant (p  = 0.0016 and p = 0.0006. Cconclusions

  17. A Risk Analysis Methodology to Address Human and Organizational Factors in Offshore Drilling Safety: With an Emphasis on Negative Pressure Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibzadeh, Maryam

    According to the final Presidential National Commission report on the BP Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout, there is need to "integrate more sophisticated risk assessment and risk management practices" in the oil industry. Reviewing the literature of the offshore drilling industry indicates that most of the developed risk analysis methodologies do not fully and more importantly, systematically address the contribution of Human and Organizational Factors (HOFs) in accident causation. This is while results of a comprehensive study, from 1988 to 2005, of more than 600 well-documented major failures in offshore structures show that approximately 80% of those failures were due to HOFs. In addition, lack of safety culture, as an issue related to HOFs, have been identified as a common contributing cause of many accidents in this industry. This dissertation introduces an integrated risk analysis methodology to systematically assess the critical role of human and organizational factors in offshore drilling safety. The proposed methodology in this research focuses on a specific procedure called Negative Pressure Test (NPT), as the primary method to ascertain well integrity during offshore drilling, and analyzes the contributing causes of misinterpreting such a critical test. In addition, the case study of the BP Deepwater Horizon accident and their conducted NPT is discussed. The risk analysis methodology in this dissertation consists of three different approaches and their integration constitutes the big picture of my whole methodology. The first approach is the comparative analysis of a "standard" NPT, which is proposed by the author, with the test conducted by the DWH crew. This analysis contributes to identifying the involved discrepancies between the two test procedures. The second approach is a conceptual risk assessment framework to analyze the causal factors of the identified mismatches in the previous step, as the main contributors of negative pressure test

  18. Passive leg-raising and end-expiratory occlusion tests perform better than pulse pressure variation in patients with low respiratory system compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, Xavier; Bleibtreu, Alexandre; Ferré, Alexis; Dres, Martin; Gharbi, Rim; Richard, Christian; Teboul, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    We tested whether the poor ability of pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness in cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome was related to low lung compliance. We also tested whether the changes in cardiac index induced by passive leg-raising and by an end-expiratory occlusion test were better than pulse pressure variation at predicting fluid responsiveness in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients. Prospective study. Medical intensive care unit. We included 54 patients with circulatory shock (63 ± 13 yrs; Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, 63 ± 24). Twenty-seven patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome (compliance of the respiratory system, 22 ± 3 mL/cm H2O). In nonacute respiratory distress syndrome patients, the compliance of the respiratory system was 45 ± 9 mL/cm H2O. We measured the response of cardiac index (transpulmonary thermodilution) to fluid administration (500 mL saline). Before fluid administration, we recorded pulse pressure variation and the changes in pulse contour analysis-derived cardiac index induced by passive leg-raising and end-expiratory occlusion. Fluid increased cardiac index ≥ 15% (44% ± 39%) in 30 "responders." Pulse pressure variation was significantly correlated with compliance of the respiratory system (r = .58), but not with tidal volume. The higher the compliance of the respiratory system, the better the prediction of fluid responsiveness by pulse pressure variation. A compliance of the respiratory system of 30 mL/cm H2O was the best cut-off for discriminating patients regarding the ability of pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness. If compliance of the respiratory system was >30 mL/cm H2O, then the area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve for predicting fluid responsiveness was not different for pulse pressure variation and the passive leg-raising and end-expiratory occlusion tests (0.98 ± 0.03, 0.91 ± 0.06, and 0.97 ± 0.03, respectively). By contrast

  19. Thermo-hydraulic instability of natural circulation BWRs at low pressure star-up. Experimental estimation of instability region with test facility considering scaling law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, F.; Furuya, M.; Yasuo, A.; Tabata, H.; Yoshioka, Y.; Kim, H.T.

    1995-01-01

    In natural circulation BWRs developed for advanced light water reactors with simplified passive safety systems, thermo-hydraulic stability should be confirmed especially at low pressure start-up. In this paper, nondimensional parameters to estimate the hydrodynamic stability to reactors at low pressure start-up were obtained by transformation of the basic equations of drift-flux model in the two-phase region into nondimensional form. A test facility based on these parameters was then constructed. The height of the test facility is 70% of SBWR and many nondimensional test facility parameters are almost the same as those of the reactor. Reactor stability was estimated experimentally. Stability maps below 0.5MPa were obtained on the heat flux - channel inlet subcooling place. It was found that there were two stability boundaries, between which the flow became unstable. Flow was stable in the high and low channel inlet subcooling regions. Typical conditions of SBWR at low pressure start-up were noted in the high channel inlet subcooling stable region. The heat flux at typical SBWR start-up was about one fifth that of the stability boundary. Though some nondimensional parameters of the test facility did not exactly agree with those of SBWR, it was suggested that the flow in SBWR was stable below 0.5MPa because of the large margin. (author)

  20. Validation of a methodology to develop a test facility in reduced scale related to boron dispersion in a pressurizer of an iPWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Samira R.V.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Bezerra, Jair L.; Silva, Mário A.B., E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia e Geociências. Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The conception and the project of a 1:200 reduced scale test facility have been developed in earlier researches. Such a facility aims to investigate boron homogenization process inside the pressurizer of an iPWR (integral PWR) by considering water mixing from this component with that coming from the reactor core. For this kind of reactor, the pressurizer is located at the top of the pressure vessel demanding the need of identifying the proper mechanisms in order to warrant an adequate homogenization for the water mixture. Once the installation of the experimental setup was concluded, its behavior has been analyzed by considering the concentration of a tracer diluted in the circulation water, whose measurements were obtained at the pressurizer outlet orifices. Two experiments representing boration(boron concentration increase)/deboration(boron concentration decrease) scenarios have been accomplished. Sample acquisition was carried out for every ten minutes during a total time equal to 180 minutes. Results showed that the combination of Fractional Scaling Analysis with local Froude number consisted of an appropriate methodology to provide the reduced scale test facility parameters, inasmuch the measured concentrations from the experiments reproduced the theoretical behavior with sufficient accuracy. (author)

  1. Association between non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis and hyper reactive blood pressure response on the exercise treadmill test

    OpenAIRE

    Laurinavicius, A.G.; Bittencourt, M.S.; Blaha, M.J.; Nary, F.C.; Kashiwagi, N.M.; Conceiçao, R.D.; Meneghelo, R.S.; Prado, R.R.; Carvalho, J.A.M.; Nasir, K.; Blumenthal, R.S.; Santos, R.D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis (HS) is associated with hypertension and increased cardiovascular risk. While Blood pressure hyper-reactive response (HRR) during peak exercise indicates an increased risk of incident hypertension and increased cardiovascular risk, no data on the association of non-alcoholic HS and HRR exists. In this study, we have evaluated the association of HS with HRR.

  2. Wind tunnel tests of an 0.019-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle -2A configuration (model 14-OTS) in the NASA Ames 8 X 7 foot unitary wind tunnel, volume 2. [cold jet gas plumes and pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, R. B.; Burrows, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the test was to determine the effects of cold jet gas plumes on (1) the integrated vehicle longitudinal and lateral-directional force data, (2) exposed wing hinge moment, (3) wing pressure distributions, (4) orbiter MPS external pressure distributions, and (5) model base pressures. An investigation was undertaken to determine the similarity between solid and gaseous plumes; fluorescent oil flow visualization studies were also conducted. Plotted wing pressure data is tabulated.

  3. Combined high-pressure cell-ultrahigh vacuum system for fast testing of model metal alloy catalysts using scanning mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Jørgensen, Jan Hoffmann; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for fabrication, surface analysis in ultrahigh vacuum, and testing of the catalytic activity of model metal alloy catalysts is described. Arrays of model catalysts are produced by electron-beam deposition of up to four metals simultaneously onto a substrate. The surface analysis...... be studied on a substrate 10 mm in diameter. A high pressure cell with an all-metal sealed ultrahigh vacuum lock is also described as part of the work. ©2004 American Institute of Physics....

  4. [Multiparameter analysis of the ergometric test. Significance of the failure of systolic blood pressure to decrease during recovery phase as an index of coronary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, G; Scaccianoce, G; Artale, S; Francaviglia, B; Platania, F; Circo, A

    1990-10-01

    Ergometric tests were performed in 27 patients who had previously undergone coronarography following instrumental findings and/or symptoms which seemed highly indicative of ischemic cardiopathy. The aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic importance of the failure of systolic blood pressure to decrease during the third minute of the recovery phase of the test as an index of coronary disease. In particular, as reported by other studies, the ratio between systolic blood pressure at the third minute of recovery and maximum systolic blood pressure during the test was also assessed values above 0.7 were considered pathological. Sixteen out the 27 patients examined showed lesions which were hemodynamically significant, whereas 11 patients were free of lesions and 9 had previous myocardial necrosis. The level of the above ratio in subjects without significant coronary lesions was 0.66 +/- 0.05, whereas it was 0.85 +/- 0.04 (p less than 0.01) in patients with coronary disease. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative prognostic values were respectively 91.6%, 62%, 64.7% and 90.9%. In patients with lesions to the three main arteries both the sensitivity and the specificity were 100%. In the same patients, the ST criteria were 85.7%, 50%, 81.8% and 74.3%.

  5. High-pressure testing of heterogeneous charge transfer in a room-temperature ionic liquid: evidence for solvent dynamic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolidze, Tina D; Khoshtariya, Dimitri E; Illner, Peter; Kulisiewicz, Leszek; Delgado, Antonio; van Eldik, Rudi

    2008-03-13

    We report the first application of a high-pressure electrochemical strategy to study heterogeneous charge transfer (CT) in a room-temperature ionic liquid, [BMIM][BTA]. High-pressure kinetic studies on electron exchange for two redox couples of different charge type, viz. [Fe(bipy)3]3+/2+ and [Fe(cp)2]+/0, at bare Au electrodes within the range of 0.1-150 MPa, revealed large positive volumes of activation that were found to be virtually the same for the two redox couples in terms of the CT rate constants and diffusion coefficients, despite the reactant's charge type. Independent viscosity (fluidity) studies at elevated pressure (up to 175 MPa), were also performed and revealed a pressure coefficient closely resembling the former ones. Complementary temperature-dependent kinetic studies within the range of 298-358 K also revealed the virtual similarity in activation enthalpies for the same kinetic and diffusion processes, as well as the viscosity of [BMIM][BTA]. A rigorous analysis of the complete variety of obtained results strongly indicates that dynamic (frictional) control of CT is operative by way of the full adiabatic mechanism. The contribution of the Franck-Condon term to the activation free energy of the kinetic process seems almost diminished because of the high value of electronic coupling and freezing out of the outer-sphere reorganization energy. Further analyses indicate that frictional control most probably takes place through slow translational modes (implying "minimal volume" cooperative dislocations) of constituent ions. This kind of motion seems further slowed down within the vicinity of the active site presumably located within the diffusive-like zone situated next to the compact (first) part of the metal/ionic liquid junction.

  6. Design and test of a reverse osmosis pressure cell for in-situ small-angle neutron scattering studies

    OpenAIRE

    Schwahn, Dietmar; Feilbach, Herbert; Starc, Thomas; Pipich, Vitaliy; Kasher, Roni; Oren, Yoram

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new method for real-time studies of membrane scaling and biofouling on thin film composite membranes (TFC) in reverse osmosis and nanofiltration water treatment using in-situ small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). SANS delivers information on nano and microscopic structures that support the interpretation of relevant engineering parameters such as membrane permeability and water flux. A flow cell high pressure SANS is described, followed by SANS characterization of TFC membrane...

  7. [Associations of the work duration, sleep duration and number of holidays with an exaggerated blood pressure response during an exercise stress test among workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryoma; Ohta, Masanori; Ikeda, Masaharu; Jiang, Ying; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that an exaggerated systolic blood pressure (ESBP) response during exercise, even if resting blood pressure is normal, is associated with an increased risk of future hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study was designed to investigate the relationships of work duration, sleep duration and number of holidays with blood pressure response during an exercise stress test among normotensive workers. The subjects were 362 normotensive workers (79 males and 283 females; age, 49.1 years). A multi-stage graded submaximal exercise stress test was performed on each subject using an electric bicycle ergometer. The workload was increased every 3 minutes, and blood pressure was measured at rest and during the last 1 minute of each stage. In this study, an ESBP response during exercise was defined according to the criteria of the Framingham Study (peak systolic blood pressure ≥210 mmHg in males, or ≥190 mmHg in females). Working environments, work duration, sleep duration, number of holidays, and physical activity during commuting and work, and leisure time exercise duration were evaluated using a questionnaire. An ESBP response during exercise was observed in 94 (26.0%) workers. The adjusted odds ratio for the prevalence of an ESBP response during exercise was found to be significantly higher with an increase in work duration, decreases in sleep duration and number of holidays (psleep duration and number of holidays groups had significantly higher adjusted odds ratio for the prevalence of an ESBP response during exercise than the lowest work duration with highest sleep duration and number of holidays groups (pexercise and daily life are necessary to prevent the incidence of future hypertension, CVD and death due to overwork in workers with long-work duration, short sleep duration and small number of holidays.

  8. Numerical predictions of heat transfer and pressure tube/calandria tube deformation during Calandria-tube Strain Contact Boiling (CSCB) tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanase, A.; Szymanski, J.; El-Hawary, M.; Delja, A., E-mail: aurelian.tanase@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The assessment of fuel channel integrity during large break LOCA requires adequate prediction of the thermal-mechanical behaviour of the fuel channel following pressure tube ballooning into contact with the calandria tube. Analytical models developed for this purpose need to be calibrated and validated against experimental data. A new series of contact boiling tests was initiated by CNSC to provide additional data on calandria tube straining behaviour after PT/CT contact. This paper presents selected results of the first of these tests and their comparisons with predictions using analytical methodology developed by CNSC staff. (author)

  9. Post-irradiation fatigue test of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel for the pressure vessel material of the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Toshimitsu; Fukaya, Kiyoshi; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Suzuki, Masahide; Eto, Motokuni; Ohmi, Masao; Mimura, Hideaki; Ooka, Norikazu.

    1996-06-01

    Low cycle fatigue tests of the irradiated 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel for the pressure vessel material of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) were performed to examine the neutron irradiation effect on fatigue properties, i.e., fatigue life and cyclic softening behavior. These tests were performed at 450degC in a vacuum of ∼10 -4 Pa using a servo-hydraulic fatigue testing machine installed in a hot cell of the Hot Laboratory of the Oarai Research Establishment. Axial strain rate was controlled at 0.1%/sec with total strain ranges of 0.75, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2 and 1.5%. Main results are summarized as follows: 1) Maximum stress at the initial stage of the cyclic fatigue testing of the specimens irradiated to a neutron fluence over 2x10 19 n/cm 2 (>1MeV) increased in comparison with the unirradiated specimens. 2) No significant difference was found in the cyclic softening behavior between the irradiated and unirradiated specimens. 3) Fatigue life of the irradiated specimen whose ductility was reduced by the neutron irradiation decreased slightly in comparison with the unirradiated specimen. 4) It is considered that there is no effect of the neutron irradiation on the fatigue life and the cyclic softening behavior at the total fluence expected in the lifetime of the HTTR pressure vessel. (author)

  10. Implementation of subsea system to monitor in-situ temperature and formation pressure in methane hydrates sediments for the production test in 2017, offshore Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, K.

    2016-12-01

    The methane hydrates phase changes, from solid to fluid, is governed by pressure drop and heat transportation through a geological formation. For the world's first offshore production test of methane hydrates conducted in 2013, the MH21 research team installed distributed temperature sensing (DTS) cables and array type resistance temperature devices (RTD) behind the casings of the monitoring wells. The temperature monitoring was continued over the period of 18 months. As a result, the thermal response of the methane hydrate-bearing sediment during depressurization was observed, and the obtained data was used to evaluate the methane dissociation behavior and to estimate the dissociation front radius from a producer well. The second offshore production test is planned in the same area in 2017 with the extended period up to one month. Two sets of a pair of monitoring and producer well were drilled in 2016. A pair of monitoring and producer wells is only 20m apart. An improved monitoring system is prepared for the second test with additional pressure measurement capability with new features of subsea system. The planed formation pressure measurement is expected to contribute not only for the evaluation of methane hydrate phase changes and estimation of its areal distribution but also the analyzing the interference in the vicinity of the producer wells from the geo-mechanical point of view. The DTS resolution was improved with longer averaging time than the previously utilized system. To accomplish the continuous acquisition up running over longer than 18 months to cover pre-flow and post-flow periods, the subsea acquisition system was equipped with an exchangeable subsea batteries by ROV. As for the surface communication method, the acoustic transponder was added in the subsea system. In this technical presentation, the improvements on the monitoring system are discussed and the scientific objectives for new measurements such as formation pressure are presented.

  11. METC/Shell Cooperative Agreement CRADA 93-011 high temperature high pressure filtration and sorbent test program. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-06-01

    This report is a summary of the results of activities of the particulate monitoring group in support of the METC/Shell CRADA 93-011. Online particulate monitoring began in August 1993 and ended in October 1994. The particulate monitoring group participated in six MGCR runs (No. 5 through No. 10). The instrument used in measuring the particle loadings (particle counts and size distribution) is the Particle Measuring Systems Classical Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer Probe High Temperature and High Pressure (PMS Model CSASP-100-HTHP). This PMS unit is rated to operate at temperatures up to 540{degree}C and gage pressures up to 2.07 MPa. Gas stream conditions, temperature at 540{degree}C, gage pressure at 2.93 MPa, and gas flowrate at 0.0157 SCM per second, precluded the direct measurement of particulate loadings in the gas stream with the PMS unit. A side stream was extracted from the gas stream after it came over to the MGCR, (Modular Gas Cleanup Rig), from the FBG, pressurized fluidized-bed gasifier, but before it entered the filter testing vessel. A sampling probe of 0.635 cm O.D. thin wall stainless steel tubing was used for extracting the sample gas isokinetically based on the expected flowrate. The sample gas stream was further split into two streams; one was directed to the PMS unit and the other to the alkali monitor unit.

  12. METC/3M Cooperative Agreement CRADA 94-024 high temperature high pressure filter materials exposure test program. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-06-01

    This report is a summary of the results of activities of the particulate monitoring group in support of the METC/3M CRADA 94024. Online particulate monitoring began in June 1994 and ended in October, 1994. The particulate monitoring group participated in four MGCR runs (No. 7 through No. 10). The instrument used in measuring the particle loadings (particle counts and size distribution) is the Particle Measuring Systems Classical Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer Probe High Temperature and High Pressure (PMS Model CSASP-100-HTHP). This PMS unit is rated to operate at temperatures up to 540{degree}C and gage pressures up to 2.0 MPa. Gas stream conditions, temperature at 540{degree}C, gage pressure at 2.93 MPa, and gas flowrate at 0.0157 SCM per second, precluded the direct measurement of particulate loadings in the gas stream with the PMS unit. A side stream was extracted from the gas stream after it came over to the MGCR, Modular Gas Cleanup Rig, from the FBG, pressurized Fluidized-Bed Gasifier, but before it entered the filter testing vessel. A sampling probe of 0.635 cm O.D. thin wall stainless steel tubing was used for extracting the sample gas isokinetically based on the expected flowrate. The sample gas stream was further split into two streams; one was directed to the PMS unit and the other to the alkali monitor unit. The alkali monitor unit was not used during runs No. 7 through No. 10.

  13. Tolerance testing of passive radio frequency identification tags for solvent, temperature, and pressure conditions encountered in an anatomic pathology or biorepository setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina A Leung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radio frequency identification (RFID tags have potential for use in identifying and tracking biospecimens in anatomic pathology and biorepository laboratories. However, there is little to no data on the tolerance of tags to solutions, solvents, temperatures, and pressures likely to be encountered in the laboratory. The functioning of the Hitachi Mu-chip RFID tag, a candidate for pathology use, was evaluated under such conditions. Methods: The RFID tags were affixed to cryovials containing tissue or media, glass slides, and tissue cassettes. The tags were interrogated for readability before and after each testing condition or cycle. Individual tags were subjected to only one testing condition but for multiple cycles. Testing conditions were: 1 Ten wet autoclave cycles (121˚C, 15 psi; 2 Ten dry autoclave cycles (121˚C, 26 psi; 3 Ten tissue processor cycles; 4 Ten hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining cycles; 5 Ten antigen retrieval pressure cooker cycles (125˚C, 15 psi; 6 75 o C for seven days; 7 75-59 o C day/night cycles for 7 days; 8 -80 o C, -150 o C, or -196 o C for 12 months; 9 Fifty freeze-thaw cycles (-196 o C to 22 o C. Results: One hundred percent of tags exposed to cold temperatures from -80 to -196 o C (80 tags, 1120 successful reads, high temperatures from 52 to 75 o C (40 tags, 420 reads, H & E staining (20 tags, 200 reads, pressure cooker antigen retrieval (20 tags, 200 reads, and wet autoclaving (20 tags, 200 reads functioned well throughout and after testing. Of note, all 20 tested tags tolerated 50 freeze-thaw cycles and all 60 tags subjected to sustained freezing temperatures were readable after 1 year. One dry autoclaved tag survived nine cycles but failed after the tenth. The remaining 19 tags were readable after all 10 dry autoclave cycles. One tag failed after the first tissue processing cycle while the remaining 19 tags survived all 10 tissue processing cycles. Conclusions: In this preliminary study, these RFID

  14. SPES-2, AP600 intergral system test S01007 2 inch CL to core make-up tank pressure balance line break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchiani, M.; Medich, C.; Rigamonti, M. [SIET S.p.A. Piacenza (Italy)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The SPES-2 is a full height, full pressure experimental test facility reproducing the Westinghouse AP600 reactor with a scaling factor of 1/395. The experimental plant, designed and operated by SIET in Piacenza, consists of a full simulation of the AP600 primary core cooling system including all the passive and active safety systems. In 1992, Westinghouse, in cooperation with ENEL (Ente Nazionale per l` Energia Elettrica), ENEA (Enter per le numove Technlogie, l` Energia e l` Ambient), Siet (Societa Informazioni Esperienze Termoidraulich) and ANSALDO developed an experimental program to test the integrated behaviour of the AP600 passive safety systems. The SPES-2 test matrix, concluded in November 1994, has examined the AP600 passive safety system response for a range of small break LOCAs at different locations on the primary system and on the passive system lines; single steam generator tube ruptures with passive and active safety systems and a main steam line break transient to demonstrate the boration capability of passive safety systems for rapid cooldown. Each of the tests has provided detailed experimental results for verification of the capability of the analysis methods to predict the integrated passive safety system behaviour. Cold and hot shakedown tests have been performed on the facility to check the characteristics of the plant before starting the experimental campaign. The paper first presents a description of the SPES-2 test facility then the main results of S01007 test {open_quotes}2{close_quotes} Cold Leg (CL) to Core Make-up Tank (CMT) pressure balance line break{close_quotes} are reported and compared with predictions performed using RELAP5/mod3/80 obtained by ANSALDO through agreement with U.S.N.R.C. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). The SPES-2 nodalization and all the calculations here presented were performed by ANSALDO and sponsored by ENEL as a part of pre-test predictions for SPES-2.

  15. Performance testing of prototype live loaded packed stem seals for large gate valves in pressurized hot water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, N.E.

    1976-01-01

    Prototype live loaded packed stem seals for large gate valves have been tested in a laboratory. The test fluid was demineralized water at 547 K, 8.27 MPa and pH 10. Nine packing configurations were tested; three different commercial brands of asbestos/graphite valve packings and three different sizes for each packing brand. Conventional and live loaded packed stem seals are briefly described. Stem leakage, packing consolidation and stem friction data are given. For all tests, leakage rates of less than 10 g d -1 were observed. It was also observed that stem friction was significantly affected by thermal expansion of the stem. (author)

  16. Measuring flow and pressure of lithium coolant under developmental testing of a high-temperature cooling system of a space nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, V. Ya.; Sinyavsky, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    Sub-megawatt space NPP use lithium as a coolant and niobium alloy as a structural material. In order to refine the lithium-niobium technology of the material and design engineering, lithium-niobium loops were worked out in RSC Energia, and they were tested at a working temperature of lithium equal to 1070-1300 K. In order to measure the lithium flow and pressure, special gauges were developed, which made possible the calibration and checkout of the loops without their dismantling. The paper describes the architecture of the electromagnetic flowmeter and the electromagnetic vibrating-wire pressure transducer (gauge) for lithium coolant in the nuclear power plant cooling systems. The operating principles of these meters are presented. Flowmeters have been developed for channel diameters ranging from 10 to 100 mm, which are capable of measuring lithium flows in the range of 0.1 to 30 L/s with the error of 3% for design calibration and 1% for volume graduation. The temperature error of the pressure transducers does not exceed 0.4% per 100 K; the nonlinearity and hysteresis of the calibration curve do not exceed 0.3 and 0.4%, respectively. The transducer applications are illustrated by the examples of results obtained from tests on the NPP module mockup and heat pipes of a radiation cooler.

  17. Observational study on efficacy of negative expiratory pressure test proposed as screening for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome among commercial interstate bus drivers - protocol study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirata Raquel P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a respiratory disease characterized by the collapse of the extrathoracic airway and has important social implications related to accidents and cardiovascular risk. The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether the drop in expiratory flow and the volume expired in 0.2 s during the application of negative expiratory pressure (NEP are associated with the presence and severity of OSA in a population of professional interstate bus drivers who travel medium and long distances. Methods/Design An observational, analytic study will be carried out involving adult male subjects of an interstate bus company. Those who agree to participate will undergo a detailed patient history, physical examination involving determination of blood pressure, anthropometric data, circumference measurements (hips, waist and neck, tonsils and Mallampati index. Moreover, specific questionnaires addressing sleep apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness will be administered. Data acquisition will be completely anonymous. Following the medical examination, the participants will perform a spirometry, NEP test and standard overnight polysomnography. The NEP test is performed through the administration of negative pressure at the mouth during expiration. This is a practical test performed while awake and requires little cooperation from the subject. In the absence of expiratory flow limitation, the increase in the pressure gradient between the alveoli and open upper airway caused by NEP results in an increase in expiratory flow. Discussion Despite the abundance of scientific evidence, OSA is still underdiagnosed in the general population. In addition, diagnostic procedures are expensive, and predictive criteria are still unsatisfactory. Because increased upper airway collapsibility is one of the main determinants of OSA, the response to the application of NEP could be a predictor of this disorder. With the

  18. Procedures for ambient-pressure and tympanometric tests of aural acoustic reflectance and admittance in human infants and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas H.; Hunter, Lisa L.; Feeney, M. Patrick; Fitzpatrick, Denis F.

    2015-01-01

    Procedures are described to measure acoustic reflectance and admittance in human adult and infant ears at frequencies from 0.2 to 8 kHz. Transfer functions were measured at ambient pressure in the ear canal, and as down- or up-swept tympanograms. Acoustically estimated ear-canal area was used to calculate ear reflectance, which was parameterized by absorbance and group delay over all frequencies (and pressures), with substantial data reduction for tympanograms. Admittance measured at the probe tip in adults was transformed into an equivalent admittance at the eardrum using a transmission-line model for an ear canal with specified area and ear-canal length. Ear-canal length was estimated from group delay around the frequency above 2 kHz of minimum absorbance. Illustrative measurements in ears with normal function are described for an adult, and two infants at 1 month of age with normal hearing and a conductive hearing loss. The sensitivity of this equivalent eardrum admittance was calculated for varying estimates of area and length. Infant-ear patterns of absorbance peaks aligned in frequency with dips in group delay were explained by a model of resonant canal-wall mobility. Procedures will be applied in a large study of wideband clinical diagnosis and monitoring of middle-ear and cochlear function. PMID:26723319

  19. Radionuclides release from re-irradiated fuel under high temperature and pressure conditions. Gamma-ray measurements of VEGA-5 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Akihide; Kudo, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Takehiko; Kanazawa, Toru; Kiuchi, Toshio; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program is being performed at JAERI to clarify mechanisms of radionuclides release from irradiated fuel during severe accidents and to improve source term predictability. The fifth VEGA-5 test was conducted in January 2002 to confirm the reproducibility of decrease in cesium release under elevated pressure that was observed in the VEGA-2 test and to investigate the release behavior of short-life radionuclides. The PWR fuel of 47 GWd/tU after about 8.2 years of cooling was re-irradiated at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) for 8 hours before the heat-up test. After that, the two pellets of 10.9 g without cladding were heated up to about 2,900 K at 1.0 MPa under the inert He condition. The experiment reconfirmed the decrease in cesium release rate under the elevated pressure. The release data on short-life radionuclides such as Ru-103, Ba-140 and Xe-133 that have never been observed in the previous VEGA tests without re-irradiation was obtained using the {gamma} ray measurement. (author)

  20. Flight Tests of a 40-Foot Nominal Diameter Modified Ringsail Parachute Deployed at Mach 1.64 and Dynamic Pressure of 9.1 Pounds Per Square Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstrom, Clinton V.; Murrow, Harold N.; Preisser, John S.

    1967-01-01

    A ringsail parachute, which had a nominal diameter of 40 feet (12.2 meters) and reference area of 1256 square feet (117 m(exp 2)) and was modified to provide a total geometric porosity of 15 percent of the reference area, was flight tested as part of the rocket launch portion of the NASA Planetary Entry Parachute Program. The payload for the flight test was an instrumented capsule from which the test parachute was ejected by a deployment mortar when the system was at a Mach number of 1.64 and a dynamic pressure of 9.1 pounds per square foot (43.6 newtons per m(exp 2)). The parachute deployed to suspension line stretch in 0.45 second with a resulting snatch force of 1620 pounds (7200 newtons). Canopy inflation began 0.07 second later and the parachute projected area increased slowly to a maximum of 20 percent of that expected for full inflation. During this test, the suspension lines twisted, primarily because the partially inflated canopy could not restrict the twisting to the attachment bridle and risers. This twisting of the suspension lines hampered canopy inflation at a time when velocity and dynamic-pressure conditions were more favorable.

  1. Does children's moral compass waver under social pressure? Using the conformity paradigm to test preschoolers' moral and social-conventional judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Elizabeth B; Chen, Chuansheng; Smetana, Judith G; Greenberger, Ellen

    2016-10-01

    The current study tested whether preschoolers' moral and social-conventional judgments change under social pressure using Asch's conformity paradigm. A sample of 132 preschoolers (Mage=3.83years, SD=0.85) rated the acceptability of moral and social-conventional events and also completed a visual judgment task (i.e., comparing line length) both independently and after having viewed two peers who consistently made immoral, unconventional, or visually inaccurate judgments. Results showed evidence of conformity on all three tasks, but conformity was stronger on the social-conventional task than on the moral and visual tasks. Older children were less susceptible to pressure for social conformity for the moral and visual tasks but not for the conventional task. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The impacts of new street light technologies: experimentally testing the effects on bats of changing from low-pressure sodium to white metal halide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Emma Louise; Wakefield, Andrew; Harris, Stephen; Jones, Gareth

    2015-05-05

    Artificial light at night is a major feature of anthropogenic global change and is increasingly recognized as affecting biodiversity, often negatively. On a global scale, newer technology white lights are replacing orange sodium lights to reduce energy waste. In 2009, Cornwall County Council (UK) commenced replacement of existing low-pressure sodium (LPS) high intensity discharge (HID) street lights with new Phillips CosmoPolis white ceramic metal halide street lights to reduce energy wastage. This changeover provided a unique collaborative opportunity to implement a before-after-control-impact field experiment to investigate the ecological effects of newly installed broad spectrum light technologies. Activity of the bat species Pipistrellus pipistrellus, P. pygmaeus and Nyctalus/Eptesicus spp. was significantly higher at metal halide than LPS lights, as found in other studies of bat activity at old technology (i.e. mercury vapour) white light types. No significant difference was found in feeding attempts per bat pass between light types, though more passes overall were recorded at metal halide lights. Species-specific attraction of bats to the metal halide lights could have cascading effects at lower trophic levels. We highlight the need for further research on possible ecosystem-level effects of light technologies before they are installed on a wide scale. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. A Highly Sensitive Assay Using Synthetic Blood Containing Test Microbes for Evaluation of the Penetration Resistance of Protective Clothing Material under Applied Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimasaki, Noriko; Hara, Masayuki; Kikuno, Ritsuko; Shinohara, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    To prevent nosocomial infections caused by even either Ebola virus or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), healthcare workers must wear the appropriate protective clothing which can inhibit contact transmission of these pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the performance of protective clothing for penetration resistance against infectious agents. In Japan, some standard methods were established to evaluate the penetration resistance of protective clothing fabric materials under applied pressure. However, these methods only roughly classified the penetration resistance of fabrics, and the detection sensitivity of the methods and the penetration amount with respect to the relationship between blood and the pathogen have not been studied in detail. Moreover, no standard method using bacteria for evaluation is known. Here, to evaluate penetration resistance of protective clothing materials under applied pressure, the detection sensitivity and the leak amount were investigated by using synthetic blood containing bacteriophage phi-X174 or S. aureus. And the volume of leaked synthetic blood and the amount of test microbe penetration were simultaneously quantified. Our results showed that the penetration detection sensitivity achieved using a test microbial culture was higher than that achieved using synthetic blood at invisible leak level pressures. This finding suggested that there is a potential risk of pathogen penetration even when visual leak of contaminated blood through the protective clothing was not observed. Moreover, at visible leak level pressures, it was found that the amount of test microbe penetration varied at least ten-fold among protective clothing materials classified into the same class of penetration resistance. Analysis of the penetration amount revealed a significant correlation between the volume of penetrated synthetic blood and the amount of test microbe penetration, indicating that the leaked volume of synthetic

  4. On-line testing of nuclear plant temperature and pressure instrumentation and other critical plant equipment. IAEA regional workshop. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Under European regional TC project RER/4/011, IAEA and VUJE Training centre organized a workshop on On-line Testing of Nuclear Power Plant Temperature and Pressure Instrumentation and Other Critical Plant Equipment in Trnava, Slovak Republic, from 25 to 29 May 1998. The objective of the workshop was to review the state-of-the-art in NPP instrumentation, cover typical instrumentation problems and solutions, describe technical and regulatory requirements for verifying the performance of nuclear power plant instrumentation, describe new methods developed and applied in NPPs for on-line verification and performance of instrumentation and present new techniques using existing instrumentation to identify the on-set problems in the plant electrical, mechanical and thermal hydraulic systems. Particular emphasis was placed on temperature measurements by Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) and thermocouples and pressure measurements using motion-balanced and forced-balanced pressure transmitters. This proceedings includes papers presented by the invited speakers and the participants each with an abstract as wells as a summary of the Round-Table discussions

  5. A versatile elevated-pressure reactor combined with an ultrahigh vacuum surface setup for efficient testing of model and powder catalysts under clean gas-phase conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfin, Franck; Piccolo, Laurent [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l' environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), UMR 5256 CNRS and Université Lyon 1, 2 avenue Albert Einstein, F-69626 Villeurbanne (France)

    2013-09-15

    A small-volume reaction cell for catalytic or photocatalytic testing of solid materials at pressures up to 1000 Torr has been coupled to a surface-science setup used for standard sample preparation and characterization under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The reactor and sample holder designs allow easy sample transfer from/to the UHV chamber, and investigation of both planar and small amounts of powder catalysts under the same conditions. The sample is heated with an infrared laser beam and its temperature is measured with a compact pyrometer. Combined in a regulation loop, this system ensures fast and accurate temperature control as well as clean heating. The reaction products are automatically sampled and analyzed by mass spectrometry and/or gas chromatography (GC). Unlike previous systems, our GC apparatus does not use a recirculation loop and allows working in clean conditions at pressures as low as 1 Torr while detecting partial pressures smaller than 10{sup −4} Torr. The efficiency and versatility of the reactor are demonstrated in the study of two catalytic systems: butadiene hydrogenation on Pd(100) and CO oxidation over an AuRh/TiO{sub 2} powder catalyst.

  6. Fiber optic LDF to monitor vascular dynamics of urticarial dermographism in pressure-tested patients before and after treatment with antihistamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikje, Natalja Skrebova; Arase, Seiji

    2008-02-01

    The local microcirculatory dynamics underlying phenomenon of urticarial dermographism (UD) are not yet sufficiently elucidated in dermatological patients. A fiber optic laser Doppler flowmeter (LDF) was used to monitor skin blood flow (SBF) changes on the back of the patients with UD before and after application of the series of pressure stimuli (9.8×10 4, 14.7×10 4, 19.6×10 4 and 24.5×10 4 Pa). All patients acted as self-controls to assess their disease activity by means of SBF values based on response to pressure stimuli before and after treatment with antihistamines, when compared to baseline SBF. Throughout 30 minutes evaluation inter-subject SBF values at pressure-tested sites were noticeably distinguished as high, moderate and low. By LDF we could differentiate the highest development of vascular dynamics after 5 minutes, coming back to normal within about 30 minutes in one group of patients, and the vascular dynamics reaching its maximum in 15 minutes, but with no fade after 30 minutes, in another group of patients. All treatment regimens in both groups of patients by LDF produced a measurable reduction already during 1-2 days of therapy, accompanied by a reduction in SBF baseline values in patients with severe and moderate symptoms of UD.

  7. Wind tunnel tests of an 0.019-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle -2A configuration (model 14-OTS) in the NASA Ames 8 X 7 foot unitary wind tunnel, volume 3. [cold jet gas plumes and pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, R. B.; Burrows, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effects of cold jet gas plumes on (1) the integrated vehicle longitudinal and lateral-directional force data, (2) exposed wing hinge moment, (3) wing pressure distributions, (4) orbiter MPS external pressure distributions, and (5) model base pressures. An investigation was undertaken to determine the similarity between solid and gaseous plumes; fluorescent oil flow visualization studies were also conducted. Tabulated data listings are included.

  8. IFPE/KOLA-3-MIR-RAMP, KOLA-3 MIR test temperature during ramp, FGR and pressure at EOL, Bu up to 55 MWd/kg UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Description: In 1996-97 a number of tests with the high burn up VVER-440 fuel under transient conditions were carried out in the MIR reactor (SSC RIAR). Fuel rods that had operated under normal operating conditions at the Kola NPP Unit 3 during 4- and 5 fuel cycles up to the maximum burnup of about 50 and 60 MWd/kgU were tested. The tests were carried out under single ramp conditions (RAMP experiment) and step by step power increase (FGR-1 and FGR-2 experiments). The objective of the experiments was to determine the power ramp influence on fuel rods state, to evaluate FGR induced-threshold linear power values, to study dependence between the linear power, temperature, structure and properties of the fuel. Nine re-fabricated fuel rods were tested in the above mentioned tests. All of these re-fabricated fuel rods (RFRs) were cut from fuel rods of the FA's 198 and 222. The positions of the RFRs, the average linear heat rate of the FAs 198 and 222 fuel rods during base irradiation, the operating conditions of the FA-198 and FA-222 fuel rods, details of the design values of the FA's 198 and 222 fuel rods and the main operating conditions of the Kola 3 during 5-9 fuel cycles are provided. RAMP test: The test rig with RFRs was installed for testing in the research reactor MIR in February 1996. During the RAMP experiment 3 non-equipped RFRs were tested under power ramp conditions. The RAMP test was divided into 3 stages: stage 1 - irradiation at initial power level (duration - ∼346 hours); stage 2 - power ramp from initial to maximal level (duration - ∼23 min); stage 3 - hold stage after ramp (duration - ∼107 hours). FGR-1 test: The FGR-1 experiment started in March 1996 and finished in April 1996. The test rig included three RFRs. Two were instrumented with pressure sensors while the third was not instrumented. FGR-2 test: The FGR-2 experiment was the second of the tests series directed to investigation of the thermal physical behaviour of VVER fuel at the different

  9. Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) Pad Abort Test Vehicle (PATV) II Attitude Control System (ACS) Integration and Pressurization Subsystem Dynamic Random Vibration Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekrami, Yasamin; Cook, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    In order to mitigate catastrophic failures on future generation space vehicles, engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have begun to integrate a novel crew abort systems that could pull a crew module away in case of an emergency at the launch pad or during ascent. The Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) is a recent test vehicle that was designed as an alternative to the baseline Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) to demonstrate the performance of a "tower-less" LAS configuration under abort conditions. The MLAS II test vehicle will execute a propulsive coast stabilization maneuver during abort to control the vehicles trajectory and thrust. To accomplish this, the spacecraft will integrate an Attitude Control System (ACS) with eight hypergolic monomethyl hydrazine liquid propulsion engines that are capable of operating in a quick pulsing mode. Two main elements of the ACS include a propellant distribution subsystem and a pressurization subsystem to regulate the flow of pressurized gas to the propellant tanks and the engines. The CAD assembly of the Attitude Control System (ACS) was configured and integrated into the Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) design. A dynamic random vibration analysis was conducted on the Main Propulsion System (MPS) helium pressurization panels to assess the response of the panel and its components under increased gravitational acceleration loads during flight. The results indicated that the panels fundamental and natural frequencies were farther from the maximum Acceleration Spectral Density (ASD) vibrations which were in the range of 150-300 Hz. These values will direct how the components will be packaged in the vehicle to reduce the effects high gravitational loads.

  10. The stable microbubble test for determining continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) success in very preterm infants receiving nasal CPAP from birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Risha; Morley, Colin J; Argus, Brenda; Tingay, David G; Donath, Susan; Davis, Peter G

    2013-01-01

    Very preterm infants can be treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) from birth, but some fail. A rapid test, such as the stable microbubble test (SMT) on gastric aspirate, may identify those who can be managed successfully using CPAP. To determine if SMT can identify soon after birth, very preterm infants who may be successfully managed on CPAP alone. Stable microbubbles (diameter CPAP from birth. Infants failed CPAP if intubated at CPAP in the delivery room at a median (interquartile range) pressure 7 (6-8) cmH2O and FiO2 0.25 (0.21-0.3). Gastric aspirates were taken at a median (interquartile range) age of 0.5 (0.3-0.6) hours. The best cut-off point for predicting CPAP success or failure was a SMT count of 8 microbubbles/mm(2). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.8 (95% CI 0.7-0.9). A SMT count ≥8 microbubbles/mm(2) had a sensitivity of 53%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 60% for predicting CPAP success. Infants treated with CPAP from birth, who had SMT counts ≥8 microbubbles/mm(2) on their gastric aspirate, did not fail CPAP. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Standard Test Method for Calculation of Stagnation Enthalpy from Heat Transfer Theory and Experimental Measurements of Stagnation-Point Heat Transfer and Pressure

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the calculation from heat transfer theory of the stagnation enthalpy from experimental measurements of the stagnation-point heat transfer and stagnation pressure. 1.2 Advantages 1.2.1 A value of stagnation enthalpy can be obtained at the location in the stream where the model is tested. This value gives a consistent set of data, along with heat transfer and stagnation pressure, for ablation computations. 1.2.2 This computation of stagnation enthalpy does not require the measurement of any arc heater parameters. 1.3 Limitations and ConsiderationsThere are many factors that may contribute to an error using this type of approach to calculate stagnation enthalpy, including: 1.3.1 TurbulenceThe turbulence generated by adding energy to the stream may cause deviation from the laminar equilibrium heat transfer theory. 1.3.2 Equilibrium, Nonequilibrium, or Frozen State of GasThe reaction rates and expansions may be such that the gas is far from thermodynamic equilibrium. 1.3.3 Noncat...

  12. Reliability, standard error, and minimum detectable change of clinical pressure pain threshold testing in people with and without acute neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, David M; Macdermid, Joy C; Nielson, Warren; Teasell, Robert W; Chiasson, Marco; Brown, Lauren

    2011-09-01

    Clinical measurement. To evaluate the intrarater, interrater, and test-retest reliability of an accessible digital algometer, and to determine the minimum detectable change in normal healthy individuals and a clinical population with neck pain. Pressure pain threshold testing may be a valuable assessment and prognostic indicator for people with neck pain. To date, most of this research has been completed using algometers that are too resource intensive for routine clinical use. Novice raters (physiotherapy students or clinical physiotherapists) were trained to perform algometry testing over 2 clinically relevant sites: the angle of the upper trapezius and the belly of the tibialis anterior. A convenience sample of normal healthy individuals and a clinical sample of people with neck pain were tested by 2 different raters (all participants) and on 2 different days (healthy participants only). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement, and minimum detectable change were calculated. A total of 60 healthy volunteers and 40 people with neck pain were recruited. Intrarater reliability was almost perfect (ICC = 0.94-0.97), interrater reliability was substantial to near perfect (ICC = 0.79-0.90), and test-retest reliability was substantial (ICC = 0.76-0.79). Smaller change was detectable in the trapezius compared to the tibialis anterior. This study provides evidence that novice raters can perform digital algometry with adequate reliability for research and clinical use in people with and without neck pain.

  13. Constant-pressure well test analysis of finite-conductivity hydraulically fractured gas wells influenced by non-Darcy flow effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashawi, Ibrahim Sami [Department of Petroleum Engineering, College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait)

    2006-09-15

    Non-Darcy flow effects have long been recognized to have serious adverse impact on the performance of high flow rate gas wells. These effects may mask the presence of fractures around the wellbores of naturally fractured reservoirs and may render the effective fracture conductivity and fracture half-length of hydraulically fractured wells much less than the designed parameters. Even though the effects of non-Darcy flow have been identified in the field and properly acknowledged in the well testing literature, little has been done to improve the well test analysis results. This paper presents a new technique that accurately determines the fracture conductivity of hydraulically fractured gas wells producing at constant-bottomhole pressure and provides direct means to calculate the magnitude of turbulence in the fracture around the wellbore from a single well test. A semi-analytical equation that incorporates the effects of non-Darcy flow in the fracture is presented for the first time. A detailed investigation of the various parameters that influence the flow behavior of real gas in the fracture nearby the wellbore is also illustrated. Furthermore, a systematic method for calculating the fracture conductivity and non-Darcy flow coefficient from a single well test is outlined. The final working equations are presented in such a way that permits a straightforward, simple, yet accurate analysis of the variable flow rate with time. No type-curve matching, multirate tests or correlations are required. The methodology of the proposed technique is illustrated using several synthetic examples. (author)

  14. Prediction of pressure of bentonite buffer in model test of disposal pit for high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, Hideo; Osada, Toru; Takao, Hajime; Ueda, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Bentonite-based buffer materials for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal are expected to fill up the space between buffer and a wall of the disposal pit, and/or between buffer and an waste-container called as overpack by its swelling deformation. That is called as self-sealing ability. This study performs the model tests simulated the relationship between buffer and space mentioned above. It also investigates the validity of the theoretical equations for evaluating the swelling characteristics of bentonite-based buffer and backfill material, which were proposed in Komine and Ogata (2003, 2004), by comparing the calculations and the experimental results. (author)

  15. SPES-2, the full-height, full-pressure, test facility simulating the AP600 plant: Main results from the experimental campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medich, C.; Rigamonti, M.; Martinelli, R.; Tarantini, M.; Conway, L.

    1995-01-01

    The SPES-2 is a full height, full pressure experimental test facility reproducing the Westinghouse AP600 reactor with a scaling factor of 1/395. The experimental plant, designed and operated by SIET in Piacenza, consists of a full simulation of the AP600 primary core cooling system including all the passive and active safety systems. In 1992, Westinghouse, in cooperation with ENEL, ENEA, SIET and ANSALDO developed an experimental program to test the integrated behavior of the AP600 passive safety systems. The SPES-2 test matrix, concluded in November 1994, has examined the AP600 passive safety system response for a range of small break LOCAs at different locations on the primary system and on the passive system lines; single steam generator tube ruptures with both passive and active non-safety systems, and a main steam line break transient to demonstrate the capability of passive safety systems for rapid cooldown. Each of the tests has provided detailed experimental results for verification of the capability of the analysis methods to predict the integrated passive safety system behavior

  16. Development of a scratch test in an autoclave for the measurement of repassivation kinetics of stainless steel in high temperature high pressure water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, R.W.; Schepers, B.; Vankeerberghen, M

    2004-07-30

    The slip-dissolution model of stress corrosion cracking states that crack tip advance is based on active dissolution of metal atoms after film rupture and until fill repassivation has occurred. The repassivation phenomenon can be investigated using a scratch test. After a stainless steel sample is polarized in the passive part of the anodic polarization curve, a sharp pin makes a scratch on the surface, hereby removing the passive film. Repassivation of the bared metal in the scratch will occur due to the applied potential. The current supplied to the metal sample is measured before, during and after scratching. A device has been designed that can perform such a test in an autoclave. A ceramic pin produces a scratch on a stainless steel sample when a metal bellow expands under a burst internal pressure. Typical problems encountered include the well controlled movement of the ceramic pins, scratch reproducibility and proper current measurement. Furthermore, a finite scratching speed results in mixed activation/repassivation, i.e. repassivation starts before the scratch is finished. A convolution calculation has been made to tackle this problem. The paper discusses the design and experimental procedure of the scratch test and some experimental results obtained in high temperature water (300 deg. C). Mathematical modeling of the repassivation current shows good correlation with experimental data. The mathematical model allows for a slow scratching speed and circumvents some of the disadvantages of conventionally fast scratch tests.

  17. Final Report for the 1st Surveillance Test of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (Capsule 2) of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai (and others)

    2007-04-15

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 1st surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Daejon after the capsule was transported from Ulchin site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Ulchin Unit 4 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsule 2 is 4.306E+18n/cm{sup 2}. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.918 for the 1st testing and the calculational uncertainty,7.0% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 3.615E+18n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 6th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 16 and 32EFPY would reach 8.478E+18 and 1.673E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Ulchin Unit 4 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life.

  18. Final Report for the 1st Surveillance Test of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (CAPSULE 2) of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai (and others)

    2006-12-15

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 1st surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejon after the capsule was transported from Ulchin site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Ulchin unit 3 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsule 2 is 4.674E 18n/cm{sup 2}. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.920 for the 1st testing and the calculational uncertainty,7.0% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 3.913E 18n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 6th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 16 and 32EFPY would reach 9.249E 18 and 1.834E 19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Ulchin unit 3 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life.

  19. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  20. Evaluation of Choroidal Thickness, Intraocular Pressure, and Serum Osmolality After the Water Drinking Test in Eyes With Primary Angle Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongpiur, Monisha E; Foo, Valencia H X; de Leon, John Mark; Baskaran, Mani; Tun, Tin A; Husain, Rahat; Perera, Shamira A; Aung, Tin

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated changes in choroidal thickness (ChT), IOP, ocular biometry, and serum osmolality after the water drinking test (WDT) in subjects with previous acute primary angle closure (APAC) and primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG). We evaluated 38 subjects, including 21 with APAC and 17 with PACG. Each subject underwent IOP measurement, A-scan biometry, spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SDOCT), anterior segment-optical coherence tomography (ASOCT), and osmolality measurements at baseline, 30, and 60 minutes after consuming at least 10 mL/kg of water. The ChT at the macula was measured from SDOCT images using the 7-line scan protocol. The fellow-eyes of APAC (FE-APAC) were compared to eyes with PACG. The mean age ± SD of the study subjects was 62.8 ± 8.6 years and 21 (55.3%) were females. At baseline, serum osmolality was significantly lower (P APAC group, whereas ChT was similar in both groups (P = 0.56). At 30 minutes after WDT, both groups demonstrated a significant increase in IOP (FE-APAC, 3.0 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.52, 4.48] mm Hg; PACG, 5.06 [95% CI, 3.68, 6.26] mm Hg; P APAC; however, the latter had lower serum osmolality at baseline. Change in mean ChT following WDT was associated with a lower baseline serum osmolality.

  1. Field application of phased array ultrasonic testing for structural weld overlay on dissimilar welds of pressurizer nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hoi; Kim, Yong Sik [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company Ltd., Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Weld overlay was first used in power plants in the US in the early 1980s as an interim method of repairing the welds of flawed piping joints. Weld overlaid piping joints in nuclear power plants must be examined periodically using ultrasonic examination technology. Portable phased array ultrasonic technology has recently become available. Currently, the application of preemptive weld overlays as a mitigation technique and/as a method to improve the examination surface condition for more complex configurations is becoming more common. These complex geometries may require several focused conventional transducers for adequate inspection of the overlay, the original weld, and the base material. Alternatively, Phased array ultrasonic probes can be used to generate several inspection angles simultaneously at various focal depths to provide better and faster coverage than that possible by conventional methods. Thus, this technology can increase the speed of examinations, save costs, and reduce radiation exposure. In this paper, we explain the general sequence of the inspection of weld overlay and the results of signal analysis for some PAUT (phased array ultrasonic testing) signals detected in on-site inspections.

  2. Use of a simple intraoperative hydrostatic pressure test to assess the relationship between mobility of the ventricular stoma and success of third ventriculostomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, Mahmoud Hamdy

    2012-02-03

    OBJECT: Neuroendoscopists often note pulsatility or flabbiness of the floor of the third ventricle during endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) and believe that either is a good indication of the procedure\\'s success. Note, however, that this belief has never been objectively measured or proven in a prospective study. The authors report on a simple test-the hydrostatic test-to assess the mobility of the floor of the third ventricle and confirm adequate ventricular flow. They also analyzed the relationship between a mobile floor (a positive hydrostatic test) and prospective success of ETV. METHODS: During a period of 3 years between July 2001 and July 2004, 30 ETVs for obstructive hydrocephalus were performed in 22 male and eight female patients. Once the stoma had been created, the irrigating Ringer lactate solution was set at a 30-cm height from the external auditory meatus, and the irrigation valve was opened while the other ports on the endoscope were closed. The ventricular floor ballooned downward and stabilized. The irrigation valve was then closed and ports of the endoscope were opened. The magnitude of the upward displacement of the floor was then assessed. Funneling of the stoma was deemed to be a good indicator of floor mobility, adequate flow, and a positive hydrostatic test. All endoscopic procedures were recorded using digital video and recordings were subsequently assessed separately by two blinded experienced neuroendoscopists. Patients underwent prospective clinical follow up during a mean period of 11.2 months (range 1 month-3 years), computerized tomography and\\/or magnetic resonance imaging studies of the brain, and measurements of cerebrospinal fluid pressure through a ventricular reservoir when present. Failure of ETV was defined as the subsequent need for shunt implantation. The overall success rate of the ETV was 70% and varied from 86.9% in patients with a mobile stoma and a positive hydrostatic test to only 14.2% in patients with a

  3. Gentilly-2 NPP - Concrete aging effects on long term pre-stress losses and propagation of concrete cracking due to pressure testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocevski, V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the study intended to evaluate the post-tension long term losses and propagation of cracks in the envelope of Gentilly-2 Nuclear Power Plant reactor building. The numerical simulation of concrete, that takes into account elastic as well as inelastic strains due to loading, shrinkage strains due to drying or cooling and inelastic strains from alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) related swelling, is explained. The simultaneous contribution of AAR, shrinkage and creep, are simulated using an enhanced elastic-plastic constitutive relation. The nonlinear relations are validated by comparing the numerically calculated strains with strain measurements from the extensometers placed in the concrete during the construction of the envelope. The post-tension losses/gains are evaluated for the vertical as well as horizontal cables. Also included is the result of pull-out test conducted on sample beam cast at the time of the reactor building construction with the same concrete mix, post-tension cable and force. Structural behaviour of the beam is simulated over the same period of time as the reactor building envelope. The test results are used also to calibrate the numerical model. The paper also includes discussion of the results obtained from the simulation of a standard internal high pressure test (145 kPa). The behavior of the reactor building envelope, prior to applied pressure, during the test and for the period of several months after the testing was simulated using an advanced numerical model and the results (strains) were compared with measured values. It was found that this method may be used as an approximate procedure for evaluation of post-tension losses/gains and assessment of propagation of cracking visible on the outside surfaces of the confinement building. In addition, a discussion of the negative effect of high post-tension on the air tightness of the confinement building of Gentilly-2. The comparison is made between the post

  4. A measurement system analysis with design of experiments: Investigation of the adhesion performance of a pressure sensitive adhesive with the probe tack test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Marc; Leopold, Claudia S

    2015-12-30

    The tack of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) is not an inherent material property and strongly depends on the measurement conditions. Following the concept of a measurement system analysis (MSA), influencing factors of the probe tack test were investigated by a design of experiments (DoE) approach. A response surface design with 38 runs was built to evaluate the influence of detachment speed, dwell time, contact force, adhesive film thickness and API content on tack, determined as the maximum of the stress strain curve (σmax). It could be shown that all investigated factors have a significant effect on the response and that the DoE approach allowed to detect two-factorial interactions between the dwell time, the contact force, the adhesive film thickness and the API content. Surprisingly, it was found that tack increases with decreasing and not with increasing adhesive film thickness. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Accelerated test for evaluation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation characteristics of non-sensitized 316 austenitic stainless steel in simulated pressure water reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xiangyu; Bali, Shirish Chandrakant; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Accelerated technique was developed for evaluation of stress corrosion cracking. • The effect of strain rate on stress corrosion cracking was investigated. • Typical intergranular crack feature was observed on the fracture surface. • The crack depth distribution shows two peaks feature. • The work hardened layer has a strong effect on stress corrosion cracking. - Abstract: Accelerated technique has been developed for evaluation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) initiation behavior of non-sensitized materials in pressure water reactor environment by means of the implementation of hollowed cylindrical specimens under slow strain rate tensile. Typical IGSCC feature was observed on the fracture surface. The crack depth distribution showed two peaks feature which relates to the worked hardened layer on the inner surface. The specimens tested at lower strain rate showed higher fraction of IGSCC, larger number of cracks initiation, shorter elongation and smaller crack opening displacement, suggesting the transition behavior of IGSCC initiation and short crack growth.

  6. Theoretical Study on Synchronous Characterization of Surface and Interfacial Mechanical Properties of Thin-Film/Substrate Systems with Residual Stress Based on Pressure Blister Test Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-xin Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, based on the pressure blister test technique, a theoretical study on the synchronous characterization of surface and interfacial mechanical properties of thin-film/substrate systems with residual stress was presented, where the problem of axisymmetric deformation of a blistering film with initial stress was analytically solved and its closed-form solution was presented. The expressions to determine Poisson’s ratios, Young’s modulus, and residual stress of surface thin films were derived; the work done by the applied external load and the elastic energy stored in the blistering thin film were analyzed in detail and their expressions were derived; and the interfacial adhesion energy released per unit delamination area of thin-film/substrate (i.e., energy release rate was finally presented. The synchronous characterization technique presented here has theoretically made a big step forward, due to the consideration for the residual stress in surface thin films.

  7. An analysis, using the CLAPTRAP code, of the pressure transients developed in the Carolinas Virginia Tube Reactor during containment performance tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1982-11-01

    To check containment performance of the CVTR, steam was injected above the operating floor through a 10 foot pipe cap containing the 1 inch diameter holes, at a steady rate of 102.8 lb/sec for a period of 166 seconds. This steam had an enthalpy of 1195 Btu/lb and was therefore not entirely typical of the much wetter material which would be rejected for the greater part of a true breached circuit accident. Pressure transients measured experimentally within the containment were compared with results calculated by the American code CONTEMPT and these results in turn have allowed the Winfrith code CLAPTRAP to be tested for consistency and to establish that the use of this code would have led to similar conclusions about the heat transfer coefficients at the heat absorbent surfaces. (U.K.)

  8. Digital implementation, simulation and tests in MATLAB of the models of Steam line, the turbines, the pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez R, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this phase of the project they were carried out exhaustive tests to the models of the steam lines, turbines and pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric central for to verify that their tendencies and behaviors are it more real possible. For it, it was necessary to also analyze the transfer functions of the different components along the steam line until the power generator. Such models define alone the dominant poles of the system, what is not limitation to reproduce a wide range of anticipated transitoriness of a power station operation. In the same manner, it was integrated and proved the integrated model form with the models of feeding water of the SUN-RAH, simulating the nuclear reactor starting from predetermined entrances of the prospective values of the vessel. Also it was coupled with the graphic interface developed with the libraries DirectX implementing a specific monitoring panel for this system. (Author)

  9. Enhancement of the quality of the reactor pressure vessel used in light water power plants by advanced material, fabrication and testing technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Ewald, J.; Maier, G.; Schellhammer, W.

    1980-01-01

    Fracture safe assessment of nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is based upon an adequate stress analysis, reliable material characteristics, and acceptable defect sizes. Problems may arise concerning inhomogeneties, low toughness and crack phenomena as observed in the base material and heat affected zone (HAZ). Therefore, efforts have been made to develop a steel which would be both non-susceptible to embrittlement and/or cracking in the HAZ, and have a higher upper-shelf toughness of base and HAZ material. Tests have been made on inhomogeneties and defects and also on improvement of chemical composition, the steel-making process, welding procedures and the optimum temperature cycle and level for stress-relief heat treatment. To solve these problems, common testing methods were supplemented by tangential-cut techniques, small HAZ-tensile test procedures and HAZ-simulation techniques. Results indicate that 50 per cent of 100 investigated component-strength welds are affected by micro stress-relief cracking (SRC) on a micro-and millimetre scale. The 22 NiMoCr 37 steel with optimised chemical composition, and the 20 MnMoNi 55 steel are both resistant to stress-relief embrittlement and SRC. Specific welding techniques are found to limit SRC and proposals for optimum stress-relief temperatures are given. For the generation of new components, the fracture-safe analysis can now be based completely upon homogeneous and high upper-shelf base materials including the HAZ. (author)

  10. Blood pressure response to isometric handgrip testing and aerobic capacity and associations with sprint performance in middle-aged men following high-intensity interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzeczny, Ryszard; Tomza, Cyprian; Polak, Anna; Nawrat-Szołtysik, Agnieszka

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a 6-week high-intensity interval training (HIIT) protocol with increasing exercise volume affects aerobic capacity and arterial blood pressure (BP) measured during a fatiguing isometric handgrip test (IHT) in middle-aged, normotensive men and to assess whether sprint performance is associated with training-induced changes in BP. Fourteen recreationally active men (age 43.0±0.9 years, body mass 74.4±2.1 kg, body height 1.74±0.02 m, BMI 24.7±0.5 kg/m2 [mean±SE]) participated in 12 HIIT sessions at an intensity of 85% of heart rate reserve. Sprinting ability was estimated at baseline using the 50-yard dash test (50YDT). Pre- and post-HIIT aerobic capacity and pressor response was assessed by the 12-min Cooper run test (12CT) and the IHT at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction, respectively. Following the intervention, the distance covered in the 12CT and handgrip time to fatigue (HTF) significantly increased (Pperformance (Ptraining-induced ΔBP during IHT are dependent on sprinting ability.

  11. Investigation and clinical applications of muscle strength change in cerebrospinal fluid tap test in cases of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi; Iida, Jun-Ichi; Kawahara, Makoto; Uchiyama, Yoshitomo

    2016-12-15

    The cerebrospinal fluid tap test (CSFTT) is widely used to diagnose idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and predict the therapeutic effectiveness of shunting. However, the ability to walk cannot be quantified for patients who are unable to walk. Therefore, we examined whether the iNPH diagnostic aid is possible using dynamometry, even for patients who are unable to walk. In this study, 45 patients underwent grip strength assessment, quadriceps strength assessment, 10-m walk test, and 3-m Timed Up and Go test before and after CSFTT. Our investigation of physical functions indicated that the CSFTT-positive group demonstrated significant improvements in grip and bilateral quadriceps muscle strength. The results of the receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated that leg muscle strength measurement reliability was high and that the area under the curve was 0.754-0.811. Our investigation of the clinically effective cutoff point for the rate of change indicated that it was 13.6% for right quadriceps muscle strength and 15.3% for left quadriceps muscle strength. Comparing CSFTT results in cases of iNPH with the observed rate of change in muscle strength can aid in the diagnosis of iNPH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of LLTR Series II tests A-1A and A-1B test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoopak, B.F.; Amos, J.C.; Norvell, T.J.

    1980-03-01

    The standard methodology, with minor modifications provides conservative yet realistic predictions of leaksite and other sodium system pressures in the LLTR Series II vessel and piping. The good agreement between predicted and measured pressures indicates that the TRANSWRAP/RELAP modeling developed from the Series I tests is applicable to larger scale units prototypical of the Clinch River steam generator design. Calculated sodium system pressures are sensitive to several modeling parameters including rupture disc modeling, acoustic velocity in the test vessel, and flow rate from the rupture tube. The acoustic velocity which produced best agreement with leaksite pressures was calculated based on the shroud diameter and shroud wall thickness. The corresponding rupture tube discharge coefficient was that of the standard design methodology developed from Series I testing. As found in Series I testing, the Series II data suggests that the leading edge of the flow in the relief line is two phase for a single, doubled-ended guillotine tube rupture. The steam generator shroud acts as if it is relatively transparent to the transmission of radial pressures to the vessel wall. Slightly lower sodium system maximum pressures measured during Test A-1b compared to Test A-1a are attributed to premature failure (failure at a lower pressure) of the rupture disc in contact with the sodium for test A-1b. The delay in failure of the second disc in Test A-1b, which was successfully modeled with TRANSWRAP, is attributed to the limited energy in the nitrogen injection

  13. Field test of low-pressure turbine blading with improved resistance against corrosion fatigue; Faeltprovning av laagtrycksturbinskovlar med foerbaettrad haerdighet mot korrosionsutmattning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavast, Jueri [Alstom Power Sweden AB, Finspong (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    Corrosion fatigue of turbine blades in low-pressure turbines is one of the most common reasons for reduced availability and reliability in fossil fueled as well as in nuclear steam turbine plants. The problem is almost exclusively localized to the area where the first condensation takes place. There is therefore a need for materials with improved resistance towards corrosion fatigue for blades in stages in the transition zone between dry and wet steam. The phase hardening stainless steel 15/5 PH is such an alternative material. This material has shown a significantly better resistance towards corrosion and corrosion fatigue in laboratory tests. The lack of field experience of this material in real plants has, however, made it difficult to introduce this relatively new and untried material. Corrosion fatigue has caused problems in the some of the nuclear units in Forsmark. Forsmark 2 was therefore regarded as a suitable plant for a field test. The result of the field test is applicable to conventional as well as to nuclear units. A total of 10 blades of 15/5 PH were installed to replace blades of conventional blade material in a stage with a ar and 40 previous history of corrosion fatigue. The field test was interrupted after 5 years and 40,000 hours of operation. The main objective of the field test was to demonstrate that blades of 15/5 PH could be successfully machined, tested, installed and of course also used in a real plant. The field test also enabled a comparison of the corrosion resistance of the two alloys. It should be underlined that demonstration of the improved resistance towards corrosion fatigue has not been an objective during this field test as this has already been evidenced by various laboratory investigations. The properties of the parent material as well as of the finished blades were controlled and documented as carefully as possible before the field test to enable evaluation of the field test. The condition of the 10 blades of 15/5 PH

  14. Gas threshold pressure test performed at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (Switzerland): experimental data and data analysis; Essais d'injection de gaz dans les argiles a opalinus du Laboratoire souterrain du Mont Terre (Suisse): donnees et interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croise, J.; Mayer, G. [Colenco Power Engineering AG, Groundwater Protection and Waste Disposal, Baden (Switzerland); Marschall, P. [NAGRA, National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Wettingen (Switzerland); Matray, J.M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Tanaka, T. [Obayashi Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Vogel, P. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Migration of gases in argillaceous formations increasingly attracts the attention of various geo-scientific disciplines for purposes like CO{sub 2} sequestration, gas storage in geological formations and disposal of hazardous wastes. Quantitative assessment of gas transport in such ultra-low permeability formations requires information on gas transport properties of the argillaceous formation. A series of hydro- and gas tests in boreholes was performed at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory in Switzerland to investigate gas transport in the Opalinus Clay, an indurated clay formation of Jurassic age. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive test campaign in the shaly facies of the Opalinus Clay, comprising a 'classical' hydro-test with water injections followed by pressure recovery sequences and an extended gas threshold pressure test. A detailed interpretation of both the hydraulic and gas test sequences was conducted using numerical simulations for the data analysis (software TOUGH2/iTOUGH2). In contrast to former test analyses, the sequential interpretation of the hydro- and gas test sequences provided a consistent set of single-phase hydraulic parameters and two-phase flow parameters. The use of independent information from laboratory testing (porosity, capillary pressure curves) constrained distinctly the inverse problem of parameter fitting. Discrimination between different parametric models of the relative permeability was impaired by inherent limitations of the field data due to non-ideal test conditions. Nevertheless, a classical two-phase flow type capillary pressure - relative permeability relationship based on the Van Genuchten - Mualem approach was found to be valid. A supplementary design study was conducted to optimise the test procedures to better distinguish between relative permeability models. It is shown that long term (> 1 year) injection tests are more adequate to constrain the models. This finding is important for the design of

  15. The 4th surveillance test and evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel material (capsule W) of Younggwang nuclear power plant unit1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwon Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-08-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 4th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Yonggwang site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Yonggwang unit 1 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules U, V, X and W are 5.555E+18, 1.662E+19, 3.358E+19, and 4.521E+19 n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of measurement versus calculation, was 0.859 for the 1st through 4th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 11.80% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.551E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 12th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 3.929E+19, 4.880E+19, 5.831E+19 and 6.782E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Yonggwang unit 1 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 4 refs., 41 figs., 35 tabs. (Author)

  16. The 4th surveillance test and evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel material (capsule W) of Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwon Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-02-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 4th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Kori site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Yonggwang unit 2 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules U, V, X and W are 5.762E+18, 1.5391E+19, 3.5119E+19, and 4.2610E+19 n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of measurement versus calculation, was 0.899 for the 1st through 4th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 12.3% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.357E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 11th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 3.525E+19, 4.337E+19, 5.148E+19 and 5.960E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Yonggwang unit 2 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 48 refs., 35 figs., 42 tabs. (Author)

  17. Analysis and Experimental Qualification of an Irradiation Capsule Design for Testing Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cladding in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kurt R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is currently investigating a number of advanced nuclear fuel cladding concepts to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactors. Alumina-forming ferritic alloys (e.g., FeCrAl) are some of the leading candidates to replace traditional zirconium alloys due to their superior oxidation resistance, provided no prohibitive irradiation-induced embrittlement occurs. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed experimental designs to irradiate thin-walled cladding tubes with representative pressurized water reactor geometry in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) under relevant temperatures. These designs allow for post-irradiation examination (PIE) of cladding that closely resembles expected commercially viable geometries and microstructures. The experiments were designed using relatively inexpensive rabbit capsules for the irradiation vehicle. The simplistic designs combined with the extremely high neutron flux in the HFIR allow for rapid testing of a large test matrix, thus reducing the time and cost needed to advanced cladding materials closer to commercialization. The designs are flexible in that they allow for testing FeCrAl alloys, stainless steels, Inconel alloys, and zirconium alloys (as a reference material) both with and without hydrides. This will allow a direct comparison of the irradiation performance of advanced cladding materials with traditional zirconium alloys. PIE will include studies of dimensional change, microstructure variation, mechanical performance, etc. This work describes the capsule design, neutronic and thermal analyses, and flow testing that were performed to support the qualification of this new irradiation vehicle.

  18. Testing antifreeze protein from the longhorn beetle Rhagium mordax as a kinetic gas hydrate inhibitor using a high-pressure micro differential scanning calorimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Perfeldt, Christine Malmos; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    pressure micro differential scanning calorimeter HP-mu DSC VII (Setaram Inc.) containing two 50 cc high pressure cells (maximum operating pressure 40 MPa; temperature range -40 to 120 degrees C) was employed to observe methane hydrate formation and decomposition in the presence of hyperactive antifreeze...

  19. Flight Test of 31.2 Diameter Modified Ringsail Parachute Deployed at Mach 1.39, Dynamic Pressure 11 Pounds per Square Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisser, John S.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.; Murrow, Harold N.

    1967-01-01

    A 31.2-foot (9.51 meter) nominal diameter (reference area 764 ft(exp 2) (71.0 m(exp 2)) ringsail parachute modified to provide 15-percent geometric porosity was flight tested while attached to a 201-pound mass (91.2 kilogram) instrumented payload as part of the rocket launch portion of the NASA Planetary Entry Parachute Program (PEPP). The parachute deployment was initiated by the firing of a mortar at a Mach number of 1.39 and a dynamic pressure of 11.0 lb/ft(exp 2) (527 newtons/m(exp 2)) at an altitude of 122,500 feet (37.3 kilometers). The parachute deployed to suspension-line stretch (snatch force) in 0.35 second, and 0.12 second later the drag force increase associated with parachute inflation began. The parachute inflated in 0.24 second to the full-open condition for a total elapsed opening time of 0.71 second. The maximum opening load of 3970 pounds (17,700 newtons) came at the time the parachute was just fully opened. During the deceleration period, the parachute exhibited an average drag coefficient of 0.52 and oscillations of the parachute canopy were less than 5 degrees. During the steady-state terminal descent portion of the test period, the average effective drag coefficient (based on vertical descent velocity) was 0.52.

  20. Using earth-tide induced water pressure changes to measure in situ permeability: A comparison with long-term pumping tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allègre, Vincent; Brodsky, Emily E.; Xue, Lian; Nale, Stephanie M.; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.

    2016-04-01

    Good constraints on hydrogeological properties are an important first step in any quantitative model of groundwater flow. Field estimation of permeability is difficult as it varies over orders of magnitude in natural systems and is scale-dependent. Here we directly compare permeabilities inferred from tidal responses with conventional large-scale, long-term pumping tests at the same site. Tidally induced water pressure changes recorded in wells are used to infer permeability at ten locations in a densely fractured sandstone unit. Each location is either an open-hole well or a port in a multilevel monitoring well. Tidal response is compared at each location to the results of two conventional, long-term and large scale pumping tests performed at the same site. We obtained consistent values between the methods for a range of site-specific permeabilities varying from ˜10-15 m2 to 10-13 m2 for both open wells with large open intervals and multilevel monitoring well. We conclude that the tidal analysis is able to capture passive and accurate estimates of permeability.

  1. Clinical and 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test symptom patterns in primary headache disorder patients presenting to otolaryngologists with "sinus" headaches, pain or pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Devyani; Rounds, Alexis B; Rank, Matthew A; Divekar, Rohit

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work was to study patient and 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22) characteristics in primary headache disorders (PHDs). Retrospective chart review of "sinus" headache/pressure/pain patients was conducted. Patients that had rhinosinusitis excluded (negative endoscopy/computed tomography [CT]), and neurologist-confirmed PHD were studied. Patterns in symptom and SNOT-22 items were analyzed by network visualization and cluster analysis. Forty-six patients met study criteria. Forty-three (93.5%) reported "need to blow nose" and 40 (86.9%) reported postnasal drainage. Sneezing was reported by 37 (80.4%) patients, "blockage/congestion of nose" by 33 (71.8%), and "runny nose by 32 (69.6%) patients. The median SNOT-22 score was 54 (interquartile range [IQR], 40 to 63). Past history included neurological diagnoses (60%), rhinologic disease (39%; chronic rhinosinusitis [CRS], rhinitis, recurrent acute sinusitis), asthma (28%), and allergen-sensitivity (26%). Previous sinonasal surgery had been performed in 41%. Network layout and cluster analysis identified 2 patient clusters and 2 symptom clusters. Two-thirds (31) of patients formed a tight cluster (cluster 1) linking to a symptom cluster of psychosocial items wrapped tightly with "facial pain/pressure." The remaining one-third of patients (cluster 2) linked to rhinologic symptoms loosely grouped away from "facial pressure/pain." In contrast to patients in cluster 2, patients in cluster 1 were predominantly female (p < 0.04), had significantly higher (p < 0.0001) median SNOT-22 scores (60 vs 34; IQR, 53 to 67 vs 17 to 42), were more likely to have migraine history (p = 0.058), and reported being "sad" (p < 0.0001) or "embarrassed" (p < 0.006). Prominent rhinologic symptoms can be present in PHD patients in the absence of rhinosinusitis. In particular, high symptom-burden/SNOT-22 scores and high psychosocial symptoms should raise suspicion of PHD when endoscopy and/or CT results do not correlate

  2. Postural control of individuals with chronic stroke compared to healthy participants: Timed-Up-and-Go, Functional Reach Test and center of pressure movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, Sigal; Reif, Shlomit; Mendelboim, Tom; Rand, Debbie

    2017-10-01

    Balance impairments are common following stroke, and may lead to loss of independent functional mobility and falls. Previous studies strived to come up with precise measures of postural control, which will provide a better prognostic power for the health status and safety of the individual. To date, the degree of difference in postural control measures between individuals with chronic stroke and healthy participants is not reported. Also there are no reported correlations between these measures and the Timed-Up-and-Go (TUG) and the Functional Reach Test (FRT). The aims of this study were: 1) to compare balance measures between young and older healthy participants and individuals with chronic stroke; 2) to assess correlations between TUG and FRT to center of pressure (COP) movements performed during four conditions; and 3) to determine the COP measures that best explain the variance in TUG and Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Cross-sectional study. Community. Thirteen young (mean±SD age 25.4±1.1), 11 older (mean±SD age 64.5± 3.5) healthy adults and 21 individuals 6-18 months post-stroke (mean±SD age 61.4 ±10.1). Measurements of COP were recorded while the subjects stood barefoot on a pressure-measuring pad during four conditions: FRT, quiet standing for 10s with eyes open and eyes closed, and sit-to-stand. The TUG was also administered. Participants filled the Activity-specific balance confidence scale (ABC), and their independence in basic activities was rated using the FIM. They also reported the number of falls since stroke onset. Between-group differences were significant. Moderate correlations between pressure-related measurements to the FRT and TUG were found. The COP path during sit-to-stand (Beta=0.971, Psit-to-stand (Beta=-0.789, Ptest scores. These measurements might shed more light on the postural control mechanisms in balance-impaired populations, therefore potentially improve the treatment of postural control.

  3. Variação da pressão intraocular após teste submáximo de força no treinamento resistido Intraocular pressure variation after submaximal strength test in resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Conte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a variação da pressão intraocular (PIO decorrente da aplicação do teste de predição para uma repetição máxima (1RM. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados em estudo observacional 145 calouros (22,04 ± 4,17 anos; de ambos os sexos do curso de Educação Física da Escola Superior de Educação Física de Jundiaí (ESEFJ. Os critérios de exclusão foram: opacidade de meios, alteração de globo ocular ou ausência de globo ocular. Todos os participantes assinaram o Termo de Consentimento Livre e Esclarecido. A avaliação da PIO foi determinada por duas medidas consecutivas com o tonômetro de Perkins: i pré-teste: antes do teste de 1RM e ii pós-teste: logo após a realização do teste. O teste de 1RM consistiu em predizer o valor de uma repetição máxima através de repetições até a fadiga. Foram utilizados os seguintes exercícios resistidos: supino, pulley dorsal, desenvolvimento, rosca direta e leg press 45º. Como procedimento estatístico foi empregado o teste "t" de Student pareado. RESULTADOS: Ocorreu redução da PIO após a realização do teste de predição de 1RM: 13,48 ± 3,32 vs.10,20 ± 3,72 mmHg (pPURPOSE: To verify the intraocular pressure (IOP after sub-maximal strength test. METHODS: 145 Physical Education freshmen (22.04 ± 4.17 years old; female and male from Superior Physical Education School of Jundiaí (ESEFJ were evaluated in an observacional study. The exclusion criteria were: media opacity and eyeball absence or changes. All subjects agreed to take part in this research and signed up the Informed Consent. IOP was measured by Perkins tonometer: i pretest: just before the submaximal strength test performance and ii post-test: immediately after the strength test. The strength test consisted in the one-repetition-maximum-assessment through repetition until fatigue. Resistance training exercises such as bench press, pulley dorsal high, shoulder press, arm curl and leg press 45º were performed

  4. Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  5. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, B.N.

    1976-01-01

    In nuclear power reactor systems which have a reactor core inside a pressure vessel, the feedwater inlet pipe and steam discharge nozzle usually require separate pressure vessel penetrations. This requirement involves a great deal of expensive high quality special machining, welding and weld joint testing. The invention overcomes most of these problems by nestling the feedwater inlet pipe inside the steam discharge nozzle. At the same time the individual heat exchanger modules are supported from the pressure vessel at the same location as the nested feedwater inlet pipe and steam discharge nozzle combination, thus eliminating the need to accomodate troublesome differential thermal expansion problems through special structures within the pressure vessel

  6. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air

  7. Pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Woodard, Charles R; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Long, William B; Gebhart, Jocelynn H; Ma, Eva K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this collective review is to outline the predisposing factors in the development of pressure ulcers and to identify a pressure ulcer prevention program. The most frequent sites for pressure ulcers are areas of skin overlying bony prominences. There are four critical factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers: pressure, shearing forces, friction, and moisture. Pressure is now viewed as the single most important etiologic factor in pressure ulcer formation. Prolonged immobilization, sensory deficit, circulatory disturbances, and poor nutrition have been identified as important risk factors in the development of pressure ulcer formation. Among the clinical assessment scales available, only two, the Braden Scale and Norton Scale, have been tested extensively for reliability and/or validity. The most commonly used risk assessment tools for pressure ulcer formation are computerized pressure monitoring and measurement of laser Doppler skin blood flow. Pressure ulcers can predispose the patient to a variety of complications that include bacteremia, osteomyelitis, squamous cell carcinoma, and sinus tracts. The three components of pressure ulcer prevention that must be considered in any patient include management of incontinence, nutritional support, and pressure relief. The pressure relief program must be individualized for non-weight-bearing individuals as well as those that can bear weight. For those that can not bear weight and passively stand, the RENAISSANCE Mattress Replacement System is recommended for the immobile patient who lies supine on the bed, the stretcher, or operating room table. This alternating pressure system is unique because it has three separate cells that are not interconnected. It is specifically designed so that deflation of each individual cell will reach a ZERO PRESSURE during each alternating pressure cycle. The superiority of this system has been documented by comprehensive clinical studies in which this system

  8. Pressure Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    EPIC is Electronic Pressure Indicating Controller produced by North American Manufacturing Company. It is a high-sensitivity device for improving combustion efficiency in industrial furnaces that interprets a signal from a pressure transducer on a furnace and regulates furnace pressure accordingly. A controller can provide savings of from five to 25 percent of an industrial user's annual furnace fuel bill.

  9. Intracranial Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvedstrup, Jeppe; Radojicic, Aleksandra; Moudrous, Walid

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new method of noninvasive intracranial pressure (nICP) measurement with conventional lumbar puncture (LP) opening pressure. METHODS: In a prospective multicenter study, patients undergoing LP for diagnostic purposes underwent intracranial pressure measurements with HeadSen...

  10. Some principles of Islamic ethics as found in Harrisian philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Sahin

    2010-04-01

    John Harris is one of the prominent philosophers and bioethicists of our time. He has published tens of books and hundreds of papers throughout his professional life. This paper aims to take a 'deep-look' at Harris' works to argue that it is possible to find some principles of Islamic ethics in Harrisian philosophy, namely in his major works, as well as in his personal life. This may be surprising, or thought of as a 'big' and 'groundless' claim, since John Harris has nothing to do with any religion in his intellectual works. The major features of Harrisian philosophy could be defined as consequentialism or utilitarianism with liberal overtones. Despite some significant and fundamental differences in the application of principles (ie, abortion, euthanasia), the similarities between the major principles in Harrisian philosophy and Islamic ethics are greater at some points than the similarities between Islamic ethics and some other religious ethics (ie, Christian, Judaism). In this study I compare Harrisian teachings with major Islamic principles on 'Responsibility', 'Side-effects and Double-effects', 'Equality', 'Vicious choice, guilt and innocence', 'Organ transplantation and property rights' and 'Advance directives'.

  11. Reinforcing effects of caffeine and theobromine as found in chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Hendrik J; Blackburn, Rachel J

    2005-08-01

    Although in a previous study we showed that caffeine and theobromine were the main psychopharmacologically active constituents in a 50-g bar of chocolate, mere activity does not guarantee a role in our liking for the food. Our aim was to see if liking for a drink repeatedly paired with these amounts of caffeine and theobromine would increase compared to a placebo-paired drink. Participants (n=64) consumed a 'novel' drink + treatment capsule on six non-consecutive mornings using a double-blind, placebo-controlled independent-sample design. Aspects of liking and intensity of various sensory descriptors for these drinks were measured at every drink collection. Treatment capsules contained either an ecologically relevant dose combination of 19-mg caffeine and 250-mg theobromine or a placebo. Liking for the drink paired with the methylxanthine-containing capsules increased over time compared to the placebo-paired drink. This highly significant effect was confirmed by subjective, retrospective changes in liking for the drink. Methylxanthines in amounts found in 50-g chocolate may well contribute to our liking for chocolate, especially to the more acquired taste for dark chocolate.

  12. Experimental investigation of iodine removal and containment depressurization in containment spray system test facility of 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Manish [Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.I.T., Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Kandar, T.K.; Vhora, S.F.; Mohan, Nalini [Directorate of Technology Development, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Mumbai (India); Iyer, K.N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.I.T., Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Prabhu, S.V., E-mail: svprabhu@iitb.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.I.T., Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Depressurization rate in a scaled down vessel filled with air and steam is studied. • Iodine removal rate in a scaled down vessel filled with steam/air is investigated. • Effect of SMD and vessel pressure on depressurization rate is studied. • Depressurization rate decreases with the increase in the droplet size (590 μm – 1 mm) • Decrease in pressure and iodine concentration with time follow exponential trend. - Abstract: As an additional safety measure in the new 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactors, the first of a kind system called containment Spray System is introduced. The system is designed to cater/mitigate the conditions after design basis accidents i.e., loss of coolant accident and main steam line break. As a contribution to the safety analysis of condition following loss-of-coolant accidents, experiments are carried out to establish the performance of the system. The loss of coolant is simulated by injecting saturated steam and iodine vapors into the containment vessel in which air is enclosed at atmospheric and room temperature, and then the steam-air mixture is cooled by sprays of water. The effect of water spray on the containment vessel pressure and the iodine scrubbing in a scaled down facility is investigated for the containment spray system of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors. The experiments are carried out in the scaled down vessel of the diameter of 2.0 m and height of 3.5 m respectively. Experiments are conducted with water at room temperature as the spray medium. Two different initial vessel pressure i.e. 0.7 bar and 1.0 bar are chosen for the studies as they are nearing the loss of coolant accident & main steam line break pressures in Indian pressurized heavy water reactors. These pressures are chosen based on the containment resultant pressures after a design basis accident. The transient temperature and pressure distribution of the steam in the vessel are measured during the depressurization

  13. Testing a capacity-load model for hypertension: disentangling early and late growth effects on childhood blood pressure in a prospective birth cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos S Grijalva-Eternod

    Full Text Available In 2005, it was estimated that hypertension affected 26.4% of the adult population worldwide. By 2025, it is predicted that it will affect about 60% of adults, a total of 1.56 billion. Both pre- and postnatal growth patterns have been associated with later blood pressure (BP, but in contrasting directions. These inconsistent associations of growth during different developmental periods merit elucidation. We tested a theoretical model treating birth weight as a marker of homeostatic metabolic capacity, and childhood height, lean mass and fat mass as independent indices of metabolic load. We predicted that decreased capacity and increased load would be independently associated with increased BP.Data from the ALSPAC cohort on growth from birth to 7 years, and body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and BP at 9 years, were analysed (n = 6579. Data were expressed as standard deviation scores (SDS or standardised regression residuals (SRR. BP was independently and positively associated with each of height, lean mass and fat mass. In a joint model systolic BP was positively associated with conditional weight velocity [males 0.40 (95%CI: 0.37-0.44 & females 0.44 (95%CI: 0.40-0.47 SDS/SRR], but not birth weight [0.00 (95%CI: -0.03-0.04 & 0.03 (95%CI: -0.01-0.07 SDS/SDS]. Adjusting for height, lean mass and fat mass, the association of systolic BP and conditional weight velocity attenuated [0.00(95%CI: -0.09-0.08 & -0.06(95%CI: -0.14-0.03 SDS/SRR], whereas that with birth weight became negative [-0.10 (95%CI: -0.14-0.06 & -0.09 (95%CI: -0.13-0.05 SDS/SDS]. Similar results were obtained for diastolic BP and pulse pressure.Consistent with our theoretical model, high metabolic load relative to metabolic capacity is associated with increased BP. Our data demonstrate the contribution of different growth and body composition components to BP variance, and clarify the developmental aetiology of hypertension.

  14. High Pressure Industrial Water Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with Space Shuttle Main Engine testing at Stennis, the Nordberg Water Pumps at the High Pressure Industrial Water Facility provide water for cooling the flame deflectors at the test stands during test firings.

  15. Teachers' Perceptions of the Impact of High Stakes Testing on Instructional Content, Instructional Strategies, Motivation and Morale, and Pressure to Improve Student Performance in Relation to Their Views on Accountability and Its Effect on Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Chauncey

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the impact of high stakes testing on instructional content, instructional strategies, motivation and morale, and pressure to improve student performance in relation to their views on accountability. It also sought to identify teachers' perceptions of the effect of high stakes testing…

  16. Probabilistic assessment of night pumping operation of flammable fluids and pressure testing with maritime diesel; Analise probabilisica de seguranca para as operacoes de bombeio noturno de inflamaveis e teste de pressao com diesel maritimo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacinto, Carlos M.C.; Barbosa, Valdir P. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, Pauli A.A. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Ramos, Fernando A.

    2008-07-01

    Some operations, due to unscientific knowledge, have been prohibited in E and P activities. Among these operations one have night pumping of flammable fluid and pressure test with maritime diesel. For this reason one has a considerable lost of time due to the necessity to wait until the morning of the day after, in case of night pumping, or due to logistic skills concerning the difficulties to obtain materials which can be adopted in place of the maritime diesel. In turn to verify, scientifically, funding on a probabilistic safety analysis, the present paper present a hybrid approach, due to the high complexity of the considered scenario. In this hybrid approach, one has: HAZOP, event trees, Bayesian network, fault trees, and Bayesian inference for expert opinions estimation. The obtained results are satisfactory haven in view that they show the probability of occurrence of a catastrophic event concerning the analyzed operations. The obtained results are very satisfactory due to the fact that the one have obtained the probability values of undesirable events, and these values can be compared to the reference one. These reference figures are known as ALARP and are proposed by HSE. (author)

  17. Pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Madhuri

    2011-04-28

    Unrelieved pressure or friction of the skin, particularly over bony prominences, can lead to pressure ulcers in up to one third of people in hospitals or community care, and one fifth of nursing home residents. Pressure ulcers are more likely in people with reduced mobility and poor skin condition, such as older people or those with vascular disease. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of preventive interventions in people at risk of developing pressure ulcers? What are the effects of treatments in people with pressure ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 64 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: air-filled vinyl boots, air-fluidised supports, alternating-pressure surfaces (including mattresses), alternative foam mattresses, constant low-pressure supports, debridement, electric profiling beds, electrotherapy, hydrocellular heel supports, low-air-loss beds (including hydrotherapy beds), low-level laser therapy, low-tech constant-low-pressure supports, medical sheepskin overlays, nutritional supplements, orthopaedic wool padding, pressure-relieving overlays on operating tables, pressure-relieving surfaces, repositioning (regular "turning"), seat cushions, standard beds, standard care, standard foam mattresses, standard tables, surgery, therapeutic ultrasound, topical lotions and

  18. Evaluation of lumbar tap test combined with mean cerebral blood flow measurement and electroencephalographic topography on idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Totaro; Iwasaki, Mitsuyoshi; Shirata, Kanji

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the diagnostic precision of the lumbar tap test (LTT). Thirty one patients (mean age, 65.4 years; male to female ratio, 12: 19) suspected of having idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) were used in the study. They underwent LTT (20-30 ml of cerebrospinal fluid was drained through a puncture with a 18 G needle; evaluation within 3 days after LTT). Based on changes in symptoms after LTT, including dementia (evaluated according to the duration of time needed to accomplish No. 7 items in the N method psychofunction test) and gait disturbance (evaluated according to the duration and the number of steps needed to walk 4 m in a straight line), mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF) monitored with 133Xe-CT, and electroencephalographic topography (EEG-T). The patients were divided into symptom-improved [LTT(+)] and no change [LTT(-)] groups. Changing patterns of EEG-T and mCBF after LTT and the efficacy of V-P shunt at 1 month after shunt administration (effective: E; non-effective: NE) were analyzed and compared. Changing patterns of EEG-T and mCBF after LTT were categorized as improvement of both parameters (type A), that of mCBF only (type B), that of EEG-T only (type C), and no change in either parameter (type D). Twenty patients were classified as LTT(+) and eleven as LTT(-). The false positive rate was 25% (5/20) for LTT(+); the false negative rate was 27.3% (3/11) for LTT(-). In all the patients, in relation to changing patterns of EEG-T and mCBF, 100% of type A patients (9/9), 75% of type B (6/8), 42.9% of type C (3/7), and 0% of type D (0/7) responded to shunting. Increased rates (IR) of mCBF in 17 patients with improvement of mCBF were 24.2±10.6% in E patients and 8.9±5.2% in NE patients, demonstrating a significantly higher percentage in E patients (p<0.005). The borderline of IR between E and NE was around 15%. Although quantitative evaluation of symptoms (dementia and gait disturbance) before and after LTT, 27

  19. The predictive value of cerebrospinal fluid tap-test in normal pressure hydrocephalus Valor preditivo da punção liquórica ("tap test" na hidrocefalia de pressão normal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito P. Damasceno

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen patients (mean age of 66.5 years with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH underwent a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt surgery. Prior to operation a cerebrospinal fluid tap-test (CSF-TT was performed with measurements of gait pattern and psychometric functions (memory, visuo-motor speed and visuo-constructive skills before and after the removal of 50 ml CSFby lumbar puncture (LP. Fifteen patients improved and 3 were unchanged after surgery. Short duration of disease, gait disturbance preceding mental deterioration, wide temporal horns and small sulci on CT-scan were associated with good outcome after shunting. There was a good correlation between the results of CSF-TT and shunt surgery (X² = 4,11 ,phi = 0.48, p Este estudo visa melhorar o valor diagnóstico e preditivo da punção liquórica ("tap test", TT na hidrocefalia de pressão normal (HPN, particularmente nos casos em que os dados clinicos e de neuroimagem são inconclusivos e não permitem uma decisão cirúrgica segura. Dezoito pacientes (média de idade = 66.5 anos com HPN foram submetidos a derivação ("shunt" ventriculo-peritoneal. O TT era realizado antes da cirurgia, consistindo na análise quantitativa da marcha e funções cognitivas (memória, rapidez perceptivo-motora e habilidade vísuo-construtiva antes e depois da retirada de 50 ml de liquor via punção lombar. Quinze pacientes melhoraram e 3 permaneceram inalterados após a cirurgia. Curta duração da doença, distúrbio da marcha precedendo a deterioração mental, dilatação dos cornos temporais e apagamento (ou redução dos sulcos corticais na tomografia computadorizada cerebral estavam associados a bons resultados pós-operatórios. Houve boa correlação entre os resultados do TT e os do "shunt" (X² = 4.11, phi = 0.48, p < 0.05, principalmente no teste da marcha (r = 0.99, p = 0.01. Esta versão do TT liquórico mostrou-se efetiva na prediçâo da melhora pós-operatória em pacientes com HPN.

  20. Application of Formation Testing While Drilling (GeoTap) for acquiring formation pressure data from the Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    A new technology to acquire wireline quality pressure tests using a Logging While Drilling approach has been successfully implemented few years ago in Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic. The Formation Tester While Drilling tool (GeoTap) uses a testing sequence similar to wireline tools. A single probe is extended to the borehole wall and a small pretest volume withdrawn from the formation. The resulting pressure transient is then analyzed for formation pressure, formation permeability and mobility information. Up-link and down-link capabilities have been added to achieve test control and quality feedback. An efficient downlink algorithm is used downhole to analyze the data. The parameters and pressure data are transmitted to the surface in real-time for continuous monitoring of the test. More detailed pressu